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Sample records for parameters including sample

  1. Revisiting Hansen Solubility Parameters by Including Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Louwerse, Manuel J; Maldonado, Ana; Rousseau, Simon; Moreau-Masselon, Chloe; Roux, Bernard; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2017-11-03

    The Hansen solubility parameter approach is revisited by implementing the thermodynamics of dissolution and mixing. Hansen's pragmatic approach has earned its spurs in predicting solvents for polymer solutions, but for molecular solutes improvements are needed. By going into the details of entropy and enthalpy, several corrections are suggested that make the methodology thermodynamically sound without losing its ease of use. The most important corrections include accounting for the solvent molecules' size, the destruction of the solid's crystal structure, and the specificity of hydrogen-bonding interactions, as well as opportunities to predict the solubility at extrapolated temperatures. Testing the original and the improved methods on a large industrial dataset including solvent blends, fit qualities improved from 0.89 to 0.97 and the percentage of correct predictions rose from 54 % to 78 %. Full Matlab scripts are included in the Supporting Information, allowing readers to implement these improvements on their own datasets. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Apparatus for microbiological sampling. [including automatic swabbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automatic apparatus is described for microbiologically sampling surface using a cotton swab which eliminates human error. The apparatus includes a self-powered transport device, such as a motor-driven wheeled cart, which mounts a swabbing motor drive for a crank arm which supports a swab in the free end thereof. The swabbing motor is pivotably mounted and an actuator rod movable responsive to the cart traveling a predetermined distance provides lifting of the swab from the surface being sampled and reversal of the direction of travel of the cart.

  3. Estimation of nonlinear pilot model parameters including time delay.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiess, J. R.; Roland, V. R.; Wells, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the feasibility of using a Kalman filter estimator for the identification of unknown parameters in nonlinear dynamic systems with a time delay. The problem considered is the application of estimation theory to determine the parameters of a family of pilot models containing delayed states. In particular, the pilot-plant dynamics are described by differential-difference equations of the retarded type. The pilot delay, included as one of the unknown parameters to be determined, is kept in pure form as opposed to the Pade approximations generally used for these systems. Problem areas associated with processing real pilot response data are included in the discussion.

  4. Enhanced sampling simulations of DNA step parameters.

    PubMed

    Karolak, Aleksandra; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2014-12-15

    A novel approach for the selection of step parameters as reaction coordinates in enhanced sampling simulations of DNA is presented. The method uses three atoms per base and does not require coordinate overlays or idealized base pairs. This allowed for a highly efficient implementation of the calculation of all step parameters and their Cartesian derivatives in molecular dynamics simulations. Good correlation between the calculated and actual twist, roll, tilt, shift, and slide parameters is obtained, while the correlation with rise is modest. The method is illustrated by its application to the methylated and unmethylated 5'-CATGTGACGTCACATG-3' double stranded DNA sequence. One-dimensional umbrella simulations indicate that the flexibility of the central CG step is only marginally affected by methylation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Iterative Importance Sampling Algorithms for Parameter Estimation

    SciT

    Grout, Ray W; Morzfeld, Matthias; Day, Marcus S.

    In parameter estimation problems one computes a posterior distribution over uncertain parameters defined jointly by a prior distribution, a model, and noisy data. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) is often used for the numerical solution of such problems. An alternative to MCMC is importance sampling, which can exhibit near perfect scaling with the number of cores on high performance computing systems because samples are drawn independently. However, finding a suitable proposal distribution is a challenging task. Several sampling algorithms have been proposed over the past years that take an iterative approach to constructing a proposal distribution. We investigate the applicabilitymore » of such algorithms by applying them to two realistic and challenging test problems, one in subsurface flow, and one in combustion modeling. More specifically, we implement importance sampling algorithms that iterate over the mean and covariance matrix of Gaussian or multivariate t-proposal distributions. Our implementation leverages massively parallel computers, and we present strategies to initialize the iterations using 'coarse' MCMC runs or Gaussian mixture models.« less

  6. C -parameter distribution at N 3 LL ' including power corrections

    DOE PAGES

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; ...

    2015-05-15

    We compute the e⁺e⁻ C-parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O(α 3 s), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments Ω n. To eliminate an O(Λ QCD) renormalon ambiguity in themore » soft function, we switch from the MS¯ to a short distance “Rgap” scheme to define the leading power correction parameter Ω 1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in Ω 1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C-parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for αs(m Z) and Ω 1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ≅ 2.5% at Q=m Z.« less

  7. Noncoherent sampling technique for communications parameter estimations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Y. T.; Choi, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a method of noncoherent demodulation of the PSK signal for signal distortion analysis at the RF interface. The received RF signal is downconverted and noncoherently sampled for further off-line processing. Any mismatch in phase and frequency is then compensated for by the software using the estimation techniques to extract the baseband waveform, which is needed in measuring various signal parameters. In this way, various kinds of modulated signals can be treated uniformly, independent of modulation format, and additional distortions introduced by the receiver or the hardware measurement instruments can thus be eliminated. Quantization errors incurred by digital sampling and ensuing software manipulations are analyzed and related numerical results are presented also.

  8. Identification of modal parameters including unmeasured forces and transient effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauberghe, B.; Guillaume, P.; Verboven, P.; Parloo, E.

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, a frequency-domain method to estimate modal parameters from short data records with known input (measured) forces and unknown input forces is presented. The method can be used for an experimental modal analysis, an operational modal analysis (output-only data) and the combination of both. A traditional experimental and operational modal analysis in the frequency domain starts respectively, from frequency response functions and spectral density functions. To estimate these functions accurately sufficient data have to be available. The technique developed in this paper estimates the modal parameters directly from the Fourier spectra of the outputs and the known input. Instead of using Hanning windows on these short data records the transient effects are estimated simultaneously with the modal parameters. The method is illustrated, tested and validated by Monte Carlo simulations and experiments. The presented method to process short data sequences leads to unbiased estimates with a small variance in comparison to the more traditional approaches.

  9. Power extraction calculation improvement when local parameters are included

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Mateos, L. M.; Hartnett, M.

    2016-02-01

    The improvement of the tidal resource assessment will be studied by comparing two approaches in a two-dimensional, finite difference, hydrodynamic model DIVAST-ADI; in a channel of non-varying cross-sectional area that connects two large basins. The first strategy, considers a constant trust coefficient; the second one, use the local field parameters around the turbine. These parameters are obtained after applying the open channel theory in the tidal stream and after considering the turbine as a linear momentum actuator disk. The parameters correspond to the upstream and downstream, with respect to the turbine, speeds and depths; also the blockage ratio, the wake velocity and the bypass coefficients and they have already been incorporated in the model. The figure (a) shows the numerical configuration at high tide developed with DIVAST-ADI. The experiment undertakes two open boundary conditions. The first one is a sinusoidal forcing introduced as a water level located at (I, J=1) and the second one, indicate that a zero velocity and a constant water depth were kept (I, J=362); when the turbine is introduced it is placed in the middle of the channel (I=161, J=181). The influence of the turbine in the velocity and elevation around the turbine region is evident; figure (b) and (c) shows that the turbine produces a discontinuity in the depth and velocity profile, when we plot a transect along the channel. Finally, the configuration implemented reproduced with satisfactory accuracy the quasi-steady flow condition, even without presenting shock-capturing capability. Also, the range of the parameters 0.01<α 4<0.55, $0

  10. Neutrino oscillation parameter sampling with MonteCUBES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blennow, Mattias; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    We present MonteCUBES ("Monte Carlo Utility Based Experiment Simulator"), a software package designed to sample the neutrino oscillation parameter space through Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms. MonteCUBES makes use of the GLoBES software so that the existing experiment definitions for GLoBES, describing long baseline and reactor experiments, can be used with MonteCUBES. MonteCUBES consists of two main parts: The first is a C library, written as a plug-in for GLoBES, implementing the Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to sample the parameter space. The second part is a user-friendly graphical Matlab interface to easily read, analyze, plot and export the results of the parameter space sampling. Program summaryProgram title: MonteCUBES (Monte Carlo Utility Based Experiment Simulator) Catalogue identifier: AEFJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 69 634 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 980 776 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: MonteCUBES builds and installs on 32 bit and 64 bit Linux systems where GLoBES is installed Operating system: 32 bit and 64 bit Linux RAM: Typically a few MBs Classification: 11.1 External routines: GLoBES [1,2] and routines/libraries used by GLoBES Subprograms used:Cat Id ADZI_v1_0, Title GLoBES, Reference CPC 177 (2007) 439 Nature of problem: Since neutrino masses do not appear in the standard model of particle physics, many models of neutrino masses also induce other types of new physics, which could affect the outcome of neutrino oscillation experiments. In general, these new physics imply high-dimensional parameter spaces that are difficult to explore using classical methods such as multi-dimensional projections and minimizations, such as those

  11. Sample Size and Item Parameter Estimation Precision When Utilizing the One-Parameter "Rasch" Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between sample size and item parameter estimation precision when utilizing the one-parameter model. Item parameter estimates are examined relative to "true" values by evaluating the decline in root mean squared deviation (RMSD) and the number of outliers as sample size increases. This occurs across…

  12. Random sampling and validation of covariance matrices of resonance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plevnik, Lucijan; Zerovnik, Gašper

    2017-09-01

    Analytically exact methods for random sampling of arbitrary correlated parameters are presented. Emphasis is given on one hand on the possible inconsistencies in the covariance data, concentrating on the positive semi-definiteness and consistent sampling of correlated inherently positive parameters, and on the other hand on optimization of the implementation of the methods itself. The methods have been applied in the program ENDSAM, written in the Fortran language, which from a file from a nuclear data library of a chosen isotope in ENDF-6 format produces an arbitrary number of new files in ENDF-6 format which contain values of random samples of resonance parameters (in accordance with corresponding covariance matrices) in places of original values. The source code for the program ENDSAM is available from the OECD/NEA Data Bank. The program works in the following steps: reads resonance parameters and their covariance data from nuclear data library, checks whether the covariance data is consistent, and produces random samples of resonance parameters. The code has been validated with both realistic and artificial data to show that the produced samples are statistically consistent. Additionally, the code was used to validate covariance data in existing nuclear data libraries. A list of inconsistencies, observed in covariance data of resonance parameters in ENDF-VII.1, JEFF-3.2 and JENDL-4.0 is presented. For now, the work has been limited to resonance parameters, however the methods presented are general and can in principle be extended to sampling and validation of any nuclear data.

  13. Impact of ADC parameters on linear optical sampling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trung-Hien; Gay, Mathilde; Gomez-Agis, Fausto; Lobo, Sébastien; Sentieys, Olivier; Simon, Jean-Claude; Peucheret, Christophe; Bramerie, Laurent

    2017-11-01

    Linear optical sampling (LOS), based on the coherent photodetection of an optical signal under test with a low repetition-rate signal originating from a pulsed local oscillator (LO), enables the characterization of the temporal electric field of optical sources. Thanks to this technique, low-speed photodetectors and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) can be integrated in the LOS system providing a cost-effective tool for characterizing high-speed signals. However, the impact of photodetector and ADC parameters on such LOS systems has not been explored in detail so far. These parameters, including the integration time of the track-and-hold function, the effective number of bits (ENOB) of the ADC, as well as the combined limited bandwidth of the photodetector and ADC are experimentally and numerically investigated in a LOS system for the first time. More specifically, by reconstructing 10-Gbit/s non-return-to-zero on-off keying (NRZ-OOK) and 10-Gbaud NRZ-quadrature phase-shift-keying (QPSK) signals, it is shown that a short integration time provides a better recovered signal fidelity. Furthermore, an ENOB of 6 bits and an ADC bandwidth normalized to the sampling rate of 2.8 are found to be sufficient in order to reliably monitor the considered signals.

  14. Nonequilibrium umbrella sampling in spaces of many order parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Alex; Warmflash, Aryeh; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2009-02-01

    We recently introduced an umbrella sampling method for obtaining nonequilibrium steady-state probability distributions projected onto an arbitrary number of coordinates that characterize a system (order parameters) [A. Warmflash, P. Bhimalapuram, and A. R. Dinner, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 154112 (2007)]. Here, we show how our algorithm can be combined with the image update procedure from the finite-temperature string method for reversible processes [E. Vanden-Eijnden and M. Venturoli, "Revisiting the finite temperature string method for calculation of reaction tubes and free energies," J. Chem. Phys. (in press)] to enable restricted sampling of a nonequilibrium steady state in the vicinity of a path in a many-dimensional space of order parameters. For the study of transitions between stable states, the adapted algorithm results in improved scaling with the number of order parameters and the ability to progressively refine the regions of enforced sampling. We demonstrate the algorithm by applying it to a two-dimensional model of driven Brownian motion and a coarse-grained (Ising) model for nucleation under shear. It is found that the choice of order parameters can significantly affect the convergence of the simulation; local magnetization variables other than those used previously for sampling transition paths in Ising systems are needed to ensure that the reactive flux is primarily contained within a tube in the space of order parameters. The relation of this method to other algorithms that sample the statistics of path ensembles is discussed.

  15. Comparison of sampling techniques for Bayesian parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Rupert; Dunkley, Joanna

    2014-02-01

    The posterior probability distribution for a set of model parameters encodes all that the data have to tell us in the context of a given model; it is the fundamental quantity for Bayesian parameter estimation. In order to infer the posterior probability distribution we have to decide how to explore parameter space. Here we compare three prescriptions for how parameter space is navigated, discussing their relative merits. We consider Metropolis-Hasting sampling, nested sampling and affine-invariant ensemble Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. We focus on their performance on toy-model Gaussian likelihoods and on a real-world cosmological data set. We outline the sampling algorithms themselves and elaborate on performance diagnostics such as convergence time, scope for parallelization, dimensional scaling, requisite tunings and suitability for non-Gaussian distributions. We find that nested sampling delivers high-fidelity estimates for posterior statistics at low computational cost, and should be adopted in favour of Metropolis-Hastings in many cases. Affine-invariant MCMC is competitive when computing clusters can be utilized for massive parallelization. Affine-invariant MCMC and existing extensions to nested sampling naturally probe multimodal and curving distributions.

  16. HIV Model Parameter Estimates from Interruption Trial Data including Drug Efficacy and Reservoir Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Rutao; Piovoso, Michael J.; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical models based on ordinary differential equations (ODE) have had significant impact on understanding HIV disease dynamics and optimizing patient treatment. A model that characterizes the essential disease dynamics can be used for prediction only if the model parameters are identifiable from clinical data. Most previous parameter identification studies for HIV have used sparsely sampled data from the decay phase following the introduction of therapy. In this paper, model parameters are identified from frequently sampled viral-load data taken from ten patients enrolled in the previously published AutoVac HAART interruption study, providing between 69 and 114 viral load measurements from 3–5 phases of viral decay and rebound for each patient. This dataset is considerably larger than those used in previously published parameter estimation studies. Furthermore, the measurements come from two separate experimental conditions, which allows for the direct estimation of drug efficacy and reservoir contribution rates, two parameters that cannot be identified from decay-phase data alone. A Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method is used to estimate the model parameter values, with initial estimates obtained using nonlinear least-squares methods. The posterior distributions of the parameter estimates are reported and compared for all patients. PMID:22815727

  17. Sampling errors in the measurement of rain and hail parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertzman, H. S.; Atlas, D.

    1977-01-01

    Attention is given to a general derivation of the fractional standard deviation (FSD) of any integrated property X such that X(D) = cD to the n. This work extends that of Joss and Waldvogel (1969). The equation is applicable to measuring integrated properties of cloud, rain or hail populations (such as water content, precipitation rate, kinetic energy, or radar reflectivity) which are subject to statistical sampling errors due to the Poisson distributed fluctuations of particles sampled in each particle size interval and the weighted sum of the associated variances in proportion to their contribution to the integral parameter to be measured. Universal curves are presented which are applicable to the exponential size distribution permitting FSD estimation of any parameters from n = 0 to n = 6. The equations and curves also permit corrections for finite upper limits in the size spectrum and a realistic fall speed law.

  18. Weighted statistical parameters for irregularly sampled time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimoldini, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Unevenly spaced time series are common in astronomy because of the day-night cycle, weather conditions, dependence on the source position in the sky, allocated telescope time and corrupt measurements, for example, or inherent to the scanning law of satellites like Hipparcos and the forthcoming Gaia. Irregular sampling often causes clumps of measurements and gaps with no data which can severely disrupt the values of estimators. This paper aims at improving the accuracy of common statistical parameters when linear interpolation (in time or phase) can be considered an acceptable approximation of a deterministic signal. A pragmatic solution is formulated in terms of a simple weighting scheme, adapting to the sampling density and noise level, applicable to large data volumes at minimal computational cost. Tests on time series from the Hipparcos periodic catalogue led to significant improvements in the overall accuracy and precision of the estimators with respect to the unweighted counterparts and those weighted by inverse-squared uncertainties. Automated classification procedures employing statistical parameters weighted by the suggested scheme confirmed the benefits of the improved input attributes. The classification of eclipsing binaries, Mira, RR Lyrae, Delta Cephei and Alpha2 Canum Venaticorum stars employing exclusively weighted descriptive statistics achieved an overall accuracy of 92 per cent, about 6 per cent higher than with unweighted estimators.

  19. Changes in bone mineral metabolism parameters, including FGF23, after discontinuing cinacalcet at kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barros, Xoana; Fuster, David; Paschoalin, Raphael; Oppenheimer, Federico; Rubello, Domenico; Perlaza, Pilar; Pons, Francesca; Torregrosa, Jose V

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the effects of the administration of cinacalcet in dialytic patients who are scheduled for kidney transplantation, and in particular about the changes in FGF23 and other mineral metabolism parameters after surgery compared with recipients not on cinacalcet at kidney transplantation. We performed a prospective observational cohort study with recruitment of consecutive kidney transplant recipients at our institution. Patients were classified according to whether they were under treatment with cinacalcet before transplantation. Bone mineral metabolism parameters, including C-terminal FGF23, were measured at baseline, on day 15, and at 1, 3, and 6 months after transplantation. In previously cinacalcet-treated patients, cinacalcet therapy was discontinued on the day of surgery and was not restarted after transplantation. A total of 48 kidney transplant recipients, 20 on cinacalcet at surgery and 28 cinacalcet non-treated patients, completed the follow-up. Serum phosphate declined significantly in the first 15 days after transplantation with no differences between the two groups, whereas cinacalcet-treated patients showed higher FGF23 levels, although not significant. After transplantation, PTH and serum calcium were significantly higher in cinacalcet-treated patients. We conclude that patients receiving cinacalcet on dialysis presented similar serum phosphate levels but higher PTH and serum calcium levels during the initial six months after kidney transplantation than cinacalcet non-treated patients. The group previously treated with cinacalcet before transplantation showed higher FGF23 levels without significant differences, so further studies should investigate its relevance in the management of these patients.

  20. Data Stewardship in the Ocean Sciences Needs to Include Physical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M.; Lehnert, K.

    2016-02-01

    Across the Ocean Sciences, research involves the collection and study of samples collected above, at, and below the seafloor, including but not limited to rocks, sediments, fluids, gases, and living organisms. Many domains in the Earth Sciences have recently expressed the need for better discovery, access, and sharing of scientific samples and collections (EarthCube End-User Domain workshops, 2012 and 2013, http://earthcube.org/info/about/end-user-workshops), as has the US government (OSTP Memo, March 2014). iSamples (Internet of Samples in the Earth Sciences) is a Research Coordination Network within the EarthCube program that aims to advance the use of innovative cyberinfrastructure to support and advance the utility of physical samples and sample collections for science and ensure reproducibility of sample-based data and research results. iSamples strives to build, grow, and foster a new community of practice, in which domain scientists, curators of sample repositories and collections, computer and information scientists, software developers and technology innovators engage in and collaborate on defining, articulating, and addressing the needs and challenges of physical samples as a critical component of digital data infrastructure. A primary goal of iSamples is to deliver a community-endorsed set of best practices and standards for the registration, description, identification, and citation of physical specimens and define an actionable plan for implementation. iSamples conducted a broad community survey about sample sharing and has created 5 different working groups to address the different challenges of developing the internet of samples - from metadata schemas and unique identifiers to an architecture for a shared cyberinfrastructure to manage collections, to digitization of existing collections, to education, and ultimately to establishing the physical infrastructure that will ensure preservation and access of the physical samples. Repositories that curate

  1. Genetic parameter estimates for carcass traits and visual scores including or not genomic information.

    PubMed

    Gordo, D G M; Espigolan, R; Tonussi, R L; Júnior, G A F; Bresolin, T; Magalhães, A F Braga; Feitosa, F L; Baldi, F; Carvalheiro, R; Tonhati, H; de Oliveira, H N; Chardulo, L A L; de Albuquerque, L G

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether visual scores used as selection criteria in Nellore breeding programs are effective indicators of carcass traits measured after slaughter. Additionally, this study evaluated the effect of different structures of the relationship matrix ( and ) on the estimation of genetic parameters and on the prediction accuracy of breeding values. There were 13,524 animals for visual scores of conformation (CS), finishing precocity (FP), and muscling (MS) and 1,753, 1,747, and 1,564 for LM area (LMA), backfat thickness (BF), and HCW, respectively. Of these, 1,566 animals were genotyped using a high-density panel containing 777,962 SNP. Six analyses were performed using multitrait animal models, each including the 3 visual scores and 1 carcass trait. For the visual scores, the model included direct additive genetic and residual random effects and the fixed effects of contemporary group (defined by year of birth, management group at yearling, and farm) and the linear effect of age of animal at yearling. The same model was used for the carcass traits, replacing the effect of age of animal at yearling with the linear effect of age of animal at slaughter. The variance and covariance components were estimated by the REML method in analyses using the numerator relationship matrix () or combining the genomic and the numerator relationship matrices (). The heritability estimates for the visual scores obtained with the 2 methods were similar and of moderate magnitude (0.23-0.34), indicating that these traits should response to direct selection. The heritabilities for LMA, BF, and HCW were 0.13, 0.07, and 0.17, respectively, using matrix and 0.29, 0.16, and 0.23, respectively, using matrix . The genetic correlations between the visual scores and carcass traits were positive, and higher correlations were generally obtained when matrix was used. Considering the difficulties and cost of measuring carcass traits postmortem, visual scores of

  2. Determining photon energy absorption parameters for different soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Kucuk, Nil; Tumsavas, Zeynal; Cakir, Merve

    2013-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μs) for five different soil samples were measured at 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The soil samples were separately irradiated with 137Cs and 60Co (370 kBq) radioactive point gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″ × 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, which had an energy resolution of 7% at 0.662 MeV for the gamma-rays from the decay of 137Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μs values for the soil samples. Furthermore, the Zeff and Neff values of the soil samples were computed for the total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region ranging from 1 keV to 15 MeV. The experimental values of the soils were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. Sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils demonstrated poor photon energy absorption characteristics. However, clay loam and clay soils had good photon energy absorption characteristics. PMID:23179375

  3. Parameters of metabolic quantification in clinical practice. Is it now time to include them in reports?

    PubMed

    Mucientes, J; Calles, L; Rodríguez, B; Mitjavila, M

    2018-01-18

    Qualitative techniques have traditionally been the standard for the diagnostic assessment with 18 F-FDG PET studies. Since the introduction of the technique, quantitative parameters have been sought, more accurate and with better diagnostic precision, that may offer relevant information of the behavior, aggressiveness or prognosis of tumors. Nowadays, more and more studies with high quality evidence show the utility of other metabolic parameters different from the SUV maximum, which despite being widely used in clinical practice is controversial and many physicians still do not know its real meaning. The objective of this paper has been to review the key concepts of these metabolic parameters that could be relevant in normal practice in the future. It has been seen that there is more evidence in the complete evaluation of the metabolism of a lesion, through volumetric parameters that more adequately reflect the patient's tumor burden. Basically, these parameters calculate the volume of tumor that fulfills certain characteristics. A software available in the majority of the workstations has been used for this purpose and it has allowed to calculate these volumes using more or less complex criteria. The simplest threshold-based segmentation methods are available in most equipments, they are easy to calculate and they have been shown in many studies to have an important prognostic significance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  4. Automated modal parameter estimation using correlation analysis and bootstrap sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghoubi, Vahid; Vakilzadeh, Majid K.; Abrahamsson, Thomas J. S.

    2018-02-01

    The estimation of modal parameters from a set of noisy measured data is a highly judgmental task, with user expertise playing a significant role in distinguishing between estimated physical and noise modes of a test-piece. Various methods have been developed to automate this procedure. The common approach is to identify models with different orders and cluster similar modes together. However, most proposed methods based on this approach suffer from high-dimensional optimization problems in either the estimation or clustering step. To overcome this problem, this study presents an algorithm for autonomous modal parameter estimation in which the only required optimization is performed in a three-dimensional space. To this end, a subspace-based identification method is employed for the estimation and a non-iterative correlation-based method is used for the clustering. This clustering is at the heart of the paper. The keys to success are correlation metrics that are able to treat the problems of spatial eigenvector aliasing and nonunique eigenvectors of coalescent modes simultaneously. The algorithm commences by the identification of an excessively high-order model from frequency response function test data. The high number of modes of this model provides bases for two subspaces: one for likely physical modes of the tested system and one for its complement dubbed the subspace of noise modes. By employing the bootstrap resampling technique, several subsets are generated from the same basic dataset and for each of them a model is identified to form a set of models. Then, by correlation analysis with the two aforementioned subspaces, highly correlated modes of these models which appear repeatedly are clustered together and the noise modes are collected in a so-called Trashbox cluster. Stray noise modes attracted to the mode clusters are trimmed away in a second step by correlation analysis. The final step of the algorithm is a fuzzy c-means clustering procedure applied to

  5. The 4-parameter Compressible Packing Model (CPM) including a critical cavity size ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquier, Gerard

    2017-06-01

    The 4-parameter Compressible Packing Model (CPM) has been developed to predict the packing density of mixtures constituted by bidisperse spherical particles. The four parameters are: the wall effect and the loosening effect coefficients, the compaction index and a critical cavity size ratio. The two geometrical interactions have been studied theoretically on the basis of a spherical cell centered on a secondary class bead. For the loosening effect, a critical cavity size ratio, below which a fine particle can be inserted into a small cavity created by touching coarser particles, is introduced. This is the only parameter which requires adaptation to extend the model to other types of particles. The 4-parameter CPM demonstrates its efficiency on frictionless glass beads (300 values), spherical particles numerically simulated (20 values), round natural particles (125 values) and crushed particles (335 values) with correlation coefficients equal to respectively 99.0%, 98.7%, 97.8%, 96.4% and mean deviations equal to respectively 0.007, 0.006, 0.007, 0.010.

  6. Characteristic parameters of superconductor-coolant interaction including high Tc current density limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.

    1989-01-01

    In the area of basic mechanisms of helium heat transfer and related influence on super-conducting magnet stability, thermal boundary conditions are important constraints. Characteristic lengths are considered along with other parameters of the superconducting composite-coolant system. Based on helium temperature range developments, limiting critical current densities are assessed at low fields for high transition temperature superconductors.

  7. Correlations of water quality parameters with mutagenicity of chlorinated drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Kathleen M; Sivaganesan, Mano; Rice, Glenn E

    2009-01-01

    Adverse health effects that may result from chronic exposure to mixtures of disinfection by-products (DBPs) present in drinking waters may be linked to both the types and concentrations of DBPs present. Depending on the characteristics of the source water and treatment processes used, both types and concentrations of DBPs found in drinking waters vary substantially. The composition of a drinking-water mixture also may change during distribution. This study evaluated the relationships between mutagenicity, using the Ames assay, and water quality parameters. The study included information on treatment, mutagenicity data, and water quality data for source waters, finished waters, and distribution samples collected from five full-scale drinking water treatment plants, which used chlorine exclusively for disinfection. Four of the plants used surface water sources and the fifth plant used groundwater. Correlations between mutagenicity and water quality parameters are presented. The highest correlation was observed between mutagenicity and the total organic halide concentrations in the treated samples.

  8. Communication: importance sampling including path correlation in semiclassical initial value representation calculations for time correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Tao, Guohua

    2013-03-07

    Full semiclassical (SC) initial value representation (IVR) for time correlation functions involves a double phase space average over a set of two phase points, each of which evolves along a classical path. Conventionally, the two initial phase points are sampled independently for all degrees of freedom (DOF) in the Monte Carlo procedure. Here, we present an efficient importance sampling scheme by including the path correlation between the two initial phase points for the bath DOF, which greatly improves the performance of the SC-IVR calculations for large molecular systems. Satisfactory convergence in the study of quantum coherence in vibrational relaxation has been achieved for a benchmark system-bath model with up to 21 DOF.

  9. Determination of D- and L-pipecolic acid in food samples including processed foods.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toru; Fujita, Manabu; Kodama, Taku; Hada, Toshikazu; Higashino, Kazuya

    2003-01-01

    Pipecolic acid, a metabolite of lysine, is found in human physiological fluids and is thought to play an important role in the central inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid system. However, it is unclear whether plasma D- and L-pipecolic acid originate from oral food intake or intestinal bacterial metabolites. We analyzed the contents of D- and L-pipecolic acid in several processed foods including dairy products (cow's milk, cheese and yogurt), fermented beverages (beer and wine) and heated samples (beef, bovine liver, bread and tofu) to clarify the relationship between plasma D- and L-pipecolic acid and dietary foods. Our study revealed that some of the samples contained high concentrations of total pipecolic acid, and a higher proportion of L- than D-isomers. The other samples also showed high proportions of L-pipecolic acid. It was also shown that there is no significant change in the ratio of the D-isomer before and after heat treatment. The heat treatments could not cause the racemization of pipecolic acid in this study. These findings suggest that plasma pipecolic acid, particularly the D-isomer, does not originate from direct food intake and that D- and L-pipecolic acid can possibly be derived from intestinal bacterial metabolites. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. TriXY-Homogeneous genetic sexing of highly degraded forensic samples including hair shafts.

    PubMed

    Madel, Maria-Bernadette; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther

    2016-11-01

    Sexing of biological evidence is an important aspect in forensic investigations. A routinely used molecular-genetic approach to this endeavour is the amelogenin sex test, which is integrated in most commercially available polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kits for human identification. However, this assay is not entirely effective in respect to highly degraded DNA samples. This study presents a homogeneous PCR assay for robust sex diagnosis, especially for the analysis of severely fragmented DNA. The introduced triplex for the X and Y chromosome (TriXY) is based on real-time PCR amplification of short intergenic sequences (<50bp) on both gonosomes. Subsequent PCR product examination and molecular-genetic sex-assignment rely on high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis. TriXY was optimized using commercially available multi-donor human DNA preparations of either male or female origin and successfully evaluated on challenging samples, including 46 ancient DNA specimens from archaeological excavations and a total of 16 DNA samples extracted from different segments of eight hair shafts of male and female donors. Additionally, sensitivity and cross-species amplification were examined to further test the assay's utility in forensic investigations. TriXY's closed-tube format avoids post-PCR sample manipulations and, therefore, distinctly reduces the risk of PCR product carry-over contamination and sample mix-up, while reducing labour and financial expenses at the same time. The method is sensitive down to the DNA content of approximately two diploid cells and has proven highly useful on severely fragmented and low quantity ancient DNA samples. Furthermore, it even allowed for sexing of proximal hair shafts with very good results. In summary, TriXY facilitates highly sensitive, rapid, and costeffective genetic sex-determination. It outperforms existing sexing methods both in terms of sensitivity and minimum required template molecule lengths. Therefore, we feel confident

  11. A concentrated parameter model for the human cardiovascular system including heart valve dynamics and atrioventricular interaction.

    PubMed

    Korakianitis, Theodosios; Shi, Yubing

    2006-09-01

    Numerical modeling of the human cardiovascular system has always been an active research direction since the 19th century. In the past, various simulation models of different complexities were proposed for different research purposes. In this paper, an improved numerical model to study the dynamic function of the human circulation system is proposed. In the development of the mathematical model, the heart chambers are described with a variable elastance model. The systemic and pulmonary loops are described based on the resistance-compliance-inertia concept by considering local effects of flow friction, elasticity of blood vessels and inertia of blood in different segments of the blood vessels. As an advancement from previous models, heart valve dynamics and atrioventricular interaction, including atrial contraction and motion of the annulus fibrosus, are specifically modeled. With these improvements the developed model can predict several important features that were missing in previous numerical models, including regurgitant flow on heart valve closure, the value of E/A velocity ratio in mitral flow, the motion of the annulus fibrosus (called the KG diaphragm pumping action), etc. These features have important clinical meaning and their changes are often related to cardiovascular diseases. Successful simulation of these features enhances the accuracy of simulations of cardiovascular dynamics, and helps in clinical studies of cardiac function.

  12. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    SciT

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reactionmore » chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.« less

  13. SPIDER - I. Sample and galaxy parameters in the grizYJHK wavebands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Barbera, F.; de Carvalho, R. R.; de La Rosa, I. G.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Kohl-Moreira, J. L.; Capelato, H. V.

    2010-11-01

    This is the first paper of a series presenting the Spheroids Panchromatic Investigation in Different Environmental Regions (SPIDER). The sample of spheroids consists of 5080 bright (Mr < -20) early-type galaxies (ETGs), in the redshift range of 0.05 to 0.095, with optical (griz) photometry and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS-DR6) and near-infrared (YJHK) photometry from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey-Large Area Survey (UKIDSS-LAS) (DR4). We describe how homogeneous photometric parameters (galaxy colours and structural parameters) are derived using grizYJHK wavebands. We find no systematic steepening of the colour-magnitude relation when probing the baseline from g - r to g - K, implying that internal colour gradients drive most of the mass-metallicity relation in ETGs. As far as structural parameters are concerned we find that the mean effective radius of ETGs smoothly decreases, by 30 per cent, from g through K, while no significant dependence on waveband is detected for the axial ratio, Sersic index and a4 parameters. Furthermore, velocity dispersions are remeasured for all the ETGs using STARLIGHT and compared to those obtained by SDSS. The velocity dispersions are rederived using a combination of simple stellar population models as templates, hence accounting for the kinematics of different galaxy stellar components. We compare our (2DPHOT) measurements of total magnitude, effective radius and mean surface brightness with those obtained as part of the SDSS pipeline (PHOTO). Significant differences are found and reported, including comparisons with a third and independent part. A full characterization of the sample completeness in all wavebands is presented, establishing the limits of application of the characteristic parameters presented here for the analysis of the global scaling relations of ETGs.

  14. Manual versus automated blood sampling: impact of repeated blood sampling on stress parameters and behavior in male NMRI mice

    PubMed Central

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Sørensen, Dorte B; Hau, Jann; Abelson, Klas S P

    2014-01-01

    Facial vein (cheek blood) and caudal vein (tail blood) phlebotomy are two commonly used techniques for obtaining blood samples from laboratory mice, while automated blood sampling through a permanent catheter is a relatively new technique in mice. The present study compared physiological parameters, glucocorticoid dynamics as well as the behavior of mice sampled repeatedly for 24 h by cheek blood, tail blood or automated blood sampling from the carotid artery. Mice subjected to cheek blood sampling lost significantly more body weight, had elevated levels of plasma corticosterone, excreted more fecal corticosterone metabolites, and expressed more anxious behavior than did the mice of the other groups. Plasma corticosterone levels of mice subjected to tail blood sampling were also elevated, although less significantly. Mice subjected to automated blood sampling were less affected with regard to the parameters measured, and expressed less anxious behavior. We conclude that repeated blood sampling by automated blood sampling and from the tail vein is less stressful than cheek blood sampling. The choice between automated blood sampling and tail blood sampling should be based on the study requirements, the resources of the laboratory and skills of the staff. PMID:24958546

  15. Systems and methods for measuring a parameter of a landfill including a barrier cap and wireless sensor systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Kunerth, Dennis C.; Svoboda, John M.; Johnson, James T.

    2007-03-06

    A method of measuring a parameter of a landfill including a cap, without passing wires through the cap, includes burying a sensor apparatus in the landfill prior to closing the landfill with the cap; providing a reader capable of communicating with the sensor apparatus via radio frequency (RF); placing an antenna above the barrier, spaced apart from the sensor apparatus; coupling the antenna to the reader either before or after placing the antenna above the barrier; providing power to the sensor apparatus, via the antenna, by generating a field using the reader; accumulating and storing power in the sensor apparatus; sensing a parameter of the landfill using the sensor apparatus while using power; and transmitting the sensed parameter to the reader via a wireless response signal. A system for measuring a parameter of a landfill is also provided.

  16. Bridging the gaps between non-invasive genetic sampling and population parameter estimation

    Francesca Marucco; Luigi Boitani; Daniel H. Pletscher; Michael K. Schwartz

    2011-01-01

    Reliable estimates of population parameters are necessary for effective management and conservation actions. The use of genetic data for capture­recapture (CR) analyses has become an important tool to estimate population parameters for elusive species. Strong emphasis has been placed on the genetic analysis of non-invasive samples, or on the CR analysis; however,...

  17. Developing a methodology for the inverse estimation of root architectural parameters from field based sampling schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandage, Shehan; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan; Javaux, Mathieu; Leitner, Daniel; Laloy, Eric; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-04-01

    Root traits are increasingly important in breading of new crop varieties. E.g., longer and fewer lateral roots are suggested to improve drought resistance of wheat. Thus, detailed root architectural parameters are important. However, classical field sampling of roots only provides more aggregated information such as root length density (coring), root counts per area (trenches) or root arrival curves at certain depths (rhizotubes). We investigate the possibility of obtaining the information about root system architecture of plants using field based classical root sampling schemes, based on sensitivity analysis and inverse parameter estimation. This methodology was developed based on a virtual experiment where a root architectural model was used to simulate root system development in a field, parameterized for winter wheat. This information provided the ground truth which is normally unknown in a real field experiment. The three sampling schemes coring, trenching, and rhizotubes where virtually applied to and aggregated information computed. Morris OAT global sensitivity analysis method was then performed to determine the most sensitive parameters of root architecture model for the three different sampling methods. The estimated means and the standard deviation of elementary effects of a total number of 37 parameters were evaluated. Upper and lower bounds of the parameters were obtained based on literature and published data of winter wheat root architectural parameters. Root length density profiles of coring, arrival curve characteristics observed in rhizotubes, and root counts in grids of trench profile method were evaluated statistically to investigate the influence of each parameter using five different error functions. Number of branches, insertion angle inter-nodal distance, and elongation rates are the most sensitive parameters and the parameter sensitivity varies slightly with the depth. Most parameters and their interaction with the other parameters show

  18. Method of extruding and packaging a thin sample of reactive material including forming the extrusion die

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Edward F.; Peterson, Leroy L.

    1985-01-01

    This invention teaches a method of cutting a narrow slot in an extrusion die with an electrical discharge machine by first drilling spaced holes at the ends of where the slot will be, whereby the oil can flow through the holes and slot to flush the material eroded away as the slot is being cut. The invention further teaches a method of extruding a very thin ribbon of solid highly reactive material such as lithium or sodium through the die in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen, argon or the like as in a glovebox. The invention further teaches a method of stamping out sample discs from the ribbon and of packaging each disc by sandwiching it between two aluminum sheets and cold welding the sheets together along an annular seam beyond the outer periphery of the disc. This provides a sample of high purity reactive material that can have a long shelf life.

  19. Method of extruding and packaging a thin sample of reactive material, including forming the extrusion die

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, E.F.; Peterson, L.L.

    1981-11-30

    This invention teaches a method of cutting a narrow slot in an extrusion die with an electrical discharge machine by first drilling spaced holes at the ends of where the slot will be, whereby the oil can flow through the holes and slot to flush the material eroded away as the slot is being cut. The invention further teaches a method of extruding a very thin ribbon of solid highly reactive material such as lithium or sodium through the die in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen, argon, or the like as in a glovebox. The invention further teaches a method of stamping out sample discs from the ribbon and of packaging each disc by sandwiching it between two aluminum sheets and cold welding the sheets together along an annular seam beyond the outer periphery of the disc. This provides a sample of high purity reactive material that can have a long shelf life.

  20. Multiobjective sampling design for parameter estimation and model discrimination in groundwater solute transport

    Knopman, Debra S.; Voss, Clifford I.

    1989-01-01

    Sampling design for site characterization studies of solute transport in porous media is formulated as a multiobjective problem. Optimal design of a sampling network is a sequential process in which the next phase of sampling is designed on the basis of all available physical knowledge of the system. Three objectives are considered: model discrimination, parameter estimation, and cost minimization. For the first two objectives, physically based measures of the value of information obtained from a set of observations are specified. In model discrimination, value of information of an observation point is measured in terms of the difference in solute concentration predicted by hypothesized models of transport. Points of greatest difference in predictions can contribute the most information to the discriminatory power of a sampling design. Sensitivity of solute concentration to a change in a parameter contributes information on the relative variance of a parameter estimate. Inclusion of points in a sampling design with high sensitivities to parameters tends to reduce variance in parameter estimates. Cost minimization accounts for both the capital cost of well installation and the operating costs of collection and analysis of field samples. Sensitivities, discrimination information, and well installation and sampling costs are used to form coefficients in the multiobjective problem in which the decision variables are binary (zero/one), each corresponding to the selection of an observation point in time and space. The solution to the multiobjective problem is a noninferior set of designs. To gain insight into effective design strategies, a one-dimensional solute transport problem is hypothesized. Then, an approximation of the noninferior set is found by enumerating 120 designs and evaluating objective functions for each of the designs. Trade-offs between pairs of objectives are demonstrated among the models. The value of an objective function for a given design is shown

  1. Effect of the extent of well purging on laboratory parameters of groundwater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reka Mathe, Agnes; Kohler, Artur; Kovacs, Jozsef

    2017-04-01

    Chemicals reaching groundwater cause water quality deterioration. Reconnaissance and remediation demands high financial and human resources. Groundwater samples are important sources of information. Representativity of these samples is fundamental to decision making. According to relevant literature the way of sampling and the sampling equipment can affect laboratory concentrations measured in samples. Detailed and systematic research on this field is missing from even international literature. Groundwater sampling procedures are regulated worldwide. Regulations describe how to sample a groundwater monitoring well. The most common element in these regulations is well purging prior to sampling. The aim of purging the well is to avoid taking the sample from the stagnant water instead of from formation water. The stagnant water forms inside and around the well because the well casing provides direct contact with the atmosphere, changing the physico-chemical composition of the well water. Sample from the stagnant water is not representative of the formation water. Regulations regarding the extent of the purging are different. Purging is mostly defined as multiply (3-5) well volumes, and/or reaching stabilization of some purged water parameters (pH, specific conductivity, etc.). There are hints for sampling without purging. To define the necessary extent of the purging repeated pumping is conducted, triplicate samples are taken at the beginning of purging, at one, two and three times well volumes and at parameter stabilization. Triplicate samples are the means to account for laboratory errors. The subsurface is not static, the test is repeated 10 times. Up to now three tests were completed.

  2. Mutagenicity of drinking water sampled from the Yangtze River and Hanshui River (Wuhan section) and correlations with water quality parameters

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xuemin; Lu, Yi; Yang, Xiaoming; Dong, Xiaorong; Ma, Kunpeng; Xiao, Sanhua; Wang, Yazhou; Tang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    A total of 54 water samples were collected during three different hydrologic periods (level period, wet period, and dry period) from Plant A and Plant B (a source for Yangtze River and Hanshui River water, respectively), and several water parameters, such as chemical oxygen demand (COD), turbidity, and total organic carbon (TOC), were simultaneously analyzed. The mutagenicity of the water samples was evaluated using the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. According to the results, the organic compounds in the water were largely frame-shift mutagens, as positive results were found for most of the tests using TA98. All of the finished water samples exhibited stronger mutagenicity than the relative raw and distribution water samples, with water samples collected from Plant B presenting stronger mutagenic strength than those from Plant A. The finished water samples from Plant A displayed a seasonal-dependent variation. Water parameters including COD (r = 0.599, P = 0.009), TOC (r = 0.681, P = 0.02), UV254 (r = 0.711, P = 0.001), and total nitrogen (r = 0.570, P = 0.014) exhibited good correlations with mutagenicity (TA98), at 2.0 L/plate, which bolsters the argument of the importance of using mutagenicity as a new parameter to assess the quality of drinking water. PMID:25825837

  3. Mutagenicity of drinking water sampled from the Yangtze River and Hanshui River (Wuhan section) and correlations with water quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xuemin; Lu, Yi; Yang, Xiaoming; Dong, Xiaorong; Ma, Kunpeng; Xiao, Sanhua; Wang, Yazhou; Tang, Fei

    2015-03-31

    A total of 54 water samples were collected during three different hydrologic periods (level period, wet period, and dry period) from Plant A and Plant B (a source for Yangtze River and Hanshui River water, respectively), and several water parameters, such as chemical oxygen demand (COD), turbidity, and total organic carbon (TOC), were simultaneously analyzed. The mutagenicity of the water samples was evaluated using the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. According to the results, the organic compounds in the water were largely frame-shift mutagens, as positive results were found for most of the tests using TA98. All of the finished water samples exhibited stronger mutagenicity than the relative raw and distribution water samples, with water samples collected from Plant B presenting stronger mutagenic strength than those from Plant A. The finished water samples from Plant A displayed a seasonal-dependent variation. Water parameters including COD (r = 0.599, P = 0.009), TOC (r = 0.681, P = 0.02), UV254 (r = 0.711, P = 0.001), and total nitrogen (r = 0.570, P = 0.014) exhibited good correlations with mutagenicity (TA98), at 2.0 L/plate, which bolsters the argument of the importance of using mutagenicity as a new parameter to assess the quality of drinking water.

  4. The Effects of Test Length and Sample Size on Item Parameters in Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Alper; Anil, Duygu

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of sample size and test length on item-parameter estimation in test development utilizing three unidimensional dichotomous models of item response theory (IRT). For this purpose, a real language test comprised of 50 items was administered to 6,288 students. Data from this test was used to obtain data sets of…

  5. A novel dispersion compensating fiber grating with a large chirp parameter and period sampled distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Li; Li, Xuhui; Chen, Xiangfei; Xie, Shizhong

    2003-11-01

    A novel fiber grating structure is proposed for the purpose of dispersion compensation. This kind of grating can be produced with a large chirp parameter and period sampled distribution along the grating length. There are multiple channels in the wide bandwidth and each channel has totally different dispersion and bandwidth. The dispersion compensation effect of this special designed grating is verified through system simulation.

  6. Estimation of genetic parameters for heat stress, including dominance gene effects, on milk yield in Thai Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Boonkum, Wuttigrai; Duangjinda, Monchai

    2015-03-01

    Heat stress in tropical regions is a major cause that strongly negatively affects to milk production in dairy cattle. Genetic selection for dairy heat tolerance is powerful technique to improve genetic performance. Therefore, the current study aimed to estimate genetic parameters and investigate the threshold point of heat stress for milk yield. Data included 52 701 test-day milk yield records for the first parity from 6247 Thai Holstein dairy cattle, covering the period 1990 to 2007. The random regression test day model with EM-REML was used to estimate variance components, genetic parameters and milk production loss. A decline in milk production was found when temperature and humidity index (THI) exceeded a threshold of 74, also it was associated with the high percentage of Holstein genetics. All variance component estimates increased with THI. The estimate of heritability of test-day milk yield was 0.231. Dominance variance as a proportion to additive variance (0.035) indicated that non-additive effects might not be of concern for milk genetics studies in Thai Holstein cattle. Correlations between genetic and permanent environmental effects, for regular conditions and due to heat stress, were - 0.223 and - 0.521, respectively. The heritability and genetic correlations from this study show that simultaneous selection for milk production and heat tolerance is possible. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  7. ECCM Scheme against Interrupted Sampling Repeater Jammer Based on Parameter-Adjusted Waveform Design

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhenhua; Peng, Bo; Shen, Rui

    2018-01-01

    Interrupted sampling repeater jamming (ISRJ) is an effective way of deceiving coherent radar sensors, especially for linear frequency modulated (LFM) radar. In this paper, for a simplified scenario with a single jammer, we propose a dynamic electronic counter-counter measure (ECCM) scheme based on jammer parameter estimation and transmitted signal design. Firstly, the LFM waveform is transmitted to estimate the main jamming parameters by investigating the discontinuousness of the ISRJ’s time-frequency (TF) characteristics. Then, a parameter-adjusted intra-pulse frequency coded signal, whose ISRJ signal after matched filtering only forms a single false target, is designed adaptively according to the estimated parameters, i.e., sampling interval, sampling duration and repeater times. Ultimately, for typical jamming scenes with different jamming signal ratio (JSR) and duty cycle, we propose two particular ISRJ suppression approaches. Simulation results validate the effective performance of the proposed scheme for countering the ISRJ, and the trade-off relationship between the two approaches is demonstrated. PMID:29642508

  8. Constraining Unsaturated Hydraulic Parameters Using the Latin Hypercube Sampling Method and Coupled Hydrogeophysical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzamian, Mohammad; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Khalil, Mohamed A.

    2017-12-01

    The coupled hydrogeophysical approach has proved to be a valuable tool for improving the use of geoelectrical data for hydrological model parameterization. In the coupled approach, hydrological parameters are directly inferred from geoelectrical measurements in a forward manner to eliminate the uncertainty connected to the independent inversion of electrical resistivity data. Several numerical studies have been conducted to demonstrate the advantages of a coupled approach; however, only a few attempts have been made to apply the coupled approach to actual field data. In this study, we developed a 1D coupled hydrogeophysical code to estimate the van Genuchten-Mualem model parameters, K s, n, θ r and α, from time-lapse vertical electrical sounding data collected during a constant inflow infiltration experiment. van Genuchten-Mualem parameters were sampled using the Latin hypercube sampling method to provide a full coverage of the range of each parameter from their distributions. By applying the coupled approach, vertical electrical sounding data were coupled to hydrological models inferred from van Genuchten-Mualem parameter samples to investigate the feasibility of constraining the hydrological model. The key approaches taken in the study are to (1) integrate electrical resistivity and hydrological data and avoiding data inversion, (2) estimate the total water mass recovery of electrical resistivity data and consider it in van Genuchten-Mualem parameters evaluation and (3) correct the influence of subsurface temperature fluctuations during the infiltration experiment on electrical resistivity data. The results of the study revealed that the coupled hydrogeophysical approach can improve the value of geophysical measurements in hydrological model parameterization. However, the approach cannot overcome the technical limitations of the geoelectrical method associated with resolution and of water mass recovery.

  9. Stability of Chronic Hepatitis-Related Parameters in Serum Samples After Long-Term Storage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rentao; Dan, Yunjie; Xiang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Yi; Kuang, Xuemei; Yang, Ge; Tang, Yulan; Liu, Mingdong; Kong, Weilong; Tan, Wenting; Deng, Guohong

    2017-06-01

    Serum samples are widely used in clinical research, but a comprehensive research of the stability of parameters relevant to chronic hepatitis and the effect of a relatively long-term (up to 10 years) storage on the stability have rarely been studied. To investigate the stability of chronic hepatitis-related parameters in serum samples after long-term storage. The storage stability of common clinical parameters such as total bile acid (TBA), total bilirubin (TBIL), potassium, cholesterol, and protein parameters such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatine kinase (CK), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), albumin, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and also hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10) were tested in serum samples after storing at -20°C or -70°C for 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, and 10 years. Levels of TBA, TBIL, and protein parameters such as ALT, CK, GGT, HDL, and HBsAg decreased significantly, but levels of potassium and cholesterol increased significantly after long-term storage, whereas blood glucose and triglycerides were stable during storage. HBV DNA remained stable at -70°C but changed at -20°C, whereas HCV RNA was stable after 1-, 2-, and 3-year storage. CXCL10 was still detectable after 8-year storage. Low temperatures (-70°C/80°C) are necessary for storage of serum samples in chronic hepatitis B research after long-term storage.

  10. Estimation of the Ratio of Scale Parameters in the Two Sample Problem with Arbitrary Right Censorship.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    70. AWST RC 7 Coeittu an rewwase ati of nee*aa.ean mimDdentify by black n,.mboJ T two-sample version of the Cram~ r -von Mines statistic for right...estimator for exponential distributions. KEY WORDS: Cram~ r -von Mtses distance; Kaplan-Meier estimators; Right censorship; Scale parameter; lodgea and...suppose that two positive random variables ’i 2 S0 and ’ r differ in distribution only by their scale parameters. That is, there exists a positive

  11. Impact of sampling parameters on the radical scavenging potential of olive (Olea europaea L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Papoti, Vassiliki T; Tsimidou, Maria Z

    2009-05-13

    The impact of sampling parameters, that is, cultivar, leaf age, and sampling date, on the radical scavenging potential of olive leaf extracts was examined via the DPPH(*) and other assays. Total phenol content was estimated colorimetrically and by fluorometry, whereas phenol composition was assessed by RP-HPLC coupled with diode array, fluorometric, and MS detection systems. Oleuropein was not always the major leaf constituent. Considerable differences noted in individual phenol levels (hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein and other secoiridoids, verbascoside, and flavonoids) among samples were not reflected either in the total phenol content or in the radical scavenging potential of the extracts. It can be suggested that olive leaf is a robust source of radical scavengers throughout the year and that differentiation in the levels of individual components depends rather on sampling period than on cultivar or age. The latter does not present predictable regularity. Exploitation of all types of leaves expected in an olive tree shoot for the extraction of bioactive compounds is feasible.

  12. Sensitivity of postplanning target and OAR coverage estimates to dosimetric margin distribution sampling parameters

    SciT

    Xu Huijun; Gordon, J. James; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A dosimetric margin (DM) is the margin in a specified direction between a structure and a specified isodose surface, corresponding to a prescription or tolerance dose. The dosimetric margin distribution (DMD) is the distribution of DMs over all directions. Given a geometric uncertainty model, representing inter- or intrafraction setup uncertainties or internal organ motion, the DMD can be used to calculate coverage Q, which is the probability that a realized target or organ-at-risk (OAR) dose metric D{sub v} exceeds the corresponding prescription or tolerance dose. Postplanning coverage evaluation quantifies the percentage of uncertainties for which target and OAR structuresmore » meet their intended dose constraints. The goal of the present work is to evaluate coverage probabilities for 28 prostate treatment plans to determine DMD sampling parameters that ensure adequate accuracy for postplanning coverage estimates. Methods: Normally distributed interfraction setup uncertainties were applied to 28 plans for localized prostate cancer, with prescribed dose of 79.2 Gy and 10 mm clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. Using angular or isotropic sampling techniques, dosimetric margins were determined for the CTV, bladder and rectum, assuming shift invariance of the dose distribution. For angular sampling, DMDs were sampled at fixed angular intervals {omega} (e.g., {omega}=1 deg., 2 deg., 5 deg., 10 deg., 20 deg.). Isotropic samples were uniformly distributed on the unit sphere resulting in variable angular increments, but were calculated for the same number of sampling directions as angular DMDs, and accordingly characterized by the effective angular increment {omega}{sub eff}. In each direction, the DM was calculated by moving the structure in radial steps of size {delta}(=0.1,0.2,0.5,1 mm) until the specified isodose was crossed. Coverage estimation accuracy {Delta}Q was quantified as a function of the sampling parameters

  13. Sensitivity of postplanning target and OAR coverage estimates to dosimetric margin distribution sampling parameters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huijun; Gordon, J James; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2011-02-01

    A dosimetric margin (DM) is the margin in a specified direction between a structure and a specified isodose surface, corresponding to a prescription or tolerance dose. The dosimetric margin distribution (DMD) is the distribution of DMs over all directions. Given a geometric uncertainty model, representing inter- or intrafraction setup uncertainties or internal organ motion, the DMD can be used to calculate coverage Q, which is the probability that a realized target or organ-at-risk (OAR) dose metric D, exceeds the corresponding prescription or tolerance dose. Postplanning coverage evaluation quantifies the percentage of uncertainties for which target and OAR structures meet their intended dose constraints. The goal of the present work is to evaluate coverage probabilities for 28 prostate treatment plans to determine DMD sampling parameters that ensure adequate accuracy for postplanning coverage estimates. Normally distributed interfraction setup uncertainties were applied to 28 plans for localized prostate cancer, with prescribed dose of 79.2 Gy and 10 mm clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. Using angular or isotropic sampling techniques, dosimetric margins were determined for the CTV, bladder and rectum, assuming shift invariance of the dose distribution. For angular sampling, DMDs were sampled at fixed angular intervals w (e.g., w = 1 degree, 2 degrees, 5 degrees, 10 degrees, 20 degrees). Isotropic samples were uniformly distributed on the unit sphere resulting in variable angular increments, but were calculated for the same number of sampling directions as angular DMDs, and accordingly characterized by the effective angular increment omega eff. In each direction, the DM was calculated by moving the structure in radial steps of size delta (=0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1 mm) until the specified isodose was crossed. Coverage estimation accuracy deltaQ was quantified as a function of the sampling parameters omega or omega eff and delta. The

  14. Bayesian model comparison and parameter inference in systems biology using nested sampling.

    PubMed

    Pullen, Nick; Morris, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Inferring parameters for models of biological processes is a current challenge in systems biology, as is the related problem of comparing competing models that explain the data. In this work we apply Skilling's nested sampling to address both of these problems. Nested sampling is a Bayesian method for exploring parameter space that transforms a multi-dimensional integral to a 1D integration over likelihood space. This approach focuses on the computation of the marginal likelihood or evidence. The ratio of evidences of different models leads to the Bayes factor, which can be used for model comparison. We demonstrate how nested sampling can be used to reverse-engineer a system's behaviour whilst accounting for the uncertainty in the results. The effect of missing initial conditions of the variables as well as unknown parameters is investigated. We show how the evidence and the model ranking can change as a function of the available data. Furthermore, the addition of data from extra variables of the system can deliver more information for model comparison than increasing the data from one variable, thus providing a basis for experimental design.

  15. Spectral gap optimization of order parameters for sampling complex molecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Berne, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    In modern-day simulations of many-body systems, much of the computational complexity is shifted to the identification of slowly changing molecular order parameters called collective variables (CVs) or reaction coordinates. A vast array of enhanced-sampling methods are based on the identification and biasing of these low-dimensional order parameters, whose fluctuations are important in driving rare events of interest. Here, we describe a new algorithm for finding optimal low-dimensional CVs for use in enhanced-sampling biasing methods like umbrella sampling, metadynamics, and related methods, when limited prior static and dynamic information is known about the system, and a much larger set of candidate CVs is specified. The algorithm involves estimating the best combination of these candidate CVs, as quantified by a maximum path entropy estimate of the spectral gap for dynamics viewed as a function of that CV. The algorithm is called spectral gap optimization of order parameters (SGOOP). Through multiple practical examples, we show how this postprocessing procedure can lead to optimization of CV and several orders of magnitude improvement in the convergence of the free energy calculated through metadynamics, essentially giving the ability to extract useful information even from unsuccessful metadynamics runs. PMID:26929365

  16. Efficient Bayesian parameter estimation with implicit sampling and surrogate modeling for a vadose zone hydrological problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Pau, G. S. H.; Finsterle, S.

    2015-12-01

    Parameter inversion involves inferring the model parameter values based on sparse observations of some observables. To infer the posterior probability distributions of the parameters, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are typically used. However, the large number of forward simulations needed and limited computational resources limit the complexity of the hydrological model we can use in these methods. In view of this, we studied the implicit sampling (IS) method, an efficient importance sampling technique that generates samples in the high-probability region of the posterior distribution and thus reduces the number of forward simulations that we need to run. For a pilot-point inversion of a heterogeneous permeability field based on a synthetic ponded infiltration experiment simu­lated with TOUGH2 (a subsurface modeling code), we showed that IS with linear map provides an accurate Bayesian description of the parameterized permeability field at the pilot points with just approximately 500 forward simulations. We further studied the use of surrogate models to improve the computational efficiency of parameter inversion. We implemented two reduced-order models (ROMs) for the TOUGH2 forward model. One is based on polynomial chaos expansion (PCE), of which the coefficients are obtained using the sparse Bayesian learning technique to mitigate the "curse of dimensionality" of the PCE terms. The other model is Gaussian process regression (GPR) for which different covariance, likelihood and inference models are considered. Preliminary results indicate that ROMs constructed based on the prior parameter space perform poorly. It is thus impractical to replace this hydrological model by a ROM directly in a MCMC method. However, the IS method can work with a ROM constructed for parameters in the close vicinity of the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimate. We will discuss the accuracy and computational efficiency of using ROMs in the implicit sampling procedure

  17. Ambient airborne solids concentrations including volcanic ash at Hanford, Washington sampling sites subsequent to the Mount St. Helens eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehmel, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    Airborne solids concentrations were measured on a near daily basis at two Hanford, Washington sites after the eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980. These sites are about 211 km east of Mount St. Helens. Collected airborne solids included resuspended volcanic ash plus normal ambient solids. Average airborne solids concentrations were greater at the Hanford meteorological station sampling site which is 24 km northwest of the Horn Rapids dam sampling site. These increased concentrations reflect the sampling site proximity to greater ash fallout depths. Both sites are in low ash fallout areas although the Hanford meteorological station site is closer to the greater ash fallout areas. Airborne solids concentrations were decreased by rain, but airborne solids concentrations rapidly increased as surfaces dried. Airborne concentrations tended to become nearly the same at both sampling sites only for July 12 and 13.

