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Sample records for parametric image formation

  1. Cosmic star formation probed via parametric stack-fitting of known sources to radio imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Best, P. N.

    2014-04-01

    The promise of multiwavelength astronomy has been tempered by the large disparity in sensitivity and resolution between different wavelength regimes. Here, we present a statistical approach which attempts to overcome this by fitting parametric models directly to image data. Specifically, we fit a model for the radio luminosity function (LF) of star-forming galaxies to pixel intensity distributions at 1.4 GHz coincident with near-IR selected sources in COSMOS. Taking a mass-limited sample in redshift bins across the range 0 < z < 4, we are able to fit the radio LF with ˜0.2 dex precision in the key parameters (e.g. Φ*,L*). Good agreement is seen between our results and those using standard methods at radio and other wavelengths. Integrating our LFs to get the star formation rate density, we find that galaxies with M* > 109.5 M⊙ contribute ≳50 per cent of cosmic star formation at 0 < z < 4. The scalability of our approach is empirically estimated, with the precision in LF parameter estimates found to scale with the number of sources in the stack, Ns, as ∝ √{N_s}. This type of approach will be invaluable in the multiwavelength analysis of upcoming surveys with the Square Kilometre Array pathfinder facilities: LOFAR, ASKAP and MeerKAT.

  2. Non-parametric partitioning of SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delyon, G.; Galland, F.; Réfrégier, Ph.

    2006-09-01

    We describe and analyse a generalization of a parametric segmentation technique adapted to Gamma distributed SAR images to a simple non parametric noise model. The partition is obtained by minimizing the stochastic complexity of a quantized version on Q levels of the SAR image and lead to a criterion without parameters to be tuned by the user. We analyse the reliability of the proposed approach on synthetic images. The quality of the obtained partition will be studied for different possible strategies. In particular, one will discuss the reliability of the proposed optimization procedure. Finally, we will precisely study the performance of the proposed approach in comparison with the statistical parametric technique adapted to Gamma noise. These studies will be led by analyzing the number of misclassified pixels, the standard Hausdorff distance and the number of estimated regions.

  3. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats.

  4. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats. PMID:24338090

  5. THz-wave parametric sources and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Kodo

    2004-12-01

    We have studied the generation of terahertz (THz) waves by optical parametric processes based on laser light scattering from the polariton mode of nonlinear crystals. Using parametric oscillation of MgO-doped LiNbO3 crystal pumped by a nano-second Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, we have realized a widely tunable coherent THz-wave sources with a simple configuration. We have also developed a novel basic technology for THz imaging, which allows detection and identification of chemicals by introducing the component spatial pattern analysis. The spatial distributions of the chemicals were obtained from terahertz multispectral trasillumination images, using absorption spectra previously measured with a widely tunable THz-wave parametric oscillator. Further we have applied this technique to the detection and identification of illicit drugs concealed in envelopes. The samples we used were methamphetamine and MDMA, two of the most widely consumed illegal drugs in Japan, and aspirin as a reference.

  6. Sparse Image Format

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. Itmore » supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.« less

  7. Sparse Image Format

    SciTech Connect

    Eads, Damian Ryan

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. It supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.

  8. Quantum processing of images by continuous wave optical parametric amplification.

    PubMed

    Lopez, L; Treps, N; Chalopin, B; Fabre, C; Maître, A

    2008-01-11

    We have experimentally shown that a degenerate optical parametric oscillator pumped by a cw laser, inserted in a cavity having degenerate transverse modes such as a hemiconfocal or confocal cavity, and operating below the oscillation threshold in the regime of phase sensitive amplification, is able to process input images of various shapes in the quantum regime. More precisely, when deamplified, the image is amplitude squeezed; when amplified, its two polarization components are intensity correlated at the quantum level. In addition, the amplification process of the images is shown to take place in the noiseless regime.

  9. THz-wave parametric source and its imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Kodo

    2004-08-01

    Widely tunable coherent terahertz (THz) wave generation has been demonstrated based on the parametric oscillation using MgO doped LiNbO3 crystal pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. This method exhibits multiple advantages like wide tunability, coherency and compactness of its system. We have developed a novel basic technology for terahertz (THz) imaging, which allows detection and identification of chemicals by introducing the component spatial pattern analysis. The spatial distributions of the chemicals were obtained from terahertz multispectral transillumination images, using absorption spectra previously measured with a widely tunable THz-wave parametric oscillator. Further we have applied this technique to the detection and identification of illicit drugs concealed in envelopes. The samples we used were methamphetamine and MDMA, two of the most widely consumed illegal drugs in Japan, and aspirin as a reference.

  10. Parametric imaging of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    A new image processing strategy is detailed for the simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. A technique for locally mapping tumor perfusion parameters using skeletonized neovascular data is also introduced. Simulated images were used to test the neovascular skeletonization technique and variance (error) of relevant parametric estimates. Preliminary DCE-US image datasets were collected in 6 female patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 MHz transducer and Definity contrast agent. Simulation data demonstrates that neovascular morphology parametric estimation is reproducible albeit measurement error can occur at a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Experimental results indicate the feasibility of our approach to performing both tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology measurements from DCE-US images. Future work will expand on our initial clinical findings and also extent our image processing strategy to 3-dimensional space to allow whole tumor characterization.

  11. Alternative Parametric Boundary Reconstruction Method for Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kolibal, Joseph; Howard, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Determining the outline or boundary contour of a two-dimensional object, or the surface of a three-dimensional object poses difficulties particularly when there is substantial measurement noise or uncertainty. By adapting the mathematical approach of stochastic function recovery to this task, it is possible to obtain usable estimates for these boundaries, even in the presence of large amounts of noise. The technique is applied to parametric boundary data and has potential applications in biomedical imaging. It should be considered as one of several techniques to improve the visualization of images. PMID:18464920

  12. A parametric vocal fold model based on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a parametric three-dimensional body-cover vocal fold model based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the human larynx. Major geometric features that are observed in the MRI images but missing in current vocal fold models are discussed, and their influence on vocal fold vibration is evaluated using eigenmode analysis. Proper boundary conditions for the model are also discussed. Based on control parameters corresponding to anatomic landmarks that can be easily measured, this model can be adapted toward a subject-specific vocal fold model for voice production research and clinical applications. PMID:27586774

  13. Thermal parametric imaging in the evaluation of skin burn depth.

    PubMed

    Rumiński, Jacek; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Renkielska, Alicja; Nowakowski, Antoni

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the extent to which infrared (IR) thermal imaging may be used for skin burn depth evaluation. The analysis can be made on the basis of the development of a thermal model of the burned skin. Different methods such as the traditional clinical visual approach and the IR imaging modalities of static IR thermal imaging, active IR thermal imaging and active-dynamic IR thermal imaging (ADT) are analyzed from the point of view of skin burn depth diagnostics. In ADT, a new approach is proposed on the basis of parametric image synthesis. Calculation software is implemented for single-node and distributed systems. The properties of all the methods are verified in experiments using phantoms and subsequently in vivo with animals with a reference histopathological examination. The results indicate that it is possible to distinguish objectively and quantitatively burns which will heal spontaneously within three weeks of infliction and which should be treated conservatively from those which need surgery because they will not heal within this period. PMID:17278587

  14. A parametric estimation approach to instantaneous spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Oktem, Figen S; Kamalabadi, Farzad; Davila, Joseph M

    2014-12-01

    Spectral imaging, the simultaneous imaging and spectroscopy of a radiating scene, is a fundamental diagnostic technique in the physical sciences with widespread application. Due to the intrinsic limitation of two-dimensional (2D) detectors in capturing inherently three-dimensional (3D) data, spectral imaging techniques conventionally rely on a spatial or spectral scanning process, which renders them unsuitable for dynamic scenes. In this paper, we present a nonscanning (instantaneous) spectral imaging technique that estimates the physical parameters of interest by combining measurements with a parametric model and solving the resultant inverse problem computationally. The associated inverse problem, which can be viewed as a multiframe semiblind deblurring problem (with shift-variant blur), is formulated as a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation problem since in many such experiments prior statistical knowledge of the physical parameters can be well estimated. Subsequently, an efficient dynamic programming algorithm is developed to find the global optimum of the nonconvex MAP problem. Finally, the algorithm and the effectiveness of the spectral imaging technique are illustrated for an application in solar spectral imaging. Numerical simulation results indicate that the physical parameters can be estimated with the same order of accuracy as state-of-the-art slit spectroscopy but with the added benefit of an instantaneous, 2D field-of-view. This technique will be particularly useful for studying the spectra of dynamic scenes encountered in space remote sensing. PMID:25347878

  15. Wavelet image coding with parametric thresholding: application to JPEG2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, Azza O.; Olivier, Christian; Marmoiton, Francois

    2003-05-01

    With the increasing use of multimedia technologies, image compression requires higher performance as well as new features. To address this need in the specific area of image coding, the latest ISO/IEC image compression standard, JPEG2000, has been developed. In part II of the standard, the Wavelet Trellis Coded Quantization (WTCQ) algorithm was adopted. It has been proved that this quantization design provides subjective image quality superior to other existing quantization techniques. In this paper we are aiming to improve the rate-distortion performance of WTCQ, by incorporating a thresholding process in JPEG2000 coding chain. The threshold decisions are derived in a Bayesian framework, and the prior used on the wavelet coefficients is the generalized Gaussian distribution (GGD). The threshold value depends on the parametric model estimation of the subband wavelet coefficient distribution. Our algorithm approaches the lowest possible memory usage by using line-based wavelet transform and a scan-based bit allocation technique. In our work, we investigate an efficient way to apply the TCQ to wavelet image coding with regard to both the computational complexity and the compression performance. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm performs competitively with the best available coding algorithms reported in the literature in terms quality performance.

  16. SPM analysis of parametric (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding images: plasma input versus reference tissue parametric methods.

    PubMed

    Schuitemaker, Alie; van Berckel, Bart N M; Kropholler, Marc A; Veltman, Dick J; Scheltens, Philip; Jonker, Cees; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2007-05-01

    (R)-[11C]PK11195 has been used for quantifying cerebral microglial activation in vivo. In previous studies, both plasma input and reference tissue methods have been used, usually in combination with a region of interest (ROI) approach. Definition of ROIs, however, can be labourious and prone to interobserver variation. In addition, results are only obtained for predefined areas and (unexpected) signals in undefined areas may be missed. On the other hand, standard pharmacokinetic models are too sensitive to noise to calculate (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Linearised versions of both plasma input and reference tissue models have been described, and these are more suitable for parametric imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of these plasma input and reference tissue parametric methods on the outcome of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding. Dynamic (R)-[11C]PK11195 PET scans with arterial blood sampling were performed in 7 younger and 11 elderly healthy subjects. Parametric images of volume of distribution (Vd) and binding potential (BP) were generated using linearised versions of plasma input (Logan) and reference tissue (Reference Parametric Mapping) models. Images were compared at the group level using SPM with a two-sample t-test per voxel, both with and without proportional scaling. Parametric BP images without scaling provided the most sensitive framework for determining differences in (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding between younger and elderly subjects. Vd images could only demonstrate differences in (R)-[11C]PK11195 binding when analysed with proportional scaling due to intersubject variation in K1/k2 (blood-brain barrier transport and non-specific binding).

  17. A non-parametric segmentation methodology for oral videocapillaroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Fabio; Cacioppo, Antonino; Lupaşcu, Carmen Alina; Messina, Pietro; Scardina, Giuseppe; Tegolo, Domenico; Valenti, Cesare

    2014-05-01

    We aim to describe a new non-parametric methodology to support the clinician during the diagnostic process of oral videocapillaroscopy to evaluate peripheral microcirculation. Our methodology, mainly based on wavelet analysis and mathematical morphology to preprocess the images, segments them by minimizing the within-class luminosity variance of both capillaries and background. Experiments were carried out on a set of real microphotographs to validate this approach versus handmade segmentations provided by physicians. By using a leave-one-patient-out approach, we pointed out that our methodology is robust, according to precision-recall criteria (average precision and recall are equal to 0.924 and 0.923, respectively) and it acts as a physician in terms of the Jaccard index (mean and standard deviation equal to 0.858 and 0.064, respectively). PMID:24657094

  18. A non-parametric segmentation methodology for oral videocapillaroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Fabio; Cacioppo, Antonino; Lupaşcu, Carmen Alina; Messina, Pietro; Scardina, Giuseppe; Tegolo, Domenico; Valenti, Cesare

    2014-05-01

    We aim to describe a new non-parametric methodology to support the clinician during the diagnostic process of oral videocapillaroscopy to evaluate peripheral microcirculation. Our methodology, mainly based on wavelet analysis and mathematical morphology to preprocess the images, segments them by minimizing the within-class luminosity variance of both capillaries and background. Experiments were carried out on a set of real microphotographs to validate this approach versus handmade segmentations provided by physicians. By using a leave-one-patient-out approach, we pointed out that our methodology is robust, according to precision-recall criteria (average precision and recall are equal to 0.924 and 0.923, respectively) and it acts as a physician in terms of the Jaccard index (mean and standard deviation equal to 0.858 and 0.064, respectively).

  19. Large Format Radiographic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. Rohrer; Lacey Stewart; M. D. Wilke; N. S. King; S. A Baker; Wilfred Lewis

    1999-08-01

    Radiographic imaging continues to be a key diagnostic in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiographic recording systems have taken on many form, from high repetition-rate, gated systems to film recording and storage phosphors. Some systems are designed for synchronization to an accelerator while others may be single shot or may record a frame sequence in a dynamic radiography experiment. While film recording remains a reliable standby in the radiographic community, there is growing interest in investigating electronic recording for many applications. The advantages of real time access to remote data acquisition are highly attractive. Cooled CCD camera systems are capable of providing greater sensitivity with improved signal-to-noise ratio. This paper begins with a review of performance characteristics of the Bechtel Nevada large format imaging system, a gated system capable of viewing scintillators up to 300 mm in diameter. We then examine configuration alternatives in lens coupled and fiber optically coupled electro-optical recording systems. Areas of investigation include tradeoffs between fiber optic and lens coupling, methods of image magnification, and spectral matching from scintillator to CCD camera. Key performance features discussed include field of view, resolution, sensitivity, dynamic range, and system noise characteristics.

  20. A Parametric Approach to Spectral-Spatial EPR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Som, Subhojit; Potter, Lee C.; Ahmad, Rizwan; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2007-01-01

    Continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging for in vivo mapping of spin distribution and spectral shape requires rapid data acquisition. A spectral-spatial imaging technique is presented that provides an order of magnitude reduction in acquisition time, compared to iterative tomographic reprojection. The proposed approach assumes that spectral shapes in the sample are well-approximated by members from a parametric family of functions. A model is developed for the spectra measured with magnetic field modulation. Parameters defining the spin distribution and spectral shapes are then determined directly from the measurements using maximum a posteriori probability estimation. The approach does not suffer approximation error from limited sweep width of the main magnetic field and explicitly incorporates the variability in signal-to-noise ratio versus strength of magnetic field gradient. The processing technique is experimentally demonstrated on a one- dimensional phantom containing a nitroxide spin label with constant g-factor. Using an L-band EPR spectrometer, spectral shapes and spin distribution are accurately recovered from two projections and a spectral window which is comparable to the maximum linewidth of the sample. PMID:17276111

  1. Study of Vertical Sound Image Control Using Parametric Loudspeakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Itou, Kouki; Aoki, Shigeaki

    A parametric loudspeaker is known as a super-directivity loudspeaker. So far, the applications have been limited monaural reproduction sound system. We had discussed characteristics of stereo reproduction with two parametric loudspeakers. In this paper, the sound localization in the vertical direction using the parametric loudspeakers was confirmed. The direction of sound localization was able to be controlled. The results were similar as in using ordinary loudspeakers. However, by setting the parametric loudspeaker 5 degrees rightward, the direction of sound localization moved about 20 degrees rightward. The measured ILD (Interaural Level Difference) using a dummy head were analyzed.

  2. Diffeomorphic demons: efficient non-parametric image registration.

    PubMed

    Vercauteren, Tom; Pennec, Xavier; Perchant, Aymeric; Ayache, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    We propose an efficient non-parametric diffeomorphic image registration algorithm based on Thirion's demons algorithm. In the first part of this paper, we show that Thirion's demons algorithm can be seen as an optimization procedure on the entire space of displacement fields. We provide strong theoretical roots to the different variants of Thirion's demons algorithm. This analysis predicts a theoretical advantage for the symmetric forces variant of the demons algorithm. We show on controlled experiments that this advantage is confirmed in practice and yields a faster convergence. In the second part of this paper, we adapt the optimization procedure underlying the demons algorithm to a space of diffeomorphic transformations. In contrast to many diffeomorphic registration algorithms, our solution is computationally efficient since in practice it only replaces an addition of displacement fields by a few compositions. Our experiments show that in addition to being diffeomorphic, our algorithm provides results that are similar to the ones from the demons algorithm but with transformations that are much smoother and closer to the gold standard, available in controlled experiments, in terms of Jacobians. PMID:19041946

  3. Acceleration of the direct reconstruction of linear parametric images using nested algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2010-03-01

    Parametric imaging using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) provides important information for biological research and clinical diagnosis. Indirect and direct methods have been developed for reconstructing linear parametric images from dynamic PET data. Indirect methods are relatively simple and easy to implement because the image reconstruction and kinetic modeling are performed in two separate steps. Direct methods estimate parametric images directly from raw PET data and are statistically more efficient. However, the convergence rate of direct algorithms can be slow due to the coupling between the reconstruction and kinetic modeling. Here we present two fast gradient-type algorithms for direct reconstruction of linear parametric images. The new algorithms decouple the reconstruction and linear parametric modeling at each iteration by employing the principle of optimization transfer. Convergence speed is accelerated by running more sub-iterations of linear parametric estimation because the computation cost of the linear parametric modeling is much less than that of the image reconstruction. Computer simulation studies demonstrated that the new algorithms converge much faster than the traditional expectation maximization (EM) and the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithms for dynamic PET.

  4. The KEA image file format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunting, Peter; Gillingham, Sam

    2013-08-01

    There are a large number of image formats already in use within the remote sensing community but currently there is no format that provides the features of: compression, support for large file sizes, ground control points, raster attribute tables and inbuilt image pyramids. Therefore, a new image format, named KEA, after the New Zealand bird, has been proposed. The KEA format provides a full implementation of the GDAL data model and is implemented within a HDF5 file. A software library with a GDAL driver have been freely provided to the community allowing use through any GDAL based software. The new format has comparable performance with existing formats while producing smaller file sizes and is already within active use for a number of projects within Landcare Research, New Zealand, and the wider community.

  5. Dissipative parametric modulation instability and pattern formation in nonlinear optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A. M.; Tarasov, N.; Churkin, D. V.; Turitsyn, S. K.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-04-01

    We present the essential features of the dissipative parametric instability, in the universal complex Ginzburg- Landau equation. Dissipative parametric instability is excited through a parametric modulation of frequency dependent losses in a zig-zag fashion in the spectral domain. Such damping is introduced respectively for spectral components in the +ΔF and in the -ΔF region in alternating fashion, where F can represent wavenumber or temporal frequency depending on the applications. Such a spectral modulation can destabilize the homogeneous stationary solution of the system leading to growth of spectral sidebands and to the consequent pattern formation: both stable and unstable patterns in one- and in two-dimensional systems can be excited. The dissipative parametric instability provides an useful and interesting tool for the control of pattern formation in nonlinear optical systems with potentially interesting applications in technological applications, like the design of mode- locked lasers emitting pulse trains with tunable repetition rate; but it could also find realizations in nanophotonics circuits or in dissipative polaritonic Bose-Einstein condensates.

  6. Image-rotating, 4-mirror, ring optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Arlee V.; Armstrong, Darrell J.

    2004-08-10

    A device for optical parametric amplification utilizing four mirrors oriented in a nonplanar configuration where the optical plane formed by two of the mirrors is orthogonal to the optical plane formed by the other two mirrors and with the ratio of lengths of the laser beam paths approximately constant regardless of the scale of the device. With a cavity length of less than approximately 110 mm, a conversion efficiency of greater than 45% can be achieved.

  7. Non-parametric PSF estimation from celestial transit solar images using blind deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Adriana; Delouille, Véronique; Jacques, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Context: Characterization of instrumental effects in astronomical imaging is important in order to extract accurate physical information from the observations. The measured image in a real optical instrument is usually represented by the convolution of an ideal image with a Point Spread Function (PSF). Additionally, the image acquisition process is also contaminated by other sources of noise (read-out, photon-counting). The problem of estimating both the PSF and a denoised image is called blind deconvolution and is ill-posed. Aims: We propose a blind deconvolution scheme that relies on image regularization. Contrarily to most methods presented in the literature, our method does not assume a parametric model of the PSF and can thus be applied to any telescope. Methods: Our scheme uses a wavelet analysis prior model on the image and weak assumptions on the PSF. We use observations from a celestial transit, where the occulting body can be assumed to be a black disk. These constraints allow us to retain meaningful solutions for the filter and the image, eliminating trivial, translated, and interchanged solutions. Under an additive Gaussian noise assumption, they also enforce noise canceling and avoid reconstruction artifacts by promoting the whiteness of the residual between the blurred observations and the cleaned data. Results: Our method is applied to synthetic and experimental data. The PSF is estimated for the SECCHI/EUVI instrument using the 2007 Lunar transit, and for SDO/AIA using the 2012 Venus transit. Results show that the proposed non-parametric blind deconvolution method is able to estimate the core of the PSF with a similar quality to parametric methods proposed in the literature. We also show that, if these parametric estimations are incorporated in the acquisition model, the resulting PSF outperforms both the parametric and non-parametric methods.

  8. Hybrid MEG (Magnetoencephalography) source characterization by cortical remapping and imaging of parametric source models

    SciTech Connect

    Baillet, S.; Mosher, J. C.; Jerbi, K.; Leahy, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Reliable estimation of the local spatial extent of neural activity is a key to the quantitative analysis of MEG sources across subjects and conditions. In association with an understanding of the temporal dynamics among multiple areas, this would represent a major advance in electrophysiological source imaging. Parametric current dipole approaches to MEG (and EEG) source localization can rapidly generate a physical model of neural current generators using a limited number of parameters. However, physiological interpretation of these models is often difficult, especially in terms of the spatial extent of the true cortical activity. In new approaches using multipolar source models [3, 5], similar problems remain in the analysis of the higher-order source moments as parameters of cortical extent. Image-based approaches to the inverse problem provide a direct estimate of cortical current generators, but computationally expensive nonlinear methods are required to produce focal sources [1,4]. Recent efforts describe how a cortical patch can be grown until a best fit to the data is reached in the least-squares sense [6], but computational considerations necessitate that the growth be seeded in predefined regions of interest. In a previous study [2], a source obtained using a parametric model was remapped onto the cortex by growing a patch of cortical dipoles in the vicinity of the parametric source until the forward MEG or EEG fields of the parametric and cortical sources matched. The source models were dipoles and first-order multipoles. We propose to combine the parametric and imaging methods for MEG source characterization to take advantage of (i) the parsimonious and computationally efficient nature of parametric source localization methods and (ii) the anatomical and physiological consistency of imaging techniques that use relevant a priori information. By performing the cortical remapping imaging step by matching the multipole expansions of the original parametric

  9. Theory of Remote Image Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blahut, Richard E.

    2004-11-01

    In many applications, images, such as ultrasonic or X-ray signals, are recorded and then analyzed with digital or optical processors in order to extract information. Such processing requires the development of algorithms of great precision and sophistication. This book presents a unified treatment of the mathematical methods that underpin the various algorithms used in remote image formation. The author begins with a review of transform and filter theory. He then discusses two- and three-dimensional Fourier transform theory, the ambiguity function, image construction and reconstruction, tomography, baseband surveillance systems, and passive systems (where the signal source might be an earthquake or a galaxy). Information-theoretic methods in image formation are also covered, as are phase errors and phase noise. Throughout the book, practical applications illustrate theoretical concepts, and there are many homework problems. The book is aimed at graduate students of electrical engineering and computer science, and practitioners in industry. Presents a unified treatment of the mathematical methods that underpin the algorithms used in remote image formation Illustrates theoretical concepts with reference to practical applications Provides insights into the design parameters of real systems

  10. Sensitivity evaluation of DSA-based parametric imaging using Doppler ultrasound in neurovascular phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramoniam, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C. N.

    2016-03-01

    An evaluation of the relation between parametric imaging results obtained from Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) images and blood-flow velocity measured using Doppler ultrasound in patient-specific neurovascular phantoms is provided. A silicone neurovascular phantom containing internal carotid artery, middle cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery was embedded in a tissue equivalent gel. The gel prevented movement of the vessels when blood mimicking fluid was pumped through it to obtain Colour Doppler images. The phantom was connected to a peristaltic pump, simulating physiological flow conditions. To obtain the parametric images, water was pumped through the phantom at various flow rates (100, 120 and 160 ml/min) and 10 ml contrast boluses were injected. DSA images were obtained at 10 frames/sec from the Toshiba C-arm and DSA image sequences were input into LabVIEW software to get parametric maps from time-density curves. The parametric maps were compared with velocities determined by Doppler ultrasound at the internal carotid artery. The velocities measured by the Doppler ultrasound were 38, 48 and 65 cm/s for flow rates of 100, 120 and 160 ml/min, respectively. For the 20% increase in flow rate, the percentage change of blood velocity measured by Doppler ultrasound was 26.3%. Correspondingly, there was a 20% decrease of Bolus Arrival Time (BAT) and 14.3% decrease of Mean Transit Time (MTT), showing strong inverse correlation with Doppler measured velocity. The parametric imaging parameters are quite sensitive to velocity changes and are well correlated to the velocities measured by Doppler ultrasound.

  11. Selecting a separable parametric spatiotemporal covariance structure for longitudinal imaging data.

    PubMed

    George, Brandon; Aban, Inmaculada

    2015-01-15

    Longitudinal imaging studies allow great insight into how the structure and function of a subject's internal anatomy changes over time. Unfortunately, the analysis of longitudinal imaging data is complicated by inherent spatial and temporal correlation: the temporal from the repeated measures and the spatial from the outcomes of interest being observed at multiple points in a patient's body. We propose the use of a linear model with a separable parametric spatiotemporal error structure for the analysis of repeated imaging data. The model makes use of spatial (exponential, spherical, and Matérn) and temporal (compound symmetric, autoregressive-1, Toeplitz, and unstructured) parametric correlation functions. A simulation study, inspired by a longitudinal cardiac imaging study on mitral regurgitation patients, compared different information criteria for selecting a particular separable parametric spatiotemporal correlation structure as well as the effects on types I and II error rates for inference on fixed effects when the specified model is incorrect. Information criteria were found to be highly accurate at choosing between separable parametric spatiotemporal correlation structures. Misspecification of the covariance structure was found to have the ability to inflate the type I error or have an overly conservative test size, which corresponded to decreased power. An example with clinical data is given illustrating how the covariance structure procedure can be performed in practice, as well as how covariance structure choice can change inferences about fixed effects.

  12. Selecting a Separable Parametric Spatiotemporal Covariance Structure for Longitudinal Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    George, Brandon; Aban, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies allow great insight into how the structure and function of a subject’s internal anatomy changes over time. Unfortunately, the analysis of longitudinal imaging data is complicated by inherent spatial and temporal correlation: the temporal from the repeated measures, and the spatial from the outcomes of interest being observed at multiple points in a patients body. We propose the use of a linear model with a separable parametric spatiotemporal error structure for the analysis of repeated imaging data. The model makes use of spatial (exponential, spherical, and Matérn) and temporal (compound symmetric, autoregressive-1, Toeplitz, and unstructured) parametric correlation functions. A simulation study, inspired by a longitudinal cardiac imaging study on mitral regurgitation patients, compared different information criteria for selecting a particular separable parametric spatiotemporal correlation structure as well as the effects on Type I and II error rates for inference on fixed effects when the specified model is incorrect. Information criteria were found to be highly accurate at choosing between separable parametric spatiotemporal correlation structures. Misspecification of the covariance structure was found to have the ability to inflate the Type I error or have an overly conservative test size, which corresponded to decreased power. An example with clinical data is given illustrating how the covariance structure procedure can be done in practice, as well as how covariance structure choice can change inferences about fixed effects. PMID:25293361

  13. Fitting of Parametric Building Models to Oblique Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, U. S.; Gerke, M.

    2011-09-01

    In literature and in photogrammetric workstations many approaches and systems to automatically reconstruct buildings from remote sensing data are described and available. Those building models are being used for instance in city modeling or in cadastre context. If a roof overhang is present, the building walls cannot be estimated correctly from nadir-view aerial images or airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. This leads to inconsistent building outlines, which has a negative influence on visual impression, but more seriously also represents a wrong legal boundary in the cadaster. Oblique aerial images as opposed to nadir-view images reveal greater detail, enabling to see different views of an object taken from different directions. Building walls are visible from oblique images directly and those images are used for automated roof overhang estimation in this research. A fitting algorithm is employed to find roof parameters of simple buildings. It uses a least squares algorithm to fit projected wire frames to their corresponding edge lines extracted from the images. Self-occlusion is detected based on intersection result of viewing ray and the planes formed by the building whereas occlusion from other objects is detected using an ALS point cloud. Overhang and ground height are obtained by sweeping vertical and horizontal planes respectively. Experimental results are verified with high resolution ortho-images, field survey, and ALS data. Planimetric accuracy of 1cm mean and 5cm standard deviation was obtained, while buildings' orientation were accurate to mean of 0.23° and standard deviation of 0.96° with ortho-image. Overhang parameters were aligned to approximately 10cm with field survey. The ground and roof heights were accurate to mean of - 9cm and 8cm with standard deviations of 16cm and 8cm with ALS respectively. The developed approach reconstructs 3D building models well in cases of sufficient texture. More images should be acquired for completeness of

  14. Non-parametric star formation histories for four dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, X.; Gilmore, Gerard; Valls-Gabaud, David

    2000-10-01

    We use recent Hubble Space Telescope colour-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stellar populations of a sample of local dSph galaxies (Carina, Leo I, Leo II and Ursa Minor) to infer the star formation histories of these systems, SFR(t). Applying a new variational calculus maximum likelihood method, which includes a full Bayesian analysis and allows a non-parametric estimate of the function one is solving for, we infer the star formation histories of the systems studied. This method has the advantage of yielding an objective answer, as one need not assume a priori the form of the function one is trying to recover. The results are checked independently using Saha's W statistic. The total luminosities of the systems are used to normalize the results into physical units and derive SN type II rates. We derive the luminosity-weighted mean star formation history of this sample of galaxies.

  15. Analysis on near field scattering spectra around nanoparticles by using parametric indirect microscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guoyan, Liu; Kun, Gao; Xuefeng, Liu; Guoqiang, Ni

    2016-10-01

    We report the simulation and measurement results of near field spatial scattering spectra around nanoparticles. Our measurement and simulations results have indicated that Parametric Indirect Microscopic Imaging can image the near field spatial scattering to a much larger distance from the scattering source of the particle under measurement whereas this part of spatial scattering was lost in the conventional microscopy. Both FDTD modeling and measurement provided evidence that parameters of indirect optical wave vector have higher sensitivity to near field scattering.

  16. Parametric imaging of viscoelasticity using optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, Philip; McLaughlin, Robert A; Sampson, David D; Kennedy, Brendan F

    2015-03-21

    We demonstrate imaging of soft tissue viscoelasticity using optical coherence elastography. Viscoelastic creep deformation is induced in tissue using step-like compressive loading and the resulting time-varying deformation is measured using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography. From a series of co-located B-scans, we estimate the local strain rate as a function of time, and parameterize it using a four-parameter Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic creep. The estimated viscoelastic strain and time constant are used to visualize viscoelastic creep in 2D, dual-parameter viscoelastograms. We demonstrate our technique on six silicone tissue-simulating phantoms spanning a range of viscoelastic parameters. As an example in soft tissue, we report viscoelastic contrast between muscle and connective tissue in fresh, ex vivo rat gastrocnemius muscle and mouse abdominal transection. Imaging viscoelastic creep deformation has the potential to provide complementary contrast to existing imaging modalities, and may provide greater insight into disease pathology.

  17. Parametric imaging using subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents in patients with breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Merton, Daniel A; Palazzo, Juan P; Hall, Anne L; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Parametric maps showing perfusion of contrast media can be useful tools for characterizing lesions in breast tissue. In this study we show the feasibility of parametric subharmonic imaging (SHI), which allows imaging of a vascular marker (the ultrasound contrast agent) while providing near complete tissue suppression. Digital SHI clips of 16 breast lesions from 14 women were acquired. Patients were scanned using a modified LOGIQ 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) transmitting/receiving at 4.4/2.2 MHz. Using motion-compensated cumulative maximum intensity (CMI) sequences, parametric maps were generated for each lesion showing the time to peak (TTP), estimated perfusion (EP), and area under the time-intensity curve (AUC). Findings were grouped and compared according to biopsy results as benign lesions (n = 12, including 5 fibroadenomas and 3 cysts) and carcinomas (n = 4). For each lesion CMI, TTP, EP, and AUC parametric images were generated. No significant variations were detected with CMI (P = .80), TTP (P = .35), or AUC (P = .65). A statistically significant variation was detected for the average pixel EP (P = .002). Especially, differences were seen between carcinoma and benign lesions (mean ± SD, 0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.05 ± 0.02 intensity units [IU]/s; P = .0014) and between carcinoma and fibroadenoma (0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.04 ± 0.01 IU/s; P = .0044), whereas differences between carcinomas and cysts were found to be nonsignificant. In conclusion, a parametric imaging method for characterization of breast lesions using the high contrast to tissue signal provided by SHI has been developed. While the preliminary sample size was limited, results show potential for breast lesion characterization based on perfusion flow parameters.

  18. Robust biological parametric mapping: an improved technique for multimodal brain image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Beason-Held, Lori; Resnick, Susan M.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2011-03-01

    Mapping the quantitative relationship between structure and function in the human brain is an important and challenging problem. Numerous volumetric, surface, region of interest and voxelwise image processing techniques have been developed to statistically assess potential correlations between imaging and non-imaging metrics. Recently, biological parametric mapping has extended the widely popular statistical parametric approach to enable application of the general linear model to multiple image modalities (both for regressors and regressands) along with scalar valued observations. This approach offers great promise for direct, voxelwise assessment of structural and functional relationships with multiple imaging modalities. However, as presented, the biological parametric mapping approach is not robust to outliers and may lead to invalid inferences (e.g., artifactual low p-values) due to slight mis-registration or variation in anatomy between subjects. To enable widespread application of this approach, we introduce robust regression and robust inference in the neuroimaging context of application of the general linear model. Through simulation and empirical studies, we demonstrate that our robust approach reduces sensitivity to outliers without substantial degradation in power. The robust approach and associated software package provides a reliable way to quantitatively assess voxelwise correlations between structural and functional neuroimaging modalities.

  19. Quantitative myocardial perfusion PET parametric imaging at the voxel-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-08-01

    Quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) PET has the potential to enhance detection of early stages of atherosclerosis or microvascular dysfunction, characterization of flow-limiting effects of coronary artery disease (CAD), and identification of balanced reduction of flow due to multivessel stenosis. We aim to enable quantitative MP-PET at the individual voxel level, which has the potential to allow enhanced visualization and quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and flow reserve (MFR) as computed from uptake parametric images. This framework is especially challenging for the 82Rb radiotracer. The short half-life enables fast serial imaging and high patient throughput; yet, the acquired dynamic PET images suffer from high noise-levels introducing large variability in uptake parametric images and, therefore, in the estimates of MBF and MFR. Robust estimation requires substantial post-smoothing of noisy data, degrading valuable functional information of physiological and pathological importance. We present a feasible and robust approach to generate parametric images at the voxel-level that substantially reduces noise without significant loss of spatial resolution. The proposed methodology, denoted physiological clustering, makes use of the functional similarity of voxels to penalize deviation of voxel kinetics from physiological partners. The results were validated using extensive simulations (with transmural and non-transmural perfusion defects) and clinical studies. Compared to post-smoothing, physiological clustering depicted enhanced quantitative noise versus bias performance as well as superior recovery of perfusion defects (as quantified by CNR) with minimal increase in bias. Overall, parametric images obtained from the proposed methodology were robust in the presence of high-noise levels as manifested in the voxel time-activity-curves.

  20. Quantitative myocardial perfusion PET parametric imaging at the voxel-level.

    PubMed

    Mohy-Ud-Din, Hassan; Lodge, Martin A; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-08-01

    Quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) PET has the potential to enhance detection of early stages of atherosclerosis or microvascular dysfunction, characterization of flow-limiting effects of coronary artery disease (CAD), and identification of balanced reduction of flow due to multivessel stenosis. We aim to enable quantitative MP-PET at the individual voxel level, which has the potential to allow enhanced visualization and quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and flow reserve (MFR) as computed from uptake parametric images. This framework is especially challenging for the (82)Rb radiotracer. The short half-life enables fast serial imaging and high patient throughput; yet, the acquired dynamic PET images suffer from high noise-levels introducing large variability in uptake parametric images and, therefore, in the estimates of MBF and MFR. Robust estimation requires substantial post-smoothing of noisy data, degrading valuable functional information of physiological and pathological importance. We present a feasible and robust approach to generate parametric images at the voxel-level that substantially reduces noise without significant loss of spatial resolution. The proposed methodology, denoted physiological clustering, makes use of the functional similarity of voxels to penalize deviation of voxel kinetics from physiological partners. The results were validated using extensive simulations (with transmural and non-transmural perfusion defects) and clinical studies. Compared to post-smoothing, physiological clustering depicted enhanced quantitative noise versus bias performance as well as superior recovery of perfusion defects (as quantified by CNR) with minimal increase in bias. Overall, parametric images obtained from the proposed methodology were robust in the presence of high-noise levels as manifested in the voxel time-activity-curves.

  1. Analytic formulation and parametrization of the kinetic potential theory for drizzle formation.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Robert; Liu, Yangang

    2004-09-01

    The kinetic potential of nucleation theory is extended to describe cloud droplet growth processes that can lead to drizzle formation. In this model drizzle formation is identified as a statistical barrier crossing phenomenon that transforms cloud droplets to much larger drizzle size with a rate dependent on turbulent diffusion, droplet collection efficiency, and properties of the underlying cloud droplet size distribution. Closed-form expressions for the kinetic potential, critical drop volume, barrier height, and both steady-state and transient barrier crossing drizzle rates are obtained in terms of measurable cloud properties. In an analogy with the theory of phase transformation, clouds are classified into two regimes: an activated metastable regime, in which there is a significant barrier and drizzle initiation resembles nucleation, and an unstable regime where kinetics dominates analogous to the spinodal regime of phase transformation. Observational evidence, including the threshold behavior of drizzle formation and the well-known effect that aerosols have on drizzle suppression, is shown to favor drizzle formation under activated conditions (more similar to nucleation than spinodal decomposition) and under transient conditions rather than steady state. These new applications of the kinetic potential theory should lead to more accurate parametrizations of aerosol-cloud interaction and improved algorithms for weather forecasting and climate prediction.

  2. Functional assessment of glioma pathogenesis by in vivo multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging and in vitro analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nai-Wei; Chang, Chen; Lin, Hsiu-Ting; Yen, Chen-Tung; Chen, Jeou-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are aggressive brain tumors with poor prognosis. In this study, we report a novel approach combining both in vivo multi-parametric MRI and in vitro cell culture assessments to evaluate the pathogenic development of gliomas. Osteopontin (OPN), a pleiotropic factor, has been implicated in the formation and progression of various human cancers, including gliomas, through its functions in regulating cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and migration. Using rat C6 glioma model, the combined approach successfully monitors the acquisition and decrease of cancer hallmarks. We show that knockdown of the expression of OPN reduces C6 cell proliferation, survival, viability and clonogenicity in vitro, and reduces tumor burden and prolongs animal survival in syngeneic rats. OPN depletion is associated with reduced tumor growth, decreased angiogenesis, and an increase of tumor-associated metabolites, as revealed by T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images, Ktrans maps, and 1H-MRS, respectively. These strategies allow us to define an important role of OPN in conferring cancer hallmarks, which can be further applied to assess the functional roles of other candidate genes in glioma. In particular, the non-invasive multi-parametric MRI measurement of cancer hallmarks related to proliferation, angiogenesis and altered metabolism may serve as a useful tool for diagnosis and for patient management. PMID:27198662

  3. Empirical validation of statistical parametric mapping for group imaging of fast neural activity using electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Packham, B; Barnes, G; Dos Santos, G Sato; Aristovich, K; Gilad, O; Ghosh, A; Oh, T; Holder, D

    2016-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) allows for the reconstruction of internal conductivity from surface measurements. A change in conductivity occurs as ion channels open during neural activity, making EIT a potential tool for functional brain imaging. EIT images can have  >10 000 voxels, which means statistical analysis of such images presents a substantial multiple testing problem. One way to optimally correct for these issues and still maintain the flexibility of complicated experimental designs is to use random field theory. This parametric method estimates the distribution of peaks one would expect by chance in a smooth random field of a given size. Random field theory has been used in several other neuroimaging techniques but never validated for EIT images of fast neural activity, such validation can be achieved using non-parametric techniques. Both parametric and non-parametric techniques were used to analyze a set of 22 images collected from 8 rats. Significant group activations were detected using both techniques (corrected p  <  0.05). Both parametric and non-parametric analyses yielded similar results, although the latter was less conservative. These results demonstrate the first statistical analysis of such an image set and indicate that such an analysis is an approach for EIT images of neural activity. PMID:27203477

  4. Image library approach to evaluating parametric uncertainty in metrology of isolated feature width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potzick, James

    2009-03-01

    When measuring the width of an isolated line or space on a wafer or photomask, only the feature's image is measured, not the object itself. Often the largest contributors to measurement uncertainty are the uncertainties in the parameters which affect the image. Measurement repeatability is often smaller than the combined parametric uncertainty. An isolated feature's edges are far enough away from nearest edges of other features that its image does not change if this distance is increased (about 10 wavelengths in an optical microscope or exposure tool, or several effective-beam-widths in a SEM). When the leading and trailing edges of the same feature are not isolated from each other the metrology process becomes nonlinear. Isolated features may not be amenable to measurement by grating methods (e.g., scatterometry), and there is no hard lower limit to how small an isolated feature can be measured. There are several ways to infer the size of an isolated feature from its image in a microscope (SEM, AFM, optical,...), and they all require image modeling. Image modeling accounts for the influence of all of the parameters which can affect the image, and relates the apparent linewidth (in the image) to the true linewidth (on the object). The values of these parameters, however, have uncertainties and these uncertainties propagate through the model and lead to parametric uncertainty in the linewidth measurement, along with the scale factor uncertainty and the measurement repeatability. The combined measurement uncertainty is required in order to decide if the result is adequate for its intended purpose and to ascertain if it is consistent with other similar results. The parametric uncertainty for optical photomask measurements derived using an edge threshold approach has been described previously [1]; this paper describes an image library approach to this issue and shows results for optical photomask metrology over a linewidth and spacewidth range of 10 nm to 4 μm. The

  5. Synthetic aperture radar target detection, feature extraction, and image formation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian

    1994-01-01

    This report presents new algorithms for target detection, feature extraction, and image formation with the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology. For target detection, we consider target detection with SAR and coherent subtraction. We also study how the image false alarm rates are related to the target template false alarm rates when target templates are used for target detection. For feature extraction from SAR images, we present a computationally efficient eigenstructure-based 2D-MODE algorithm for two-dimensional frequency estimation. For SAR image formation, we present a robust parametric data model for estimating high resolution range signatures of radar targets and for forming high resolution SAR images.

  6. Robust parametric estimation over optimal support of fluid flow structure in multispectral image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougon, Nicolas F.; Brossard-Pailleux, M. A.; Preteux, Francoise J.

    2000-10-01

    This article presents a methodology for analyzing the Lagrangian structure of fluid flows generated by the evolution of cloud systems in meteorological multispectral image sequences. The correlation between the orientation of cloud texture and the underlying motion field Lagrangian component allows to adopt a static strategy. Following a scale-space approach, we therefore first construct a non-local robust estimator for the locally dominant orientation field in an image. This estimator, which is derived from the image structure tensor, is relevant in both mono- and multisprectral contexts. In a second step, the Lagrangian component of the flow is estimated over some bounded image region by robustly fitting a hierarchical vector parametric model to the dominant orientation field. Here, a recurrent problem deals with adaptating the geometry of the model support to obtain unbiased estimates. To tackle this classic issue, we introduce a novel variational, semi-parametric approach which allows the joint optimization of model parameters and support. This approach is generic and, in particular, can be readily applied to motion estimation yielding robust measurement of the Eulerian structure of the flow. Finally, a structural characterization of the reflecting vector field is derived by means of classic differential geometry techniques. This methodology is applied to the analysis of temperated latitude depressions in Meteosat images.

  7. Parametric Subharmonic Imaging Using a Commercial Intravascular Ultrasound Scanner An In Vivo Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Eisenbrey, John R.; Sridharan, Anush; deMuinck, Ebo D.; Doyley, Marvin M.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The feasibility of visualizing atherosclerotic plaque using parametric subharmonic intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was investigated in vivo. Methods Atherosclerosis was induced in the aorta of 2 rabbits. Following injection of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA), radiofrequency IVUS signals were acquired at 40 MHz with a Galaxy IVUS scanner (Boston Scientific/Scimed, Natick, MA). Subharmonic imaging (SHI; receiving at 20 MHz) was performed offline by applying an 8-order equalization filter. Contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTRs) were computed for the vessel relative to the plaque area over 4 time points. Contrast-to-tissue ratios were also calculated for the plaque-tissue and vessel-tissue from 4 tissue regions of interest at 4 time points. Finally, parametric images showing the cumulative maximum intensity (CMI), time to peak, perfusion (PER), and time-integrated intensity (TII) were generated for the fundamental and subharmonic data sets, and CTR measurements were repeated. Results Injection of the contrast agent resulted in improved delineation between plaque and the vessel lumen. Subharmonic imaging resulted in noticeable tissue suppression, although the intensity from the contrast agent was reduced. No significant improvement in the plaque to vessel lumen CTR was observed between the subharmonic and fundamental IVUS (2.1 ± 3.64 versus 2.2 ± 4.20; P = .5). However, the CTR for plaque-tissue was improved (11.8 ± 7.32 versus 9.9 ± 7.06; P < .0001) for SHI relative to fundamental imaging. Cumulative-maximum-intensity and TII maps of both fundamental and subharmonic data provided increased CTRs relative to nonparametric data sets (P< .002). Additionally, the CMI, PER, and TII of SHI IVUS showed significantly improved vessel-plaque CTRs for SHI relative to the fundamental (P < .04). Conclusions Parametric SHI IVUS of atherosclerotic plaque is feasible and improves the visualization of the plaque. PMID:22368126

  8. Spatial modes of phase-sensitive parametric image amplifiers with circular and elliptical Gaussian pumps.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Muthiah; Stelmakh, Nikolai; Vasilyev, Michael; Kumar, Prem

    2011-12-19

    We develop a method for finding the number and shapes of the independently squeezed or amplified modes of a spatially-broadband, travelling-wave, frequency- and polarization-degenerate optical parametric amplifier in the general case of an elliptical Gaussian pump. The obtained results show that for tightly focused pump only one mode is squeezed, and this mode has a Gaussian TEM(00) shape. For larger pump spot sizes that support multiple modes, the shapes of the most-amplified modes are close to Hermite- or Laguerre-Gaussian profiles. These results can be used to generate matched local oscillators for detecting high amounts of squeezing and to design parametric image amplifiers that introduce minimal distortion.

  9. Multiresolution parametric estimation of transparent motions and denoising of fluoroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Auvray, Vincent; Liénard, Jean; Bouthemy, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    We describe a novel multiresolution parametric framework to estimate transparent motions typically present in X-Ray exams. Assuming the presence if two transparent layers, it computes two affine velocity fields by minimizing an appropriate objective function with an incremental Gauss-Newton technique. We have designed a realistic simulation scheme of fluoroscopic image sequences to validate our method on data with ground truth and different levels of noise. An experiment on real clinical images is also reported. We then exploit this transparent-motion estimation method to denoise two layers image sequences using a motion-compensated estimation method. In accordance with theory, we show that we reach a denoising factor of 2/3 in a few iterations without bringing any local artifacts in the image sequence.

  10. Automatic measurement of vertebral body deformations in CT images based on a 3D parametric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štern, Darko; Bürmen, Miran; Njagulj, Vesna; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2012-03-01

    Accurate and objective evaluation of vertebral body deformations represents an important part of the clinical diagnostics and therapy of pathological conditions affecting the spine. Although modern clinical practice is oriented towards threedimensional (3D) imaging techniques, the established methods for the evaluation of vertebral body deformations are based on measurements in two-dimensional (2D) X-ray images. In this paper, we propose a method for automatic measurement of vertebral body deformations in computed tomography (CT) images that is based on efficient modeling of the vertebral body shape with a 3D parametric model. By fitting the 3D model to the vertebral body in the image, quantitative description of normal and pathological vertebral bodies is obtained from the value of 25 parameters of the model. The evaluation of vertebral body deformations is based on the distance of the observed vertebral body from the distribution of the parameter values of normal vertebral bodies in the parametric space. The distribution is obtained from 80 normal vertebral bodies in the training data set and verified with eight normal vertebral bodies in the control data set. The statistically meaningful distance of eight pathological vertebral bodies in the study data set from the distribution of normal vertebral bodies in the parametric space shows that the parameters can be used to successfully model vertebral body deformations in 3D. The proposed method may therefore be used to assess vertebral body deformations in 3D or provide clinically meaningful observations that are not available when using 2D methods that are established in clinical practice.