  18. NASTRAN thermal analyzer: Theory and application including a guide to modeling engineering problems, volume 2. [sample problem library guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, C. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A sample problem library containing 20 problems covering most facets of Nastran Thermal Analyzer modeling is presented. Areas discussed include radiative interchange, arbitrary nonlinear loads, transient temperature and steady-state structural plots, temperature-dependent conductivities, simulated multi-layer insulation, and constraint techniques. The use of the major control options and important DMAP alters is demonstrated.

  19. Crack Damage Parameters and Dilatancy of Artificially Jointed Granite Samples Under Triaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, G.; Alejano, L. R.; Arzua, J.; Markley, T.

    2018-06-01

    A database of post-peak triaxial test results was created for artificially jointed planes introduced in cylindrical compression samples of a Blanco Mera granite. Aside from examining the artificial jointing effect on major rock and rock mass parameters such as stiffness, peak strength and residual strength, other strength parameters related to brittle cracking and post-yield dilatancy were analyzed. Crack initiation and crack damage values for both the intact and artificially jointed samples were determined, and these damage envelopes were found to be notably impacted by the presence of jointing. The data suggest that with increased density of jointing, the samples transition from a combined matrix damage and joint slip yielding mechanism to yield dominated by joint slip. Additionally, post-yield dilation data were analyzed in the context of a mobilized dilation angle model, and the peak dilation angle was found to decrease significantly when there were joints in the samples. These dilatancy results are consistent with hypotheses in the literature on rock mass dilatancy.

  20. SERE: single-parameter quality control and sample comparison for RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Stefan K; Kanwar, Rahul; Gölzenleuchter, Meike; Therneau, Terry M; Beutler, Andreas S

    2012-10-03

    Assessing the reliability of experimental replicates (or global alterations corresponding to different experimental conditions) is a critical step in analyzing RNA-Seq data. Pearson's correlation coefficient r has been widely used in the RNA-Seq field even though its statistical characteristics may be poorly suited to the task. Here we present a single-parameter test procedure for count data, the Simple Error Ratio Estimate (SERE), that can determine whether two RNA-Seq libraries are faithful replicates or globally different. Benchmarking shows that the interpretation of SERE is unambiguous regardless of the total read count or the range of expression differences among bins (exons or genes), a score of 1 indicating faithful replication (i.e., samples are affected only by Poisson variation of individual counts), a score of 0 indicating data duplication, and scores >1 corresponding to true global differences between RNA-Seq libraries. On the contrary the interpretation of Pearson's r is generally ambiguous and highly dependent on sequencing depth and the range of expression levels inherent to the sample (difference between lowest and highest bin count). Cohen's simple Kappa results are also ambiguous and are highly dependent on the choice of bins. For quantifying global sample differences SERE performs similarly to a measure based on the negative binomial distribution yet is simpler to compute. SERE can therefore serve as a straightforward and reliable statistical procedure for the global assessment of pairs or large groups of RNA-Seq datasets by a single statistical parameter.

  1. Characterization of PDMS samples with variation of its synthesis parameters for tunable optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez-Garcia, Josimar; Cruz-Félix, Angel S.; Santiago-Alvarado, Agustin; González-García, Jorge

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays the elastomer known as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, Sylgard 184), due to its physical properties, low cost and easy handle, have become a frequently used material for the elaboration of optical components such as: variable focal length liquid lenses, optical waveguides, solid elastic lenses, etc. In recent years, we have been working in the characterization of this material for applications in visual sciences; in this work, we describe the elaboration of PDMSmade samples, also, we present physical and optical properties of the samples by varying its synthesis parameters such as base: curing agent ratio, and both, curing time and temperature. In the case of mechanical properties, tensile and compression tests were carried out through a universal testing machine to obtain the respective stress-strain curves, and to obtain information regarding its optical properties, UV-vis spectroscopy is applied to the samples to obtain transmittance and absorbance curves. Index of refraction variation was obtained through an Abbe refractometer. Results from the characterization will determine the proper synthesis parameters for the elaboration of tunable refractive surfaces for potential applications in robotics.

  2. Effect of sampling schedule on pharmacokinetic parameter estimates of promethazine in astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Wang, Zuwei; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2005-08-01

    Six astronauts on the Shuttle Transport System (STS) participated in an investigation on the pharmacokinetics of promethazine (PMZ), a medication used for the treatment of space motion sickness (SMS) during flight. Each crewmember completed the protocol once during flight and repeated thirty days after returned to Earth. Saliva samples were collected at scheduled times for 72 h after PMZ administration; more frequent samples were collected on the ground than during flight owing to schedule constraints in flight. PMZ concentrations in saliva were determined by a liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric (LC-MS) assay and pharmacokinetic parameters (PKPs) were calculated using actual flight and ground-based data sets and using time-matched sampling schedule on ground to that during flight. Volume of distribution (Vc) and clearance (Cls) decreased during flight compared to that from time-matched ground data set; however, ClS and Vc estimates were higher for all subjects when partial ground data sets were used for analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) normalized with administered dose was similar in flight and partial ground data; however AUC was significantly lower using time-matched sampling compared with the full data set on ground. Half life (t1/2) was longest during flight, shorter with matched-sampling schedule on ground and shortest when complete data set from ground was used. Maximum concentration (Cmax), time for Cmax (tmax), parameters of drug absorption, depicted a similar trend with lowest and longest respectively, during flight, lower with time- matched ground data and highest and shortest with full ground data.

  3. Effect of Sampling Schedule on Pharmacokinetic Parameter Estimates of Promethazine in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Wang, Zuwei; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2005-01-01

    Six astronauts on the Shuttle Transport System (STS) participated in an investigation on the pharmacokinetics of promethazine (PMZ), a medication used for the treatment of space motion sickness (SMS) during flight. Each crewmember completed the protocol once during flight and repeated thirty days after returned to Earth. Saliva samples were collected at scheduled times for 72 h after PMZ administration; more frequent samples were collected on the ground than during flight owing to schedule constraints in flight. PMZ concentrations in saliva were determined by a liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric (LC-MS) assay and pharmacokinetic parameters (PKPs) were calculated using actual flight and ground-based data sets and using time-matched sampling schedule on ground to that during flight. Volume of distribution (V(sub c)) and clearance (Cl(sub s),) decreased during flight compared to that from time-matched ground data set; however, Cl(sub s) and V(sub c) estimates were higher for all subjects when partial ground data sets were used for analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) normalized with administered dose was similar in flight and partial ground data; however AUC was significantly lower using time-matched sampling compared with the full data set on ground. Half life (t(sub 1/2)) was longest during flight, shorter with matched-sampling schedule on ground and shortest when complete data set from ground was used. Maximum concentration (C(sub max)), time for C(sub max), (t(sub max)), parameters of drug absorption, depicted a similar trend with lowest and longest respectively, during flight, lower with time-matched ground data and highest and shortest with full ground data.

  4. The impact of temporal sampling resolution on parameter inference for biological transport models.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jonathan U; Baker, Ruth E

    2018-06-25

    Imaging data has become an essential tool to explore key biological questions at various scales, for example the motile behaviour of bacteria or the transport of mRNA, and it has the potential to transform our understanding of important transport mechanisms. Often these imaging studies require us to compare biological species or mutants, and to do this we need to quantitatively characterise their behaviour. Mathematical models offer a quantitative description of a system that enables us to perform this comparison, but to relate mechanistic mathematical models to imaging data, we need to estimate their parameters. In this work we study how collecting data at different temporal resolutions impacts our ability to infer parameters of biological transport models; performing exact inference for simple velocity jump process models in a Bayesian framework. The question of how best to choose the frequency with which data is collected is prominent in a host of studies because the majority of imaging technologies place constraints on the frequency with which images can be taken, and the discrete nature of observations can introduce errors into parameter estimates. In this work, we mitigate such errors by formulating the velocity jump process model within a hidden states framework. This allows us to obtain estimates of the reorientation rate and noise amplitude for noisy observations of a simple velocity jump process. We demonstrate the sensitivity of these estimates to temporal variations in the sampling resolution and extent of measurement noise. We use our methodology to provide experimental guidelines for researchers aiming to characterise motile behaviour that can be described by a velocity jump process. In particular, we consider how experimental constraints resulting in a trade-off between temporal sampling resolution and observation noise may affect parameter estimates. Finally, we demonstrate the robustness of our methodology to model misspecification, and then apply

  5. Spectral Line Parameters Including Temperature Dependences of Self- and Air-Broadening in the 2 (left arrow) 0 Band of CO at 2.3 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.; Sung, K.; Brown, L. R.; Predoi-Cross, A.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature dependences of pressure-broadened half-width and pressure-induced shift coefficients along with accurate positions and intensities have been determined for transitions in the 2<--0 band of C-12 O-16 from analyzing high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra recorded with two different Fourier transform spectrometers. A total of 28 spectra, 16 self-broadened and 12 air-broadened, recorded using high- purity (greater than or equal to 99.5% C-12-enriched) CO samples and CO diluted with dry air(research grade) at different temperatures and pressures, were analyzed simultaneously to maximize the accuracy of the retrieved parameters. The sample temperatures ranged from 150 to 298K and the total pressures varied between 5 and 700 Torr. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares spectrum fitting technique was used to adjust the rovibrational constants (G, B, D, etc.) and intensity parameters (including Herman-Wallis coefficients), rather than determining individual line positions and intensities. Self-and air-broadened Lorentz half-width coefficients, their temperature dependence exponents, self- and air-pressure-induced shift coefficients, their temperature dependences, self- and air-line mixing coefficients, their temperature dependences and speed dependence have been retrieved from the analysis. Speed-dependent line shapes with line mixing employing off-diagonal relaxation matrix element formalism were needed to minimize the fit residuals. This study presents a precise and complete set of spectral line parameters that consistently reproduce the spectrum of carbon monoxide over terrestrial atmospheric conditions.

  6. Detection of Organic Constituents Including Chloromethylpropene in the Analyses of the ROCKNEST Drift by Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eigenbrode, J. L.; Glavin, D.; Coll, P.; Summons, R. E.; Mahaffy, P.; Archer, D.; Brunner, A.; Conrad, P.; Freissinet, C.; Martin, M.; hide

    2013-01-01

    key challenge in assessing the habitability of martian environments is the detection of organic matter - a requirement of all life as we know it. The Curiosity rover, which landed on August 6, 2012 in Gale Crater of Mars, includes the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite capable of in situ analysis of gaseous organic components thermally evolved from sediment samples collected, sieved, and delivered by the MSL rover. On Sol 94, SAM received its first solid sample: scooped sediment from Rocknest that was sieved to <150 m particle size. Multiple 10-40 mg portions of the scoop #5 sample were delivered to SAM for analyses. Prior to their introduction, a blank (empty cup) analysis was performed. This blank served 1) to clean the analytical instrument of SAMinternal materials that accumulated in the gas processing system since integration into the rover, and 2) to characterize the background signatures of SAM. Both the blank and the Rocknest samples showed the presence of hydrocarbon components.

  7. Neutrino masses and cosmological parameters from a Euclid-like survey: Markov Chain Monte Carlo forecasts including theoretical errors

    SciT

    Audren, Benjamin; Lesgourgues, Julien; Bird, Simeon

    2013-01-01

    We present forecasts for the accuracy of determining the parameters of a minimal cosmological model and the total neutrino mass based on combined mock data for a future Euclid-like galaxy survey and Planck. We consider two different galaxy surveys: a spectroscopic redshift survey and a cosmic shear survey. We make use of the Monte Carlo Markov Chains (MCMC) technique and assume two sets of theoretical errors. The first error is meant to account for uncertainties in the modelling of the effect of neutrinos on the non-linear galaxy power spectrum and we assume this error to be fully correlated in Fouriermore » space. The second error is meant to parametrize the overall residual uncertainties in modelling the non-linear galaxy power spectrum at small scales, and is conservatively assumed to be uncorrelated and to increase with the ratio of a given scale to the scale of non-linearity. It hence increases with wavenumber and decreases with redshift. With these two assumptions for the errors and assuming further conservatively that the uncorrelated error rises above 2% at k = 0.4 h/Mpc and z = 0.5, we find that a future Euclid-like cosmic shear/galaxy survey achieves a 1-σ error on M{sub ν} close to 32 meV/25 meV, sufficient for detecting the total neutrino mass with good significance. If the residual uncorrelated errors indeed rises rapidly towards smaller scales in the non-linear regime as we have assumed here then the data on non-linear scales does not increase the sensitivity to the total neutrino mass. Assuming instead a ten times smaller theoretical error with the same scale dependence, the error on the total neutrino mass decreases moderately from σ(M{sub ν}) = 18 meV to 14 meV when mildly non-linear scales with 0.1 h/Mpc < k < 0.6 h/Mpc are included in the analysis of the galaxy survey data.« less

  8. Receiver calibration and the nonlinearity parameter measurement of thick solid samples with diffraction and attenuation corrections.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Barnard, Daniel; Cho, Sungjong; Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents analytical and experimental techniques for accurate determination of the nonlinearity parameter (β) in thick solid samples. When piezoelectric transducers are used for β measurements, the receiver calibration is required to determine the transfer function from which the absolute displacement can be calculated. The measured fundamental and second harmonic displacement amplitudes should be modified to account for beam diffraction and material absorption. All these issues are addressed in this study and the proposed technique is validated through the β measurements of thick solid samples. A simplified self-reciprocity calibration procedure for a broadband receiver is described. The diffraction and attenuation corrections for the fundamental and second harmonics are explicitly derived. Aluminum alloy samples in five different thicknesses (4, 6, 8, 10, 12cm) are prepared and β measurements are made using the finite amplitude, through-transmission method. The effects of diffraction and attenuation corrections on β measurements are systematically investigated. When diffraction and attenuation corrections are all properly made, the variation of β between different thickness samples is found to be less than 3.2%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The influence of inertial sensor sampling frequency on the accuracy of measurement parameters in rearfoot running.

    PubMed

    Mitschke, Christian; Zaumseil, Falk; Milani, Thomas L

    2017-11-01

    Increasingly, inertial sensors are being used for running analyses. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate the influence of inertial sensor sampling frequencies (SF) on the accuracy of kinematic, spatio-temporal, and kinetic parameters. We hypothesized that running analyses at lower SF result in less signal information and therefore the inability to sufficiently interpret measurement data. Twenty-one subjects participated in this study. Rearfoot strikers ran on an indoor running track at a velocity of 3.5 ± 0.1 ms -1 . A uniaxial accelerometer was attached at the tibia and an inertial measurement unit was mounted at the heel of the right shoe. All sensors were synchronized at the start and data was measured with 1000 Hz (reference SF). Datasets were reduced to 500, 333, 250, 200, and 100 Hz in post-processing. The results of this study showed that a minimum SF of 500 Hz should be used to accurately measure kinetic parameters (e.g. peak heel acceleration). In contrast, stride length showed accurate results even at 333 Hz. 200 Hz were required to calculate parameters accurately for peak tibial acceleration, stride duration, and all kinematic measurements. The information from this study is necessary to correctly interpret measurement data of existing investigations and to plan future studies.

  10. Analytical Parameters of an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor for Fast Analysis in Food Samples

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Amperometric biosensors based on the use of glucose oxidase (GOx) are able to combine the robustness of electrochemical techniques with the specificity of biological recognition processes. However, very little information can be found in literature about the fundamental analytical parameters of these sensors. In this work, the analytical behavior of an amperometric biosensor based on the immobilization of GOx using a hydrogel (Chitosan) onto highly ordered titanium dioxide nanotube arrays (TiO2NTAs) has been evaluated. The GOx–Chitosan/TiO2NTAs biosensor showed a sensitivity of 5.46 μA·mM−1 with a linear range from 0.3 to 1.5 mM; its fundamental analytical parameters were studied using a commercial soft drink. The obtained results proved sufficient repeatability (RSD = 1.9%), reproducibility (RSD = 2.5%), accuracy (95–105% recovery), and robustness (RSD = 3.3%). Furthermore, no significant interferences from fructose, ascorbic acid and citric acid were obtained. In addition, the storage stability was further examined, after 30 days, the GOx–Chitosan/TiO2NTAs biosensor retained 85% of its initial current response. Finally, the glucose content of different food samples was measured using the biosensor and compared with the respective HPLC value. In the worst scenario, a deviation smaller than 10% was obtained among the 20 samples evaluated. PMID:29135931

  11. Analytical Parameters of an Amperometric Glucose Biosensor for Fast Analysis in Food Samples.

    PubMed

    Artigues, Margalida; Abellà, Jordi; Colominas, Sergi

    2017-11-14

    Amperometric biosensors based on the use of glucose oxidase (GOx) are able to combine the robustness of electrochemical techniques with the specificity of biological recognition processes. However, very little information can be found in literature about the fundamental analytical parameters of these sensors. In this work, the analytical behavior of an amperometric biosensor based on the immobilization of GOx using a hydrogel (Chitosan) onto highly ordered titanium dioxide nanotube arrays (TiO₂NTAs) has been evaluated. The GOx-Chitosan/TiO₂NTAs biosensor showed a sensitivity of 5.46 μA·mM -1 with a linear range from 0.3 to 1.5 mM; its fundamental analytical parameters were studied using a commercial soft drink. The obtained results proved sufficient repeatability (RSD = 1.9%), reproducibility (RSD = 2.5%), accuracy (95-105% recovery), and robustness (RSD = 3.3%). Furthermore, no significant interferences from fructose, ascorbic acid and citric acid were obtained. In addition, the storage stability was further examined, after 30 days, the GOx-Chitosan/TiO₂NTAs biosensor retained 85% of its initial current response. Finally, the glucose content of different food samples was measured using the biosensor and compared with the respective HPLC value. In the worst scenario, a deviation smaller than 10% was obtained among the 20 samples evaluated.

  12. Simplifying sample pretreatment: application of dried blood spot (DBS) method to blood samples, including postmortem, for UHPLC-MS/MS analysis of drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Odoardi, Sara; Anzillotti, Luca; Strano-Rossi, Sabina

    2014-10-01

    The complexity of biological matrices, such as blood, requires the development of suitably selective and reliable sample pretreatment procedures prior to their instrumental analysis. A method has been developed for the analysis of drugs of abuse and their metabolites from different chemical classes (opiates, methadone, fentanyl and analogues, cocaine, amphetamines and amphetamine-like substances, ketamine, LSD) in human blood using dried blood spot (DBS) and subsequent UHPLC-MS/MS analysis. DBS extraction required only 100μL of sample, added with the internal standards and then three droplets (30μL each) of this solution were spotted on the card, let dry for 1h, punched and extracted with methanol with 0.1% of formic acid. The supernatant was evaporated and the residue was then reconstituted in 100μL of water with 0.1% of formic acid and injected in the UHPLC-MS/MS system. The method was validated considering the following parameters: LOD and LOQ, linearity, precision, accuracy, matrix effect and dilution integrity. LODs were 0.05-1ng/mL and LOQs were 0.2-2ng/mL. The method showed satisfactory linearity for all substances, with determination coefficients always higher than 0.99. Intra and inter day precision, accuracy, matrix effect and dilution integrity were acceptable for all the studied substances. The addition of internal standards before DBS extraction and the deposition of a fixed volume of blood on the filter cards ensured the accurate quantification of the analytes. The validated method was then applied to authentic postmortem blood samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Improved Horvitz-Thompson Estimation of Model Parameters from Two-phase Stratified Samples: Applications in Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, Norman E.; Lumley, Thomas; Ballantyne, Christie M; Chambless, Lloyd E.; Kulich, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The case-cohort study involves two-phase sampling: simple random sampling from an infinite super-population at phase one and stratified random sampling from a finite cohort at phase two. Standard analyses of case-cohort data involve solution of inverse probability weighted (IPW) estimating equations, with weights determined by the known phase two sampling fractions. The variance of parameter estimates in (semi)parametric models, including the Cox model, is the sum of two terms: (i) the model based variance of the usual estimates that would be calculated if full data were available for the entire cohort; and (ii) the design based variance from IPW estimation of the unknown cohort total of the efficient influence function (IF) contributions. This second variance component may be reduced by adjusting the sampling weights, either by calibration to known cohort totals of auxiliary variables correlated with the IF contributions or by their estimation using these same auxiliary variables. Both adjustment methods are implemented in the R survey package. We derive the limit laws of coefficients estimated using adjusted weights. The asymptotic results suggest practical methods for construction of auxiliary variables that are evaluated by simulation of case-cohort samples from the National Wilms Tumor Study and by log-linear modeling of case-cohort data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Although not semiparametric efficient, estimators based on adjusted weights may come close to achieving full efficiency within the class of augmented IPW estimators. PMID:20174455

  14. Including gauge-group parameters into the theory of interactions: an alternative mass-generating mechanism for gauge fields

    SciT

    Aldaya, V.; Lopez-Ruiz, F. F.; Sanchez-Sastre, E.

    2006-11-03

    We reformulate the gauge theory of interactions by introducing the gauge group parameters into the model. The dynamics of the new 'Goldstone-like' bosons is accomplished through a non-linear {sigma}-model Lagrangian. They are minimally coupled according to a proper prescription which provides mass terms to the intermediate vector bosons without spoiling gauge invariance. The present formalism is explicitly applied to the Standard Model of electroweak interactions.

  15. SERE: Single-parameter quality control and sample comparison for RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Assessing the reliability of experimental replicates (or global alterations corresponding to different experimental conditions) is a critical step in analyzing RNA-Seq data. Pearson’s correlation coefficient r has been widely used in the RNA-Seq field even though its statistical characteristics may be poorly suited to the task. Results Here we present a single-parameter test procedure for count data, the Simple Error Ratio Estimate (SERE), that can determine whether two RNA-Seq libraries are faithful replicates or globally different. Benchmarking shows that the interpretation of SERE is unambiguous regardless of the total read count or the range of expression differences among bins (exons or genes), a score of 1 indicating faithful replication (i.e., samples are affected only by Poisson variation of individual counts), a score of 0 indicating data duplication, and scores >1 corresponding to true global differences between RNA-Seq libraries. On the contrary the interpretation of Pearson’s r is generally ambiguous and highly dependent on sequencing depth and the range of expression levels inherent to the sample (difference between lowest and highest bin count). Cohen’s simple Kappa results are also ambiguous and are highly dependent on the choice of bins. For quantifying global sample differences SERE performs similarly to a measure based on the negative binomial distribution yet is simpler to compute. Conclusions SERE can therefore serve as a straightforward and reliable statistical procedure for the global assessment of pairs or large groups of RNA-Seq datasets by a single statistical parameter. PMID:23033915

  16. Migration of antioxidants from polylactic acid films, a parameter estimation approach: Part I - A model including convective mass transfer coefficient.

    PubMed

    Samsudin, Hayati; Auras, Rafael; Burgess, Gary; Dolan, Kirk; Soto-Valdez, Herlinda

    2018-03-01

    A two-step solution based on the boundary conditions of Crank's equations for mass transfer in a film was developed. Three driving factors, the diffusion (D), partition (K p,f ) and convective mass transfer coefficients (h), govern the sorption and/or desorption kinetics of migrants from polymer films. These three parameters were simultaneously estimated. They provide in-depth insight into the physics of a migration process. The first step was used to find the combination of D, K p,f and h that minimized the sums of squared errors (SSE) between the predicted and actual results. In step 2, an ordinary least square (OLS) estimation was performed by using the proposed analytical solution containing D, K p,f and h. Three selected migration studies of PLA/antioxidant-based films were used to demonstrate the use of this two-step solution. Additional parameter estimation approaches such as sequential and bootstrap were also performed to acquire a better knowledge about the kinetics of migration. The proposed model successfully provided the initial guesses for D, K p,f and h. The h value was determined without performing a specific experiment for it. By determining h together with D, under or overestimation issues pertaining to a migration process can be avoided since these two parameters are correlated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Calculation of distribution coefficients in the SAMPL5 challenge from atomic solvation parameters and surface areas.

    PubMed

    Santos-Martins, Diogo; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2016-11-01

    In the context of SAMPL5, we submitted blind predictions of the cyclohexane/water distribution coefficient (D) for a series of 53 drug-like molecules. Our method is purely empirical and based on the additive contribution of each solute atom to the free energy of solvation in water and in cyclohexane. The contribution of each atom depends on the atom type and on the exposed surface area. Comparatively to similar methods in the literature, we used a very small set of atomic parameters: only 10 for solvation in water and 1 for solvation in cyclohexane. As a result, the method is protected from overfitting and the error in the blind predictions could be reasonably estimated. Moreover, this approach is fast: it takes only 0.5 s to predict the distribution coefficient for all 53 SAMPL5 compounds, allowing its application in virtual screening campaigns. The performance of our approach (submission 49) is modest but satisfactory in view of its efficiency: the root mean square error (RMSE) was 3.3 log D units for the 53 compounds, while the RMSE of the best performing method (using COSMO-RS) was 2.1 (submission 16). Our method is implemented as a Python script available at https://github.com/diogomart/SAMPL5-DC-surface-empirical .

  18. Determination of the pathological state of skin samples by optical polarimetry parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Buelta, L.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2008-11-01

    Polarimetry is widely known to involve a series of powerful optical techniques that characterize the polarization behaviour of a sample. In this work, we propose a method for applying polarimetric procedures to the characterization of biological tissues, in order to differentiate between healthy and pathologic tissues on a polarimetric basis. Usually, medical morphology diseases are diagnosed based on histological alterations of the tissue. The fact that these alterations will be reflected in polarization information highlights the suitability of polarimetric procedures for diagnostic purposes. The analysis is mainly focused on the depolarization properties of the media, as long as the internal structure strongly affects the polarization state of the light that interacts with the sample. Therefore, a method is developed in order to determine the correlation between pathological ultraestructural characteristics and the subsequent variations in the polarimetric parameters of the backscattered light. This study is applied to three samples of porcine skin corresponding to a healthy region, a mole, and a cancerous region. The results show that the method proposed is indeed an adequate technique in order to achieve an early, accurate and effective cancer detection.

  19. Determination of low molecular weight alcohols including fusel oil in various samples by diethyl ether extraction and capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kang-Lyung

    2005-01-01

    Low molecular weight alcohols including fusel oil were determined using diethyl ether extraction and capillary gas chromatography. Twelve kinds of alcohols were successfully resolved on the HP-FFAP (polyethylene glycol) capillary column. The diethyl ether extraction method was very useful for the analysis of alcohols in alcoholic beverages and biological samples with excellent cleanliness of the resulting chromatograms and high sensitivity compared to the direct injection method. Calibration graphs for all standard alcohols showed good linearity in the concentration range used, 0.001-2% (w/v) for all alcohols. Salting out effects were significant (p < 0.01) for the low molecular weight alcohols methanol, isopropanol, propanol, 2-butanol, n-butanol and ethanol, but not for the relatively high molecular weight alcohols amyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol, and heptanol. The coefficients of variation of the relative molar responses were less than 5% for all of the alcohols. The limits of detection and quantitation were 1-5 and 10-60 microg/L for the diethyl ether extraction method, and 10-50 and 100-350 microg/L for the direct injection method, respectively. The retention times and relative retention times of standard alcohols were significantly shifted in the direct injection method when the injection volumes were changed, even with the same analysis conditions, but they were not influenced in the diethyl ether extraction method. The recoveries by the diethyl ether extraction method were greater than 95% for all samples and greater than 97% for biological samples.

  20. Biochemical Parameters of Guinea Pig Perilymph Sampled According to Scala and Following Sound Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gershbein, Leon L.; Manshio, Dennis T.; Shurrager, Phil S.

    1974-01-01

    Guinea pigs were exposed to sound varying from 2 to 8 kHz in frequency and 80-100 dB (SPL) in intensity for periods of 1 hr. The biochemical parameters, glucose, sodium, total protein, and the glycolytic enzymes, aldolase, phosphohexose isomerase, and total LDH as well as isozymes of the latter were ascertained for blood serum, perilymph, and, in some instances, cerebrospinal fluid. The three enzymes occurred at lower levels in perilymph as compared to blood serum. Except for a small difference in serum total protein, sound presentation incurred no significant effect on any of the above parameters. Definite differences in several metabolites were discerned for perilymph sampled according to scala and which were independent of the respective acoustical treatments. Thus, as compared to the scale tympani, the scala vestibuli perilymph displayed a higher glucose content and a diminished total LDH level and of the latter isozymes, LDH1 ranged lower and LDH2, higher. As further evidence pointing to cerebrospinal fluid as the possible origin of perilymph, similarities in glucose contents and LDH isozyme patterns were noted for both fluids. PMID:4470918

  1. Effect of Preload Alterations on Left Ventricular Systolic Parameters Including Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography Radial Strain During General Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ulrike; Base, Eva; Ristl, Robin; Mora, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    Frequently used parameters for evaluation of left ventricular systolic function are load-sensitive. However, the impact of preload alterations on speckle-tracking echocardiographic parameters during anesthesia has not been validated. Therefore, two-dimensional (2D) speckle-tracking echocardiography radial strain (RS) was assessed during general anesthesia, simulating 3 different preload conditions. Single-center prospective observational study. University hospital. Thirty-three patients with normal left ventricular systolic function undergoing major surgery. Transgastric views of the midpapillary level of the left ventricle were acquired at 3 different positions. Fractional shortening (FS), fractional area change (FAC), and 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography RS were analyzed in the transgastric midpapillary view. Considerable correlation above 0.5 was found for FAC and FS in the zero and Trendelenburg positions (r = 0.629, r = 0.587), and for RS and FAC in the anti-Trendelenburg position (r = 0.518). In the repeated-measures analysis, significant differences among the values measured at the 3 positions were found for FAC and FS. For FAC, there were differences up to 2.8 percentage points between the anti-Trendelenburg position and the other 2 positions. For FS, only the difference between position zero and anti-Trendelenburg was significant, with an observed change of 1.66. Two-dimensional RS was not significantly different at all positions, with observed changes below 1 percentage point. Alterations in preload did not result in clinically relevant changes of RS, FS, or FAC. Observed changes for RS were smallest; however, the variation of RS was larger than that of FS or FAC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Simple Penalties on Maximum-Likelihood Estimates of Genetic Parameters to Reduce Sampling Variation

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Multivariate estimates of genetic parameters are subject to substantial sampling variation, especially for smaller data sets and more than a few traits. A simple modification of standard, maximum-likelihood procedures for multivariate analyses to estimate genetic covariances is described, which can improve estimates by substantially reducing their sampling variances. This is achieved by maximizing the likelihood subject to a penalty. Borrowing from Bayesian principles, we propose a mild, default penalty—derived assuming a Beta distribution of scale-free functions of the covariance components to be estimated—rather than laboriously attempting to determine the stringency of penalization from the data. An extensive simulation study is presented, demonstrating that such penalties can yield very worthwhile reductions in loss, i.e., the difference from population values, for a wide range of scenarios and without distorting estimates of phenotypic covariances. Moreover, mild default penalties tend not to increase loss in difficult cases and, on average, achieve reductions in loss of similar magnitude to computationally demanding schemes to optimize the degree of penalization. Pertinent details required for the adaptation of standard algorithms to locate the maximum of the likelihood function are outlined. PMID:27317681

  3. Compressive properties of passive skeletal muscle-the impact of precise sample geometry on parameter identification in inverse finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Böl, Markus; Kruse, Roland; Ehret, Alexander E; Leichsenring, Kay; Siebert, Tobias

    2012-10-11

    Due to the increasing developments in modelling of biological material, adequate parameter identification techniques are urgently needed. The majority of recent contributions on passive muscle tissue identify material parameters solely by comparing characteristic, compressive stress-stretch curves from experiments and simulation. In doing so, different assumptions concerning e.g. the sample geometry or the degree of friction between the sample and the platens are required. In most cases these assumptions are grossly simplified leading to incorrect material parameters. In order to overcome such oversimplifications, in this paper a more reliable parameter identification technique is presented: we use the inverse finite element method (iFEM) to identify the optimal parameter set by comparison of the compressive stress-stretch response including the realistic geometries of the samples and the presence of friction at the compressed sample faces. Moreover, we judge the quality of the parameter identification by comparing the simulated and experimental deformed shapes of the samples. Besides this, the study includes a comprehensive set of compressive stress-stretch data on rabbit soleus muscle and the determination of static friction coefficients between muscle and PTFE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sample size planning for composite reliability coefficients: accuracy in parameter estimation via narrow confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    Terry, Leann; Kelley, Ken

    2012-11-01

    Composite measures play an important role in psychology and related disciplines. Composite measures almost always have error. Correspondingly, it is important to understand the reliability of the scores from any particular composite measure. However, the point estimates of the reliability of composite measures are fallible and thus all such point estimates should be accompanied by a confidence interval. When confidence intervals are wide, there is much uncertainty in the population value of the reliability coefficient. Given the importance of reporting confidence intervals for estimates of reliability, coupled with the undesirability of wide confidence intervals, we develop methods that allow researchers to plan sample size in order to obtain narrow confidence intervals for population reliability coefficients. We first discuss composite reliability coefficients and then provide a discussion on confidence interval formation for the corresponding population value. Using the accuracy in parameter estimation approach, we develop two methods to obtain accurate estimates of reliability by planning sample size. The first method provides a way to plan sample size so that the expected confidence interval width for the population reliability coefficient is sufficiently narrow. The second method ensures that the confidence interval width will be sufficiently narrow with some desired degree of assurance (e.g., 99% assurance that the 95% confidence interval for the population reliability coefficient will be less than W units wide). The effectiveness of our methods was verified with Monte Carlo simulation studies. We demonstrate how to easily implement the methods with easy-to-use and freely available software. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Impact of large volume paracentesis on respiratory parameters including transpulmonary pressure and on transpulmonary thermodilution derived hemodynamics: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Ulrich; Karsten, Eugen; Lahmer, Tobias; Rasch, Sebastian; Thies, Philipp; Henschel, Benedikt; Fischer, Gerrit; Schmid, Roland M.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Appropriate mechanical ventilation and prevention of alveolar collaps is mainly dependent on transpulmonary pressure TPP. TPP is assessed by measurement of esophageal pressure EP, largely influenced by pleural and intraabdominal pressure IAP. Consecutively, TPP-guided ventilation might be particularly useful in patients with high IAP. This study investigates the impact of large volume paracentesis LVP on TPP, EP, IAP as well as on hemodynamic and respiratory function in patients with liver cirrhosis and tense ascites. Material and methods We analysed 23 LVP-procedures in 11 cirrhotic patients ventilated with the AVEA Viasys respirator (CareFusion, USA) which is capable to measure EP via an esophageal tube. Results LVP of a mean volume of 4826±1276 mL of ascites resulted in marked increases in inspiratory (17.9±8.9 vs. 5.4±13.3 cmH2O; p<0.001) as well as expiratory TPP (-3.0±4.7 vs. -15.9±10.9 cmH2O; p<0.001; primary endpoint). In parallel, the inspiratory (2.4±8.7 vs. 14.1±14.5 cmH2O; p<0.001) and expiratory EP (12.4±6.0 vs. 24.9±11.3 cmH2O; p<0.001) significantly decreased. The effects were most pronounced for the release of the first 500 mL of ascites. LVP evoked substantial decreases in IAP and central venous pressure CVP. By contrast, mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, global end-diastolic volume index, extravascular lung water index and systemic vascular resistance index did not change. Among the respiratory parameters we observed an increase in paO2/FiO2 (247.7±60.9 vs. 208.3±46.8 mmHg; p<0.001) and a decrease in Oxygenation Index OI (4.8±2.0 vs. 5.8±3.1 cmH2O/mmHg; p = 0.002). Tidal volume (510±100 vs. 452±113 mL; p = 0.008) and dynamic respiratory system compliance Cdyn (46.8±15.9 vs. 35.1±14.6 mL/cmH20; p<0.001) increased, whereas paCO2 (47.3±10.7 vs. 51.2±12.3mmHg; p = 0.046) and the respiratory rate decreased (17.1±7.3 vs. 19.6±7.8 min-1; p = 0.010). Conclusions In mechanically ventilated patients with decompensated

  6. Immunological parameters, including CXCL8 (IL-8) characterize cerebro- and cardiovascular events in patients with peripheral artery diseases.

    PubMed

    Szomjak, E; Der, H; Kerekes, G; Veres, K; Csiba, L; Toth, J; Peter, M; Soltesz, P; Szodoray, P

    2010-04-01

    The most commonly occurring atherosclerotic manifestations are peripheral artery diseases (PAD). Immune-mediated processes contribute to the development of atherosclerosis, and affect the diseases outcome. The aim of the present study was to assess various immune-competent cells, cytokines and chemokines in patients with PAD and to evaluate whether the base immunological values reflect the subsequent development of cardio/cerebrovascular symptoms. One hundred sixty patients with PAD were followed-up for 42 months. At the time of enrolment, we determined blood lymphocyte subpopulations, both T-helper (Th)1/Th2-type intracytoplasmic cytokines and soluble cytokines, chemokines. Intracellular cytokines were measured on phorbol-myristate-acetate- and ionomycine- stimulated cells. Lymphocyte subgroups were quantified by flow cytometry, soluble cytokines by ELISA and intracellular cytokine levels were measured by flow cytometry. The ankle-brachial index (ABI), indicator of atherosclerosis, was also evaluated. The clinical results were correlated with the immune-parameters to assess the input of immune-inflammatory events in the propagation of vascular manifestation. CD4(+) T-cell proportions in patients with PAD with cerebro- cardio-vascular manifestations were decreased, which further reduced in patients with fatal outcome. Of circulating chemokines, IL-8 (CXCL-8) was increased in patients with subsequent cerebro- cardio-vascular manifestations, compared to those without the symptoms, and further raised in patients with fatal outcome. The percentage of interferon (IFN)-gamma positive cells showed clear negative correlation with ABI. We conclude that altered peripheral lymphocyte subsets and cytokine/chemokine imbalance play important roles in the proinflammatory cascade and reflect disease severity in patients with PAD.

  7. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis using fundamental parameter approach of Catha edulis and other related plant samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, Abdallah A.; Moharram, Mohammed A.; Mostafa, Nasser Y.

    2012-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify trace elements in the Catha edulis plant (Khat) with a fundamental parameter approach. C. edulis is a famous drug plant in east Africa and Arabian Peninsula. We have previously confirmed that hydroxyapatite represents one of the main inorganic compounds in the leaves and stalks of C. edulis. Comparable plant leaves from basil, mint and green tea were included in the present investigation as well as trifolium leaves were included as a non-related plant. The elemental analyses of the plants were done by Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) spectroscopy. Standard-less quantitative WDXRF analysis was carried out based on the fundamental parameter approaches. According to the standard-less analysis algorithms, there is an essential need for an accurate determination of the amount of organic material in the sample. A new approach, based on the differential thermal analysis, was successfully used for the organic material determination. The obtained results based on this approach were in a good agreement with the commonly used methods. Depending on the developed method, quantitative analysis results of eighteen elements including; Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Na, Ni, Mg, Mn, P, Rb, S, Si, Sr, Ti and Zn were obtained for each plant. The results of the certified reference materials of green tea (NCSZC73014, China National Analysis Center for Iron and Steel, Beijing, China) confirmed the validity of the proposed method.

  8. Bone mineral metabolism parameters and urinary albumin excretion in a representative US population sample.

    PubMed

    Ellam, Timothy; Fotheringham, James; Wilkie, Martin E; Francis, Sheila E; Chico, Timothy J A

    2014-01-01

    Even within accepted normal ranges, higher serum phosphorus, dietary phosphorus density, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Lower serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) also predicts adverse cardiovascular outcomes. We hypothesized that vascular dysfunction accompanying subtle disturbances of these bone metabolism parameters would result in associations with increased low grade albuminuria. We examined participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 1999-2010 (N = 19,383) with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m² and without severe albuminuria (urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) <300 mg/g). Albuminuria was quantified as ACR and fractional albumin excretion (FE(alb)). Increasing quintiles of dietary phosphorus density, serum phosphorus and ALP were not associated with higher ACR or FE(alb). The lowest versus highest quintile of 25(OH)D was associated with greater albuminuria, but not after adjustment for other covariates including cardiovascular risk factors. An association between the highest versus lowest quintile of bone-specific ALP and greater ACR persisted after covariate adjustment, but was not accompanied by an independent association with FE(alb). Increasing quintiles of PTH demonstrated associations with both higher ACR and FE(alb) that were not abolished by adjusting for covariates including age, gender, race, body mass index, diabetes, blood pressure, history of cardiovascular disease, smoking, eGFR, 25(OH)D, season of measurement, lipids, hemoglobin and C-reactive protein. Adjusted increases in ACR and FE(alb) associated with the highest versus lowest quintile of PTH were 19% (95% confidence interval 7-28% p<0.001) and 17% (8-31% p = 0.001) respectively. In this population, of the bone mineral parameters associated with cardiovascular outcomes, only PTH is independently associated with ACR and FE(alb).

  9. On the relation between correlation dimension, approximate entropy and sample entropy parameters, and a fast algorithm for their calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Sebastian; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Pawlak, Sebastian; Kosmider, Marcin; Piskorski, Jaroslaw

    2012-12-01

    We explore the relation between correlation dimension, approximate entropy and sample entropy parameters, which are commonly used in nonlinear systems analysis. Using theoretical considerations we identify the points which are shared by all these complexity algorithms and show explicitly that the above parameters are intimately connected and mutually interdependent. A new geometrical interpretation of sample entropy and correlation dimension is provided and the consequences for the interpretation of sample entropy, its relative consistency and some of the algorithms for parameter selection for this quantity are discussed. To get an exact algorithmic relation between the three parameters we construct a very fast algorithm for simultaneous calculations of the above, which uses the full time series as the source of templates, rather than the usual 10%. This algorithm can be used in medical applications of complexity theory, as it can calculate all three parameters for a realistic recording of 104 points within minutes with the use of an average notebook computer.

  10. Development and Validation of Limited-Sampling Strategies for Predicting Amoxicillin Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Suarez-Kurtz, Guilherme; Ribeiro, Frederico Mota; Vicente, Flávio L.; Struchiner, Claudio J.

    2001-01-01

    Amoxicillin plasma concentrations (n = 1,152) obtained from 48 healthy subjects in two bioequivalence studies were used to develop limited-sampling strategy (LSS) models for estimating the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), the maximum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmax), and the time interval of concentration above MIC susceptibility breakpoints in plasma (T>MIC). Each subject received 500-mg amoxicillin, as reference and test capsules or suspensions, and plasma concentrations were measured by a validated microbiological assay. Linear regression analysis and a “jack-knife” procedure revealed that three-point LSS models accurately estimated (R2, 0.92; precision, <5.8%) the AUC from 0 h to infinity (AUC0-∞) of amoxicillin for the four formulations tested. Validation tests indicated that a three-point LSS model (1, 2, and 5 h) developed for the reference capsule formulation predicts the following accurately (R2, 0.94 to 0.99): (i) the individual AUC0-∞ for the test capsule formulation in the same subjects, (ii) the individual AUC0-∞ for both reference and test suspensions in 24 other subjects, and (iii) the average AUC0-∞ following single oral doses (250 to 1,000 mg) of various amoxicillin formulations in 11 previously published studies. A linear regression equation was derived, using the same sampling time points of the LSS model for the AUC0-∞, but using different coefficients and intercept, for estimating Cmax. Bioequivalence assessments based on LSS-derived AUC0-∞'s and Cmax's provided results similar to those obtained using the original values for these parameters. Finally, two-point LSS models (R2 = 0.86 to 0.95) were developed for T>MICs of 0.25 or 2.0 μg/ml, which are representative of microorganisms susceptible and resistant to amoxicillin. PMID:11600352

  11. Soluble CD26 levels and its association to epidemiologic parameters in a sample population.

    PubMed

    De Chiara, Loretta; Rodríguez-Piñeiro, Ana M; Cordero, Oscar J; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco J; Ayude, Daniel; Rivas-Hervada And, Francisco J; de la Cadena, María Páez

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested the use of soluble CD26 (sCD26) as a tumour marker for the detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) and advanced adenomas. The aim of this study was to assess the sCD26 concentration in a large cohort to evaluate its association to epidemiologic parameters and CRC-related symptoms/pathologies. Serum samples were collected from 2,754 putatively healthy individuals with ages ranging from 30-65 years, and with personal or familial history of polyps, CRC and/or CR symptoms. sCD26 levels were measured by ELISA. No association was found between the sCD26 concentration and age (< 50 and 50), the personal or familial history of polyps or CRC, rectal bleeding, haemorrhoids or diverticula. However, sCD26 was related to non-inflammatory benign pathologies (excluding rectal bleeding, changes in bowel habits, haemorrhoids, diverticula) and to inflammatory benign pathologies. Our results confirm that the sCD26 can be easily offered and evaluated in a large cohort. Additionally, the validation of sCD26 as a tumour marker for screening and case-finding purposes requires a further comparison with an established non-invasive test like the faecal occult blood.

  12. Optimizing Design Parameters for Sets of Concentric Tube Robots using Sampling-based Motion Planning

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Cenk; Torres, Luis G.; Alterovitz, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Concentric tube robots are tentacle-like medical robots that can bend around anatomical obstacles to access hard-to-reach clinical targets. The component tubes of these robots can be swapped prior to performing a task in order to customize the robot’s behavior and reachable workspace. Optimizing a robot’s design by appropriately selecting tube parameters can improve the robot’s effectiveness on a procedure-and patient-specific basis. In this paper, we present an algorithm that generates sets of concentric tube robot designs that can collectively maximize the reachable percentage of a given goal region in the human body. Our algorithm combines a search in the design space of a concentric tube robot using a global optimization method with a sampling-based motion planner in the robot’s configuration space in order to find sets of designs that enable motions to goal regions while avoiding contact with anatomical obstacles. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm in a simulated scenario based on lung anatomy. PMID:26951790

  13. Optimizing Design Parameters for Sets of Concentric Tube Robots using Sampling-based Motion Planning.

    PubMed

    Baykal, Cenk; Torres, Luis G; Alterovitz, Ron

    2015-09-28

    Concentric tube robots are tentacle-like medical robots that can bend around anatomical obstacles to access hard-to-reach clinical targets. The component tubes of these robots can be swapped prior to performing a task in order to customize the robot's behavior and reachable workspace. Optimizing a robot's design by appropriately selecting tube parameters can improve the robot's effectiveness on a procedure-and patient-specific basis. In this paper, we present an algorithm that generates sets of concentric tube robot designs that can collectively maximize the reachable percentage of a given goal region in the human body. Our algorithm combines a search in the design space of a concentric tube robot using a global optimization method with a sampling-based motion planner in the robot's configuration space in order to find sets of designs that enable motions to goal regions while avoiding contact with anatomical obstacles. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm in a simulated scenario based on lung anatomy.

  14. Estimation of genetic parameters and their sampling variances of quantitative traits in the type 2 modified augmented design

    We proposed a method to estimate the error variance among non-replicated genotypes, thus to estimate the genetic parameters by using replicated controls. We derived formulas to estimate sampling variances of the genetic parameters. Computer simulation indicated that the proposed methods of estimatin...

  15. Associations of rumen parameters with feed efficiency and sampling routine in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Lam, S; Munro, J C; Zhou, M; Guan, L L; Schenkel, F S; Steele, M A; Miller, S P; Montanholi, Y R

    2018-07-01

    Characterizing ruminal parameters in the context of sampling routine and feed efficiency is fundamental to understand the efficiency of feed utilization in the bovine. Therefore, we evaluated microbial and volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles, rumen papillae epithelial and stratum corneum thickness and rumen pH (RpH) and temperature (RT) in feedlot cattle. In all, 48 cattle (32 steers plus 16 bulls), fed a high moisture corn and haylage-based ration, underwent a productive performance test to determine residual feed intake (RFI) using feed intake, growth, BW and composition traits. Rumen fluid was collected, then RpH and RT logger were inserted 5.5±1 days before slaughter. At slaughter, the logger was recovered and rumen fluid and rumen tissue were sampled. The relative daily time spent in specific RpH and RT ranges were determined. Polynomial regression analysis was used to characterize RpH and RT circadian patterns. Animals were divided into efficient and inefficient groups based on RFI to compare productive performance and ruminal parameters. Efficient animals consumed 1.8 kg/day less dry matter than inefficient cattle (P⩽0.05) while achieving the same productive performance (P⩾0.10). Ruminal bacteria population was higher (P⩽0.05) (7.6×1011 v. 4.3×1011 copy number of 16S rRNA gene/ml rumen fluid) and methanogen population was lower (P⩽0.05) (2.3×109 v. 4.9×109 copy number of 16S rRNA gene/ml rumen fluid) in efficient compared with inefficient cattle at slaughter with no differences (P⩾0.10) between samples collected on-farm. No differences (P⩾0.10) in rumen fluid VFA were also observed between feed efficiency groups either on-farm or at slaughter. However, increased (P⩽0.05) acetate, and decreased (P⩽0.05) propionate, butyrate, valerate and caproate concentrations were observed at slaughter compared with on-farm. Efficient had increased (P⩽0.05) rumen epithelium thickness (136 v. 126 µm) compared with inefficient cattle. Efficient animals

  16. Effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on estimation accuracy of crop biophysical parameters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shezhou; Chen, Jing M; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan; Zeng, Hongcheng; Peng, Dailiang; Li, Dong

    2016-05-30

    Vegetation leaf area index (LAI), height, and aboveground biomass are key biophysical parameters. Corn is an important and globally distributed crop, and reliable estimations of these parameters are essential for corn yield forecasting, health monitoring and ecosystem modeling. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is considered an effective technology for estimating vegetation biophysical parameters. However, the estimation accuracies of these parameters are affected by multiple factors. In this study, we first estimated corn LAI, height and biomass (R2 = 0.80, 0.874 and 0.838, respectively) using the original LiDAR data (7.32 points/m2), and the results showed that LiDAR data could accurately estimate these biophysical parameters. Second, comprehensive research was conducted on the effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on the estimation accuracy of LAI, height and biomass. Our findings indicated that LiDAR point density had an important effect on the estimation accuracy for vegetation biophysical parameters, however, high point density did not always produce highly accurate estimates, and reduced point density could deliver reasonable estimation results. Furthermore, the results showed that sampling size and height threshold were additional key factors that affect the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Therefore, the optimal sampling size and the height threshold should be determined to improve the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Our results also implied that a higher LiDAR point density, larger sampling size and height threshold were required to obtain accurate corn LAI estimation when compared with height and biomass estimations. In general, our results provide valuable guidance for LiDAR data acquisition and estimation of vegetation biophysical parameters using LiDAR data.

  17. SU-E-T-295: Simultaneous Beam Sampling and Aperture Shape Optimization for Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT)

    SciT

    Zarepisheh, M; Li, R; Xing, L

    Purpose: Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital LINACs, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, (such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle) are optimized altogether. SPORT promises to deliver unprecedented radiation dose distributions efficiently, yet there does not exist any optimization algorithm to implement it. The purpose of this work is to propose an optimization algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: We build a mathematical model whose variables are beam angles (including non-coplanar and/or even nonisocentric beams) andmore » aperture shapes. To solve the resulting large scale optimization problem, we devise an exact, convergent and fast optimization algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques named column generation, gradient method, and pattern search. Column generation is used to find a good set of aperture shapes as an initial solution by adding apertures sequentially. Then we apply the gradient method to iteratively improve the current solution by reshaping the aperture shapes and updating the beam angles toward the gradient. Algorithm continues by pattern search method to explore the part of the search space that cannot be reached by the gradient method. Results: The proposed technique is applied to a series of patient cases and significantly improves the plan quality. In a head-and-neck case, for example, the left parotid gland mean-dose, brainstem max-dose, spinal cord max-dose, and mandible mean-dose are reduced by 10%, 7%, 24% and 12% respectively, compared to the conventional VMAT plan while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Conclusion: Combined use of column generation, gradient search and pattern search algorithms provide an effective way to optimize simultaneously the large collection of station parameters and significantly

  18. Parameter Estimation with Small Sample Size: A Higher-Order IRT Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Jimmy; Hong, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Sample size ranks as one of the most important factors that affect the item calibration task. However, due to practical concerns (e.g., item exposure) items are typically calibrated with much smaller samples than what is desired. To address the need for a more flexible framework that can be used in small sample item calibration, this article…

  19. Developing the Noncentrality Parameter for Calculating Group Sample Sizes in Heterogeneous Analysis of Variance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luh, Wei-Ming; Guo, Jiin-Huarng

    2011-01-01

    Sample size determination is an important issue in planning research. In the context of one-way fixed-effect analysis of variance, the conventional sample size formula cannot be applied for the heterogeneous variance cases. This study discusses the sample size requirement for the Welch test in the one-way fixed-effect analysis of variance with…

  20. Behavior of sensitivities in the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation: Implications for parameter estimation and sampling design

    Knopman, Debra S.; Voss, Clifford I.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of sensitivities has a significant impact on parameter estimation and sampling design for studies of solute transport in porous media. Physical insight into the behavior of sensitivities is offered through an analysis of analytically derived sensitivities for the one-dimensional form of the advection-dispersion equation. When parameters are estimated in regression models of one-dimensional transport, the spatial and temporal variability in sensitivities influences variance and covariance of parameter estimates. Several principles account for the observed influence of sensitivities on parameter uncertainty. (1) Information about a physical parameter may be most accurately gained at points in space and time with a high sensitivity to the parameter. (2) As the distance of observation points from the upstream boundary increases, maximum sensitivity to velocity during passage of the solute front increases and the consequent estimate of velocity tends to have lower variance. (3) The frequency of sampling must be “in phase” with the S shape of the dispersion sensitivity curve to yield the most information on dispersion. (4) The sensitivity to the dispersion coefficient is usually at least an order of magnitude less than the sensitivity to velocity. (5) The assumed probability distribution of random error in observations of solute concentration determines the form of the sensitivities. (6) If variance in random error in observations is large, trends in sensitivities of observation points may be obscured by noise and thus have limited value in predicting variance in parameter estimates among designs. (7) Designs that minimize the variance of one parameter may not necessarily minimize the variance of other parameters. (8) The time and space interval over which an observation point is sensitive to a given parameter depends on the actual values of the parameters in the underlying physical system.

  1. Realistic sampling of anisotropic correlogram parameters for conditional simulation of daily rainfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyasi-Agyei, Yeboah

    2018-01-01

    This paper has established a link between the spatial structure of radar rainfall, which more robustly describes the spatial structure, and gauge rainfall for improved daily rainfield simulation conditioned on the limited gauged data for regions with or without radar records. A two-dimensional anisotropic exponential function that has parameters of major and minor axes lengths, and direction, is used to describe the correlogram (spatial structure) of daily rainfall in the Gaussian domain. The link is a copula-based joint distribution of the radar-derived correlogram parameters that uses the gauge-derived correlogram parameters and maximum daily temperature as covariates of the Box-Cox power exponential margins and Gumbel copula. While the gauge-derived, radar-derived and the copula-derived correlogram parameters reproduced the mean estimates similarly using leave-one-out cross-validation of ordinary kriging, the gauge-derived parameters yielded higher standard deviation (SD) of the Gaussian quantile which reflects uncertainty in over 90% of cases. However, the distribution of the SD generated by the radar-derived and the copula-derived parameters could not be distinguished. For the validation case, the percentage of cases of higher SD by the gauge-derived parameter sets decreased to 81.2% and 86.6% for the non-calibration and the calibration periods, respectively. It has been observed that 1% reduction in the Gaussian quantile SD can cause over 39% reduction in the SD of the median rainfall estimate, actual reduction being dependent on the distribution of rainfall of the day. Hence the main advantage of using the most correct radar correlogram parameters is to reduce the uncertainty associated with conditional simulations that rely on SD through kriging.

  2. Phase Diagrams and the Non-Linear Dielectric Constant in the Landau-Type Potential Including the Linear-Quadratic Coupling between Order Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Makoto; Orihara, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Yoshihiro

    1997-04-01

    The phase diagrams in the Landau-type thermodynamic potential including the linear-quadratic coupling between order parameters p and q, i.e., qp2, which is applicable to the phase transition in the benzil, phospholipid bilayers, and the isotropic-nematic phase transition in liquid crystals, are studied. It was found that the phase diagram in the extreme case has one tricritical point c1, one critical end point e1, and two triple points t1 and t2. The linear and nonlinear dielectric constants in the potential are discussed in the case that the order parameter p is the polarization.

  3. Comparison of three nondestructive and contactless techniques for investigations of recombination parameters on an example of silicon samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrobak, Ł.; Maliński, M.

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents a comparison of three nondestructive and contactless techniques used for determination of recombination parameters of silicon samples. They are: photoacoustic method, modulated free carriers absorption method and the photothermal radiometry method. In the paper the experimental set-ups used for measurements of the recombination parameters in these methods as also theoretical models used for interpretation of obtained experimental data have been presented and described. The experimental results and their respective fits obtained with these nondestructive techniques are shown and discussed. The values of the recombination parameters obtained with these methods are also presented and compared. Main advantages and disadvantages of presented methods have been discussed.

  4. Inventory of forest resources (including water) by multi-level sampling. [nine northern Virginia coastal plain counties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, R. C.; Dana, R. W.; Roberts, E. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A stratified random sample using LANDSAT band 5 and 7 panchromatic prints resulted in estimates of water in counties with sampling errors less than + or - 9% (67% probability level). A forest inventory using a four band LANDSAT color composite resulted in estimates of forest area by counties that were within + or - 6.7% and + or - 3.7% respectively (67% probability level). Estimates of forest area for counties by computer assisted techniques were within + or - 21% of operational forest survey figures and for all counties the difference was only one percent. Correlations of airborne terrain reflectance measurements with LANDSAT radiance verified a linear atmospheric model with an additive (path radiance) term and multiplicative (transmittance) term. Coefficients of determination for 28 of the 32 modeling attempts, not adverseley affected by rain shower occurring between the times of LANDSAT passage and aircraft overflights, exceeded 0.83.

  5. Normal- and oblique-shock flow parameters in equilibrium air including attached-shock solutions for surfaces at angles of attack, sweep, and dihedral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Souders, S. W.

    1975-01-01

    Normal- and oblique-shock flow parameters for air in thermochemical equilibrium are tabulated as a function of shock angle for altitudes ranging from 15.24 km to 91.44 km in increments of 7.62 km at selected hypersonic speeds. Post-shock parameters tabulated include flow-deflection angle, velocity, Mach number, compressibility factor, isentropic exponent, viscosity, Reynolds number, entropy difference, and static pressure, temperature, density, and enthalpy ratios across the shock. A procedure is presented for obtaining oblique-shock flow properties in equilibrium air on surfaces at various angles of attack, sweep, and dihedral by use of the two-dimensional tabulations. Plots of the flow parameters against flow-deflection angle are presented at altitudes of 30.48, 60.96, and 91.44 km for various stream velocities.

  6. Further comments on sensitivities, parameter estimation, and sampling design in one-dimensional analysis of solute transport in porous media

    Knopman, Debra S.; Voss, Clifford I.

    1988-01-01

    Sensitivities of solute concentration to parameters associated with first-order chemical decay, boundary conditions, initial conditions, and multilayer transport are examined in one-dimensional analytical models of transient solute transport in porous media. A sensitivity is a change in solute concentration resulting from a change in a model parameter. Sensitivity analysis is important because minimum information required in regression on chemical data for the estimation of model parameters by regression is expressed in terms of sensitivities. Nonlinear regression models of solute transport were tested on sets of noiseless observations from known models that exceeded the minimum sensitivity information requirements. Results demonstrate that the regression models consistently converged to the correct parameters when the initial sets of parameter values substantially deviated from the correct parameters. On the basis of the sensitivity analysis, several statements may be made about design of sampling for parameter estimation for the models examined: (1) estimation of parameters associated with solute transport in the individual layers of a multilayer system is possible even when solute concentrations in the individual layers are mixed in an observation well; (2) when estimating parameters in a decaying upstream boundary condition, observations are best made late in the passage of the front near a time chosen by adding the inverse of an hypothesized value of the source decay parameter to the estimated mean travel time at a given downstream location; (3) estimation of a first-order chemical decay parameter requires observations to be made late in the passage of the front, preferably near a location corresponding to a travel time of √2 times the half-life of the solute; and (4) estimation of a parameter relating to spatial variability in an initial condition requires observations to be made early in time relative to passage of the solute front.

  7. Sampling schemes and parameter estimation for nonlinear Bernoulli-Gaussian sparse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudineau, Mégane; Carfantan, Hervé; Bourguignon, Sébastien; Bazot, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We address the sparse approximation problem in the case where the data are approximated by the linear combination of a small number of elementary signals, each of these signals depending non-linearly on additional parameters. Sparsity is explicitly expressed through a Bernoulli-Gaussian hierarchical model in a Bayesian framework. Posterior mean estimates are computed using Markov Chain Monte-Carlo algorithms. We generalize the partially marginalized Gibbs sampler proposed in the linear case in [1], and build an hybrid Hastings-within-Gibbs algorithm in order to account for the nonlinear parameters. All model parameters are then estimated in an unsupervised procedure. The resulting method is evaluated on a sparse spectral analysis problem. It is shown to converge more efficiently than the classical joint estimation procedure, with only a slight increase of the computational cost per iteration, consequently reducing the global cost of the estimation procedure.

  8. Variability of morphometric parameters of human trabecular tissue from coxo-arthritis and osteoporotic samples.

    PubMed

    Marinozzi, Franco; Marinozzi, Andrea; Bini, Fabiano; Zuppante, Francesca; Pecci, Raffaella; Bedini, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    Morphometric and architectural bone parameters change in diseases such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. The mechanical strength of bone is primarily influenced by bone quantity and quality. Bone quality is defined by parameters such as trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, trabecular density and degree of anisotropy that describe the micro-architectural structure of bone. Recently, many studies have validated microtomography as a valuable investigative technique to assess bone morphometry, thanks to micro-CT non-destructive, non-invasive and reliability features, in comparison to traditional techniques such as histology. The aim of this study is the analysis by micro-computed tomography of six specimens, extracted from patients affected by osteoarthritis and osteoporosis, in order to observe the tridimensional structure and calculate several morphometric parameters.

  9. Identification of control parameters for the sulfur gas storability with bag sampling methods

    Air samples containing sulfur compounds are often collected and stored in sample bags prior to analyses. The storage stability of six gaseous sulfur compounds (H2S, CH3SH, DMS, CS2, DMDS and SO2) was compared between two different bag materials (polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) and polyester aluminum (PEA))...

  10. Map showing locations and statistical parameters of beach and offshore sand samples, Tutuila Island, American Samoa

    Dingler, J.R.; Carlson, D.V.; Sallenger, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    In April 1985, sand samples were collected from many of the beaches on Tutuila Island, American Samoa, and in July 1985, three bays were surveyed using side-scan sonar and shallow seismic profiling. During that second trip, scuba divers collected sand samples from the surveyed areas. Dingler and others (1986) describes the study; this report presents the grain-size and composition data for the onshore and offshore sand samples. Locations of the onshore samples are plotted on the map of the island, which is reproduced from Normark and others (1985); locations of most of the offshore samples and side-scan sonar interpretations made during the study are plotted on enlargements (A and B, respectively) of Fagaitua and Nua-seetaga Bays. Lam Yuen (1981), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (1980), and Sea Engineering Services Inc. (1980) provide additional information pertaining to the island's beaches.

  11. Exploring Replica-Exchange Wang-Landau sampling in higher-dimensional parameter space

    SciT

    Valentim, Alexandra; Rocha, Julio C. S.; Tsai, Shan-Ho

    We considered a higher-dimensional extension for the replica-exchange Wang-Landau algorithm to perform a random walk in the energy and magnetization space of the two-dimensional Ising model. This hybrid scheme combines the advantages of Wang-Landau and Replica-Exchange algorithms, and the one-dimensional version of this approach has been shown to be very efficient and to scale well, up to several thousands of computing cores. This approach allows us to split the parameter space of the system to be simulated into several pieces and still perform a random walk over the entire parameter range, ensuring the ergodicity of the simulation. Previous work, inmore » which a similar scheme of parallel simulation was implemented without using replica exchange and with a different way to combine the result from the pieces, led to discontinuities in the final density of states over the entire range of parameters. From our simulations, it appears that the replica-exchange Wang-Landau algorithm is able to overcome this diculty, allowing exploration of higher parameter phase space by keeping track of the joint density of states.« less

  12. Item Parameter Invariance of the Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test across Male and Female Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immekus, Jason C.; Maller, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    The Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test (KAIT[TM]) is an individually administered test of intelligence for individuals ranging in age from 11 to 85+ years. The item response theory-likelihood ratio procedure, based on the two-parameter logistic model, was used to detect differential item functioning (DIF) in the KAIT across males and…

  13. What predicts inattention in adolescents? An experience-sampling study comparing chronotype, subjective, and objective sleep parameters.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Timo; Krkovic, Katarina; Lincoln, Tania M

    2017-10-01

    Many adolescents sleep insufficiently, which may negatively affect their functioning during the day. To improve sleep interventions, we need a better understanding of the specific sleep-related parameters that predict poor functioning. We investigated to which extent subjective and objective parameters of sleep in the preceding night (state parameters) and the trait variable chronotype predict daytime inattention as an indicator of poor functioning. We conducted an experience-sampling study over one week with 61 adolescents (30 girls, 31 boys; mean age = 15.5 years, standard deviation = 1.1 years). Participants rated their inattention two times each day (morning, afternoon) on a smartphone. Subjective sleep parameters (feeling rested, positive affect upon awakening) were assessed each morning on the smartphone. Objective sleep parameters (total sleep time, sleep efficiency, wake after sleep onset) were assessed with a permanently worn actigraph. Chronotype was assessed with a self-rated questionnaire at baseline. We tested the effect of subjective and objective state parameters of sleep on daytime inattention, using multilevel multiple regressions. Then, we tested whether the putative effect of the trait parameter chronotype on inattention is mediated through state sleep parameters, again using multilevel regressions. We found that short sleep time, but no other state sleep parameter, predicted inattention to a small effect. As expected, the trait parameter chronotype also predicted inattention: morningness was associated with less inattention. However, this association was not mediated by state sleep parameters. Our results indicate that short sleep time causes inattention in adolescents. Extended sleep time might thus alleviate inattention to some extent. However, it cannot alleviate the effect of being an 'owl'. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Description of Workshop Series for Precollege Teachers on Women and Gender, Including Topics Covered, Readings Used, and Sample Handouts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Anne

    A 2-year curriculum transformation project for 12 humanities teachers from seven independent schools sought to help pre-college teachers integrate new information and insights based on women's studies and gender scholarship into their teaching. Topics covered during the workshops included the history of concern with women and gender; engenderment…

  15. Comparison of semen parameters in samples collected by masturbation at a clinic and at home.

    PubMed

    Elzanaty, Saad; Malm, Johan

    2008-06-01

    To investigate differences in semen quality between samples collected by masturbation at a clinic and at home. Cross-sectional study. Fertility center. Three hundred seventy-nine men assessed for infertility. None. Semen was analyzed according to World Health Organization guidelines. Seminal markers of epididymal (neutral alpha-glucosidase), prostatic (prostate-specific antigen and zinc), and seminal vesicle (fructose) function were measured. Two patient groups were defined according to sample collection location: at a clinic (n = 273) or at home (n = 106). Compared with clinic-collected semen, home-collected samples had statistically significantly higher values for sperm concentration, total sperm count, rapid progressive motility, and total count of progressive motility. Semen volume, proportion of normal sperm morphology, neutral alpha-glucosidase, prostate-specific antigen, zinc, and fructose did not differ significantly between groups. An abnormal sperm concentration (<20 x 10(6)/mL) was seen in statistically significantly fewer of the samples obtained at home (19/106, 18%) than at the clinic (81/273, 30%), and the same applied to proportions of samples with abnormal (< 25%) rapid progressive motility (68/106 [64%] and 205/273 [75%], respectively). The present results demonstrate superior semen quality in samples collected by masturbation at home compared with at a clinic. This should be taken into consideration in infertility investigations.

  16. Statistical Analysis of a Large Sample Size Pyroshock Test Data Set Including Post Flight Data Assessment. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra spacecraft was launched on an Atlas IIAS launch vehicle on its mission to observe planet Earth in late 1999. Prior to launch, the new design of the spacecraft's pyroshock separation system was characterized by a series of 13 separation ground tests. The analysis methods used to evaluate this unusually large amount of shock data will be discussed in this paper, with particular emphasis on population distributions and finding statistically significant families of data, leading to an overall shock separation interface level. The wealth of ground test data also allowed a derivation of a Mission Assurance level for the flight. All of the flight shock measurements were below the EOS Terra Mission Assurance level thus contributing to the overall success of the EOS Terra mission. The effectiveness of the statistical methodology for characterizing the shock interface level and for developing a flight Mission Assurance level from a large sample size of shock data is demonstrated in this paper.

  17. Cost-constrained optimal sampling for system identification in pharmacokinetics applications with population priors and nuisance parameters.

    PubMed

    Sorzano, Carlos Oscars S; Pérez-De-La-Cruz Moreno, Maria Angeles; Burguet-Castell, Jordi; Montejo, Consuelo; Ros, Antonio Aguilar

    2015-06-01

    Pharmacokinetics (PK) applications can be seen as a special case of nonlinear, causal systems with memory. There are cases in which prior knowledge exists about the distribution of the system parameters in a population. However, for a specific patient in a clinical setting, we need to determine her system parameters so that the therapy can be personalized. This system identification is performed many times by measuring drug concentrations in plasma. The objective of this work is to provide an irregular sampling strategy that minimizes the uncertainty about the system parameters with a fixed amount of samples (cost constrained). We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the average Fisher's information matrix associated to the PK problem, and then estimate the sampling points that minimize the maximum uncertainty associated to system parameters (a minimax criterion). The minimization is performed employing a genetic algorithm. We show that such a sampling scheme can be designed in a way that is adapted to a particular patient and that it can accommodate any dosing regimen as well as it allows flexible therapeutic strategies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. Sampling of Stochastic Input Parameters for Rockfall Calculations and for Structural Response Calculations Under Vibratory Ground Motion

    SciT

    M. Gross

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to define the sampled values of stochastic (random) input parameters for (1) rockfall calculations in the lithophysal and nonlithophysal zones under vibratory ground motions, and (2) structural response calculations for the drip shield and waste package under vibratory ground motions. This analysis supplies: (1) Sampled values of ground motion time history and synthetic fracture pattern for analysis of rockfall in emplacement drifts in nonlithophysal rock (Section 6.3 of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'', BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]); (2) Sampled values of ground motion time history and rock mechanical properties category for analysis of rockfall inmore » emplacement drifts in lithophysal rock (Section 6.4 of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'', BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]); (3) Sampled values of ground motion time history and metal to metal and metal to rock friction coefficient for analysis of waste package and drip shield damage to vibratory motion in ''Structural Calculations of Waste Package Exposed to Vibratory Ground Motion'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167083]) and in ''Structural Calculations of Drip Shield Exposed to Vibratory Ground Motion'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163425]). The sampled values are indices representing the number of ground motion time histories, number of fracture patterns and rock mass properties categories. These indices are translated into actual values within the respective analysis and model reports or calculations. This report identifies the uncertain parameters and documents the sampled values for these parameters. The sampled values are determined by GoldSim V6.04.007 [DIRS 151202] calculations using appropriate distribution types and parameter ranges. No software development or model development was required for these calculations. The calculation of the sampled values allows parameter uncertainty to be incorporated into the rockfall and structural response calculations that support development of the seismic scenario for

  19. [Identification of Systemic Contaminations with Legionella Spec. in Drinking Water Plumbing Systems: Sampling Strategies and Corresponding Parameters].

    PubMed

    Völker, S; Schreiber, C; Müller, H; Zacharias, N; Kistemann, T

    2017-05-01

    After the amendment of the Drinking Water Ordinance in 2011, the requirements for the hygienic-microbiological monitoring of drinking water installations have increased significantly. In the BMBF-funded project "Biofilm Management" (2010-2014), we examined the extent to which established sampling strategies in practice can uncover drinking water plumbing systems systemically colonized with Legionella. Moreover, we investigated additional parameters that might be suitable for detecting systemic contaminations. We subjected the drinking water plumbing systems of 8 buildings with known microbial contamination (Legionella) to an intensive hygienic-microbiological sampling with high spatial and temporal resolution. A total of 626 drinking hot water samples were analyzed with classical culture-based methods. In addition, comprehensive hygienic observations were conducted in each building and qualitative interviews with operators and users were applied. Collected tap-specific parameters were quantitatively analyzed by means of sensitivity and accuracy calculations. The systemic presence of Legionella in drinking water plumbing systems has a high spatial and temporal variability. Established sampling strategies were only partially suitable to detect long-term Legionella contaminations in practice. In particular, the sampling of hot water at the calorifier and circulation re-entrance showed little significance in terms of contamination events. To detect the systemic presence of Legionella,the parameters stagnation (qualitatively assessed) and temperature (compliance with the 5K-rule) showed better results. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Including Online-Recruited Seeds: A Respondent-Driven Sample of Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    PubMed

    Lachowsky, Nathan John; Lal, Allan; Forrest, Jamie I; Card, Kiffer George; Cui, Zishan; Sereda, Paul; Rich, Ashleigh; Raymond, Henry Fisher; Roth, Eric A; Moore, David M; Hogg, Robert S

    2016-03-15

    Technology has changed the way men who have sex with men (MSM) seek sex and socialize, which may impact the implementation of respondent-driven sampling (RDS) among this population. Initial participants (also known as seeds) are a critical consideration in RDS because they begin the recruitment chains. However, little information is available on how the online-recruited seeds may effect RDS implementation. The objectives of this study were to compare (1) online-recruited versus offline-recruited seeds and (2) subsequent recruitment chains of online-recruited versus offline-recruited seeds. Between 2012 and 2014, we recruited MSM using RDS in Vancouver, Canada. RDS weights were used with logistic regression to address each objective. A total of 119 seeds were used, 85 of whom were online-recruited seeds, to recruit an additional 600 MSM. Compared with offline-recruited seeds, online-recruited seeds were less likely to be HIV-positive (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13-0.88), to have attended a gay community group (AOR 0.33, 95% CI 0.12-0.90), and to feel gay community involvement was "very important" (AOR 0.16, 95% CI 0.03-0.93). Online-recruited seeds were more likely to ask a sexual partner's HIV status always versus <50% of the time (AOR 5.21, 95% CI 1.17-23.23), to have watched the Pride parade (AOR 6.30, 95% CI 1.69-23.45), and to have sought sex online (AOR 4.29, 95% CI 1.53-12-12.05). Further, compared with recruitment chains started by offline-recruited seeds, recruits from chains started by online-recruited seeds (283/600, 47.2%) were less likely to be HIV-positive (AOR 0.25, 95% CI 0.16-0.40), to report "versatile" versus "bottom" sexual position preference (AOR 0.56, 95% CI 0.35-0.88), and to be in a relationship lasting >1 year (AOR 1.65, 95% CI 1.06-2.56). Recruits of online seeds were more likely to be out as gay for longer (eg, 11-21 vs 1-4 years, AOR 2.22, 95% CI 1.27-3.88) and have fewer Facebook friends (eg, 201-500 vs >500, AOR 1.69, 95% CI 1.02-2.80). Online

  1. Including Online-Recruited Seeds: A Respondent-Driven Sample of Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Lachowsky, Nathan John; Lal, Allan; Forrest, Jamie I; Card, Kiffer George; Cui, Zishan; Sereda, Paul; Rich, Ashleigh; Raymond, Henry Fisher; Roth, Eric A; Moore, David M

    2016-01-01

    Background Technology has changed the way men who have sex with men (MSM) seek sex and socialize, which may impact the implementation of respondent-driven sampling (RDS) among this population. Initial participants (also known as seeds) are a critical consideration in RDS because they begin the recruitment chains. However, little information is available on how the online-recruited seeds may effect RDS implementation. Objective The objectives of this study were to compare (1) online-recruited versus offline-recruited seeds and (2) subsequent recruitment chains of online-recruited versus offline-recruited seeds. Methods Between 2012 and 2014, we recruited MSM using RDS in Vancouver, Canada. RDS weights were used with logistic regression to address each objective. Results A total of 119 seeds were used, 85 of whom were online-recruited seeds, to recruit an additional 600 MSM. Compared with offline-recruited seeds, online-recruited seeds were less likely to be HIV-positive (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13-0.88), to have attended a gay community group (AOR 0.33, 95% CI 0.12-0.90), and to feel gay community involvement was “very important” (AOR 0.16, 95% CI 0.03-0.93). Online-recruited seeds were more likely to ask a sexual partner’s HIV status always versus <50% of the time (AOR 5.21, 95% CI 1.17-23.23), to have watched the Pride parade (AOR 6.30, 95% CI 1.69-23.45), and to have sought sex online (AOR 4.29, 95% CI 1.53-12-12.05). Further, compared with recruitment chains started by offline-recruited seeds, recruits from chains started by online-recruited seeds (283/600, 47.2%) were less likely to be HIV-positive (AOR 0.25, 95% CI 0.16-0.40), to report “versatile” versus “bottom” sexual position preference (AOR 0.56, 95% CI 0.35-0.88), and to be in a relationship lasting >1 year (AOR 1.65, 95% CI 1.06-2.56). Recruits of online seeds were more likely to be out as gay for longer (eg, 11-21 vs 1-4 years, AOR 2.22, 95% CI 1.27-3.88) and have fewer Facebook friends (eg

  2. How Big Is Big Enough? Sample Size Requirements for CAST Item Parameter Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuah, Siang Chee; Drasgow, Fritz; Luecht, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive tests offer the advantages of reduced test length and increased accuracy in ability estimation. However, adaptive tests require large pools of precalibrated items. This study looks at the development of an item pool for 1 type of adaptive administration: the computer-adaptive sequential test. An important issue is the sample size required…

  3. Conditioning and Robustness of RNA Boltzmann Sampling under Thermodynamic Parameter Perturbations.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Emily; Murrugarra, David; Heitsch, Christine

    2017-07-25

    Understanding how RNA secondary structure prediction methods depend on the underlying nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model remains a fundamental challenge in the field. Minimum free energy (MFE) predictions are known to be "ill conditioned" in that small changes to the thermodynamic model can result in significantly different optimal structures. Hence, the best practice is now to sample from the Boltzmann distribution, which generates a set of suboptimal structures. Although the structural signal of this Boltzmann sample is known to be robust to stochastic noise, the conditioning and robustness under thermodynamic perturbations have yet to be addressed. We present here a mathematically rigorous model for conditioning inspired by numerical analysis, and also a biologically inspired definition for robustness under thermodynamic perturbation. We demonstrate the strong correlation between conditioning and robustness and use its tight relationship to define quantitative thresholds for well versus ill conditioning. These resulting thresholds demonstrate that the majority of the sequences are at least sample robust, which verifies the assumption of sampling's improved conditioning over the MFE prediction. Furthermore, because we find no correlation between conditioning and MFE accuracy, the presence of both well- and ill-conditioned sequences indicates the continued need for both thermodynamic model refinements and alternate RNA structure prediction methods beyond the physics-based ones. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. An algebraic aspect of Pareto mixture parameter estimation using censored sample: A Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Sharif, Kashif; Fahmi, Aliya

    2018-04-27

    Applications of Pareto distribution are common in reliability, survival and financial studies. In this paper, A Pareto mixture distribution is considered to model a heterogeneous population comprising of two subgroups. Each of two subgroups is characterized by the same functional form with unknown distinct shape and scale parameters. Bayes estimators have been derived using flat and conjugate priors using squared error loss function. Standard errors have also been derived for the Bayes estimators. An interesting feature of this study is the preparation of components of Fisher Information matrix.

  5. Comparison of sampling procedures and microbiological and non-microbiological parameters to evaluate cleaning and disinfection in broiler houses.

    PubMed

    Luyckx, K; Dewulf, J; Van Weyenberg, S; Herman, L; Zoons, J; Vervaet, E; Heyndrickx, M; De Reu, K

    2015-04-01

    Cleaning and disinfection of the broiler stable environment is an essential part of farm hygiene management. Adequate cleaning and disinfection is essential for prevention and control of animal diseases and zoonoses. The goal of this study was to shed light on the dynamics of microbiological and non-microbiological parameters during the successive steps of cleaning and disinfection and to select the most suitable sampling methods and parameters to evaluate cleaning and disinfection in broiler houses. The effectiveness of cleaning and disinfection protocols was measured in six broiler houses on two farms through visual inspection, adenosine triphosphate hygiene monitoring and microbiological analyses. Samples were taken at three time points: 1) before cleaning, 2) after cleaning, and 3) after disinfection. Before cleaning and after disinfection, air samples were taken in addition to agar contact plates and swab samples taken from various sampling points for enumeration of total aerobic flora, Enterococcus spp., and Escherichia coli and the detection of E. coli and Salmonella. After cleaning, air samples, swab samples, and adenosine triphosphate swabs were taken and a visual score was also assigned for each sampling point. The mean total aerobic flora determined by swab samples decreased from 7.7±1.4 to 5.7±1.2 log CFU/625 cm2 after cleaning and to 4.2±1.6 log CFU/625 cm2 after disinfection. Agar contact plates were used as the standard for evaluating cleaning and disinfection, but in this study they were found to be less suitable than swabs for enumeration. In addition to measuring total aerobic flora, Enterococcus spp. seemed to be a better hygiene indicator to evaluate cleaning and disinfection protocols than E. coli. All stables were Salmonella negative, but the detection of its indicator organism E. coli provided additional information for evaluating cleaning and disinfection protocols. Adenosine triphosphate analyses gave additional information about the

  6. Parameter extraction of coupling-of-modes equations including coupling between two surface acoustic waves on SiO2/Cu/LiNbO3 structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yulin; Bao, Jingfu; Li, Xinyi; Zhang, Benfeng; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2018-07-01

    This paper describes extraction of parameters of an extended coupling-of-modes (COM) model including coupling between Rayleigh and shear-horizontal (SH) surface acoustic waves (SAW) on the SiO2-overlay/Cu-grating/LiNbO3-substrate structure. First, dispersion characteristics of two SAWs are calculated by the finite element method (FEM), and are fitted with those given by the extended COM. Then variation of COM parameters is expressed in polynomials in terms of the SiO2 and Cu thicknesses and the rotation angle Θ of LiNbO3. Then it is shown how the optimal Θ giving the SH SAW suppression changes with the thicknesses. The result agrees well with that obtained directly by FEM. It is also shown the optimal Θ changes abruptly at certain Cu thickness, and is due to decoupling between two SAW modes.

  7. The effect of the sample size and location on contrast ultrasound measurement of perfusion parameters.

    PubMed

    Leinonen, Merja R; Raekallio, Marja R; Vainio, Outi M; Ruohoniemi, Mirja O; O'Brien, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound can be used to quantify tissue perfusion based on region of interest (ROI) analysis. The effect of the location and size of the ROI on the obtained perfusion parameters has been described in phantom, ex vivo and in vivo studies. We assessed the effects of location and size of the ROI on perfusion parameters in the renal cortex of 10 healthy, anesthetized cats using Definity contrast-enhanced ultrasound to estimate the importance of the ROI on quantification of tissue perfusion with contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Three separate sets of ROIs were placed in the renal cortex, varying in location, size or depth. There was a significant inverse association between increased depth or increased size of the ROI and peak intensity (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in the peak intensity between the ROIs placed in a row in the near field cortex. There was no significant difference in the ROIs with regard to arrival time, time to peak intensity and wash-in rate. When comparing two different ROIs in a patient with focal lesions, such as suspected neoplasia or infarction, the ROIs should always be placed at same depth and be as similar in size as possible.

  8. Comparison of sampling methodologies and estimation of population parameters for a temporary fish ectoparasite.

    PubMed

    Artim, J M; Sikkel, P C

    2016-08-01

    Characterizing spatio-temporal variation in the density of organisms in a community is a crucial part of ecological study. However, doing so for small, motile, cryptic species presents multiple challenges, especially where multiple life history stages are involved. Gnathiid isopods are ecologically important marine ectoparasites, micropredators that live in substrate for most of their lives, emerging only once during each juvenile stage to feed on fish blood. Many gnathiid species are nocturnal and most have distinct substrate preferences. Studies of gnathiid use of habitat, exploitation of hosts, and population dynamics have used various trap designs to estimate rates of gnathiid emergence, study sensory ecology, and identify host susceptibility. In the studies reported here, we compare and contrast the performance of emergence, fish-baited and light trap designs, outline the key features of these traps, and determine some life cycle parameters derived from trap counts for the Eastern Caribbean coral-reef gnathiid, Gnathia marleyi. We also used counts from large emergence traps and light traps to estimate additional life cycle parameters, emergence rates, and total gnathiid density on substrate, and to calibrate the light trap design to provide estimates of rate of emergence and total gnathiid density in habitat not amenable to emergence trap deployment.

  9. Bisphenol A and other bisphenol analogues including BPS and BPF in surface water samples from Japan, China, Korea and India.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Eriko; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Taniyasu, Sachi; Lam, James; Lam, Paul K S; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Jeong, Yunsun; Kannan, Pranav; Achyuthan, Hema; Munuswamy, Natesan; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-12-01

    Concentrations of eight bisphenol analogues (BPs) including BPA, BPS, and BPF were determined in surface waters collected from select rivers in Japan, Korea, China, and India. BPA was found at a concentration in the range of several tens to several hundreds of nanograms per liter in most of the rivers surveyed and some of the highest concentrations (54-1950 ng/L) were found in rivers in Chennai, India. Concentrations of BPF were one to two orders of magnitude higher than those of BPA in river and sea waters collected from Japan, Korea and China, which suggested that BPF is a major contaminant in surface waters in several Southeast Asian countries. BPF concentrations as high as 2850 ng/L were found in the Tamagawa River in Japan. The flux of BPs through riverine discharges into Tokyo Bay was calculated to be approximately 5.5 t per year. Based on the flux estimates and the mass of BPF found in water column and sediment in Tokyo Bay, it was found that BPF degrades faster than BPA in the environment. Elevated concentrations of BPF found in surface waters suggest the need for further studies to determine the fate and toxicity of this compound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preferences for Depression Treatment Including Internet-Based Interventions: Results From a Large Sample of Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dorow, Marie; Löbner, Margrit; Pabst, Alexander; Stein, Janine; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.

    2018-01-01

    Background: To date, little is known about treatment preferences for depression concerning new media. This study aims to (1) investigate treatment preferences for depression including internet-based interventions and (2) examine subgroup differences concerning age, gender and severity of depression as well as patient-related factors associated with treatment preferences. Methods: Data were derived from the baseline assessment of the @ktiv-trial. Depression treatment preferences were assessed from n = 641 primary care patients with mild to moderate depression regarding the following treatments: medication, psychotherapy, combined treatment, alternative treatment, talking to friends and family, exercise, self-help literature, and internet-based interventions. Depression severity was specified by GPs according to ICD-10 criteria. Ordinal logistic regression models were conducted to identify associated factors of treatment preferences. Results: Patients had a mean age of 43.9 years (SD = 13.8) and more than two thirds (68.6%) were female. About 43% of patients had mild depression while 57% were diagnosed with moderate depression. The majority of patients reported strong preferences for psychotherapy, talking to friends and family, and exercise. About one in five patients was very likely to consider internet-based interventions in case of depression. Younger patients expressed significantly stronger treatment preferences for psychotherapy and internet-based interventions than older patients. The most salient factors associated with treatment preferences were the patients' education and perceived self-efficacy. Conclusions: Patients with depression report individually different treatment preferences.Our results underline the importance of shared decision-making within primary care. Future studies should investigate treatment preferences for different types of internet-based interventions. PMID:29867605

  11. Optimization of sampling parameters for collection and preconcentration of alveolar air by needle traps.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Wojciech; Filipiak, Anna; Ager, Clemens; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Amann, Anton

    2012-06-01

    The approach for breath-VOCs' collection and preconcentration by applying needle traps was developed and optimized. The alveolar air was collected from only a few exhalations under visual control of expired CO(2) into a large gas-tight glass syringe and then warmed up to 45 °C for a short time to avoid condensation. Subsequently, a specially constructed sampling device equipped with Bronkhorst® electronic flow controllers was used for automated adsorption. This sampling device allows time-saving collection of expired/inspired air in parallel onto three different needle traps as well as improvement of sensitivity and reproducibility of NT-GC-MS analysis by collection of relatively large (up to 150 ml) volume of exhaled breath. It was shown that the collection of alveolar air derived from only a few exhalations into a large syringe followed by automated adsorption on needle traps yields better results than manual sorption by up/down cycles with a 1 ml syringe, mostly due to avoided condensation and electronically controlled stable sample flow rate. The optimal profile and composition of needle traps consists of 2 cm Carbopack X and 1 cm Carboxen 1000, allowing highly efficient VOCs' enrichment, while injection by a fast expansive flow technique requires no modifications in instrumentation and fully automated GC-MS analysis can be performed with a commercially available autosampler. This optimized analytical procedure considerably facilitates the collection and enrichment of alveolar air, and is therefore suitable for application at the bedside of critically ill patients in an intensive care unit. Due to its simplicity it can replace the time-consuming sampling of sufficient breath volume by numerous up/down cycles with a 1 ml syringe.

  12. Arterial waveform parameters in a large, population-based sample of adults: relationships with ethnicity and lifestyle factors

    PubMed Central

    Sluyter, J D; Hughes, A D; Thom, S A McG; Lowe, A; Camargo Jr, C A; Hametner, B; Wassertheurer, S; Parker, K H; Scragg, R K R

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about how aortic waveform parameters vary with ethnicity and lifestyle factors. We investigated these issues in a large, population-based sample. We carried out a cross-sectional analysis of 4798 men and women, aged 50–84 years from Auckland, New Zealand. Participants were 3961 European, 321 Pacific, 266 Maori and 250 South Asian people. We assessed modifiable lifestyle factors via questionnaires, and measured body mass index (BMI) and brachial blood pressure (BP). Suprasystolic oscillometry was used to derive aortic pressure, from which several haemodynamic parameters were calculated. Heavy alcohol consumption and BMI were positively related to most waveform parameters. Current smokers had higher levels of aortic augmentation index than non-smokers (difference=3.7%, P<0.0001). Aortic waveform parameters, controlling for demographics, antihypertensives, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), were higher in non-Europeans than in Europeans. Further adjustment for brachial BP or lifestyle factors (particularly BMI) reduced many differences but several remained. Despite even further adjustment for mean arterial pressure, pulse rate, height and total:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, compared with Europeans, South Asians had higher levels of all measured aortic waveform parameters (for example, for backward pressure amplitude: β=1.5 mm Hg; P<0.0001), whereas Pacific people had 9% higher loge (excess pressure integral) (P<0.0001). In conclusion, aortic waveform parameters varied with ethnicity in line with the greater prevalence of CVD among non-white populations. Generally, this was true even after accounting for brachial BP, suggesting that waveform parameters may have increased usefulness in capturing ethnic variations in cardiovascular risk. Heavy alcohol consumption, smoking and especially BMI may partially contribute to elevated levels of these parameters. PMID:28004730

  13. Arterial waveform parameters in a large, population-based sample of adults: relationships with ethnicity and lifestyle factors.

    PubMed

    Sluyter, J D; Hughes, A D; Thom, S A McG; Lowe, A; Camargo, C A; Hametner, B; Wassertheurer, S; Parker, K H; Scragg, R K R

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about how aortic waveform parameters vary with ethnicity and lifestyle factors. We investigated these issues in a large, population-based sample. We carried out a cross-sectional analysis of 4798 men and women, aged 50-84 years from Auckland, New Zealand. Participants were 3961 European, 321 Pacific, 266 Maori and 250 South Asian people. We assessed modifiable lifestyle factors via questionnaires, and measured body mass index (BMI) and brachial blood pressure (BP). Suprasystolic oscillometry was used to derive aortic pressure, from which several haemodynamic parameters were calculated. Heavy alcohol consumption and BMI were positively related to most waveform parameters. Current smokers had higher levels of aortic augmentation index than non-smokers (difference=3.7%, P<0.0001). Aortic waveform parameters, controlling for demographics, antihypertensives, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), were higher in non-Europeans than in Europeans. Further adjustment for brachial BP or lifestyle factors (particularly BMI) reduced many differences but several remained. Despite even further adjustment for mean arterial pressure, pulse rate, height and total:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, compared with Europeans, South Asians had higher levels of all measured aortic waveform parameters (for example, for backward pressure amplitude: β=1.5 mm Hg; P<0.0001), whereas Pacific people had 9% higher log e (excess pressure integral) (P<0.0001). In conclusion, aortic waveform parameters varied with ethnicity in line with the greater prevalence of CVD among non-white populations. Generally, this was true even after accounting for brachial BP, suggesting that waveform parameters may have increased usefulness in capturing ethnic variations in cardiovascular risk. Heavy alcohol consumption, smoking and especially BMI may partially contribute to elevated levels of these parameters.

  14. Estimating Divergence Parameters With Small Samples From a Large Number of Loci

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Hey, Jody

    2010-01-01

    Most methods for studying divergence with gene flow rely upon data from many individuals at few loci. Such data can be useful for inferring recent population history but they are unlikely to contain sufficient information about older events. However, the growing availability of genome sequences suggests a different kind of sampling scheme, one that may be more suited to studying relatively ancient divergence. Data sets extracted from whole-genome alignments may represent very few individuals but contain a very large number of loci. To take advantage of such data we developed a new maximum-likelihood method for genomic data under the isolation-with-migration model. Unlike many coalescent-based likelihood methods, our method does not rely on Monte Carlo sampling of genealogies, but rather provides a precise calculation of the likelihood by numerical integration over all genealogies. We demonstrate that the method works well on simulated data sets. We also consider two models for accommodating mutation rate variation among loci and find that the model that treats mutation rates as random variables leads to better estimates. We applied the method to the divergence of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans and detected a low, but statistically significant, signal of gene flow from D. simulans to D. melanogaster. PMID:19917765

  15. Accuracy in parameter estimation for targeted effects in structural equation modeling: sample size planning for narrow confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    Lai, Keke; Kelley, Ken

    2011-06-01

    In addition to evaluating a structural equation model (SEM) as a whole, often the model parameters are of interest and confidence intervals for those parameters are formed. Given a model with a good overall fit, it is entirely possible for the targeted effects of interest to have very wide confidence intervals, thus giving little information about the magnitude of the population targeted effects. With the goal of obtaining sufficiently narrow confidence intervals for the model parameters of interest, sample size planning methods for SEM are developed from the accuracy in parameter estimation approach. One method plans for the sample size so that the expected confidence interval width is sufficiently narrow. An extended procedure ensures that the obtained confidence interval will be no wider than desired, with some specified degree of assurance. A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted that verified the effectiveness of the procedures in realistic situations. The methods developed have been implemented in the MBESS package in R so that they can be easily applied by researchers. © 2011 American Psychological Association

  16. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa. PMID:24977219

  17. Geometrical and material parameters to assess the macroscopic mechanical behaviour of fresh cranial bone samples.

    PubMed

    Auperrin, Audrey; Delille, Rémi; Lesueur, Denis; Bruyère, Karine; Masson, Catherine; Drazétic, Pascal

    2014-03-21

    The present study aims at providing quantitative data for the personalisation of geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the adult cranial bone to be applied to head FE models. A set of 351 cranial bone samples, harvested from 21 human skulls, were submitted to three-point bending tests at 10 mm/min. For each of them, an apparent elastic modulus was calculated using the beam's theory and a density-dependant beam inertia. Thicknesses, apparent densities and percentage of ash weight were also measured. Distributions of characteristics among the different skull bones show their symmetry and their significant differences between skull areas. A data analysis was performed to analyse potential relationship between thicknesses, densities and the apparent elastic modulus. A specific regression was pointed out to estimate apparent elastic modulus from the product of thickness by apparent density. These results offer quantitative tools in view of personalising head FE models and thus improve definition of local injury criteria for this body part. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. ARAM: an automated image analysis software to determine rosetting parameters and parasitaemia in Plasmodium samples.

    PubMed

    Kudella, Patrick Wolfgang; Moll, Kirsten; Wahlgren, Mats; Wixforth, Achim; Westerhausen, Christoph

    2016-04-18

    Rosetting is associated with severe malaria and a primary cause of death in Plasmodium falciparum infections. Detailed understanding of this adhesive phenomenon may enable the development of new therapies interfering with rosette formation. For this, it is crucial to determine parameters such as rosetting and parasitaemia of laboratory strains or patient isolates, a bottleneck in malaria research due to the time consuming and error prone manual analysis of specimens. Here, the automated, free, stand-alone analysis software automated rosetting analyzer for micrographs (ARAM) to determine rosetting rate, rosette size distribution as well as parasitaemia with a convenient graphical user interface is presented. Automated rosetting analyzer for micrographs is an executable with two operation modes for automated identification of objects on images. The default mode detects red blood cells and fluorescently labelled parasitized red blood cells by combining an intensity-gradient with a threshold filter. The second mode determines object location and size distribution from a single contrast method. The obtained results are compared with standardized manual analysis. Automated rosetting analyzer for micrographs calculates statistical confidence probabilities for rosetting rate and parasitaemia. Automated rosetting analyzer for micrographs analyses 25 cell objects per second reliably delivering identical results compared to manual analysis. For the first time rosette size distribution is determined in a precise and quantitative manner employing ARAM in combination with established inhibition tests. Additionally ARAM measures the essential observables parasitaemia, rosetting rate and size as well as location of all detected objects and provides confidence intervals for the determined observables. No other existing software solution offers this range of function. The second, non-malaria specific, analysis mode of ARAM offers the functionality to detect arbitrary objects

  19. Effect of experimental and sample factors on dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate: mechanism of dehydration and determination of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Bērziņš, Agris; Actiņš, Andris

    2014-06-01

    The dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate [3-(1,1,1-trimethylhydrazin-1-ium-2-yl)propionate dihydrate] was analyzed in isothermal and nonisothermal modes. The particle size, sample preparation and storage, sample weight, nitrogen flow rate, relative humidity, and sample history were varied in order to evaluate the effect of these factors and to more accurately interpret the data obtained from such analysis. It was determined that comparable kinetic parameters can be obtained in both isothermal and nonisothermal mode. However, dehydration activation energy values obtained in nonisothermal mode showed variation with conversion degree because of different rate-limiting step energy at higher temperature. Moreover, carrying out experiments in this mode required consideration of additional experimental complications. Our study of the different sample and experimental factor effect revealed information about changes of the dehydration rate-limiting step energy, variable contribution from different rate limiting steps, as well as clarified the dehydration mechanism. Procedures for convenient and fast determination of dehydration kinetic parameters were offered. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  20. Measurement of neutrino and antineutrino oscillations by the T2K experiment including a new additional sample of νe interactions at the far detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Amey, J.; Andreopoulos, C.; Antonova, M.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ashida, Y.; Ban, S.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Barry, C.; Batkiewicz, M.; Berardi, V.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Bienstock, S.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Calland, R. G.; Campbell, T.; Cao, S.; Cartwright, S. L.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Chappell, A.; Checchia, C.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Coleman, J.; Collazuol, G.; Coplowe, D.; Cudd, A.; Dabrowska, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Denner, P. F.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duffy, K. E.; Dumarchez, J.; Dunne, P.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Fiorillo, G.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Garcia, A.; Giganti, C.; Gizzarelli, F.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haigh, J. T.; Hansen, D.; Harada, J.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hillairet, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hiramoto, A.; Hirota, S.; Hogan, M.; Holeczek, J.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, S.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Karlen, D.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Knight, A.; Knox, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Koller, P. P.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Koshio, Y.; Kowalik, K.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Lamoureux, M.; Lasorak, P.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Licciardi, M.; Lindner, T.; Liptak, Z. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Li, X.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Lou, T.; Ludovici, L.; Lu, X.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Maret, L.; Marino, A. D.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Ma, W. Y.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Morrison, J.; Mueller, Th. A.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K. D.; Nakanishi, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Novella, P.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Patel, N. D.; Paudyal, P.; Pavin, M.; Payne, D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickering, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Pritchard, A.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radermacher, T.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rayner, M. A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rondio, E.; Rossi, B.; Roth, S.; Ruggeri, A. C.; Rychter, A.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Shirahige, T.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Steinmann, J.; Stewart, T.; Stowell, P.; Suda, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tamura, R.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Thakore, T.; Thompson, L. F.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Vagins, M.; Vallari, Z.; Vasseur, G.; Vilela, C.; Vladisavljevic, T.; Wachala, T.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wret, C.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; T2K Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The T2K experiment reports an updated analysis of neutrino and antineutrino oscillations in appearance and disappearance channels. A sample of electron neutrino candidates at Super-Kamiokande in which a pion decay has been tagged is added to the four single-ring samples used in previous T2K oscillation analyses. Through combined analyses of these five samples, simultaneous measurements of four oscillation parameters, |Δ m322 |, sin2θ23, sin2θ13, and δCP and of the mass ordering are made. A set of studies of simulated data indicates that the sensitivity to the oscillation parameters is not limited by neutrino interaction model uncertainty. Multiple oscillation analyses are performed, and frequentist and Bayesian intervals are presented for combinations of the oscillation parameters with and without the inclusion of reactor constraints on sin2θ13. When combined with reactor measurements, the hypothesis of C P conservation (δCP=0 or π ) is excluded at 90% confidence level. The 90% confidence region for δCP is [-2.95 ,-0.44 ] ([-1.47 ,-1.27 ] ) for normal (inverted) ordering. The central values and 68% confidence intervals for the other oscillation parameters for normal (inverted) ordering are Δ m322=2.54 ±0.08 (2.51 ±0.08 )×10-3 eV2/c4 and sin2θ23 =0.5 5-0.09+0.05 (0.5 5-0.08+0.05), compatible with maximal mixing. In the Bayesian analysis, the data weakly prefer normal ordering (Bayes factor 3.7) and the upper octant for sin2θ23 (Bayes factor 2.4).

  1. Prediction of oxidation parameters of purified Kilka fish oil including gallic acid and methyl gallate by adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Asnaashari, Maryam; Farhoosh, Reza; Farahmandfar, Reza

    2016-10-01

    As a result of concerns regarding possible health hazards of synthetic antioxidants, gallic acid and methyl gallate may be introduced as natural antioxidants to improve oxidative stability of marine oil. Since conventional modelling could not predict the oxidative parameters precisely, artificial neural network (ANN) and neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) modelling with three inputs, including type of antioxidant (gallic acid and methyl gallate), temperature (35, 45 and 55 °C) and concentration (0, 200, 400, 800 and 1600 mg L(-1) ) and four outputs containing induction period (IP), slope of initial stage of oxidation curve (k1 ) and slope of propagation stage of oxidation curve (k2 ) and peroxide value at the IP (PVIP ) were performed to predict the oxidation parameters of Kilka oil triacylglycerols and were compared to multiple linear regression (MLR). The results showed ANFIS was the best model with high coefficient of determination (R(2)  = 0.99, 0.99, 0.92 and 0.77 for IP, k1 , k2 and PVIP , respectively). So, the RMSE and MAE values for IP were 7.49 and 4.92 in ANFIS model. However, they were to be 15.95 and 10.88 and 34.14 and 3.60 for the best MLP structure and MLR, respectively. So, MLR showed the minimum accuracy among the constructed models. Sensitivity analysis based on the ANFIS model suggested a high sensitivity of oxidation parameters, particularly the induction period on concentrations of gallic acid and methyl gallate due to their high antioxidant activity to retard oil oxidation and enhanced Kilka oil shelf life. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. A system of equations to approximate the pharmacokinetic parameters of lacosamide at steady state from one plasma sample.

    PubMed

    Cawello, Willi; Schäfer, Carina

    2014-08-01

    Frequent plasma sampling to monitor pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), is invasive, costly and time consuming. For drugs with a well-defined PK profile, such as AED lacosamide, equations can accurately approximate PK parameters from one steady-state plasma sample. Equations were derived to approximate steady-state peak and trough lacosamide plasma concentrations (Cpeak,ss and Ctrough,ss, respectively) and area under concentration-time curve during dosing interval (AUCτ,ss) from one plasma sample. Lacosamide (ka: ∼2 h(-1); ke: ∼0.05 h(-1), corresponding to half-life of 13 h) was calculated to reach Cpeak,ss after ∼1 h (tmax,ss). Equations were validated by comparing approximations to reference PK parameters obtained from single plasma samples drawn 3-12h following lacosamide administration, using data from double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group PK study. Values of relative bias (accuracy) between -15% and +15%, and root mean square error (RMSE) values≤15% (precision) were considered acceptable for validation. Thirty-five healthy subjects (12 young males; 11 elderly males, 12 elderly females) received lacosamide 100mg/day for 4.5 days. Equation-derived PK values were compared to reference mean Cpeak,ss, Ctrough,ss and AUCτ,ss values. Equation-derived PK data had a precision of 6.2% and accuracy of -8.0%, 2.9%, and -0.11%, respectively. Equation-derived versus reference PK values for individual samples obtained 3-12h after lacosamide administration showed correlation (R2) range of 0.88-0.97 for AUCτ,ss. Correlation range for Cpeak,ss and Ctrough,ss was 0.65-0.87. Error analyses for individual sample comparisons were independent of time. Derived equations approximated lacosamide Cpeak,ss, Ctrough,ss and AUCτ,ss using one steady-state plasma sample within validation range. Approximated PK parameters were within accepted validation criteria when compared to reference PK values. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  3. Fasting time and lipid parameters: association with hepatic steatosis — data from a random population sample

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current guidelines recommend measuring plasma lipids in fasting patients. Recent studies, however, suggest that variation in plasma lipid concentrations secondary to fasting time may be minimal. Objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of fasting time on plasma lipid concentrations (total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides). A second objective was to determine the effect of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease exerted on the above-mentioned lipid levels. Method Subjects participating in a population-based cross-sectional study (2,445 subjects; 51.7% females) were questioned at time of phlebotomy regarding duration of pre-phlebotomy fasting. Total cholesterol, LDL and HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were determined and correlated with length of fasting. An upper abdominal ultrasonographic examination was performed and body-mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were calculated. Subjects were divided into three groups based on their reported fasting periods of 1–4 h, 4–8 h and > 8 h. After application of the exclusion criteria, a total of 1,195 subjects (52.4% females) were included in the study collective. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for continuous variables and the chi-square test for categorical variables. The effects of age, BMI, WHR, alcohol consumption, fasting time and hepatic steatosis on the respective lipid variables were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Results At multivariate analysis, fasting time was associated with elevated triglycerides (p = 0.0047 for 1–4 h and p = 0.0147 for 4–8 h among females; p < 0.0001 for 1–4 h and p = 0.0002 for 4–8 h among males) and reduced LDL cholesterol levels (p = 0.0003 for 1–4 h and p = 0.0327 for 4–8 h among males). Among males, hepatic steatosis represents an independent factor affecting elevated total cholesterol (p = 0.0278) and triglyceride concentrations (p = 0.0002). Conclusion

  4. Comparison of the solid-phase extraction efficiency of a bounded and an included cyclodextrin-silica microporous composite for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons determination in water samples.

    PubMed

    Mauri-Aucejo, Adela; Amorós, Pedro; Moragues, Alaina; Guillem, Carmen; Belenguer-Sapiña, Carolina

    2016-08-15

    Solid-phase extraction is one of the most important techniques for sample purification and concentration. A wide variety of solid phases have been used for sample preparation over time. In this work, the efficiency of a new kind of solid-phase extraction adsorbent, which is a microporous material made from modified cyclodextrin bounded to a silica network, is evaluated through an analytical method which combines solid-phase extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples. Several parameters that affected the analytes recovery, such as the amount of solid phase, the nature and volume of the eluent or the sample volume and concentration influence have been evaluated. The experimental results indicate that the material possesses adsorption ability to the tested polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Under the optimum conditions, the quantification limits of the method were in the range of 0.09-2.4μgL(-1) and fine linear correlations between peak height and concentration were found around 1.3-70μgL(-1). The method has good repeatability and reproducibility, with coefficients of variation under 8%. Due to the concentration results, this material may represent an alternative for trace analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water trough solid-phase extraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Order parameter free enhanced sampling of the vapor-liquid transition using the generalized replica exchange method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Kim, Jaegil; Straub, John E

    2013-03-14

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) is extended into the isobaric-isothermal ensemble, and applied to simulate a vapor-liquid phase transition in Lennard-Jones fluids. Merging an optimally designed generalized ensemble sampling with replica exchange, gREM is particularly well suited for the effective simulation of first-order phase transitions characterized by "backbending" in the statistical temperature. While the metastable and unstable states in the vicinity of the first-order phase transition are masked by the enthalpy gap in temperature replica exchange method simulations, they are transformed into stable states through the parameterized effective sampling weights in gREM simulations, and join vapor and liquid phases with a succession of unimodal enthalpy distributions. The enhanced sampling across metastable and unstable states is achieved without the need to identify a "good" order parameter for biased sampling. We performed gREM simulations at various pressures below and near the critical pressure to examine the change in behavior of the vapor-liquid phase transition at different pressures. We observed a crossover from the first-order phase transition at low pressure, characterized by the backbending in the statistical temperature and the "kink" in the Gibbs free energy, to a continuous second-order phase transition near the critical pressure. The controlling mechanisms of nucleation and continuous phase transition are evident and the coexistence properties and phase diagram are found in agreement with literature results.

  6. The influence of technological parameters on the dynamic behavior of "liquid wood" samples obtained by injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavanescu Mazurchevici, Simona; Carausu, Constantin; Comaneci, Radu; Nedelcu, Dumitru

    2017-10-01

    The plastic products contribute to environmental pollution. Replacing the plastic materials with biodegradable materials with superior properties is an absolute necessity and important research direction for the near future. The first steps in this regard were the creation of composite materials containing natural fibers with positive effects on the environment that have penetrated in different fields. The bioplastics and biocomposites made from natural fibers is a topical solution. The next step was made towards obtaining biodegradable and recyclable materials based on cellulose, lignin and no carcinogens. In this category fall the "liquid wood" with a use up to five times without affecting the mechanical properties. "Liquid wood" is a high quality thermoplastic biocomposite. "Liquid wood" is a biopolymer composite divided in three categories, ARBOFORM®, ARBOBLEND® and ARBOFILL®, which have differed composition in terms of lignin percentage, being delivered by Tecnaro, as granules, [1]. The paper's research was focus on Arboform L V3 Nature and Arboform L V3 Nature reinforced with aramid fiber. In the experimental plan were taken into account six parameters (Dinj - direction of injection [°]; Ttop - melting temperature [°C]; Pinj - injection pressure [MPa] Ss - speed [m/min]; tinj - injection time [s] and tc - cooling time [s]) each with two levels, research carried on by Taguchi methodology. Processing Taguchi method allowed both Taguchi setting work parameters influence on storage modulus and damping as the size and influence their ranking. Experimental research concerning the influence technological parameters on storage modulus of samples obtained by injection from Arboform L V3 Nature yielded an average of 6055MPa and descending order as follows: Trac, Ss, Pinj, Dinj and Ttop. The average of model for reinforced material was 6419MPa and descending order of parameters influence such as: Dinj, Trac, Ttop, tinj, Ss and Pinj.

  7. Conformational sampling with stochastic proximity embedding and self-organizing superimposition: establishing reasonable parameters for their practical use.

    PubMed

    Tresadern, Gary; Agrafiotis, Dimitris K

    2009-12-01

    Stochastic proximity embedding (SPE) and self-organizing superimposition (SOS) are two recently introduced methods for conformational sampling that have shown great promise in several application domains. Our previous validation studies aimed at exploring the limits of these methods and have involved rather exhaustive conformational searches producing a large number of conformations. However, from a practical point of view, such searches have become the exception rather than the norm. The increasing popularity of virtual screening has created a need for 3D conformational search methods that produce meaningful answers in a relatively short period of time and work effectively on a large scale. In this work, we examine the performance of these algorithms and the effects of different parameter settings at varying levels of sampling. Our goal is to identify search protocols that can produce a diverse set of chemically sensible conformations and have a reasonable probability of sampling biologically active space within a small number of trials. Our results suggest that both SPE and SOS are extremely competitive in this regard and produce very satisfactory results with as few as 500 conformations per molecule. The results improve even further when the raw conformations are minimized with a molecular mechanics force field to remove minor imperfections and any residual strain. These findings provide additional evidence that these methods are suitable for many everyday modeling tasks, both high- and low-throughput.

  8. Atmospheric parameters and magnesium and calcium NLTE abundances for a sample of 16 ultra metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnova, Tatyana; Mashonkina, Lyudmila; Ezzeddine, Rana; Frebel, Anna

    2018-06-01

    The most metal-poor stars provide important observational clues to the astrophysical objects that enriched the primordial gas with heavy elements. Accurate atmospheric parameters is a prerequisite of determination of accurate abundances. We present atmospheric parameters and abundances of calcium and magnesium for a sample of 16 ultra-metal poor (UMP) stars. In spectra of UMP stars, iron is represented only by lines of Fe I, while calcium is represented with lines of Ca I and Ca II, which can be used for determination/checking of effective temperature and surface gravity. Accurate calculations of synthetic spectra of UMP stars require non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) treatment of line formation, since deviations from LTE grow with metallicity decreasing. The method of atmospheric parameter determination is based on NLTE analysis of lines of Ca I and Ca II, multi-band photometry, and isochrones. The method was tested in advance with the ultra metal-poor giant CD-38 245, where, in addition, trigonometric parallax measurements from Gaia DR1 and lines of Fe I and Fe II are available. Using photometric Teff = 4900 K and distance based log g = 2.0 for CD-38 245, we derived consistent within error bars NLTE abundances from Fe I and Fe II and Ca I and Ca II, while LTE leads to a discrepancy of 0.6 dex between Ca I and Ca II. We determined NLTE and LTE abundances of magnesium and calcium in 16 stars of the sample. For the majority of stars, as expected, [Ca/Mg] NLTE abundance ratios are close to 0, while LTE leads to systematically higher [Ca/Mg], by up to 0.3 dex, and larger spread of [Ca/Mg] for different stars. Three stars of our sample are strongly enhanced in magnesium, with [Mg/Ca] of 1.3 dex. It is worth noting that, for these three stars, we got very similar [Mg/Ca] of 1.30, 1.45, and 1.29, in contrast to the data from the literature, where, for the same stars, [Mg/Ca] vary from 0.7 to 1.4. Very similar [Mg/Ca] abundance ratios of these stars argue that

  9. Alaska Geochemical Database, Version 2.0 (AGDB2)--including “best value” data compilations for rock, sediment, soil, mineral, and concentrate sample media

    Granitto, Matthew; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Labay, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    The Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2) contains new geochemical data compilations in which each geologic material sample has one “best value” determination for each analyzed species, greatly improving speed and efficiency of use. Like the Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB, http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/637/) before it, the AGDB2 was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessments, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessments, and studies in medical geology. This relational database, created from the Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) that was released in 2011, serves as a data archive in support of present and future Alaskan geologic and geochemical projects, and contains data tables in several different formats describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses. The analytical results were determined by 85 laboratory and field analytical methods on 264,095 rock, sediment, soil, mineral and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel and analyzed in U.S. Geological Survey laboratories or, under contracts, in commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various U.S. Geological Survey programs and projects from 1962 through 2009. In addition, mineralogical data from 18,138 nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrate samples are included in this database. The AGDB2 includes historical geochemical data originally archived in the U.S. Geological Survey Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database, used from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s and the U.S. Geological Survey PLUTO database used from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. All of these data are currently maintained in the National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB were used to generate

  10. Discussion of parameters associated with the determination of arsenic by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry in slurried environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, E; Baeten, H; Hoenig, M

    2001-01-02

    A slurry sampling-fast program procedure has been developed for the determination of arsenic in plants, soils and sediments by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Efficiencies of various single and mixed modifiers for thermal stabilization of arsenic and for a better removal of the matrix during pyrolysis step were compared. The influence of the slurry concentration, amounts of modifier and parameters of the pyrolysis step on the As integrated absorbance signals have been studied and a comparison between fast and conventional furnace programs was also made. The ultrasonic agitation of the slurry followed by a fast electrothermal program using an Ir/Mg modifier provides the most consistent performance in terms of precision and accuracy. The reliability of the whole procedure has been compared with results obtained after application of a wet digestion method with an HF step and validated by analyzing eleven certified reference materials. Arsenic detection and quantitation limits expressed on dry sample matter were about 30 and 100 micrograms kg-1, respectively.

  11. Implementing reduced-risk integrated pest management in fresh-market cabbage: influence of sampling parameters, and validation of binomial sequential sampling plans for the cabbage looper (Lepidoptera Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Burkness, Eric C; Hutchison, W D

    2009-10-01

    Populations of cabbage looper, Trichoplusiani (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), were sampled in experimental plots and commercial fields of cabbage (Brasicca spp.) in Minnesota during 1998-1999 as part of a larger effort to implement an integrated pest management program. Using a resampling approach and the Wald's sequential probability ratio test, sampling plans with different sampling parameters were evaluated using independent presence/absence and enumerative data. Evaluations and comparisons of the different sampling plans were made based on the operating characteristic and average sample number functions generated for each plan and through the use of a decision probability matrix. Values for upper and lower decision boundaries, sequential error rates (alpha, beta), and tally threshold were modified to determine parameter influence on the operating characteristic and average sample number functions. The following parameters resulted in the most desirable operating characteristic and average sample number functions; action threshold of 0.1 proportion of plants infested, tally threshold of 1, alpha = beta = 0.1, upper boundary of 0.15, lower boundary of 0.05, and resampling with replacement. We found that sampling parameters can be modified and evaluated using resampling software to achieve desirable operating characteristic and average sample number functions. Moreover, management of T. ni by using binomial sequential sampling should provide a good balance between cost and reliability by minimizing sample size and maintaining a high level of correct decisions (>95%) to treat or not treat.

  12. Rapid mapping of compound eye visual sampling parameters with FACETS, a highly automated wide-field goniometer.

    PubMed

    Douglass, John K; Wehling, Martin F

    2016-12-01

    A highly automated goniometer instrument (called FACETS) has been developed to facilitate rapid mapping of compound eye parameters for investigating regional visual field specializations. The instrument demonstrates the feasibility of analyzing the complete field of view of an insect eye in a fraction of the time required if using non-motorized, non-computerized methods. Faster eye mapping makes it practical for the first time to employ sample sizes appropriate for testing hypotheses about the visual significance of interspecific differences in regional specializations. Example maps of facet sizes are presented from four dipteran insects representing the Asilidae, Calliphoridae, and Stratiomyidae. These maps provide the first quantitative documentation of the frontal enlarged-facet zones (EFZs) that typify asilid eyes, which, together with the EFZs in male Calliphoridae, are likely to be correlated with high-spatial-resolution acute zones. The presence of EFZs contrasts sharply with the almost homogeneous distribution of facet sizes in the stratiomyid. Moreover, the shapes of EFZs differ among species, suggesting functional specializations that may reflect differences in visual ecology. Surveys of this nature can help identify species that should be targeted for additional studies, which will elucidate fundamental principles and constraints that govern visual field specializations and their evolution.

  13. The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales in a Dutch non-clinical sample: psychometric properties including the adult separation anxiety disorder scale.

    PubMed

    Möller, Eline L; Bögels, Susan M

    2016-09-01

    With DSM-5, the American Psychiatric Association encourages complementing categorical diagnoses with dimensional severity ratings. We therefore examined the psychometric properties of the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales, a set of brief dimensional scales that are consistent in content and structure and assess DSM-5-based core features of anxiety disorders. Participants (285 males, 255 females) completed the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales for social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder that were included in previous studies on the scales, and also for separation anxiety disorder, which is included in the DSM-5 chapter on anxiety disorders. Moreover, they completed the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Adult version (SCARED-A). The DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales demonstrated high internal consistency, and the scales correlated significantly and substantially with corresponding SCARED-A subscales, supporting convergent validity. Separation anxiety appeared present among adults, supporting the DSM-5 recognition of separation anxiety as an anxiety disorder across the life span. To conclude, the DSM-5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales are a valuable tool to screen for specific adult anxiety disorders, including separation anxiety. Research in more diverse and clinical samples with anxiety disorders is needed. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales in a Dutch non‐clinical sample: psychometric properties including the adult separation anxiety disorder scale

    PubMed Central

    Bögels, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With DSM‐5, the American Psychiatric Association encourages complementing categorical diagnoses with dimensional severity ratings. We therefore examined the psychometric properties of the DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales, a set of brief dimensional scales that are consistent in content and structure and assess DSM‐5‐based core features of anxiety disorders. Participants (285 males, 255 females) completed the DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales for social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and panic disorder that were included in previous studies on the scales, and also for separation anxiety disorder, which is included in the DSM‐5 chapter on anxiety disorders. Moreover, they completed the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders Adult version (SCARED‐A). The DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales demonstrated high internal consistency, and the scales correlated significantly and substantially with corresponding SCARED‐A subscales, supporting convergent validity. Separation anxiety appeared present among adults, supporting the DSM‐5 recognition of separation anxiety as an anxiety disorder across the life span. To conclude, the DSM‐5 Dimensional Anxiety Scales are a valuable tool to screen for specific adult anxiety disorders, including separation anxiety. Research in more diverse and clinical samples with anxiety disorders is needed. © 2016 The Authors International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27378317

  15. Analysis and toxicity of 59 PAH in petrogenic and pyrogenic environmental samples including dibenzopyrenes, 7H-benzo[c]fluorene, 5-methylchrysene and 1-methylpyrene.

    PubMed

    Richter-Brockmann, Sigrid; Achten, Christine

    2018-06-01

    In this study 59 PAH were analyzed in samples of petrogenic and pyrogenic sources as well as mixed environmental matrices. Among the analytes, PAH of molecular weights from 128 Da to 302 Da in alkylated and in native form were included. Results show that non-EPA PAH make up 69.3–95.1% of the overall toxic equivalents (TEQ) as based on the toxic equivalent factors (TEF) of 24 PAH. Particularly 7H-benzo[c]fluorene, dibenzopyrene isomers and alkylated PAH (in particular 5-methylchrysene and 1-methylpyrene) turned out to have a huge impact on the toxicity and must not be neglected in future risk assessment. In detail, dibenzopyrenes have a high impact on toxicity predominantly in pyrogenic materials (21% to 84%; mean: 59%) whereas 7H-benzo[c]fluorene dominates toxicity of petrogenic materials (up to 80%; mean: 26%). However, in the studied mixed environmental samples the toxic impact of both groups together is as high as about 80%. Many non-EPA PAH are not considered in risk assessment and amongst them there are some very toxic ones. This needs to be carefully evaluated in future studies.