  11. NiftyFit: a Software Package for Multi-parametric Model-Fitting of 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Melbourne, Andrew; Toussaint, Nicolas; Owen, David; Simpson, Ivor; Anthopoulos, Thanasis; De Vita, Enrico; Atkinson, David; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    Multi-modal, multi-parametric Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging is becoming an increasingly sophisticated tool for neuroimaging. The relationships between parameters estimated from different individual MR modalities have the potential to transform our understanding of brain function, structure, development and disease. This article describes a new software package for such multi-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging that provides a unified model-fitting framework. We describe model-fitting functionality for Arterial Spin Labeled MRI, T1 Relaxometry, T2 relaxometry and Diffusion Weighted imaging, providing command line documentation to generate the figures in the manuscript. Software and data (using the nifti file format) used in this article are simultaneously provided for download. We also present some extended applications of the joint model fitting framework applied to diffusion weighted imaging and T2 relaxometry, in order to both improve parameter estimation in these models and generate new parameters that link different MR modalities. NiftyFit is intended as a clear and open-source educational release so that the user may adapt and develop their own functionality as they require.

  12. NiftyFit: a Software Package for Multi-parametric Model-Fitting of 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Melbourne, Andrew; Toussaint, Nicolas; Owen, David; Simpson, Ivor; Anthopoulos, Thanasis; De Vita, Enrico; Atkinson, David; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    Multi-modal, multi-parametric Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging is becoming an increasingly sophisticated tool for neuroimaging. The relationships between parameters estimated from different individual MR modalities have the potential to transform our understanding of brain function, structure, development and disease. This article describes a new software package for such multi-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging that provides a unified model-fitting framework. We describe model-fitting functionality for Arterial Spin Labeled MRI, T1 Relaxometry, T2 relaxometry and Diffusion Weighted imaging, providing command line documentation to generate the figures in the manuscript. Software and data (using the nifti file format) used in this article are simultaneously provided for download. We also present some extended applications of the joint model fitting framework applied to diffusion weighted imaging and T2 relaxometry, in order to both improve parameter estimation in these models and generate new parameters that link different MR modalities. NiftyFit is intended as a clear and open-source educational release so that the user may adapt and develop their own functionality as they require. PMID:26972806

  13. A distribution-based parametrization for improved tomographic imaging of solute plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pidlisecky, A.; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2011-01-01

    Difference geophysical tomography (e.g. radar, resistivity and seismic) is used increasingly for imaging fluid flow and mass transport associated with natural and engineered hydrologic phenomena, including tracer experiments, in situ remediation and aquifer storage and recovery. Tomographic data are collected over time, inverted and differenced against a background image to produce 'snapshots' revealing changes to the system; these snapshots readily provide qualitative information on the location and morphology of plumes of injected tracer, remedial amendment or stored water. In principle, geometric moments (i.e. total mass, centres of mass, spread, etc.) calculated from difference tomograms can provide further quantitative insight into the rates of advection, dispersion and mass transfer; however, recent work has shown that moments calculated from tomograms are commonly biased, as they are strongly affected by the subjective choice of regularization criteria. Conventional approaches to regularization (Tikhonov) and parametrization (image pixels) result in tomograms which are subject to artefacts such as smearing or pixel estimates taking on the sign opposite to that expected for the plume under study. Here, we demonstrate a novel parametrization for imaging plumes associated with hydrologic phenomena. Capitalizing on the mathematical analogy between moment-based descriptors of plumes and the moment-based parameters of probability distributions, we design an inverse problem that (1) is overdetermined and computationally efficient because the image is described by only a few parameters, (2) produces tomograms consistent with expected plume behaviour (e.g. changes of one sign relative to the background image), (3) yields parameter estimates that are readily interpreted for plume morphology and offer direct insight into hydrologic processes and (4) requires comparatively few data to achieve reasonable model estimates. We demonstrate the approach in a series of

  14. Multimode quantum properties of a self-imaging optical parametric oscillator: Squeezed vacuum and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-beams generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, L.; Chalopin, B.; Riviere de la Souchere, A.; Fabre, C.; Treps, N.; Maitre, A.

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the spatial quantum properties of the light emitted by a perfectly spatially degenerate optical parametric oscillator (self-imaging optical parametric oscillator). We show that this device produces local squeezing for areas bigger than a coherence area that depends on the crystal length and pump width. Furthermore, it generates local EPR beams in the far field. We show, calculating the eigenmodes of the system, that it is highly multimode for realistic experimental parameters.

  15. Parametric and nonparametric analysis of life courses: an application to family formation patterns.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Marco; Piccarreta, Raffaella; Salford, Gaia

    2013-06-01

    We discuss a unified approach to the description and explanation of life course patterns represented as sequences of states observed in discrete time. In particular, we study life course data collected as part of the Dutch Fertility and Family Surveys (FFS) to learn about the family formation behavior of 1,897 women born between 1953 and 1962. Retrospective monthly data were available on each 18- to 30-year-old woman living either with or without children as single, married, or cohabiting. We first study via a nonparametric approach which factors explain the pairwise dissimilarities observed between life courses. Permutation distribution inference allows for the study of the statistical significance of the effect of a set of covariates of interest. We then develop a parametric model for the sequence-generating process that can be used to describe state transitions and durations conditional on covariates and conditional on having observed an initial segment of the trajectory. Fitting of the proposed model and the corresponding model selection process are based on the observed data likelihood. We discuss the application of the methods to the FFS.

  16. Assessment of brain perfusion using parametric and factor images extracted from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Anne L.; Moody, Alan R.

    1998-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers a minimally invasive method of investigating brain blood flow. This paper describes two different methods of extracting quantitative and qualitative information from this data. The first approach is to generate parametric images showing blood flow, blood volume and time-to-peak activity on a pixel by pixel basis. The second approach uses factor analysis. Principal components are extracted from the data and these orthogonal factors are then rotated to give a set of oblique factors, which satisfy certain simple constraints. In most cases three factors can be identified: a background or non- enhancing factor, an early vascular factor which is strongly correlated to arterial flow, and a late vascular factor which is strongly correlated to venous flow. The parametric and factor images are complimentary in nature: the former provides quantitative information that is readily understood by the clinician, while the latter makes no a priori assumptions about the underlying physiology and also allows more subtle changes in cerebral blood flow to be assessed. The factor images may also be of great value in defining regions of interest over which to carry out a more detailed quantitative analysis. This dual approach can be readily adapted to assess perfusion in other organs such as the heart or kidneys.

  17. Label-free imaging of thick tissue at 1550 nm using a femtosecond optical parametric generator.

    PubMed

    Trägårdh, Johanna; Robb, Gillian; Gadalla, Kamal K E; Cobb, Stuart; Travis, Christopher; Oppo, Gian-Luca; McConnell, Gail

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a simple wavelength-tunable optical parametric generator (OPG), emitting broadband ultrashort pulses with peak wavelengths at 1530-1790 nm, for nonlinear label-free microscopy. The OPG consists of a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, pumped at 1064 nm by a ultrafast Yb:fiber laser with high pulse energy. We demonstrate that this OPG can be used for label-free imaging, by third-harmonic generation, of nuclei of brain cells and blood vessels in a >150 μm thick brain tissue section, with very little decay of intensity with imaging depth and no visible damage to the tissue at an incident average power of 15 mW. PMID:26258338

  18. An automated approach for segmentation of intravascular ultrasound images based on parametric active contour models.

    PubMed

    Vard, Alireza; Jamshidi, Kamal; Movahhedinia, Naser

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a fully automated approach to detect the intima and media-adventitia borders in intravascular ultrasound images based on parametric active contour models. To detect the intima border, we compute a new image feature applying a combination of short-term autocorrelations calculated for the contour pixels. These feature values are employed to define an energy function of the active contour called normalized cumulative short-term autocorrelation. Exploiting this energy function, the intima border is separated accurately from the blood region contaminated by high speckle noise. To extract media-adventitia boundary, we define a new form of energy function based on edge, texture and spring forces for the active contour. Utilizing this active contour, the media-adventitia border is identified correctly even in presence of branch openings and calcifications. Experimental results indicate accuracy of the proposed methods. In addition, statistical analysis demonstrates high conformity between manual tracing and the results obtained by the proposed approaches.

  19. En face parametric imaging of tissue birefringence using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Chin, Lixin; Yang, Xiaojie; McLaughlin, Robert A; Noble, Peter B; Sampson, David D

    2013-06-01

    A technique for generating en face parametric images of tissue birefringence from scans acquired using a fiber-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system utilizing only a single-incident polarization state is presented. The value of birefringence is calculated for each A-scan in the PS-OCT volume using a quadrature demodulation and phase unwrapping algorithm. The algorithm additionally uses weighted spatial averaging and weighted least squares regression to account for the variation in phase accuracies due to varying OCT signal-to-noise-ratio. The utility of this technique is demonstrated using a model of thermally induced damage in porcine tendon and validated against histology. The resulting en face images of tissue birefringence are more useful than conventional PS-OCT B-scans in assessing the severity of tissue damage and in localizing the spatial extent of damage. PMID:23733021

  20. Image-rotating cavity designs for improved beam quality in nanosecond optical parametric oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Arlee V.; Bowers, Mark S.

    2001-05-01

    We show by computer simulation that high beam quality can be achieved in high-energy, nanosecond optical parametric oscillators by use of image-rotating resonators. Lateral walk-off between the signal and the idler beams in a nonlinear crystal creates correlations across the beams in the walk off direction, or equivalently, creates a restricted acceptance angle. These correlations can improve the beam quality in the walk-off plane. We show that image rotation or reflection can be used to improve beam quality in both planes. The lateral walk-off can be due to birefringent walk-off in type II mixing or to noncollinear mixing in type I or type II mixing.

  1. Theoretical Analysis of Penalized Maximum-Likelihood Patlak Parametric Image Reconstruction in Dynamic PET for Lesion Detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-04-01

    Detecting cancerous lesions is a major clinical application of emission tomography. In a previous work, we studied penalized maximum-likelihood (PML) image reconstruction for lesion detection in static PET. Here we extend our theoretical analysis of static PET reconstruction to dynamic PET. We study both the conventional indirect reconstruction and direct reconstruction for Patlak parametric image estimation. In indirect reconstruction, Patlak parametric images are generated by first reconstructing a sequence of dynamic PET images, and then performing Patlak analysis on the time activity curves (TACs) pixel-by-pixel. In direct reconstruction, Patlak parametric images are estimated directly from raw sinogram data by incorporating the Patlak model into the image reconstruction procedure. PML reconstruction is used in both the indirect and direct reconstruction methods. We use a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) to assess lesion detectability in Patlak parametric images. Simplified expressions for evaluating the lesion detectability have been derived and applied to the selection of the regularization parameter value to maximize detection performance. The proposed method is validated using computer-based Monte Carlo simulations. Good agreements between the theoretical predictions and the Monte Carlo results are observed. Both theoretical predictions and Monte Carlo simulation results show the benefit of the indirect and direct methods under optimized regularization parameters in dynamic PET reconstruction for lesion detection, when compared with the conventional static PET reconstruction.

  2. Gated frequency-resolved optical imaging with an optical parametric amplifier for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Bliss, D.E.

    1997-02-01

    Implementation of optical imagery in a diffuse inhomogeneous medium such as biological tissue requires an understanding of photon migration and multiple scattering processes which act to randomize pathlength and degrade image quality. The nature of transmitted light from soft tissue ranges from the quasi-coherent properties of the minimally scattered component to the random incoherent light of the diffuse component. Recent experimental approaches have emphasized dynamic path-sensitive imaging measurements with either ultrashort laser pulses (ballistic photons) or amplitude modulated laser light launched into tissue (photon density waves) to increase image resolution and transmissive penetration depth. Ballistic imaging seeks to compensate for these {open_quotes}fog-like{close_quotes} effects by temporally isolating the weak early-arriving image-bearing component from the diffusely scattered background using a subpicosecond optical gate superimposed on the transmitted photon time-of-flight distribution. The authors have developed a broadly wavelength tunable (470 nm -2.4 {mu}m), ultrashort amplifying optical gate for transillumination spectral imaging based on optical parametric amplification in a nonlinear crystal. The time-gated image amplification process exhibits low noise and high sensitivity, with gains greater than 104 achievable for low light levels. We report preliminary benchmark experiments in which this system was used to reconstruct, spectrally upcovert, and enhance near-infrared two-dimensional images with feature sizes of 65 {mu}m/mm{sup 2} in background optical attenuations exceeding 10{sup 12}. Phase images of test objects exhibiting both absorptive contrast and diffuse scatter were acquired using a self-referencing Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor in combination with short-pulse quasi-ballistic gating. The sensor employed a lenslet array based on binary optics technology and was sensitive to optical path distortions approaching {lambda}/100.

  3. Pixel-based parametric source depth map for Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altabella, L.; Boschi, F.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Optical tomography represents a challenging problem in optical imaging because of the intrinsically ill-posed inverse problem due to photon diffusion. Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) for optical photons produced in tissues by several radionuclides (i.e.: 32P, 18F, 90Y), has been investigated using both 3D multispectral approach and multiviews methods. Difficult in convergence of 3D algorithms can discourage to use this technique to have information of depth and intensity of source. For these reasons, we developed a faster 2D corrected approach based on multispectral acquisitions, to obtain source depth and its intensity using a pixel-based fitting of source intensity. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data were used to develop and validate the method to obtain the parametric map of source depth. With this approach we obtain parametric source depth maps with a precision between 3% and 7% for MC simulation and 5-6% for experimental data. Using this method we are able to obtain reliable information about the source depth of Cerenkov luminescence with a simple and flexible procedure.

  4. Observation of Geometric Parametric Instability Induced by the Periodic Spatial Self-Imaging of Multimode Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Tonello, Alessandro; Barthélémy, Alain; Couderc, Vincent; Shalaby, Badr Mohamed; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Spatiotemporal mode coupling in highly multimode physical systems permits new routes for exploring complex instabilities and forming coherent wave structures. We present here the first experimental demonstration of multiple geometric parametric instability sidebands, generated in the frequency domain through resonant space-time coupling, owing to the natural periodic spatial self-imaging of a multimode quasi-continuous-wave beam in a standard graded-index multimode fiber. The input beam was launched in the fiber by means of an amplified microchip laser emitting sub-ns pulses at 1064 nm. The experimentally observed frequency spacing among sidebands agrees well with analytical predictions and numerical simulations. The first-order peaks are located at the considerably large detuning of 123.5 THz from the pump. These results open the remarkable possibility to convert a near-infrared laser directly into a broad spectral range spanning visible and infrared wavelengths, by means of a single resonant parametric nonlinear effect occurring in the normal dispersion regime. As further evidence of our strong space-time coupling regime, we observed the striking effect that all of the different sideband peaks were carried by a well-defined and stable bell-shaped spatial profile.

  5. Observation of Geometric Parametric Instability Induced by the Periodic Spatial Self-Imaging of Multimode Waves.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Tonello, Alessandro; Barthélémy, Alain; Couderc, Vincent; Shalaby, Badr Mohamed; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Spatiotemporal mode coupling in highly multimode physical systems permits new routes for exploring complex instabilities and forming coherent wave structures. We present here the first experimental demonstration of multiple geometric parametric instability sidebands, generated in the frequency domain through resonant space-time coupling, owing to the natural periodic spatial self-imaging of a multimode quasi-continuous-wave beam in a standard graded-index multimode fiber. The input beam was launched in the fiber by means of an amplified microchip laser emitting sub-ns pulses at 1064 nm. The experimentally observed frequency spacing among sidebands agrees well with analytical predictions and numerical simulations. The first-order peaks are located at the considerably large detuning of 123.5 THz from the pump. These results open the remarkable possibility to convert a near-infrared laser directly into a broad spectral range spanning visible and infrared wavelengths, by means of a single resonant parametric nonlinear effect occurring in the normal dispersion regime. As further evidence of our strong space-time coupling regime, we observed the striking effect that all of the different sideband peaks were carried by a well-defined and stable bell-shaped spatial profile. PMID:27203323

  6. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging of vulnerable plaques: a finite element method parametric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Plaque rupture is the most common cause of complications such as stroke and coronary heart failure. Recent histopathological evidence suggests that several plaque features, including a large lipid core and a thin fibrous cap, are associated with plaques most at risk for rupture. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging, a recently developed ultrasound-based elasticity imaging technique, shows promise for imaging these features noninvasively. Clinically, this could be used to distinguish vulnerable plaques, for which surgical intervention may be required, from those less prone to rupture. In this study, a parametric analysis using Finite-Element Method (FEM) models was performed to simulate ARFI imaging of five different carotid artery plaques across a wide range of material properties. It was demonstrated that ARFI could resolve the softer lipid pool from the surrounding, stiffer media and fibrous cap and was most dependent upon the stiffness of the lipid pool component. Stress concentrations due to an ARFI excitation were located in the media and fibrous cap components. In all cases, the maximum Von Mises stress was < 1.2 kPa. In comparing these results with others investigating plaque rupture, it is concluded that while the mechanisms may be different, the Von Mises stresses imposed by ARFI are orders of magnitude lower than the stresses associated with blood pressure. PMID:23122224

  7. Parametric studies of magnetic-optic imaging using finite-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, C.; Udpa, L.; Xuan, L.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Thorne, D.; Shih, W.

    2000-05-01

    Magneto-optic imaging is a relatively new sensor application of bubble memory technology to NDI. The Magneto-Optic Imager (MOI) uses a magneto-optic (MO) sensor to produce analog images of magnetic flux leakage from surface and subsurface defects. The flux leakage is produced by eddy current induction techniques in nonferrous metals and magnetic yokes are used in ferromagnetic materials. The technique has gained acceptance in the aircraft maintenance industry for use to detect surface-breaking cracks and corrosion. Until recently, much of the MOI development has been empirical in nature since the electromagnetic processes that produce images are rather complex. The availability of finite element techniques to numerically solve Maxwell's equations, in conjunction with MOI observations, allows greater understanding of the capabilities of the instrument. In this paper, we present a systematic set of finite element calculations along with MOI measurements on specific defects to quantify the current capability of the MOI as well as its desired performance. Parametric studies including effects of liftoff and proximity of edges are also studied.—This material is based upon work supported by the Federal Aviation Administration under Contract #DTFA03-98-D-00008, Delivery Order #IA013 and performed at Iowa State University's Center for NDE as part of the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability program.

  8. Active infrared hyperspectral imaging system using a broadly tunable optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcolm, G. P. A.; Maker, G. T.; Robertson, G.; Dunn, M. H.; Stothard, D. J. M.

    2009-09-01

    The in situ identification and spatial location of gases, discrete liquid droplets and residues on surfaces is a technically challenging problem. Active Infrared (IR) hyperspectral imaging is a powerful technique that combines real-time imaging and optical spectroscopy for "standoff" detection of suspected chemical substances, including chemical warfare agents, toxic industrial chemicals, explosives and narcotics. An active IR hyperspectral imaging system requires a coherent, broadly tunable IR light source of high spectral purity, in order to detect a broad range of target substances. In this paper we outline a compact and power-efficient IR illumination source with high stability, efficiency, tuning range and spectral purity based upon an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The fusion of established OPO technology with novel diode-pumped laser technology and electro-mechanical scanning has enabled a broadly applicable imaging system. This system is capable of hyperspectral imaging at both Near-IR (1.3 - 1.9 μm) and Mid-IR (2.3 - 4.6 μm) wavelengths simultaneously with a line width of < 3 cm-1. System size and complexity are minimised by using a dual InGaAs/InSb single element detector, and images are acquired by raster scanning the coaxial signal and idler beams simultaneously, at ranges up to 20 m. Reflection, absorption and scatter of incident radiation by chemical targets and their surroundings provide a method for spatial location, and characteristic spectra obtained from each sample can be used to identify targets uniquely. To date, we have recognized liquids in sample sizes as small 20 μl-and gases with sensitivity as high as 10ppm.m-at detection standoff distances > 10 m.

  9. Multistatic synthetic aperture radar image formation.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V; Swoboda, J; Yarman, C E; Yazici, B

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we consider a multistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging scenario where a swarm of airborne antennas, some of which are transmitting, receiving or both, are traversing arbitrary flight trajectories and transmitting arbitrary waveforms without any form of multiplexing. The received signal at each receiving antenna may be interfered by the scattered signal due to multiple transmitters and additive thermal noise at the receiver. In this scenario, standard bistatic SAR image reconstruction algorithms result in artifacts in reconstructed images due to these interferences. In this paper, we use microlocal analysis in a statistical setting to develop a filtered-backprojection (FBP) type analytic image formation method that suppresses artifacts due to interference while preserving the location and orientation of edges of the scene in the reconstructed image. Our FBP-type algorithm exploits the second-order statistics of the target and noise to suppress the artifacts due to interference in a mean-square sense. We present numerical simulations to demonstrate the performance of our multistatic SAR image formation algorithm with the FBP-type bistatic SAR image reconstruction algorithm. While we mainly focus on radar applications, our image formation method is also applicable to other problems arising in fields such as acoustic, geophysical and medical imaging.

  10. Preclinical evaluation of parametric image reconstruction of [18F]FMISO PET: correlation with ex vivo immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoyin; Bayer, Christine; Maftei, Constantin-Alin; Astner, Sabrina T; Vaupel, Peter; Ziegler, Sibylle I; Shi, Kuangyu

    2014-01-20

    Compared to indirect methods, direct parametric image reconstruction (PIR) has the advantage of high quality and low statistical errors. However, it is not yet clear if this improvement in quality is beneficial for physiological quantification. This study aimed to evaluate direct PIR for the quantification of tumor hypoxia using the hypoxic fraction (HF) assessed from immunohistological data as a physiological reference. Sixteen mice with xenografted human squamous cell carcinomas were scanned with dynamic [18F]FMISO PET. Afterward, tumors were sliced and stained with H&E and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. The hypoxic signal was segmented using k-means clustering and HF was specified as the ratio of the hypoxic area over the viable tumor area. The parametric Patlak slope images were obtained by indirect voxel-wise modeling on reconstructed images using filtered back projection and ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and by direct PIR (e.g., parametric-OSEM, POSEM). The mean and maximum Patlak slopes of the tumor area were investigated and compared with HF. POSEM resulted in generally higher correlations between slope and HF among the investigated methods. A strategy for the delineation of the hypoxic tumor volume based on thresholding parametric images at half maximum of the slope is recommended based on the results of this study. PMID:24351879

  11. Preclinical evaluation of parametric image reconstruction of [18F]FMISO PET: correlation with ex vivo immunohistochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaoyin; Bayer, Christine; Maftei, Constantin-Alin; Astner, Sabrina T.; Vaupel, Peter; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Shi, Kuangyu

    2014-01-01

    Compared to indirect methods, direct parametric image reconstruction (PIR) has the advantage of high quality and low statistical errors. However, it is not yet clear if this improvement in quality is beneficial for physiological quantification. This study aimed to evaluate direct PIR for the quantification of tumor hypoxia using the hypoxic fraction (HF) assessed from immunohistological data as a physiological reference. Sixteen mice with xenografted human squamous cell carcinomas were scanned with dynamic [18F]FMISO PET. Afterward, tumors were sliced and stained with H&E and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. The hypoxic signal was segmented using k-means clustering and HF was specified as the ratio of the hypoxic area over the viable tumor area. The parametric Patlak slope images were obtained by indirect voxel-wise modeling on reconstructed images using filtered back projection and ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and by direct PIR (e.g., parametric-OSEM, POSEM). The mean and maximum Patlak slopes of the tumor area were investigated and compared with HF. POSEM resulted in generally higher correlations between slope and HF among the investigated methods. A strategy for the delineation of the hypoxic tumor volume based on thresholding parametric images at half maximum of the slope is recommended based on the results of this study.

  12. Lossless data embedding for all image formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridrich, Jessica; Goljan, Miroslav; Du, Rui

    2002-04-01

    Lossless data embedding has the property that the distortion due to embedding can be completely removed from the watermarked image without accessing any side channel. This can be a very important property whenever serious concerns over the image quality and artifacts visibility arise, such as for medical images, due to legal reasons, for military images or images used as evidence in court that may be viewed after enhancement and zooming. We formulate two general methodologies for lossless embedding that can be applied to images as well as any other digital objects, including video, audio, and other structures with redundancy. We use the general principles as guidelines for designing efficient, simple, and high-capacity lossless embedding methods for three most common image format paradigms - raw, uncompressed formats (BMP), lossy or transform formats (JPEG), and palette formats (GIF, PNG). We close the paper with examples of how the concept of lossless data embedding can be used as a powerful tool to achieve a variety of non-trivial tasks, including elegant lossless authentication using fragile watermarks. Note on terminology: some authors coined the terms erasable, removable, reversible, invertible, and distortion-free for the same concept.