  16. Comparison of two blood sampling techniques for the determination of coagulation parameters in the horse: Jugular venipuncture and indwelling intravenous catheter.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, C J; McGowan, C M; Pinchbeck, G; Carslake, H B

    2018-05-01

    Evaluation of coagulation status is an important component of critical care. Ongoing monitoring of coagulation status in hospitalised horses has previously been via serial venipuncture due to concerns that sampling directly from the intravenous catheter (IVC) may alter the accuracy of the results. Adverse effects such as patient anxiety and trauma to the sampled vessel could be avoided by the use of an indwelling IVC for repeat blood sampling. To compare coagulation parameters from blood obtained by jugular venipuncture with IVC sampling in critically ill horses. Prospective observational study. A single set of paired blood samples were obtained from horses (n = 55) admitted to an intensive care unit by direct jugular venipuncture and, following removal of a presample, via an indwelling IVC. The following coagulation parameters were measured on venipuncture and IVC samples: whole blood prothrombin time (PT), fresh plasma PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and stored plasma antithrombin activity (AT) and fibrinogen concentration. D-dimer concentration was also measured in some horses (n = 22). Comparison of venipuncture and IVC results was performed using Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. Agreement between paired results was assessed using Bland Altman analysis. Correlation was substantial and agreement was good between sample methods for all parameters except AT and D-dimers. Each coagulation parameter was tested using only one assay. Sampling was limited to a convenience sample and timing of sample collection was not standardised in relation to when the catheter was flushed with heparinised saline. With the exception of AT and D-dimers, coagulation parameters measured on blood samples obtained via an IVC have clinically equivalent values to those obtained by jugular venipuncture. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  17. Simultaneous analysis of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances including ultrashort-chain C2 and C3 compounds in rain and river water samples by ultra performance convergence chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Leo W Y; Stadey, Christopher; Mabury, Scott A

    2017-11-03

    An analytical method using ultra performance convergence chromatography (UPC 2 ) coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer operated in negative electrospray mode was developed to measure perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) including the ultrashort-chain PFASs (C2-C3). Compared to the existing liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method using an ion exchange column, the new method has a lower detection limit (0.4pg trifluoroacetate (TFA) on-column), narrower peak width (3-6s), and a shorter run time (8min). Using the same method, different classes of PFASs (e.g., perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs) and perfluorinated carboxylates (PFCAs), perfluorinated phosphonates (PFPAs) and phosphinates (PFPiAs), polyfluoroalkyl phosphate diesters (diPAPs)) can be measured in a single analysis. Rain (n=2) and river water (n=2) samples collected in Toronto, ON, were used for method validation and application. Results showed that short-chain PFAS (C2-C7 PFCAs and C4 PFSA) contributed to over 80% of the detectable PFASs in rain samples and the C2-C3 PFASs alone accounted for over 40% of the total. Reports on environmental levels of these ultrashort-chain PFASs are relatively scarce. Relatively large contribution of these ultrashort-chain PFASs to the total PFASs indicate the need to include the measurement of short-chain PFASs, especially C2 and C3 PFASs, in environmental monitoring. The sources of TFA and other short-chain PFASs in the environment are not entirely clear. The newly developed analytical method may help further investigation on the sources and the environmental levels of these ultrashort-chain PFASs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigations of the possibility of determination of thermal parameters of Si and SiGe samples based on the Photo Thermal Radiometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrobak, Ł.; Maliński, M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents results of investigations of the possibility of determination of thermal parameters (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity) of silicon and silicon germanium crystals from the frequency characteristics of the Photo Thermal Radiometry (PTR) signal. The theoretical analysis of the influence of the mentioned parameters on the PTR signal has been presented and discussed. The values of the thermal and recombination parameters have been extracted from the fittings of the theoretical to experimental data. The presented approach uses the reference Si sample whose thermal and recombination parameters are known.

  19. Finite-sample and asymptotic sign-based tests for parameters of non-linear quantile regression with Markov noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirenko, M. A.; Tarasenko, P. F.; Pushkarev, M. I.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most noticeable features of sign-based statistical procedures is an opportunity to build an exact test for simple hypothesis testing of parameters in a regression model. In this article, we expanded a sing-based approach to the nonlinear case with dependent noise. The examined model is a multi-quantile regression, which makes it possible to test hypothesis not only of regression parameters, but of noise parameters as well.

  20. The EBLM project. I. Physical and orbital parameters, including spin-orbit angles, of two low-mass eclipsing binaries on opposite sides of the brown dwarf limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Hebb, L.; Anderson, D. R.; Cargile, P.; Collier Cameron, A.; Doyle, A. P.; Faedi, F.; Gillon, M.; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Maxted, P.; Naef, D.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Stassun, K.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a series of papers aiming to study the dozens of low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBLM), with F, G, K primaries, that have been discovered in the course of the WASP survey. Our objects are mostly single-line binaries whose eclipses have been detected by WASP and were initially followed up as potential planetary transit candidates. These have bright primaries, which facilitates spectroscopic observations during transit and allows the study of the spin-orbit distribution of F, G, K+M eclipsing binaries through the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Here we report on the spin-orbit angle of WASP-30b, a transiting brown dwarf, and improve its orbital parameters. We also present the mass, radius, spin-orbit angle and orbital parameters of a new eclipsing binary, J1219-39b (1SWAPJ121921.03-395125.6, TYC 7760-484-1), which, with a mass of 95 ± 2 Mjup, is close to the limit between brown dwarfs and stars. We find that both objects have projected spin-orbit angles aligned with their primaries' rotation. Neither primaries are synchronous. J1219-39b has a modestly eccentric orbit and is in agreement with the theoretical mass-radius relationship, whereas WASP-30b lies above it. Using WASP-South photometric observations (Sutherland, South Africa) confirmed with radial velocity measurement from the CORALIE spectrograph, photometry from the EulerCam camera (both mounted on the Swiss 1.2 m Euler Telescope), radial velocities from the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO's 3.6 m Telescope (prog ID 085.C-0393), and photometry from the robotic 60 cm TRAPPIST telescope, all located at ESO, La Silla, Chile. The data is publicly available at the CDS Strasbourg and on demand to the main author.Tables A.1-A.3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgPhotometry tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A18

  1. Infection frequency of Epstein-Barr virus in subgingival samples from patients with different periodontal status and its correlation with clinical parameters*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan-min; Yan, Jie; Chen, Li-li; Sun, Wei-lian; Gu, Zhi-yuan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To detect the infection frequencies of different genotypes of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in subgingival samples from chronic periodontitis (CP) patients, and to discuss the correlation between infection with EBV and clinical parameters. Methods: Nested-PCR assay was used to detect EBV-1 and EBV-2 in subgingival samples from 65 CP patients, 65 gingivitis patients and 24 periodontally healthy individuals. The amplicons were further identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP) with endonucleases Afa I and Stu I. Clinical parameters mainly included bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), attachment loss (AL) in six sites of the dentition. Results: In CP patients, gingivitis and periodontally healthy individuals, the infection frequencies were 47.7%, 24.6% and 16.7% for EBV-1, and 15.4%, 7.7% and 0% for EBV-2, respectively. In 2 out of the 65 CP patients co-infection of EBV-1 and EBV-2 was found. The positive rate of EBV-1 in chronic periodontitis patients was higher than that in gingivitis patients (P=0.01) and periodontally healthy individuals (P=0.01). But no significant difference was shown in EBV-1 frequency between gingivitis patients and healthy individuals (P>0.05) or in EBV-2 frequency among the three groups (P>0.05). In CP patients, higher mean BOP value was found in EBV-1 or EBV-2 positive patients than that in EBV negative ones (P<0.01), but with no statistical difference in the mean PD or AL value between EBV positive and negative patients (P>0.05). After initial periodontal treatment, 12 out of the 21 EBV-1 positive CP patients did not show detectable EBV-1 in subgingival samples. Conclusion: nPCR plus RFLP analysis is a sensitive, specific and stable method to detect EBV-1 and EBV-2 in subgingival samples. Subgingival infection with EBV-1 is closely associated with chronic periodontitis. Infection of EBV in subgingival samples was correlated with BOP. PMID:17048301

  2. Soot on snow in Iceland: First results on black carbon and organic carbon in Iceland 2016 snow and ice samples, including the glacier Solheimajökull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinander, Outi; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Gritsevich, Maria; Aurela, Minna; Arnalds, Olafur; Dragosics, Monika; Virkkula, Aki; Svensson, Jonas; Peltoniemi, Jouni; Kontu, Anna; Kivekäs, Niku; Leppäranta, Matti; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Laaksonen, Ari; Lihavainen, Heikki; Arslan, Ali N.; Paatero, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    New results on black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) on snow and ice in Iceland in 2016 will be presented in connection to our earlier results on BC and OC on Arctic seasonal snow surface, and in connection to our 2013 and 2016 experiments on effects of light absorbing impurities, including Icelandic dust, on snow albedo, melt and density. Our sampling included the glacier Solheimajökull in Iceland. The mass balance of this glacier is negative and it has been shrinking during the last 20 years by 900 meters from its southwestern corner. Icelandic snow and ice samples were not expected to contain high concentrations of BC, as power generation with domestic renewable water and geothermal power energy sources cover 80 % of the total energy consumption in Iceland. Our BC results on filters analyzed with a Thermal/Optical Carbon Aerosol Analyzer (OC/EC) confirm this assumption. Other potential soot sources in Iceland include agricultural burning, industry (aluminum and ferroalloy production and fishing industry), open burning, residential heating and transport (shipping, road traffic, aviation). On the contrary to low BC, we have found high concentrations of organic carbon in our Iceland 2016 samples. Some of the possible reasons for those will be discussed in this presentation. Earlier, we have measured and reported unexpectedly low snow albedo values of Arctic seasonally melting snow in Sodankylä, north of Arctic Circle. Our low albedo results of melting snow have been confirmed by three independent data sets. We have explained these low values to be due to: (i) large snow grain sizes up to 3 mm in diameter (seasonally melting snow); (ii) meltwater surrounding the grains and increasing the effective grain size; (iii) absorption caused by impurities in the snow, with concentration of elemental carbon (black carbon) in snow of 87 ppb, and organic carbon 2894 ppb. The high concentrations of carbon were due to air masses originating from the Kola Peninsula, Russia

  3. Comparison of haematology, coagulation and clinical chemistry parameters in blood samples from the sublingual vein and vena cava in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Seibel, J; Bodié, K; Weber, S; Bury, D; Kron, M; Blaich, G

    2010-10-01

    The investigation of clinical pathology parameters (haematology, clinical chemistry and coagulation) is an important part of the preclinical evaluation of drug safety. However, the blood sampling method employed should avoid or minimize stress and injury in laboratory animals. In the present study, we compared the clinical pathology results from blood samples collected terminally from the vena cava (VC) immediately before necropsy with samples taken from the sublingual vein (VS) also prior to necropsy in order to determine whether the sampling method has an influence on clinical pathology parameters. Forty-six 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to two groups (VC or VS; n = 23 each). All rats were anaesthetized with isoflurane prior to sampling. In the VC group, blood was withdrawn from the inferior VC. For VS sampling, the tongue was gently pulled out and the VS was punctured. The haematology, coagulation and clinical chemistry parameters were compared. Equivalence was established for 13 parameters, such as mean corpuscular volume, white blood cells and calcium. No equivalence was found for the remaining 26 parameters, although they were considered to be similar when compared with the historical data and normal ranges. The most conspicuous finding was that activated prothrombin time was 30.3% less in blood taken from the VC (16.6 ± 0.89 s) than that in the VS samples (23.8 ± 1.58 s). Summing up, blood sampling from the inferior VC prior to necropsy appears to be a suitable and reliable method for terminal blood sampling that reduces stress and injury to laboratory rats in preclinical drug safety studies.

  4. Modeling motor vehicle crashes using Poisson-gamma models: examining the effects of low sample mean values and small sample size on the estimation of the fixed dispersion parameter.

    PubMed

    Lord, Dominique

    2006-07-01

    There has been considerable research conducted on the development of statistical models for predicting crashes on highway facilities. Despite numerous advancements made for improving the estimation tools of statistical models, the most common probabilistic structure used for modeling motor vehicle crashes remains the traditional Poisson and Poisson-gamma (or Negative Binomial) distribution; when crash data exhibit over-dispersion, the Poisson-gamma model is usually the model of choice most favored by transportation safety modelers. Crash data collected for safety studies often have the unusual attributes of being characterized by low sample mean values. Studies have shown that the goodness-of-fit of statistical models produced from such datasets can be significantly affected. This issue has been defined as the "low mean problem" (LMP). Despite recent developments on methods to circumvent the LMP and test the goodness-of-fit of models developed using such datasets, no work has so far examined how the LMP affects the fixed dispersion parameter of Poisson-gamma models used for modeling motor vehicle crashes. The dispersion parameter plays an important role in many types of safety studies and should, therefore, be reliably estimated. The primary objective of this research project was to verify whether the LMP affects the estimation of the dispersion parameter and, if it is, to determine the magnitude of the problem. The secondary objective consisted of determining the effects of an unreliably estimated dispersion parameter on common analyses performed in highway safety studies. To accomplish the objectives of the study, a series of Poisson-gamma distributions were simulated using different values describing the mean, the dispersion parameter, and the sample size. Three estimators commonly used by transportation safety modelers for estimating the dispersion parameter of Poisson-gamma models were evaluated: the method of moments, the weighted regression, and the maximum

  5. HEALTH SURVEY INCLUDING SELECTED BLOOD PARAMETERS IN THE AFRICAN SLENDER SNOUTED CROCODILE (MECISTOPS CATAPHRACTUS) AT THE ABIDJAN ZOO IN CÔTE D'IVOIRE.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Carol; Eschenbrenner, Matt

    2017-06-01

    The Zoo National d'Abidjan (Abidjan Zoo) in Côte d'Ivoire, West Africa, holds the world's largest captive population of African slender-snouted crocodiles (Mecistops cataphractus, formerly Crocodylus cataphractus), at 36 adults, 16 yearlings, and 23 hatchlings. Twelve yearling and 12 adult slender-snouted crocodiles at the Abidjan Zoo were restrained for physical exam, body condition scoring, and venipuncture in September 2015. Blood samples collected from the supravertebral venous sinus were analyzed using a handheld blood analyzer (Abaxis® I-stat, Abaxis, Inc., Union City, California 94587, USA) with Chem8+ cartridges (CLIAwaived, Inc., San Diego, California 92130, USA). The adult crocodiles appeared in good general health and demonstrated blood values similar to those of other reptiles. The yearlings had low, ionized calcium values and low hematocrit and hemoglobin levels compared with the adult crocodiles and to other crocodile reference ranges. These findings may dramatically improve the health of the crocodiles and help to ensure a thriving captive population of this critically endangered species.

  6. Optimization of Sample Preparation and Instrumental Parameters for the Rapid Analysis of Drugs of Abuse in Hair samples by MALDI-MS/MS Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinders, Bryn; Beasley, Emma; Verlaan, Ricky M.; Cuypers, Eva; Francese, Simona; Bassindale, Tom; Clench, Malcolm R.; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2017-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has been employed to rapidly screen longitudinally sectioned drug user hair samples for cocaine and its metabolites using continuous raster imaging. Optimization of the spatial resolution and raster speed were performed on intact cocaine contaminated hair samples. The optimized settings (100 × 150 μm at 0.24 mm/s) were subsequently used to examine longitudinally sectioned drug user hair samples. The MALDI-MS/MS images showed the distribution of the most abundant cocaine product ion at m/z 182. Using the optimized settings, multiple hair samples obtained from two users were analyzed in approximately 3 h: six times faster than the standard spot-to-spot acquisition method. Quantitation was achieved using longitudinally sectioned control hair samples sprayed with a cocaine dilution series. A multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) experiment was also performed using the `dynamic pixel' imaging method to screen for cocaine and a range of its metabolites, in order to differentiate between contaminated hairs and drug users. Cocaine, benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene were detectable, in agreement with analyses carried out using the standard LC-MS/MS method. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Constraints on the sum of neutrino masses using cosmological data including the latest extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey DR14 quasar sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sai; Wang, Yi-Fan; Xia, Dong-Mei

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the constraints on the sum of neutrino masses ({{Σ }}{m}ν ) using the most recent cosmological data, which combines the distance measurement from baryonic acoustic oscillation in the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey DR14 quasar sample with the power spectra of temperature and polarization anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background from the Planck 2015 data release. We also use other low-redshift observations, including the baryonic acoustic oscillation at relatively low redshifts, Type Ia supernovae, and the local measurement of the Hubble constant. In the standard cosmological constant Λ cold dark matter plus massive neutrino model, we obtain the 95% upper limit to be {{Σ }}{m}ν < 0.129{eV} for the degenerate mass hierarchy, {{Σ }}{m}ν < 0.159{eV} for the normal mass hierarchy, and {{Σ }}{m}ν < 0.189{eV} for the inverted mass hierarchy. Based on Bayesian evidence, we find that the degenerate hierarchy is positively supported, and the current data combination cannot distinguish between normal and inverted hierarchies. Assuming the degenerate mass hierarchy, we extend our study to non-standard cosmological models including generic dark energy, spatial curvature, and extra relativistic degrees of freedom, but find these models are not favored by the data. SW is Supported by a grant from the Research Grant Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (14301214), DMX is Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11505018) and the Chongqing Science and Technology Plan Project (Cstc2015jvyj40031)

  8. Reliability and Construct Validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised in a Swedish Non-Criminal Sample - A Multimethod Approach including Psychophysiological Correlates of Empathy for Pain.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Karolina; Nilsonne, Gustav; Howner, Katarina; Tamm, Sandra; Caman, Shilan; Wang, Hui-Xin; Ingvar, Martin; Edens, John F; Gustavsson, Petter; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Petrovic, Predrag; Fischer, Håkan; Kristiansson, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Cross-cultural investigation of psychopathy measures is important for clarifying the nomological network surrounding the psychopathy construct. The Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R) is one of the most extensively researched self-report measures of psychopathic traits in adults. To date however, it has been examined primarily in North American criminal or student samples. To address this gap in the literature, we examined PPI-R's reliability, construct validity and factor structure in non-criminal individuals (N = 227) in Sweden, using a multimethod approach including psychophysiological correlates of empathy for pain. PPI-R construct validity was investigated in subgroups of participants by exploring its degree of overlap with (i) the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), (ii) self-rated empathy and behavioral and physiological responses in an experiment on empathy for pain, and (iii) additional self-report measures of alexithymia and trait anxiety. The PPI-R total score was significantly associated with PCL:SV total and factor scores. The PPI-R Coldheartedness scale demonstrated significant negative associations with all empathy subscales and with rated unpleasantness and skin conductance responses in the empathy experiment. The PPI-R higher order Self-Centered Impulsivity and Fearless Dominance dimensions were associated with trait anxiety in opposite directions (positively and negatively, respectively). Overall, the results demonstrated solid reliability (test-retest and internal consistency) and promising but somewhat mixed construct validity for the Swedish translation of the PPI-R.

  9. Evaluation of two new surrogate indices including parameters not using insulin to assess insulin sensitivity/resistance in non-diabetic postmenopausal women: a MONET group study.

    PubMed

    Bastard, J-P; Lavoie, M-E; Messier, V; Prud'homme, D; Rabasa-Lhoret, R

    2012-06-01

    The study evaluated and compared, with other surrogate indices of insulin sensitivity/resistance (IS/R), the relevance of the TyG index, a product of fasting glucose and triglyceride (TG) levels, and the EGIR index, which includes TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and waist circumference in its formula to estimate IS/R, in non-diabetic postmenopausal women. A secondary analysis was performed using the baseline data for 163 non-diabetic postmenopausal women from the Montreal-Ottawa New Emerging Team (MONET) population database. The subjects participated in hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic (HIEG) clamp and oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) tests. Correlations and comparisons between surrogate indices were performed in addition to inter-rater agreement tests. The optimal value of surrogate indices for diagnosis of IS/R was established on a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) scatter plot. A significant correlation was found between the HIEG clamp and all IS/R surrogate indices tested [r=-0.370 (TyG index) to 0.608 (SIisOGTT index); P<0.001]. On ROC curve analysis, a higher AUROC was found for SIisOGTT (0.791) than for TyG and EGIR (0.706 and 0.675, respectively; P=0.07 and P<0.05, respectively). The TyG and EGIR IS/R indices were only relatively modestly related to the HIEG clamp. In contrast, both fasting- and OGTT-derived IS/R surrogate indices, which include insulin values in their formulae, appeared to be more accurate in estimating IS/R in our study population. Thus, the TyG and EGIR IS/R indices need to be tested and validated more extensively in different populations before being put to large-scale clinical use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. On the continuous dependence with respect to sampling of the linear quadratic regulator problem for distributed parameter system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.; Wang, C.

    1992-01-01

    The convergence of solutions to the discrete- or sampled-time linear quadratic regulator problem and associated Riccati equation for infinite-dimensional systems to the solutions to the corresponding continuous time problem and equation, as the length of the sampling interval (the sampling rate) tends toward zero(infinity) is established. Both the finite-and infinite-time horizon problems are studied. In the finite-time horizon case, strong continuity of the operators that define the control system and performance index, together with a stability and consistency condition on the sampling scheme are required. For the infinite-time horizon problem, in addition, the sampled systems must be stabilizable and detectable, uniformly with respect to the sampling rate. Classes of systems for which this condition can be verified are discussed. Results of numerical studies involving the control of a heat/diffusion equation, a hereditary or delay system, and a flexible beam are presented and discussed.

  11. On the continuous dependence with respect to sampling of the linear quadratic regulator problem for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.; Wang, C.

    1990-01-01

    The convergence of solutions to the discrete or sampled time linear quadratic regulator problem and associated Riccati equation for infinite dimensional systems to the solutions to the corresponding continuous time problem and equation, as the length of the sampling interval (the sampling rate) tends toward zero (infinity) is established. Both the finite and infinite time horizon problems are studied. In the finite time horizon case, strong continuity of the operators which define the control system and performance index together with a stability and consistency condition on the sampling scheme are required. For the infinite time horizon problem, in addition, the sampled systems must be stabilizable and detectable, uniformly with respect to the sampling rate. Classes of systems for which this condition can be verified are discussed. Results of numerical studies involving the control of a heat/diffusion equation, a hereditary of delay system, and a flexible beam are presented and discussed.

  12. The Application of EM38: Determination of Soil Parameters, Selection of Soil Sampling Points and Use in Agriculture and Archaeology

    PubMed Central

    Heil, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Fast and accurate assessment of within-field variation is essential for detecting field-wide heterogeneity and contributing to improvements in the management of agricultural lands. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of field scale characterization by electromagnetic induction, firstly with a focus on the applications of EM38 to salinity, soil texture, water content and soil water turnover, soil types and boundaries, nutrients and N-turnover and soil sampling designs. Furthermore, results concerning special applications in agriculture, horticulture and archaeology are included. In addition to these investigations, this survey also presents a wide range of practical methods for use. Secondly, the effectiveness of conductivity readings for a specific target in a specific locality is determined by the intensity at which soil factors influence these values in relationship to the desired information. The interpretation and utility of apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) readings are highly location- and soil-specific, so soil properties influencing the measurement of ECa must be clearly understood. From the various calibration results, it appears that regression constants for the relationships between ECa, electrical conductivity of aqueous soil extracts (ECe), texture, yield, etc., are not necessarily transferable from one region to another. The modelling of ECa, soil properties, climate and yield are important for identifying the location to which specific utilizations of ECa technology (e.g., ECa−texture relationships) can be appropriately applied. In general, the determination of absolute levels of ECa is frequently not possible, but it appears to be quite a robust method to detect relative differences, both spatially and temporally. Often, the use of ECa is restricted to its application as a covariate or the use of the readings in a relative sense rather than as absolute terms. PMID:29113048

  13. An experimental palladium-103 seed (OptiSeedexp) in a biocompatible polymer without a gold marker: characterization of dosimetric parameters including the interseed effect.

    PubMed

    Abboud, F; Scalliet, P; Vynckier, S

    2008-12-01

    Permanent implantation of 125I (iodine) or 103Pd (palladium) sources is a popular treatment option in the management of early stage prostate cancer. New sources are being developed, some of which are being marketed for different clinical applications. A new technique of adjuvant stereotactic permanent seed breast implant, similar to that used in the treatment of prostate cancer, has been proposed by [N. Jansen et al., Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 67, 1052-1058 (2007)] with encouraging results. The presence of artifacts from the metallic seeds, however, can disturb follow-up imaging. The development of plastic seeds has reduced these artifacts. This paper presents a feasibility study of the advantages of palladium-103 seeds, encapsulated with a biocompatible polymer, for future clinical applications, and on the effect of the gold marker on the dosimetric characteristics of such seeds. Experimental palladium seeds, OptiSeedexp, were manufactured by International Brachytherapy (IBt), Seneffe, Belgium, from a biocompatible polymer, including the marker. Apart from the absence of a gold marker, the studied seed has an identical design to the OptiSeed103 [Phys. Med. Biol. 50, 1493-1504 (2005)]; [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 63, 311-321 (2005)]. Polymer encapsulation was preferred by IBt in order to reduce the quantity of radioactive material needed for a given dose rate and to reduce the anisotropy of the radiation field around the seed. In addition, this design is intended to decrease the interseed effects that can occur as a result of the marker and the encapsulation. Dosimetric measurements were performed using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (1 mm3) in solid water phantoms (WT1). Measured data were compared to Monte Carlo simulated data in solid water using the MCNP code, version 4C. Updated cross sections [Med. Phys. 30, 701-711 (2003)] were used. As the measured and calculated data were in agreement, Monte Carlo calculations were then performed in liquid water to

  14. An experimental palladium-103 seed (OptiSeed{sup exp}) in a biocompatible polymer without a gold marker: Characterization of dosimetric parameters including the interseed effect

    SciT

    Abboud, F.; Scalliet, P.; Vynckier, S.

    Permanent implantation of {sup 125}I (iodine) or {sup 103}Pd (palladium) sources is a popular treatment option in the management of early stage prostate cancer. New sources are being developed, some of which are being marketed for different clinical applications. A new technique of adjuvant stereotactic permanent seed breast implant, similar to that used in the treatment of prostate cancer, has been proposed by [N. Jansen et al., Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 67, 1052-1058 (2007)] with encouraging results. The presence of artifacts from the metallic seeds, however, can disturb follow-up imaging. The development of plastic seeds has reduced thesemore » artifacts. This paper presents a feasibility study of the advantages of palladium-103 seeds, encapsulated with a biocompatible polymer, for future clinical applications, and on the effect of the gold marker on the dosimetric characteristics of such seeds. Experimental palladium seeds, OptiSeed{sup exp}, were manufactured by International Brachytherapy (IBt), Seneffe, Belgium, from a biocompatible polymer, including the marker. Apart from the absence of a gold marker, the studied seed has an identical design to the OptiSeed{sup 103}[Phys. Med. Biol. 50, 1493-1504 (2005)]; [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 63, 311-321 (2005)]. Polymer encapsulation was preferred by IBt in order to reduce the quantity of radioactive material needed for a given dose rate and to reduce the anisotropy of the radiation field around the seed. In addition, this design is intended to decrease the interseed effects that can occur as a result of the marker and the encapsulation. Dosimetric measurements were performed using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (1 mm{sup 3}) in solid water phantoms (WT1). Measured data were compared to Monte Carlo simulated data in solid water using the MCNP code, version 4C. Updated cross sections [Med. Phys. 30, 701-711 (2003)] were used. As the measured and calculated data were in agreement, Monte Carlo calculations were

  15. Effects of sampling techniques on physical parameters and concentrations of selected persistent organic pollutants in suspended matter.

    PubMed

    Pohlert, Thorsten; Hillebrand, Gudrun; Breitung, Vera

    2011-06-01

    This study focusses on the effect of sampling techniques for suspended matter in stream water on subsequent particle-size distribution and concentrations of total organic carbon and selected persistent organic pollutants. The key questions are whether differences between the sampling techniques are due to the separation principle of the devices or due to the difference between time-proportional versus integral sampling. Several multivariate homogeneity tests were conducted on an extensive set of field-data that covers the period from 2002 to 2007, when up to three different sampling techniques were deployed in parallel at four monitoring stations of the River Rhine. The results indicate homogeneity for polychlorinated biphenyls, but significant effects due to the sampling techniques on particle-size, organic carbon and hexachlorobenzene. The effects can be amplified depending on the site characteristics of the monitoring stations.

  16. 13C-Methyl Formate: Observations of a Sample of High-mass Star-forming Regions Including orion-KL and Spectroscopic Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favre, Cécile; Carvajal, Miguel; Field, David; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Brouillet, Nathalie; Despois, Didier; Baudry, Alain; Kleiner, Isabelle; Bergin, Edwin A.; Crockett, Nathan R.; Neill, Justin L.; Margulès, Laurent; Huet, Thérèse R.; Demaison, Jean

    2014-12-01

    We have surveyed a sample of massive star-forming regions located over a range of distances from the Galactic center for methyl formate, HCOOCH3, and its isotopologues H13COOCH3 and HCOO13CH3. The observations were carried out with the APEX telescope in the frequency range 283.4-287.4 GHz. Based on the APEX observations, we report tentative detections of the 13C-methyl formate isotopologue HCOO13CH3 toward the following four massive star-forming regions: Sgr B2(N-LMH), NGC 6334 IRS 1, W51 e2, and G19.61-0.23. In addition, we have used the 1 mm ALMA science verification observations of Orion-KL and confirm the detection of the 13C-methyl formate species in Orion-KL and image its spatial distribution. Our analysis shows that the 12C/13C isotope ratio in methyl formate toward the Orion-KL Compact Ridge and Hot Core-SW components (68.4 ± 10.1 and 71.4 ± 7.8, respectively) are, for both the 13C-methyl formate isotopologues, commensurate with the average 12C/13C ratio of CO derived toward Orion-KL. Likewise, regarding the other sources, our results are consistent with the 12C/13C in CO. We also report the spectroscopic characterization, which includes a complete partition function, of the complex H13COOCH3 and HCOO13CH3 species. New spectroscopic data for both isotopomers H13COOCH3 and HCOO13CH3, presented in this study, have made it possible to measure this fundamentally important isotope ratio in a large organic molecule for the first time. This publication is based on data acquired with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). APEX is a collaboration between the Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, the European Southern Observatory, and the Onsala Space Observatory (under program ID 089.F-9319).

  17. {sup 13}C-METHYL FORMATE: OBSERVATIONS OF A SAMPLE OF HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS INCLUDING ORION-KL AND SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION

    SciT

    Favre, Cécile; Bergin, Edwin A.; Crockett, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    We have surveyed a sample of massive star-forming regions located over a range of distances from the Galactic center for methyl formate, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and its isotopologues H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3}. The observations were carried out with the APEX telescope in the frequency range 283.4-287.4 GHz. Based on the APEX observations, we report tentative detections of the {sup 13}C-methyl formate isotopologue HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3} toward the following four massive star-forming regions: Sgr B2(N-LMH), NGC 6334 IRS 1, W51 e2, and G19.61-0.23. In addition, we have used the 1 mm ALMA science verification observations of Orion-KL and confirm the detection ofmore » the {sup 13}C-methyl formate species in Orion-KL and image its spatial distribution. Our analysis shows that the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope ratio in methyl formate toward the Orion-KL Compact Ridge and Hot Core-SW components (68.4 ± 10.1 and 71.4 ± 7.8, respectively) are, for both the {sup 13}C-methyl formate isotopologues, commensurate with the average {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio of CO derived toward Orion-KL. Likewise, regarding the other sources, our results are consistent with the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C in CO. We also report the spectroscopic characterization, which includes a complete partition function, of the complex H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3} species. New spectroscopic data for both isotopomers H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3}, presented in this study, have made it possible to measure this fundamentally important isotope ratio in a large organic molecule for the first time.« less

  18. Small Sample Properties of Asymptotically Efficient Estimators of the Parameters of a Bivariate Gaussian–Weibull Distribution

    Steve P. Verrill; James W. Evans; David E. Kretschmann; Cherilyn A. Hatfield

    2012-01-01

    Two important wood properties are stiffness (modulus of elasticity or MOE) and bending strength (modulus of rupture or MOR). In the past, MOE has often been modeled as a Gaussian and MOR as a lognormal or a two or three parameter Weibull. It is well known that MOE and MOR are positively correlated. To model the simultaneous behavior of MOE and MOR for the purposes of...

  19. Some Physical, Chemical, and Biological Parameters of Samples of Scleractinium Coral Aquaculture Skeleton Used for Reconstruction/Engineering of the Bone Tissue.

    PubMed

    Popov, A A; Sergeeva, N S; Britaev, T A; Komlev, V S; Sviridova, I K; Kirsanova, V A; Akhmedova, S A; Dgebuadze, P Yu; Teterina, A Yu; Kuvshinova, E A; Schanskii, Ya D

    2015-08-01

    Physical and chemical (phase and chemical composition, dynamics of resorption, and strength properties), and biological (cytological compatibility and scaffold properties of the surface) properties of samples of scleractinium coral skeletons from aquacultures of three types and corresponding samples of natural coral skeletons (Pocillopora verrucosa, Acropora formosa, and Acropora nobilis) were studied. Samples of scleractinium coral aquaculture skeleton of A. nobilis, A. formosa, and P. verrucosa met the requirements (all study parameters) to materials for osteoplasty and 3D-scaffolds for engineering of bone tissue.

  20. Determination of water-extractable nonstructural carbohydrates, including inulin, in grass samples with high-performance anion exchange chromatography and pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Raessler, Michael; Wissuwa, Bianka; Breul, Alexander; Unger, Wolfgang; Grimm, Torsten

    2008-09-10

    The exact and reliable determination of carbohydrates in plant samples of different origin is of great importance with respect to plant physiology. Additionally, the identification and quantification of carbohydrates are necessary for the evaluation of the impact of these compounds on the biogeochemistry of carbon. To attain this goal, it is necessary to analyze a great number of samples with both high sensitivity and selectivity within a limited time frame. This paper presents a rugged and easy method that allows the isocratic chromatographic determination of 12 carbohydrates and sugar alcohols from one sample within 30 min. The method was successfully applied to a variety of plant materials with particular emphasis on perennial ryegrass samples of the species Lolium perenne. The method was easily extended to the analysis of the polysaccharide inulin after its acidic hydrolysis into the corresponding monomers without the need for substantial change of chromatographic conditions or even the use of enzymes. It therefore offers a fundamental advantage for the analysis of the complex mixture of nonstructural carbohydrates often found in plant samples.

  1. Determination of drugs in surface water and wastewater samples by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: Methods and preliminary results including toxicity studies with Vibrio fischeri

    Farre, M.; Ferrer, I.; Ginebreda, A.; Figueras, M.; Olivella, L.; Tirapu, L.; Vilanova, M.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work a combined analytical method involving toxicity and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) was developed for the determination of pharmaceutical compounds in water samples. The drugs investigated were the analgesics: ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, and diclofenac, the decomposition product of the acetyl salicylic acid: salicylic acid and one lipid lowering agent, gemfibrozil. The selected compounds are acidic substances, very polar and all of them are analgesic compounds that can be purchased without medical prescription. The developed protocol consisted, first of all, on the use Microtox?? and ToxAlert??100 toxicity tests with Vibrio fischeri for the different pharmaceutical drugs. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) values and the toxicity units (TU) were determined for every compound using both systems. Sample enrichment of water samples was achieved by solid-phase extraction procedure (SPE), using the Merck LiChrolut?? EN cartridges followed by LC-ESI-MS. Average recoveries loading 1 l of samples with pH=2 varied from 69 to 91% and the detection limits in the range of 15-56 ng/l. The developed method was applied to real samples from wastewater and surface-river waters of Catalonia (north-east of Spain). One batch of samples was analyzed in parallel also by High Resolution Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (HRGC-MS) and the results have been compared with the LC-ESI-MS method developed in this work. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Correlation between Asian Dust and Specific Radioactivities of Fission Products Included in Airborne Samples in Tokushima, Shikoku Island, Japan, Due to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    SciT

    Sakama, M., E-mail: minorusakama@tokushima-u.ac.jp; Nagano, Y.; Kitade, T.

    2014-06-15

    Radioactive fission product {sup 131}I released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (FD-NPP) was first detected on March 23, 2011 in an airborne aerosol sample collected at Tokushima, Shikoku Island, located in western Japan. Two other radioactive fission products, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs were also observed in a sample collected from April 2 to 4, 2011. The maximum specific radioactivities observed in this work were about 2.5 to 3.5 mBq×m{sup -3} in a airborne aerosol sample collected on April 6. During the course of the continuous monitoring, we also made our first observation of seasonal Asian Dust andmore » those fission products associated with the FDNPP accident concurrently from May 2 to 5, 2011. We found that the specific radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs decreased drastically only during the period of Asian Dust. And also, it was found that this trend was very similar to the atmospheric elemental concentration (ng×m{sup -3}) variation of stable cesium ({sup 133}Cs) quantified by elemental analyses using our developed ICP-DRC-MS instrument.« less

  3. Evaluation of parameters affecting quantitative detection of Escherichia coli O157 in enriched water samples using immunomagnetic electrochemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Daniel R; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S; Wachtel, Marian R; Belt, Kenneth T; Karns, Jeffrey S

    2003-12-01

    We report here the use of immunomagnetic (IM) electrochemiluminescence (ECL) for quantitative detection of Esherichia coli O157:H7 in water samples following enrichment in minimal lactose broth (MLB). IM beads prepared in-house with four commercial anti-O157 monoclonal antibodies were compared for efficiency of cell capture. IM-ECL responses for E. coli O157:H7 (strain SEA13B88) were similar for all four commercial anti-O157 LPS monoclonal antibodies. The ECL signal was linearly correlated with E. coli O157:H7 cell concentration, indicating a constant ECL response per cell. Twenty-two strains of E. coli O157:H7 or O157:NM gave comparable ECL signals using IM beads prepared in-house. To assess the potential for interference from background bacteria in MLB-enriched water samples, 10(4) cells of E. coli O157:H7 (strain SEA13B88) were added to enriched samples prior to analysis. There was considerable variability in recovery of E. coli O157:H7 cells; net ECL signals ranged from 1% to 100% of expected values (i.e., percent inhibition from 0% to 99%). Cultures of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Enterobacter cloacae, subsequently isolated from MLB-enriched water samples via IM separation (IMS), were observed to interfere with the binding of E. coli O157:H7 cells to IM beads. Recoveries of 10(4) E. coli O157:H7 cells were samples that contain ca. 10(9) total lactose-fermenting bacteria ml(-1). Assuming comparable growth rates for E. coli O157:H7 and other lactose

  4. Influence of sexual stimulation on sperm parameters in semen samples collected via masturbation from normozoospermic men or cryptozoospermic men participating in an assisted reproduction programme.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Sofikitis, N; Mio, Y; Miyagawa, I

    2000-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of sexual stimulation via sexually stimulating videotaped visual images (VIM) on sperm function, two semen samples were collected from each of 19 normozoospermic men via masturbation with VIM. Two additional samples were collected from each man via masturbation without VIM. The volume of seminal plasma, total sperm count, sperm motility, percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa, outcome of hypo-osmotic swelling test and zona-free hamster oocyte sperm penetration assay, and markers of the secretory function of prostate were significantly larger in semen samples collected via masturbation with VIM than masturbation without VIM. The improved sperm parameters in the samples collected via masturbation with VIM may reflect an enhanced prostatic secretory function and increased loading of the vas deferens at that time. In a similar protocol, two semen samples were collected via masturbation with VIM from each of 22 non-obstructed azoospermic men. Semen samples from these men had been occasionally positive in the past for a very small number of spermatozoa (cryptozoospermic men). Two additional samples were collected from each cryptozoospermic man via masturbation without VIM. The volume of seminal plasma, total sperm count, sperm motility, and a marker of the secretory function of prostate were significantly larger in semen samples collected via masturbation with VIM. Fourteen out of the 22 men were negative for spermatozoa in both samples collected via masturbation without VIM. These men demonstrated spermatozoa in both samples collected via masturbation with VIM. Six men with immotile spermatozoa in both samples collected via masturbation without VIM exposed motile spermatozoa in both samples collected via masturbation with VIM. High sexual stimulation during masturbation with VIM results in recovery of spermatozoa of greater fertilizing potential both in normozoospermic and cryptozoospermic men. The appearance of spermatozoa after

  5. A multiparametric analysis of the Einstein sample of early-type galaxies. 1: Luminosity and ISM parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Paul B.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Kim, Dong-Woo

    1995-01-01

    We have conducted bivariate and multivariate statistical analysis of data measuring the luminosity and interstellar medium of the Einstein sample of early-type galaxies (presented by Fabbiano, Kim, & Trinchieri 1992). We find a strong nonlinear correlation between L(sub B) and L(sub X), with a power-law slope of 1.8 +/- 0.1, steepening to 2.0 +/- if we do not consider the Local Group dwarf galaxies M32 and NGC 205. Considering only galaxies with log L(sub X) less than or equal to 40.5, we instead find a slope of 1.0 +/- 0.2 (with or without the Local Group dwarfs). Although E and S0 galaxies have consistent slopes for their L(sub B)-L(sub X) relationships, the mean values of the distribution functions of both L(sub X) and L(sub X)/L(sub B) for the S0 galaxies are lower than those for the E galaxies at the 2.8 sigma and 3.5 sigma levels, respectively. We find clear evidence for a correlation between L(sub X) and the X-ray color C(sub 21), defined by Kim, Fabbiano, & Trinchieri (1992b), which indicates that X-ray luminosity is correlated with the spectral shape below 1 keV in the sense that low-L(sub X) systems have relatively large contributions from a soft component compared with high-L(sub X) systems. We find evidence from our analysis of the 12 micron IRAS data for our sample that our S0 sample has excess 12 micron emission compared with the E sample, scaled by their optical luminosities. This may be due to emission from dust heated in star-forming regions in S0 disks. This interpretation is reinforced by the existence of a strong L(sub 12)-L(sub 100) correlation for our S0 sample that is not found for the E galaxies, and by an analysis of optical-IR colors. We find steep slopes for power-law relationships between radio luminosity and optical, X-ray, and far-IR (FIR) properties. This last point argues that the presence of an FIR-emitting interstellar medium (ISM) in early-type galaxies is coupled to their ability to generate nonthermal radio continuum, as

  6. Experimental research of the influence of the strength of ore samples on the parameters of an electromagnetic signal during acoustic excitation in the process of uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavorovich, L. V.; Bespal`ko, A. A.; Fedotov, P. I.

    2018-01-01

    Parameters of electromagnetic responses (EMRe) generated during uniaxial compression of rock samples under excitation by deterministic acoustic pulses are presented and discussed. Such physical modeling in the laboratory allows to reveal the main regularities of electromagnetic signals (EMS) generation in rock massive. The influence of the samples mechanical properties on the parameters of the EMRe excited by an acoustic signal in the process of uniaxial compression is considered. It has been established that sulfides and quartz in the rocks of the Tashtagol iron ore deposit (Western Siberia, Russia) contribute to the conversion of mechanical energy into the energy of the electromagnetic field, which is expressed in an increase in the EMS amplitude. The decrease in the EMS amplitude when the stress-strain state of the sample changes during the uniaxial compression is observed when the amount of conductive magnetite contained in the rock is increased. The obtained results are important for the physical substantiation of testing methods and monitoring of changes in the stress-strain state of the rock massive by the parameters of electromagnetic signals and the characteristics of electromagnetic emission.

  7. Relation between sources of particulate air pollution and biological effect parameters in samples from four European cities: An exploratory study

    SciT

    Steerenberg, P.A.; van Amelsvoort, L.; Lovik, M.

    2006-05-15

    Given that there are widely different prevalence rates of respiratory allergies and asthma between the countries of Europe and that exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) is substantial in urban environments throughout Europe, an EU project entitled 'Respiratory Allergy and Inflammation Due to Ambient Particles' (RAIAP) was set up. The project focused on the role of physical and chemical composition of PM on release of cytokines of cells in vitro, on respiratory inflammation in vivo, and on adjuvant potency in allergy animal models. Coarse (2.5 - 10 {mu}m) and fine (0.15 - 2.5 {mu}m) particles were collected during the spring,more » summer and winter in Rome ( I), Oslo (N), Lodz (PL), and Amsterdam (NL). Markers within the same model were often well correlated. Markers of inflammation in the in vitro and in vivo models also showed a high degree of correlation. In contrast, correlation between parameters in the different allergy models and between allergy and inflammation markers was generally poor. This suggests that various bioassays are needed to assess the potential hazard of PM. The present study also showed that by clustering chemical constituents of PM based on the overall response pattern in the bioassays, five distinct groups could be identified. The clusters of traffic, industrial combustion and/or incinerators, and combustion of black and brown coal/wood smoke were associated primarily with adjuvant activity for respiratory allergy, whereas clusters of crustal of material and sea spray are predominantly associated with measures for inflammation and acute toxicity. The present study has shown that biological effect of PM can be linked to one or more PM emission sources and that this linkage requires a wide range of bioassays.« less

  8. Optimization of the SPME parameters and its online coupling with HPLC for the analysis of tricyclic antidepressants in plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Alves, Claudete; Fernandes, Christian; Dos Santos Neto, Alvaro José; Rodrigues, José Carlos; Costa Queiroz, Maria Eugênia; Lanças, Fernando Mauro

    2006-07-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-liquid chromatography (LC) is used to analyze tricyclic antidepressant drugs desipramine, imipramine, nortriptyline, amitriptyline, and clomipramine (internal standard) in plasma samples. Extraction conditions are optimized using a 2(3) factorial design plus a central point to evaluate the influence of the time, temperature, and matrix pH. A Polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (60-mum film thickness) fiber is selected after the assessment of different types of coating. The chromatographic separation is realized using a C(18) column (150 x 4.6 mm, 5-microm particles), ammonium acetate buffer (0.05 mol/L, pH 5.50)-acetonitrile (55:45 v/v) with 0.1% of triethylamine as mobile phase and UV-vis detection at 214 nm. Among the factorial design conditions evaluated, the best results are obtained at a pH 11.0, temperature of 30 degrees C, and extraction time of 45 min. The proposed method, using a lab-made SPME-LC interface, allowed the determination of tricyclic antidepressants in in plasma at therapeutic concentration levels.

  9. Clinical presentation of hyperthyroidism in a large representative sample of outpatients in France: relationships with age, aetiology and hormonal parameters.

    PubMed

    Goichot, B; Caron, Ph; Landron, F; Bouée, S

    2016-03-01

    Signs and symptoms of thyrotoxicosis are not specific, and thyroid function tests are frequently prescribed to recognize such thyroid dysfunction. Ultrasensitive assays of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) allow early diagnosis and identification of mild hyperthyroidism (generally designed as 'subclinical'). The aim of this study was to re-evaluate the clinical picture of thyrotoxicosis in the context of the current large utilization of ultrasensitive TSH assays. Prospective descriptive cohort. Clinical presentation of 1572 patients with a recent (<3 months) diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis recruited by a large representative sample of 263 French endocrinologists was studied using two questionnaires (one at inclusion and the second after 3 months) concerning symptoms, hormonal evaluation and treatment. A total of 1240 (78·9%) patients were women, mean age 48 ± 17 years. Subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCHT) was present in 86 patients (10·4%). Symptoms of thyrotoxicosis were in decreasing frequency order: palpitations, weakness, heat-related signs and disturbed sleep. A total of 64·9% of patients had lost weight. Signs and symptoms were more frequent in Graves' disease, in young patients, and were partially related to biochemical severity. Symptoms were less frequent in elderly patients except for cardiac manifestations (atrial fibrillation). Most patients with SCHT had one or several signs or symptoms of thyrotoxicosis. This study confirms that elderly patients have less symptoms of thyrotoxicosis than younger subjects but are at increased risk of cardiac complications. Our results show that most patients with 'subclinical' HT have in fact signs or symptoms of thyrotoxicosis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Patient perspectives on disparities in healthcare from African-American, Asian, Hispanic, and Native American samples including a secondary analysis of the Institute of Medicine focus group data.

    PubMed

    Gaston-Johansson, Fannie; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Oguntomilade, Lola; Bradley, Vanessa; Mason, Phyllis

    2007-12-01

    The existence of racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare in the United States is well recognized. However, often overlooked in the planning and design of initiatives to address those disparities are the patient perspectives regarding the issues of racial and ethnic disparities that directly affect them. The objective of this study was to identify the patient priorities and to provide recommendations for action to improve minority health-care quality. A secondary objective was the qualitative analysis of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) focus group data. Six focus groups were conducted with nine participants in each. These included an African-American focus group in Washington, D.C., an African-American focus group in Los Angeles, an Asian focus group in Los Angeles, an Hispanic focus group in Washington, D.C., an Hispanic focus group in Los Angeles, and a Native American focus group in Albuquerque, NM. The barriers and priorities for action included difficulty in making informed choices when identifying and selecting providers, poor service delivery from medical office staff, the inefficiency of medical visits, provider communication and cultural competence barriers, and stressful treatment settings. Patient recommendations targeted provision of tools to empower patients throughout the process of care, provider and staff training in communication and cultural competence, alternate models of service delivery, and accessible mechanisms for evaluation and oversight. This study concluded that patient-identified priorities and recommendations warranted modification of current explanatory models for minority health-care quality and the provision of greater clarity regarding directions for policy and behavioral initiatives and criteria for performance evaluation be advanced.

  11. Sorption of Sr, Co and Zn on illite: Batch experiments and modelling including Co in-diffusion measurements on compacted samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, V.; Baeyens, B.; Glaus, M. A.; Kupcik, T.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Van Laer, L.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Schäfer, T.

    2018-02-01

    Experimental investigations on the uptake of divalent cations (Sr, Co and Zn) onto illite (Illite du Puy, Le-Puy-en-Velay, France) were carried out by three different international research groups (Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal, KIT (Germany), Group Waste & Disposal, SCK-CEN, (Belgium) and Laboratory for Waste Management, PSI (Switzerland)) in the framework of the European FP7 CatClay project. The dependence of solid-liquid distribution ratios (Rd values) on pH at trace metal conditions (sorption edges) and on the metal ion concentration (sorption isotherms) was determined in dilute suspensions of homo-ionic Na-illite (Na-IdP) under controlled N2 atmosphere. The experimental results were modelled using the 2 Site Protolysis Non Electrostatic Surface Complexation and Cation Exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) sorption model. The sorption of Sr depends strongly on ionic strength, while a rather weak pH dependence is observed in a pH range between 3 and 11. The data were modelled with cation exchange reactions, taking into account competition with H, K, Ca, Mg and Al, and surface complexation on weak amphotheric edge sites at higher pH values. The sorption of Co on Na-IdP, however, is strongly pH dependent. Cation exchange on the planar sites and surface complexation on strong and weak amphoteric edge sites were used to describe the Co sorption data. Rd values for Co derived from in-diffusion measurements on compacted Na-IdP samples (bulk-dry density of 1700 kg m-3) between pH 5.0 and 9.0 are in good agreement with the batch sorption data. The equivalence of both approaches to measure sorption was thus confirmed for the present test system. In addition, the results highlight the importance of both major and minor surface species for the diffusive transport behaviour of strongly sorbing metal cations. While surface complexes at the edge sites determine largely the Rd value, the diffusive flux may be governed by those species bound to the planar sites, even at low fractional

  12. Measurement of spectral characteristics and CCT mixture of PDMS and the luminophore depending on the geometric parameters and the concentration of the samples of the special optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jargus, Jan; Nedoma, Jan; Fajkus, Marcel; Novak, Martin; Bednarek, Lukas; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2017-05-01

    White light is produced by a suitable combination of spectral components RGB (colors) or through exposure excitation of blue light (the blue component of light). This blue part of the light is partly and suitably transformed by luminophore so that the resulting emitted spectrum corresponded to the spectral characteristics of white light with a given correlated color temperature (CCT). This paper deals with the measurement of optical properties of a mixture polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and luminophore, which is irradiated by the blue LED (Light-Emitting Diode) to obtain the white color of light. The subject of the investigation is the dependence of CCT on the concentration of the luminophore in a mixture of PDMS and different geometrical parameters of the samples. There are many kinds of PDMS and luminophore. We used PDMS Sylgard 184 and luminophore-labeled U2. More accurately Yttrium Aluminium Oxide: Cerium Y3Al5O12: Ce. From the analyzed data, we determined, which mutual combinations of concentration of the mixture of luminophore and PDMS together with the geometric parameters of the samples of the special optical fibers are suitable for illumination, while we get the desired CCT.

  13. Histogram analysis parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can predict histopathological findings including proliferation potential, cellularity, and nucleic areas in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Surov, Alexey; Meyer, Hans Jonas; Leifels, Leonard; Höhn, Anne-Kathrin; Richter, Cindy; Winter, Karsten

    2018-04-20

    Our purpose was to analyze possible associations between histogram analysis parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging DCE MRI and histopathological findings like proliferation index, cell count and nucleic areas in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). 30 patients (mean age 57.0 years) with primary HNSCC were included in the study. In every case, histogram analysis parameters of K trans , V e , and K ep were estimated using a mathlab based software. Tumor proliferation index, cell count, and nucleic areas were estimated on Ki 67 antigen stained specimens. Spearman's non-parametric rank sum correlation coefficients were calculated between DCE and different histopathological parameters. KI 67 correlated with K trans min ( p = -0.386, P = 0.043) and s K trans skewness ( p = 0.382, P = 0.045), V e min ( p = -0.473, P = 0.011), Ve entropy ( p = 0.424, P = 0.025), and K ep entropy ( p = 0.464, P = 0.013). Cell count correlated with K trans kurtosis ( p = 0.40, P = 0.034), V e entropy ( p = 0.475, P = 0.011). Total nucleic area correlated with V e max ( p = 0.386, P = 0.042) and V e entropy ( p = 0.411, P = 0.030). In G1/2 tumors, only K trans entropy correlated well with total ( P =0.78, P =0.013) and average nucleic areas ( p = 0.655, P = 0.006). In G3 tumors, KI 67 correlated with Ve min ( p = -0.552, P = 0.022) and V e entropy ( p = 0.524, P = 0.031). Ve max correlated with total nucleic area ( p = 0.483, P = 0.049). Kep max correlated with total area ( p = -0.51, P = 0.037), and K ep entropy with KI 67 ( p = 0.567, P = 0.018). We concluded that histogram-based parameters skewness, kurtosis and entropy of K trans , V e , and K ep can be used as markers for proliferation activity, cellularity and nucleic content in HNSCC. Tumor grading influences significantly associations between perfusion and histopathological parameters.

  14. [Environmental surveillance of a sample of indoor swimming pools from Emilia Romagna region: microclimate characteristics and chemical parameters, particularly disinfection by products, in pool waters].

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, G; Righi, E; Predieri, G; Giacobazzi, P; Mastroianni, K; Aggazzotti, G

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the environmental and healthy aspects from a representative sample of indoor swimming pools located in the Emilia Romagna region. During the sampling sessions, the occupational environment was evaluated in terms of microclimate parameters and thermal comfort/discomfort conditions. Moreover the chemical risk was assessed by analyzing from the pool water the presence of disinfection by-products (DBPs), such as: trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), chlorite, chlorate and bromate. The analytical results are in agreement with the Italian legislation (Accordo Stato-Regioni; 2003) even if in some of the sampled indoor swimming pools, the dosed combined chlorine levels, were greater than the Italian limit. With the regard to the microclimate conditions evaluation, the considered thermal indices, Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) and Predicted Percentage of Dissatisfied (PPD%), described a satisfactory occupational environment. Among DBPs, the THMs mean levels (41.4 +/- 30.0 microg/l) resulted close to the values of the current Italian drinking water legislation, and seem to not represent an health issue. The pool waters chlorate levels (range: 5 - 19537 microg/l) need further investigations as recent epidemiological studies on drinking water hypothesized a potential genotoxicity effect of these compounds which are involved in cellular oxidative processes.

  15. Systematic Evaluation of Non-Uniform Sampling Parameters in the Targeted Analysis of Urine Metabolites by 1H,1H 2D NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schlippenbach, Trixi von; Oefner, Peter J; Gronwald, Wolfram

    2018-03-09

    Non-uniform sampling (NUS) allows the accelerated acquisition of multidimensional NMR spectra. The aim of this contribution was the systematic evaluation of the impact of various quantitative NUS parameters on the accuracy and precision of 2D NMR measurements of urinary metabolites. Urine aliquots spiked with varying concentrations (15.6-500.0 µM) of tryptophan, tyrosine, glutamine, glutamic acid, lactic acid, and threonine, which can only be resolved fully by 2D NMR, were used to assess the influence of the sampling scheme, reconstruction algorithm, amount of omitted data points, and seed value on the quantitative performance of NUS in 1 H, 1 H-TOCSY and 1 H, 1 H-COSY45 NMR spectroscopy. Sinusoidal Poisson-gap sampling and a compressed sensing approach employing the iterative re-weighted least squares method for spectral reconstruction allowed a 50% reduction in measurement time while maintaining sufficient quantitative accuracy and precision for both types of homonuclear 2D NMR spectroscopy. Together with other advances in instrument design, such as state-of-the-art cryogenic probes, use of 2D NMR spectroscopy in large biomedical cohort studies seems feasible.

  16. Study on the influence of X-ray tube spectral distribution on the analysis of bulk samples and thin films: Fundamental parameters method and theoretical coefficient algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, Rafał

    2008-11-01

    Knowledge of X-ray tube spectral distribution is necessary in theoretical methods of matrix correction, i.e. in both fundamental parameter (FP) methods and theoretical influence coefficient algorithms. Thus, the influence of X-ray tube distribution on the accuracy of the analysis of thin films and bulk samples is presented. The calculations are performed using experimental X-ray tube spectra taken from the literature and theoretical X-ray tube spectra evaluated by three different algorithms proposed by Pella et al. (X-Ray Spectrom. 14 (1985) 125-135), Ebel (X-Ray Spectrom. 28 (1999) 255-266), and Finkelshtein and Pavlova (X-Ray Spectrom. 28 (1999) 27-32). In this study, Fe-Cr-Ni system is selected as an example and the calculations are performed for X-ray tubes commonly applied in X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), i.e., Cr, Mo, Rh and W. The influence of X-ray tube spectra on FP analysis is evaluated when quantification is performed using various types of calibration samples. FP analysis of bulk samples is performed using pure-element bulk standards and multielement bulk standards similar to the analyzed material, whereas for FP analysis of thin films, the bulk and thin pure-element standards are used. For the evaluation of the influence of X-ray tube spectra on XRF analysis performed by theoretical influence coefficient methods, two algorithms for bulk samples are selected, i.e. Claisse-Quintin (Can. Spectrosc. 12 (1967) 129-134) and COLA algorithms (G.R. Lachance, Paper Presented at the International Conference on Industrial Inorganic Elemental Analysis, Metz, France, June 3, 1981) and two algorithms (constant and linear coefficients) for thin films recently proposed by Sitko (X-Ray Spectrom. 37 (2008) 265-272).

  17. Population pharmacokinetic characterization of BAY 81-8973, a full-length recombinant factor VIII: lessons learned - importance of including samples with factor VIII levels below the quantitation limit.

    PubMed

    Garmann, D; McLeay, S; Shah, A; Vis, P; Maas Enriquez, M; Ploeger, B A

    2017-07-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK), safety and efficacy of BAY 81-8973, a full-length, unmodified, recombinant human factor VIII (FVIII), were evaluated in the LEOPOLD trials. The aim of this study was to develop a population PK model based on pooled data from the LEOPOLD trials and to investigate the importance of including samples with FVIII levels below the limit of quantitation (BLQ) to estimate half-life. The analysis included 1535 PK observations (measured by the chromogenic assay) from 183 male patients with haemophilia A aged 1-61 years from the 3 LEOPOLD trials. The limit of quantitation was 1.5 IU dL -1 for the majority of samples. Population PK models that included or excluded BLQ samples were used for FVIII half-life estimations, and simulations were performed using both estimates to explore the influence on the time below a determined FVIII threshold. In the data set used, approximately 16.5% of samples were BLQ, which is not uncommon for FVIII PK data sets. The structural model to describe the PK of BAY 81-8973 was a two-compartment model similar to that seen for other FVIII products. If BLQ samples were excluded from the model, FVIII half-life estimations were longer compared with a model that included BLQ samples. It is essential to assess the importance of BLQ samples when performing population PK estimates of half-life for any FVIII product. Exclusion of BLQ data from half-life estimations based on population PK models may result in an overestimation of half-life and underestimation of time under a predetermined FVIII threshold, resulting in potential underdosing of patients. © 2017 Bayer AG. Haemophilia Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Optimization of chemical and instrumental parameters in hydride generation laser-induced breakdown spectrometry for the determination of arsenic, antimony, lead and germanium in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Yeşiller, Semira Unal; Yalçın, Serife

    2013-04-03

    A laser induced breakdown spectrometry hyphenated with on-line continuous flow hydride generation sample introduction system, HG-LIBS, has been used for the determination of arsenic, antimony, lead and germanium in aqueous environments. Optimum chemical and instrumental parameters governing chemical hydride generation, laser plasma formation and detection were investigated for each element under argon and nitrogen atmosphere. Arsenic, antimony and germanium have presented strong enhancement in signal strength under argon atmosphere while lead has shown no sensitivity to ambient gas type. Detection limits of 1.1 mg L(-1), 1.0 mg L(-1), 1.3 mg L(-1) and 0.2 mg L(-1) were obtained for As, Sb, Pb and Ge, respectively. Up to 77 times enhancement in detection limit of Pb were obtained, compared to the result obtained from the direct analysis of liquids by LIBS. Applicability of the technique to real water samples was tested through spiking experiments and recoveries higher than 80% were obtained. Results demonstrate that, HG-LIBS approach is suitable for quantitative analysis of toxic elements and sufficiently fast for real time continuous monitoring in aqueous environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular pedigree reconstruction and estimation of evolutionary parameters in a wild Atlantic salmon river system with incomplete sampling: a power analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pedigree reconstruction using genetic analysis provides a useful means to estimate fundamental population biology parameters relating to population demography, trait heritability and individual fitness when combined with other sources of data. However, there remain limitations to pedigree reconstruction in wild populations, particularly in systems where parent-offspring relationships cannot be directly observed, there is incomplete sampling of individuals, or molecular parentage inference relies on low quality DNA from archived material. While much can still be inferred from incomplete or sparse pedigrees, it is crucial to evaluate the quality and power of available genetic information a priori to testing specific biological hypotheses. Here, we used microsatellite markers to reconstruct a multi-generation pedigree of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) using archived scale samples collected with a total trapping system within a river over a 10 year period. Using a simulation-based approach, we determined the optimal microsatellite marker number for accurate parentage assignment, and evaluated the power of the resulting partial pedigree to investigate important evolutionary and quantitative genetic characteristics of salmon in the system. Results We show that at least 20 microsatellites (ave. 12 alleles/locus) are required to maximise parentage assignment and to improve the power to estimate reproductive success and heritability in this study system. We also show that 1.5 fold differences can be detected between groups simulated to have differing reproductive success, and that it is possible to detect moderate heritability values for continuous traits (h2 ~ 0.40) with more than 80% power when using 28 moderately to highly polymorphic markers. Conclusion The methodologies and work flow described provide a robust approach for evaluating archived samples for pedigree-based research, even where only a proportion of the total population is sampled. The

  20. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) Over the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Healthy and Neuropsychiatric Samples: Influence of Stimulation Parameters.

    PubMed

    Dedoncker, Josefien; Brunoni, Andre R; Baeken, Chris; Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Research into the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on cognitive functioning is increasing rapidly. However, methodological heterogeneity in prefrontal tDCS research is also increasing, particularly in technical stimulation parameters that might influence tDCS effects. To systematically examine the influence of technical stimulation parameters on DLPFC-tDCS effects. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of tDCS studies targeting the DLPFC published from the first data available to February 2016. Only single-session, sham-controlled, within-subject studies reporting the effects of tDCS on cognition in healthy controls and neuropsychiatric patients were included. Evaluation of 61 studies showed that after single-session a-tDCS, but not c-tDCS, participants responded faster and more accurately on cognitive tasks. Sub-analyses specified that following a-tDCS, healthy subjects responded faster, while neuropsychiatric patients responded more accurately. Importantly, different stimulation parameters affected a-tDCS effects, but not c-tDCS effects, on accuracy in healthy samples vs. increased current density and density charge resulted in improved accuracy in healthy samples, most prominently in females; for neuropsychiatric patients, task performance during a-tDCS resulted in stronger increases in accuracy rates compared to task performance following a-tDCS. Healthy participants respond faster, but not more accurate on cognitive tasks after a-tDCS. However, increasing the current density and/or charge might be able to enhance response accuracy, particularly in females. In contrast, online task performance leads to greater increases in response accuracy than offline task performance in neuropsychiatric patients. Possible implications and practical recommendations are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of losartan/hydrochlorothiazide treatment, after change from ARB at usual dosage, on blood pressure and various metabolic parameters including high-molecular weight adiponectin in Japanese male hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Hiroshi; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Saito, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    Losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), has been reported to increase serum level of high-molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin, which has beneficial effects on insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. On the other hand, treatment with diuretics was reported to decrease the adiponectin level. In the present study, we investigated the effects of changing the treatment to losartan/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) on blood pressure (BP) and various metabolic parameters in Japanese male hypertensive subjects. This study included 15 subjects whose therapy was changed from a usual dosage of ARB to losartan 50mg/HCTZ 12.5mg daily, and also 14 subjects who continued losartan treatment (50mg/day). Serum HMW-adiponectin concentration was assayed using a commercially available HMW-specific ELISA kit. In the losartan/HCTZ patient group, systolic/diastolic BP decreased from 146/95 to 130/84 mmHg (P = 0.0012 for both). The HbA1c level tended to increase from 5.44 ± 0.39 to 5.55 ± 0.44% (P = 0.0554) and serum creatinine level slightly increased from 0.82 ± 0.12 to 0.87 ± 0.12 mg/dl (P = 0.0015). In contrast, serum TG (125 ± 77 to 149 ± 112 mg/dl), uric acid, and HMW-adiponectin levels (3.24 ± 2.97 to 3.36 ± 2.43 μg/ml) were unchanged. In the 14 patients who continued losartan treatment, systolic/diastolic BP was unchanged from 134/86 to 129/80 mmHg. The HbA1c level tended to increase from 5.26 ± 0.63 to 5.39 ± 0.71% (P = 0.0880), serum creatinine and uric acid levels were unchanged, serum lipids tended to improve, and serum HMW-adiponectin levels increased from 3.03 ± 1.06 to 3.46 ± 1.28 μg/ml (P = 0.0105). In summary, changing treatment to losartan/HCTZ, when changed from a usual dosage of ARB, exerted good BP control, while the HMW-adiponectin level was unchanged in male hypertensive subjects.

  2. Discriminatory ability of quantitative ultrasound parameters and bone mineral density in a population-based sample of postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures: results of the Basel Osteoporosis Study.

    PubMed

    Hartl, F; Tyndall, A; Kraenzlin, M; Bachmeier, C; Gückel, C; Senn, U; Hans, D; Theiler, R

    2002-02-01

    The discriminatory potential to classify subjects with or without vertebral fractures was tested cross-sectionally with different methods for the measurement of bone status in a population-based sample of postmenopausal women. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement at the calcaneus (Lunar Achilles, Hologic Sahara), the proximal phalanges (Igea Bone Profiler), and measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA; Lunar Expert) at several anatomic sites was performed in 500 postmenopausal women (aged 65-75 years) randomly selected from the population. In addition, 50 young female subjects (20-40 years old) had QUS measurements and served as controls to express QUS results as T-score values. Radiographs of the lumbar and thoracic spine were performed in the elderly women. Two independent radiologists reviewed the X-rays for the presence of vertebral fractures. Of 486 eligible study participants, no fracture was seen in 396 participants. Single vertebral fractures were observed in 71 subjects; 19 individuals presented multiple fractures. The overall prevalence of vertebral fractures was 18.5%. Participants without vertebral fractures were compared with subjects with vertebral fractures. Normal statistical distributions were found for all bone measurement results. Risk of vertebral fracture in subjects with no and multiple vertebral fracture was estimated using age adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for QUS and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) values. Each SD decrease in bone measurement increased the risk of multiple vertebral fracture by 3.0 (95% CI, 1.6-5.6) for the Achilles stiffness, by 3.8 (95% CI, 1.8-8.2) for the Sahara QUI, 2.1 (95% CI, 1.3-3.4) for the Bone Profiler amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SOS), and 2.1 (95% CI, 1.2-3.9) and 2.4 (95% CI, 1.3-4.3) for DXA lumbar spine and for DXA total hip, respectively. Results of a discriminant analysis showed sensitivities between 84% and 58% and specificities between 72

  3. The relationships between sixteen perfluorinated compound concentrations in blood serum and food, and other parameters, in the general population of South Korea with proportionate stratified sampling method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Young; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Kang, Dong-Mug; Hwang, Yong-Sik; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2014-02-01

    Serum samples were collected from volunteers of various ages and both genders using a proportionate stratified sampling method, to assess the exposure of the general population in Busan, South Korea to perfluorinated compounds (PFCs). 16 PFCs were investigated in serum samples from 306 adults (124 males and 182 females) and one day composite diet samples (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) from 20 of the serum donors, to investigate the relationship between food and serum PFC concentrations. Perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid were the dominant PFCs in the serum samples, with mean concentrations of 8.4 and 13 ng/mL, respectively. Perfluorotridecanoic acid was the dominant PFC in the composite food samples, ranging from

    samples increased with the age of the volunteer, and were higher in males than in females, similar to the results of other studies. We confirmed from the relationships between questionnaire results and the PFC concentrations in the serum samples, that food is one of the important contribution factors of human exposure to PFCs. However, there were no correlations between the PFC concentrations in the one day composite diet samples and the serum samples, because a one day composite diet sample is not necessarily representative of a person's long-term diet and because of the small number of samples taken. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid quantitation of atorvastatin in process pharmaceutical powder sample using Raman spectroscopy and evaluation of parameters related to accuracy of analysis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Il; Han, Janghee; Woo, Young-Ah; Kim, Jaejin; Kang, Myung Joo

    2018-07-05

    The purpose of this study was to determine the atorvastatin (ATV) content in process pharmaceutical powder sample using Raman spectroscopy. To establish the analysis method, the influence of the type of Raman measurements (back-scattering or transmission mode), preparation of calibration sample (simple admixing or granulation), sample pre-treatment (pelletization), and spectral pretreatment on the Raman spectra was investigated. The characteristic peak of the active compound was more distinctively detected in transmission Raman mode with a laser spot size of 4mm than in the back-scattering method. Preparation of calibration samples by wet granulation, identical to the actual manufacturing process, provided unchanged spectral patterns for the in process sample, with no changes and/or shifts in the spectrum. Pelletization before Raman analysis remarkably improved spectral reproducibility by decreasing the difference in density between the samples. Probabilistic quotient normalization led to accurate and consistent quantification of the ATV content in the calibration samples (standard error of cross validation: 1.21%). Moreover, the drug content in the granules obtained from five commercial batches were reliably quantified, with no statistical difference (p=0.09) with that obtained by HPLC assay. From these findings, we suggest that transmission Raman analysis may be a fast and non-invasive method for the quantification of ATV in actual manufacturing processes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid quantitation of atorvastatin in process pharmaceutical powder sample using Raman spectroscopy and evaluation of parameters related to accuracy of analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Young-Il; Han, Janghee; Woo, Young-Ah; Kim, Jaejin; Kang, Myung Joo

    2018-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the atorvastatin (ATV) content in process pharmaceutical powder sample using Raman spectroscopy. To establish the analysis method, the influence of the type of Raman measurements (back-scattering or transmission mode), preparation of calibration sample (simple admixing or granulation), sample pre-treatment (pelletization), and spectral pretreatment on the Raman spectra was investigated. The characteristic peak of the active compound was more distinctively detected in transmission Raman mode with a laser spot size of 4 mm than in the back-scattering method. Preparation of calibration samples by wet granulation, identical to the actual manufacturing process, provided unchanged spectral patterns for the in process sample, with no changes and/or shifts in the spectrum. Pelletization before Raman analysis remarkably improved spectral reproducibility by decreasing the difference in density between the samples. Probabilistic quotient normalization led to accurate and consistent quantification of the ATV content in the calibration samples (standard error of cross validation: 1.21%). Moreover, the drug content in the granules obtained from five commercial batches were reliably quantified, with no statistical difference (p = 0.09) with that obtained by HPLC assay. From these findings, we suggest that transmission Raman analysis may be a fast and non-invasive method for the quantification of ATV in actual manufacturing processes.

  6. Flavoring Chemicals in E-Cigarettes: Diacetyl, 2,3-Pentanedione, and Acetoin in a Sample of 51 Products, Including Fruit-, Candy-, and Cocktail-Flavored E-Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Joseph G.; Flanigan, Skye S.; LeBlanc, Mallory; Vallarino, Jose; MacNaughton, Piers; Stewart, James H.; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are > 7,000 e-cigarette flavors currently marketed. Flavoring chemicals gained notoriety in the early 2000s when inhalation exposure of the flavoring chemical diacetyl was found to be associated with a disease that became known as “popcorn lung.” There has been limited research on flavoring chemicals in e-cigarettes. Objective: We aimed to determine if the flavoring chemical diacetyl and two other high-priority flavoring chemicals, 2,3-pentanedione and acetoin, are present in a convenience sample of flavored e-cigarettes. Methods: We selected 51 types of flavored e-cigarettes sold by leading e-cigarette brands and flavors we deemed were appealing to youth. E-cigarette contents were fully discharged and the air stream was captured and analyzed for total mass of diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and acetoin, according to OSHA method 1012. Results: At least one flavoring chemical was detected in 47 of 51 unique flavors tested. Diacetyl was detected above the laboratory limit of detection in 39 of the 51 flavors tested, ranging from below the limit of quantification to 239 μg/e-cigarette. 2,3-Pentanedione and acetoin were detected in 23 and 46 of the 51 flavors tested at concentrations up to 64 and 529 μg/e-cigarette, respectively. Conclusion: Because of the associations between diacetyl and bronchiolitis obliterans and other severe respiratory diseases observed in workers, urgent action is recommended to further evaluate this potentially widespread exposure via flavored e-cigarettes. Citation: Allen JG, Flanigan SS, LeBlanc M, Vallarino J, MacNaughton P, Stewart JH, Christiani DC. 2016. Flavoring chemicals in e-cigarettes: diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and acetoin in a sample of 51 products, including fruit-, candy-, and cocktail-flavored e-cigarettes. Environ Health Perspect 124:733–739; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510185 PMID:26642857

  7. Flavoring Chemicals in E-Cigarettes: Diacetyl, 2,3-Pentanedione, and Acetoin in a Sample of 51 Products, Including Fruit-, Candy-, and Cocktail-Flavored E-Cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Allen, Joseph G; Flanigan, Skye S; LeBlanc, Mallory; Vallarino, Jose; MacNaughton, Piers; Stewart, James H; Christiani, David C

    2016-06-01

    There are > 7,000 e-cigarette flavors currently marketed. Flavoring chemicals gained notoriety in the early 2000s when inhalation exposure of the flavoring chemical diacetyl was found to be associated with a disease that became known as "popcorn lung." There has been limited research on flavoring chemicals in e-cigarettes. We aimed to determine if the flavoring chemical diacetyl and two other high-priority flavoring chemicals, 2,3-pentanedione and acetoin, are present in a convenience sample of flavored e-cigarettes. We selected 51 types of flavored e-cigarettes sold by leading e-cigarette brands and flavors we deemed were appealing to youth. E-cigarette contents were fully discharged and the air stream was captured and analyzed for total mass of diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and acetoin, according to OSHA method 1012. At least one flavoring chemical was detected in 47 of 51 unique flavors tested. Diacetyl was detected above the laboratory limit of detection in 39 of the 51 flavors tested, ranging from below the limit of quantification to 239 μg/e-cigarette. 2,3-Pentanedione and acetoin were detected in 23 and 46 of the 51 flavors tested at concentrations up to 64 and 529 μg/e-cigarette, respectively. Because of the associations between diacetyl and bronchiolitis obliterans and other severe respiratory diseases observed in workers, urgent action is recommended to further evaluate this potentially widespread exposure via flavored e-cigarettes. Allen JG, Flanigan SS, LeBlanc M, Vallarino J, MacNaughton P, Stewart JH, Christiani DC. 2016. Flavoring chemicals in e-cigarettes: diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and acetoin in a sample of 51 products, including fruit-, candy-, and cocktail-flavored e-cigarettes. Environ Health Perspect 124:733-739; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510185.

  8. Reliability and Construct Validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised in a Swedish Non-Criminal Sample – A Multimethod Approach including Psychophysiological Correlates of Empathy for Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sörman, Karolina; Nilsonne, Gustav; Howner, Katarina; Tamm, Sandra; Caman, Shilan; Wang, Hui-Xin; Ingvar, Martin; Edens, John F.; Gustavsson, Petter; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Petrovic, Predrag; Fischer, Håkan; Kristiansson, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Cross-cultural investigation of psychopathy measures is important for clarifying the nomological network surrounding the psychopathy construct. The Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R) is one of the most extensively researched self-report measures of psychopathic traits in adults. To date however, it has been examined primarily in North American criminal or student samples. To address this gap in the literature, we examined PPI-R’s reliability, construct validity and factor structure in non-criminal individuals (N = 227) in Sweden, using a multimethod approach including psychophysiological correlates of empathy for pain. PPI-R construct validity was investigated in subgroups of participants by exploring its degree of overlap with (i) the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), (ii) self-rated empathy and behavioral and physiological responses in an experiment on empathy for pain, and (iii) additional self-report measures of alexithymia and trait anxiety. The PPI-R total score was significantly associated with PCL:SV total and factor scores. The PPI-R Coldheartedness scale demonstrated significant negative associations with all empathy subscales and with rated unpleasantness and skin conductance responses in the empathy experiment. The PPI-R higher order Self-Centered Impulsivity and Fearless Dominance dimensions were associated with trait anxiety in opposite directions (positively and negatively, respectively). Overall, the results demonstrated solid reliability (test-retest and internal consistency) and promising but somewhat mixed construct validity for the Swedish translation of the PPI-R. PMID:27300292

  9. Ostertagia ostertagi antibodies in milk samples: relationships with herd management and milk production parameters in two Mediterranean production systems of Spain.

    PubMed

    Almería, S; Adelantado, C; Charlier, J; Claerebout, E; Bach, A

    2009-12-01

    The present study analyzed Ostertagia ostertagi antibodies by indirect ELISA in milk samples in two cattle systems in Mediterranean Spain to indirectly monitor gastrointestinal nematode (GI) parasitism effects on production. Individual samples from 10 animals and the corresponding milk herd samples were collected from 133 herds in Girona (intensive management) and 123 herds in Minorca (extensive management). Both locations showed high and significant positive relationships between average optical density ratios (ODR) of individual animals and ODR in their milk tank. Although antibodies levels were low, there were significantly higher in Minorca. Negative correlations between ODR values and milk production were found in both systems. Importantly, in Minorca, average herd milk production was higher in the herds that treated their animals against GI nematodes compared to those that did not treat. The ELISA technique was valuable to indirectly assess differences in the level of GI nematode infection even in cattle production systems with low levels of infection.

  10. Variable anelastic attenuation and site effect in estimating source parameters of various major earthquakes including M w 7.8 Nepal and M w 7.5 Hindu kush earthquake by using far-field strong-motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Kumar, Parveen; Chauhan, Vishal; Hazarika, Devajit

    2017-10-01

    Strong-motion records of recent Gorkha Nepal earthquake ( M w 7.8), its strong aftershocks and seismic events of Hindu kush region have been analysed for estimation of source parameters. The M w 7.8 Gorkha Nepal earthquake of 25 April 2015 and its six aftershocks of magnitude range 5.3-7.3 are recorded at Multi-Parametric Geophysical Observatory, Ghuttu, Garhwal Himalaya (India) >600 km west from the epicentre of main shock of Gorkha earthquake. The acceleration data of eight earthquakes occurred in the Hindu kush region also recorded at this observatory which is located >1000 km east from the epicentre of M w 7.5 Hindu kush earthquake on 26 October 2015. The shear wave spectra of acceleration record are corrected for the possible effects of anelastic attenuation at both source and recording site as well as for site amplification. The strong-motion data of six local earthquakes are used to estimate the site amplification and the shear wave quality factor ( Q β) at recording site. The frequency-dependent Q β( f) = 124 f 0.98 is computed at Ghuttu station by using inversion technique. The corrected spectrum is compared with theoretical spectrum obtained from Brune's circular model for the horizontal components using grid search algorithm. Computed seismic moment, stress drop and source radius of the earthquakes used in this work range 8.20 × 1016-5.72 × 1020 Nm, 7.1-50.6 bars and 3.55-36.70 km, respectively. The results match with the available values obtained by other agencies.

  11. Effects of depletion sampling by standard three-pass pulsed DC electrofishing on blood chemistry parameters of fishes from Appalachian streams

    Densmore, Christine L.; Panek, Frank M.

    2013-01-01

    Adverse effects on fishes captured by electrofishing techniques have long been recognized, although the extent of associated physical injury and behavioral alterations are highly variable and dependent on a number of factors. We examined the effects of three-pass pulsed DC (PDC) electrofishing on two salmonid species (Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis) and five other genera (Green Sunfish Lepomis cyanellus, Potomac Sculpin Cottus girardi, Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas, Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides, and Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus) common to Appalachian streams. We examined the corresponding effects of PDC electroshock on the following physiological indicators of stress and trauma: blood glucose and serum lactate, as well as on other blood chemistry, namely, enzymes, electrolytes, minerals, and proteins. All species demonstrated physiological responses to PDC electroshock, indicated by the biochemical differences in blood parameters in unshocked and shocked groups of fish with or without gross evidence of hemorrhagic trauma. Serum lactate was the most consistent indicator of these effects. Significant differences in whole blood glucose levels were also noted in treatment groups in all species except Green Sunfish, although the patterns observed were not as consistent as for serum lactate. Elevations in the serum enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase, in the electroshocked fish occurred only in the two salmonid species. In many instances, although blood parameters were elevated in electroshocked fish compared with the unshocked controls for a given species, there were no differences in those levels in electroshocked fish based on the presence of gross hemorrhagic trauma to axial musculature. While some of the blood parameters examined correlated with both the occurrence of electroshock and the resultant tissue injury, there was no apparent link between the altered blood chemistry and

  12. The numerical evaluation of maximum-likelihood estimates of the parameters for a mixture of normal distributions from partially identified samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    Likelihood equations determined by the two types of samples which are necessary conditions for a maximum-likelihood estimate were considered. These equations suggest certain successive approximations iterative procedures for obtaining maximum likelihood estimates. The procedures, which are generalized steepest ascent (deflected gradient) procedures, contain those of Hosmer as a special case.

  13. A meta-analysis of the associations between common variation in the PDE8B gene and thyroid hormone parameters, including assessment of longitudinal stability of associations over time and effect of thyroid hormone replacement

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter N; Panicker, Vijay; Sayers, Adrian; Shields, Beverley; Iqbal, Ahmed; Bremner, Alexandra P; Beilby, John P; Leedman, Peter J; Hattersley, Andrew T; Vaidya, Bijay; Frayling, Timothy; Evans, Jonathan; Tobias, Jonathan H; Timpson, Nicholas J; Walsh, John P; Dayan, Colin M

    2011-01-01

    Objective Common variants in PDE8B are associated with TSH but apparently without any effect on thyroid hormone levels that is difficult to explain. Furthermore, the stability of the association has not been examined in longitudinal studies or in patients on levothyroxine (l-T4). Design Totally, four cohorts were used (n=2557): the Busselton Health Study (thyroid function measured on two occasions), DEPTH, EFSOCH (selective cohorts), and WATTS (individuals on l-T4). Methods Meta-analysis to clarify associations between the rs4704397 single nucleotide polymorphism in PDE8B on TSH, tri-iodothyronine (T3), and T4 levels. Results Meta-analysis confirmed that genetic variation in PDE8B was associated with TSH (P=1.64×10−10 0.20 s.d./allele, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.142, 0.267) and identified a possible new association with free T4 (P=0.023, −0.07 s.d./allele, 95% CI −0.137, −0.01), no association was seen with free T3 (P=0.218). The association between PDE8B and TSH was similar in 1981 (0.14 s.d./allele, 95% CI 0.04, 0.238) and 1994 (0.20 s.d./allele, 95% CI 0.102, 0.300) and even more consistent between PDE8B and free T4 in 1981 (−0.068 s.d./allele, 95% CI −0.167, 0.031) and 1994 (−0.07 s.d./allele, 95% CI −0.170, 0.030). No associations were seen between PDE8B and thyroid hormone parameters in individuals on l-T4. Conclusion Common genetic variation in PDE8B is associated with reciprocal changes in TSH and free T4 levels that are consistent over time and lost in individuals on l-T4. These findings identify a possible genetic marker reflecting variation in thyroid hormone output that will be of value in epidemiological studies and provides additional evidence that PDE8B is involved in TSH signaling in the thyroid. PMID:21317282

  14. Comparing changes in haematologic parameters occurring in patients included in randomized controlled trials of artesunate-amodiaquine vs single and combination treatments of uncomplicated falciparum in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Zwang, Julien; Ndiaye, Jean-Louis; Djimdé, Abdoulaye; Dorsey, Grant; Mårtensson, Andreas; Karema, Corine; Olliaro, Piero

    2012-01-25

    Artesunate-amodiaquine (AS&AQ) is a widely used artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) for falciparum malaria. A comprehensive appreciation of its effects on haematology vs other anti-malarials is needed in view of potential safety liabilities. Individual-patient data analysis conducted on a database from seven randomized controlled trials conducted in sub-Saharan African comparing AS&AQ to reference treatments in uncomplicated falciparum malaria patients of all ages. Haematologic values (white cells total and neutrophil counts, haemoglobin/haematocrit, platelets) were analysed as both continuous and categorical variables for their occurrence, (severity grade 1-4) and changes during follow-up. Risks and trends were calculated using multivariate logistic random effect models. 4,502 patients (72% < 5 years old), from 13 sites in nine countries with 28-day follow-up were treated with AS&AQ (45%) or a comparator (other forms of ACT accounted for 27%, other combination 12%, mono-therapies 16%). Pre-treatment leucopaenia (3%) and neutropaenia (6%) were infrequent; anaemia was common (39%). The treatment-emergent adverse events incidence (TEAE = condition not present or less severe pre-treatment) was 11% for neutropaenia, 6% for thrombocytopaenia with AS&AQ and not different from treatment groups; anaemia was higher with AS&AQ (20%) or other forms of ACT (22%) than in non-artemisinin groups (4%, p = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of anaemia, thrombocytopaenia, and leucopaenia decreased with follow-up time, while neutropaenia increased; the risk of anaemia and thrombocytopaenia increased with higher baseline parasitaemia and parasitological reappearance. White cells total count was not a good surrogate for neutropaenia. No systematic significant difference between treatments was detected. Older patients were at lower risks. The effects of AS&AQ on haematologic parameters were not different from those of other anti-malarial treatments used in sub

  15. Rotation-Activity Correlations in K and M Dwarfs. I. Stellar Parameters and Compilations of v sin I and P/sin I for a Large Sample of Late-K and M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdebine, E. R.; Mullan, D. J.; Paletou, F.; Gebran, M.

    2016-05-01

    The reliable determination of rotation-activity correlations (RACs) depends on precise measurements of the following stellar parameters: T eff, parallax, radius, metallicity, and rotational speed v sin I. In this paper, our goal is to focus on the determination of these parameters for a sample of K and M dwarfs. In a future paper (Paper II), we will combine our rotational data with activity data in order to construct RACs. Here, we report on a determination of effective temperatures based on the (R-I) C color from the calibrations of Mann et al. and Kenyon & Hartmann for four samples of late-K, dM2, dM3, and dM4 stars. We also determine stellar parameters (T eff, log(g), and [M/H]) using the principal component analysis-based inversion technique for a sample of 105 late-K dwarfs. We compile all effective temperatures from the literature for this sample. We determine empirical radius-[M/H] correlations in our stellar samples. This allows us to propose new effective temperatures, stellar radii, and metallicities for a large sample of 612 late-K and M dwarfs. Our mean radii agree well with those of Boyajian et al. We analyze HARPS and SOPHIE spectra of 105 late-K dwarfs, and we have detected v sin I in 92 stars. In combination with our previous v sin I measurements in M and K dwarfs, we now derive P/sin I measures for a sample of 418 K and M dwarfs. We investigate the distributions of P/sin I, and we show that they are different from one spectral subtype to another at a 99.9% confidence level. Based on observations available at Observatoire de Haute Provence and the European Southern Observatory databases and on Hipparcos parallax measurements.

  16. ROTATION–ACTIVITY CORRELATIONS IN K AND M DWARFS. I. STELLAR PARAMETERS AND COMPILATIONS OF v sin i AND P /sin i FOR A LARGE SAMPLE OF LATE-K AND M DWARFS

    SciT

    Houdebine, E. R.; Mullan, D. J.; Paletou, F.

    The reliable determination of rotation–activity correlations (RACs) depends on precise measurements of the following stellar parameters: T {sub eff}, parallax, radius, metallicity, and rotational speed v sin i . In this paper, our goal is to focus on the determination of these parameters for a sample of K and M dwarfs. In a future paper (Paper II), we will combine our rotational data with activity data in order to construct RACs. Here, we report on a determination of effective temperatures based on the ( R – I ){sub C} color from the calibrations of Mann et al. and Kenyon andmore » Hartmann for four samples of late-K, dM2, dM3, and dM4 stars. We also determine stellar parameters ( T {sub eff}, log( g ), and [M/H]) using the principal component analysis–based inversion technique for a sample of 105 late-K dwarfs. We compile all effective temperatures from the literature for this sample. We determine empirical radius–[M/H] correlations in our stellar samples. This allows us to propose new effective temperatures, stellar radii, and metallicities for a large sample of 612 late-K and M dwarfs. Our mean radii agree well with those of Boyajian et al. We analyze HARPS and SOPHIE spectra of 105 late-K dwarfs, and we have detected v sin i in 92 stars. In combination with our previous v sin i measurements in M and K dwarfs, we now derive P /sin i measures for a sample of 418 K and M dwarfs. We investigate the distributions of P /sin i , and we show that they are different from one spectral subtype to another at a 99.9% confidence level.« less

  17. Selected Field Parameters from Streams and Analytical Data from Water and Macroinvertebrate Samples, Central Colorado Assessment Project, Environmental Assessment Task, 2004 and 2005

    Fey, David L.; Church, Stan E.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Wanty, Richard B.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Adams, Monique; Anthony, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP) began in October 2003 and is planned to last through September 2008. One major goal of this project is to compare the relationships between surface-water chemistry and aquatic fauna in mined and unmined areas. To accomplish this goal, we are conducting a State-scale reconnaissance sampling program, in which we are collecting water and macroinvertebrate samples. Selected results from the first two years of project analyses are reported here. We plan to develop statistical models and use geographic information system (GIS) technology to quantify the relationships between ecological indicators of metal contamination in Rocky Mountain streams and water quality, landscape and land-use characteristics (for example, mine density, geology, geomorphology, vegetation, topography). Our research will test the hypothesis that physicochemical variables and ecological responses to metal concentrations in stream water in Rocky Mountain streams are ultimately determined largely by historical land uses.

  18. Detection of Quiescent Infections with Multiple Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses (EEHVs), Including EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7, within Lymphoid Lung Nodules or Lung and Spleen Tissue Samples from Five Asymptomatic Adult African Elephants

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Jian-Chao; Heaggans, Sarah Y.; Long, Simon Y.; Latimer, Erin M.; Nofs, Sally A.; Bronson, Ellen; Casares, Miguel; Fouraker, Michael D.; Pearson, Virginia R.; Richman, Laura K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT More than 80 cases of lethal hemorrhagic disease associated with elephant endotheliotropic herpesviruses (EEHVs) have been identified in young Asian elephants worldwide. Diagnostic PCR tests detected six types of EEHV in blood of elephants with acute disease, although EEHV1A is the predominant pathogenic type. Previously, the presence of herpesvirus virions within benign lung and skin nodules from healthy African elephants led to suggestions that African elephants may be the source of EEHV disease in Asian elephants. Here, we used direct PCR-based DNA sequencing to detect EEHV genomes in necropsy tissue from five healthy adult African elephants. Two large lung nodules collected from culled wild South African elephants contained high levels of either EEHV3 alone or both EEHV2 and EEHV3. Similarly, a euthanized U.S. elephant proved to harbor multiple EEHV types distributed nonuniformly across four small lung nodules, including high levels of EEHV6, lower levels of EEHV3 and EEHV2, and a new GC-rich branch type, EEHV7. Several of the same EEHV types were also detected in random lung and spleen samples from two other elephants. Sanger PCR DNA sequence data comprising 100 kb were obtained from a total of 15 different strains identified, with (except for a few hypervariable genes) the EEHV2, EEHV3, and EEHV6 strains all being closely related to known genotypes from cases of acute disease, whereas the seven loci (4.0 kb) obtained from EEHV7 averaged 18% divergence from their nearest relative, EEHV3. Overall, we conclude that these four EEHV species, but probably not EEHV1, occur commonly as quiescent infections in African elephants. IMPORTANCE Acute hemorrhagic disease characterized by high-level viremia due to infection by members of the Proboscivirus genus threatens the future breeding success of endangered Asian elephants worldwide. Although the genomes of six EEHV types from acute cases have been partially or fully characterized, lethal disease predominantly

  19. Detection of Quiescent Infections with Multiple Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesviruses (EEHVs), Including EEHV2, EEHV3, EEHV6, and EEHV7, within Lymphoid Lung Nodules or Lung and Spleen Tissue Samples from Five Asymptomatic Adult African Elephants.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jian-Chao; Heaggans, Sarah Y; Long, Simon Y; Latimer, Erin M; Nofs, Sally A; Bronson, Ellen; Casares, Miguel; Fouraker, Michael D; Pearson, Virginia R; Richman, Laura K; Hayward, Gary S

    2015-12-30

    More than 80 cases of lethal hemorrhagic disease associated with elephant endotheliotropic herpesviruses (EEHVs) have been identified in young Asian elephants worldwide. Diagnostic PCR tests detected six types of EEHV in blood of elephants with acute disease, although EEHV1A is the predominant pathogenic type. Previously, the presence of herpesvirus virions within benign lung and skin nodules from healthy African elephants led to suggestions that African elephants may be the source of EEHV disease in Asian elephants. Here, we used direct PCR-based DNA sequencing to detect EEHV genomes in necropsy tissue from five healthy adult African elephants. Two large lung nodules collected from culled wild South African elephants contained high levels of either EEHV3 alone or both EEHV2 and EEHV3. Similarly, a euthanized U.S. elephant proved to harbor multiple EEHV types distributed nonuniformly across four small lung nodules, including high levels of EEHV6, lower levels of EEHV3 and EEHV2, and a new GC-rich branch type, EEHV7. Several of the same EEHV types were also detected in random lung and spleen samples from two other elephants. Sanger PCR DNA sequence data comprising 100 kb were obtained from a total of 15 different strains identified, with (except for a few hypervariable genes) the EEHV2, EEHV3, and EEHV6 strains all being closely related to known genotypes from cases of acute disease, whereas the seven loci (4.0 kb) obtained from EEHV7 averaged 18% divergence from their nearest relative, EEHV3. Overall, we conclude that these four EEHV species, but probably not EEHV1, occur commonly as quiescent infections in African elephants. Acute hemorrhagic disease characterized by high-level viremia due to infection by members of the Proboscivirus genus threatens the future breeding success of endangered Asian elephants worldwide. Although the genomes of six EEHV types from acute cases have been partially or fully characterized, lethal disease predominantly involves a variety

  20. The numerical evaluation of maximum-likelihood estimates of the parameters for a mixture of normal distributions from partially identified samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    Likelihood equations determined by the two types of samples which are necessary conditions for a maximum-likelihood estimate are considered. These equations, suggest certain successive-approximations iterative procedures for obtaining maximum-likelihood estimates. These are generalized steepest ascent (deflected gradient) procedures. It is shown that, with probability 1 as N sub 0 approaches infinity (regardless of the relative sizes of N sub 0 and N sub 1, i=1,...,m), these procedures converge locally to the strongly consistent maximum-likelihood estimates whenever the step size is between 0 and 2. Furthermore, the value of the step size which yields optimal local convergence rates is bounded from below by a number which always lies between 1 and 2.

  1. A design methodology for nonlinear systems containing parameter uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, G. E.; Auslander, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    In the present design methodology for nonlinear systems containing parameter uncertainty, a generalized sensitivity analysis is incorporated which employs parameter space sampling and statistical inference. For the case of a system with j adjustable and k nonadjustable parameters, this methodology (which includes an adaptive random search strategy) is used to determine the combination of j adjustable parameter values which maximize the probability of those performance indices which simultaneously satisfy design criteria in spite of the uncertainty due to k nonadjustable parameters.

  2. Evaluation of growth performance, serum biochemistry and haematological parameters on broiler birds fed with raw and processed samples of Entada scandens, Canavalia gladiata and Canavalia ensiformis seed meal as an alternative protein source.

    PubMed

    Sasipriya, Gopalakrishnan; Siddhuraju, Perumal

    2013-03-01

    The experiment was carried out to investigate the inclusion of underutilised legumes, Entada scandens, Canavalia gladiata and Canavalia ensiformis, seed meal in soybean-based diet in broilers. The utilisation of these wild legumes is limited by the presence of antinutrient compounds. Processing methods like soaking followed by autoclaving in sodium bicarbonate solution in E. scandens and C. gladiata and soaking followed by autoclaving in ash solution in C. ensiformis were adopted. The proximate composition of raw and processed samples of E. scandens, C. gladiata and C. ensiformis were determined. The protein content was enhanced in processed sample of E. scandens (46 %) and C. ensiformis (16 %). This processing method had reduced the maximum number of antinutrients such as tannins (10-100 %), trypsin inhibitor activity (99 %), chymotrypsin inhibitor activity (72-100 %), canavanine (60-62 %), amylase inhibitor activity (73-100 %), saponins (78-92 %), phytic acid (19-40 %) and lectins. Hence, the raw samples at 15 % and processed samples at 15 and 30 % were replaced with soybean protein in commercial broiler diet respectively. Birds fed with 30 % processed samples of E. scandens, C. gladiata and C. ensiformis showed significantly similar results of growth performance, carcass characteristics, organ weight, haematological parameters and serum biochemical parameters (cholesterol, protein, bilirubin, albumin, globulin and liver and kidney function parameters) without any adverse effects after 42 days of supplementation. The proper utilisation of these underutilised legumes may act as an alternative protein ingredient in poultry diets.

  3. Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon Compounds including 3 Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) in Whole-air Samples (April 1979 – December 2012)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Blake, Donald [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA (USA)

    2013-09-01

    Whole-air samples are collected in conditioned, evacuated, 2-L stainless steel canisters; each canister is filled to ambient pressure over a period of about 1 minute (approximately 20 seconds to 2 minutes). These canisters are returned to the University of California at Irvine for chromatographic analysis.

  4. MontePython 3: Parameter inference code for cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckmann, Thejs; Lesgourgues, Julien; Audren, Benjamin; Benabed, Karim; Prunet, Simon

    2018-05-01

    MontePython 3 provides numerous ways to explore parameter space using Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) sampling, including Metropolis-Hastings, Nested Sampling, Cosmo Hammer, and a Fisher sampling method. This improved version of the Monte Python (ascl:1307.002) parameter inference code for cosmology offers new ingredients that improve the performance of Metropolis-Hastings sampling, speeding up convergence and offering significant time improvement in difficult runs. Additional likelihoods and plotting options are available, as are post-processing algorithms such as Importance Sampling and Adding Derived Parameter.

  5. Bone volume fraction and structural parameters for estimation of mechanical stiffness and failure load of human cancellous bone samples; in-vitro comparison of ultrasound transit time spectroscopy and X-ray μCT.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Ali Hamed; Wille, Marie-Luise; Langton, Christian M

    2018-02-01

    Conventional mechanical testing is the 'gold standard' for assessing the stiffness (N mm -1 ) and strength (MPa) of bone, although it is not applicable in-vivo since it is inherently invasive and destructive. The mechanical integrity of a bone is determined by its quantity and quality; being related primarily to bone density and structure respectively. Several non-destructive, non-invasive, in-vivo techniques have been developed and clinically implemented to estimate bone density, both areal (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)) and volumetric (quantitative computed tomography (QCT)). Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters of velocity and attenuation are dependent upon both bone quantity and bone quality, although it has not been possible to date to transpose one particular QUS parameter into separate estimates of quantity and quality. It has recently been shown that ultrasound transit time spectroscopy (UTTS) may provide an accurate estimate of bone density and hence quantity. We hypothesised that UTTS also has the potential to provide an estimate of bone structure and hence quality. In this in-vitro study, 16 human femoral bone samples were tested utilising three techniques; UTTS, micro computed tomography (μCT), and mechanical testing. UTTS was utilised to estimate bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and two novel structural parameters, inter-quartile range of the derived transit time (UTTS-IQR) and the transit time of maximum proportion of sonic-rays (TTMP). μCT was utilised to derive BV/TV along with several bone structure parameters. A destructive mechanical test was utilised to measure the stiffness and strength (failure load) of the bone samples. BV/TV was calculated from the derived transit time spectrum (TTS); the correlation coefficient (R 2 ) with μCT-BV/TV was 0.885. For predicting mechanical stiffness and strength, BV/TV derived by both μCT and UTTS provided the strongest correlation with mechanical stiffness (R 2 =0.567 and 0.618 respectively) and

  6. FT-Raman and chemometric tools for rapid determination of quality parameters in milk powder: Classification of samples for the presence of lactose and fraud detection by addition of maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Júnior, Paulo Henrique; de Sá Oliveira, Kamila; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Rocha; De Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa; Stephani, Rodrigo; Pinto, Michele da Silva; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Perrone, Ítalo Tuler

    2016-04-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy has been explored as a quick screening method to evaluate the presence of lactose and identify milk powder samples adulterated with maltodextrin (2.5-50% w/w). Raman measurements can easily differentiate samples of milk powder, without the need for sample preparation, while traditional quality control methods, including high performance liquid chromatography, are cumbersome and slow. FT-Raman spectra were obtained from samples of whole lactose and low-lactose milk powder, both without and with addition of maltodextrin. Differences were observed between the spectra involved in identifying samples with low lactose content, as well as adulterated samples. Exploratory data analysis using Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis was also developed to classify samples with PCA and PLS-DA. The PLS-DA models obtained allowed to correctly classify all samples. These results demonstrate the utility of FT-Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics to infer about the quality of milk powder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Parameter screening: the use of a dummy parameter to identify non-influential parameters in a global sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorashadi Zadeh, Farkhondeh; Nossent, Jiri; van Griensven, Ann; Bauwens, Willy

    2017-04-01

    Parameter estimation is a major concern in hydrological modeling, which may limit the use of complex simulators with a large number of parameters. To support the selection of parameters to include in or exclude from the calibration process, Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) is widely applied in modeling practices. Based on the results of GSA, the influential and the non-influential parameters are identified (i.e. parameters screening). Nevertheless, the choice of the screening threshold below which parameters are considered non-influential is a critical issue, which has recently received more attention in GSA literature. In theory, the sensitivity index of a non-influential parameter has a value of zero. However, since numerical approximations, rather than analytical solutions, are utilized in GSA methods to calculate the sensitivity indices, small but non-zero indices may be obtained for the indices of non-influential parameters. In order to assess the threshold that identifies non-influential parameters in GSA methods, we propose to calculate the sensitivity index of a "dummy parameter". This dummy parameter has no influence on the model output, but will have a non-zero sensitivity index, representing the error due to the numerical approximation. Hence, the parameters whose indices are above the sensitivity index of the dummy parameter can be classified as influential, whereas the parameters whose indices are below this index are within the range of the numerical error and should be considered as non-influential. To demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed "dummy parameter approach", 26 parameters of a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model are selected to be analyzed and screened, using the variance-based Sobol' and moment-independent PAWN methods. The sensitivity index of the dummy parameter is calculated from sampled data, without changing the model equations. Moreover, the calculation does not even require additional model evaluations for the Sobol

  8. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  9. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  10. Genetic parameters of cheese yield and curd nutrient recovery or whey loss traits predicted using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy of samples collected during milk recording on Holstein, Brown Swiss, and Simmental dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, A; Albera, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Ferragina, A; Bittante, G

    2015-07-01

    Cheese yield is the most important technological parameter in the dairy industry in many countries. The aim of this study was to infer (co)variance components for cheese yields (CY) and nutrient recoveries in curd (REC) predicted using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of samples collected during milk recording on Holstein, Brown Swiss, and Simmental dairy cows. A total of 311,354 FTIR spectra representing the test-day records of 29,208 dairy cows (Holstein, Brown Swiss, and Simmental) from 654 herds, collected over a 3-yr period, were available for the study. The traits of interest for each cow consisted of 3 cheese yield traits (%CY: fresh curd, curd total solids, and curd water as a percent of the weight of the processed milk), 4 curd nutrient recovery traits (REC: fat, protein, total solids, and the energy of the curd as a percent of the same nutrient in the processed milk), and 3 daily cheese production traits (daily fresh curd, total solids, and the water of the curd per cow). Calibration equations (freely available upon request to the corresponding author) were used to predict individual test-day observations for these traits. The (co)variance components were estimated for the CY, REC, milk production, and milk composition traits via a set of 4-trait analyses within each breed. All analyses were performed using REML and linear animal models. The heritabilities of the %CY were always higher for Holstein and Brown Swiss cows (0.22 to 0.33) compared with Simmental cows (0.14 to 0.18). In general, the fresh cheese yield (%CYCURD) showed genetic variation and heritability estimates that were slightly higher than those of its components, %CYSOLIDS and %CYWATER. The parameter RECPROTEIN was the most heritable trait in all the 3 breeds, with values ranging from 0.32 to 0.41. Our estimation of the genetic relationships of the CY and REC with milk production and composition revealed that the current selection strategies used in dairy cattle are expected

  11. Adaptive Peer Sampling with Newscast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tölgyesi, Norbert; Jelasity, Márk

    The peer sampling service is a middleware service that provides random samples from a large decentralized network to support gossip-based applications such as multicast, data aggregation and overlay topology management. Lightweight gossip-based implementations of the peer sampling service have been shown to provide good quality random sampling while also being extremely robust to many failure scenarios, including node churn and catastrophic failure. We identify two problems with these approaches. The first problem is related to message drop failures: if a node experiences a higher-than-average message drop rate then the probability of sampling this node in the network will decrease. The second problem is that the application layer at different nodes might request random samples at very different rates which can result in very poor random sampling especially at nodes with high request rates. We propose solutions for both problems. We focus on Newscast, a robust implementation of the peer sampling service. Our solution is based on simple extensions of the protocol and an adaptive self-control mechanism for its parameters, namely—without involving failure detectors—nodes passively monitor local protocol events using them as feedback for a local control loop for self-tuning the protocol parameters. The proposed solution is evaluated by simulation experiments.

  12. Calibrating binary lumped parameter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Stewart, Mike

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater at its discharge point is a mixture of water from short and long flowlines, and therefore has a distribution of ages rather than a single age. Various transfer functions describe the distribution of ages within the water sample. Lumped parameter models (LPMs), which are mathematical models of water transport based on simplified aquifer geometry and flow configuration can account for such mixing of groundwater of different age, usually representing the age distribution with two parameters, the mean residence time, and the mixing parameter. Simple lumped parameter models can often match well the measured time varying age tracer concentrations, and therefore are a good representation of the groundwater mixing at these sites. Usually a few tracer data (time series and/or multi-tracer) can constrain both parameters. With the building of larger data sets of age tracer data throughout New Zealand, including tritium, SF6, CFCs, and recently Halon-1301, and time series of these tracers, we realised that for a number of wells the groundwater ages using a simple lumped parameter model were inconsistent between the different tracer methods. Contamination or degradation of individual tracers is unlikely because the different tracers show consistent trends over years and decades. This points toward a more complex mixing of groundwaters with different ages for such wells than represented by the simple lumped parameter models. Binary (or compound) mixing models are able to represent a more complex mixing, with mixing of water of two different age distributions. The problem related to these models is that they usually have 5 parameters which makes them data-hungry and therefore difficult to constrain all parameters. Two or more age tracers with different input functions, with multiple measurements over time, can provide the required information to constrain the parameters of the binary mixing model. We obtained excellent results using tritium time series encompassing

  13. Neoclassical transport including collisional nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Candy, J; Belli, E A

    2011-06-10

    In the standard δf theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction δf is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlüter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  14. Application of the Akinfiev-Diamond equation of state to neutral hydroxides of metalloids (B(OH)3, Si(OH)4, As(OH)3) at infinite dilution in water over a wide range of the state parameters, including steam conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinfiev, Nikolay N.; Plyasunov, Andrey V.

    2014-02-01

    The Akinfiev and Diamond (2003) equation of state (EoS) for aqueous nonelectrolytes was employed to describe hydroxides of metalloids (B(OH)3, Si(OH)4, As(OH)3) over a wide temperature and pressure ranges, including steam conditions. The EoS is based on the accurate knowledge of solvent (H2O) properties and requires only three empirical parameters to be fitted to experimental data, and these are independent of temperature and pressure. For nonvolatile components thermodynamic properties of species in the ideal gas state were evaluated using quantum chemical computations. The proposed approach has been tested to predict the whole set of thermodynamic properties of solutes (the chemical potential, entropy, molar volume, and molar heat capacity) over a wide range of temperatures (273-1200 K) and pressures (0.1-1000 MPa), including the near-critical region and both low and high density regions of the solvent. Thus it can be used for modeling various geochemical processes over a whole range of solvent densities, including processes in boiling fluids and a vapor phase as well. solubility data in a low density aqueous fluid (ρ1∗ < 0.2 g cm-3); data with very high solubility values (mSi(OH)4 > 1 mol kg-1) where polymerization effects may take place (Newton and Manning, 2003); the rest of data, containing the majority of quartz solubility points at 293-1273 K, 0.1-1000 MPa. Only the 3rd part of experimental quartz solubility data has been used in the fitting procedure. Thermodynamic properties of Si(OH)4 in the ideal gas state were recently determined by the analysis of the relevant experimental data in Plyasunov (2011b). The temperature dependence of heat capacity of the molecule was adopted from comprehensive study of Rutz and Bockhorn (2005)where DFT calculations at different levels of theory including CBS-QBS and G3MP2 methods, as well as corrections for hindered rotations and scaling for vibration frequencies were employed. The adopted Cpo (T = 300-1500 K) values

  15. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    SciT

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrologicalmore » parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified accordingly to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using a Principal component analyses (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) –based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each S-class with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the methodology is applicable to other

  16. Non-destructive sampling of a comet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessberger, H. L.; Kotthaus, M.

    1991-04-01

    Various conditions which must be met for the development of a nondestructive sampling and acquisition system are outlined and the development of a new robotic sampling system suited for use on a cometary surface is briefly discussed. The Rosetta mission of ESA will take samples of a comet nucleus and return both core and volatile samples to earth. Various considerations which must be taken into account for such a project are examined including the identification of design parameters for sample quality; the identification of the most probable site conditions; the development of a sample acquisition system with respect to these conditions; the production of model materials and model conditions; and the investigation of the relevant material properties. An adequate sampling system should also be designed and built, including various tools, and the system should be tested under simulated cometary conditions.

  17. Bibliography for aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Maine, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    An extensive bibliography in the field of aircraft parameter estimation has been compiled. This list contains definitive works related to most aircraft parameter estimation approaches. Theoretical studies as well as practical applications are included. Many of these publications are pertinent to subjects peripherally related to parameter estimation, such as aircraft maneuver design or instrumentation considerations.

  18. Is there an efficient trap or collection method for sampling Anopheles darlingi and other malaria vectors that can describe the essential parameters affecting transmission dynamics as effectively as human landing catches? - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lima, José Bento Pereira; Rosa-Freitas, Maria Goreti; Rodovalho, Cynara Melo; Santos, Fátima; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Distribution, abundance, feeding behaviour, host preference, parity status and human-biting and infection rates are among the medical entomological parameters evaluated when determining the vector capacity of mosquito species. To evaluate these parameters, mosquitoes must be collected using an appropriate method. Malaria is primarily transmitted by anthropophilic and synanthropic anophelines. Thus, collection methods must result in the identification of the anthropophilic species and efficiently evaluate the parameters involved in malaria transmission dynamics. Consequently, human landing catches would be the most appropriate method if not for their inherent risk. The choice of alternative anopheline collection methods, such as traps, must consider their effectiveness in reproducing the efficiency of human attraction. Collection methods lure mosquitoes by using a mixture of olfactory, visual and thermal cues. Here, we reviewed, classified and compared the efficiency of anopheline collection methods, with an emphasis on Neotropical anthropophilic species, especially Anopheles darlingi, in distinct malaria epidemiological conditions in Brazil. PMID:25185008

  19. Comparison between genetic parameters of cheese yield and nutrient recovery or whey loss traits measured from individual model cheese-making methods or predicted from unprocessed bovine milk samples using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bittante, G; Ferragina, A; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Cecchinato, A

    2014-10-01

    Cheese yield is an important technological trait in the dairy industry. The aim of this study was to infer the genetic parameters of some cheese yield-related traits predicted using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis and compare the results with those obtained using an individual model cheese-producing procedure. A total of 1,264 model cheeses were produced using 1,500-mL milk samples collected from individual Brown Swiss cows, and individual measurements were taken for 10 traits: 3 cheese yield traits (fresh curd, curd total solids, and curd water as a percent of the weight of the processed milk), 4 milk nutrient recovery traits (fat, protein, total solids, and energy of the curd as a percent of the same nutrient in the processed milk), and 3 daily cheese production traits per cow (fresh curd, total solids, and water weight of the curd). Each unprocessed milk sample was analyzed using a MilkoScan FT6000 (Foss, Hillerød, Denmark) over the spectral range, from 5,000 to 900 wavenumber × cm(-1). The FTIR spectrum-based prediction models for the previously mentioned traits were developed using modified partial least-square regression. Cross-validation of the whole data set yielded coefficients of determination between the predicted and measured values in cross-validation of 0.65 to 0.95 for all traits, except for the recovery of fat (0.41). A 3-fold external validation was also used, in which the available data were partitioned into 2 subsets: a training set (one-third of the herds) and a testing set (two-thirds). The training set was used to develop calibration equations, whereas the testing subsets were used for external validation of the calibration equations and to estimate the heritabilities and genetic correlations of the measured and FTIR-predicted phenotypes. The coefficients of determination between the predicted and measured values in cross-validation results obtained from the training sets were very similar to those obtained from the whole

  20. Attaining insight into interactions between hydrologic model parameters and geophysical attributes for national-scale model parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, N.; Clark, M. P.; Newman, A. J.; Wood, A.; Gutmann, E. D.

    2017-12-01

    Estimating spatially distributed model parameters is a grand challenge for large domain hydrologic modeling, especially in the context of hydrologic model applications such as streamflow forecasting. Multi-scale Parameter Regionalization (MPR) is a promising technique that accounts for the effects of fine-scale geophysical attributes (e.g., soil texture, land cover, topography, climate) on model parameters and nonlinear scaling effects on model parameters. MPR computes model parameters with transfer functions (TFs) that relate geophysical attributes to model parameters at the native input data resolution and then scales them using scaling functions to the spatial resolution of the model implementation. One of the biggest challenges in the use of MPR is identification of TFs for each model parameter: both functional forms and geophysical predictors. TFs used to estimate the parameters of hydrologic models typically rely on previous studies or were derived in an ad-hoc, heuristic manner, potentially not utilizing maximum information content contained in the geophysical attributes for optimal parameter identification. Thus, it is necessary to first uncover relationships among geophysical attributes, model parameters, and hydrologic processes (i.e., hydrologic signatures) to obtain insight into which and to what extent geophysical attributes are related to model parameters. We perform multivariate statistical analysis on a large-sample catchment data set including various geophysical attributes as well as constrained VIC model parameters at 671 unimpaired basins over the CONUS. We first calibrate VIC model at each catchment to obtain constrained parameter sets. Additionally, parameter sets sampled during the calibration process are used for sensitivity analysis using various hydrologic signatures as objectives to understand the relationships among geophysical attributes, parameters, and hydrologic processes.

  1. Apollo 14 rock samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, I. C.

    1978-01-01

    Petrographic descriptions of all Apollo 14 samples larger than 1 cm in any dimension are presented. The sample description format consists of: (1) an introductory section which includes information on lunar sample location, orientation, and return containers, (2) a section on physical characteristics, which contains the sample mass, dimensions, and a brief description; (3) surface features, including zap pits, cavities, and fractures as seen in binocular view; (4) petrographic description, consisting of a binocular description and, if possible, a thin section description; and (5) a discussion of literature relevant to sample petrology is included for samples which have previously been examined by the scientific community.

  2. Communications circuit including a linear quadratic estimator

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Dennis D.

    2015-07-07

    A circuit includes a linear quadratic estimator (LQE) configured to receive a plurality of measurements a signal. The LQE is configured to weight the measurements based on their respective uncertainties to produce weighted averages. The circuit further includes a controller coupled to the LQE and configured to selectively adjust at least one data link parameter associated with a communication channel in response to receiving the weighted averages.

  3. CRUMP 2003 Selected Water Sample Results

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Point locations and water sampling results performed in 2003 by the Church Rock Uranium Monitoring Project (CRUMP) a consortium of organizations (Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency, US Environmental Protection Agency, New Mexico Scientific Laboratory Division, Navajo Tribal Utility Authority and NM Water Quality Control Commission). Samples include general description of the wells sampled, general chemistry, heavy metals and aestheic parameters, and selected radionuclides. Here only six sampling results are presented in this point shapefile, including: Gross Alpha (U-Nat Ref.) (pCi/L), Gross Beta (Sr/Y-90 Ref.) (pCi/L), Radium-226 (pCi/L), Radium-228 (pCi/L), Total Uranium (pCi/L), and Uranium mass (ug/L). The CRUMP samples were collected in the area of Churchrock, NM in the Eastern AUM Region of the Navajo Nation.

  4. GROUND WATER SAMPLING ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining representative ground water samples is important for site assessment and
    remedial performance monitoring objectives. Issues which must be considered prior to initiating a ground-water monitoring program include defining monitoring goals and objectives, sampling point...

  5. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  6. New approaches for the standardization and validation of a real-time qPCR assay using TaqMan probes for quantification of yellow fever virus on clinical samples with high quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Monteiro, Alice G; Trindade, Gisela F; Yamamura, Anna M Y; Moreira, Otacilio C; de Paula, Vanessa S; Duarte, Ana Cláudia M; Britto, Constança; Lima, Sheila Maria B

    2015-01-01

    The development and production of viral vaccines, in general, involve several steps that need the monitoring of viral load throughout the entire process. Applying a 2-step quantitative reverse transcription real time PCR assay (RT-qPCR), viral load can be measured and monitored in a few hours. In this context, the development, standardization and validation of a RT-qPCR test to quickly and efficiently quantify yellow fever virus (YFV) in all stages of vaccine production are extremely important. To serve this purpose we used a plasmid construction containing the NS5 region from 17DD YFV to generate the standard curve and to evaluate parameters such as linearity, precision and specificity against other flavivirus. Furthermore, we defined the limits of detection as 25 copies/reaction, and quantification as 100 copies/reaction for the test. To ensure the quality of the method, reference controls were established in order to avoid false negative results. The qRT-PCR technique based on the use of TaqMan probes herein standardized proved to be effective for determining yellow fever viral load both in vivo and in vitro, thus becoming a very important tool to assure the quality control for vaccine production and evaluation of viremia after vaccination or YF disease.

  7. New approaches for the standardization and validation of a real-time qPCR assay using TaqMan probes for quantification of yellow fever virus on clinical samples with high quality parameters

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes-Monteiro, Alice G; Trindade, Gisela F; Yamamura, Anna MY; Moreira, Otacilio C; de Paula, Vanessa S; Duarte, Ana Cláudia M; Britto, Constança; Lima, Sheila Maria B

    2015-01-01

    The development and production of viral vaccines, in general, involve several steps that need the monitoring of viral load throughout the entire process. Applying a 2-step quantitative reverse transcription real time PCR assay (RT-qPCR), viral load can be measured and monitored in a few hours. In this context, the development, standardization and validation of a RT-qPCR test to quickly and efficiently quantify yellow fever virus (YFV) in all stages of vaccine production are extremely important. To serve this purpose we used a plasmid construction containing the NS5 region from 17DD YFV to generate the standard curve and to evaluate parameters such as linearity, precision and specificity against other flavivirus. Furthermore, we defined the limits of detection as 25 copies/reaction, and quantification as 100 copies/reaction for the test. To ensure the quality of the method, reference controls were established in order to avoid false negative results. The qRT-PCR technique based on the use of TaqMan probes herein standardized proved to be effective for determining yellow fever viral load both in vivo and in vitro, thus becoming a very important tool to assure the quality control for vaccine production and evaluation of viremia after vaccination or YF disease. PMID:26011746

  8. RnaSeqSampleSize: real data based sample size estimation for RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shilin; Li, Chung-I; Guo, Yan; Sheng, Quanhu; Shyr, Yu

    2018-05-30

    One of the most important and often neglected components of a successful RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiment is sample size estimation. A few negative binomial model-based methods have been developed to estimate sample size based on the parameters of a single gene. However, thousands of genes are quantified and tested for differential expression simultaneously in RNA-Seq experiments. Thus, additional issues should be carefully addressed, including the false discovery rate for multiple statistic tests, widely distributed read counts and dispersions for different genes. To solve these issues, we developed a sample size and power estimation method named RnaSeqSampleSize, based on the distributions of gene average read counts and dispersions estimated from real RNA-seq data. Datasets from previous, similar experiments such as the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) can be used as a point of reference. Read counts and their dispersions were estimated from the reference's distribution; using that information, we estimated and summarized the power and sample size. RnaSeqSampleSize is implemented in R language and can be installed from Bioconductor website. A user friendly web graphic interface is provided at http://cqs.mc.vanderbilt.edu/shiny/RnaSeqSampleSize/ . RnaSeqSampleSize provides a convenient and powerful way for power and sample size estimation for an RNAseq experiment. It is also equipped with several unique features, including estimation for interested genes or pathway, power curve visualization, and parameter optimization.