  13. SAR image formation toolbox for MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, LeRoy A.; Moore, Linda J.

    2010-04-01

    While many synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation techniques exist, two of the most intuitive methods for implementation by SAR novices are the matched filter and backprojection algorithms. The matched filter and (non-optimized) backprojection algorithms are undeniably computationally complex. However, the backprojection algorithm may be successfully employed for many SAR research endeavors not involving considerably large data sets and not requiring time-critical image formation. Execution of both image reconstruction algorithms in MATLAB is explicitly addressed. In particular, a manipulation of the backprojection imaging equations is supplied to show how common MATLAB functions, ifft and interp1, may be used for straight-forward SAR image formation. In addition, limits for scene size and pixel spacing are derived to aid in the selection of an appropriate imaging grid to avoid aliasing. Example SAR images generated though use of the backprojection algorithm are provided given four publicly available SAR datasets. Finally, MATLAB code for SAR image reconstruction using the matched filter and backprojection algorithms is provided.

  14. Cloud Optimized Image Format and Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, P.; Plesea, L.; Maurer, T.

    2015-04-01

    Cloud based image storage and processing requires revaluation of formats and processing methods. For the true value of the massive volumes of earth observation data to be realized, the image data needs to be accessible from the cloud. Traditional file formats such as TIF and NITF were developed in the hay day of the desktop and assumed fast low latency file access. Other formats such as JPEG2000 provide for streaming protocols for pixel data, but still require a server to have file access. These concepts no longer truly hold in cloud based elastic storage and computation environments. This paper will provide details of a newly evolving image storage format (MRF) and compression that is optimized for cloud environments. Although the cost of storage continues to fall for large data volumes, there is still significant value in compression. For imagery data to be used in analysis and exploit the extended dynamic range of the new sensors, lossless or controlled lossy compression is of high value. Compression decreases the data volumes stored and reduces the data transferred, but the reduced data size must be balanced with the CPU required to decompress. The paper also outlines a new compression algorithm (LERC) for imagery and elevation data that optimizes this balance. Advantages of the compression include its simple to implement algorithm that enables it to be efficiently accessed using JavaScript. Combing this new cloud based image storage format and compression will help resolve some of the challenges of big image data on the internet.

  15. Quantitative analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for brain disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kwak, Byung-Joon

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively analyze data from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in patients with brain disorders and to assess its potential utility for analyzing brain function. DTI was obtained by performing 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD), and the data were analyzed using Matlab-based SPM software. The two-sample t-test was used for error analysis of the location of the activated pixels. We compared regions of white matter where the fractional anisotropy (FA) values were low and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were increased. In the AD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right sub-lobar insula, and right occipital lingual gyrus whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the right inferior frontal gyrus and right middle frontal gyrus. In the VD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right limbic cingulate gyrus, and right sub-lobar caudate tail whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the left lateral globus pallidus and left medial globus pallidus. In conclusion by using DTI and SPM analysis, we were able to not only determine the structural state of the regions affected by brain disorders but also quantitatively analyze and assess brain function.

  16. Restoration of distorted images, terahertz generation and terahertz interference based on multiple-coupled optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yujie J.

    2015-03-01

    We review our progress made on applications of coupled optical parametric oscillators based on a composite consisting of adhesive-free-bonded KTiOPO4 stacks. By using the phase- conjugate output generated by the composite, we have demonstrated that the spatial profile after the beam propagates through the phase-distorted medium can be restored to the profile before the distortion. In addition, we have restored the images being blurred by the phase distortion. We have efficiently generated terahertz outputs by mixing the idler twins from the coupled optical parametric oscillators. By using the alternatively-rotated GaP plates as an output coupler for the coupled optical parametric oscillators, we have efficiently generated terahertz waves based on an intracavity configuration. By placing both the composite and a bulk KTiOPO4 crystal in the same cavity, we have demonstrated the interference effect of the THz waves generated by using different pairs of the optical beams.

  17. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ˜15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ˜45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  18. A parametric analysis of lithospheric imaging by Full-Waveform Inversion of teleseismic body-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, Stephen; Monteiller, Vadim; Operto, Stéphane; Nolet, Guust; Virieux, Jean

    2015-04-01

    With the deployment of dense seismic arrays and the continuous growth of computing facilities, full-waveform inversion (FWI) of teleseismic data has become a method of choice for 3D high-resolution lithospheric imaging. FWI is a local optimization problem that seeks to estimate Earth's elastic properties by iteratively minimizing the misfit function between observed and modeled seismograms. Recent investigations have shown the feasibility of such local inversions by injecting a pre-computed global wavefield at the edges of the lithospheric target. In this study, we present all the methodological ingredients needed for the application of FWI to lithospheric data. The global wavefield, which is computed in an axisymmetric global earth with AxiSEM, is injected in the lithospheric target by the so-called total-field/scattered-field method. The inversion, which is implemented with an adjoint formalism, is performed following a multiscale approach, proceeding hierarchically from low to high frequencies. We further perform a parametric analysis in a realistic model representative of the Western Alps. This analysis mainly focus on the FWI sensitivity to the source characteristics. One key issue is the estimation of the temporal source excitation, as there might be some trade-off between the source estimation and the subsurface update. We also investigate the imprint of the sources repartition on the spatial resolution of the imaging, the FWI sensitivity to the accuracy of the starting model and the effects of considering a complex topography. Seismic modeling in the FWI models allows us to assess which parts of the teleseismic wavefield significantly contribute to the imaging.

  19. Gated frequency-resolved optical imaging with an optical parametric amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Cameron, S.M.; Bliss, D.E.; Kimmel, M.W.; Neal, D.R.

    1999-08-10

    A system for detecting objects in a turbid media utilizes an optical parametric amplifier as an amplifying gate for received light from the media. An optical gating pulse from a second parametric amplifier permits the system to respond to and amplify only ballistic photons from the object in the media. 13 figs.

  20. Gated frequency-resolved optical imaging with an optical parametric amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Cameron, Stewart M.; Bliss, David E.; Kimmel, Mark W.; Neal, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    A system for detecting objects in a turbid media utilizes an optical parametric amplifier as an amplifying gate for received light from the media. An optical gating pulse from a second parametric amplifier permits the system to respond to and amplify only ballistic photons from the object in the media.

  1. HOMOGENEOUS UGRIZ PHOTOMETRY FOR ACS VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY GALAXIES: A NON-PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS FROM SDSS IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chin-Wei; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; West, Andrew A.; Peng, Eric W.

    2010-11-15

    We present photometric and structural parameters for 100 ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) galaxies based on homogeneous, multi-wavelength (ugriz), wide-field SDSS (DR5) imaging. These early-type galaxies, which trace out the red sequence in the Virgo Cluster, span a factor of nearly {approx}10{sup 3} in g-band luminosity. We describe an automated pipeline that generates background-subtracted mosaic images, masks field sources and measures mean shapes, total magnitudes, effective radii, and effective surface brightnesses using a model-independent approach. A parametric analysis of the surface brightness profiles is also carried out to obtain Sersic-based structural parameters and mean galaxy colors. We compare the galaxy parameters to those in the literature, including those from the ACSVCS, finding good agreement in most cases, although the sizes of the brightest, and most extended, galaxies are found to be most uncertain and model dependent. Our photometry provides an external measurement of the random errors on total magnitudes from the widely used Virgo Cluster Catalog, which we estimate to be {sigma}(B{sub T}){approx} 0.13 mag for the brightest galaxies, rising to {approx} 0.3 mag for galaxies at the faint end of our sample (B{sub T} {approx} 16). The distribution of axial ratios of low-mass ('dwarf') galaxies bears a strong resemblance to the one observed for the higher-mass ('giant') galaxies. The global structural parameters for the full galaxy sample-profile shape, effective radius, and mean surface brightness-are found to vary smoothly and systematically as a function of luminosity, with unmistakable evidence for changes in structural homology along the red sequence. As noted in previous studies, the ugriz galaxy colors show a nonlinear but smooth variation over a {approx}7 mag range in absolute magnitude, with an enhanced scatter for the faintest systems that is likely the signature of their more diverse star formation histories.

  2. Characterization and differentiation of two mammary tumors using parametric imaging with ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2003-10-01

    Two kinds of solid tumors were acquired and scanned in vivo ultrasonically. The first tumor series (fibroadenoma) was acquired from tumors that developed spontaneously in rats. The second tumor series was acquired by culturing a carcinoma cell line (4T1-MMT) and injecting the cells into Balb/c mice. The scatterer properties (average scatterer diameter and acoustic concentration) were estimated using a Gaussian form factor from the backscattered ultrasound measured from both kinds of tumors. Parametric images of tumors were constructed utilizing estimated scatterer properties for regions of interest inside the tumors and surrounding normal tissues. The average scatterer diameter and acoustic concentration for the fibroadenomas were estimated at 107+/-14 micrometers and 15.2+/-5 dB (mm-3), respectively. The average scatterer diameter and acoustic concentration for the carcinomas was estimated at 30+/-4.6 micrometers and 10.3+/-6.9 dB (mm-3), respectively. A comparison with light microscopic evaluations of the fibroadenomas showed cellular structures around 100 micrometers in size, and carcinomas showed cell nuclei with an average size of 12.5 micrometers in diameter (the total cellular size ranging from 50% to 200% larger than the nucleus size). [Work supported by NIH F32 CA96419 to MLO and by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  3. An efficient topology adaptation system for parametric active contour segmentation of 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhau, Jochen; Scherzer, Otmar

    2008-03-01

    Active contour models have already been used succesfully for segmentation of organs from medical images in 3D. In implicit models, the contour is given as the isosurface of a scalar function, and therefore topology adaptations are handled naturally during a contour evolution. Nevertheless, explicit or parametric models are often preferred since user interaction and special geometric constraints are usually easier to incorporate. Although many researchers have studied topology adaptation algorithms in explicit mesh evolutions, no stable algorithm is known for interactive applications. In this paper, we present a topology adaptation system, which consists of two novel ingredients: A spatial hashing technique is used to detect self-colliding triangles of the mesh whose expected running time is linear with respect to the number of mesh vertices. For the topology change procedure, we have developed formulas by homology theory. During a contour evolution, we just have to choose between a few possible mesh retriangulations by local triangle-triangle intersection tests. Our algorithm has several advantages compared to existing ones: Since the new algorithm does not require any global mesh reparametrizations, it is very efficient. Since the topology adaptation system does not require constant sampling density of the mesh vertices nor especially smooth meshes, mesh evolution steps can be performed in a stable way with a rather coarse mesh. We apply our algorithm to 3D ultrasonic data, showing that accurate segmentation is obtained in some seconds.

  4. Pattern formation without diffraction matching in optical parametric oscillators with a metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Tassin, Philippe; Van der Sande, Guy; Veretennicoff, Irina; Kockaert, Pascal; Tlidi, Mustapha

    2009-05-25

    We consider a degenerate optical parametric oscillator containing a left-handed material. We show that the inclusion of a left-handed material layer allows for controlling the strength and sign of the diffraction coefficient at either the pump or the signal frequency. Subsequently, we demonstrate the existence of stable dissipative structures without diffraction matching, i.e., without the usual relationship between the diffraction coefficients of the signal and pump fields. Finally, we investigate the size scaling of these light structures with decreasing diffraction strength.

  5. Multiresolution target discrimination during image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lance M.; Oh, Seung-Mok; McClellan, James H.

    2000-08-01

    This paper presents a novel scheme to detect and discriminate landmines from other clutter objects during the image formation process for ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. By identifying likely regions containing the targets of interest, i.e., landmines, it is possible to speed up the overall formation time by pruning the processing to resolve regions that do not contain targets. The image formation algorithm is a multiscale approximation to standard backprojection known as the quadtree that uses a 'divide-and- conquer' strategy. The intermediate quadtree data admits multiresolution representations of the scene, and we develop a contrast statistic to discriminate structured/diffuse regions and an aperture diversity statistic to discriminate between regions containing mines and desert scrub. The potential advantages of this technique are illustrated using data collected at Yuma, AZ by the ARL BoomSAR system.

  6. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  7. Parametric fMRI of paced motor responses uncovers novel whole-brain imaging biomarkers in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João Valente; Faustino, Ricardo; Lobo, Mercês; Cunha, Gil; Nunes, César; Ferreira, Carlos; Januário, Cristina; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    Machado-Joseph Disease, inherited type 3 spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA3), is the most common form worldwide. Neuroimaging and neuropathology have consistently demonstrated cerebellar alterations. Here we aimed to discover whole-brain functional biomarkers, based on parametric performance-level-dependent signals. We assessed 13 patients with early SCA3 and 14 healthy participants. We used a combined parametric behavioral/functional neuroimaging design to investigate disease fingerprints, as a function of performance levels, coupled with structural MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was designed to parametrically analyze behavior and neural responses to audio-paced bilateral thumb movements at temporal frequencies of 1, 3, and 5 Hz. Our performance-level-based design probing neuronal correlates of motor coordination enabled the discovery that neural activation and behavior show critical loss of parametric modulation specifically in SCA3, associated with frequency-dependent cortico/subcortical activation/deactivation patterns. Cerebellar/cortical rate-dependent dissociation patterns could clearly differentiate between groups irrespective of grey matter loss. Our findings suggest functional reorganization of the motor network and indicate a possible role of fMRI as a tool to monitor disease progression in SCA3. Accordingly, fMRI patterns proved to be potential biomarkers in early SCA3, as tested by receiver operating characteristic analysis of both behavior and neural activation at different frequencies. Discrimination analysis based on BOLD signal in response to the applied parametric finger-tapping task significantly often reached >80% sensitivity and specificity in single regions-of-interest.Functional fingerprints based on cerebellar and cortical BOLD performance dependent signal modulation can thus be combined as diagnostic and/or therapeutic targets in hereditary ataxia. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3656-3668, 2016. © 2016 Wiley

  8. Parametric fMRI of paced motor responses uncovers novel whole-brain imaging biomarkers in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João Valente; Faustino, Ricardo; Lobo, Mercês; Cunha, Gil; Nunes, César; Ferreira, Carlos; Januário, Cristina; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2016-10-01

    Machado-Joseph Disease, inherited type 3 spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA3), is the most common form worldwide. Neuroimaging and neuropathology have consistently demonstrated cerebellar alterations. Here we aimed to discover whole-brain functional biomarkers, based on parametric performance-level-dependent signals. We assessed 13 patients with early SCA3 and 14 healthy participants. We used a combined parametric behavioral/functional neuroimaging design to investigate disease fingerprints, as a function of performance levels, coupled with structural MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was designed to parametrically analyze behavior and neural responses to audio-paced bilateral thumb movements at temporal frequencies of 1, 3, and 5 Hz. Our performance-level-based design probing neuronal correlates of motor coordination enabled the discovery that neural activation and behavior show critical loss of parametric modulation specifically in SCA3, associated with frequency-dependent cortico/subcortical activation/deactivation patterns. Cerebellar/cortical rate-dependent dissociation patterns could clearly differentiate between groups irrespective of grey matter loss. Our findings suggest functional reorganization of the motor network and indicate a possible role of fMRI as a tool to monitor disease progression in SCA3. Accordingly, fMRI patterns proved to be potential biomarkers in early SCA3, as tested by receiver operating characteristic analysis of both behavior and neural activation at different frequencies. Discrimination analysis based on BOLD signal in response to the applied parametric finger-tapping task significantly often reached >80% sensitivity and specificity in single regions-of-interest.Functional fingerprints based on cerebellar and cortical BOLD performance dependent signal modulation can thus be combined as diagnostic and/or therapeutic targets in hereditary ataxia. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3656-3668, 2016. © 2016 Wiley

  9. Novel hemispheric image formation: concepts and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Simon; Konen, Pierre; Roulet, Patrice; Villegas, Mathieu

    2008-04-01

    Panoramic and hemispheric lens technologies represent new and exciting opportunities in both imaging and projection systems. Such lenses offer intriguing applications for the transportation/automotive industry, in the protection of civilian and military areas, business. In this paper we describe a new optical design technique that provides a greater degree of freedom in producing a variety of hemispheric spatial light distribution areas. This innovative optical design strategy, of generating and controlling image mapping, has been successful in producing high-resolution imaging and projection systems. This success has subsequently generated increased interest in the high-resolution camera/projector and the concept of absolute measurement with high-resolution wide-angle lenses. The new technique described in this paper uses optimization techniques to improve the performance of a customized wide-angle lens optical system for a specific application. By adding a custom angle-to-pixel ratio at the optical design stage, this customized optical system provides ideal image coverage while reducing and optimizing signal processing. This novel image formation technique requires the development of new algorithms in order to view the panoramic image on a display without any residual distortion.

  10. Adaptive sparse reconstruction with joint parametric estimation for high-speed uniformly moving targets in coincidence imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Guofeng; Wang, Hongqiang; Yang, Zhaocheng; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2016-04-01

    As a complementary imaging technology, coincidence imaging radar (CIR) achieves high resolution for stationary or low-speed targets under the assumption of ignoring the influence of the original position mismatching. As to high-speed moving targets moving from the original imaging cell to other imaging cells during imaging, it is inaccurate to reconstruct the target using the previous imaging plane. We focus on the recovery problem for high-speed moving targets in the CIR system based on the intrapulse frequency random modulation signal in a single pulse. The effects induced by the motion on the imaging performance are analyzed. Because the basis matrix in the CIR imaging equation is determined by the unknown velocity parameter of the moving target, both the target images and basis matrix should be estimated jointly. We propose an adaptive joint parametric estimation recovery algorithm based on the Tikhonov regularization method to update the target velocity and basis matrix adaptively and recover the target images synchronously. Finally, the target velocity and target images are obtained in an iterative manner. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Image Formation in Bio-optical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Over the past two decades a number of optical sensing methods have emerged with potential to provide complementary information to traditional medical imaging modalities in application areas ranging from basic science to disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Though still largely in the research and development stage, modalities including diffuse optical tomography (DOT), fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), photo-acoustic tomography (PAT), and bio-luminescence tomography (BLT) have excited much interest due to their natural functional imaging capability, their relatively low cost, and the fact that none required the use of ionizing radiation. These advantages however are tempered by a number of challenges associated with the processing of these data. Specifically, these data types all rely in one way or another on the interaction of light with tissue. The diffusive nature of this interaction inherently limits the spatial resolution of these modalities. As a result the process of forming an image is a far more delicate task than is the case with more standard imaging modalities such as X-ray computed tomography (CT). Two basic methods have been explored to address the ill-posedness of these problems in order to improve the information content in the resulting images. The optical data may be augmented either through the use of spectral diversity or by attempting to integrate optical data types with information from other modalities such as CT or MRI. Alternatively, a mathematical technique known as regularization can be used to impose physically-based constraints on the reconstruction. In this talk, I shall provide an overview of the work in my group in optical image formation within the contexts of DOT for breast cancer imaging and FMT for small animal imaging. The focus of the talk will be on methods that integrate data augmentation and mathematical regularization. In the case of FMT, we shall discuss our work in combining the optical data with information

  12. Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Formation in Reconfigurable Logic

    SciTech Connect

    DUDLEY,PETER A.

    2001-06-01

    This paper studies the implementation of polar format, synthetic aperture radar image formation in modern Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA's). The polar format algorithm is described in rough terms and each of the processing steps is mapped to FPGA logic. This FPGA logic is analyzed with respect to throughput and circuit size for compatibility with airborne image formation.

  13. Noninvasive Characterization of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Using Textural Analysis of Quantitative Ultrasound Parametric Images

    PubMed Central

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The identification of tumor pathologic characteristics is an important part of breast cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning but currently requires biopsy as its standard. Here, we investigated a noninvasive quantitative ultrasound method for the characterization of breast tumors in terms of their histologic grade, which can be used with clinical diagnostic ultrasound data. METHODS: Tumors of 57 locally advanced breast cancer patients were analyzed as part of this study. Seven quantitative ultrasound parameters were determined from each tumor region from the radiofrequency data, including mid-band fit, spectral slope, 0-MHz intercept, scatterer spacing, attenuation coefficient estimate, average scatterer diameter, and average acoustic concentration. Parametric maps were generated corresponding to the region of interest, from which four textural features, including contrast, energy, homogeneity, and correlation, were determined as further tumor characterization parameters. Data were examined on the basis of tumor subtypes based on histologic grade (grade I versus grade II to III). RESULTS: Linear discriminant analysis of the means of the parametric maps resulted in classification accuracy of 79%. On the other hand, the linear combination of the texture features of the parametric maps resulted in classification accuracy of 82%. Finally, when both the means and textures of the parametric maps were combined, the best classification accuracy was obtained (86%). CONCLUSIONS: Textural characteristics of quantitative ultrasound spectral parametric maps provided discriminant information about different types of breast tumors. The use of texture features significantly improved the results of ultrasonic tumor characterization compared to conventional mean values. Thus, this study suggests that texture-based quantitative ultrasound analysis of in vivo breast tumors can provide complementary diagnostic information about tumor histologic characteristics

  14. The Planet Formation Imager (PFI) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, Alicia; Monnier, John; Kraus, Stefan; Ireland, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Among the most fascinating and hotly-debated areas in contemporary astrophysics are the means by which planetary systems are assembled from the large rotating disks of gas and dust which attend a stellar birth. Although important work is being done both in theory and observation, a full understanding of the physics of planet formation can only be achieved by opening observational windows able to directly witness the process in action. The key requirement is then to probe planet-forming systems at the natural spatial scales over which material is being assembled. By definition, this is the so-called Hill Sphere, which delineates the region of influence of a gravitating body within its surrounding environment. The Planet Formation Imager project has crystallized around this challenging goal: to deliver resolved images of Hill-Sphere-sized structures within candidate planet-hosting disks in the nearest star-forming regions. In this contribution I outline the primary science case of PFI and give an overview about the work of the PFI science and technical working group and present radiation-hydrodynamics simulations from which we derive preliminary specifications that guide the design of the facility. Finally, I give an overview about the technologies that we are investigating in order to meet the specifications.

  15. Featured Image: A Bubble Triggering Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This remarkable false-color, mid-infrared image (click for the full view!) was produced by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). It captures a tantalizing view of Sh 2-207 and Sh 2-208, the latter of which is one of the lowest-metallicity star-forming regions in the Galaxy. In a recent study led by Chikako Yasui (University of Tokyo and the Koyama Astronomical Observatory), a team of scientists has examined this region to better understand how star formation in low-metallicity environments differs from that in the solar neighborhood. The authors analysis suggests that sequential star formation is taking place in these low-metallicity regions, triggered by an expanding bubble (the large dashed oval indicated in the image) with a ~30 pc radius. You can find out more about their study by checking out the paper below!CitationChikako Yasui et al 2016 AJ 151 115. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/151/5/115

  16. Rate of Pu(IV) polymer formation in nitric acid solutions. A parametric study

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Osborne, M.M.

    1984-07-01

    The kinetics of Pu(IV) polymer formation has been examined with the intent of developing a simple mathematical equation that would predict the appearance of polymer. The fundamental polymerization rate has been found to be dependent on [Pu(IV)]{sup 1} {sup 2} and [HNO{sub 3}]{sup -6}. The activation energy for polymer formation is real temperature dependent, varying from 66.9 kJ/mol (16 kcal/mol) at 25{sup 0}C to 150.5 kJ/mol (36 kcal/mol) at 105{sup 0}C. These relationships have guided the developement of an empirical model that gives time to form 2% polymer in hours, t = [Pu/sub T/]/sup a/[HNO{sub 3}]/sup b/ Ae/sup c/T/, where a = -1.6, b = 4.6, c = 12.300 K, and A = 7.66 x 10{sup -16} h M{sup -3}; [Pu/sub T/] is the total plutonium concentration, mol/L; and [HNO{sub 3}] is the makeup nitric acid concentration, mol/L. 11 references, 26 figures, 1 table.

  17. Incorporating outlier detection and replacement into a non-parametric framework for movement and distortion correction of diffusion MR images.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jesper L R; Graham, Mark S; Zsoldos, Enikő; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N

    2016-11-01

    Despite its great potential in studying brain anatomy and structure, diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is marred by artefacts more than any other commonly used MRI technique. In this paper we present a non-parametric framework for detecting and correcting dMRI outliers (signal loss) caused by subject motion. Signal loss (dropout) affecting a whole slice, or a large connected region of a slice, is frequently observed in diffusion weighted images, leading to a set of unusable measurements. This is caused by bulk (subject or physiological) motion during the diffusion encoding part of the imaging sequence. We suggest a method to detect slices affected by signal loss and replace them by a non-parametric prediction, in order to minimise their impact on subsequent analysis. The outlier detection and replacement, as well as correction of other dMRI distortions (susceptibility-induced distortions, eddy currents (EC) and subject motion) are performed within a single framework, allowing the use of an integrated approach for distortion correction. Highly realistic simulations have been used to evaluate the method with respect to its ability to detect outliers (types 1 and 2 errors), the impact of outliers on retrospective correction of movement and distortion and the impact on estimation of commonly used diffusion tensor metrics, such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Data from a large imaging project studying older adults (the Whitehall Imaging sub-study) was used to demonstrate the utility of the method when applied to datasets with severe subject movement. The results indicate high sensitivity and specificity for detecting outliers and that their deleterious effects on FA and MD can be almost completely corrected. PMID:27393418

  18. SPARCO : a semi-parametric approach for image reconstruction of chromatic objects. Application to young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluska, J.; Malbet, F.; Berger, J.-P.; Baron, F.; Lazareff, B.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Monnier, J. D.; Soulez, F.; Thiébaut, E.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The emergence of optical interferometers with three and more telescopes allows image reconstruction of astronomical objects at the milliarcsecond scale. However, some objects contain components with very different spectral energy distributions (SED; i.e. different temperatures), which produces strong chromatic effects on the interferograms that have to be managed with care by image reconstruction algorithms. For example, the gray approximation for the image reconstruction process results in a degraded image if the total (u,v)-coverage given by the spectral supersynthesis is used. Aims: The relative flux contribution of the central object and an extended structure changes with wavelength for different temperatures. For young stellar objects, the known characteristics of the central object (i.e., stellar SED), or even the fit of the spectral index and the relative flux ratio, can be used to model the central star while reconstructing the image of the extended structure separately. Methods: We present a new method, called SPARCO (semi-parametric algorithm for the image reconstruction of chromatic objects), which describes the spectral characteristics of both the central object and the extended structure to consider them properly when reconstructing the image of the surrounding environment. We adapted two image-reconstruction codes ( Macim , Squeeze , and MiRA ) to implement this new prescription. Results: SPARCO is applied using Macim , Squeeze , and MiRA on a young stellar object model and also on literature data on HR 5999 in the near-infrared with the VLTI. We obtain smoother images of the modeled circumstellar emission and improve the χ2 by a factor 9. Conclusions: This method paves the way to improved aperture-synthesis imaging of several young stellar objects with existing datasets. More generally, the approach can be used on astrophysical sources with similar features, such as active galactic nuclei, planetary nebulae, and asymptotic giant branch

  19. Parametric Experimental Study of the Formation of Glaze Ice Shapes on Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Reshotko, Eli

    1999-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effect of velocity and sweep angle on the critical distance in ice accretion formation on swept wings at glaze ice conditions. The critical distance is defined as the distance from the attachment line to the beginning of the zone where roughness elements develop into glaze ice feathers. Icing runs were performed on a NACA 00 1 2 swept wing tip at velocities of 75, 100, 150, and 200 miles per hour. At each velocity and tunnel condition, the sweep angle was changed from 0 deg to 45 deg at 5 deg increments. Casting data, ice shape tracings, and close-up photographic data were obtained. The results showed that at given velocity and tunnel conditions, as the sweep angle is increased from 0 deg to 25 deg the critical distance slowly decreases. As the sweep angle is increased past 25 deg, the critical distance starts decreasing more rapidly. For 75 and 100 mph it reaches a value of 0 millimeters at 35 deg. For 150 and 200 mph it reaches a value of 0 millimeters at 40 deg. On the ice accretion, as the sweep angle is increased from 0 deg to 25 deg, the extent of the attachment line zone slowly decreases. In the glaze ice feathers zone, the angle that the preferred direction of growth of the feathers makes with respect to the attachment line direction increases. But overall, the ice accretions remain similar to the 0 deg sweep angle case. As the sweep angle is increased above 25 deg, the extent of the attachment line zone decreases rapidly and complete scallops form at 35 deg sweep angle for 75 and 100 mph, and at 40 deg for 150 and 200 mph.

  20. Medusae Fossae Formation - High Resolution Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An exotic terrain of wind-eroded ridges and residual smooth surfaces are seen in one of the highest resolution images ever taken of Mars from orbit. The Medusae Fossae formation is believed to be formed of the fragmental ejecta of huge explosive volcanic eruptions. When subjected to intense wind-blasting over hundreds of millions of years, this material erodes easily once the uppermost tougher crust is breached. The crust, or cap rock, can be seen in the upper right part of the picture. The finely-spaced ridges are similar to features on Earth called yardangs, which are formed by intense winds plucking individual grains from, and by wind-driven sand blasting particles off, sedimentary deposits.

    The image was taken on October 30, 1997 at 11:05 AM PST, shortly after the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft's 31st closest approach to Mars. The image covers an area 3.6 X 21.5 km (2.2 X 13.4 miles) at 3.6 m (12 feet) per picture element--craters only 11 m (36 feet, about the size of a swimming pool) across can be seen. The best Viking view of the area (VO 1 387S34) has a resolution of 240 m/pixel, or 67 times lower resolution than the MOC frame.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  1. Statistical parametric mapping and cluster counting analysis of [18F] FDG-PET imaging in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Mitsis, Effie M; Chu, Kingwai; Newmark, Randall E; Hazlett, Erin A; Buchsbaum, Monte S

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated regional cerebral glucose metabolism abnormalities of [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). PET images of 81 TBI patients and 68 normal controls were acquired and a word list learning task was administered during the uptake period. The TBI group included 35 patients with positive structural imaging (CT or MRI) findings soon after injury, 40 patients with negative findings, and 6 cases without structural imaging. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis was applied with several levels of spatial smoothing. Cluster counting analysis was performed for each subject to identify abnormal clusters with contiguous voxel values that deviated by two standard deviations or more from the mean of the normal controls, and to count the number of clusters in 10 size categories. SPM maps demonstrated that the 81 patients had significantly lower FDG uptake than normal controls, widely across the cortex (including bilateral frontal and temporal regions), and in the thalamus. Cluster counting results indicated that TBI patients had a higher proportion of larger clusters than controls. These large low-FDG-uptake clusters of the TBI patients were closer to the brain edge than those of controls. These results suggest that deficits of cerebral metabolism in TBI are spread over multiple brain areas, that they are closer to the cortical surface than clusters in controls, and that group spatial patterns of abnormal cerebral metabolism may be similar in TBI patients with cognitive deficits with and without obvious acute abnormalities identified on structural imaging.

  2. Patch diameter limits for tiered subaperture SAR image formation algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-12-31

    Synthetic Aperture Radar image formation algorithms typically use transform techniques that often requires trading between image resolution, algorithm efficiency, and focussed image scene size limits. This is due to assumptions for the data such as simplified (often straight-line) flight paths, simplified imaging geometry, and simplified models for phase functions. Many errors in such assumptions are typically untreatable due to their dependence on both data domain positions and image domain positions. The result is that large scenes often require inefficient multiple image formation iterations, followed by a mosaicking operation of the focussed image patches. One class of image formation algorithms that performs favorably divides the spatial and frequency apertures into subapertures, and perhaps those subapertures into sub-subapertures, and so on, in a tiered subaperture fashion. This allows a gradual shift from data domain into image domain that allows correcting many types of errors that limit other image formation algorithms, even in a dynamic motion environment, thereby allowing larger focussed image patches without mosaicking. This paper presents and compares focussed patch diameter limits for tiered subaperture (TSA) image formation algorithms, for various numbers of tiers of subapertures. Examples are given that show orders-of-magnitude improvement in non-mosaicked focussed image patch size over traditional polar format processing, and that patch size limits increase with the number of tiers of subapertures, although with diminishing returns.

  3. Image Formation in Lenses and Mirrors, a Complete Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Albert A.

    1976-01-01

    Provides tables and graphs that give a complete and simple picture of the relationships of image distance, object distance, and magnification in all formations of images by simple lenses and mirrors. (CP)

  4. A beamforming algorithm for bistatic SAR image formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David Alan; Wahl, Daniel Eugene; Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    Beamforming is a methodology for collection-mode-independent SAR image formation. It is essentially equivalent to backprojection. The authors have in previous papers developed this idea and discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the approach to monostatic SAR image formation vis--vis the more standard and time-tested polar formatting algorithm (PFA). In this paper we show that beamforming for bistatic SAR imaging leads again to a very simple image formation algorithm that requires a minimal number of lines of code and that allows the image to be directly formed onto a three-dimensional surface model, thus automatically creating an orthorectified image. The same disadvantage of beamforming applied to monostatic SAR imaging applies to the bistatic case, however, in that the execution time for the beamforming algorithm is quite long compared to that of PFA. Fast versions of beamforming do exist to help alleviate this issue. Results of image reconstructions from phase history data are presented.

  5. Multi-parametric monitoring and assessment of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) boiling by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): an ex vivo feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-03-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and change in relative phase shift during high energy HIFU treatment with tissue boiling. Forty three (n = 43) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 28). Two-dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10 s, 20 s and 30 s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11 W, which were selected and verified as treatment parameters capable of inducing boiling using both thermocouple and passive cavitation detection (PCD) measurements. Although a steady decrease in the displacement, compressive strain, and relative change in the focal phase shift (Δϕ) were obtained in numerous cases, indicating an overall increase in relative stiffness, the study outcomes also showed that during boiling, a reverse lesion-to-background displacement contrast was detected, indicating potential change in tissue absorption, geometrical change and/or, mechanical gelatification or pulverization. Following treatment, corresponding 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions also mapped consistent discrepancy in the lesion-to-background displacement contrast. Despite the expectedly chaotic changes in acoustic properties with boiling, the relative change in phase shift showed a consistent decrease, indicating its robustness to monitor biomechanical properties independent of the acoustic property changes throughout the HIFU treatment. In addition, the 2D HMI displacement images confirmed and indicated the increase in the thermal lesion size with

  6. Medical imaging V: Image capture, formatting, and display

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Digital image display I-V; Quality assurance I-V; Clinical image presentation I-V; Imaging systems; Image compression; Workstations; and Medical diagnostic imaging support system for military medicine and other federal agencies.

  7. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    organism, we needed to first turn our attention to a well understood organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a well-studied organism and will be used to compare our results with others. Then, we will turn our attention to TD. It is expected that the research performed will provide key data to validate biochemical studies of TD and result in high profile publications in leading journals. For this project, our ultimate goal was to combine both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experimental analysis with computer simulations to provide unique 3D molecular structural, dynamics, and functional information on the order of microns for this DOE mission relevant microorganism, T. denitrificans. For FY05, our goals were to: (1) Determine proper media for optimal growth of PA; growth rate measurements in that media and characterization of metabolite signatures during growth via {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, (2) Determine and build mineral, metal, and implant material surfaces to support growth of PA, (3) Implementing new MRI sequences to image biofilms more efficiently and increase resolution with new hardware design, (4) Develop further diffusion and flow MRI measurements of biofilms and biofilm formation with different MRI pulse sequences and different hardware design, and (5) Develop a zero dimension model of the rate of growth and the metabolite profiles of PA. Our major accomplishments are discussed in the following text. However, the bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled, ''NMR Metabolomics of Planktonic and Biofilm Modes of Growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa''. This paper will be submitted to the Journal of Bacteriology in coming weeks. In addition, this one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign during FY05 for some proof-of-principle MRI measurements on polymers. We are currently using similar methods to evaluate these polymers. In addition, this work on MRI measurements

  8. Single molecule image formation, reconstruction and processing: introduction.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Amit; Piestun, Rafael; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2016-07-01

    The ability to image at the single molecule scale has revolutionized research in molecular biology. This feature issue presents a collection of articles that provides new insights into the fundamental limits of single molecule imaging and reports novel techniques for image formation and analysis. PMID:27409708

  9. Combination of an optical parametric oscillator and quantum-dots 655 to improve imaging depth of vasculature by intravital multicolor two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Clément; Lamasse, Lisa; Jaouen, Alexandre; Rougon, Geneviève; Debarbieux, Franck

    2016-06-01

    Simultaneous imaging of different cell types and structures in the mouse central nervous system (CNS) by intravital two-photon microscopy requires the characterization of fluorophores and advances in approaches to visualize them. We describe the use of a two-photon infrared illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) on quantum-dots 655 (QD655) nanocrystals to improve resolution of the vasculature deeper in the mouse brain both in healthy and pathological conditions. Moreover, QD655 signal can be unmixed from the DsRed2, CFP, EGFP and EYFP fluorescent proteins, which enhances the panel of multi-parametric correlative investigations both in the cortex and the spinal cord.

  10. Non parametric denoising methods based on wavelets: Application to electron microscopy images in low exposure time

    SciTech Connect

    Soumia, Sid Ahmed; Messali, Zoubeida; Ouahabi, Abdeldjalil; Trepout, Sylvain E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr Messaoudi, Cedric E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr Marco, Sergio E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr

    2015-01-13

    The 3D reconstruction of the Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Energy Filtering TEM images (EFTEM) hampered by the noisy nature of these images, so that their alignment becomes so difficult. This noise refers to the collision between the frozen hydrated biological samples and the electrons beam, where the specimen is exposed to the radiation with a high exposure time. This sensitivity to the electrons beam led specialists to obtain the specimen projection images at very low exposure time, which resulting the emergence of a new problem, an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper investigates the problem of TEM images denoising when they are acquired at very low exposure time. So, our main objective is to enhance the quality of TEM images to improve the alignment process which will in turn improve the three dimensional tomography reconstructions. We have done multiple tests on special TEM images acquired at different exposure time 0.5s, 0.2s, 0.1s and 1s (i.e. with different values of SNR)) and equipped by Golding beads for helping us in the assessment step. We herein, propose a structure to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structure is based on four different denoising methods, to combine the multiple noisy TEM images copies. Namely, the four different methods are Soft, the Hard as Wavelet-Thresholding methods, Bilateral Filter as a non-linear technique able to maintain the edges neatly, and the Bayesian approach in the wavelet domain, in which context modeling is used to estimate the parameter for each coefficient. To ensure getting a high signal-to-noise ratio, we have guaranteed that we are using the appropriate wavelet family at the appropriate level. So we have chosen âĂIJsym8âĂİ wavelet at level 3 as the most appropriate parameter. Whereas, for the bilateral filtering many tests are done in order to determine the proper filter parameters represented by the size of the filter, the range parameter and the

  11. Whole-body direct 4D parametric PET imaging employing nested generalized Patlak expectation–maximization reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Casey, Michael E.; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-08-01

    Whole-body (WB) dynamic PET has recently demonstrated its potential in translating the quantitative benefits of parametric imaging to the clinic. Post-reconstruction standard Patlak (sPatlak) WB graphical analysis utilizes multi-bed multi-pass PET acquisition to produce quantitative WB images of the tracer influx rate K i as a complimentary metric to the semi-quantitative standardized uptake value (SUV). The resulting K i images may suffer from high noise due to the need for short acquisition frames. Meanwhile, a generalized Patlak (gPatlak) WB post-reconstruction method had been suggested to limit K i bias of sPatlak analysis at regions with non-negligible 18F-FDG uptake reversibility; however, gPatlak analysis is non-linear and thus can further amplify noise. In the present study, we implemented, within the open-source software for tomographic image reconstruction platform, a clinically adoptable 4D WB reconstruction framework enabling efficient estimation of sPatlak and gPatlak images directly from dynamic multi-bed PET raw data with substantial noise reduction. Furthermore, we employed the optimization transfer methodology to accelerate 4D expectation–maximization (EM) convergence by nesting the fast image-based estimation of Patlak parameters within each iteration cycle of the slower projection-based estimation of dynamic PET images. The novel gPatlak 4D method was initialized from an optimized set of sPatlak ML-EM iterations to facilitate EM convergence. Initially, realistic simulations were conducted utilizing published 18F-FDG kinetic parameters coupled with the XCAT phantom. Quantitative analyses illustrated enhanced K i target-to-background ratio (TBR) and especially contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) performance for the 4D versus the indirect methods and static SUV. Furthermore, considerable convergence acceleration was observed for the nested algorithms involving 10–20 sub-iterations. Moreover, systematic reduction in K i % bias and improved TBR were

  12. Whole-body direct 4D parametric PET imaging employing nested generalized Patlak expectation-maximization reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Casey, Michael E.; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-08-01

    Whole-body (WB) dynamic PET has recently demonstrated its potential in translating the quantitative benefits of parametric imaging to the clinic. Post-reconstruction standard Patlak (sPatlak) WB graphical analysis utilizes multi-bed multi-pass PET acquisition to produce quantitative WB images of the tracer influx rate K i as a complimentary metric to the semi-quantitative standardized uptake value (SUV). The resulting K i images may suffer from high noise due to the need for short acquisition frames. Meanwhile, a generalized Patlak (gPatlak) WB post-reconstruction method had been suggested to limit K i bias of sPatlak analysis at regions with non-negligible 18F-FDG uptake reversibility; however, gPatlak analysis is non-linear and thus can further amplify noise. In the present study, we implemented, within the open-source software for tomographic image reconstruction platform, a clinically adoptable 4D WB reconstruction framework enabling efficient estimation of sPatlak and gPatlak images directly from dynamic multi-bed PET raw data with substantial noise reduction. Furthermore, we employed the optimization transfer methodology to accelerate 4D expectation-maximization (EM) convergence by nesting the fast image-based estimation of Patlak parameters within each iteration cycle of the slower projection-based estimation of dynamic PET images. The novel gPatlak 4D method was initialized from an optimized set of sPatlak ML-EM iterations to facilitate EM convergence. Initially, realistic simulations were conducted utilizing published 18F-FDG kinetic parameters coupled with the XCAT phantom. Quantitative analyses illustrated enhanced K i target-to-background ratio (TBR) and especially contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) performance for the 4D versus the indirect methods and static SUV. Furthermore, considerable convergence acceleration was observed for the nested algorithms involving 10-20 sub-iterations. Moreover, systematic reduction in K i % bias and improved TBR were

  13. Whole-body direct 4D parametric PET imaging employing nested generalized Patlak expectation-maximization reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Casey, Michael E; Lodge, Martin A; Rahmim, Arman; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-08-01

    Whole-body (WB) dynamic PET has recently demonstrated its potential in translating the quantitative benefits of parametric imaging to the clinic. Post-reconstruction standard Patlak (sPatlak) WB graphical analysis utilizes multi-bed multi-pass PET acquisition to produce quantitative WB images of the tracer influx rate K i as a complimentary metric to the semi-quantitative standardized uptake value (SUV). The resulting K i images may suffer from high noise due to the need for short acquisition frames. Meanwhile, a generalized Patlak (gPatlak) WB post-reconstruction method had been suggested to limit K i bias of sPatlak analysis at regions with non-negligible (18)F-FDG uptake reversibility; however, gPatlak analysis is non-linear and thus can further amplify noise. In the present study, we implemented, within the open-source software for tomographic image reconstruction platform, a clinically adoptable 4D WB reconstruction framework enabling efficient estimation of sPatlak and gPatlak images directly from dynamic multi-bed PET raw data with substantial noise reduction. Furthermore, we employed the optimization transfer methodology to accelerate 4D expectation-maximization (EM) convergence by nesting the fast image-based estimation of Patlak parameters within each iteration cycle of the slower projection-based estimation of dynamic PET images. The novel gPatlak 4D method was initialized from an optimized set of sPatlak ML-EM iterations to facilitate EM convergence. Initially, realistic simulations were conducted utilizing published (18)F-FDG kinetic parameters coupled with the XCAT phantom. Quantitative analyses illustrated enhanced K i target-to-background ratio (TBR) and especially contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) performance for the 4D versus the indirect methods and static SUV. Furthermore, considerable convergence acceleration was observed for the nested algorithms involving 10-20 sub-iterations. Moreover, systematic reduction in K i % bias and improved TBR were

  14. Impact of temporal, spatial and cascaded effects on the pulse formation in ultra-broadband parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Lang, T; Harth, A; Matyschok, J; Binhammer, T; Schultze, M; Morgner, U

    2013-01-14

    A 2 + 1 dimensional nonlinear pulse propagation model is presented, illustrating the weighting of different effects for the parametric amplification of ultra-broadband spectra in different regimes of energy scaling. Typical features in the distribution of intensity and phase of state-of-the-art OPA-systems can be understood by cascaded spatial and temporal effects.

  15. Impact of temporal, spatial and cascaded effects on the pulse formation in ultra-broadband parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Lang, T; Harth, A; Matyschok, J; Binhammer, T; Schultze, M; Morgner, U

    2013-01-14

    A 2 + 1 dimensional nonlinear pulse propagation model is presented, illustrating the weighting of different effects for the parametric amplification of ultra-broadband spectra in different regimes of energy scaling. Typical features in the distribution of intensity and phase of state-of-the-art OPA-systems can be understood by cascaded spatial and temporal effects. PMID:23388988

  16. Differential two-signal picosecond-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging microscopy by using a dual-mode optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yong Shim; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Cho, Hyuck

    2007-11-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel differential two-signal technique of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging microscopy using a picosecond (ps) optical parametric oscillator (OPO). By adjusting a Lyot filter inside the cavity, we operated the OPO oscillating in two stable modes separated by a few nanometers. The CARS images generated by the two modes are separated by a spectrograph behind the microscope setup, and their differential image is directly obtained by balanced lock-in detection. The feasibility of the technique is experimentally verified by imaging micrometer-sized polystyrene beads immersed in water. PMID:18026271

  17. Parametric modelling and segmentation of vertebral bodies in 3D CT and MR spine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2011-12-01

    Accurate and objective evaluation of vertebral deformations is of significant importance in clinical diagnostics and therapy of pathological conditions affecting the spine. Although modern clinical practice is focused on three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, the established methods for evaluation of vertebral deformations are limited to measuring deformations in two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images. In this paper, we propose a method for quantitative description of vertebral body deformations by efficient modelling and segmentation of vertebral bodies in 3D. The deformations are evaluated from the parameters of a 3D superquadric model, which is initialized as an elliptical cylinder and then gradually deformed by introducing transformations that yield a more detailed representation of the vertebral body shape. After modelling the vertebral body shape with 25 clinically meaningful parameters and the vertebral body pose with six rigid body parameters, the 3D model is aligned to the observed vertebral body in the 3D image. The performance of the method was evaluated on 75 vertebrae from CT and 75 vertebrae from T2-weighted MR spine images, extracted from the thoracolumbar part of normal and pathological spines. The results show that the proposed method can be used for 3D segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT and MR images, as the proposed 3D model is able to describe both normal and pathological vertebral body deformations. The method may therefore be used for initialization of whole vertebra segmentation or for quantitative measurement of vertebral body deformations.