  9. Lunar Sample Quarantine & Sample Curation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.

    2000-01-01

    The main goal of this presentation is to discuss some of the responsibility of the lunar sample quarantine project. The responsibilities are: flying the mission safely, and on schedule, protect the Earth from biohazard, and preserve scientific integrity of samples.

  10. Radar altimeter waveform modeled parameter recovery. [SEASAT-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Satellite-borne radar altimeters include waveform sampling gates providing point samples of the transmitted radar pulse after its scattering from the ocean's surface. Averages of the waveform sampler data can be fitted by varying parameters in a model mean return waveform. The theoretical waveform model used is described as well as a general iterative nonlinear least squares procedures used to obtain estimates of parameters characterizing the modeled waveform for SEASAT-1 data. The six waveform parameters recovered by the fitting procedure are: (1) amplitude; (2) time origin, or track point; (3) ocean surface rms roughness; (4) noise baseline; (5) ocean surface skewness; and (6) altitude or off-nadir angle. Additional practical processing considerations are addressed and FORTRAN source listing for subroutines used in the waveform fitting are included. While the description is for the Seasat-1 altimeter waveform data analysis, the work can easily be generalized and extended to other radar altimeter systems.

  11. Isolators Including Main Spring Linear Guide Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goold, Ryan (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Ruebsamen, Dale Thomas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of isolators, such as three parameter isolators, including a main spring linear guide system are provided. In one embodiment, the isolator includes first and second opposing end portions, a main spring mechanically coupled between the first and second end portions, and a linear guide system extending from the first end portion, across the main spring, and toward the second end portion. The linear guide system expands and contracts in conjunction with deflection of the main spring along the working axis, while restricting displacement and rotation of the main spring along first and second axes orthogonal to the working axis.

  12. Developing Water Sampling Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Participants in the D-19 symposium on aquatic sampling and measurement for water pollution assessment were informed that determining the extent of waste water stream pollution is not a cut and dry procedure. Topics discussed include field sampling, representative sampling from storm sewers, suggested sampler features and application of improved…

  13. Curation of Frozen Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, L. A.; Allen, C. C.; Bastien, R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Astromaterials Curator are charged by NPD 7100.10D with the curation of all of NASA s extraterrestrial samples, including those from future missions. This responsibility includes the development of new sample handling and preparation techniques; therefore, the Astromaterials Curator must begin developing procedures to preserve, prepare and ship samples at sub-freezing temperatures in order to enable future sample return missions. Such missions might include the return of future frozen samples from permanently-shadowed lunar craters, the nuclei of comets, the surface of Mars, etc. We are demonstrating the ability to curate samples under cold conditions by designing, installing and testing a cold curation glovebox. This glovebox will allow us to store, document, manipulate and subdivide frozen samples while quantifying and minimizing contamination throughout the curation process.

  14. Sampling Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  15. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  16. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  17. Improving Lab Sample Management - POS/MCEARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Scientists face increasing challenges in managing their laboratory samples, including long-term storage of legacy samples, tracking multiple aliquots of samples for many experiments, and linking metadata to these samples. Other factors complicating sample management include the...

  18. Fluid sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studenick, D. K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inlet leak is described for sampling gases, more specifically, for selectively sampling multiple fluids. This fluid sampling device includes a support frame. A plurality of fluid inlet devices extend through the support frame and each of the fluid inlet devices include a longitudinal aperture. An opening device that is responsive to a control signal selectively opens the aperture to allow fluid passage. A closing device that is responsive to another control signal selectively closes the aperture for terminating further fluid flow.

  19. A Mars Sample Return Sample Handling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David; Stroker, Carol

    2013-01-01

    We present a sample handling system, a subsystem of the proposed Dragon landed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission [1], that can return to Earth orbit a significant mass of frozen Mars samples potentially consisting of: rock cores, subsurface drilled rock and ice cuttings, pebble sized rocks, and soil scoops. The sample collection, storage, retrieval and packaging assumptions and concepts in this study are applicable for the NASA's MPPG MSR mission architecture options [2]. Our study assumes a predecessor rover mission collects samples for return to Earth to address questions on: past life, climate change, water history, age dating, understanding Mars interior evolution [3], and, human safety and in-situ resource utilization. Hence the rover will have "integrated priorities for rock sampling" [3] that cover collection of subaqueous or hydrothermal sediments, low-temperature fluidaltered rocks, unaltered igneous rocks, regolith and atmosphere samples. Samples could include: drilled rock cores, alluvial and fluvial deposits, subsurface ice and soils, clays, sulfates, salts including perchlorates, aeolian deposits, and concretions. Thus samples will have a broad range of bulk densities, and require for Earth based analysis where practical: in-situ characterization, management of degradation such as perchlorate deliquescence and volatile release, and contamination management. We propose to adopt a sample container with a set of cups each with a sample from a specific location. We considered two sample cups sizes: (1) a small cup sized for samples matching those submitted to in-situ characterization instruments, and, (2) a larger cup for 100 mm rock cores [4] and pebble sized rocks, thus providing diverse samples and optimizing the MSR sample mass payload fraction for a given payload volume. We minimize sample degradation by keeping them frozen in the MSR payload sample canister using Peltier chip cooling. The cups are sealed by interference fitted heat activated memory

  20. Sherborne Missile Fire Frequency with Unconstraint Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shaquan

    2018-01-01

    For the modeling problem of shipborne missile fire frequency, the fire frequency models with unconstant parameters were proposed, including maximum fire frequency models with unconstant parameters, and actual fire frequency models with unconstant parameters, which can be used to calculate the missile fire frequency with unconstant parameters.

  1. Recovering Parameters of Johnson's SB Distribution

    Bernard R. Parresol

    2003-01-01

    A new parameter recovery model for Johnson's SB distribution is developed. This latest alternative approach permits recovery of the range and both shape parameters. Previous models recovered only the two shape parameters. Also, a simple procedure for estimating the distribution minimum from sample values is presented. The new methodology...

  2. SAMPLING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hannaford, B.A.; Rosenberg, R.; Segaser, C.L.; Terry, C.L.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus is given for the batch sampling of radioactive liquids such as slurries from a system by remote control, while providing shielding for protection of operating personnel from the harmful effects of radiation.

  3. Application of Statistically Derived CPAS Parachute Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, Leah M.; Ray, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) Analysis Team is responsible for determining parachute inflation parameters and dispersions that are ultimately used in verifying system requirements. A model memo is internally released semi-annually documenting parachute inflation and other key parameters reconstructed from flight test data. Dispersion probability distributions published in previous versions of the model memo were uniform because insufficient data were available for determination of statistical based distributions. Uniform distributions do not accurately represent the expected distributions since extreme parameter values are just as likely to occur as the nominal value. CPAS has taken incremental steps to move away from uniform distributions. Model Memo version 9 (MMv9) made the first use of non-uniform dispersions, but only for the reefing cutter timing, for which a large number of sample was available. In order to maximize the utility of the available flight test data, clusters of parachutes were reconstructed individually starting with Model Memo version 10. This allowed for statistical assessment for steady-state drag area (CDS) and parachute inflation parameters such as the canopy fill distance (n), profile shape exponent (expopen), over-inflation factor (C(sub k)), and ramp-down time (t(sub k)) distributions. Built-in MATLAB distributions were applied to the histograms, and parameters such as scale (sigma) and location (mu) were output. Engineering judgment was used to determine the "best fit" distribution based on the test data. Results include normal, log normal, and uniform (where available data remains insufficient) fits of nominal and failure (loss of parachute and skipped stage) cases for all CPAS parachutes. This paper discusses the uniform methodology that was previously used, the process and result of the statistical assessment, how the dispersions were incorporated into Monte Carlo analyses, and the application of the distributions in

  4. The ARIEL mission reference sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingales, Tiziano; Tinetti, Giovanna; Pillitteri, Ignazio; Leconte, Jérémy; Micela, Giuseppina; Sarkar, Subhajit

    2018-02-01

    The ARIEL (Atmospheric Remote-sensing Exoplanet Large-survey) mission concept is one of the three M4 mission candidates selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) for a Phase A study, competing for a launch in 2026. ARIEL has been designed to study the physical and chemical properties of a large and diverse sample of exoplanets and, through those, understand how planets form and evolve in our galaxy. Here we describe the assumptions made to estimate an optimal sample of exoplanets - including already known exoplanets and expected ones yet to be discovered - observable by ARIEL and define a realistic mission scenario. To achieve the mission objectives, the sample should include gaseous and rocky planets with a range of temperatures around stars of different spectral type and metallicity. The current ARIEL design enables the observation of ˜1000 planets, covering a broad range of planetary and stellar parameters, during its four year mission lifetime. This nominal list of planets is expected to evolve over the years depending on the new exoplanet discoveries.

  5. On Markov parameters in system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Minh; Juang, Jer-Nan; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed discussion of Markov parameters in system identification is given. Different forms of input-output representation of linear discrete-time systems are reviewed and discussed. Interpretation of sampled response data as Markov parameters is presented. Relations between the state-space model and particular linear difference models via the Markov parameters are formulated. A generalization of Markov parameters to observer and Kalman filter Markov parameters for system identification is explained. These extended Markov parameters play an important role in providing not only a state-space realization, but also an observer/Kalman filter for the system of interest.

  6. System and method for motor parameter estimation

    SciT

    Luhrs, Bin; Yan, Ting

    2014-03-18

    A system and method for determining unknown values of certain motor parameters includes a motor input device connectable to an electric motor having associated therewith values for known motor parameters and an unknown value of at least one motor parameter. The motor input device includes a processing unit that receives a first input from the electric motor comprising values for the known motor parameters for the electric motor and receive a second input comprising motor data on a plurality of reference motors, including values for motor parameters corresponding to the known motor parameters of the electric motor and values formore » motor parameters corresponding to the at least one unknown motor parameter value of the electric motor. The processor determines the unknown value of the at least one motor parameter from the first input and the second input and determines a motor management strategy for the electric motor based thereon.« less

  7. SAMPLING OSCILLOSCOPE

    DOEpatents

    Sugarman, R.M.

    1960-08-30

    An oscilloscope is designed for displaying transient signal waveforms having random time and amplitude distributions. The oscilloscopc is a sampling device that selects for display a portion of only those waveforms having a particular range of amplitudes. For this purpose a pulse-height analyzer is provided to screen the pulses. A variable voltage-level shifter and a time-scale rampvoltage generator take the pulse height relative to the start of the waveform. The variable voltage shifter produces a voltage level raised one step for each sequential signal waveform to be sampled and this results in an unsmeared record of input signal waveforms. Appropriate delay devices permit each sample waveform to pass its peak amplitude before the circuit selects it for display.

  8. FLUXNET2015 Dataset: Batteries included

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, G.; Papale, D.; Agarwal, D.; Trotta, C.; Chu, H.; Canfora, E.; Torn, M. S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis datasets have become one of the signature products of the FLUXNET global network. They are composed from contributions of individual site teams to regional networks, being then compiled into uniform data products - now used in a wide variety of research efforts: from plant-scale microbiology to global-scale climate change. The FLUXNET Marconi Dataset in 2000 was the first in the series, followed by the FLUXNET LaThuile Dataset in 2007, with significant additions of data products and coverage, solidifying the adoption of the datasets as a research tool. The FLUXNET2015 Dataset counts with another round of substantial improvements, including extended quality control processes and checks, use of downscaled reanalysis data for filling long gaps in micrometeorological variables, multiple methods for USTAR threshold estimation and flux partitioning, and uncertainty estimates - all of which accompanied by auxiliary flags. This "batteries included" approach provides a lot of information for someone who wants to explore the data (and the processing methods) in detail. This inevitably leads to a large number of data variables. Although dealing with all these variables might seem overwhelming at first, especially to someone looking at eddy covariance data for the first time, there is method to our madness. In this work we describe the data products and variables that are part of the FLUXNET2015 Dataset, and the rationale behind the organization of the dataset, covering the simplified version (labeled SUBSET), the complete version (labeled FULLSET), and the auxiliary products in the dataset.

  9. Enhanced conformational sampling using enveloping distribution sampling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-10-14

    To lessen the problem of insufficient conformational sampling in biomolecular simulations is still a major challenge in computational biochemistry. In this article, an application of the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) is proposed that addresses this challenge and its sampling efficiency is demonstrated in simulations of a hexa-β-peptide whose conformational equilibrium encompasses two different helical folds, i.e., a right-handed 2.7(10∕12)-helix and a left-handed 3(14)-helix, separated by a high energy barrier. Standard MD simulations of this peptide using the GROMOS 53A6 force field did not reach convergence of the free enthalpy difference between the two helices even after 500 ns of simulation time. The use of soft-core non-bonded interactions in the centre of the peptide did enhance the number of transitions between the helices, but at the same time led to neglect of relevant helical configurations. In the simulations of a two-state EDS reference Hamiltonian that envelops both the physical peptide and the soft-core peptide, sampling of the conformational space of the physical peptide ensures that physically relevant conformations can be visited, and sampling of the conformational space of the soft-core peptide helps to enhance the transitions between the two helices. The EDS simulations sampled many more transitions between the two helices and showed much faster convergence of the relative free enthalpy of the two helices compared with the standard MD simulations with only a slightly larger computational effort to determine optimized EDS parameters. Combined with various methods to smoothen the potential energy surface, the proposed EDS application will be a powerful technique to enhance the sampling efficiency in biomolecular simulations.

  10. Seafloor Soil Sampling and Geotechnical Parameter Determination - Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    Ko + Au(I- Ko )] (7-1) 97 I where ;v = effective overburden pressure (Section 6.1.3) K 0 = coefficient of lateral earLh pressure AU = reference pore...sin i+(6/a Vcos i su [ Ko i 0 V(7-2) a 1 + (2 A -1) sin 4 Vf 99 to oiU - ~1 where ; = overburden pressure ot depth where strength, Su, is to be...Rickivdo ANtON TfIW)I* SKO 11"will NY tIAltA. JOh I~ 11 Acwtx. CO IIRAI Ir/ IA M6I~. CA IIKOWN. RODEIRT Unoily. At. IIUILOCK 1.3 Ju4 I.AYri3X lt,! WA WM TA IIIf O~mc CA 128

  11. Families classification including multiopposition asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Andrea; Spoto, Federica; Knežević, Zoran; Novaković, Bojan; Tsirvoulis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of our new classification of asteroid families, upgraded by using catalog with > 500,000 asteroids. We discuss the outcome of the most recent update of the family list and of their membership. We found enough evidence to perform 9 mergers of the previously independent families. By introducing an improved method of estimation of the expected family growth in the less populous regions (e.g. at high inclination) we were able to reliably decide on rejection of one tiny group as a probable statistical fluke. Thus we reduced our current list to 115 families. We also present newly determined ages for 6 families, including complex 135 and 221, improving also our understanding of the dynamical vs. collisional families relationship. We conclude with some recommendations for the future work and for the family name problem.

  12. Parameterisation of clastic sediments including benthic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobertz, B.; Harff, J.; Bohling, B.

    2009-02-01

    biologists group were combined in order to derive roughness lengths from abundance measurements of four previously selected key species which represent the originators of the dominating benthic structures at the sea floor in the south-western Baltic Sea. Critical shear stress velocity and bed roughness are known at few sample sites only. They were extrapolated into the larger investigation area using a proxy-target concept. The mean near bottom milieu (bathymetry, median grain size, salinity, oxygen) which was derived using results from numerical modelling serves as the proxy. Since the milieu parameters are measured at the sampling sites for which the target parameters have been determined, a combined hierarchical and supervised classification was employed to transfer the local knowledge into the unknown investigation area.

  13. Using an ensemble smoother to evaluate parameter uncertainty of an integrated hydrological model of Yanqi basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; McLaughlin, Dennis; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Li, WenPeng; Dong, XinGuang

    2015-10-01

    Model uncertainty needs to be quantified to provide objective assessments of the reliability of model predictions and of the risk associated with management decisions that rely on these predictions. This is particularly true in water resource studies that depend on model-based assessments of alternative management strategies. In recent decades, Bayesian data assimilation methods have been widely used in hydrology to assess uncertain model parameters and predictions. In this case study, a particular data assimilation algorithm, the Ensemble Smoother with Multiple Data Assimilation (ESMDA) (Emerick and Reynolds, 2012), is used to derive posterior samples of uncertain model parameters and forecasts for a distributed hydrological model of Yanqi basin, China. This model is constructed using MIKESHE/MIKE11software, which provides for coupling between surface and subsurface processes (DHI, 2011a-d). The random samples in the posterior parameter ensemble are obtained by using measurements to update 50 prior parameter samples generated with a Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) procedure. The posterior forecast samples are obtained from model runs that use the corresponding posterior parameter samples. Two iterative sample update methods are considered: one based on an a perturbed observation Kalman filter update and one based on a square root Kalman filter update. These alternatives give nearly the same results and converge in only two iterations. The uncertain parameters considered include hydraulic conductivities, drainage and river leakage factors, van Genuchten soil property parameters, and dispersion coefficients. The results show that the uncertainty in many of the parameters is reduced during the smoother updating process, reflecting information obtained from the observations. Some of the parameters are insensitive and do not benefit from measurement information. The correlation coefficients among certain parameters increase in each iteration, although they generally

  14. Correlations of fatty acid supplementation, aeroallergens, shampoo, and ear cleanser with multiple parameters in pruritic dogs.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Gene H; Freeman, Lisa M; Hannah, Steven S

    2004-01-01

    Seventy-two pruritic dogs were fed one of four diets controlled for n-6:n-3 fatty acid ratios and total dietary intake of fatty acids. Multiple parameters were evaluated, including clinical and cytological findings, aeroallergen testing, microbial sampling techniques, and effects of an anti-fungal/antibacterial shampoo and ear cleanser. Significant correlations were observed between many clinical parameters, anatomical sampling sites, and microbial counts when data from the diet groups was combined. There were no statistically significant differences between individual diets for any of the clinical parameters. The importance of total clinical management in the control of pruritus was demonstrated.

  15. Including Magnetostriction in Micromagnetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Fabian, Karl; Nagy, Lesleis

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic anomalies that identify crustal spreading are predominantly recorded by basalts formed at the mid-ocean ridges, whose magnetic signals are dominated by iron-titanium-oxides (Fe3-xTixO4), so called "titanomagnetites", of which the Fe2.4Ti0.6O4 (TM60) phase is the most common. With sufficient quantities of titanium present, these minerals exhibit strong magnetostriction. To date, models of these grains in the pseudo-single domain (PSD) range have failed to accurately account for this effect. In particular, a popular analytic treatment provided by Kittel (1949) for describing the magnetostrictive energy as an effective increase of the anisotropy constant can produce unphysical strains for non-uniform magnetizations. I will present a rigorous approach based on work by Brown (1966) and by Kroner (1958) for including magnetostriction in micromagnetic codes which is suitable for modelling hysteresis loops and finding remanent states in the PSD regime. Preliminary results suggest the more rigorously defined micromagnetic models exhibit higher coercivities and extended single domain ranges when compared to more simplistic approaches.

  16. Extraterrestrial Samples at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the curation of extraterrestrial samples at NASA Johnson Space Center is shown. The topics include: 1) Apollo lunar samples; 2) Meteorites from Antarctica; 3) Cosmic dust from the stratosphere; 4) Genesis solar wind ions; 5) Stardust comet and interstellar grains; and 5) Space-Exposed Hardware.

  17. Sampling Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Three locations to the right of the test dig area are identified for the first samples to be delivered to the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL), and the Optical Microscope (OM) on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. These sampling areas are informally labeled 'Baby Bear', 'Mama Bear', and 'Papa Bear' respectively. This image was taken on the seventh day of the Mars mission, or Sol 7 (June 1, 2008) by the Surface Stereo Imager aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Sample EPA Biotech Form

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This sample “EPA Biotech Form” is a header sheet that will accompany all biotechnology submission choices, including MCANs, TERAs, Tier I and Tier II exemption, and biotechnology Test Market Exemption Applications (TMEAs).

  19. Lunar Sample Compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Sample Compendium is a succinct summary of what has been learned from the study of Apollo and Luna samples of the Moon. Basic information is compiled, sample-by-sample, in the form of an advanced catalog in order to provide a basic description of each sample. Information presented is carefully attributed to the original source publication, thus the Compendium also serves as a ready access to the now vast scientific literature pertaining to lunar smples. The Lunar Sample Compendium is a work in progress (and may always be). Future plans include: adding sections on additional samples, adding new thin section photomicrographs, replacing the faded photographs with newly digitized photos from the original negatives, attempting to correct the age data using modern decay constants, adding references to each section, and adding an internal search engine.

  20. Sampling Intervals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    is practically the same as the one proposed by ARINC Research Corporation [ 4 ] for the construction of oil analysis decision tables. For each...pooled over two different failure modes ( auxillary drive bearing and an oil pump). The plot seems to indicate two distinct groups of data and one of the... decision would be to continue sampling at the same rate. -0 S 4,, .4 -12 Oo INITIAL DISTRIBUTION LIST DIRECTOR (2) DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS DEFENSE TECH

  1. Influence of meteorological parameters on air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioda, Adriana; Ventura, Luciana; Lima, Igor; Luna, Aderval

    2013-04-01

    The physical characterization representative of ambient air particle concentrations is becoming a topic of great interest for urban air quality monitoring and human exposure assessment. Human exposure to particulate matter of less than 2.5 µm in diameter (PM2.5) can result in a variety of adverse health impacts, including reduced lung function and premature mortality. Numerous studies have shown that fine airborne inhalable particulate matter particles (PM2.5) are more dangerous to human health than coarse particles, e.g. PM10. This study investigates meteorological parameter impacts on PM2.5 concentrations in the atmosphere of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Samples were collected during 24 h every six days using a high-volume sampler from six sites in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro from January to December 2011. The particles mass was determined by Gravimetry. Meteorological parameters were obtained from automatic stations near the sampling sites. The average PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 9 to 32 µg/m3 for all sites, exceeding the suggested annual limit of WHO (10 µg/m3). The relationship between the effects of temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction and particle concentration was examined using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for the different sites and seasons. The results for each sampling point and season presented different principal component numbers, varying from 2 to 4, and extremely different relationships with the parameters. This clearly shows that changes in meteorological conditions exert a marked influence on air quality.

  2. Sample treatments prior to capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Borges, Javier; Borges-Miquel, Teresa M; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2007-06-15

    Sample preparation is a crucial part of chemical analysis and in most cases can become the bottleneck of the whole analytical process. Its adequacy is a key factor in determining the success of the analysis and, therefore, careful selection and optimization of the parameters controlling sample treatment should be carried out. This work revises the different strategies that have been developed for sample preparation prior to capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS). Namely the present work presents an exhaustive and critical revision of the different samples treatments used together with on-line CE-MS including works published from January 2000 to July 2006.

  3. WEIGHTED LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION UNDER TWO-PHASE SAMPLING

    PubMed Central

    Saegusa, Takumi; Wellner, Jon A.

    2013-01-01

    We develop asymptotic theory for weighted likelihood estimators (WLE) under two-phase stratified sampling without replacement. We also consider several variants of WLEs involving estimated weights and calibration. A set of empirical process tools are developed including a Glivenko–Cantelli theorem, a theorem for rates of convergence of M-estimators, and a Donsker theorem for the inverse probability weighted empirical processes under two-phase sampling and sampling without replacement at the second phase. Using these general results, we derive asymptotic distributions of the WLE of a finite-dimensional parameter in a general semiparametric model where an estimator of a nuisance parameter is estimable either at regular or nonregular rates. We illustrate these results and methods in the Cox model with right censoring and interval censoring. We compare the methods via their asymptotic variances under both sampling without replacement and the more usual (and easier to analyze) assumption of Bernoulli sampling at the second phase. PMID:24563559

  4. Identifying parameter regions for multistationarity

    PubMed Central

    Conradi, Carsten; Mincheva, Maya; Wiuf, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Mathematical modelling has become an established tool for studying the dynamics of biological systems. Current applications range from building models that reproduce quantitative data to identifying systems with predefined qualitative features, such as switching behaviour, bistability or oscillations. Mathematically, the latter question amounts to identifying parameter values associated with a given qualitative feature. We introduce a procedure to partition the parameter space of a parameterized system of ordinary differential equations into regions for which the system has a unique or multiple equilibria. The procedure is based on the computation of the Brouwer degree, and it creates a multivariate polynomial with parameter depending coefficients. The signs of the coefficients determine parameter regions with and without multistationarity. A particular strength of the procedure is the avoidance of numerical analysis and parameter sampling. The procedure consists of a number of steps. Each of these steps might be addressed algorithmically using various computer programs and available software, or manually. We demonstrate our procedure on several models of gene transcription and cell signalling, and show that in many cases we obtain a complete partitioning of the parameter space with respect to multistationarity. PMID:28972969

  5. Sampling design optimization for spatial functions

    Olea, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new procedure is presented for minimizing the sampling requirements necessary to estimate a mappable spatial function at a specified level of accuracy. The technique is based on universal kriging, an estimation method within the theory of regionalized variables. Neither actual implementation of the sampling nor universal kriging estimations are necessary to make an optimal design. The average standard error and maximum standard error of estimation over the sampling domain are used as global indices of sampling efficiency. The procedure optimally selects those parameters controlling the magnitude of the indices, including the density and spatial pattern of the sample elements and the number of nearest sample elements used in the estimation. As an illustration, the network of observation wells used to monitor the water table in the Equus Beds of Kansas is analyzed and an improved sampling pattern suggested. This example demonstrates the practical utility of the procedure, which can be applied equally well to other spatial sampling problems, as the procedure is not limited by the nature of the spatial function. ?? 1984 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  6. AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) Dive Control System Development Including Sensor Bias Compensation and Parameter Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    equations, x(k+l) = A*x(k) + B*u(k) + Ko *[y(k)-C*x(k)] in which y(k) is the previous time sensor output signals. In this case, two outputs were...available to the observer, the pitch rate, and the water depth. The observer gains, Ko , may be selected by using the dual of the controller pole placement...becomes, 15 y(k) = [l;l]*ye(k) so that the gains for the two-input system become Ko = [l;l]*ke where Ke are found via pole placement using ye(k). The

  7. On the Accuracy of Atmospheric Parameter Determination in BAFGK Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikova, T.; Piskunov, N.; Shulyak, D.

    2015-04-01

    During the past few years, many papers determining the atmospheric parameters in FGK stars appeared in the literature where the accuracy of effective temperatures is given as 20-40 K. For main sequence stars within the 5 000-13 000 K temperature range, we have performed a comparative analysis of the parameters derived from the spectra by using the SME (Spectroscopy Made Easy) package and those found in the literature. Our sample includes standard stars Sirius, Procyon, δ Eri, and the Sun. Combining different spectral regions in the fitting procedure, we investigated an effect different atomic species have on the derived atmospheric parameters. The temperature difference may exceed 100 K depending on the spectral regions used in the SME procedure. It is shown that the atmospheric parameters derived with the SME procedure which includes wings of hydrogen lines in fitting agrees better with the results derived by the other methods and tools across a large part of the main sequence. For three stars—π Cet, 21 Peg, and Procyon—the atmospheric parameters were also derived by fitting a calculated energy distribution to the observed one. We found a substantial difference in the parameters inferred from different sets and combinations of spectrophotometric observations. An intercomparison of our results and literature data shows that the average accuracy of effective temperature determination for cool stars and for the early B-stars is 70-85 K and 170-200 K, respectively.

  8. SPOTting Model Parameters Using a Ready-Made Python Package.

    PubMed

    Houska, Tobias; Kraft, Philipp; Chamorro-Chavez, Alejandro; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The choice for specific parameter estimation methods is often more dependent on its availability than its performance. We developed SPOTPY (Statistical Parameter Optimization Tool), an open source python package containing a comprehensive set of methods typically used to calibrate, analyze and optimize parameters for a wide range of ecological models. SPOTPY currently contains eight widely used algorithms, 11 objective functions, and can sample from eight parameter distributions. SPOTPY has a model-independent structure and can be run in parallel from the workstation to large computation clusters using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). We tested SPOTPY in five different case studies to parameterize the Rosenbrock, Griewank and Ackley functions, a one-dimensional physically based soil moisture routine, where we searched for parameters of the van Genuchten-Mualem function and a calibration of a biogeochemistry model with different objective functions. The case studies reveal that the implemented SPOTPY methods can be used for any model with just a minimal amount of code for maximal power of parameter optimization. They further show the benefit of having one package at hand that includes number of well performing parameter search methods, since not every case study can be solved sufficiently with every algorithm or every objective function.

  9. SPOTting Model Parameters Using a Ready-Made Python Package

    PubMed Central

    Houska, Tobias; Kraft, Philipp; Chamorro-Chavez, Alejandro; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The choice for specific parameter estimation methods is often more dependent on its availability than its performance. We developed SPOTPY (Statistical Parameter Optimization Tool), an open source python package containing a comprehensive set of methods typically used to calibrate, analyze and optimize parameters for a wide range of ecological models. SPOTPY currently contains eight widely used algorithms, 11 objective functions, and can sample from eight parameter distributions. SPOTPY has a model-independent structure and can be run in parallel from the workstation to large computation clusters using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). We tested SPOTPY in five different case studies to parameterize the Rosenbrock, Griewank and Ackley functions, a one-dimensional physically based soil moisture routine, where we searched for parameters of the van Genuchten-Mualem function and a calibration of a biogeochemistry model with different objective functions. The case studies reveal that the implemented SPOTPY methods can be used for any model with just a minimal amount of code for maximal power of parameter optimization. They further show the benefit of having one package at hand that includes number of well performing parameter search methods, since not every case study can be solved sufficiently with every algorithm or every objective function. PMID:26680783

  10. SPOTting Model Parameters Using a Ready-Made Python Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houska, Tobias; Kraft, Philipp; Chamorro-Chavez, Alejandro; Breuer, Lutz

    2017-04-01

    The choice for specific parameter estimation methods is often more dependent on its availability than its performance. We developed SPOTPY (Statistical Parameter Optimization Tool), an open source python package containing a comprehensive set of methods typically used to calibrate, analyze and optimize parameters for a wide range of ecological models. SPOTPY currently contains eight widely used algorithms, 11 objective functions, and can sample from eight parameter distributions. SPOTPY has a model-independent structure and can be run in parallel from the workstation to large computation clusters using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). We tested SPOTPY in five different case studies to parameterize the Rosenbrock, Griewank and Ackley functions, a one-dimensional physically based soil moisture routine, where we searched for parameters of the van Genuchten-Mualem function and a calibration of a biogeochemistry model with different objective functions. The case studies reveal that the implemented SPOTPY methods can be used for any model with just a minimal amount of code for maximal power of parameter optimization. They further show the benefit of having one package at hand that includes number of well performing parameter search methods, since not every case study can be solved sufficiently with every algorithm or every objective function.

  11. Adaptive web sampling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Steven K

    2006-12-01

    A flexible class of adaptive sampling designs is introduced for sampling in network and spatial settings. In the designs, selections are made sequentially with a mixture distribution based on an active set that changes as the sampling progresses, using network or spatial relationships as well as sample values. The new designs have certain advantages compared with previously existing adaptive and link-tracing designs, including control over sample sizes and of the proportion of effort allocated to adaptive selections. Efficient inference involves averaging over sample paths consistent with the minimal sufficient statistic. A Markov chain resampling method makes the inference computationally feasible. The designs are evaluated in network and spatial settings using two empirical populations: a hidden human population at high risk for HIV/AIDS and an unevenly distributed bird population.

  12. Comparison of veterinary drug residue results in animal tissues by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole or quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry after different sample preparation methods, including use of a commercial lipid removal product.

    PubMed

    Anumol, Tarun; Lehotay, Steven J; Stevens, Joan; Zweigenbaum, Jerry

    2017-04-01

    Veterinary drug residues in animal-derived foods must be monitored to ensure food safety, verify proper veterinary practices, enforce legal limits in domestic and imported foods, and for other purposes. A common goal in drug residue analysis in foods is to achieve acceptable monitoring results for as many analytes as possible, with higher priority given to the drugs of most concern, in an efficient and robust manner. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has implemented a multiclass, multi-residue method based on sample preparation using dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) for cleanup and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QQQ) for analysis of >120 drugs at regulatory levels of concern in animal tissues. Recently, a new cleanup product called "enhanced matrix removal for lipids" (EMR-L) was commercially introduced that used a unique chemical mechanism to remove lipids from extracts. Furthermore, high-resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight (Q/TOF) for (U)HPLC detection often yields higher selectivity than targeted QQQ analyzers while allowing retroactive processing of samples for other contaminants. In this study, the use of both d-SPE and EMR-L sample preparation and UHPLC-QQQ and UHPLC-Q/TOF analysis methods for shared spiked samples of bovine muscle, kidney, and liver was compared. The results showed that the EMR-L method provided cleaner extracts overall and improved results for several anthelmintics and tranquilizers compared to the d-SPE method, but the EMR-L method gave lower recoveries for certain β-lactam antibiotics. QQQ vs. Q/TOF detection showed similar mixed performance advantages depending on analytes and matrix interferences, with an advantage to Q/TOF for greater possible analytical scope and non-targeted data collection. Either combination of approaches may be used to meet monitoring purposes, with an edge in efficiency to d-SPE, but greater instrument robustness and less matrix effects when

  13. Display Parameters and Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * HUMAN FACTORS * Anthropometry * Sensory * Cognitive * Discussions * THE HUMAN VISUAL SYSTEM - CAPABILITIES AND LIMITATIONS * Cornea * Pupil and Iris * Lens * Vitreous Humor * Retina * RODS - NIGHT VISION * CONES - DAY VISION * RODS AND CONES - TWILIGHT VISION * VISUAL PIGMENTS * MACULA * BLOOD * CHOROID COAT * Visual Signal Processing * Pathways to the Brain * Spatial Vision * Temporal Vision * Colour Vision * Colour Blindness * DICHROMATISM * Protanopia * Deuteranopia * Tritanopia * ANOMALOUS TRICHROMATISM * Protanomaly * Deuteranomaly * Tritanomaly * CONE MONOCHROMATISM * ROD MONOCHROMATISM * Using Colour Effectively * COLOUR MIXTURES AND THE CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * Colour Matching Functions and Chromaticity Co-ordinates * CIE 1931 Colour Space * CIE PRIMARIES * CIE COLOUR MATCHING FUNCTIONS AND CHROMATICITY CO-ORDINATES * METHODS FOR DETERMINING TRISTIMULUS VALUES AND COLOUR CO-ORDINATES * Spectral Power Distribution Method * Filter Method * CIE 1931 CHROMATICITY DIAGRAM * ADDITIVE COLOUR MIXTURE * CIE 1976 Chromaticity Diagram * CIE Uniform Colour Spaces and Colour Difference Formulae * CIELUV OR L*u*v* * CIELAB OR L*a*b* * CIE COLOUR DIFFERENCE FORMULAE * Colour Temperature and CIE Standard Illuminants and source * RADIOMETRIC AND PHOTOMETRIC QUANTITIES * Photopic (Vλ and Scotopic (Vλ') Luminous Efficiency Function * Photometric and Radiometric Flux * Luminous and Radiant Intensities * Incidence: Illuminance and Irradiance * Exitance or Emittance (M) * Luminance and Radiance * ERGONOMIC REQUIREMENTS OF DISPLAYS * ELECTRO-OPTICAL PARAMETERS AND REQUIREMENTS * Contrast and Contrast Ratio * Luminance and Brightness * Colour Contrast and Chromaticity * Glare * Other Aspects of Legibility * SHAPE AND SIZE OF CHARACTERS * DEFECTS AND BLEMISHES * FLICKER AND DISTORTION * ANGLE OF VIEW * Switching Speed * Threshold and Threshold Characteristic * Measurement Techniques For Electro-optical Parameters * RADIOMETRIC

  14. Statistical Inference for Data Adaptive Target Parameters.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Alan E; Kherad-Pajouh, Sara; van der Laan, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Consider one observes n i.i.d. copies of a random variable with a probability distribution that is known to be an element of a particular statistical model. In order to define our statistical target we partition the sample in V equal size sub-samples, and use this partitioning to define V splits in an estimation sample (one of the V subsamples) and corresponding complementary parameter-generating sample. For each of the V parameter-generating samples, we apply an algorithm that maps the sample to a statistical target parameter. We define our sample-split data adaptive statistical target parameter as the average of these V-sample specific target parameters. We present an estimator (and corresponding central limit theorem) of this type of data adaptive target parameter. This general methodology for generating data adaptive target parameters is demonstrated with a number of practical examples that highlight new opportunities for statistical learning from data. This new framework provides a rigorous statistical methodology for both exploratory and confirmatory analysis within the same data. Given that more research is becoming "data-driven", the theory developed within this paper provides a new impetus for a greater involvement of statistical inference into problems that are being increasingly addressed by clever, yet ad hoc pattern finding methods. To suggest such potential, and to verify the predictions of the theory, extensive simulation studies, along with a data analysis based on adaptively determined intervention rules are shown and give insight into how to structure such an approach. The results show that the data adaptive target parameter approach provides a general framework and resulting methodology for data-driven science.

  15. pypet: A Python Toolkit for Data Management of Parameter Explorations

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Robert; Obermayer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    pypet (Python parameter exploration toolkit) is a new multi-platform Python toolkit for managing numerical simulations. Sampling the space of model parameters is a key aspect of simulations and numerical experiments. pypet is designed to allow easy and arbitrary sampling of trajectories through a parameter space beyond simple grid searches. pypet collects and stores both simulation parameters and results in a single HDF5 file. This collective storage allows fast and convenient loading of data for further analyses. pypet provides various additional features such as multiprocessing and parallelization of simulations, dynamic loading of data, integration of git version control, and supervision of experiments via the electronic lab notebook Sumatra. pypet supports a rich set of data formats, including native Python types, Numpy and Scipy data, Pandas DataFrames, and BRIAN(2) quantities. Besides these formats, users can easily extend the toolkit to allow customized data types. pypet is a flexible tool suited for both short Python scripts and large scale projects. pypet's various features, especially the tight link between parameters and results, promote reproducible research in computational neuroscience and simulation-based disciplines. PMID:27610080

  16. pypet: A Python Toolkit for Data Management of Parameter Explorations.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Robert; Obermayer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    pypet (Python parameter exploration toolkit) is a new multi-platform Python toolkit for managing numerical simulations. Sampling the space of model parameters is a key aspect of simulations and numerical experiments. pypet is designed to allow easy and arbitrary sampling of trajectories through a parameter space beyond simple grid searches. pypet collects and stores both simulation parameters and results in a single HDF5 file. This collective storage allows fast and convenient loading of data for further analyses. pypet provides various additional features such as multiprocessing and parallelization of simulations, dynamic loading of data, integration of git version control, and supervision of experiments via the electronic lab notebook Sumatra. pypet supports a rich set of data formats, including native Python types, Numpy and Scipy data, Pandas DataFrames, and BRIAN(2) quantities. Besides these formats, users can easily extend the toolkit to allow customized data types. pypet is a flexible tool suited for both short Python scripts and large scale projects. pypet's various features, especially the tight link between parameters and results, promote reproducible research in computational neuroscience and simulation-based disciplines.

  17. Hybrid Gibbs Sampling and MCMC for CMB Analysis at Small Angular Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewell, Jeffrey B.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wandelt, B. D.; Gorski, K. M.; Huey, G.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Dickinson, C.; Banday, A. J.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    A) Gibbs Sampling has now been validated as an efficient, statistically exact, and practically useful method for "low-L" (as demonstrated on WMAP temperature polarization data). B) We are extending Gibbs sampling to directly propagate uncertainties in both foreground and instrument models to total uncertainty in cosmological parameters for the entire range of angular scales relevant for Planck. C) Made possible by inclusion of foreground model parameters in Gibbs sampling and hybrid MCMC and Gibbs sampling for the low signal to noise (high-L) regime. D) Future items to be included in the Bayesian framework include: 1) Integration with Hybrid Likelihood (or posterior) code for cosmological parameters; 2) Include other uncertainties in instrumental systematics? (I.e. beam uncertainties, noise estimation, calibration errors, other).

  18. Sampling Operations on Big Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-29

    gories. These include edge sampling methods where edges are selected by a predetermined criteria; snowball sampling methods where algorithms start... Sampling Operations on Big Data Vijay Gadepally, Taylor Herr, Luke Johnson, Lauren Milechin, Maja Milosavljevic, Benjamin A. Miller Lincoln...process and disseminate information for discovery and exploration under real-time constraints. Common signal processing operations such as sampling and

  19. Sample holder with optical features

    DOEpatents

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2013-07-30

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  20. Cosmological parameter estimation using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, J.; Souradeep, T.

    2014-03-01

    Constraining parameters of a theoretical model from observational data is an important exercise in cosmology. There are many theoretically motivated models, which demand greater number of cosmological parameters than the standard model of cosmology uses, and make the problem of parameter estimation challenging. It is a common practice to employ Bayesian formalism for parameter estimation for which, in general, likelihood surface is probed. For the standard cosmological model with six parameters, likelihood surface is quite smooth and does not have local maxima, and sampling based methods like Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method are quite successful. However, when there are a large number of parameters or the likelihood surface is not smooth, other methods may be more effective. In this paper, we have demonstrated application of another method inspired from artificial intelligence, called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for estimating cosmological parameters from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data taken from the WMAP satellite.

  1. [Development of an analyzing system for soil parameters based on NIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Hua; Li, Min-Zan; Sun, Hong

    2009-10-01

    A rapid estimation system for soil parameters based on spectral analysis was developed by using object-oriented (OO) technology. A class of SOIL was designed. The instance of the SOIL class is the object of the soil samples with the particular type, specific physical properties and spectral characteristics. Through extracting the effective information from the modeling spectral data of soil object, a map model was established between the soil parameters and its spectral data, while it was possible to save the mapping model parameters in the database of the model. When forecasting the content of any soil parameter, the corresponding prediction model of this parameter can be selected with the same soil type and the similar soil physical properties of objects. And after the object of target soil samples was carried into the prediction model and processed by the system, the accurate forecasting content of the target soil samples could be obtained. The system includes modules such as file operations, spectra pretreatment, sample analysis, calibrating and validating, and samples content forecasting. The system was designed to run out of equipment. The parameters and spectral data files (*.xls) of the known soil samples can be input into the system. Due to various data pretreatment being selected according to the concrete conditions, the results of predicting content will appear in the terminal and the forecasting model can be stored in the model database. The system reads the predicting models and their parameters are saved in the model database from the module interface, and then the data of the tested samples are transferred into the selected model. Finally the content of soil parameters can be predicted by the developed system. The system was programmed with Visual C++6.0 and Matlab 7.0. And the Access XP was used to create and manage the model database.

  2. Constitutive parameter measurements of lossy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, A.; Park, A.

    1989-01-01

    The electrical constitutive parameters of lossy materials are considered. A discussion of the NRL arch for lossy coatings is presented involving analytical analyses of the reflected field using the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) and physical optics (PO). The actual values for these parameters can be obtained through a traditional transmission technique which is examined from an error analysis standpoint. Alternate sample geometries are suggested for this technique to reduce sample tolerance requirements for accurate parameter determination. The performance for one alternate geometry is given.

  3. Prediction of compressibility parameters of the soils using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Kurnaz, T Fikret; Dagdeviren, Ugur; Yildiz, Murat; Ozkan, Ozhan

    2016-01-01

    The compression index and recompression index are one of the important compressibility parameters to determine the settlement calculation for fine-grained soil layers. These parameters can be determined by carrying out laboratory oedometer test on undisturbed samples; however, the test is quite time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, many empirical formulas based on regression analysis have been presented to estimate the compressibility parameters using soil index properties. In this paper, an artificial neural network (ANN) model is suggested for prediction of compressibility parameters from basic soil properties. For this purpose, the input parameters are selected as the natural water content, initial void ratio, liquid limit and plasticity index. In this model, two output parameters, including compression index and recompression index, are predicted in a combined network structure. As the result of the study, proposed ANN model is successful for the prediction of the compression index, however the predicted recompression index values are not satisfying compared to the compression index.

  4. Fundamental Parameters Line Profile Fitting in Laboratory Diffractometers

    PubMed Central

    Cheary, R. W.; Coelho, A. A.; Cline, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    The fundamental parameters approach to line profile fitting uses physically based models to generate the line profile shapes. Fundamental parameters profile fitting (FPPF) has been used to synthesize and fit data from both parallel beam and divergent beam diffractometers. The refined parameters are determined by the diffractometer configuration. In a divergent beam diffractometer these include the angular aperture of the divergence slit, the width and axial length of the receiving slit, the angular apertures of the axial Soller slits, the length and projected width of the x-ray source, the absorption coefficient and axial length of the sample. In a parallel beam system the principal parameters are the angular aperture of the equatorial analyser/Soller slits and the angular apertures of the axial Soller slits. The presence of a monochromator in the beam path is normally accommodated by modifying the wavelength spectrum and/or by changing one or more of the axial divergence parameters. Flat analyzer crystals have been incorporated into FPPF as a Lorentzian shaped angular acceptance function. One of the intrinsic benefits of the fundamental parameters approach is its adaptability any laboratory diffractometer. Good fits can normally be obtained over the whole 20 range without refinement using the known properties of the diffractometer, such as the slit sizes and diffractometer radius, and emission profile. PMID:27366594

  5. Parameters of Technological Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Chauncey; Rudman, Richard

    1973-01-01

    Examines the factors involved in technological growth and identifies the key parameters as societal resources and societal expectations. Concludes that quality of life can only be maintained by reducing population growth, since this parameter is the product of material levels, overcrowding, food, and pollution. (JR)

  6. Nonuniform sampling by quantiles.

    PubMed

    Craft, D Levi; Sonstrom, Reilly E; Rovnyak, Virginia G; Rovnyak, David

    2018-03-01

    A flexible strategy for choosing samples nonuniformly from a Nyquist grid using the concept of statistical quantiles is presented for broad classes of NMR experimentation. Quantile-directed scheduling is intuitive and flexible for any weighting function, promotes reproducibility and seed independence, and is generalizable to multiple dimensions. In brief, weighting functions are divided into regions of equal probability, which define the samples to be acquired. Quantile scheduling therefore achieves close adherence to a probability distribution function, thereby minimizing gaps for any given degree of subsampling of the Nyquist grid. A characteristic of quantile scheduling is that one-dimensional, weighted NUS schedules are deterministic, however higher dimensional schedules are similar within a user-specified jittering parameter. To develop unweighted sampling, we investigated the minimum jitter needed to disrupt subharmonic tracts, and show that this criterion can be met in many cases by jittering within 25-50% of the subharmonic gap. For nD-NUS, three supplemental components to choosing samples by quantiles are proposed in this work: (i) forcing the corner samples to ensure sampling to specified maximum values in indirect evolution times, (ii) providing an option to triangular backfill sampling schedules to promote dense/uniform tracts at the beginning of signal evolution periods, and (iii) providing an option to force the edges of nD-NUS schedules to be identical to the 1D quantiles. Quantile-directed scheduling meets the diverse needs of current NUS experimentation, but can also be used for future NUS implementations such as off-grid NUS and more. A computer program implementing these principles (a.k.a. QSched) in 1D- and 2D-NUS is available under the general public license. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nonuniform sampling by quantiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, D. Levi; Sonstrom, Reilly E.; Rovnyak, Virginia G.; Rovnyak, David

    2018-03-01

    A flexible strategy for choosing samples nonuniformly from a Nyquist grid using the concept of statistical quantiles is presented for broad classes of NMR experimentation. Quantile-directed scheduling is intuitive and flexible for any weighting function, promotes reproducibility and seed independence, and is generalizable to multiple dimensions. In brief, weighting functions are divided into regions of equal probability, which define the samples to be acquired. Quantile scheduling therefore achieves close adherence to a probability distribution function, thereby minimizing gaps for any given degree of subsampling of the Nyquist grid. A characteristic of quantile scheduling is that one-dimensional, weighted NUS schedules are deterministic, however higher dimensional schedules are similar within a user-specified jittering parameter. To develop unweighted sampling, we investigated the minimum jitter needed to disrupt subharmonic tracts, and show that this criterion can be met in many cases by jittering within 25-50% of the subharmonic gap. For nD-NUS, three supplemental components to choosing samples by quantiles are proposed in this work: (i) forcing the corner samples to ensure sampling to specified maximum values in indirect evolution times, (ii) providing an option to triangular backfill sampling schedules to promote dense/uniform tracts at the beginning of signal evolution periods, and (iii) providing an option to force the edges of nD-NUS schedules to be identical to the 1D quantiles. Quantile-directed scheduling meets the diverse needs of current NUS experimentation, but can also be used for future NUS implementations such as off-grid NUS and more. A computer program implementing these principles (a.k.a. QSched) in 1D- and 2D-NUS is available under the general public license.

  8. New prior sampling methods for nested sampling - Development and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Barrie; Tuyl, Frank; Hudson, Irene

    2017-06-01

    Nested Sampling is a powerful algorithm for fitting models to data in the Bayesian setting, introduced by Skilling [1]. The nested sampling algorithm proceeds by carrying out a series of compressive steps, involving successively nested iso-likelihood boundaries, starting with the full prior distribution of the problem parameters. The "central problem" of nested sampling is to draw at each step a sample from the prior distribution whose likelihood is greater than the current likelihood threshold, i.e., a sample falling inside the current likelihood-restricted region. For both flat and informative priors this ultimately requires uniform sampling restricted to the likelihood-restricted region. We present two new methods of carrying out this sampling step, and illustrate their use with the lighthouse problem [2], a bivariate likelihood used by Gregory [3] and a trivariate Gaussian mixture likelihood. All the algorithm development and testing reported here has been done with Mathematica® [4].

  9. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  10. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  11. Sequential ensemble-based optimal design for parameter estimation: SEQUENTIAL ENSEMBLE-BASED OPTIMAL DESIGN

    SciT

    Man, Jun; Zhang, Jiangjiang; Li, Weixuan

    2016-10-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has been widely used in parameter estimation for hydrological models. The focus of most previous studies was to develop more efficient analysis (estimation) algorithms. On the other hand, it is intuitively understandable that a well-designed sampling (data-collection) strategy should provide more informative measurements and subsequently improve the parameter estimation. In this work, a Sequential Ensemble-based Optimal Design (SEOD) method, coupled with EnKF, information theory and sequential optimal design, is proposed to improve the performance of parameter estimation. Based on the first-order and second-order statistics, different information metrics including the Shannon entropy difference (SD), degrees ofmore » freedom for signal (DFS) and relative entropy (RE) are used to design the optimal sampling strategy, respectively. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by synthetic one-dimensional and two-dimensional unsaturated flow case studies. It is shown that the designed sampling strategies can provide more accurate parameter estimation and state prediction compared with conventional sampling strategies. Optimal sampling designs based on various information metrics perform similarly in our cases. The effect of ensemble size on the optimal design is also investigated. Overall, larger ensemble size improves the parameter estimation and convergence of optimal sampling strategy. Although the proposed method is applied to unsaturated flow problems in this study, it can be equally applied in any other hydrological problems.« less

  12. Zγ production at NNLO including anomalous couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John M.; Neumann, Tobias; Williams, Ciaran

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we present a next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD calculation of the processes pp → l + l -γ and pp\\to ν \\overline{ν}γ that we have implemented in MCFM. Our calculation includes QCD corrections at NNLO both for the Standard Model (SM) and additionally in the presence of Zγγ and ZZγ anomalous couplings. We compare our implementation, obtained using the jettiness slicing approach, with a previous SM calculation and find broad agreement. Focusing on the sensitivity of our results to the slicing parameter, we show that using our setup we are able to compute NNLO cross sections with numerical uncertainties of about 0.1%, which is small compared to residual scale uncertainties of a few percent. We study potential improvements using two different jettiness definitions and the inclusion of power corrections. At √{s}=13 TeV we present phenomenological results and consider Zγ as a background to H → Zγ production. We find that, with typical cuts, the inclusion of NNLO corrections represents a small effect and loosens the extraction of limits on anomalous couplings by about 10%.

  13. 300 Area treated effluent disposal facility sampling schedule. Revision 1

    SciT

    Loll, C.M.

    1995-03-28

    This document is the interface between the 300 Area liquid effluent process engineering (LEPE) group and the waste sampling and characterization facility (WSCF), concerning process control samples. It contains a schedule for process control samples at the 300 Area TEDF which describes the parameters to be measured, the frequency of sampling and analysis, the sampling point, and the purpose for each parameter.

  14. 300 Area treated effluent disposal facility sampling schedule

    SciT

    Loll, C.M.

    1994-10-11

    This document is the interface between the 300 Area Liquid Effluent Process Engineering (LEPE) group and the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF), concerning process control samples. It contains a schedule for process control samples at the 300 Area TEDF which describes the parameters to be measured, the frequency of sampling and analysis, the sampling point, and the purpose for each parameter.

  15. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  16. Parameter estimating state reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Parameter estimation is considered for systems whose entire state cannot be measured. Linear observers are designed to recover the unmeasured states to a sufficient accuracy to permit the estimation process. There are three distinct dynamics that must be accommodated in the system design: the dynamics of the plant, the dynamics of the observer, and the system updating of the parameter estimation. The latter two are designed to minimize interaction of the involved systems. These techniques are extended to weakly nonlinear systems. The application to a simulation of a space shuttle POGO system test is of particular interest. A nonlinear simulation of the system is developed, observers designed, and the parameters estimated.

  17. Optimal three-dimensional reusable tug trajectories for planetary missions including correction for nodal precession

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsody, J.

    1976-01-01

    Equations are derived by using the maximum principle to maximize the payload of a reusable tug for planetary missions. The analysis includes a correction for precession of the space shuttle orbit. The tug returns to this precessed orbit (within a specified time) and makes the required nodal correction. A sample case is analyzed that represents an inner planet mission as specified by a fixed declination and right ascension of the outgoing asymptote and the mission energy. The reusable stage performance corresponds to that of a typical cryogenic tug. Effects of space shuttle orbital inclination, several trajectory parameters, and tug thrust on payload are also investigated.

  18. Open port sampling interface

    SciT

    Van Berkel, Gary J

    A system for sampling a sample material includes a probe which can have an outer probe housing with an open end. A liquid supply conduit within the housing has an outlet positioned to deliver liquid to the open end of the housing. The liquid supply conduit can be connectable to a liquid supply for delivering liquid at a first volumetric flow rate to the open end of the housing. A liquid exhaust conduit within the housing is provided for removing liquid from the open end of the housing. A liquid exhaust system can be provided for removing liquid from themore » liquid exhaust conduit at a second volumetric flow rate, the first volumetric flow rate exceeding the second volumetric flow rate, wherein liquid at the open end will receive sample, liquid containing sample material will be drawn into and through the liquid exhaust conduit, and liquid will overflow from the open end.« less

  19. Adaptive sampling in behavioral surveys.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S K

    1997-01-01

    Studies of populations such as drug users encounter difficulties because the members of the populations are rare, hidden, or hard to reach. Conventionally designed large-scale surveys detect relatively few members of the populations so that estimates of population characteristics have high uncertainty. Ethnographic studies, on the other hand, reach suitable numbers of individuals only through the use of link-tracing, chain referral, or snowball sampling procedures that often leave the investigators unable to make inferences from their sample to the hidden population as a whole. In adaptive sampling, the procedure for selecting people or other units to be in the sample depends on variables of interest observed during the survey, so the design adapts to the population as encountered. For example, when self-reported drug use is found among members of the sample, sampling effort may be increased in nearby areas. Types of adaptive sampling designs include ordinary sequential sampling, adaptive allocation in stratified sampling, adaptive cluster sampling, and optimal model-based designs. Graph sampling refers to situations with nodes (for example, people) connected by edges (such as social links or geographic proximity). An initial sample of nodes or edges is selected and edges are subsequently followed to bring other nodes into the sample. Graph sampling designs include network sampling, snowball sampling, link-tracing, chain referral, and adaptive cluster sampling. A graph sampling design is adaptive if the decision to include linked nodes depends on variables of interest observed on nodes already in the sample. Adjustment methods for nonsampling errors such as imperfect detection of drug users in the sample apply to adaptive as well as conventional designs.

  20. A portable foot-parameter-extracting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, MingKai; Liang, Jin; Li, Wenpan; Liu, Shifan

    2016-03-01

    In order to solve the problem of automatic foot measurement in garment customization, a new automatic footparameter- extracting system based on stereo vision, photogrammetry and heterodyne multiple frequency phase shift technology is proposed and implemented. The key technologies applied in the system are studied, including calibration of projector, alignment of point clouds, and foot measurement. Firstly, a new projector calibration algorithm based on plane model has been put forward to get the initial calibration parameters and a feature point detection scheme of calibration board image is developed. Then, an almost perfect match of two clouds is achieved by performing a first alignment using the Sampled Consensus - Initial Alignment algorithm (SAC-IA) and refining the alignment using the Iterative Closest Point algorithm (ICP). Finally, the approaches used for foot-parameterextracting and the system scheme are presented in detail. Experimental results show that the RMS error of the calibration result is 0.03 pixel and the foot parameter extracting experiment shows the feasibility of the extracting algorithm. Compared with the traditional measurement method, the system can be more portable, accurate and robust.

  1. The ADA's practice parameters.

    PubMed

    Ellek, Donalda M

    2005-01-01

    The ADA parameters of care have served the needs of practicing dentists for fifteen years. Their purpose is to describe a range of treatment options that dentists will want to consider, in combination with particular clinical conditions and patient preferences. These options have been developed based on available evidence and a consensus of professional judgment. The ADA has exercised concern that parameters not be used, out of the context of individual professional judgment, for policy purposes.

  2. Parameters of care for craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Joseph G; Warren, Stephen M; Bernstein, Joseph; Burnett, Whitney; Cunningham, Michael L; Edmond, Jane C; Figueroa, Alvaro A; Kapp-Simon, Kathleen A; Labow, Brian I; Peterson-Falzone, Sally J; Proctor, Mark R; Rubin, Marcie S; Sze, Raymond W; Yemen, Terrance A

    2012-01-01

    A multidisciplinary meeting was held from March 4 to 6, 2010, in Atlanta, Georgia, entitled "Craniosynostosis: Developing Parameters for Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management." The goal of this meeting was to create parameters of care for individuals with craniosynostosis. Fifty-two conference attendees represented a broad range of expertise, including anesthesiology, craniofacial surgery, dentistry, genetics, hand surgery, neurosurgery, nursing, ophthalmology, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics, otolaryngology, pediatrics, psychology, public health, radiology, and speech-language pathology. These attendees also represented 16 professional societies and peer-reviewed journals. The current state of knowledge related to each discipline was reviewed. Based on areas of expertise, four breakout groups were created to reach a consensus and draft specialty-specific parameters of care based on the literature or, in the absence of literature, broad clinical experience. In an iterative manner, the specialty-specific draft recommendations were presented to all conference attendees. Participants discussed the recommendations in multidisciplinary groups to facilitate exchange and consensus across disciplines. After the conference, a pediatric intensivist and social worker reviewed the recommendations. Consensus was reached among the 52 conference attendees and two post hoc reviewers. Longitudinal parameters of care were developed for the diagnosis, treatment, and management of craniosynostosis in each of the 18 specialty areas of care from prenatal evaluation to adulthood. To our knowledge, this is the first multidisciplinary effort to develop parameters of care for craniosynostosis. These parameters were designed to help facilitate the development of educational programs for the patient, families, and health-care professionals; stimulate the creation of a national database and registry to promote research, especially in the area of outcome studies; improve

  3. Aircraft data summaries for the SURE intensives. Final report. [Sampling done August 1977 near Rockport, Indiana and Duncan Falls, Ohio

    SciT

    Blumenthal, D.L.; Tommerdahl, J.B.; McDonald, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    As part of the EPRI sulfate regional experiment (SURE), Meteorology Research, Inc., (MRI) and Research Triangle Institute (RTI) conducted six air quality sampling programs in the eastern United States using instrumented aircraft. This volume includes the air quality and meteorological data obtained during the August 1977 Intensive when MRI sampled near the Rockport, Indiana, SURE Station and RTI sampled near the Duncan Falls, Ohio, SURE Station. Sampling data are presented for all measured parameters.

  4. Ball assisted device for analytical surface sampling

    DOEpatents

    ElNaggar, Mariam S; Van Berkel, Gary J; Covey, Thomas R

    2015-11-03

    A system for sampling a surface includes a sampling probe having a housing and a socket, and a rolling sampling sphere within the socket. The housing has a sampling fluid supply conduit and a sampling fluid exhaust conduit. The sampling fluid supply conduit supplies sampling fluid to the sampling sphere. The sampling fluid exhaust conduit has an inlet opening for receiving sampling fluid carried from the surface by the sampling sphere. A surface sampling probe and a method for sampling a surface are also disclosed.

  5. [A comparison of convenience sampling and purposive sampling].

    PubMed

    Suen, Lee-Jen Wu; Huang, Hui-Man; Lee, Hao-Hsien

    2014-06-01

    Convenience sampling and purposive sampling are two different sampling methods. This article first explains sampling terms such as target population, accessible population, simple random sampling, intended sample, actual sample, and statistical power analysis. These terms are then used to explain the difference between "convenience sampling" and purposive sampling." Convenience sampling is a non-probabilistic sampling technique applicable to qualitative or quantitative studies, although it is most frequently used in quantitative studies. In convenience samples, subjects more readily accessible to the researcher are more likely to be included. Thus, in quantitative studies, opportunity to participate is not equal for all qualified individuals in the target population and study results are not necessarily generalizable to this population. As in all quantitative studies, increasing the sample size increases the statistical power of the convenience sample. In contrast, purposive sampling is typically used in qualitative studies. Researchers who use this technique carefully select subjects based on study purpose with the expectation that each participant will provide unique and rich information of value to the study. As a result, members of the accessible population are not interchangeable and sample size is determined by data saturation not by statistical power analysis.

  6. The assessment of body sway and the choice of the stability parameter(s).

    PubMed

    Raymakers, J A; Samson, M M; Verhaar, H J J

    2005-01-01

    This methodological study aims at comparison of the practical usefulness of several parameters of body sway derived from recordings of the center of pressure (CoP) with the aid of a static force platform as proposed in the literature. These included: mean displacement velocity, maximal range of movement along x- and y-co-ordinates, movement area, planar deviation, phase plane parameter of Riley and the parameters of the diffusion stabilogram according to Collins. They were compared in over 850 experiments in a group of young healthy subjects (n = 10, age 21-45 years), a group of elderly healthy (n = 38, age 61-78 years) and two groups of elderly subjects (n = 10 and n = 21, age 65-89 years) with stability problems under different conditions known to interfere with stability as compared to standing with open eyes fixing a visual anchoring point: closing the eyes, standing on plastic foam in stead of a firm surface and performing a cognitive task: the modified stroop test. A force platform (Kistler) was used and co-ordinates of the body's center of pressure were recorded during 60 s of quiet barefoot standing with a sampling frequency of 10 Hz. In general, the results show important overlapping among groups and test conditions. Mean displacement velocity shows the most consistent differences between test situations, health conditions and age ranges, but is not affected by an extra cognitive task in healthy old people. Mean maximal sideways sway range is different among groups and test conditions except for the cognitive task in young and elderly subjects. Standardised displacement parameters such as standard deviations of displacements and planar deviation discriminate less well than the actual range of motion or the velocity. The critical time interval derived from the diffusion stabilogram according to Collins et al. seems to add a specific type of information since it shows significant influence from addition of a cognitive task in old subjects standing on a firm

  7. Patient identification in blood sampling.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Anne; Bolton-Maggs, Paula

    The majority of adverse reports relating to blood transfusions result from human error, including misidentification of patients and incorrect labelling of samples. This article outlines best practice in blood sampling for transfusion (but is recommended for all pathology samples) and the role of patient empowerment in improving safety.

  8. Sampling and data handling methods for inhalable particulate sampling. Final report nov 78-dec 80

    SciT

    Smith, W.B.; Cushing, K.M.; Johnson, J.W.

    1982-05-01

    The report reviews the objectives of a research program on sampling and measuring particles in the inhalable particulate (IP) size range in emissions from stationary sources, and describes methods and equipment required. A computer technique was developed to analyze data on particle-size distributions of samples taken with cascade impactors from industrial process streams. Research in sampling systems for IP matter included concepts for maintaining isokinetic sampling conditions, necessary for representative sampling of the larger particles, while flowrates in the particle-sizing device were constant. Laboratory studies were conducted to develop suitable IP sampling systems with overall cut diameters of 15 micrometersmore » and conforming to a specified collection efficiency curve. Collection efficiencies were similarly measured for a horizontal elutriator. Design parameters were calculated for horizontal elutriators to be used with impactors, the EPA SASS train, and the EPA FAS train. Two cyclone systems were designed and evaluated. Tests on an Andersen Size Selective Inlet, a 15-micrometer precollector for high-volume samplers, showed its performance to be with the proposed limits for IP samplers. A stack sampling system was designed in which the aerosol is diluted in flow patterns and with mixing times simulating those in stack plumes.« less

  9. Growth reference for Saudi preschool children: LMS parameters and percentiles.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Shaffi Ahamed; El Mouzan, Mohammad Issa; AlSalloum, Abdullah Abdulmohsin; AlHerbish, Abdullah Sulaiman

    2016-01-01

    Previous growth charts for Saudi children have not included detailed tables and parameters needed for research and incorporation in electronic records. The objective of this report is to publish the L, M, and S parameters and percentiles as well as the corresponding growth charts for Saudi preschool children. Community-based survey and measurement of growth parameters in a sample selected by a multistage probability procedure. A stratified listing of the Saudi population. Raw data from the previous nationally-representative sample were reanalyzed using the Lambda-Mu-Sigma (LMS) methodology to calculate the L, M, and S parameters of percentiles (from 3rd to 97th) for weight, length/height, head circumference, and body mass index-for-age, and weight for-length/height for boys and girls from birth to 60 months. Length or height and weight of Saudi preschool children. There were 15601 Saudi children younger than 60 months of age, 7896 (50.6 %) were boys. The LMS parameters for weight for age from birth to 60 months (5 years) are reported for the 3rd, 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, 95th, and 97th percentiles as well as the corresponding graphs. Similarly, the LMS parameters for length/height-for-age, head circumference-for-age, weight-for-length/height and body mass index-for-age (BMi) are shown with the corresponding graphs for boys and girls. Using the data in this report, clinicians and researchers can assess the growth of Saudi preschool children. The report does not reflect interregional variations in growth.

  10. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOEpatents

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  11. Nondestructive prediction of pork freshness parameters using multispectral scattering images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiuying; Li, Cuiling; Peng, Yankun; Chao, Kuanglin; Wang, Mingwu

    2012-05-01

    Optical technology is an important and immerging technology for non-destructive and rapid detection of pork freshness. This paper studied on the possibility of using multispectral imaging technique and scattering characteristics to predict the freshness parameters of pork meat. The pork freshness parameters selected for prediction included total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), color parameters (L *, a *, b *), and pH value. Multispectral scattering images were obtained from pork sample surface by a multispectral imaging system developed by ourselves; they were acquired at the selected narrow wavebands whose center wavelengths were 517,550, 560, 580, 600, 760, 810 and 910nm. In order to extract scattering characteristics from multispectral images at multiple wavelengths, a Lorentzian distribution (LD) function with four parameters (a: scattering asymptotic value; b: scattering peak; c: scattering width; d: scattering slope) was used to fit the scattering curves at the selected wavelengths. The results show that the multispectral imaging technique combined with scattering characteristics is promising for predicting the freshness parameters of pork meat.

  12. GRID-BASED EXPLORATION OF COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETER SPACE WITH SNAKE

    SciT

    Mikkelsen, K.; Næss, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K., E-mail: kristin.mikkelsen@astro.uio.no

    2013-11-10

    We present a fully parallelized grid-based parameter estimation algorithm for investigating multidimensional likelihoods called Snake, and apply it to cosmological parameter estimation. The basic idea is to map out the likelihood grid-cell by grid-cell according to decreasing likelihood, and stop when a certain threshold has been reached. This approach improves vastly on the 'curse of dimensionality' problem plaguing standard grid-based parameter estimation simply by disregarding grid cells with negligible likelihood. The main advantages of this method compared to standard Metropolis-Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods include (1) trivial extraction of arbitrary conditional distributions; (2) direct access to Bayesian evidences; (3)more » better sampling of the tails of the distribution; and (4) nearly perfect parallelization scaling. The main disadvantage is, as in the case of brute-force grid-based evaluation, a dependency on the number of parameters, N{sub par}. One of the main goals of the present paper is to determine how large N{sub par} can be, while still maintaining reasonable computational efficiency; we find that N{sub par} = 12 is well within the capabilities of the method. The performance of the code is tested by comparing cosmological parameters estimated using Snake and the WMAP-7 data with those obtained using CosmoMC, the current standard code in the field. We find fully consistent results, with similar computational expenses, but shorter wall time due to the perfect parallelization scheme.« less

  13. The Impact of Uncertain Physical Parameters on HVAC Demand Response

    SciT

    Sun, Yannan; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Lu, Shuai

    HVAC units are currently one of the major resources providing demand response (DR) in residential buildings. Models of HVAC with DR function can improve understanding of its impact on power system operations and facilitate the deployment of DR technologies. This paper investigates the importance of various physical parameters and their distributions to the HVAC response to DR signals, which is a key step to the construction of HVAC models for a population of units with insufficient data. These parameters include the size of floors, insulation efficiency, the amount of solid mass in the house, and efficiency of the HVAC units.more » These parameters are usually assumed to follow Gaussian or Uniform distributions. We study the effect of uncertainty in the chosen parameter distributions on the aggregate HVAC response to DR signals, during transient phase and in steady state. We use a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method with linear regression and Prony analysis to evaluate sensitivity of DR output to the uncertainty in the distribution parameters. The significance ranking on the uncertainty sources is given for future guidance in the modeling of HVAC demand response.« less

  14. EXOFIT: orbital parameters of extrasolar planets from radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, Sreekumar T.; Lahav, Ofer

    2009-04-01

    Retrieval of orbital parameters of extrasolar planets poses considerable statistical challenges. Due to sparse sampling, measurement errors, parameters degeneracy and modelling limitations, there are no unique values of basic parameters, such as period and eccentricity. Here, we estimate the orbital parameters from radial velocity data in a Bayesian framework by utilizing Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations with the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. We follow a methodology recently proposed by Gregory and Ford. Our implementation of MCMC is based on the object-oriented approach outlined by Graves. We make our resulting code, EXOFIT, publicly available with this paper. It can search for either one or two planets as illustrated on mock data. As an example we re-analysed the orbital solution of companions to HD 187085 and HD 159868 from the published radial velocity data. We confirm the degeneracy reported for orbital parameters of the companion to HD 187085, and show that a low-eccentricity orbit is more probable for this planet. For HD 159868, we obtained slightly different orbital solution and a relatively high `noise' factor indicating the presence of an unaccounted signal in the radial velocity data. EXOFIT is designed in such a way that it can be extended for a variety of probability models, including different Bayesian priors.

  15. New fundamental parameters for attitude representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patera, Russell P.

    2017-08-01

    A new attitude parameter set is developed to clarify the geometry of combining finite rotations in a rotational sequence and in combining infinitesimal angular increments generated by angular rate. The resulting parameter set of six Pivot Parameters represents a rotation as a great circle arc on a unit sphere that can be located at any clocking location in the rotation plane. Two rotations are combined by linking their arcs at either of the two intersection points of the respective rotation planes. In a similar fashion, linking rotational increments produced by angular rate is used to derive the associated kinematical equations, which are linear and have no singularities. Included in this paper is the derivation of twelve Pivot Parameter elements that represent all twelve Euler Angle sequences, which enables efficient conversions between Pivot Parameters and any Euler Angle sequence. Applications of this new parameter set include the derivation of quaternions and the quaternion composition rule, as well as, the derivation of the analytical solution to time dependent coning motion. The relationships between Pivot Parameters and traditional parameter sets are included in this work. Pivot Parameters are well suited for a variety of aerospace applications due to their effective composition rule, singularity free kinematic equations, efficient conversion to and from Euler Angle sequences and clarity of their geometrical foundation.

  16. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  17. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  18. Target parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hocking, W. K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of any radar experiment is to determine as much as possible about the entities which scatter the radiation. This review discusses many of the various parameters which can be deduced in a radar experiment, and also critically examines the procedures used to deduce them. Methods for determining the mean wind velocity, the RMS fluctuating velocities, turbulence parameters, and the shapes of the scatterers are considered. Complications with these determinations are discussed. It is seen throughout that a detailed understanding of the shape and cause of the scatterers is important in order to make better determinations of these various quantities. Finally, some other parameters, which are less easily acquired, are considered. For example, it is noted that momentum fluxes due to buoyancy waves and turbulence can be determined, and on occasions radars can be used to determine stratospheric diffusion coefficients and even temperature profiles in the atmosphere.

  19. Radio Evolution of Supernova Remnants Including Nonlinear Particle Acceleration: Insights from Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlović, Marko Z.; Urošević, Dejan; Arbutina, Bojan; Orlando, Salvatore; Maxted, Nigel; Filipović, Miroslav D.

    2018-01-01

    We present a model for the radio evolution of supernova remnants (SNRs) obtained by using three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations coupled with nonlinear kinetic theory of cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration in SNRs. We model the radio evolution of SNRs on a global level by performing simulations for a wide range of the relevant physical parameters, such as the ambient density, supernova (SN) explosion energy, acceleration efficiency, and magnetic field amplification (MFA) efficiency. We attribute the observed spread of radio surface brightnesses for corresponding SNR diameters to the spread of these parameters. In addition to our simulations of Type Ia SNRs, we also considered SNR radio evolution in denser, nonuniform circumstellar environments modified by the progenitor star wind. These simulations start with the mass of the ejecta substantially higher than in the case of a Type Ia SN and presumably lower shock speed. The magnetic field is understandably seen as very important for the radio evolution of SNRs. In terms of MFA, we include both resonant and nonresonant modes in our large-scale simulations by implementing models obtained from first-principles, particle-in-cell simulations and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamical simulations. We test the quality and reliability of our models on a sample consisting of Galactic and extragalactic SNRs. Our simulations give Σ ‑ D slopes between ‑4 and ‑6 for the full Sedov regime. Recent empirical slopes obtained for the Galactic samples are around ‑5, while those for the extragalactic samples are around ‑4.

  20. Determination of polarimetric parameters of honey by near-infrared transflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    García-Alvarez, M; Ceresuela, S; Huidobro, J F; Hermida, M; Rodríguez-Otero, J L

    2002-01-30

    NIR transflectance spectroscopy was used to determine polarimetric parameters (direct polarization, polarization after inversion, specific rotation in dry matter, and polarization due to nonmonosaccharides) and sucrose in honey. In total, 156 honey samples were collected during 1992 (45 samples), 1995 (56 samples), and 1996 (55 samples). Samples were analyzed by NIR spectroscopy and polarimetric methods. Calibration (118 samples) and validation (38 samples) sets were made up; honeys from the three years were included in both sets. Calibrations were performed by modified partial least-squares regression and scatter correction by standard normal variation and detrend methods. For direct polarization, polarization after inversion, specific rotation in dry matter, and polarization due to nonmonosaccharides, good statistics (bias, SEV, and R(2)) were obtained for the validation set, and no statistically (p = 0.05) significant differences were found between instrumental and polarimetric methods for these parameters. Statistical data for sucrose were not as good as those of the other parameters. Therefore, NIR spectroscopy is not an effective method for quantitative analysis of sucrose in these honey samples. However, NIR spectroscopy may be an acceptable method for semiquantitative evaluation of sucrose for honeys, such as those in our study, containing up to 3% of sucrose. Further work is necessary to validate the uncertainty at higher levels.

  1. Synchronizing data from irregularly sampled sensors

    SciT

    Uluyol, Onder

    A system and method include receiving a set of sampled measurements for each of multiple sensors, wherein the sampled measurements are at irregular intervals or different rates, re-sampling the sampled measurements of each of the multiple sensors at a higher rate than one of the sensor's set of sampled measurements, and synchronizing the sampled measurements of each of the multiple sensors.

  2. Apparatus and method for handheld sampling

    DOEpatents

    Staab, Torsten A.

    2005-09-20

    The present invention includes an apparatus, and corresponding method, for taking a sample. The apparatus is built around a frame designed to be held in at least one hand. A sample media is used to secure the sample. A sample media adapter for securing the sample media is operated by a trigger mechanism connectively attached within the frame to the sample media adapter.

  3. SPOTting model parameters using a ready-made Python package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houska, Tobias; Kraft, Philipp; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    The selection and parameterization of reliable process descriptions in ecological modelling is driven by several uncertainties. The procedure is highly dependent on various criteria, like the used algorithm, the likelihood function selected and the definition of the prior parameter distributions. A wide variety of tools have been developed in the past decades to optimize parameters. Some of the tools are closed source. Due to this, the choice for a specific parameter estimation method is sometimes more dependent on its availability than the performance. A toolbox with a large set of methods can support users in deciding about the most suitable method. Further, it enables to test and compare different methods. We developed the SPOT (Statistical Parameter Optimization Tool), an open source python package containing a comprehensive set of modules, to analyze and optimize parameters of (environmental) models. SPOT comes along with a selected set of algorithms for parameter optimization and uncertainty analyses (Monte Carlo, MC; Latin Hypercube Sampling, LHS; Maximum Likelihood, MLE; Markov Chain Monte Carlo, MCMC; Scuffled Complex Evolution, SCE-UA; Differential Evolution Markov Chain, DE-MCZ), together with several likelihood functions (Bias, (log-) Nash-Sutcliff model efficiency, Correlation Coefficient, Coefficient of Determination, Covariance, (Decomposed-, Relative-, Root-) Mean Squared Error, Mean Absolute Error, Agreement Index) and prior distributions (Binomial, Chi-Square, Dirichlet, Exponential, Laplace, (log-, multivariate-) Normal, Pareto, Poisson, Cauchy, Uniform, Weibull) to sample from. The model-independent structure makes it suitable to analyze a wide range of applications. We apply all algorithms of the SPOT package in three different case studies. Firstly, we investigate the response of the Rosenbrock function, where the MLE algorithm shows its strengths. Secondly, we study the Griewank function, which has a challenging response surface for

  4. XPI: The Xanadu Parameter Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N.; Barrett, P.; Oneel, B.; Jacobs, P.

    1992-01-01

    XPI is a table driven parameter interface which greatly simplifies both command driven programs such as BROWSE and XIMAGE as well as stand alone single-task programs. It moves all of the syntax and semantic parsing of commands and parameters out of the users code into common code and externally defined tables. This allows the programmer to concentrate on writing the code unique to the application rather than reinventing the user interface and for external graphical interfaces to interface with no changes to the command driven program. XPI also includes a compatibility library which allows programs written using the IRAF host interface (Mandel and Roll) to use XPI in place of the IRAF host interface.

  5. Phenological Parameters Estimation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKellip, Rodney D.; Ross, Kenton W.; Spruce, Joseph P.; Smoot, James C.; Ryan, Robert E.; Gasser, Gerald E.; Prados, Donald L.; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    The Phenological Parameters Estimation Tool (PPET) is a set of algorithms implemented in MATLAB that estimates key vegetative phenological parameters. For a given year, the PPET software package takes in temporally processed vegetation index data (3D spatio-temporal arrays) generated by the time series product tool (TSPT) and outputs spatial grids (2D arrays) of vegetation phenological parameters. As a precursor to PPET, the TSPT uses quality information for each pixel of each date to remove bad or suspect data, and then interpolates and digitally fills data voids in the time series to produce a continuous, smoothed vegetation index product. During processing, the TSPT displays NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) time series plots and images from the temporally processed pixels. Both the TSPT and PPET currently use moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite multispectral data as a default, but each software package is modifiable and could be used with any high-temporal-rate remote sensing data collection system that is capable of producing vegetation indices. Raw MODIS data from the Aqua and Terra satellites is processed using the TSPT to generate a filtered time series data product. The PPET then uses the TSPT output to generate phenological parameters for desired locations. PPET output data tiles are mosaicked into a Conterminous United States (CONUS) data layer using ERDAS IMAGINE, or equivalent software package. Mosaics of the vegetation phenology data products are then reprojected to the desired map projection using ERDAS IMAGINE

  6. Games with fuzzy parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messaoud, Deghdak

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we study the existence of equilibrium in non-cooperative game with fuzzy parameters. We generalize te results of Larbani and Kacher(2008, 2009) in infinite dimentional spaces. The proof is based on the Browder-Fan fixed point theorem.

  7. Calculation of Optical Parameters of Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.

    2007-12-01

    Validation of a modified four-parameter model describing temperature effect on liquid crystal refractive indices is being reported in the present article. This model is based upon the Vuks equation. Experimental data of ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices for two liquid crystal samples MLC-9200-000 and MLC-6608 are used to validate the above-mentioned theoretical model. Using these experimental data, birefringence, order parameter, normalized polarizabilities, and the temperature gradient of refractive indices are determined. Two methods: directly using birefringence measurements and using Haller's extrapolation procedure are adopted for the determination of order parameter. Both approches of order parameter calculation are compared. The temperature dependences of all these parameters are discussed. A close agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  8. A comparison between two powder compaction parameters of plasticity: the effective medium A parameter and the Heckel 1/K parameter.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Foad; Klevan, Ingvild; Nordström, Josefina; Alderborn, Göran; Frenning, Göran

    2013-09-10

    The purpose of the research was to introduce a procedure to derive a powder compression parameter (EM A) representing particle yield stress using an effective medium equation and to compare the EM A parameter with the Heckel compression parameter (1/K). 16 pharmaceutical powders, including drugs and excipients, were compressed in a materials testing instrument and powder compression profiles were derived using the EM and Heckel equations. The compression profiles thus obtained could be sub-divided into regions among which one region was approximately linear and from this region, the compression parameters EM A and 1/K were calculated. A linear relationship between the EM A parameter and the 1/K parameter was obtained with a strong correlation. The slope of the plot was close to 1 (0.84) and the intercept of the plot was small in comparison to the range of parameter values obtained. The relationship between the theoretical EM A parameter and the 1/K parameter supports the interpretation of the empirical Heckel parameter as being a measure of yield stress. It is concluded that the combination of Heckel and EM equations represents a suitable procedure to derive a value of particle plasticity from powder compression data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sample Size Estimation: The Easy Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a simple approach to making quick sample size estimates for basic hypothesis tests. Although there are many sources available for estimating sample sizes, methods are not often integrated across statistical tests, levels of measurement of variables, or effect sizes. A few parameters are required to estimate sample sizes and…

  10. Natural sampling strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallum, C. R.; Basu, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    A natural stratum-based sampling scheme and the aggregation procedures for estimating wheat area, yield, and production and their associated prediction error estimates are described. The methodology utilizes LANDSAT imagery and agrophysical data to permit an improved stratification in foreign areas by ignoring political boundaries and restratifying along boundaries that are more homogeneous with respect to the distribution of agricultural density, soil characteristics, and average climatic conditions. A summary of test results is given including a discussion of the various problems encountered.

  11. PAR -- Interface to the ADAM Parameter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Malcolm J.; Chipperfield, Alan J.

    PAR is a library of Fortran subroutines that provides convenient mechanisms for applications to exchange information with the outside world, through input-output channels called parameters. Parameters enable a user to control an application's behaviour. PAR supports numeric, character, and logical parameters, and is currently implemented only on top of the ADAM parameter system. The PAR library permits parameter values to be obtained, without or with a variety of constraints. Results may be put into parameters to be passed onto other applications. Other facilities include setting a prompt string, and suggested defaults. This document also introduces a preliminary C interface for the PAR library -- this may be subject to change in the light of experience.

  12. Nonlinear Spatial Inversion Without Monte Carlo Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, A.; Nawaz, A.

    2017-12-01

    High-dimensional, nonlinear inverse or inference problems usually have non-unique solutions. The distribution of solutions are described by probability distributions, and these are usually found using Monte Carlo (MC) sampling methods. These take pseudo-random samples of models in parameter space, calculate the probability of each sample given available data and other information, and thus map out high or low probability values of model parameters. However, such methods would converge to the solution only as the number of samples tends to infinity; in practice, MC is found to be slow to converge, convergence is not guaranteed to be achieved in finite time, and detection of convergence requires the use of subjective criteria. We propose a method for Bayesian inversion of categorical variables such as geological facies or rock types in spatial problems, which requires no sampling at all. The method uses a 2-D Hidden Markov Model over a grid of cells, where observations represent localized data constraining the model in each cell. The data in our example application are seismic properties such as P- and S-wave impedances or rock density; our model parameters are the hidden states and represent the geological rock types in each cell. The observations at each location are assumed to depend on the facies at that location only - an assumption referred to as `localized likelihoods'. However, the facies at a location cannot be determined solely by the observation at that location as it also depends on prior information concerning its correlation with the spatial distribution of facies elsewhere. Such prior information is included in the inversion in the form of a training image which represents a conceptual depiction of the distribution of local geologies that might be expected, but other forms of prior information can be used in the method as desired. The method provides direct (pseudo-analytic) estimates of posterior marginal probability distributions over each variable

  13. Environmental Sustainability - Including Land and Water Use

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessments of environmental sustainability can be conducted in many ways with one of the most quantitative methods including Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). While historically LCIA has included a comprehensive list of impact categories including: ozone depletion, global c...

  14. On-line estimation of error covariance parameters for atmospheric data assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, Dick P.

    1995-01-01

    A simple scheme is presented for on-line estimation of covariance parameters in statistical data assimilation systems. The scheme is based on a maximum-likelihood approach in which estimates are produced on the basis of a single batch of simultaneous observations. Simple-sample covariance estimation is reasonable as long as the number of available observations exceeds the number of tunable parameters by two or three orders of magnitude. Not much is known at present about model error associated with actual forecast systems. Our scheme can be used to estimate some important statistical model error parameters such as regionally averaged variances or characteristic correlation length scales. The advantage of the single-sample approach is that it does not rely on any assumptions about the temporal behavior of the covariance parameters: time-dependent parameter estimates can be continuously adjusted on the basis of current observations. This is of practical importance since it is likely to be the case that both model error and observation error strongly depend on the actual state of the atmosphere. The single-sample estimation scheme can be incorporated into any four-dimensional statistical data assimilation system that involves explicit calculation of forecast error covariances, including optimal interpolation (OI) and the simplified Kalman filter (SKF). The computational cost of the scheme is high but not prohibitive; on-line estimation of one or two covariance parameters in each analysis box of an operational bozed-OI system is currently feasible. A number of numerical experiments performed with an adaptive SKF and an adaptive version of OI, using a linear two-dimensional shallow-water model and artificially generated model error are described. The performance of the nonadaptive versions of these methods turns out to depend rather strongly on correct specification of model error parameters. These parameters are estimated under a variety of conditions, including

  15. Inverse sampling regression for pooled data.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-López, Osval A; Montesinos-López, Abelardo; Eskridge, Kent; Crossa, José

    2017-06-01

    Because pools are tested instead of individuals in group testing, this technique is helpful for estimating prevalence in a population or for classifying a large number of individuals into two groups at a low cost. For this reason, group testing is a well-known means of saving costs and producing precise estimates. In this paper, we developed a mixed-effect group testing regression that is useful when the data-collecting process is performed using inverse sampling. This model allows including covariate information at the individual level to incorporate heterogeneity among individuals and identify which covariates are associated with positive individuals. We present an approach to fit this model using maximum likelihood and we performed a simulation study to evaluate the quality of the estimates. Based on the simulation study, we found that the proposed regression method for inverse sampling with group testing produces parameter estimates with low bias when the pre-specified number of positive pools (r) to stop the sampling process is at least 10 and the number of clusters in the sample is also at least 10. We performed an application with real data and we provide an NLMIXED code that researchers can use to implement this method.

  16. Investigation of the influence of sampling schemes on quantitative dynamic fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yunpeng; Chen, Xueli; Yin, Jipeng; Wang, Guodong; Wang, Bo; Zhan, Yonghua; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Liang, Jimin

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic optical data from a series of sampling intervals can be used for quantitative analysis to obtain meaningful kinetic parameters of probe in vivo. The sampling schemes may affect the quantification results of dynamic fluorescence imaging. Here, we investigate the influence of different sampling schemes on the quantification of binding potential (BP) with theoretically simulated and experimentally measured data. Three groups of sampling schemes are investigated including the sampling starting point, sampling sparsity, and sampling uniformity. In the investigation of the influence of the sampling starting point, we further summarize two cases by considering the missing timing sequence between the probe injection and sampling starting time. Results show that the mean value of BP exhibits an obvious growth trend with an increase in the delay of the sampling starting point, and has a strong correlation with the sampling sparsity. The growth trend is much more obvious if throwing the missing timing sequence. The standard deviation of BP is inversely related to the sampling sparsity, and independent of the sampling uniformity and the delay of sampling starting time. Moreover, the mean value of BP obtained by uniform sampling is significantly higher than that by using the non-uniform sampling. Our results collectively suggest that a suitable sampling scheme can help compartmental modeling of dynamic fluorescence imaging provide more accurate results and simpler operations. PMID:29675325

  17. Failure probability under parameter uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, R; Tsanakas, A

    2011-05-01

    In many problems of risk analysis, failure is equivalent to the event of a random risk factor exceeding a given threshold. Failure probabilities can be controlled if a decisionmaker is able to set the threshold at an appropriate level. This abstract situation applies, for example, to environmental risks with infrastructure controls; to supply chain risks with inventory controls; and to insurance solvency risks with capital controls. However, uncertainty around the distribution of the risk factor implies that parameter error will be present and the measures taken to control failure probabilities may not be effective. We show that parameter uncertainty increases the probability (understood as expected frequency) of failures. For a large class of loss distributions, arising from increasing transformations of location-scale families (including the log-normal, Weibull, and Pareto distributions), the article shows that failure probabilities can be exactly calculated, as they are independent of the true (but unknown) parameters. Hence it is possible to obtain an explicit measure of the effect of parameter uncertainty on failure probability. Failure probability can be controlled in two different ways: (1) by reducing the nominal required failure probability, depending on the size of the available data set, and (2) by modifying of the distribution itself that is used to calculate the risk control. Approach (1) corresponds to a frequentist/regulatory view of probability, while approach (2) is consistent with a Bayesian/personalistic view. We furthermore show that the two approaches are consistent in achieving the required failure probability. Finally, we briefly discuss the effects of data pooling and its systemic risk implications. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  18. Flammability Parameters of Candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balog, Karol; Kobetičová, Hana; Štefko, Tomáš

    2017-06-01

    The paper deals with the assessment of selected fire safety characteristics of candles. Weight loss of a candle during the burning process, candle burning rate, soot index, heat release rate and yield of carbon oxides were determined. Soot index was determined according to EN 15426: 2007 - Candles - Specification for Sooting Behavior. All samples met the prescribed amount of produced soot. Weight loss, heat release rate and the yield of carbon oxides were determined for one selected sample. While yield of CO increased during the measurement, the yield of CO2 decreased by half in 40 minutes.

  19. Statistical inference involving binomial and negative binomial parameters.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Miguel A; Núñez-Antón, Vicente

    2009-05-01

    Statistical inference about two binomial parameters implies that they are both estimated by binomial sampling. There are occasions in which one aims at testing the equality of two binomial parameters before and after the occurrence of the first success along a sequence of Bernoulli trials. In these cases, the binomial parameter before the first success is estimated by negative binomial sampling whereas that after the first success is estimated by binomial sampling, and both estimates are related. This paper derives statistical tools to test two hypotheses, namely, that both binomial parameters equal some specified value and that both parameters are equal though unknown. Simulation studies are used to show that in small samples both tests are accurate in keeping the nominal Type-I error rates, and also to determine sample size requirements to detect large, medium, and small effects with adequate power. Additional simulations also show that the tests are sufficiently robust to certain violations of their assumptions.

  20. Effects of Chitin and Sepia Ink Hybrid Hemostatic Sponge on the Blood Parameters of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Sun, Yu-Lin; Chen, Dao-Hai

    2014-01-01

    Chitin and sepia ink hybrid hemostatic sponge (CTSH sponge), a new biomedical material, was extensively studied for its beneficial biological properties of hemostasis and stimulation of healing. However, studies examining the safety of CTSH sponge in the blood system are lacking. This experiment aimed to examine whether CTSH sponge has negative effect on blood systems of mice, which were treated with a dosage of CTSH sponge (135 mg/kg) through a laparotomy. CTSH sponge was implanted into the abdominal subcutaneous and a laparotomy was used for blood sampling from abdominal aortic. Several kinds of blood parameters were detected at different time points, which were reflected by coagulation parameters including thrombin time (TT), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplatin time (APTT), fibrinogen (FIB) and platelet factor 4 (PF4); anticoagulation parameter including antithrombin III (AT-III); fibrinolytic parameters including plasminogen (PLG), fibrin degradation product (FDP) and D-dimer; hemorheology parameters including blood viscosity (BV) and plasma viscosity (PV). Results showed that CTSH sponge has no significant effect on the blood parameters of mice. The data suggested that CTSH sponge can be applied in the field of biomedical materials and has potential possibility to be developed into clinical drugs of hemostatic agents. PMID:24727395

  1. CosmoSIS: A system for MC parameter estimation

    DOE PAGES

    Bridle, S.; Dodelson, S.; Jennings, E.; ...

    2015-12-23

    CosmoSIS is a modular system for cosmological parameter estimation, based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo and related techniques. It provides a series of samplers, which drive the exploration of the parameter space, and a series of modules, which calculate the likelihood of the observed data for a given physical model, determined by the location of a sample in the parameter space. While CosmoSIS ships with a set of modules that calculate quantities of interest to cosmologists, there is nothing about the framework itself, nor in the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, that is specific to cosmology. Thus CosmoSIS could bemore » used for parameter estimation problems in other fields, including HEP. This paper describes the features of CosmoSIS and show an example of its use outside of cosmology. Furthermore, it also discusses how collaborative development strategies differ between two different communities: that of HEP physicists, accustomed to working in large collaborations, and that of cosmologists, who have traditionally not worked in large groups.« less

  2. Sampling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2017-03-07

    In one embodiment, the present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for supporting a tubing bundle during installation or removal. The apparatus includes a clamp for securing the tubing bundle to an external wireline. In various examples, the clamp is external to the tubing bundle or integral with the tubing bundle. According to one method, a tubing bundle and wireline are deployed together and the tubing bundle periodically secured to the wireline using a clamp. In another embodiment, the present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit. In a specific example, one or more clamps are used to connect the first and/or second conduits to an external wireline.

  3. The association between lipid parameters and obesity in university students.

    PubMed

    Hertelyova, Z; Salaj, R; Chmelarova, A; Dombrovsky, P; Dvorakova, M C; Kruzliak, P

    2016-07-01

    Abdominal obesity is associated with high plasma triglyceride and with low plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Objective of the study was to find an association between plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels and anthropometric parameters in abdominal obesity in Slovakian university students. Lipid profile and anthropometric parameters of obesity were studied in a sample of 419 probands, including 137 men and 282 women. Males had higher values of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG) and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) than females, but these differences were not significant. Females had significantly (P < 0.05) higher TC and HDL-C (P < 0.001) than males. In comparison, all anthropometric parameters in the males were significantly (P < 0.001) higher than in the females. A positive correlation between non-HDL-C, TG, VLDL-C and anthropometric parameters (BMI, WC, WHR, WHtR) was found at P < 0.001. LDL was positively correlated with BMI, WCF, WHtR and TC with BMI, WHtR at P < 0.001. We also observed a correlation between TC-WCF and LDL-WHR at P < 0.01. A negative correlation was found between HDL and all monitored anthropometric parameters at P < 0.001. On the other hand, no correlation between TC and WHR was detected. This study shows an association between plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels and anthropometric parameters in abdominal obesity in young people, predominantly university students.

  4. Metadata, Identifiers, and Physical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arctur, D. K.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Hills, D. J.; Jenkyns, R.; Stroker, K. J.; Todd, N. S.; Dassie, E. P.; Bowring, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Physical samples are integral to much of the research conducted by geoscientists. The samples used in this research are often obtained at significant cost and represent an important investment for future research. However, making information about samples - whether considered data or metadata - available for researchers to enable discovery is difficult: a number of key elements related to samples are difficult to characterize in common ways, such as classification, location, sample type, sampling method, repository information, subsample distribution, and instrumentation, because these differ from one domain to the next. Unifying these elements or developing metadata crosswalks is needed. The iSamples (Internet of Samples) NSF-funded Research Coordination Network (RCN) is investigating ways to develop these types of interoperability and crosswalks. Within the iSamples RCN, one of its working groups, WG1, has focused on the metadata related to physical samples. This includes identifying existing metadata standards and systems, and how they might interoperate with the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) schema (schema.igsn.org) in order to help inform leading practices for metadata. For example, we are examining lifecycle metadata beyond the IGSN `birth certificate.' As a first step, this working group is developing a list of relevant standards and comparing their various attributes. In addition, the working group is looking toward technical solutions to facilitate developing a linked set of registries to build the web of samples. Finally, the group is also developing a comparison of sample identifiers and locators. This paper will provide an overview and comparison of the standards identified thus far, as well as an update on the technical solutions examined for integration. We will discuss how various sample identifiers might work in complementary fashion with the IGSN to more completely describe samples, facilitate retrieval of contextual information, and

  5. Seasonal microbial and environmental parameters at Crocker Reef, Florida Keys, 2014–2015

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Yates, Kimberly K.; Lawler, Stephanie N.; Moore, Christopher S.; Smiley, Nathan A.

    2015-11-04

    Microbial measurements included enumeration of total bacteria, enumeration of virus-like particles, and plate counts of Vibrio spp. colony-forming units (CFU). These measurements were intended to give a sense of any seasonal changes in the total microbial load and to provide an indication of water quality. Additional environmental parameters measured included water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and pH. Four sites (table 1) were intensively sampled for periods of approximately 48 hours during summer (July 2014) and winter (January–February 2015), during which water samples were collected every 4 hours for analysis, except when prevented by weather conditions.

  6. Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Wipe Sampling ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report This investigation tested specific (CWAs), including sarin (GB), soman (GD), cyclosarin (GF), sulfur mustard (HD), and O-ethyl-S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate (VX) on the non-ideal (e.g., porous and permeable) surfaces of drywall, vinyl tile, wood, laminate, and coated glass. Pesticides (diazinon and malathion) were used so that a comparison is possible with existing literature data (1). Experiments included testing with coupons having surface areas of 10 cm2 and 100 cm2. The 10-cm2 coupons were of a size that could easily be extracted in a 2 oz jar (to provide comparative data for CWA recoveries generated by direct extraction) and the 100-cm2 coupons better represented the area of a surface that might typically be sampled by wipe extraction. In addition, CWA, at a normalized surface concentration of 0.1 µg per cm2 surface area, were spiked on coupons of the tested surfaces. Wipes were wetted with either dichloromethane (DCM) or isopropanol (IPA) before sampling for CWA. Experimental parameters include multiple wipe types, porous/permeable surfaces, coupon surface area, solvent used to wet the wipe (i.e., wetting solvent), and the utility of VX-d14 as an extracted internal standard.

  7. Hardrock Elastic Physical Properties: Birch's Seismic Parameter Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M.; Milkereit, B.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying rock composition and properties is imperative in a variety of fields including geotechnical engineering, mining, and petroleum exploration, in order to accurately make any petrophysical calculations. Density is, in particular, an important parameter that allows us to differentiate between lithologies and estimate or calculate other petrophysical properties. It is well established that compressional and shear wave velocities of common crystalline rocks increase with increasing densities (i.e. the Birch and Nafe-Drake relationships). Conventional empirical relations do not take into account S-wave velocity. Physical properties of Fe-oxides and massive sulfides, however, differ significantly from the empirical velocity-density relationships. Currently, acquiring in-situ density data is challenging and problematic, and therefore, developing an approximation for density based on seismic wave velocity and elastic moduli would be beneficial. With the goal of finding other possible or better relationships between density and the elastic moduli, a database of density, P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio was compiled based on a multitude of lab samples. The database is comprised of isotropic, non-porous metamorphic rock. Multi-parameter cross plots of the various elastic parameters have been analyzed in order to find a suitable parameter combination that reduces high density outliers. As expected, the P-wave velocity to S-wave velocity ratios show no correlation with density. However, Birch's seismic parameter, along with the bulk modulus, shows promise in providing a link between observed compressional and shear wave velocities and rock densities, including massive sulfides and Fe-oxides.

  8. Image correlation and sampling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Sedwick, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of analytical approaches for solving image correlation and image sampling of multispectral data is discussed. Relevant multispectral image statistics which are applicable to image correlation and sampling are identified. The general image statistics include intensity mean, variance, amplitude histogram, power spectral density function, and autocorrelation function. The translation problem associated with digital image registration and the analytical means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques are considered. General expressions for determining the reconstruction error for specific image sampling strategies are developed.

  9. Planning Robot-Control Parameters With Qualitative Reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    Qualitative-reasoning planning algorithm helps to determine quantitative parameters controlling motion of robot. Algorithm regarded as performing search in multidimensional space of control parameters from starting point to goal region in which desired result of robotic manipulation achieved. Makes use of directed graph representing qualitative physical equations describing task, and interacts, at each sampling period, with history of quantitative control parameters and sensory data, to narrow search for reliable values of quantitative control parameters.

  10. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  11. Gaussian mass optimization for kernel PCA parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Wang, Zulin

    2011-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel kernel parameter optimization method based on Gaussian mass, which aims to overcome the current brute force parameter optimization method in a heuristic way. Generally speaking, the choice of kernel parameter should be tightly related to the target objects while the variance between the samples, the most commonly used kernel parameter, doesn't possess much features of the target, which gives birth to Gaussian mass. Gaussian mass defined in this paper has the property of the invariance of rotation and translation and is capable of depicting the edge, topology and shape information. Simulation results show that Gaussian mass leads a promising heuristic optimization boost up for kernel method. In MNIST handwriting database, the recognition rate improves by 1.6% compared with common kernel method without Gaussian mass optimization. Several promising other directions which Gaussian mass might help are also proposed at the end of the paper.

  12. Reference tissue modeling with parameter coupling: application to a study of SERT binding in HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Christopher J.; Hammoud, Dima A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2011-04-01

    When applicable, it is generally preferred to evaluate positron emission tomography (PET) studies using a reference tissue-based approach as that avoids the need for invasive arterial blood sampling. However, most reference tissue methods have been shown to have a bias that is dependent on the level of tracer binding, and the variability of parameter estimates may be substantially affected by noise level. In a study of serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in HIV dementia, it was determined that applying parameter coupling to the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) reduced the variability of parameter estimates and yielded the strongest between-group significant differences in SERT binding. The use of parameter coupling makes the application of SRTM more consistent with conventional blood input models and reduces the total number of fitted parameters, thus should yield more robust parameter estimates. Here, we provide a detailed evaluation of the application of parameter constraint and parameter coupling to [11C]DASB PET studies. Five quantitative methods, including three methods that constrain the reference tissue clearance (kr2) to a common value across regions were applied to the clinical and simulated data to compare measurement of the tracer binding potential (BPND). Compared with standard SRTM, either coupling of kr2 across regions or constraining kr2 to a first-pass estimate improved the sensitivity of SRTM to measuring a significant difference in BPND between patients and controls. Parameter coupling was particularly effective in reducing the variance of parameter estimates, which was less than 50% of the variance obtained with standard SRTM. A linear approach was also improved when constraining kr2 to a first-pass estimate, although the SRTM-based methods yielded stronger significant differences when applied to the clinical study. This work shows that parameter coupling reduces the variance of parameter estimates and may better discriminate between

  13. Inverse modeling of hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in the Community Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Hou, Z.; Huang, M.; Tian, F.; Leung, L. Ruby

    2013-12-01

    This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Both deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MCMC)-Bayesian inversion approaches are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites with different climate and soil conditions. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches provides significant improvements in the model simulations compared to using default CLM4 parameter values, and that as more information comes in, the predictive intervals (ranges of posterior distributions) of the calibrated parameters become narrower. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.

  14. Drug samples: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Coolidge, Melvin P

    2002-07-01

    The common practice of drug manufacturers in providing 'free' samples to physicians has influenced the business of medicine in several ways. This article analyzes some of the pros and cons of drug sampling, including from professional, societal, economical, legal, and practical perspectives, and provides suggestions on how to dispense with some of the problems inherent in the current system.

  15. Clean and Cold Sample Curation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Agee, C. B.; Beer, R.; Cooper, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    Curation of Mars samples includes both samples that are returned to Earth, and samples that are collected, examined, and archived on Mars. Both kinds of curation operations will require careful planning to ensure that the samples are not contaminated by the instruments that are used to collect and contain them. In both cases, sample examination and subdivision must take place in an environment that is organically, inorganically, and biologically clean. Some samples will need to be prepared for analysis under ultra-clean or cryogenic conditions. Inorganic and biological cleanliness are achievable separately by cleanroom and biosafety lab techniques. Organic cleanliness to the <50 ng/sq cm level requires material control and sorbent removal - techniques being applied in our Class 10 cleanrooms and sample processing gloveboxes.

  16. Documentation of Apollo 15 samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, R. L.; Hait, M. H.; Larson, K. B.; Swann, G. A.; Reed, V. S.; Schaber, G. G.

    1972-01-01

    A catalog is presented of the documentation of Apollo 15 samples using photographs and verbal descriptions returned from the lunar surface. Almost all of the Apollo 15 samples were correlated with lunar surface photographs, descriptions, and traverse locations. Where possible, the lunar orientations of rock samples were reconstructed in the lunar receiving laboratory, using a collimated light source to reproduce illumination and shadow characteristics of the same samples shown in lunar photographs. In several cases, samples were not recognized in lunar surface photographs, and their approximate locations are known only by association with numbered sample bags used during their collection. Tables, photographs, and maps included in this report are designed to aid in the understanding of the lunar setting of the Apollo 15 samples.

  17. Returning Samples from Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Kanik, I.; Brownlee, D.; McKay, C.; Anbar, A.; Glavin, D.; Yano, H.

    2012-12-01

    From the first half century of space exploration, we have obtained samples only from the Moon, comet Wild 2, the Solar Wind and the asteroid Itokawa. The in-depth analyses of these samples in terrestrial laboratories have yielded profound knowledge that could not have been obtained without the returned samples. While obtaining samples from Solar System bodies is crucial science, it is rarely done due to cost and complexity. Cassini's discovery of geysers on Enceladus and organic materials, indicate that there is an exceptional opportunity and science rational to do a low-cost flyby sample return mission, similar to what was done by the Stardust. The earliest low cost possible flight opportunity is the next Discovery Mission [Tsou et al 2012]. Enceladus Plume Discovery - While Voyager provided evidence for young surfaces on Enceladus, the existence of Enceladus plumes was discovered by Cassini. Enceladus and comets are the only known solar system bodies that have jets enabling sample collection without landing or surface contact. Cassini in situ Findings -Cassini's made many discoveries at Saturn, including the break up of large organics in the plumes of Enceladus. Four prime criteria for habitability are liquid water, a heat source, organics and nitrogen [McKay et al. 2008, Waite et al. 2009, Postberg et al. 2011]. Out of all the NASA designated habitability targets, Enceladus is the single body that presents evidence for all four criteria. Significant advancement in the exploration of the biological potential of Enceladus can be made on returned samples in terrestrial laboratories where the full power of state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation and procedures can be used. Without serious limits on power, mass or even cost, terrestrial laboratories provide the ultimate in analytical capability, adaptability, reproducibility and reliability. What Questions can Samples Address? - Samples collected from the Enceladus plume will enable a thorough and replicated

  18. Stack sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

    2014-09-16

    An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

  19. On the effect of model parameters on forecast objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzban, Caren; Jones, Corinne; Li, Ning; Sandgathe, Scott

    2018-04-01

    Many physics-based numerical models produce a gridded, spatial field of forecasts, e.g., a temperature map. The field for some quantities generally consists of spatially coherent and disconnected objects. Such objects arise in many problems, including precipitation forecasts in atmospheric models, eddy currents in ocean models, and models of forest fires. Certain features of these objects (e.g., location, size, intensity, and shape) are generally of interest. Here, a methodology is developed for assessing the impact of model parameters on the features of forecast objects. The main ingredients of the methodology include the use of (1) Latin hypercube sampling for varying the values of the model parameters, (2) statistical clustering algorithms for identifying objects, (3) multivariate multiple regression for assessing the impact of multiple model parameters on the distribution (across the forecast domain) of object features, and (4) methods for reducing the number of hypothesis tests and controlling the resulting errors. The final output of the methodology is a series of box plots and confidence intervals that visually display the sensitivities. The methodology is demonstrated on precipitation forecasts from a mesoscale numerical weather prediction model.

  20. Sample processing approach for detection of ricin in surface samples.

    PubMed

    Kane, Staci; Shah, Sanjiv; Erler, Anne Marie; Alfaro, Teneile

    2017-12-01

    With several ricin contamination incidents reported over the past decade, rapid and accurate methods are needed for environmental sample analysis, especially after decontamination. A sample processing method was developed for common surface sampling devices to improve the limit of detection and avoid false negative/positive results for ricin analysis. Potential assay interferents from the sample matrix (bleach residue, sample material, wetting buffer), including reference dust, were tested using a Time-Resolved Fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. Test results suggested that the sample matrix did not cause the elevated background fluorescence sometimes observed when analyzing post-bleach decontamination samples from ricin incidents. Furthermore, sample particulates (80mg/mL Arizona Test Dust) did not enhance background fluorescence or interfere with ricin detection by TRF. These results suggested that high background fluorescence in this immunoassay could be due to labeled antibody quality and/or quantity issues. Centrifugal ultrafiltration devices were evaluated for ricin concentration as a part of sample processing. Up to 30-fold concentration of ricin was observed by the devices, which serve to remove soluble interferents and could function as the front-end sample processing step to other ricin analytical methods. The procedure has the potential to be used with a broader range of environmental sample types and with other potential interferences and to be followed by other ricin analytical methods, although additional verification studies would be required. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Scheduling Algorithm for Mission Planning and Logistics Evaluation (SAMPLE). Volume 2: Mission payloads subsystem description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupnick, E.; Wiggins, D.

    1980-01-01

    The scheduling algorithm for mission planning and logistics evaluation (SAMPLE) is presented. Two major subsystems are included: The mission payloads program; and the set covering program. Formats and parameter definitions for the payload data set (payload model), feasible combination file, and traffic model are documented.

  2. Introduction to Sample Size Choice for Confidence Intervals Based on "t" Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaofeng Steven; Loudermilk, Brandon; Simpson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Sample size can be chosen to achieve a specified width in a confidence interval. The probability of obtaining a narrow width given that the confidence interval includes the population parameter is defined as the power of the confidence interval, a concept unfamiliar to many practitioners. This article shows how to utilize the Statistical Analysis…

  3. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  4. Precision cosmological parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, William Ashton, Jr.

    2009-09-01

    methods. These techniques will help in the understanding of new physics contained in current and future data sets as well as benefit the research efforts of the cosmology community. Our idea is to shift the computationally intensive pieces of the parameter estimation framework to a parallel training step. We then provide a machine learning code that uses this training set to learn the relationship between the underlying cosmological parameters and the function we wish to compute. This code is very accurate and simple to evaluate. It can provide incredible speed- ups of parameter estimation codes. For some applications this provides the convenience of obtaining results faster, while in other cases this allows the use of codes that would be impossible to apply in the brute force setting. In this thesis we provide several examples where our method allows more accurate computation of functions important for data analysis than is currently possible. As the techniques developed in this work are very general, there are no doubt a wide array of applications both inside and outside of cosmology. We have already seen this interest as other scientists have presented ideas for using our algorithm to improve their computational work, indicating its importance as modern experiments push forward. In fact, our algorithm will play an important role in the parameter analysis of Planck, the next generation CMB space mission.

  5. Multicomponent Arcjet plasma Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunkov, V.; Kositsin, V. V.; Ruban, V. I.; Shalay, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    To determine the plasma arc parameters of an arcjet thruster, the kinetic theory of gases is used. We can find a well-known statement about the adiabatic character of the compression process due to the growth of the gas temperature in a change in its spectral composition and in the Doppler effect. The use of tungsten in the nozzle design details explains the appearance of atoms of this element in the plasma volume. The emission spectra of tungsten allow us to indirectly judge the temperature of the arc discharge and its character. Absorption of the long-wavelength wing of the line contour at λ = 465.987 nm substantiates our conclusion about the consumption of the anode material in the process of operating the arcjet. The Doppler shift of the emission lines of argon allows us to determine the rate of the gas jet escape. The results of the study can be useful in the design of aircraft.

  6. A software tool to assess uncertainty in transient-storage model parameters using Monte Carlo simulations

    Ward, Adam S.; Kelleher, Christa A.; Mason, Seth J. K.; Wagener, Thorsten; McIntyre, Neil; McGlynn, Brian L.; Runkel, Robert L.; Payn, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners alike often need to understand and characterize how water and solutes move through a stream in terms of the relative importance of in-stream and near-stream storage and transport processes. In-channel and subsurface storage processes are highly variable in space and time and difficult to measure. Storage estimates are commonly obtained using transient-storage models (TSMs) of the experimentally obtained solute-tracer test data. The TSM equations represent key transport and storage processes with a suite of numerical parameters. Parameter values are estimated via inverse modeling, in which parameter values are iteratively changed until model simulations closely match observed solute-tracer data. Several investigators have shown that TSM parameter estimates can be highly uncertain. When this is the case, parameter values cannot be used reliably to interpret stream-reach functioning. However, authors of most TSM studies do not evaluate or report parameter certainty. Here, we present a software tool linked to the One-dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage (OTIS) model that enables researchers to conduct uncertainty analyses via Monte-Carlo parameter sampling and to visualize uncertainty and sensitivity results. We demonstrate application of our tool to 2 case studies and compare our results to output obtained from more traditional implementation of the OTIS model. We conclude by suggesting best practices for transient-storage modeling and recommend that future applications of TSMs include assessments of parameter certainty to support comparisons and more reliable interpretations of transport processes.

  7. Ceramic Life Prediction Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    preferential. A standard creep testing Satec machine with a modified load train assembly was used for tensile stress-rupture testing. The specimen is...to the standard Satec machine head which includes crossed (90°) knife edges. The assembly procedure includes hanging the load train parts from...the Satec head as influenced by gravity. At this point the lower Satec crossarm is lowered to snub the train in this position. The load train

  8. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  9. Impact of Including Higher Actinides in Fast Reactor Transmutation Analyses

    SciT

    B. Forget; M. Asgari; R. Ferrer

    2007-09-01

    Previous fast reactor transmutation studies generally disregarded higher mass minor actinides beyond Cm-246 due to various considerations including deficiencies in nuclear cross-section data. Although omission of these higher mass actinides does not significantly impact the neutronic calculations and fuel cycle performance parameters follow-on neutron dose calculations related to fuel recycling, transportation and handling are significantly impacted. This report shows that including the minor actinides in the equilibrium fast reactor calculations will increase the predicted neutron emission by about 30%. In addition a sensitivity study was initiated by comparing the impact of different cross-section evaluation file for representing these minor actinides.

  10. The Effect of Including or Excluding Students with Testing Accommodations on IRT Calibrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karkee, Thakur; Lewis, Dan M.; Barton, Karen; Haug, Carolyn

    This study aimed to determine the degree to which the inclusion of accommodated students with disabilities in the calibration sample affects the characteristics of item parameters and the test results. Investigated were effects on test reliability, item fit to the applicable item response theory (IRT) model, item parameter estimates, and students'…

  11. Suspension Parameter Measurements of Wheeled Military Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    suspension through the wheel pads. The SPIdER was designed so that in the future, with a modest amount of modification , it can be upgraded to include the...AND MOBILITY (P&M) MINI-SYMPOSIUM AUGUST 14-16, MICHIGAN SUSPENSION PARAMETER MEASUREMENTS OF WHEELED MILITARY VEHICLES Dale Andreatta Gary...was built to measure the suspension parameters of any military wheeled vehicle. This is part of an ongoing effort to model and predict vehicle

  12. Estimating parameters of hidden Markov models based on marked individuals: use of robust design data

    Kendall, William L.; White, Gary C.; Hines, James E.; Langtimm, Catherine A.; Yoshizaki, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Development and use of multistate mark-recapture models, which provide estimates of parameters of Markov processes in the face of imperfect detection, have become common over the last twenty years. Recently, estimating parameters of hidden Markov models, where the state of an individual can be uncertain even when it is detected, has received attention. Previous work has shown that ignoring state uncertainty biases estimates of survival and state transition probabilities, thereby reducing the power to detect effects. Efforts to adjust for state uncertainty have included special cases and a general framework for a single sample per period of interest. We provide a flexible framework for adjusting for state uncertainty in multistate models, while utilizing multiple sampling occasions per period of interest to increase precision and remove parameter redundancy. These models also produce direct estimates of state structure for each primary period, even for the case where there is just one sampling occasion. We apply our model to expected value data, and to data from a study of Florida manatees, to provide examples of the improvement in precision due to secondary capture occasions. We also provide user-friendly software to implement these models. This general framework could also be used by practitioners to consider constrained models of particular interest, or model the relationship between within-primary period parameters (e.g., state structure) and between-primary period parameters (e.g., state transition probabilities).

  13. Aircraft data summaries for the SURE intensives. Final report. [Sampling done October, 1978 near Duncan Falls, Ohio and Giles County, Tennessee

    SciT

    Keifer, W.S.; Blumenthal, D.L.; Tommerdahl, J.B.

    1981-09-01

    As part of the EPRI sulfate regional experiment (SURE), Meteorology Research, Inc., (MRI) and Research Triangle Institute (RTI) conducted six air quality sampling programs in the eastern United States using instrumented aircraft. This volume includes the air quality and meteorological data obtained during the October 1978 intensive when MRI sampled near the Giles County, Tennessee, SURE Station and RTI sampled near the Duncan Falls, Ohio, SURE Station. Sampling data are presented for all measured parameters.

  14. Parameters for scale-up of lethal microwave treatment to eradicate cerambycid larvae infesting solid wood packing materials

    Mary R. Fleming; John J. Janowiak; Joseph Kearns; Jeffrey E. Shield; Rustum Roy; Dinesh K. Agrawal; Leah S. Bauer; Kelli Hoover

    2004-01-01

    The use of microwave irradiation to eradicate insects infesting wood used to manufacture packing materials such as pallets and crateswas evaluated. The focus of this preliminary studywas to determinewhich microwave parameters, including chamber-volume to sample-volumeratios,variations ofpower and time, and energydensity (total microwavepower/woodvolume), affect the...

  15. Composition of diesel exhaust with particular reference to particle bound organics including formation of artifacts.

    PubMed

    Lies, K H; Hartung, A; Postulka, A; Gring, H; Schulze, J

    1986-01-01

    For particulate emissions, standards were established by the US EPA in February 1980. Regulations limiting particulates from new light duty diesel vehicles are valid by model year 1982. The corresponding standards on a pure mass basis do not take into account any chemical character of the diesel particulate matter. Our investigation of the material composition shows that diesel particulates consist mainly of soot (up to 80% by weight) and adsorptively bound organics including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The qualitative and quantitative nature of hydrocarbon compounds associated with the particulates is dependent not only on the combustion parameters of the engine but also to an important degree on the sampling conditions when the particulates are collected (dilution ratio, temperature, filter material, sampling time etc.). Various methods for the analyses of PAH and their oxy- and nitro-derivatives are described including sampling, extraction, fractionation and chemical analysis. Quantitative comparison of PAH, nitro-PAH and oxy-PAH from different engines are given. For assessing mutagenicity of particulate matter, short-term biological tests are widely used. These biological tests often need a great amount of particulate matter requiring prolonged filter sampling times. Since it is well known that facile PAH oxidation can take place under the conditions used for sampling and analysis, the question rises if these PAH-derivates found in particle extracts partly or totally are produced during sampling (artifacts). Various results concerning nitro- and oxy-PAH are presented characterizing artifact formation as a minor problem under the conditions of the Federal Test Procedure. But results show that under other sampling conditions, e.g. electrostatic precipitation, higher NO2-concentrations and longer sampling times, artifact formation can become a bigger problem. The more stringent particulate standard of 0.2 g/mi for model years 1986 and 1987 respectively

  16. Sampling properties of directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.-W.; Christensen, C.; Bizhani, G.; Foster, D. V.; Grassberger, P.; Paczuski, M.

    2012-10-01

    For many real-world networks only a small “sampled” version of the original network may be investigated; those results are then used to draw conclusions about the actual system. Variants of breadth-first search (BFS) sampling, which are based on epidemic processes, are widely used. Although it is well established that BFS sampling fails, in most cases, to capture the IN component(s) of directed networks, a description of the effects of BFS sampling on other topological properties is all but absent from the literature. To systematically study the effects of sampling biases on directed networks, we compare BFS sampling to random sampling on complete large-scale directed networks. We present new results and a thorough analysis of the topological properties of seven complete directed networks (prior to sampling), including three versions of Wikipedia, three different sources of sampled World Wide Web data, and an Internet-based social network. We detail the differences that sampling method and coverage can make to the structural properties of sampled versions of these seven networks. Most notably, we find that sampling method and coverage affect both the bow-tie structure and the number and structure of strongly connected components in sampled networks. In addition, at a low sampling coverage (i.e., less than 40%), the values of average degree, variance of out-degree, degree autocorrelation, and link reciprocity are overestimated by 30% or more in BFS-sampled networks and only attain values within 10% of the corresponding values in the complete networks when sampling coverage is in excess of 65%. These results may cause us to rethink what we know about the structure, function, and evolution of real-world directed networks.

  17. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records maintained in state criminal history record repositories, including those states participating in the NFF. (c...

  18. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records maintained in state criminal history record repositories, including those states participating in the NFF. (c...

  19. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records maintained in state criminal history record repositories, including those states participating in the NFF. (c...

  20. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records maintained in state criminal history record repositories, including those states participating in the NFF. (c...

  1. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records maintained in state criminal history record repositories, including those states participating in the NFF. (c...

  2. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... exclusivity and those channels below 470 MHz, including those licensed pursuant to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Included services. 1.9005 Section 1.9005... Radiotelephone Service (part 22 of this chapter); (b) The Rural Radiotelephone Service (part 22 of this chapter...