  18. Effect of injection technique on temporal parametric imaging derived from digital subtraction angiography in patient specific phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Garcia, Victor L.; Bednarek, Daniel R; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Parametric imaging maps (PIM’s) derived from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the cerebral arterial flow assessment in clinical settings have been proposed, but experiments have yet to determine the reliability of such studies. For this study, we have observed the effects of different injection techniques on PIM’s. A flow circuit set to physiologic conditions was created using an internal carotid artery phantom. PIM’s were derived for two catheter positions, two different contrast bolus injection volumes (5ml and 10 ml), and four injection rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 ml/s). Using a gamma variate fitting approach, we derived PIM’s for mean-transit-time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP) and bolus-arrivaltime (BAT). For the same injection rates, a larger bolus resulted in an increased MTT and TTP, while a faster injection rate resulted in a shorter MTT, TTP, and BAT. In addition, the position of the catheter tip within the vasculature directly affected the PIM. The experiment showed that the PIM is strongly correlated with the injection conditions, and, therefore, they have to be interpreted with caution. PIM images must be taken from the same patient to be able to be meaningfully compared. These comparisons can include pre- and post-treatment images taken immediately before and after an interventional procedure or simultaneous arterial flow comparisons through the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Due to the strong correlation between PIM and injection conditions, this study indicates that this assessment method should be used only to compare flow changes before and after treatment within the same patient using the same injection conditions. PMID:25302010

  19. Generalized whole-body Patlak parametric imaging for enhanced quantification in clinical PET.

    PubMed

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Zhou, Yun; Lodge, Martin A; Casey, Michael E; Wahl, Richard L; Zaidi, Habib; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-11-21

    We recently developed a dynamic multi-bed PET data acquisition framework to translate the quantitative benefits of Patlak voxel-wise analysis to the domain of routine clinical whole-body (WB) imaging. The standard Patlak (sPatlak) linear graphical analysis assumes irreversible PET tracer uptake, ignoring the effect of FDG dephosphorylation, which has been suggested by a number of PET studies. In this work: (i) a non-linear generalized Patlak (gPatlak) model is utilized, including a net efflux rate constant kloss, and (ii) a hybrid (s/g)Patlak (hPatlak) imaging technique is introduced to enhance contrast to noise ratios (CNRs) of uptake rate Ki images. Representative set of kinetic parameter values and the XCAT phantom were employed to generate realistic 4D simulation PET data, and the proposed methods were additionally evaluated on 11 WB dynamic PET patient studies. Quantitative analysis on the simulated Ki images over 2 groups of regions-of-interest (ROIs), with low (ROI A) or high (ROI B) true kloss relative to Ki, suggested superior accuracy for gPatlak. Bias of sPatlak was found to be 16-18% and 20-40% poorer than gPatlak for ROIs A and B, respectively. By contrast, gPatlak exhibited, on average, 10% higher noise than sPatlak. Meanwhile, the bias and noise levels for hPatlak always ranged between the other two methods. In general, hPatlak was seen to outperform all methods in terms of target-to-background ratio (TBR) and CNR for all ROIs. Validation on patient datasets demonstrated clinical feasibility for all Patlak methods, while TBR and CNR evaluations confirmed our simulation findings, and suggested presence of non-negligible kloss reversibility in clinical data. As such, we recommend gPatlak for highly quantitative imaging tasks, while, for tasks emphasizing lesion detectability (e.g. TBR, CNR) over quantification, or for high levels of noise, hPatlak is instead preferred. Finally, gPatlak and hPatlak CNR was systematically higher compared to routine SUV

  20. Generalized whole-body Patlak parametric imaging for enhanced quantification in clinical PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Zhou, Yun; Lodge, Martin A.; Casey, Michael E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Zaidi, Habib; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-11-01

    We recently developed a dynamic multi-bed PET data acquisition framework to translate the quantitative benefits of Patlak voxel-wise analysis to the domain of routine clinical whole-body (WB) imaging. The standard Patlak (sPatlak) linear graphical analysis assumes irreversible PET tracer uptake, ignoring the effect of FDG dephosphorylation, which has been suggested by a number of PET studies. In this work: (i) a non-linear generalized Patlak (gPatlak) model is utilized, including a net efflux rate constant kloss, and (ii) a hybrid (s/g)Patlak (hPatlak) imaging technique is introduced to enhance contrast to noise ratios (CNRs) of uptake rate Ki images. Representative set of kinetic parameter values and the XCAT phantom were employed to generate realistic 4D simulation PET data, and the proposed methods were additionally evaluated on 11 WB dynamic PET patient studies. Quantitative analysis on the simulated Ki images over 2 groups of regions-of-interest (ROIs), with low (ROI A) or high (ROI B) true kloss relative to Ki, suggested superior accuracy for gPatlak. Bias of sPatlak was found to be 16-18% and 20-40% poorer than gPatlak for ROIs A and B, respectively. By contrast, gPatlak exhibited, on average, 10% higher noise than sPatlak. Meanwhile, the bias and noise levels for hPatlak always ranged between the other two methods. In general, hPatlak was seen to outperform all methods in terms of target-to-background ratio (TBR) and CNR for all ROIs. Validation on patient datasets demonstrated clinical feasibility for all Patlak methods, while TBR and CNR evaluations confirmed our simulation findings, and suggested presence of non-negligible kloss reversibility in clinical data. As such, we recommend gPatlak for highly quantitative imaging tasks, while, for tasks emphasizing lesion detectability (e.g. TBR, CNR) over quantification, or for high levels of noise, hPatlak is instead preferred. Finally, gPatlak and hPatlak CNR was systematically higher compared to routine SUV

  1. Principles of MR image formation and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Duerk, J L

    1999-11-01

    This article describes a number of concepts that provide insights into the process of MR imaging. The use of shaped, fixed-bandwidth RF pulses and magnetic field gradients is described to provide an understanding of the methods used for slice selection. Variations in the slice-excitation profile are shown as a function of the RF pulse shape used, the truncation method used, and the tip angle. It should be remembered that although the goal is to obtain uniform excitation across the slice, this goal is never achieved in practice, thus necessitating the use of slice gaps in some cases. Excitation, refocusing, and inversion pulses are described. Excitation pulses nutate the spins from the longitudinal axis into the transverse plane, where their magnetization can be detected. Refocusing pulses are used to flip the magnetization through 180 degrees once it is in the transverse plane, so that the influence of magnetic field inhomogeneities is eliminated. Inversion pulses are used to flip the magnetization from the +z to the -z direction in invesrsion-recovery sequences. Radiofrequency pulses can also be used to eliminate either fat or water protons from the images because of the small differences in resonant frequency between these two types of protons. Selective methods based on chemical shift and binomial methods are described. Once the desired magnetization has been tipped into the transverse plane by the slice-selection process, two imaging axes remain to be spatially encoded. One axis is easily encoded by the application of a second magnetic field gradient that establishes a one-to-one mapping between position and frequency during the time that the signal is converted from analog to digital sampling. This frequency-encoding gradient is used in combination with the Fourier transform to determine the location of the precessing magnetization. The second image axis is encoded by a process known as phase encoding. The collected data can be described as the 2D Fourier

  2. Effects of registration error on parametric response map analysis: a simulation study using liver CT-perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lausch, A.; Jensen, N. K. G.; Chen, J.; Lee, T. Y.; Lock, M.; Wong, E.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of registration error (RE) on parametric response map (PRM) analysis of pre and post-radiotherapy (RT) functional images. Methods: Arterial blood flow maps (ABF) were generated from the CT-perfusion scans of 5 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. ABF values within each patient map were modified to produce seven new ABF maps simulating 7 distinct post-RT functional change scenarios. Ground truth PRMs were generated for each patient by comparing the simulated and original ABF maps. Each simulated ABF map was then deformed by different magnitudes of realistic respiratory motion in order to simulate RE. PRMs were generated for each of the deformed maps and then compared to the ground truth PRMs to produce estimates of RE-induced misclassification. Main findings: The percentage of voxels misclassified as decreasing, no change, and increasing, increased with RE For all patients, increasing RE was observed to increase the number of high post-RT ABF voxels associated with low pre-RT ABF voxels and vice versa. 3 mm of average tumour RE resulted in 18-45% tumour voxel misclassification rates. Conclusions: RE induced misclassification posed challenges for PRM analysis in the liver where registration accuracy tends to be lower. Quantitative understanding of the sensitivity of the PRM method to registration error is required if PRMs are to be used to guide radiation therapy dose painting techniques.

  3. Parametric analysis of an imaging radar for use as an imaging radar for use as an independent landing monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundick, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    The capabilities are analyzed of a real aperture, forward-looking imaging radar for use as an independent landing monitor, which will provide the pilot with an independent means of assessing the progress of an automatic landing during Category 3 operations. The analysis shows that adequate ground resolution and signal-to-noise ratio can be obtained to image a runway with grassy surroundings using a radar operating at 35 GHz in good weather and in most fog but that performance is severely degraded in moderate to heavy rain and wet snow. Weather effects on a 10 GHz imager are not serious, with the possible exception of very heavy rain, but the azimuthal resolution at 10 GHz is inadequate with antennas up to 2 m long.

  4. A parametric analysis of two-dimensional elastic full waveform inversion of teleseismic data for lithospheric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pageot, Damien; Operto, Stéphane; Vallée, Martin; Brossier, Romain; Virieux, Jean

    2013-06-01

    The development of dense networks of broad-band seismographs makes teleseismic data amenable to full-waveform inversion (FWI) methods for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. Compared to scattered-field migration, FWI seeks to involve the full seismic wavefield in the inversion. We present a parametric analysis of 2-D frequency-domain FWI in the framework of lithospheric imaging from teleseismic data to identify the main factors that impact on the quality of the reconstructed compressional (P)-wave and shear (S)-wave speed models. Compared to controlled-source seismology, the main adaptation of FWI to teleseismic configuration consists of the implementation with a scattered-filed formulation of plane-wave sources that impinge on the base of the lithospheric target located below the receiver network at an arbitrary incidence angle. Seismic modelling is performed with a hp-adaptive discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured triangular mesh. A quasi-Newton inversion algorithm provides an approximate accounting for the Hessian operator, which contributes to reduce the footprint of the coarse acquisition geometry in the imaging. A versatile algorithm to compute the gradient of the misfit function with the adjoint-state method allows for abstraction between the forward-problem operators and the meshes that are during seismic modelling and inversion, respectively. An approximate correction for obliquity is derived for future application to real teleseismic data under the two-dimension approximation. Comparisons between the characteristic scales involved in exploration geophysics and in teleseismic seismology suggest that the resolution gain provided by full waveform technologies should be of the same order of magnitude for both applications. We first show the importance of the surface-reflected wavefield to dramatically improve the resolving power of FWI by combining tomography-like and migration-like imaging through the incorporation of the forward-scattered and the

  5. Parametric techniques for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 1): T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Perea Palazón, R J; Ortiz Pérez, J T; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Solé Arqués, M

    2016-01-01

    The development of myocardial fibrosis is a common process in the appearance of ventricular dysfunction in many heart diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to accurately evaluate the structure and function of the heart, and its role in the macroscopic characterization of myocardial fibrosis by late enhancement techniques has been widely validated clinically. Recent studies have demonstrated that T1-mapping techniques can quantify diffuse myocardial fibrosis and the expansion of the myocardial extracellular space in absolute terms. However, further studies are necessary to validate the usefulness of this technique in the early detection of tissue remodeling at a time when implementing early treatment would improve a patient's prognosis. This article reviews the state of the art for T1 mapping of the myocardium, its clinical applications, and its limitations.

  6. Parametric methods for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 2): T2 mapping.

    PubMed

    Perea Palazón, R J; Solé Arqués, M; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Ortiz Pérez, J T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is considered the reference technique for characterizing myocardial tissue; for example, T2-weighted sequences make it possible to evaluate areas of edema or myocardial inflammation. However, traditional sequences have many limitations and provide only qualitative information. Moreover, traditional sequences depend on the reference to remote myocardium or skeletal muscle, which limits their ability to detect and quantify diffuse myocardial damage. Recently developed magnetic resonance myocardial mapping techniques enable quantitative assessment of parameters indicative of edema. These techniques have proven better than traditional sequences both in acute cardiomyopathy and in acute ischemic heart disease. This article synthesizes current developments in T2 mapping as well as their clinical applications and limitations.

  7. Parametric techniques for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 1): T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Perea Palazón, R J; Ortiz Pérez, J T; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Solé Arqués, M

    2016-01-01

    The development of myocardial fibrosis is a common process in the appearance of ventricular dysfunction in many heart diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to accurately evaluate the structure and function of the heart, and its role in the macroscopic characterization of myocardial fibrosis by late enhancement techniques has been widely validated clinically. Recent studies have demonstrated that T1-mapping techniques can quantify diffuse myocardial fibrosis and the expansion of the myocardial extracellular space in absolute terms. However, further studies are necessary to validate the usefulness of this technique in the early detection of tissue remodeling at a time when implementing early treatment would improve a patient's prognosis. This article reviews the state of the art for T1 mapping of the myocardium, its clinical applications, and its limitations. PMID:26944850

  8. Parametric methods for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 2): T2 mapping.

    PubMed

    Perea Palazón, R J; Solé Arqués, M; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Ortiz Pérez, J T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is considered the reference technique for characterizing myocardial tissue; for example, T2-weighted sequences make it possible to evaluate areas of edema or myocardial inflammation. However, traditional sequences have many limitations and provide only qualitative information. Moreover, traditional sequences depend on the reference to remote myocardium or skeletal muscle, which limits their ability to detect and quantify diffuse myocardial damage. Recently developed magnetic resonance myocardial mapping techniques enable quantitative assessment of parameters indicative of edema. These techniques have proven better than traditional sequences both in acute cardiomyopathy and in acute ischemic heart disease. This article synthesizes current developments in T2 mapping as well as their clinical applications and limitations. PMID:26315259

  9. Geometric Constructions for Image Formation by a Converging Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Light rays emerge from an object in all directions. In introductory texts, three "special" rays are selected to draw the image produced by lenses and mirrors. This presentation may suggest to students that these three rays are necessary for the formation of an image. We discuss that the three rays attain their "special status" from the geometric…

  10. Multi-parametric imaging of cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic response followed by ischemic injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-02-01

    We use rodent parietal cortex as a model system and utilize a synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle imaging (SDW-LSCI) technique to explore the hemodynamic response of infarct and penumbra to a brain injury (middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model). The SDW-LSCI system is able to take snapshots rapidly (maximum 500 Hz) over the entire brain surface, providing key information about the hemodynamic response, in terms of which it may be used to elucidate evolution of penumbra region from onsite to 90 min of MCAO. Changes in flow are quantified as to the flow experiencing physical occlusions of the MCA normalized to that of baseline. Furthermore, the system is capable of providing information as to the changes of the concentration of oxygenated, (HbO) deoxygenated (Hb), and total hemoglobin (HbT) in the cortex based on the spectral characteristics of HbO and Hb. We observe that the oxygenation variations in the four regions are detectable and distinct. Combining the useful information, four regions of interest (ROI), infarct, penumbra, reduced flow and contralateral portions in the brain upon ischemic injury may be differentiated. Implications of our results are discussed with respect to current understanding of the mechanisms underlying MCAO. We anticipate that SDW-LSCI holds promise for rapid and large field of view localization of ischemic injury.

  11. Parametric approaches to micro-scale characterization of tissue volumes in vivo and ex vivo: Imaging microvasculature, attenuation, birefringence, and stiffness (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, David D.; Chin, Lixin; Gong, Peijun; Wijesinghe, Philip; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Allen, Wesley M.; Klyen, Blake R.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; McLaughlin, Robert A.

    2016-03-01

    INVITED TALK Advances in imaging tissue microstructure in living subjects, or in freshly excised tissue with minimum preparation and processing, are important for future diagnosis and surgical guidance in the clinical setting, particularly for application to cancer. Whilst microscopy methods continue to advance on the cellular scale and medical imaging is well established on the scale of the whole tumor or organ, it is attractive to consider imaging the tumor environment on the micro-scale, between that of cells and whole tissues. Such a scenario is ideally suited to optical coherence tomography (OCT), with the twin attractions of requiring little or no tissue preparation, and in vivo capability. OCT's intrinsic scattering contrast reveals many morphological features of tumors, but is frequently ineffective in revealing other important aspects, such as microvasculature, or in reliably distinguishing tumor from uninvolved stroma. To address these shortcomings, we are developing several advances on the basic OCT approach. We are exploring speckle fluctuations to image tissue microvasculature and we have been developing several parametric approaches to tissue micro-scale characterization. Our approaches extract, from a three-dimensional OCT data set, a two-dimensional image of an optical parameter, such as attenuation or birefringence, or a mechanical parameter, such as stiffness, that aids in characterizing the tissue. This latter method, termed optical coherence elastography, parallels developments in ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Parametric imaging of birefringence and of stiffness both show promise in addressing the important issue of differentiating cancer from uninvolved stroma in breast tissue.

  12. Large format, high resolution images sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blouke, Morley M.; Corrie, B.; Heidtmann, Denis L.; Yang, F. H.; Winzenread, M.; Lust, M. L.; Marsh, H. H.; Janesick, James R.

    1987-01-01

    The performance requirements for scientific-quality CCDs are discussed, focusing on the design of two devices, and the progress toward achieving the desired performance is discussed. These devices are intended for rear-illuminated applications and have 512 x 512 and 2048 x 2048 pixel formats. The thinned 10 to 20 micron thick Si membrane is fully supported by a unique glass ceramic substrate. Quantum efficiencies of greater than 70 percent at 700 nm and greater than 40 percent at wavelengths less than 400 nm have been measured on a test device. Dark currents as low as 6 pA/sq cm also have been measured recently.

  13. Image formation using stimulated raman scattering gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, V. G.; Makarov, E. A.; Stasel'ko, D. I.

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical analysis of the spatial, noise, and energy characteristics of an amplifier has been performed in the mode of spectral and time selection using subnanosecond stimulated Raman Scattering gain of weak echo signals in crystalline active media that are known for high (up to 10-1 cm/MW) gain coefficients. The possibility to reach high gain values has been demonstrated for weak signals from objects at acceptable angular sizes of the field of vision of an amplifier. To provide a signal-to-noise ratio that exceeds unity over the entire field of vision, the number of photons at the input to an amplifier that is required has to exceed the number of its resolution elements. Accurate determination of the possibilities of recording of weak echo signals and quality of images of targets that are obtained using amplifiers under stimulated Raman Scattering requires additional special experiments.

  14. Target detection during image formation for ultrawideband radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lance M.; Oh, Seung-Mok; McClellan, James H.; Murenzi, Romain; Namuduri, Kameswara R.

    1999-09-01

    In this work, we introduce a detection scheme that is able to identify regions of interest during the intermediate stages of an image formation process for ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar. Traditional detection methods manipulate the data after image formation. However, this approach wastes computational resources by resolving to completion the entire scene including area dominated by benign clutter. As an alternative, we introduce a multiscale focus of attention (FOA) algorithm that processes intermediate radar data from a quadtree-based backprojection image formation algorithm. As the stages of the quadtree algorithm progress, the FOA thresholds a detection statistic that estimates the signal-to-background ratio for increasingly smaller subpatches. Whenever a subpatch fails a detection, the FOA cues the image formation processor to terminate further processing of that subpatch. We demonstrate that the FOA is able to decrease the overall computational load of the image formation process by a factor of two. We also show that the new FOA method provides fewer false alarms than the two-parameter CFAR FOA over a small database of UWB radar data.

  15. Effects of using inclined parametric echosounding on sub-bottom acoustic imaging and advances in buried object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Held, Philipp; Feldens, Peter; Wilken, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    This study reports an adaptation of a parametric echosounder system using 15 kHz as secondary frequency to investigate the angular response of sub-bottom backscatter strength of layered mud, providing a new method for enhanced acoustic detection of buried targets. Adaptions to achieve both vertical (0°) and non-vertical inclination (1-15°, 30°, 45° and 60°) comprise mechanical tilting of the acoustic transducer and electronic beam steering. Data were acquired at 18 m water depth at a study site characterized by a flat, muddy seafloor where a 0.1 m diameter power cable lies 1-2 m below the seafloor. Surveying the cable with vertical incidence revealed that the buried cable can hardly be discriminated against the backscatter strength of the layered mud. However, the backscatter strength of layered mud decreases strongly at >3±0.5° incidence and the layered mud echo pattern vanishes beyond 5°. As a consequence, the backscatter pattern of the buried cable is very pronounced in acoustic images gathered at 15°, 30°, 45° and 60° incidence. The size of the cable echo pattern increases linearly with incidence. These effects are attributed to reflection loss from layered mud at larger incidence and to the scattering of the 0.1 m diameter buried cable. Data analyses support the visual impression of superior detection of the cable with an up to 2.6-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio at 40° incidence compared to the vertical incidence case.

  16. Topological defect formation in 1D and 2D spin chains realized by network of optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamerly, Ryan; Inaba, Kensuke; Inagaki, Takahiro; Takesue, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    A network of optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) is used to simulate classical Ising and XY spin chains. The collective nonlinear dynamics of this network, driven by quantum noise rather than thermal fluctuations, seeks out the Ising/XY ground state as the system transitions from below to above the lasing threshold. We study the behavior of this “Ising machine” for three canonical problems: a 1D ferromagnetic spin chain, a 2D square lattice and problems where next-nearest-neighbor couplings give rise to frustration. If the pump turn-on time is finite, topological defects form (domain walls for the Ising model, winding number and vortices for XY) and their density can be predicted from a numerical model involving a linear “growth stage” and a nonlinear “saturation stage”. These predictions are compared against recent data for a 10,000-spin 1D Ising machine.

  17. Combination of an optical parametric oscillator and quantum-dots 655 to improve imaging depth of vasculature by intravital multicolor two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ricard, Clément; Lamasse, Lisa; Jaouen, Alexandre; Rougon, Geneviève; Debarbieux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of different cell types and structures in the mouse central nervous system (CNS) by intravital two-photon microscopy requires the characterization of fluorophores and advances in approaches to visualize them. We describe the use of a two-photon infrared illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) on quantum-dots 655 (QD655) nanocrystals to improve resolution of the vasculature deeper in the mouse brain both in healthy and pathological conditions. Moreover, QD655 signal can be unmixed from the DsRed2, CFP, EGFP and EYFP fluorescent proteins, which enhances the panel of multi-parametric correlative investigations both in the cortex and the spinal cord. PMID:27375951

  18. Transmission of digital images within the NTSC analog format

    DOEpatents

    Nickel, George H.

    2004-06-15

    HDTV and NTSC compatible image communication is done in a single NTSC channel bandwidth. Luminance and chrominance image data of a scene to be transmitted is obtained. The image data is quantized and digitally encoded to form digital image data in HDTV transmission format having low-resolution terms and high-resolution terms. The low-resolution digital image data terms are transformed to a voltage signal corresponding to NTSC color subcarrier modulation with retrace blanking and color bursts to form a NTSC video signal. The NTSC video signal and the high-resolution digital image data terms are then transmitted in a composite NTSC video transmission. In a NTSC receiver, the NTSC video signal is processed directly to display the scene. In a HDTV receiver, the NTSC video signal is processed to invert the color subcarrier modulation to recover the low-resolution terms, where the recovered low-resolution terms are combined with the high-resolution terms to reconstruct the scene in a high definition format.

  19. A comparison of spotlight synthetic aperture radar image formation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Knittle, C.D.; Doren, N.E.; Jakowatz, C.V.

    1996-10-01

    Spotlight synthetic aperture radar images can be formed from the complex phase history data using two main techniques: (1) polar-to-cartesian interpolation followed by two-dimensional inverse Fourier transform (2DFFT), and (2) convolution backprojection (CBP). CBP has been widely used to reconstruct medical images in computer aided tomography, and only recently has been applied to form synthetic aperture radar imagery. It is alleged that CBP yields higher quality images because (1) all the Fourier data are used and (2) the polar formatted data is used directly to form a 2D Cartesian image and therefore 2D interpolation is not required. This report compares the quality of images formed by CBP and several modified versions of the 2DFFT method. We show from an image quality point of view that CBP is equivalent to first windowing the phase history data and then interpolating to an exscribed rectangle. From a mathematical perspective, we should expect this conclusion since the same Fourier data are used to form the SAR image. We next address the issue of parallel implementation of each algorithm. We dispute previous claims that CBP is more readily parallelizable than the 2DFFT method. Our conclusions are supported by comparing execution times between massively parallel implementations of both algorithms, showing that both experience similar decreases in computation time, but that CBP takes significantly longer to form an image.

  20. Radio astronomical image formation using constrained least squares and Krylov subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouri Sardarabadi, Ahmad; Leshem, Amir; van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    2016-04-01

    Aims: Image formation for radio astronomy can be defined as estimating the spatial intensity distribution of celestial sources throughout the sky, given an array of antennas. One of the challenges with image formation is that the problem becomes ill-posed as the number of pixels becomes large. The introduction of constraints that incorporate a priori knowledge is crucial. Methods: In this paper we show that in addition to non-negativity, the magnitude of each pixel in an image is also bounded from above. Indeed, the classical "dirty image" is an upper bound, but a much tighter upper bound can be formed from the data using array processing techniques. This formulates image formation as a least squares optimization problem with inequality constraints. We propose to solve this constrained least squares problem using active set techniques, and the steps needed to implement it are described. It is shown that the least squares part of the problem can be efficiently implemented with Krylov-subspace-based techniques. We also propose a method for correcting for the possible mismatch between source positions and the pixel grid. This correction improves both the detection of sources and their estimated intensities. The performance of these algorithms is evaluated using simulations. Results: Based on parametric modeling of the astronomical data, a new imaging algorithm based on convex optimization, active sets, and Krylov-subspace-based solvers is presented. The relation between the proposed algorithm and sequential source removing techniques is explained, and it gives a better mathematical framework for analyzing existing algorithms. We show that by using the structure of the algorithm, an efficient implementation that allows massive parallelism and storage reduction is feasible. Simulations are used to compare the new algorithm to classical CLEAN. Results illustrate that for a discrete point model, the proposed algorithm is capable of detecting the correct number of sources

  1. Comparative evaluation of Logan and relative-equilibrium graphical methods for parametric imaging of dynamic [18F]FDDNP PET determinations

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Koon-Pong; Kepe, Vladimir; Dahlbom, Magnus; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Small, Gary W.; Barrio, Jorge R.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Logan graphical analysis with cerebellum as reference region has been widely used for the estimation of the distribution volume ratio (DVR) of [18F]FDDNP as a measure of amyloid burden and tau deposition in human brain because of its simplicity and computational ease. However, spurious parametric DVR images may be produced with shorter scanning times and when the noise level is high. In this work, we have characterized a relative-equilibrium-based (RE) graphical method against the Logan analysis for parametric imaging and region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. Methods Dynamic [18F]FDDNP PET scans were performed on 9 control subjects and 12 patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Using the cerebellum as reference input, regional DVR estimates were derived using both the Logan analysis and the RE plot approach. Effects on DVR estimates obtained at voxel and ROI levels by both graphical approaches using data in different time windows were investigated and compared with the standard values derived using the Logan analysis on a voxel-by-voxel basis for the time window of 35–125 min used in previous studies. Results Larger bias and variability were observed for DVR estimates obtained by the Logan graphical analysis at the voxel level when short time windows (85–125 and 45–65 min) were used, because of high noise levels in voxel-wise parametric imaging. However, when the Logan graphical analysis was applied at the ROI level over those short time windows, the DVR estimates did not differ significantly from the standard values derived using the Logan analysis on the voxel level for the time window of 35–125 min, and their bias and variability were remarkably lower. Conversely, the RE plot approach was more robust in providing DVR estimates with less bias and variability even when short time windows were used. The DVR estimates obtained at voxel and ROI levels were consistent. No significant differences were observed in DVR estimates obtained by the RE plot

  2. Near Infrared (NIR) Imaging Techniques Using Lasers and Nonlinear Crystal Optical Parametric Oscillator/Amplifier (OPO/OPA) Imaging and Transferred Electron (TE) Photocathode Image Intensifiers

    SciTech Connect

    YATES,GEORGE J.; MCDONALD,THOMAS E. JR.; BLISS,DAVID E.; CAMERON,STEWART M.; GREIVES,KENNETH H.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.