  3. Server-Side Includes Made Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2002-01-01

    Describes server-side include (SSI) codes which allow Webmasters to insert content into Web pages without programming knowledge. Explains how to enable the codes on a Web server, provides a step-by-step process for implementing them, discusses tags and syntax errors, and includes examples of their use on the Web site for Southern Illinois…

  4. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  5. Advanced hierarchical distance sampling

    Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we cover a number of important extensions of the basic hierarchical distance-sampling (HDS) framework from Chapter 8. First, we discuss the inclusion of “individual covariates,” such as group size, in the HDS model. This is important in many surveys where animals form natural groups that are the primary observation unit, with the size of the group expected to have some influence on detectability. We also discuss HDS integrated with time-removal and double-observer or capture-recapture sampling. These “combined protocols” can be formulated as HDS models with individual covariates, and thus they have a commonality with HDS models involving group structure (group size being just another individual covariate). We cover several varieties of open-population HDS models that accommodate population dynamics. On one end of the spectrum, we cover models that allow replicate distance sampling surveys within a year, which estimate abundance relative to availability and temporary emigration through time. We consider a robust design version of that model. We then consider models with explicit dynamics based on the Dail and Madsen (2011) model and the work of Sollmann et al. (2015). The final major theme of this chapter is relatively newly developed spatial distance sampling models that accommodate explicit models describing the spatial distribution of individuals known as Point Process models. We provide novel formulations of spatial DS and HDS models in this chapter, including implementations of those models in the unmarked package using a hack of the pcount function for N-mixture models.

  6. The effect of uphill and downhill walking on gait parameters: A self-paced treadmill study.

    PubMed

    Kimel-Naor, Shani; Gottlieb, Amihai; Plotnik, Meir

    2017-07-26

    It has been shown that gait parameters vary systematically with the slope of the surface when walking uphill (UH) or downhill (DH) (Andriacchi et al., 1977; Crowe et al., 1996; Kawamura et al., 1991; Kirtley et al., 1985; McIntosh et al., 2006; Sun et al., 1996). However, gait trials performed on inclined surfaces have been subject to certain technical limitations including using fixed speed treadmills (TMs) or, alternatively, sampling only a few gait cycles on inclined ramps. Further, prior work has not analyzed upper body kinematics. This study aims to investigate effects of slope on gait parameters using a self-paced TM (SPTM) which facilitates more natural walking, including measuring upper body kinematics and gait coordination parameters. Gait of 11 young healthy participants was sampled during walking in steady state speed. Measurements were made at slopes of +10°, 0° and -10°. Force plates and a motion capture system were used to reconstruct twenty spatiotemporal gait parameters. For validation, previously described parameters were compared with the literature, and novel parameters measuring upper body kinematics and bilateral gait coordination were also analyzed. Results showed that most lower and upper body gait parameters were affected by walking slope angle. Specifically, UH walking had a higher impact on gait kinematics than DH walking. However, gait coordination parameters were not affected by walking slope, suggesting that gait asymmetry, left-right coordination and gait variability are robust characteristics of walking. The findings of the study are discussed in reference to a potential combined effect of slope and gait speed. Follow-up studies are needed to explore the relative effects of each of these factors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Optimization of liquid scintillation measurements applied to smears and aqueous samples collected in industrial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapon, Arnaud; Pigrée, Gilbert; Putmans, Valérie; Rogel, Gwendal

    Search for low-energy β contaminations in industrial environments requires using Liquid Scintillation Counting. This indirect measurement method supposes a fine control from sampling to measurement itself. Thus, in this paper, we focus on the definition of a measurement method, as generic as possible, for both smears and aqueous samples' characterization. That includes choice of consumables, sampling methods, optimization of counting parameters and definition of energy windows, using the maximization of a Figure of Merit. Detection limits are then calculated considering these optimized parameters. For this purpose, we used PerkinElmer Tri-Carb counters. Nevertheless, except those relative to some parameters specific to PerkinElmer, most of the results presented here can be extended to other counters.

  8. Sampling and Data Analysis for Environmental Microbiology

    SciT

    Murray, Christopher J.

    2001-06-01

    A brief review of the literature indicates the importance of statistical analysis in applied and environmental microbiology. Sampling designs are particularly important for successful studies, and it is highly recommended that researchers review their sampling design before heading to the laboratory or the field. Most statisticians have numerous stories of scientists who approached them after their study was complete only to have to tell them that the data they gathered could not be used to test the hypothesis they wanted to address. Once the data are gathered, a large and complex body of statistical techniques are available for analysis ofmore » the data. Those methods include both numerical and graphical techniques for exploratory characterization of the data. Hypothesis testing and analysis of variance (ANOVA) are techniques that can be used to compare the mean and variance of two or more groups of samples. Regression can be used to examine the relationships between sets of variables and is often used to examine the dependence of microbiological populations on microbiological parameters. Multivariate statistics provides several methods that can be used for interpretation of datasets with a large number of variables and to partition samples into similar groups, a task that is very common in taxonomy, but also has applications in other fields of microbiology. Geostatistics and other techniques have been used to examine the spatial distribution of microorganisms. The objectives of this chapter are to provide a brief survey of some of the statistical techniques that can be used for sample design and data analysis of microbiological data in environmental studies, and to provide some examples of their use from the literature.« less

  9. A three-parameter asteroid taxonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.; Williams, James G.; Matson, Dennis L.; Veeder, Glenn J.; Gradie, Jonathan C.

    1989-01-01

    Broadband U, V, and x photometry together with IRAS asteroid albedos have been used to construct an asteroid classification system. The system is based on three parameters (U-V and v-x color indices and visual geometric albedo), and it is able to place 96 percent of the present sample of 357 asteroids into 11 taxonomic classes. It is noted that all but one of these classes are analogous to those previously found using other classification schemes. The algorithm is shown to account for the observational uncertainties in each of the classification parameters.

  10. Systematic parameter inference in stochastic mesoscopic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Yang, Xiu; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-02-01

    We propose a method to efficiently determine the optimal coarse-grained force field in mesoscopic stochastic simulations of Newtonian fluid and polymer melt systems modeled by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and energy conserving dissipative particle dynamics (eDPD). The response surfaces of various target properties (viscosity, diffusivity, pressure, etc.) with respect to model parameters are constructed based on the generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion using simulation results on sampling points (e.g., individual parameter sets). To alleviate the computational cost to evaluate the target properties, we employ the compressive sensing method to compute the coefficients of the dominant gPC terms given the prior knowledge that the coefficients are "sparse". The proposed method shows comparable accuracy with the standard probabilistic collocation method (PCM) while it imposes a much weaker restriction on the number of the simulation samples especially for systems with high dimensional parametric space. Fully access to the response surfaces within the confidence range enables us to infer the optimal force parameters given the desirable values of target properties at the macroscopic scale. Moreover, it enables us to investigate the intrinsic relationship between the model parameters, identify possible degeneracies in the parameter space, and optimize the model by eliminating model redundancies. The proposed method provides an efficient alternative approach for constructing mesoscopic models by inferring model parameters to recover target properties of the physics systems (e.g., from experimental measurements), where those force field parameters and formulation cannot be derived from the microscopic level in a straight forward way.

  11. Systematic parameter inference in stochastic mesoscopic modeling

    SciT

    Lei, Huan; Yang, Xiu; Li, Zhen

    2017-02-01

    We propose a method to efficiently determine the optimal coarse-grained force field in mesoscopic stochastic simulations of Newtonian fluid and polymer melt systems modeled by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and energy conserving dissipative particle dynamics (eDPD). The response surfaces of various target properties (viscosity, diffusivity, pressure, etc.) with respect to model parameters are constructed based on the generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion using simulation results on sampling points (e.g., individual parameter sets). To alleviate the computational cost to evaluate the target properties, we employ the compressive sensing method to compute the coefficients of the dominant gPC terms given the priormore » knowledge that the coefficients are “sparse”. The proposed method shows comparable accuracy with the standard probabilistic collocation method (PCM) while it imposes a much weaker restriction on the number of the simulation samples especially for systems with high dimensional parametric space. Fully access to the response surfaces within the confidence range enables us to infer the optimal force parameters given the desirable values of target properties at the macroscopic scale. Moreover, it enables us to investigate the intrinsic relationship between the model parameters, identify possible degeneracies in the parameter space, and optimize the model by eliminating model redundancies. The proposed method provides an efficient alternative approach for constructing mesoscopic models by inferring model parameters to recover target properties of the physics systems (e.g., from experimental measurements), where those force field parameters and formulation cannot be derived from the microscopic level in a straight forward way.« less

  12. Stochastic control system parameter identifiability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. H.; Herget, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The parameter identification problem of general discrete time, nonlinear, multiple input/multiple output dynamic systems with Gaussian white distributed measurement errors is considered. The knowledge of the system parameterization was assumed to be known. Concepts of local parameter identifiability and local constrained maximum likelihood parameter identifiability were established. A set of sufficient conditions for the existence of a region of parameter identifiability was derived. A computation procedure employing interval arithmetic was provided for finding the regions of parameter identifiability. If the vector of the true parameters is locally constrained maximum likelihood (CML) identifiable, then with probability one, the vector of true parameters is a unique maximal point of the maximum likelihood function in the region of parameter identifiability and the constrained maximum likelihood estimation sequence will converge to the vector of true parameters.

  13. Enamel surface topography analysis for diet discrimination. A methodology to enhance and select discriminative parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, Arthur; Blondel, Cécile; Brunetière, Noël; Ramdarshan, Anusha; Merceron, Gildas

    2018-03-01

    Tooth wear and, more specifically, dental microwear texture is a dietary proxy that has been used for years in vertebrate paleoecology and ecology. DMTA, dental microwear texture analysis, relies on a few parameters related to the surface complexity, anisotropy and heterogeneity of the enamel facets at the micrometric scale. Working with few but physically meaningful parameters helps in comparing published results and in defining levels for classification purposes. Other dental microwear approaches are based on ISO parameters and coupled with statistical tests to find the more relevant ones. The present study roughly utilizes most of the aforementioned parameters in their more or less modified form. But more than parameters, we here propose a new approach: instead of a single parameter characterizing the whole surface, we sample the surface and thus generate 9 derived parameters in order to broaden the parameter set. The identification of the most discriminative parameters is performed with an automated procedure which is an extended and refined version of the workflows encountered in some studies. The procedure in its initial form includes the most common tools, like the ANOVA and the correlation analysis, along with the required mathematical tests. The discrimination results show that a simplified form of the procedure is able to more efficiently identify the desired number of discriminative parameters. Also highlighted are some trends like the relevance of working with both height and spatial parameters, as well as the potential benefits of dimensionless surfaces. On a set of 45 surfaces issued from 45 specimens of three modern ruminants with differences in feeding preferences (grazing, leaf-browsing and fruit-eating), it is clearly shown that the level of wear discrimination is improved with the new methodology compared to the other ones.

  14. Inverse Modeling of Hydrologic Parameters Using Surface Flux and Runoff Observations in the Community Land Model

    SciT

    Sun, Yu; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi

    2013-12-10

    This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Two inversion strategies, the deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) - Bayesian inversion approaches, are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find thatmore » using model parameters calibrated by the least-square fitting provides little improvements in the model simulations but the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches are consistent - as more information comes in, the predictive intervals of the calibrated parameters become narrower and the misfits between the calculated and observed responses decrease. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to the different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.« less

  15. Relativistic parameters of senescence.

    PubMed

    Stathatos, Marios A

    2005-01-01

    The laws of biochemistry and biology are governed by parameters whose description in mathematical formulas is based on the three-dimensional space. It is a fact, however, that the life span of a cell and its specific functions, though limited, can be extended or diminished depending on the genetic code but also, on the natural pressure of the environment. The plasticity exhibited by a cellular system has been attributed to the change of the three-dimensional structure of the cell, with time being a simple measure of this change. The model of biological relativity proposed here, considers time as a flexible fourth dimension that corresponds directly to the inertial status of the cells. Two types of clocks are defined: the relativistic biological clock (RBC) and the mechanical clock (MC). In contrast to the MCs that show the astrological reference time, the time shown by the RBCs delay because it depends on cellular activity. The maximum and the expected life span of the cells and/or the organisms can be therefore relied on time transformation. One of the most important factors that can affect time flow is the energy that is produced during metabolic work. Based on this observation, RBCs can be constructed following series of theoretical experiments in order to assess biological time and life span changes.

  16. [Acoustical parameters of toys].

    PubMed

    Harazin, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Toys play an important role in the development of the sight and hearing concentration in children. They also support the development of manipulation, gently influence a child and excite its emotional activities. A lot of toys emit various sounds. The aim of the study was to assess sound levels produced by sound-emitting toys used by young children. Acoustical parameters of noise were evaluated for 16 sound-emitting plastic toys in laboratory conditions. The noise level was recorded at four different distances, 10, 20, 25 and 30 cm, from the toy. Measurements of A-weighted sound pressure levels and noise levels in octave band in the frequency range from 31.5 Hz to 16 kHz were performed at each distance. Taking into consideration the highest equivalent A-weighted sound levels produced by tested toys, they can be divided into four groups: below 70 dB (6 toys), from 70 to 74 dB (4 toys), from 75 to 84 dB (3 toys) and from 85 to 94 dB (3 toys). The majority of toys (81%) emitted dominant sound levels in octave band at the frequency range from 2 kHz to 4 kHz. Sound-emitting toys produce the highest acoustic energy at the frequency range of the highest susceptibility of the auditory system. Noise levels produced by some toys can be dangerous to children's hearing.

  17. Universal MOSFET parameter analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klekachev, A. V.; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Pikulev, V. B.; Gurtov, V. A.

    2006-05-01

    MOSFET analyzer is developed to extract most important parameters of transistors. Instead of routine DC transfer and output characteristics, analyzer provides an evaluation of interface states density by applying charge pumping technique. There are two features that outperform the analyzer among similar products of other vendors. It is compact (100 × 80 × 50 mm 3 in dimensions) and lightweight (< 200 gram) instrument with ultra low power supply (< 2.5 W). The analyzer operates under control of IBM PC by means of USB interface that simultaneously provides power supply. Owing to the USB-compatible microcontroller as the basic element, designed analyzer offers cost-effective solution for diverse applications. The enclosed software runs under Windows 98/2000/XP operating systems, it has convenient graphical interface simplifying measurements for untrained user. Operational characteristics of analyzer are as follows: gate and drain output voltage within limits of +/-10V measuring current range of 1pA ÷ 10 mA; lowest limit of interface states density characterization of ~10 9 cm -2 • eV -1. The instrument was designed on the base of component parts from CYPRESS and ANALOG DEVICES (USA).

  18. Chemical analyses of provided samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Christopher H.

    1993-01-01

    Two batches of samples were received and chemical analysis was performed of the surface and near surface regions of the samples by the surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI) method. The samples included four one-inch optics and several paint samples. The analyses emphasized surface contamination or modification. In these studies, pulsed sputtering by 7 keV Ar+ and primarily single-photon ionization (SPI) by coherent 118 nm radiation (at approximately 5 x 10(exp 5) W/cm(sup 2) were used. For two of the samples, also multiphoton ionization (MPI) at 266 nm (approximately 5 x 10(exp 11) W/cm(sup 2) was used. Most notable among the results was the silicone contamination on Mg2 mirror 28-92, and that the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) paint sample had been enriched in K and Na and depleted in Zn, Si, B, and organic compounds relative to the control paint.

  19. Practice parameter on disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Shaw, Jon A

    2013-11-01

    This Practice Parameter identifies best approaches to the assessment and management of children and adolescents across all phases of a disaster. Delivered within a disaster system of care, many interventions are appropriate for implementation in the weeks and months after a disaster. These include psychological first aid, family outreach, psychoeducation, social support, screening, and anxiety reduction techniques. The clinician should assess and monitor risk and protective factors across all phases of a disaster. Schools are a natural site for conducting assessments and delivering services to children. Multimodal approaches using social support, psychoeducation, and cognitive behavioral techniques have the strongest evidence base. Psychopharmacologic interventions are not generally used but may be necessary as an adjunct to other interventions for children with severe reactions or coexisting psychiatric conditions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Adapted random sampling patterns for accelerated MRI.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Florian; Clason, Christian; Diwoky, Clemens; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2011-02-01

    Variable density random sampling patterns have recently become increasingly popular for accelerated imaging strategies, as they lead to incoherent aliasing artifacts. However, the design of these sampling patterns is still an open problem. Current strategies use model assumptions like polynomials of different order to generate a probability density function that is then used to generate the sampling pattern. This approach relies on the optimization of design parameters which is very time consuming and therefore impractical for daily clinical use. This work presents a new approach that generates sampling patterns by making use of power spectra of existing reference data sets and hence requires neither parameter tuning nor an a priori mathematical model of the density of sampling points. The approach is validated with downsampling experiments, as well as with accelerated in vivo measurements. The proposed approach is compared with established sampling patterns, and the generalization potential is tested by using a range of reference images. Quantitative evaluation is performed for the downsampling experiments using RMS differences to the original, fully sampled data set. Our results demonstrate that the image quality of the method presented in this paper is comparable to that of an established model-based strategy when optimization of the model parameter is carried out and yields superior results to non-optimized model parameters. However, no random sampling pattern showed superior performance when compared to conventional Cartesian subsampling for the considered reconstruction strategy.

  1. Information sampling behavior with explicit sampling costs

    PubMed Central

    Juni, Mordechai Z.; Gureckis, Todd M.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2015-01-01

    The decision to gather information should take into account both the value of information and its accrual costs in time, energy and money. Here we explore how people balance the monetary costs and benefits of gathering additional information in a perceptual-motor estimation task. Participants were rewarded for touching a hidden circular target on a touch-screen display. The target’s center coincided with the mean of a circular Gaussian distribution from which participants could sample repeatedly. Each “cue” — sampled one at a time — was plotted as a dot on the display. Participants had to repeatedly decide, after sampling each cue, whether to stop sampling and attempt to touch the hidden target or continue sampling. Each additional cue increased the participants’ probability of successfully touching the hidden target but reduced their potential reward. Two experimental conditions differed in the initial reward associated with touching the hidden target and the fixed cost per cue. For each condition we computed the optimal number of cues that participants should sample, before taking action, to maximize expected gain. Contrary to recent claims that people gather less information than they objectively should before taking action, we found that participants over-sampled in one experimental condition, and did not significantly under- or over-sample in the other. Additionally, while the ideal observer model ignores the current sample dispersion, we found that participants used it to decide whether to stop sampling and take action or continue sampling, a possible consequence of imperfect learning of the underlying population dispersion across trials. PMID:27429991

  2. Investigation into the influence of build parameters on failure of 3D printed parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasini, Giacomo

    Additive manufacturing, including fused deposition modeling (FDM), is transforming the built world and engineering education. Deep understanding of parts created through FDM technology has lagged behind its adoption in home, work, and academic environments. Properties of parts created from bulk materials through traditional manufacturing are understood well enough to accurately predict their behavior through analytical models. Unfortunately, Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters create anisotropy on a scale that fundamentally affects the part properties. Understanding AM process parameters (implemented by program algorithms called slicers) is necessary to predict part behavior. Investigating algorithms controlling print parameters (slicers) revealed stark differences between the generation of part layers. In this work, tensile testing experiments, including a full factorial design, determined that three key factors, width, thickness, infill density, and their interactions, significantly affect the tensile properties of 3D printed test samples.

  3. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of techniques...

  4. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of techniques...

  5. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of techniques...

  6. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccine-Preventable Adult Diseases Resources Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... are hospitalized, and some even die. People with asthma or COPD are at higher risk for serious ...

  7. STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS FOR 10 HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M33

    SciT

    Ma, Jun, E-mail: majun@nao.cas.cn

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, we present the properties of 10 halo globular clusters (GCs) with luminosities L ≃ 5–7 × 10{sup 5} L{sub ⊙} in the Local Group galaxy M33 using images from the Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 in the F555W and F814W bands. We obtained the ellipticities, position angles, and surface brightness profiles for each GC. In general, the ellipticities of the M33 sample clusters are similar to those of the M31 clusters. The structural and dynamical parameters are derived by fitting the profiles to three different models combined with mass-to-light ratios (M/L values) from population-synthesis models. The structural parametersmore » include core radii, concentration, half-light radii, and central surface brightness. The dynamical parameters include the integrated cluster mass, integrated binding energy, central surface mass density, and predicted line of sight velocity dispersion at the cluster center. The velocity dispersions of the four clusters predicted here agree well with the observed dispersions by Larsen et al. The results here showed that the majority of the sample halo GCs are better fitted by both the King model and the Wilson model than the Sérsic model. In general, the properties of the clusters in M33, M31, and the Milky Way fall in the same regions of parameter spaces. The tight correlations of cluster properties indicate a “fundamental plane” for clusters, which reflects some universal physical conditions and processes operating at the epoch of cluster formation.« less

  8. A study of parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herget, C. J.; Patterson, R. E., III

    1978-01-01

    A set of definitions for deterministic parameter identification ability were proposed. Deterministic parameter identificability properties are presented based on four system characteristics: direct parameter recoverability, properties of the system transfer function, properties of output distinguishability, and uniqueness properties of a quadratic cost functional. Stochastic parameter identifiability was defined in terms of the existence of an estimation sequence for the unknown parameters which is consistent in probability. Stochastic parameter identifiability properties are presented based on the following characteristics: convergence properties of the maximum likelihood estimate, properties of the joint probability density functions of the observations, and properties of the information matrix.

  9. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  10. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  11. Modeling association among demographic parameters in analysis of open population capture-recapture data.

    PubMed

    Link, William A; Barker, Richard J

    2005-03-01

    We present a hierarchical extension of the Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) model for open population capture-recapture data. In addition to recaptures of marked animals, we model first captures of animals and losses on capture. The parameter set includes capture probabilities, survival rates, and birth rates. The survival rates and birth rates are treated as a random sample from a bivariate distribution, thus the model explicitly incorporates correlation in these demographic rates. A key feature of the model is that the likelihood function, which includes a CJS model factor, is expressed entirely in terms of identifiable parameters; losses on capture can be factored out of the model. Since the computational complexity of classical likelihood methods is prohibitive, we use Markov chain Monte Carlo in a Bayesian analysis. We describe an efficient candidate-generation scheme for Metropolis-Hastings sampling of CJS models and extensions. The procedure is illustrated using mark-recapture data for the moth Gonodontis bidentata.

  12. Modeling association among demographic parameters in analysis of open population capture-recapture data

    Link, William A.; Barker, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a hierarchical extension of the Cormack–Jolly–Seber (CJS) model for open population capture–recapture data. In addition to recaptures of marked animals, we model first captures of animals and losses on capture. The parameter set includes capture probabilities, survival rates, and birth rates. The survival rates and birth rates are treated as a random sample from a bivariate distribution, thus the model explicitly incorporates correlation in these demographic rates. A key feature of the model is that the likelihood function, which includes a CJS model factor, is expressed entirely in terms of identifiable parameters; losses on capture can be factored out of the model. Since the computational complexity of classical likelihood methods is prohibitive, we use Markov chain Monte Carlo in a Bayesian analysis. We describe an efficient candidate-generation scheme for Metropolis–Hastings sampling of CJS models and extensions. The procedure is illustrated using mark-recapture data for the moth Gonodontis bidentata.

  13. Atmospheric stellar parameters from cross-correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, L.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Sneden, C.; Udry, S.

    2017-08-01

    The increasing number of spectra gathered by spectroscopic sky surveys and transiting exoplanet follow-up has pushed the community to develop automated tools for atmospheric stellar parameters determination. Here we present a novel approach that allows the measurement of temperature (Teff), metallicity ([Fe/H]) and gravity (log g) within a few seconds and in a completely automated fashion. Rather than performing comparisons with spectral libraries, our technique is based on the determination of several cross-correlation functions (CCFs) obtained by including spectral features with different sensitivity to the photospheric parameters. We use literature stellar parameters of high signal-to-noise (SNR), high-resolution HARPS spectra of FGK main-sequence stars to calibrate Teff, [Fe/H] and log g as a function of CCF parameters. Our technique is validated using low-SNR spectra obtained with the same instrument. For FGK stars we achieve a precision of σ _{{T_eff}} = 50 K, σlog g = 0.09 dex and σ _{{{[Fe/H]}}} =0.035 dex at SNR = 50, while the precision for observation with SNR ≳ 100 and the overall accuracy are constrained by the literature values used to calibrate the CCFs. Our approach can easily be extended to other instruments with similar spectral range and resolution or to other spectral range and stars other than FGK dwarfs if a large sample of reference stars is available for the calibration. Additionally, we provide the mathematical formulation to convert synthetic equivalent widths to CCF parameters as an alternative to direct calibration. We have made our tool publicly available.

  14. Geotechnical Parameters of Alluvial Soils from in-situ Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Młynarek, Zbigniew; Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Wierzbicki, Jędrzej

    2012-10-01

    The article concentrates on the identification of geotechnical parameters of alluvial soil represented by silts found near Poznan and Elblag. Strength and deformation parameters of the subsoil tested were identified by the CPTU (static penetration) and SDMT (dilatometric) methods, as well as by the vane test (VT). Geotechnical parameters of the subsoil were analysed with a view to using the soil as an earth construction material and as a foundation for buildings constructed on the grounds tested. The article includes an analysis of the overconsolidation process of the soil tested and a formula for the identification of the overconsolidation ratio OCR. Equation 9 reflects the relation between the undrained shear strength and plasticity of the silts analyzed and the OCR value. The analysis resulted in the determination of the Nkt coefficient, which might be used to identify the undrained shear strength of both sediments tested. On the basis of a detailed analysis of changes in terms of the constrained oedometric modulus M0, the relations between the said modulus, the liquidity index and the OCR value were identified. Mayne's formula (1995) was used to determine the M0 modulus from the CPTU test. The usefullness of the sediments found near Poznan as an earth construction material was analysed after their structure had been destroyed and compacted with a Proctor apparatus. In cases of samples characterised by different water content and soil particle density, the analysis of changes in terms of cohesion and the internal friction angle proved that these parameters are influenced by the soil phase composition (Fig. 18 and 19). On the basis of the tests, it was concluded that the most desirable shear strength parameters are achieved when the silt is compacted below the optimum water content.

  15. Geotechnical Parameters of Alluvial Soils from in-situ Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Młynarek, Zbigniew; Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Wierzbicki, Jedrzej

    2012-10-01

    The article concentrates on the identification of geotechnical parameters of alluvial soil represented by silts found near Poznan and Elblag. Strength and deformation parameters of the subsoil tested were identified by the CPTU (static penetration) and SDMT (dilatometric) methods, as well as by the vane test (VT). Geotechnical parameters of the subsoil were analysed with a view to using the soil as an earth construction material and as a foundation for buildings constructed on the grounds tested. The article includes an analysis of the overconsolidation process of the soil tested and a formula for the identification of the overconsolidation ratio OCR. Equation 9 reflects the relation between the undrained shear strength and plasticity of the silts analyzed and the OCR value. The analysis resulted in the determination of the Nkt coefficient, which might be used to identify the undrained shear strength of both sediments tested. On the basis of a detailed analysis of changes in terms of the constrained oedometric modulus M0, the relations between the said modulus, the liquidity index and the OCR value were identified. Mayne's formula (1995) was used to determine the M0 modulus from the CPTU test. The usefullness of the sediments found near Poznan as an earth construction material was analysed after their structure had been destroyed and compacted with a Proctor apparatus. In cases of samples characterised by different water content and soil particle density, the analysis of changes in terms of cohesion and the internal friction angle proved that these parameters are influenced by the soil phase composition (Fig. 18 and 19). On the basis of the tests, it was concluded that the most desirable shear strength parameters are achieved when the silt is compacted below the optimum water content.

  16. Analysis of sagittal spinopelvic parameters in achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jae-Young; Suh, Seung-Woo; Modi, Hitesh N; Park, Jong-Woong; Park, Jung-Ho

    2011-08-15

    Prospective radiological analysis of patients with achondroplasia. To analyze sagittal spinal alignment and pelvic orientation in achondroplasia patients. Knowledge of sagittal spinopelvic parameters is important for the treatment of achondroplasia, because they differ from those of the normal population and can induce pain. The study and control groups were composed of 32 achondroplasia patients and 24 healthy volunteers, respectively. All underwent lateral radiography of the whole spine including hip joints. The radiographic parameters examined were sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence (PI), S1 overhang, thoracic kyphosis, T10-L2 kyphosis, lumbar lordosis (LL1, LL2), and sagittal balance. Statistical analysis was performed to identify significant differences between the two groups. In addition, correlations between parameters and symptoms were sought. Sagittal spinopelvic parameters, namely, pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence, S1 overhang, thoracic kyphosis, T10-L2 kyphosis, lumbar lordosis 1 and sagittal balance were found to be significantly different in the patient and control groups (P < 0.05). In addition, sagittal parameters were found to be related to each other in the patient group (P < 0.05), that is, PI was related to SS and pelvic tilt, and LL was related to thoracic kyphosis. Furthermore, in terms of relations between spinal and pelvic parameters, LL was related to SS and PI, and sagittal balance was related to SS and PI. Furthermore, LL and T10-L2 kyphosis were found to be related to pain (P < 0.05), whereas no other parameter was found to be related to VAS scores. Sagittal parameters and possible relationships between sagittal parameters and symptoms were found to be significantly different in achondroplasia patients and normal healthy controls. The present study shows that sagittal spinal and pelvic parameters can assist the treatment of spinal disorders in achondroplasia patients.

  17. How Sample Size Affects a Sampling Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulekar, Madhuri S.; Siegel, Murray H.

    2009-01-01

    If students are to understand inferential statistics successfully, they must have a profound understanding of the nature of the sampling distribution. Specifically, they must comprehend the determination of the expected value and standard error of a sampling distribution as well as the meaning of the central limit theorem. Many students in a high…

  18. Comet coma sample return instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Brownlee, Don E.; Burnett, Donald S.; Tsou, Peter; Uesugi, K. T.

    1994-01-01

    The sample collection technology and instrument concept for the Sample of Comet Coma Earth Return Mission (SOCCER) are described. The scientific goals of this Flyby Sample Return are to return to coma dust and volatile samples from a known comet source, which will permit accurate elemental and isotopic measurements for thousands of individual solid particles and volatiles, detailed analysis of the dust structure, morphology, and mineralogy of the intact samples, and identification of the biogenic elements or compounds in the solid and volatile samples. Having these intact samples, morphologic, petrographic, and phase structural features can be determined. Information on dust particle size, shape, and density can be ascertained by analyzing penetration holes and tracks in the capture medium. Time and spatial data of dust capture will provide understanding of the flux dynamics of the coma and the jets. Additional information will include the identification of cosmic ray tracks in the cometary grains, which can provide a particle's process history and perhaps even the age of the comet. The measurements will be made with the same equipment used for studying micrometeorites for decades past; hence, the results can be directly compared without extrapolation or modification. The data will provide a powerful and direct technique for comparing the cometary samples with all known types of meteorites and interplanetary dust. This sample collection system will provide the first sample return from a specifically identified primitive body and will allow, for the first time, a direct method of matching meteoritic materials captured on Earth with known parent bodies.

  19. Analysis of hepatitis C viral dynamics using Latin hypercube sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachpute, Gaurav; Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P.

    2012-12-01

    We consider a mathematical model comprising four coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to study hepatitis C viral dynamics. The model includes the efficacies of a combination therapy of interferon and ribavirin. There are two main objectives of this paper. The first one is to approximate the percentage of cases in which there is a viral clearance in absence of treatment as well as percentage of response to treatment for various efficacy levels. The other is to better understand and identify the parameters that play a key role in the decline of viral load and can be estimated in a clinical setting. A condition for the stability of the uninfected and the infected steady states is presented. A large number of sample points for the model parameters (which are physiologically feasible) are generated using Latin hypercube sampling. An analysis of the simulated values identifies that, approximately 29.85% cases result in clearance of the virus during the early phase of the infection. Results from the χ2 and the Spearman's tests done on the samples, indicate a distinctly different distribution for certain parameters for the cases exhibiting viral clearance under the combination therapy.

  20. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  1. Duplex sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Paul E.; Lloyd, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a duplex sampling apparatus. The apparatus is adapted to independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved in the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Orbital parameters of Kuiper Belt objects (Volk+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, K.; Malhotra, R.

    2017-11-01

    Our starting point is the list of minor planets in the outer solar system cataloged in the database of the Minor Planet Center (http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/lists/t_centaurs.html and http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/lists/t_tnos.html) as of 2016 October 20. The complete listing of our sample, including best-fit orbital parameters and sky locations, is provided in Table1. (1 data file).

  3. Predictive model for inflammation grades of chronic hepatitis B: Large-scale analysis of clinical parameters and gene expressions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weichen; Ma, Yanyun; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Jingyi; Zhang, Menghan; Wang, Yi; Li, Yi; Wu, Lijun; Pan, Yida; Zhang, Yitong; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Xinxin; Zhang, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jiming; Li, Hai; Lu, Lungen; Jin, Li; Wang, Jiucun; Yuan, Zhenghong; Liu, Jie

    2017-11-01

    Liver biopsy is the gold standard to assess pathological features (eg inflammation grades) for hepatitis B virus-infected patients although it is invasive and traumatic; meanwhile, several gene profiles of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) have been separately described in relatively small hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected samples. We aimed to analyse correlations among inflammation grades, gene expressions and clinical parameters (serum alanine amino transaminase, aspartate amino transaminase and HBV-DNA) in large-scale CHB samples and to predict inflammation grades by using clinical parameters and/or gene expressions. We analysed gene expressions with three clinical parameters in 122 CHB samples by an improved regression model. Principal component analysis and machine-learning methods including Random Forest, K-nearest neighbour and support vector machine were used for analysis and further diagnosis models. Six normal samples were conducted to validate the predictive model. Significant genes related to clinical parameters were found enriching in the immune system, interferon-stimulated, regulation of cytokine production, anti-apoptosis, and etc. A panel of these genes with clinical parameters can effectively predict binary classifications of inflammation grade (area under the ROC curve [AUC]: 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.77-0.93), validated by normal samples. A panel with only clinical parameters was also valuable (AUC: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.65-0.86), indicating that liquid biopsy method for detecting the pathology of CHB is possible. This is the first study to systematically elucidate the relationships among gene expressions, clinical parameters and pathological inflammation grades in CHB, and to build models predicting inflammation grades by gene expressions and/or clinical parameters as well. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Hyperspectral signature analysis of skin parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Garza, Luis; Kang, Sewon; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The temporal analysis of changes in biological skin parameters, including melanosome concentration, collagen concentration and blood oxygenation, may serve as a valuable tool in diagnosing the progression of malignant skin cancers and in understanding the pathophysiology of cancerous tumors. Quantitative knowledge of these parameters can also be useful in applications such as wound assessment, and point-of-care diagnostics, amongst others. We propose an approach to estimate in vivo skin parameters using a forward computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel Equations. We use this model to map the skin parameters to their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We then use machine learning based regression to develop an inverse map from hyperspectral signatures to skin parameters. In particular, we employ support vector machine based regression to estimate the in vivo skin parameters given their corresponding hyperspectral signature. We build on our work from SPIE 2012, and validate our methodology on an in vivo dataset. This dataset consists of 241 signatures collected from in vivo hyperspectral imaging of patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian and African American ethnicities. In addition, we also extend our methodology past the visible region and through the short-wave infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We find promising results when comparing the estimated skin parameters to the ground truth, demonstrating good agreement with well-established physiological precepts. This methodology can have potential use in non-invasive skin anomaly detection and for developing minimally invasive pre-screening tools.

  5. Detecting the sampling rate through observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Isao

    2018-09-01

    This paper proposes a method to detect the sampling rate of discrete time series of diffusion processes. Using the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters of a diffusion process, we establish a criterion based on the Kullback-Leibler divergence and thereby estimate the sampling rate. Simulation studies are conducted to check whether the method can detect the sampling rates from data and their results show a good performance in the detection. In addition, the method is applied to a financial time series sampled on daily basis and shows the detected sampling rate is different from the conventional rates.

  6. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciT

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  7. Electrochemical cell structure including an ionomeric barrier

    DOEpatents

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Hibbs, Michael

    2017-06-20

    An apparatus includes an electrochemical half-cell comprising: an electrolyte, an anode; and an ionomeric barrier positioned between the electrolyte and the anode. The anode may comprise a multi-electron vanadium phosphorous alloy, such as VP.sub.x, wherein x is 1-5. The electrochemical half-cell is configured to oxidize the vanadium and phosphorous alloy to release electrons. A method of mitigating corrosion in an electrochemical cell includes disposing an ionomeric barrier in a path of electrolyte or ion flow to an anode and mitigating anion accumulation on the surface of the anode.

  8. Weather information network including graphical display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Daniel R. (Inventor); Burdon, David (Inventor); Son, Robert S. (Inventor); Martin, Kevin D. (Inventor); Harrison, John (Inventor); Hughes, Keith R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus for providing weather information onboard an aircraft includes a processor unit and a graphical user interface. The processor unit processes weather information after it is received onboard the aircraft from a ground-based source, and the graphical user interface provides a graphical presentation of the weather information to a user onboard the aircraft. Preferably, the graphical user interface includes one or more user-selectable options for graphically displaying at least one of convection information, turbulence information, icing information, weather satellite information, SIGMET information, significant weather prognosis information, and winds aloft information.

  9. Triplet ultrasound growth parameters.

    PubMed

    Vora, Neeta L; Ruthazer, Robin; House, Michael; Chelmow, David

    2006-03-01

    To create ultrasound growth curves for normal growth of fetal triplets using statistical methodology that properly accounts for similarities of growth of fetuses within a mother as well as repeated measurements over time for each fetus. In this longitudinal study, all triplet pregnancies managed at a single tertiary center from 1992-2004 were reviewed. Fetuses with major anomalies, prior selective reduction, or fetal demise were excluded. Data from early and late gestation in which there were fewer than 30 fetal measurements available for analysis were excluded. We used multilevel models to account for variation in growth within a single fetus over time, variations in growth between multiple fetuses within a single mother, and variations in fetal growth between mothers. Medians (50th), 10th, and 90th percentiles were estimated by the creation of multiple quadratic growth models from bootstrap samples adapting a previously published method to compute prediction intervals. Estimated fetal weight was derived from Hadlock's formula. One hundred fifty triplet pregnancies were identified. Twenty-seven pregnancies were excluded for the following reasons: missing records (23), fetal demise (3), and fetal anomaly (1). The study group consisted of 123 pregnancies. The gestational age range was restricted to 14-34 weeks. Figures and tables were developed showing medians, 10th and 90th percentiles for estimated fetal weight, femur length, biparietal diameter, abdominal circumference, and head circumference. Growth curves for triplet pregnancies were derived. These may be useful for identification of abnormal growth in triplet fetuses. III.

  10. Selection of sampling rate for digital control of aircrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, P.; Powell, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    The considerations in selecting the sample rates for digital control of aircrafts are identified and evaluated using the optimal discrete method. A high performance aircraft model which includes a bending mode and wind gusts was studied. The following factors which influence the selection of the sampling rates were identified: (1) the time and roughness response to control inputs; (2) the response to external disturbances; and (3) the sensitivity to variations of parameters. It was found that the time response to a control input and the response to external disturbances limit the selection of the sampling rate. The optimal discrete regulator, the steady state Kalman filter, and the mean response to external disturbances are calculated.

  11. Two means of sampling sexual minority women: how different are the samples of women?

    PubMed

    Boehmer, Ulrike; Clark, Melissa; Timm, Alison; Ozonoff, Al

    2008-01-01

    We compared 2 sampling approaches of sexual minority women in 1 limited geographic area to better understand the implications of these 2 sampling approaches. Sexual minority women identified through the Census did not differ on average age or the prevalence of raising children from those sampled using nonrandomized methods. Women in the convenience sample were better educated and lived in smaller households. Modeling the likelihood of disability in this population resulted in contradictory parameter estimates by sampling approach. The degree of variation observed both between sampling approaches and between different parameters suggests that the total population of sexual minority women is still unmeasured. Thoroughly constructed convenience samples will continue to be a useful sampling strategy to further research on this population.

  12. Discriminative parameter estimation for random walks segmentation.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Pierre-Yves; Goodman, Danny; Kumrnar, Puneet; Azzabou, Noura; Carlier, Pierre G; Paragios, Nikos; Kumar, M Pawan

    2013-01-01

    The Random Walks (RW) algorithm is one of the most efficient and easy-to-use probabilistic segmentation methods. By combining contrast terms with prior terms, it provides accurate segmentations of medical images in a fully automated manner. However, one of the main drawbacks of using the RW algorithm is that its parameters have to be hand-tuned. we propose a novel discriminative learning framework that estimates the parameters using a training dataset. The main challenge we face is that the training samples are not fully supervised. Specifically, they provide a hard segmentation of the images, instead of a probabilistic segmentation. We overcome this challenge by treating the optimal probabilistic segmentation that is compatible with the given hard segmentation as a latent variable. This allows us to employ the latent support vector machine formulation for parameter estimation. We show that our approach significantly outperforms the baseline methods on a challenging dataset consisting of real clinical 3D MRI volumes of skeletal muscles.

  13. 42 CFR 441.520 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Included services. 441.520 Section 441.520 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the following services: (1) Assistance with ADLs, IADLs, and health-related tasks through hands-on...

  14. 42 CFR 441.520 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Included services. 441.520 Section 441.520 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the following services: (1) Assistance with ADLs, IADLs, and health-related tasks through hands-on...

  15. 42 CFR 441.520 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Included services. 441.520 Section 441.520 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the following services: (1) Assistance with ADLs, IADLs, and health-related tasks through hands-on...

  16. 34 CFR 300.20 - Include.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Include. 300.20 Section 300.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES...

  17. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  18. Nuclear Chemistry: Include It in Your Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Charles H.; Sheline, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the topics that might be included in a nuclear chemistry section are explored. Offers radioactivity, closed shells in nuclei, energy of nuclear processes, nuclear reactions, and fission and fusion as topics of interest. Provided are ideas and examples for each. (MVL)

  19. 34 CFR 300.20 - Include.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include. 300.20 Section 300.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES...

  20. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Included services. 410.100 Section 410.100 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF) Services...

  1. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... this subpart apply to the following services, which include Wireless Radio Services in which commercial... chapter); (h) The Broadband Radio Service (part 27 of this chapter); (i) The Educational Broadband Service (part 27 of this chapter); (j) The Wireless Communications Service in the 698-746 MHz band (part 27 of...

  2. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... following services, which include Wireless Radio Services in which commercial or private licensees hold...) The broadband Personal Communications Service (part 24 of this chapter); (h) The Broadband Radio...) The Wireless Communications Service in the 698-746 MHz band (part 27 of this chapter); (k) The...

  3. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... this subpart apply to the following services, which include Wireless Radio Services in which commercial... chapter); (h) The Broadband Radio Service (part 27 of this chapter); (i) The Educational Broadband Service (part 27 of this chapter); (j) The Wireless Communications Service in the 698-746 MHz band (part 27 of...

  4. Including the Excluded: One School for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EFA 2000 Bulletin, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of "EFA 2000" focuses on the theme of inclusive education, i.e., including children with disabilities in general education classrooms. The cover story discusses a 1995 UNESCO survey of 63 countries that showed that integration of children with disabilities in regular schools is a declared policy in almost every country.…

  5. Geneva mechanism. [including star wheel and driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, R. H.; Kenney, R. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An improved Geneva mechanism is characterized by a driven star-wheel having a segmented cam-follower surface. Star-wheel driver includes a restraining cam having a segmented cam surface for engaging the cam-follower surface of the star-wheel and antifriction rollers pinned to the restraining cam for engaging the cam-follower surface.

  6. A simple vibrating sample magnetometer for macroscopic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Dominguez, V.; Quesada, A.; Guzmán-Mínguez, J. C.; Moreno, L.; Lere, M.; Spottorno, J.; Giacomone, F.; Fernández, J. F.; Hernando, A.; García, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    We here present a simple model of a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The system allows recording magnetization curves at room temperature with a resolution of the order of 0.01 emu and is appropriated for macroscopic samples. The setup can be mounted with different configurations depending on the requirements of the sample to be measured (mass, saturation magnetization, saturation field, etc.). We also include here examples of curves obtained with our setup and comparison curves measured with a standard commercial VSM that confirms the reliability of our device.

  7. Sparsely sampling the sky: Regular vs. random sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykari, P.; Pires, S.; Starck, J.-L.; Jaffe, A. H.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: The next generation of galaxy surveys, aiming to observe millions of galaxies, are expensive both in time and money. This raises questions regarding the optimal investment of this time and money for future surveys. In a previous work, we have shown that a sparse sampling strategy could be a powerful substitute for the - usually favoured - contiguous observation of the sky. In our previous paper, regular sparse sampling was investigated, where the sparse observed patches were regularly distributed on the sky. The regularity of the mask introduces a periodic pattern in the window function, which induces periodic correlations at specific scales. Methods: In this paper, we use a Bayesian experimental design to investigate a "random" sparse sampling approach, where the observed patches are randomly distributed over the total sparsely sampled area. Results: We find that in this setting, the induced correlation is evenly distributed amongst all scales as there is no preferred scale in the window function. Conclusions: This is desirable when we are interested in any specific scale in the galaxy power spectrum, such as the matter-radiation equality scale. As the figure of merit shows, however, there is no preference between regular and random sampling to constrain the overall galaxy power spectrum and the cosmological parameters.

  8. Inspecting Engineering Samples

    2017-12-08

    Goddard's Ritsko Wins 2011 SAVE Award The winner of the 2011 SAVE Award is Matthew Ritsko, a Goddard financial manager. His tool lending library would track and enable sharing of expensive space-flight tools and hardware after projects no longer need them. This set of images represents the types of tools used at NASA. To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/topics/people/features/ritsko-save.html Dr. Doug Rabin (Code 671) and PI La Vida Cooper (Code 564) inspect engineering samples of the HAS-2 imager which will be tested and readout using a custom ASIC with a 16-bit ADC (analog to digital converter) and CDS (correlated double sampling) circuit designed by the Code 564 ASIC group as a part of an FY10 IRAD. The purpose of the IRAD was to develop and high resolution digitizer for Heliophysics applications such as imaging. Future goals for the collaboration include characterization testing and eventually a sounding rocket flight of the integrated system. *ASIC= Application Specific Integrated Circuit NASA/GSFC/Chris Gunn

  9. NASA Sample Return Missions: Recovery Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, L. F.; Cannon, R. E.

    2017-01-01

    The Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah, is the site of all NASA unmanned sample return missions. To date these missions include the Genesis solar wind samples (2004) and Stardust cometary and interstellar dust samples (2006). NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Mission will return its first asteroid sample at UTTR in 2023.

  10. A Primer on Sampling for Statewide Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Richard M.

    This paper is a primer on sampling procedures for statewide assessment. The careful reader should gain substantial knowledge about the promises and pitfalls of sampling for assessment. The primer has three basic objectives: (1) to define terms and concepts basic to sampling theory and its application, including population, sampling unit, sampling…

  11. Computer Graphics Simulations of Sampling Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Florence S.; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the use of computer graphics simulations to enhance student understanding of sampling distributions that arise in introductory statistics. Highlights include the distribution of sample proportions, the distribution of the difference of sample means, the distribution of the difference of sample proportions, and the distribution of sample…

  12. An overview of STRUCTURE: applications, parameter settings, and supporting software

    PubMed Central

    Porras-Hurtado, Liliana; Ruiz, Yarimar; Santos, Carla; Phillips, Christopher; Carracedo, Ángel; Lareu, Maria V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We present an up-to-date review of STRUCTURE software: one of the most widely used population analysis tools that allows researchers to assess patterns of genetic structure in a set of samples. STRUCTURE can identify subsets of the whole sample by detecting allele frequency differences within the data and can assign individuals to those sub-populations based on analysis of likelihoods. The review covers STRUCTURE's most commonly used ancestry and frequency models, plus an overview of the main applications of the software in human genetics including case-control association studies (CCAS), population genetics, and forensic analysis. The review is accompanied by supplementary material providing a step-by-step guide to running STRUCTURE. Methods: With reference to a worked example, we explore the effects of changing the principal analysis parameters on STRUCTURE results when analyzing a uniform set of human genetic data. Use of the supporting software: CLUMPP and distruct is detailed and we provide an overview and worked example of STRAT software, applicable to CCAS. Conclusion: The guide offers a simplified view of how STRUCTURE, CLUMPP, distruct, and STRAT can be applied to provide researchers with an informed choice of parameter settings and supporting software when analyzing their own genetic data. PMID:23755071

  13. The Effects of Sampling Probe Design and Sampling Techniques on Aerosol Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    Schematic of Extraction and Sampling System 39 16. Filter Housing 40 17. Theoretical Isokinetic Flow Requirements of the EPA Sampling...from the flow parameters based on a zero-error assumption at isokinetic sampling conditions. Isokinetic , or equal velocity sampling, was...prior to testing the probes. It was also used to measure the flow field adjacent to the probe inlets to determine the isokinetic condition of the

  14. PV cells electrical parameters measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibira, Gabriel

    2017-12-01

    When measuring optical parameters of a photovoltaic silicon cell, precise results bring good electrical parameters estimation, applying well-known physical-mathematical models. Nevertheless, considerable re-combination phenomena might occur in both surface and intrinsic thin layers within novel materials. Moreover, rear contact surface parameters may influence close-area re-combination phenomena, too. Therefore, the only precise electrical measurement approach is to prove assumed cell electrical parameters. Based on theoretical approach with respect to experiments, this paper analyses problems within measurement procedures and equipment used for electrical parameters acquisition within a photovoltaic silicon cell, as a case study. Statistical appraisal quality is contributed.

  15. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  16. Applied Survey Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Edward; Blair, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Written for students and researchers who wish to understand the conceptual and practical aspects of sampling, this book is designed to be accessible without requiring advanced statistical training. It covers a wide range of topics, from the basics of sampling to special topics such as sampling rare populations, sampling organizational populations,…

  17. Calculating background levels for ecological risk parameters in toxic harbor sediment

    Leadon, C.J.; McDonnell, T.R.; Lear, J.; Barclift, D.

    2007-01-01

    Establishing background levels for biological parameters is necessary in assessing the ecological risks from harbor sediment contaminated with toxic chemicals. For chemicals in sediment, the term contaminated is defined as having concentrations above background and significant human health or ecological risk levels. For biological parameters, a site could be considered contaminated if levels of the parameter are either more or less than the background level, depending on the specific parameter. Biological parameters can include tissue chemical concentrations in ecological receptors, bioassay responses, bioaccumulation levels, and benthic community metrics. Chemical parameters can include sediment concentrations of a variety of potentially toxic chemicals. Indirectly, contaminated harbor sediment can impact shellfish, fish, birds, and marine mammals, and human populations. This paper summarizes the methods used to define background levels for chemical and biological parameters from a survey of ecological risk investigations of marine harbor sediment at California Navy bases. Background levels for regional biological indices used to quantify ecological risks for benthic communities are also described. Generally, background stations are positioned in relatively clean areas exhibiting the same physical and general chemical characteristics as nearby areas with contaminated harbor sediment. The number of background stations and the number of sample replicates per background station depend on the statistical design of the sediment ecological risk investigation, developed through the data quality objective (DQO) process. Biological data from the background stations can be compared to data from a contaminated site by using minimum or maximum background levels or comparative statistics. In Navy ecological risk assessments (ERA's), calculated background levels and appropriate ecological risk screening criteria are used to identify sampling stations and sites with contaminated

  18. Dynamic Analyses Including Joints Of Truss Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    1991-01-01

    Method for mathematically modeling joints to assess influences of joints on dynamic response of truss structures developed in study. Only structures with low-frequency oscillations considered; only Coulomb friction and viscous damping included in analysis. Focus of effort to obtain finite-element mathematical models of joints exhibiting load-vs.-deflection behavior similar to measured load-vs.-deflection behavior of real joints. Experiments performed to determine stiffness and damping nonlinearities typical of joint hardware. Algorithm for computing coefficients of analytical joint models based on test data developed to enable study of linear and nonlinear effects of joints on global structural response. Besides intended application to large space structures, applications in nonaerospace community include ground-based antennas and earthquake-resistant steel-framed buildings.

  19. Combustor arrangement including flow control vanes

    SciT

    Rodriguez, Jose L.

    A combustor assembly (17) including guide vanes (44) located between an inner cylinder (24) and a flow sleeve (25). Each guide vane (44) includes a circumferentially angled flow directing portion (60) adjacent to a leading edge (46). The leading edge (46) of at least one guide vane (44) can be located radially inward along the longitudinal axis (54) relative to the leading edge (46) of at least one other of the guide vanes (44). The length of the guide vanes (44) may vary, and the circumferential spacing between a first pair of the guide vanes (44) can be different frommore » a spacing between a second pair of the guide vanes (44).« less

  20. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    SciT

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths,more » increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.« less

  1. Helicopter gust response characteristics including unsteady aerodynamic stall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcidiacono, P. J.; Bergquist, R. R.; Alexander, W. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The results of an analytical study to evaluate the general response characteristics of a helicopter subjected to various types of discrete gust encounters are presented. The analysis employed was a nonlinear coupled, multi-blade rotorfuselage analysis including the effects of blade flexibility and unsteady aerodynamic stall. Only the controls-fixed response of the basic aircraft without any aircraft stability augmentation was considered. A discussion of the basic differences between gust sensitivity of fixed and rotary wing aircraft is presented. The effects of several rotor configuration and aircraft operating parameters on initial gust-induced load factor and blade vibratory stress and pushrod loads are discussed.

  2. Ground state of a confined Yukawa plasma including correlation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, C.; Ludwig, P.; Filinov, A.; Piel, A.; Bonitz, M.

    2007-09-01

    The ground state of an externally confined one-component Yukawa plasma is derived analytically using the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, the radial density profile is computed. The results are compared with the recently obtained mean-field (MF) density profile [Henning , Phys. Rev. E 74, 056403 (2006)]. While the MF results are more accurate for weak screening, the LDA with correlations included yields the proper description for large screening. By comparison with first-principles simulations for three-dimensional spherical Yukawa crystals, we demonstrate that the two approximations complement each other. Together they accurately describe the density profile in the full range of screening parameters.

  3. Temporary agency contracts: what should they include?

    PubMed

    Sferrella, Sheila M

    2002-01-01

    The AHRA Board committed to provide some tools to help our members with agency contracts. This article provides the sections for a contract and what they should include. Of course, the language will have to comply with your organization's requirements. To comply with HIPAA regulations for contracts, I've also included language for business associates. JCAHO requires that the following documentation be on file for all contracted personnel: 1. Hospital job description or formal contract outlining the job responsibilities. 2. All licenses, certifications and registrations are reviewed and a process is developed to ensure that they remain current. 3. Competency is evaluated and maintained. 4. Evidence that personnel received a general orientation. 5. Evidence that personnel received a departmental orientation. 6. Safety and infection control standards must be met. In order to aid with compliance when utilizing contracted personnel, my organization developed a Contractor Personnel Administrative Compliance Checklist, which identifies requirements for compliance, a reference for assistance, and places to record that the requirement has been met for each of the areas listed in the previous item. Our standard contract includes sections on general definition of engagement, credentials and work experience; health, including immunization and drug testing; corporation; JCAHO; terms of the contract; and, non-disclosure of information. A business associate agreement may be necessary to comply with HIPAA regulations. Using the template has made my job much easier than trying to read each contract that crosses my desk. If an agency refuses to sign our contract, then we do not conduct business with that company. If an agency requests changes to the contract, depending on the language, we may or may not agree to it. This information is not intended to be legal advice, but rather an educational overview. As with any contract, the reader should consult with legal counsel at his or her

  4. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  5. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  6. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  7. Petroleum supply monthly, April 1991. [Glossary included

    SciT

    Not Available

    1991-04-29

    Data presented in the PSM (Petroleum Supply Monthly) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in Primary Supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated,more » the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 14 figs., 65 tabs.« less

  8. The use of Landsat for monitoring water parameters in the coastal zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, D. E.; Witte, W. G.

    1977-01-01

    Landsats 1 and 2 have been successful in detecting and quantifying suspended sediment and several other important parameters in the coastal zone, including chlorophyll, particles, alpha (light transmission), tidal conditions, acid and sewage dumps, and in some instances oil spills. When chlorophyll a is present in detectable quantities, however, it is shown to interfere with the measurement of sediment. The Landsat banding problem impairs the instrument resolution and places a requirement on the sampling program to collect surface data from a sufficiently large area. A sampling method which satisfies this condition is demonstrated.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fundamental parameters of Kepler stars (Silva Aguirre+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Aguirre, V.; Davies, G. R.; Basu, S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Creevey, O.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Bedding, T. R.; Casagrande, L.; Handberg, R.; Lund, M. N.; Nissen, P. E.; Chaplin, W. J.; Huber, D.; Serenelli, A. M.; Stello, D.; van Eylen, V.; Campante, T. L.; Elsworth, Y.; Gilliland, R. L.; Hekker, S.; Karoff, C.; Kawaler, S. D.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    Our sample has been extracted from the 77 exoplanet host stars presented in Huber et al. (2013, Cat. J/ApJ/767/127). We have made use of the full time-base of observations from the Kepler satellite to uniformly determine precise fundamental stellar parameters, including ages, for a sample of exoplanet host stars where high-quality asteroseismic data were available. We devised a Bayesian procedure flexible in its input and applied it to different grids of models to study systematics from input physics and extract statistically robust properties for all stars. (4 data files).

  10. Extracting galactic structure parameters from multivariated density estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.; Creze, M.; Robin, A.; Bienayme, O.

    1992-01-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis, including includes cluster analysis (unsupervised classification), discriminant analysis (supervised classification) and principle component analysis (dimensionlity reduction method), and nonparameter density estimation have been successfully used to search for meaningful associations in the 5-dimensional space of observables between observed points and the sets of simulated points generated from a synthetic approach of galaxy modelling. These methodologies can be applied as the new tools to obtain information about hidden structure otherwise unrecognizable, and place important constraints on the space distribution of various stellar populations in the Milky Way. In this paper, we concentrate on illustrating how to use nonparameter density estimation to substitute for the true densities in both of the simulating sample and real sample in the five-dimensional space. In order to fit model predicted densities to reality, we derive a set of equations which include n lines (where n is the total number of observed points) and m (where m: the numbers of predefined groups) unknown parameters. A least-square estimation will allow us to determine the density law of different groups and components in the Galaxy. The output from our software, which can be used in many research fields, will also give out the systematic error between the model and the observation by a Bayes rule.

  11. ADVANCES IN GROUND WATER SAMPLING PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining representative ground water samples is important for site assessment and remedial performance monitoring objectives. Issues which must be considered prior to initiating a ground-water monitoring program include defining monitoring goals and objectives, sampling point...

  12. Practice Parameter for Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medicus, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This Practice Parameter describes the principles of psychodynamic psychotherapy with children and is based on clinical consensus and available research evidence. It presents guidelines for the practice of child psychodynamic psychotherapy, including indications and contraindications, the setting, verbal and interactive (play) techniques, work with…

  13. Models and parameters for environmental radiological assessments

    SciT

    Miller, C W

    1984-01-01

    This book presents a unified compilation of models and parameters appropriate for assessing the impact of radioactive discharges to the environment. Models examined include those developed for the prediction of atmospheric and hydrologic transport and deposition, for terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and for internal and external dosimetry. Chapters have been entered separately into the data base. (ACR)

  14. [Renal patient's diet: Can fish be included?].

    PubMed

    Castro González, M I; Maafs Rodríguez, A G; Galindo Gómez, C

    2012-01-01

    Medical and nutritional treatment for renal disease, now a major public health issue, is highly complicated. Nutritional therapy must seek to retard renal dysfunction, maintain an optimal nutritional status and prevent the development of underlying pathologies. To analyze ten fish species to identify those that, because of their low phosphorus content, high biological value protein and elevated n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, could be included in renal patient's diet. The following fish species (Litte tunny, Red drum, Spotted eagleray, Escolar, Swordfish, Big-scale pomfret, Cortez flounder, Largemouth blackbass, Periche mojarra, Florida Pompano) were analyzed according to the AOAC and Keller techniques to determine their protein, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, cholesterol, vitamins D(3) and E, and n-3 EPA+DHA content. These results were used to calculate relations between nutrients. The protein in the analyzed species ranged from 16.5 g/100 g of fillet (Largemouth black bass) to 27.2 g/100 g (Red drum); the lowest phosphorus value was 28.6 mg/100 g (Periche mojarra) and the highest 216.3 mg/100 g (Spotted eagle ray). 80% of the fish presented > 100 mg EPA + DHA in 100 g of fillet. By its Phosphorus/gProtein ratio, Escolar and Swordfish could not be included in the renal diet; Little tunny, Escolar, Big-scale pomfret, Largemouth black-bass, Periche mojarra and Florida Pompano presented a lower Phosphorus/EPA + DHA ratio. Florida pompano is the most recommended specie for renal patients, due to its optimal nutrient relations. However, all analyzed species, except Escolar and Swordfish, could be included in renal diets.

  15. Fuel delivery system including heat exchanger means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel delivery system is presented wherein first and second heat exchanger means are each adapted to provide the transfer of heat between the fuel and a second fluid such as lubricating oil associated with the gas turbine engine. Valve means are included which are operative in a first mode to provide for flow of the second fluid through both first and second heat exchange means and further operative in a second mode for bypassing the second fluid around the second heat exchanger means.

  16. Ocean management plan includes array of recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    When U.S. President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore appeared in Monterey, California in June 1998 for a National Oceans Conference, some of the salt water spray from the Pacific Ocean must have clung to