    2000-12-20

    Laboratory experiments utilizing different near-infrared (NIR) sensitive imaging techniques for LADAR range gated imaging at eye-safe wavelengths are presented. An OPO/OPA configuration incorporating a nonlinear crystal for wavelength conversion of 1.56 micron probe or broadcast laser light to 807 nm light by utilizing a second pump laser at 532 nm for gating and gain, was evaluated for sensitivity, resolution, and general image quality. These data are presented with similar test results obtained from an image intensifier based upon a transferred electron (TE) photocathode with high quantum efficiency (QE) in the 1-2 micron range, with a P-20 phosphor output screen. Data presented include range-gated imaging performance in a cloud chamber with varying optical attenuation of laser reflectance images.

  3. SAR image formation with azimuth interpolation after azimuth transform

    DOEpatents

    Doerry; Armin W. , Martin; Grant D. , Holzrichter; Michael W.

    2008-07-08

    Two-dimensional SAR data can be processed into a rectangular grid format by subjecting the SAR data to a Fourier transform operation, and thereafter to a corresponding interpolation operation. Because the interpolation operation follows the Fourier transform operation, the interpolation operation can be simplified, and the effect of interpolation errors can be diminished. This provides for the possibility of both reducing the re-grid processing time, and improving the image quality.

  4. Image formation in the eye: very specified complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzmann, David E.

    2005-08-01

    The formation of an image, and its correct interpretation by sighted living creatures, is a unique example of specified complexity unlike anything else in nature. While many of the functional aspects of living organisms are extremely complex, only an image requires a unique mapping process by the eye-brain system to be useful to the organism. The transfer of light from an object scene to a visual detection system (eye + brain) conveys an enormous amount of information. But unless that information is correctly organized into a useful image, the exchange of information is degraded and of questionable use. This paper examines the "connections" necessary for images to be interpreted correctly, as well as addressing the additional complexity requirement of dual-image mapping for stereovision capabilities. Statistics are presented for "simple eyes" consisting of a few pixels to illustrate the daunting task that random chance has to produce any form of a functional eye. For example, a 12-pixel eye (or camera) has 12! (479,001,600) possible pixel-to-brain (computer) wiring combinations, which can then be compared to the 126 million rods/cones of the actual human eye. If one tries to "connect the wires" (correctly interpret the information contained) in a 12-pixel image by random processes, by the time 6 pixels become correctly connected, over 99.9% of all the trials are incorrect, producing "noise" rather than a recognizable image. Higher numbers of pixels quickly make the problem astronomically worse for achieving any kind of useful image. This paper concludes that random-chance purposeless undirected processes cannot account for how images are perceived by living organisms.

  5. Image formation by and wave propagation in a photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimi, Patanjali; Vodo, Plarenta; Wentao, Lu; di Gennaro, Emiliano; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2004-03-01

    Negative refraction and imaging by a flat slab of a material are two of the important consequences of lefthanded electromagnetism. In our recent work we have demonstrated negative refraction and imaging by photonic crystals in the microwave frequency range [1]. The details of image formation are intriguing and urge its investigation. We have carried out microwave measurements in a parallel plate waveguide made of a pair of metallic plates. The Photonic crystal is made of alumina rods arranged on a square lattice such that the electric field is parallel to the axis of the rods. The detector is a dipole antenna which is inserted into the waveguide from outside. HP 8510C network analyzer is used to measure the complex transmission coefficient . The intensity maps of vs. probe position are obtained by scanning the probe using an x-y robot, both inside and outside the crystal. The results suggest Bloch wave propagation inside the crystal and that the image formation requires a better understanding than a simple ray diagram following geometric optics. [1] P. V. Parimi et al., Nature, 426, 404 (2003).

  6. Stimulated parametric emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Keisuke; Kataoka, Shogo; Murase, Rena; Watanabe, Wataru; Higashi, Tsunehito; Kawakami, Shigeki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Fukui, Kiichi; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    We propose a novel microscopy technique based on the four-wave mixing (FWM) process that is enhanced by two-photon electronic resonance induced by a pump pulse along with stimulated emission induced by a dump pulse. A Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used as light sources for the pump and dump pulses, respectively. We demonstrate that our proposed FWM technique can be used to obtain a one-dimensional image of ethanol-thinned Coumarin 120 solution sandwiched between a hole-slide glass and a cover slip, and a two-dimensional image of a leaf of Camellia sinensis.

  7. High Speed Large Format Photon Counting Microchannel Plate Imaging Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.; Vallerga, J.; Craven, C.; Popecki, M.; O'Mahony, A.; Minot, M.

    The development of a new class of microchannel plate technology, using atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques applied to a borosilicate microcapillary array is enabling the implementation of larger, more stable detectors for Astronomy and remote sensing. Sealed tubes with MCPs with SuperGenII, bialkali, GaAs and GaN photocathodes have been developed to cover a wide range of optical/UV sensing applications. Formats of 18mm and 25mm circular, and 50mm (Planacon) and 20cm square have been constructed for uses from night time remote reconnaissance and biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, to large area focal plane imagers for Astronomy, neutron detection and ring imaging Cherenkov detection. The large focal plane areas were previously unattainable, but the new developments in construction of ALD microchannel plates allow implementation of formats of 20cm or more. Continuing developments in ALD microchannel plates offer improved overall sealed tube lifetime and gain stability, and furthermore show reduced levels of radiation induced background. High time resolution astronomical and remote sensing applications can be addressed with microchannel plate based imaging, photon time tagging detector sealed tube schemes. Photon counting imaging readouts for these devices vary from cross strip (XS), cross delay line (XDL), to stripline anodes, and pad arrays depending on the intended application. The XS and XDL readouts have been implemented in formats from 22mm, and 50mm to 20cm. Both use MCP charge signals detected on two orthogonal layers of conductive fingers to encode event X-Y positions. XDL readout uses signal propagation delay to encode positions while XS readout uses charge cloud centroiding. Spatial resolution readout of XS detectors can be better than 20 microns FWHM, with good image linearity while using low gain (<10^6), allowing high local counting rates and longer overall tube lifetime. XS tubes with electronics can encode event

  8. Computational image formation with photon sieves for milli-arcsecond solar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktem, Figen S.; Kamalabadi, Farzad; Davila, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    A photon sieve is a modification of a Fresnel zone plate in which open zones are replaced by a large number of circular holes. This diffractive imaging element is specially suited to observations at UV and x-ray wavelengths where refractive lenses are not available due to strong absorption of materials, and reflective mirrors are difficult to manufacture with sufficient surface figure accuracy to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. On the other hand, photon sieves enable diffraction-limited imaging with much more relaxed tolerances than conventional imaging technology. In this presentation, we present the capabilities of an instrument concept that is based on computational image formation with photon sieves. The instrument enables high-resolution spectral imaging by distributing the imaging task between a photon sieve system and a computational method. A photon sieve coupled with a moving detector provides measurements from multiple planes. Then computational image formation, which involves deconvolution, is performed in a Bayesian estimation framework to reconstruct the multi-spectral images from these measurements. In addition to diffraction-limited high spatial resolution enabled by photon sieves, this instrument can also achieve higher spectral resolution than the conventional spectral imagers, since the technique offers the possibility of separating nearby spectral components that would not otherwise be possible using wavelength filters. Here, the promising capabilities and the imaging performance are shown for imaging the solar corona at EUV wavelengths. The effectiveness of various potential observing scenarios, the effects of interfering emission lines, and the appropriate form of the cost function for image deconvolution are examined.

  9. Impact of time-of-flight on indirect 3D and direct 4D parametric image reconstruction in the presence of inconsistent dynamic PET data.

    PubMed

    Kotasidis, F A; Mehranian, A; Zaidi, H

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic parameter estimation in dynamic PET suffers from reduced accuracy and precision when parametric maps are estimated using kinetic modelling following image reconstruction of the dynamic data. Direct approaches to parameter estimation attempt to directly estimate the kinetic parameters from the measured dynamic data within a unified framework. Such image reconstruction methods have been shown to generate parametric maps of improved precision and accuracy in dynamic PET. However, due to the interleaving between the tomographic and kinetic modelling steps, any tomographic or kinetic modelling errors in certain regions or frames, tend to spatially or temporally propagate. This results in biased kinetic parameters and thus limits the benefits of such direct methods. Kinetic modelling errors originate from the inability to construct a common single kinetic model for the entire field-of-view, and such errors in erroneously modelled regions could spatially propagate. Adaptive models have been used within 4D image reconstruction to mitigate the problem, though they are complex and difficult to optimize. Tomographic errors in dynamic imaging on the other hand, can originate from involuntary patient motion between dynamic frames, as well as from emission/transmission mismatch. Motion correction schemes can be used, however, if residual errors exist or motion correction is not included in the study protocol, errors in the affected dynamic frames could potentially propagate either temporally, to other frames during the kinetic modelling step or spatially, during the tomographic step. In this work, we demonstrate a new strategy to minimize such error propagation in direct 4D image reconstruction, focusing on the tomographic step rather than the kinetic modelling step, by incorporating time-of-flight (TOF) within a direct 4D reconstruction framework. Using ever improving TOF resolutions (580 ps, 440 ps, 300 ps and 160 ps), we demonstrate that direct 4D TOF image

  10. Impact of time-of-flight on indirect 3D and direct 4D parametric image reconstruction in the presence of inconsistent dynamic PET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotasidis, F. A.; Mehranian, A.; Zaidi, H.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic parameter estimation in dynamic PET suffers from reduced accuracy and precision when parametric maps are estimated using kinetic modelling following image reconstruction of the dynamic data. Direct approaches to parameter estimation attempt to directly estimate the kinetic parameters from the measured dynamic data within a unified framework. Such image reconstruction methods have been shown to generate parametric maps of improved precision and accuracy in dynamic PET. However, due to the interleaving between the tomographic and kinetic modelling steps, any tomographic or kinetic modelling errors in certain regions or frames, tend to spatially or temporally propagate. This results in biased kinetic parameters and thus limits the benefits of such direct methods. Kinetic modelling errors originate from the inability to construct a common single kinetic model for the entire field-of-view, and such errors in erroneously modelled regions could spatially propagate. Adaptive models have been used within 4D image reconstruction to mitigate the problem, though they are complex and difficult to optimize. Tomographic errors in dynamic imaging on the other hand, can originate from involuntary patient motion between dynamic frames, as well as from emission/transmission mismatch. Motion correction schemes can be used, however, if residual errors exist or motion correction is not included in the study protocol, errors in the affected dynamic frames could potentially propagate either temporally, to other frames during the kinetic modelling step or spatially, during the tomographic step. In this work, we demonstrate a new strategy to minimize such error propagation in direct 4D image reconstruction, focusing on the tomographic step rather than the kinetic modelling step, by incorporating time-of-flight (TOF) within a direct 4D reconstruction framework. Using ever improving TOF resolutions (580 ps, 440 ps, 300 ps and 160 ps), we demonstrate that direct 4D TOF image

  11. A Contrast Enhancement Method for HDR Image Using a Modified Image Formation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Byoung-Ju; Hong, Hee-Dong; Choi, Ho-Hyoung

    Poor illumination and viewing conditions have negativeinfluences on the quality of an image, especially the contrast of the dark and bright region. Thus, captured and displayed images usually need contrast enhancement. Histogram-based or gamma correction-based methods are generally utilized for this. However, these methods are global contrast enhancement method, and since the sensitivity of the human eye changes locally according to the position of the object and the illumination in the scene, the global contrast enhancement methods have a limit. The spatial adaptive method is needed to overcome these limitations and it has led to the development of an integrated surround retinex (ISR), and estimation of dominant chromaticity (EDC) methods. However, these methods are based on Gray-World Assumption, and they use a general image formation model, so the color constancy is known to get poor results, shown through graying-out, halo-artifacts (ringing effects), and the dominated color. This paper presents a contrast enhancement method using a modified image formation model in which the image is divided into three components: global illumination, local illumination and reflectance. After applying the power constant value to control the contrast in the resulting image, the output image is obtained from their product to avoid or minimize a color distortion, based on the sRGB color representation. The experimental results show that the proposed method yields better performances than conventional methods.

  12. The science case for the Planet Formation Imager (PFI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Stefan; Monnier, John; Harries, Tim; Dong, Ruobing; Bate, Matthew; Whitney, Barbara; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Buscher, David; Berger, Jean-Philippe; Haniff, Chris; Ireland, Mike; Labadie, Lucas; Lacour, Sylvestre; Petrov, Romain; Ridgway, Steve; Surdej, Jean; ten Brummelaar, Theo; Tuthill, Peter; van Belle, Gerard

    2014-07-01

    Among the most fascinating and hotly-debated areas in contemporary astrophysics are the means by which planetary systems are assembled from the large rotating disks of gas and dust which attend a stellar birth. Although important work has already been, and is still being done both in theory and observation, a full understanding of the physics of planet formation can only be achieved by opening observational windows able to directly witness the process in action. The key requirement is then to probe planet-forming systems at the natural spatial scales over which material is being assembled. By definition, this is the so-called Hill Sphere which delineates the region of influence of a gravitating body within its surrounding environment. The Planet Formation Imager project (PFI; http://www.planetformationimager.org) has crystallized around this challenging goal: to deliver resolved images of Hill-Sphere-sized structures within candidate planethosting disks in the nearest star-forming regions. In this contribution we outline the primary science case of PFI. For this purpose, we briefly review our knowledge about the planet-formation process and discuss recent observational results that have been obtained on the class of transition disks. Spectro-photometric and multi-wavelength interferometric studies of these systems revealed the presence of extended gaps and complex density inhomogeneities that might be triggered by orbiting planets. We present detailed 3-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of disks with single and multiple embedded planets, from which we compute synthetic images at near-infrared, mid-infrared, far-infrared, and sub-millimeter wavelengths, enabling a direct comparison of the signatures that are detectable with PFI and complementary facilities such as ALMA. From these simulations, we derive some preliminary specifications that will guide the array design and technology roadmap of the facility.

  13. Polar format algorithm for SAR imaging with Matlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Ross; Best, Matthew; Farrell, Sean

    2014-06-01

    Due to its computational efficiency, the polar format algorithm (PFA) is considered by many to be the workhorse for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. PFA is implemented in spatial Fourier space, also known as "K-space", which is a convenient domain for understanding SAR performance metrics, sampling requirements, etc. In this paper the mathematics behind PFA are explained and computed examples are presented, both using simulated data, and experimental airborne radar data from the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Gotcha Challenge collect. In addition, a simple graphical method is described that can be used to model and predict wavefront curvature artifacts in PFA imagery, which are due to the limited validity of the underlying far-field approximation. The appendix includes Matlab code for computing SAR images using PFA.

  14. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  15. High-pulse-energy mid-infrared fractional-image-rotation-enhancement ZnGeP2 optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Marc; Schellhorn, Martin; Haakestad, Magnus W; Fonnum, Helge; Lippert, Espen

    2016-06-01

    A high-energy mid-infrared ZnGeP2 (ZGP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on the nonplanar fractional-image-rotation enhancement resonator pumped by a 2.05 μm Ho3+:YLF laser is presented. Up to 120 mJ pulse energy in a rotationally symmetric beam is generated in the 3-5 μm wavelength range at 1 Hz repetition rate. Slope efficiencies of up to 78% are achieved with respect to the pump pulse energy incident onto the ZGP crystal. The OPO pulses have a duration close to 15 ns, corresponding to a maximum peak power of 8 MW. A measurement of M2 dependence on pump beam diameter is presented.

  16. Mid-infrared rotated image singly resonant twisted rectangle optical parametric oscillator based on HgGa(2)S(4) pumped at 1064 nm.

    PubMed

    Marchev, Georgi; Reza, Manuel; Badikov, Valeriy; Esteban-Martin, Adolfo; Stöppler, Georg; Starikova, Marina; Badikov, Dmitrii; Panyutin, Vladimir; Eichhorn, Marc; Shevyrdyaeva, Galina; Tyazhev, Aleksey; Sheina, Svetlana; Agnesi, Antonio; Fintisova, Anna; Petrov, Valentin

    2014-11-20

    We compare linear, planar ring, and rotated image singly resonant twisted rectangle (RISTRA) type nanosecond optical parametric oscillator cavities using HgGa2S4 nonlinear crystal pumped by 8 ns pulses at 1064 nm from a low beam quality pump source. The input-output characteristics and the output idler beam quality at 6300 nm are compared for two values of the pump beam diameter presenting different cavity Fresnel numbers and magnitudes of the spatial walk-off effect due to birefringence. The RISTRA cavity ensures in all cases a circular output beam profile but is advantageous in terms of beam quality with respect to the planar ring only at a large pump beam diameter. PMID:25607872

  17. Monitoring tumor response of prostate cancer to radiation therapy by multi-parametric 1H and hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Vickie Yi

    Radiation therapy is one of the most common curative therapies for patients with localized prostate cancer, but despite excellent success rates, a significant number of patients suffer post- treatment cancer recurrence. The accurate characterization of early tumor response remains a major challenge for the clinical management of these patients. Multi-parametric MRI/1H MR spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) has been shown to increase the diagnostic performance in evaluating the effectiveness of radiation therapy. 1H MRSI can detect altered metabolic profiles in cancerous tissue. In this project, the concentrations of prostate metabolites from snap-frozen biopsies of recurrent cancer after failed radiation therapy were correlated with histopathological findings to identify quantitative biomarkers that predict for residual aggressive versus indolent cancer. The total choline to creatine ratio was significantly higher in recurrent aggressive versus indolent cancer, suggesting that use of a higher threshold tCho/Cr ratio in future in vivo 1H MRSI studies could improve the selection and therapeutic planning for patients after failed radiation therapy. Varying radiation doses may cause a diverse effect on prostate cancer micro-environment and metabolism, which could hold the key to improving treatment protocols for individual patients. The recent development and clinical translation of hyperpolarized 13C MRI have provided the ability to monitor both changes in the tumor micro-environment and its metabolism using a multi-probe approach, [1-13C]pyruvate and 13C urea, combined with 1H Multi-parametric MRI. In this thesis, hyperpolarized 13C MRI, 1H dynamic contrast enhancement, and diffusion weighted imaging were used to identify early radiation dose response in a transgenic prostate cancer model. Hyperpolarized pyruvate to lactate metabolism significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion by 1 day after radiation therapy, prior to any changes observed using 1H DCE and diffusion

  18. Effect of parametric resonance on the formation of waves with a broad multiharmonic spectrum during the development of two-stream instability

    SciTech Connect

    Kulish, V. V.; Lysenko, A. V.; Rombovsky, M. Yu.

    2010-07-15

    A cubically nonlinear multiharmonic theory of two-stream instability in a two-velocity relativistic electron beam is constructed with allowance for parametric resonance between harmonics of longitudinal waves of different types, as well as between wave harmonics of the same type. The effect of these two kinds of parametric resonance interaction on the development of two-stream instability is investigated. It is shown that parametric resonance between different types of longitudinal waves excited in a two-velocity beam can substantially affect the development of physical processes in the system under study. It is proposed to use parametric resonance between longitudinal waves of different types to form waves with a prescribed broad multiharmonic spectrum.

  19. 3D wavefront image formation for NIITEK GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumekh, Mehrdad; Ton, Tuan; Howard, Pete

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining (HD) Research and Development Program focuses on developing, testing, demonstrating, and validating new technology for immediate use in humanitarian demining operations around the globe. Beginning in the late 1990's, the U.S. Army Countermine Division funded the development of the NIITEK ground penetrating radar (GPR) for detection of anti-tank (AT) landmines. This work is concerned with signal processing algorithms to suppress sources of artifacts in the NIITEK GPR, and formation of three-dimensional (3D) imagery from the resultant data. We first show that the NIITEK GPR data correspond to a 3D Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) database. An adaptive filtering method is utilized to suppress ground return and self-induced resonance (SIR) signals that are generated by the interaction of the radar-carrying platform and the transmitted radar signal. We examine signal processing methods to improve the fidelity of imagery for this 3D SAR system using pre-processing methods that suppress Doppler aliasing as well as other side lobe leakage artifacts that are introduced by the radar radiation pattern. The algorithm, known as digital spotlighting, imposes a filtering scheme on the azimuth-compressed SAR data, and manipulates the resultant spectral data to achieve a higher PRF to suppress the Doppler aliasing. We also present the 3D version of the Fourier-based wavefront reconstruction, a computationally-efficient and approximation-free SAR imaging method, for image formation with the NIITEK 3D SAR database.

  20. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org . PMID:21063949

  1. Clinical applications of modern imaging technology: stereo image formation and location of brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dezong; Wang, Jinxiang

    1994-05-01

    It is very important to locate the tumor for a patient, who has cancer in his brain. If he only gets X-CT or MRI pictures, the doctor does not know the size, shape location of the tumor and the relation between the tumor and other organs. This paper presents the formation of stereo images of cancer. On the basis of color code and color 3D reconstruction. The stereo images of tumor, brain and encephalic truncus are formed. The stereo image of cancer can be round on X, Y, Z-coordinates to show the shape from different directions. In order to show the location of tumor, stereo image of tumor and encephalic truncus are provided on different angles. The cross section pictures are also offered to indicate the relation of brain, tumor and encephalic truncus on cross sections. In this paper the calculating of areas, volume and the space between cancer and the side of the brain are also described.

  2. Image formation modeling in cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vulović, Miloš; Ravelli, Raimond B G; van Vliet, Lucas J; Koster, Abraham J; Lazić, Ivan; Lücken, Uwe; Rullgård, Hans; Öktem, Ozan; Rieger, Bernd

    2013-07-01

    Accurate modeling of image formation in cryo-electron microscopy is an important requirement for quantitative image interpretation and optimization of the data acquisition strategy. Here we present a forward model that accounts for the specimen's scattering properties, microscope optics, and detector response. The specimen interaction potential is calculated with the isolated atom superposition approximation (IASA) and extended with the influences of solvent's dielectric and ionic properties as well as the molecular electrostatic distribution. We account for an effective charge redistribution via the Poisson-Boltzmann approach and find that the IASA-based potential forms the dominant part of the interaction potential, as the contribution of the redistribution is less than 10%. The electron wave is propagated through the specimen by a multislice approach and the influence of the optics is included via the contrast transfer function. We incorporate the detective quantum efficiency of the camera due to the difference between signal and noise transfer characteristics, instead of using only the modulation transfer function. The full model was validated against experimental images of 20S proteasome, hemoglobin, and GroEL. The simulations adequately predict the effects of phase contrast, changes due to the integrated electron flux, thickness, inelastic scattering, detective quantum efficiency and acceleration voltage. We suggest that beam-induced specimen movements are relevant in the experiments whereas the influence of the solvent amorphousness can be neglected. All simulation parameters are based on physical principles and, when necessary, experimentally determined.

  3. Large format imaging spectrometers for future hyperspectral Landsat mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silny, John F.; Chrien, Thomas G.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes a design concept for a Landsat-class imaging spectrometer. The challenge is to match the Landsat data parameters, including a 185 Km swath and a 30 meter ground sample distance (GSD) from a 705 Km sun-synchronous orbit with a sensor that has contiguous spectral coverage of the solar reflected spectrum (400 to 2500 nm). The result is a remote sensing satellite that provides global access imaging spectrometer data at moderate spatial resolution. Key design trades exist for the spectrometer, focal plane array, dispersive element, and calibrator. Recent developments in large format imaging spectrometers at Raytheon are presented in support of a monolithic spectrometer approach. Features of the design include (1) high signal-to-noise ratio, (2) well-corrected spectral fidelity across a 6,000 pixel push-broom field-of-view, (3) straightforward calibration of the data to units of absolute spectral radiance, and (4) real-time simulation of Thematic Mapper bands, vegetation indices, and water vapor maps for direct continuous downlink.

  4. Image formation modeling in cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vulović, Miloš; Ravelli, Raimond B G; van Vliet, Lucas J; Koster, Abraham J; Lazić, Ivan; Lücken, Uwe; Rullgård, Hans; Öktem, Ozan; Rieger, Bernd

    2013-07-01

    Accurate modeling of image formation in cryo-electron microscopy is an important requirement for quantitative image interpretation and optimization of the data acquisition strategy. Here we present a forward model that accounts for the specimen's scattering properties, microscope optics, and detector response. The specimen interaction potential is calculated with the isolated atom superposition approximation (IASA) and extended with the influences of solvent's dielectric and ionic properties as well as the molecular electrostatic distribution. We account for an effective charge redistribution via the Poisson-Boltzmann approach and find that the IASA-based potential forms the dominant part of the interaction potential, as the contribution of the redistribution is less than 10%. The electron wave is propagated through the specimen by a multislice approach and the influence of the optics is included via the contrast transfer function. We incorporate the detective quantum efficiency of the camera due to the difference between signal and noise transfer characteristics, instead of using only the modulation transfer function. The full model was validated against experimental images of 20S proteasome, hemoglobin, and GroEL. The simulations adequately predict the effects of phase contrast, changes due to the integrated electron flux, thickness, inelastic scattering, detective quantum efficiency and acceleration voltage. We suggest that beam-induced specimen movements are relevant in the experiments whereas the influence of the solvent amorphousness can be neglected. All simulation parameters are based on physical principles and, when necessary, experimentally determined. PMID:23711417

  5. [Evaluation of Sorafenib for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Low α-Fetoprotein by Arrival Time Parametric Imaging Using Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography with Sonazoid].

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Kazue; Watanabe, Manabu; Ikehara, Takashi; Matsukiyo, Yasushi; Kogame, Michio; Shinohara, Mie; Kikuchi, Yoshinori; Shinohara, Masao; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Sumino, Yasukiyo

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to determine the usefulness of arrival time parametric imaging (AtPI) using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS)with Sonazoid in the evaluation of early response to sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thirteen ad- vanced HCC patients with low a / -fetoprotein (AFP) level (≤35 ng/mL) who received sorafenib for at least 4 weeks were enrolled in this study. CEUS was performed before and after treatment (2 weeks), and the images of the target lesion in the arterial phase were analyzed by AtPI. In the color mapping images obtained by AtPI, the mean arrival time of the contrast agent in the target lesion from the starting point (mean time: MT) was calculated. In each patient, differences between MT before and MT 2 weeks after treatment were compared. MT (+) and MT(-) groups were designated as such if the difference was 0 or greater(blood flow velocity of the lesion was reduced)and less than 0 sec(blood flow velocity of the lesion was increased), respectively. The overall survival was evaluated between the 2 groups. In the MT (+) group (7 patients) and MT (-) group (6 patients), the median survival times were 307 and 208 days, respectively, which was statistically significant. We suggest AtPI is useful for evaluating early response to sorafenib in advanced HCC patients with low AFP level. PMID:27067685

  6. Segmentation of densely populated cell nuclei from confocal image stacks using 3D non-parametric shape priors.

    PubMed

    Ong, Lee-Ling S; Wang, Mengmeng; Dauwels, Justin; Asada, H Harry

    2014-01-01

    An approach to jointly estimate 3D shapes and poses of stained nuclei from confocal microscopy images, using statistical prior information, is presented. Extracting nuclei boundaries from our experimental images of cell migration is challenging due to clustered nuclei and variations in their shapes. This issue is formulated as a maximum a posteriori estimation problem. By incorporating statistical prior models of 3D nuclei shapes into level set functions, the active contour evolutions applied on the images is constrained. A 3D alignment algorithm is developed to build the training databases and to match contours obtained from the images to them. To address the issue of aligning the model over multiple clustered nuclei, a watershed-like technique is used to detect and separate clustered regions prior to active contour evolution. Our method is tested on confocal images of endothelial cells in microfluidic devices, compared with existing approaches.

  7. Image Charge Effects on the Formation of Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Singh, Virendra; Behrens, Sven Holger

    2012-10-18

    Vigorous mixing of an aqueous particle dispersion with oil usually produces a particle-stabilized emulsion (a "Pickering emulsion"), the longevity of which depends on the particles' wetting properties. A known exception occurs when particles fail to adsorb to the oil-water interface created during mixing because of a strong repulsion between charges on the particle surface and similar charges on the oil-water interface; in this case, no Pickering emulsion is formed. Here, we present experimental evidence that the rarely considered electrostatic image force can cause a much bigger hindrance to particle adsorption and prevent the formation of Pickering emulsions even when the particle interaction with the interface charge is attractive. A simple theoretical estimate confirms the observed magnitude of this effect and points at an important limitation of Pickering emulsification, a technology with widespread industrial applications and increasing popularity in materials research and development.

  8. Automatic target detection in UAV imagery using image formation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huibao; Si, Jennie; Abousleman, Glen P.

    2003-09-01

    This paper is about automatic target detection (ATD) in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imagery. Extracting reliable features under all conditions from a 2D projection of a target in UAV imagery is a difficult problem. However, since the target size information is usually invariant to the image formation proces, we propose an algorithm for automatically estimating the size of a 3D target by using its 2D projection. The size information in turn becomes an important feature to be used in a knowledge-driven, multi-resolution-based algorithm for automatically detecting targets in UAV imagery. Experimental results show that our proposed ATD algorithm provides outstanding detection performance, while significantly reducing the false alarm rate and the computational complexity.

  9. High efficiency intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2005-03-01

    We have built and tested a highly efficient source of pulsed 320 nm light based on intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-injection-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. The four-mirror nonplanar ring optical cavity uses the RISTRA geometry, denoting rotated-image singly-resonant twisted rectangle. The cavity contains a type-II xz-cut KTP crystal pumped by the 532 nm second harmonic of Nd:YAG to generate an 803~nm signal and 1576 nm idler, and a type-II BBO crystal to sum-frequency mix the 532 nm pump and cavity-resonant 803 nm signal to generate 320 nm light. The cavity is configured so pump light passes first through the BBO crystal and then through the KTP crystal with the 320 nm light exiting through the output coupler following the BBO sum-frequency crystal. The cavity output coupler is designed to be a high reflector at 532 nm, have high transmission at 320 nm, and reflect approximately 85% at 803 nm. With this configuration we've obtained 1064 nm to 320 nm optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24% and generated single-frequency λ = 320 nm pulses with energies up to 140 mJ.

  10. High-efficiency intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Darrell Jewell; Smith, Arlee Virgil

    2005-02-01

    We have built and tested a highly efficient source of pulsed 320 nm light based on intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-injection-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. The four-mirror nonplanar ring optical cavity uses the RISTRA geometry, denoting rotated-image singly-resonant twisted rectangle. The cavity contains a type-II xz-cut KTP crystal pumped by the 532 nm second harmonic of Nd:YAG to generate an 803{approx}nm signal and 1576 nm idler, and a type-II BBO crystal to sum-frequency mix the 532 nm pump and cavity-resonant 803 nm signal to generate 320 nm light. The cavity is configured so pump light passes first through the BBO crystal and then through the KTP crystal with the 320 nm light exiting through the output coupler following the BBO sum-frequency crystal. The cavity output coupler is designed to be a high reflector at 532 nm, have high transmission at 320 nm, and reflect approximately 85% at 803 nm. With this configuration we've obtained 1064 nm to 320 nm optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24% and generated single-frequency {lambda} = 320 nm pulses with energies up to 140 mJ.

  11. Parametrization of textural patterns in {sup 123}I-ioflupane imaging for the automatic detection of Parkinsonism

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Murcia, F. J. Górriz, J. M.; Ramírez, J.; Moreno-Caballero, M.; Gómez-Río, M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: A novel approach to a computer aided diagnosis system for the Parkinson's disease is proposed. This tool is intended as a supporting tool for physicians, based on fully automated methods that lead to the classification of{sup 123}I-ioflupane SPECT images. Methods: {sup 123}I-ioflupane images from three different databases are used to train the system. The images are intensity and spatially normalized, then subimages are extracted and a 3D gray-level co-occurrence matrix is computed over these subimages, allowing the characterization of the texture using Haralick texture features. Finally, different discrimination estimation methods are used to select a feature vector that can be used to train and test the classifier. Results: Using the leave-one-out cross-validation technique over these three databases, the system achieves results up to a 97.4% of accuracy, and 99.1% of sensitivity, with positive likelihood ratios over 27. Conclusions: The system presents a robust feature extraction method that helps physicians in the diagnosis task by providing objective, operator-independent textural information about{sup 123}I-ioflupane images, commonly used in the diagnosis of the Parkinson's disease. Textural features computation has been optimized by using a subimage selection algorithm, and the discrimination estimation methods used here makes the system feature-independent, allowing us to extend it to other databases and diseases.

  12. Range-Gated LADAR Coherent Imaging Using Parametric Up-Conversion of IR and NIR Light for Imaging with a Visible-Range Fast-Shuttered Intensified Digital CCD Camera

    SciTech Connect

    YATES,GEORGE J.; MCDONALD,THOMAS E. JR.; BLISS,DAVID E.; CAMERON,STEWART M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.

    2000-12-20

    Research is presented on infrared (IR) and near infrared (NIR) sensitive sensor technologies for use in a high speed shuttered/intensified digital video camera system for range-gated imaging at ''eye-safe'' wavelengths in the region of 1.5 microns. The study is based upon nonlinear crystals used for second harmonic generation (SHG) in optical parametric oscillators (OPOS) for conversion of NIR and IR laser light to visible range light for detection with generic S-20 photocathodes. The intensifiers are ''stripline'' geometry 18-mm diameter microchannel plate intensifiers (MCPIIS), designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPIIS are designed for fast optical shattering with exposures in the 100-200 ps range, and are coupled to a fast readout CCD camera. Conversion efficiency and resolution for the wavelength conversion process are reported. Experimental set-ups for the wavelength shifting and the optical configurations for producing and transporting laser reflectance images are discussed.

  13. Digital image database processing to simulate image formation in ideal lighting conditions of the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda-Santos, Jessica; Santiago-Alvarado, Agustin; Cruz-Félix, Angel S.; Hernández-Méndez, Arturo

    2015-09-01

    The pupil size of the human eye has a large effect in the image quality due to inherent aberrations. Several studies have been performed to calculate its size relative to the luminance as well as considering other factors, i.e., age, size of the adapting field and mono and binocular vision. Moreover, ideal lighting conditions are known, but software suited to our specific requirements, low cost and low computational consumption, in order to simulate radiation adaptation and image formation in the retina with ideal lighting conditions has not yet been developed. In this work, a database is created consisting of 70 photographs corresponding to the same scene with a fixed target at different times of the day. By using this database, characteristics of the photographs are obtained by measuring the luminance average initial threshold value of each photograph by means of an image histogram. Also, we present the implementation of a digital filter for both, image processing on the threshold values of our database and generating output images with the threshold values reported for the human eye in ideal cases. Some potential applications for this kind of filters may be used in artificial vision systems.

  14. Electroencephalograph (EEG) study on self-contemplating image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Hong, Elliot; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2016-05-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is one of the most widely used electrophysiological monitoring methods and plays a significant role in studies of human brain electrical activities. Default mode network (DMN), is a functional connection of brain regions that are activated while subjects are not in task positive state or not focused on the outside world. In this study, EEG was used for human brain signals recording while all subjects were asked to sit down quietly on a chair with eyes closed and thinking about some parts of their own body, such as left and right hands, left and right ears, lips, nose, and the images of faces that they were familiar with as well as doing some simple mathematical calculation. The time is marker when the image is formed in the subject's mind. By analyzing brain activity maps 300ms right before the time marked instant for each of the 4 wave bands, Delta, Theta, Alpha and Beta waves. We found that for most EEG datasets during this 300ms, Delta wave activity would mostly locate at the frontal lobe or the visual cortex, and the change and movement of activities are slow. Theta wave activity tended to rotate along the edge of cortex either clockwise or counterclockwise. Beta wave behaved like inquiry types of oscillations between any two regions spread over the cortex. Alpha wave activity looks like a mix of the Theta and Beta activities but more close to Theta activity. From the observation we feel that Beta and high Alpha are playing utility role for information inquiry. Theta and low Alpha are likely playing the role of binding and imagination formation in DMN operations.

  15. Image formation by bifocal lenses in a trilobite eye?

    PubMed

    Gál, J; Horváth, G; Clarkson, E N; Haiman, O

    2000-01-01

    In this work we report on a unique and ancient type of eye, in which the lower surface of the upper calcite lens units possessed an enigmatic central bulge making the dioptric apparatus similar to a bifocal lens. This eye belonged to the trilobite Dalmanitina socialis, which became extinct several hundred million years ago. As far as we know, image formation by bifocal lenses of this kind did/does not occur in any other ancient or modern animal visual system. We suggest that the function of these bifocal lenses may be to enable the trilobite to see simultaneously both very near (e.g. floating food particles and tiny preys) and far (e.g. sea floor, conspecifics, or approaching enemies) in the optical environment through the central and peripheral lens region, respectively. This was the only reasonable function we could find to explain the puzzling lens shape. We admit that it is not clear whether bifocality was necessary for the animal studied. We show that the misleading and accidental resemblance of an erroneous correcting lens surface (designed by René DesCartes in 1637 [DesCartes, R. (1637). Oeuvres de DesCartes. La Géometrie. Livre 2. pp. 134. J. Maire, Leyden] to the correcting interface in the compound Dalmanitina lens may be the reason why the earlier students of the Dalmanitina lens did not recognize its possible bifocality.

  16. Restoration of blurred images based on phase conjugation by using single second-order nonlinear parametric processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yujie J.

    2014-09-01

    We review our previous result: backward difference-frequency generation can be exploited to achieve phase conjugation in a second-order nonlinear medium. The backward configuration can be utilized to achieve broadband quasi-phasematching, compared with the forward counterpart. Our calculation shows that a nonlinear reflectivity of close to 100% is achievable from a laser emitting an output power of ≈ 1 mW. Such an efficient phase conjugator is made feasible by placing the nonlinear medium inside a pump laser cavity. In addition, a Fabry-Perot cavity at the input frequency is used to significantly improve the nonlinear reflectivity. In our previous experimental result, we demonstrated that broadband and polarization-insensitive phase conjugation, achieved based on difference-frequency generation in a second-order nonlinear composite consisting of stacked KTP plates, was exploited to restore blurred images due to phase distortion as a novel scheme. Due to the quasi-phase matching in the stacked KTP crystals, our result reveals that the image restoration is insensitive to the polarization direction and wavelength of the input beam.

  17. Multi-parametric imaging of tumor spheroids with ultra-bright and tunable nanoparticle O2 probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergey M.; Jenkins, James; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal probes allow for flexible choice of imaging equipment when performing quenched-phosphorescence O2 measurements: one- or two-photon, PLIM or intensity-based ratiometric read-outs. Spectral and temporal (e.g. FLIMPLIM) discrimination can be used to image O2 together with pH, Ca2+, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell death markers or cell/organelle specific markers. However, the main challenge of existing nanoparticle probes is their limited diffusion across thick (> 20-50 μm) 3D cell models such as tumor spheroids. Here, we present new class of polymeric nanoparticle probes having tunable size, charge, cell-penetrating ability, and reporter dyes. Being spectrally similar to the recently described MM2, PA2 and other O2 probes, they are 5-10 times brighter, demonstrate improved ratiometric response and their surface chemistry can be easily modified. With cultures of 2D and 3D cell models (fibroblasts, PC12 aggregates, HCT116 human colon cancer spheroids) we found cell-specific staining by these probes. However, the efficient staining of model of interest can be tuned by changing number of positive and negative surface groups at nanoparticle, to allow most efficient loading. We also demonstrate how real-time monitoring of oxygenation can be used to select optimal spheroid production with low variability in size and high cell viability.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of multi-parametric MR imaging marker changes post-laser interstitial ablation therapy (LITT) for epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Danish, Shabbar; Wong, Stephen; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-03-01

    Laser-induced interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) has recently emerged as a new, less invasive alternative to craniotomy for treating epilepsy; which allows for focussed delivery of laser energy monitored in real time by MRI, for precise removal of the epileptogenic foci. Despite being minimally invasive, the effects of laser ablation on the epileptogenic foci (reflected by changes in MR imaging markers post-LITT) are currently unknown. In this work, we present a quantitative framework for evaluating LITT-related changes by quantifying per-voxel changes in MR imaging markers which may be more reflective of local treatment related changes (TRC) that occur post-LITT, as compared to the standard volumetric analysis which involves monitoring a more global volume change across pre-, and post-LITT MRI. Our framework focuses on three objectives: (a) development of temporal MRI signatures that characterize TRC corresponding to patients with seizure freedom by comparing differences in MR imaging markers and monitoring them over time, (b) identification of the optimal time point when early LITT induced effects (such as edema and mass effect) subside by monitoring TRC at subsequent time-points post-LITT, and (c) identification of contributions of individual MRI protocols towards characterizing LITT-TRC for epilepsy by identifying MR markers that change most dramatically over time and employ individual contributions to create a more optimal weighted MP-MRI temporal profile that can better characterize TRC compared to any individual imaging marker. A cohort of patients were monitored at different time points post-LITT via MP-MRI involving T1-w, T2-w, T2-GRE, T2-FLAIR, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) protocols. Post affine registration of individual MRI protocols to a reference MRI protocol pre-LITT, differences in individual MR markers are computed on a per-voxel basis, at different time-points with respect to baseline (pre-LITT) MRI as well as across subsequent time

  19. Parametric Cost Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1995-01-01

    Parametric cost analysis is a mathematical approach to estimating cost. Parametric cost analysis uses non-cost parameters, such as quality characteristics, to estimate the cost to bring forth, sustain, and retire a product. This paper reviews parametric cost analysis and shows how it can be used within the cost deployment process.

  20. Three-dimensional parametric mapping in quantitative micro-CT imaging of post-surgery femoral head-neck samples: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Panetta, Daniele; De Paola, Gaia; Tripodi, Maria; Citarelli, Carmine; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; Lazzerini, Ilaria; Salvadori, Piero Antonio; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis and pathological increased occurrence of fractures are an important public health problem. They may affect patients’ quality of life and even increase mortality of osteoporotic patients, and consequently represent a heavy economic burden for national healthcare systems. The adoption of simple and inexpensive methods for mass screening of population at risk may be the key for an effective prevention. The current clinical standards of diagnosing osteoporosis and assessing the risk of an osteoporotic bone fracture include dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) for the measurement of bone mineral density (BMD). Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a tomographic imaging technique with very high resolution allowing direct quantification of cancellous bone microarchitecture. The Authors performed micro-CT analysis of the femoral heads harvested from 8 patients who have undergone surgery for hip replacement for primary and secondary degenerative disease to identify possible new morphometric parameters based on the analysis of the distribution of intra-subject microarchitectural parameters through the creation of parametric images. Our results show that the micro-architectural metrics commonly used may not be sufficient for the realistic assessment of bone microarchitecture of the femoral head in patients with hip osteoarthritis. The innovative micro-CT approach considers the entire femoral head in its physiological shape with all its components like cartilage, cortical layer and trabecular region. The future use of these methods for a more detailed study of the reaction of trabecular bone for the internal fixation or prostheses would be desirable. PMID:26811703

  1. Three-dimensional parametric mapping in quantitative micro-CT imaging of post-surgery femoral head-neck samples: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Panetta, Daniele; De Paola, Gaia; Tripodi, Maria; Citarelli, Carmine; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Lazzerini, Ilaria; Salvadori, Piero Antonio; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis and pathological increased occurrence of fractures are an important public health problem. They may affect patients' quality of life and even increase mortality of osteoporotic patients, and consequently represent a heavy economic burden for national healthcare systems. The adoption of simple and inexpensive methods for mass screening of population at risk may be the key for an effective prevention. The current clinical standards of diagnosing osteoporosis and assessing the risk of an osteoporotic bone fracture include dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) for the measurement of bone mineral density (BMD). Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a tomographic imaging technique with very high resolution allowing direct quantification of cancellous bone microarchitecture. The Authors performed micro-CT analysis of the femoral heads harvested from 8 patients who have undergone surgery for hip replacement for primary and secondary degenerative disease to identify possible new morphometric parameters based on the analysis of the distribution of intra-subject microarchitectural parameters through the creation of parametric images. Our results show that the micro-architectural metrics commonly used may not be sufficient for the realistic assessment of bone microarchitecture of the femoral head in patients with hip osteoarthritis. The innovative micro-CT approach considers the entire femoral head in its physiological shape with all its components like cartilage, cortical layer and trabecular region. The future use of these methods for a more detailed study of the reaction of trabecular bone for the internal fixation or prostheses would be desirable. PMID:26811703

  2. X-ray Bragg magnifier microscope as a linear shift invariant imaging system: image formation and phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Vagovič, P; Svéda, L; Cecilia, A; Hamann, E; Pelliccia, D; Gimenez, E N; Korytár, D; Pavlov, K M; Zápražný, Z; Zuber, M; Koenig, T; Olbinado, M; Yashiro, W; Momose, A; Fiederle, M; Baumbach, T

    2014-09-01

    We present the theoretical description of the image formation with the in-line germanium Bragg Magnifier Microscope (BMM) and the first successful phase retrieval of X-ray holograms recorded with this imaging system. The conditions under which the BMM acts as a linear shift invariant system are theoretically explained and supported by the experiment. Such an approach simplifies the mathematical treatment of the image formation and reconstruction as complicated propagation of the wavefront onto inclined planes can be avoided. Quantitative phase retrieval is demonstrated using a test sample and a proof of concept phase imaging of a spider leg is also presented.

  3. Wavefront curvature limitations and compensation to polar format processing for synthetic aperture radar images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-01-01

    Limitations on focused scene size for the Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation are derived. A post processing filtering technique for compensating the spatially variant blurring in the image is examined. Modifications to this technique to enhance its robustness are proposed.

  4. On the importance of image formation optics in the design of infrared spectroscopic imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Mayerich, David; van Dijk, Thomas; Walsh, Michael J; Schulmerich, Matthew V; Carney, P Scott; Bhargava, Rohit

    2014-08-21

    Infrared spectroscopic imaging provides micron-scale spatial resolution with molecular contrast. While recent work demonstrates that sample morphology affects the recorded spectrum, considerably less attention has been focused on the effects of the optics, including the condenser and objective. This analysis is extremely important, since it will be possible to understand effects on recorded data and provides insight for reducing optical effects through rigorous microscope design. Here, we present a theoretical description and experimental results that demonstrate the effects of commonly-employed cassegranian optics on recorded spectra. We first combine an explicit model of image formation and a method for quantifying and visualizing the deviations in recorded spectra as a function of microscope optics. We then verify these simulations with measurements obtained from spatially heterogeneous samples. The deviation of the computed spectrum from the ideal case is quantified via a map which we call a deviation map. The deviation map is obtained as a function of optical elements by systematic simulations. Examination of deviation maps demonstrates that the optimal optical configuration for minimal deviation is contrary to prevailing practice in which throughput is maximized for an instrument without a sample. This report should be helpful for understanding recorded spectra as a function of the optics, the analytical limits of recorded data determined by the optical design, and potential routes for optimization of imaging systems.

  5. On the importance of image formation optics in the design of infrared spectroscopic imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Mayerich, David; van Dijk, Thomas; Walsh, Michael; Schulmerich, Matthew; Carney, P. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic imaging provides micron-scale spatial resolution with molecular contrast. While recent work demonstrates that sample morphology affects the recorded spectrum, considerably less attention has been focused on the effects of the optics, including the condenser and objective. This analysis is extremely important, since it will be possible to understand effects on recorded data and provides insight for reducing optical effects through rigorous microscope design. Here, we present a theoretical description and experimental results that demonstrate the effects of commonly-employed cassegranian optics on recorded spectra. We first combine an explicit model of image formation and a method for quantifying and visualizing the deviations in recorded spectra as a function of microscope optics. We then verify these simulations with measurements obtained from spatially heterogeneous samples. The deviation of the computed spectrum from the ideal case is quantified via a map which we call a deviation map. The deviation map is obtained as a function of optical elements by systematic simulations. Examination of deviation maps demonstrates that the optimal optical configuration for minimal deviation is contrary to prevailing practice in which throughput is maximized for an instrument without a sample. This report should be helpful for understanding recorded spectra as a function of the optics, the analytical limits of recorded data determined by the optical design, and potential routes for optimization of imaging systems. PMID:24936526

  6. A high-resolution, four-band SAR testbed with real-time image formation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.; Sander, G.; Thompson, M.; Burns, B.; Fellerhoff, R.; Dubbert, D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the Twin-Otter SAR Testbed developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This SAR is a flexible, adaptable testbed capable of operation on four frequency bands: Ka, Ku, X, and VHF/UHF bands. The SAR features real-time image formation at fine resolution in spotlight and stripmap modes. High-quality images are formed in real time using the overlapped subaperture (OSA) image-formation and phase gradient autofocus (PGA) algorithms.

  7. Digital interpolators for polar format processing. [of synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, John W.; Hudson, Ralph E.; Bayma, Robert W.; Nelson, Jeffrey E.

    1989-01-01

    The polar format approach to SAR image formation requires data to be interpolated from a warped grid onto a Cartesian lattice. In general, this requires that data be interpolated between varying sampling rates. In this paper, frequency-domain optimality criteria for polar format interpolators are defined and justified, and an approach to designing the corresponding digital filters is described.

  8. Formats of image data files that can be used for routine digital light micrography. Part one.

    PubMed

    Entwistle, A

    2003-04-01

    Failing to open computer files that describe image data is not the most frustrating experience that the user of a computer can suffer, but it is high on list of possible aggravations. To ameliorate this, the structure of uncompressed image data files is described here. The various ways in which information that describes a picture can be recorded are related, and a primary distinction between raster or bitmap based and vector or object based image data files is drawn. Bitmap based image data files are the more useful of the two formats for recording complicated images such as digital light micrographs, whereas object based files are better for recording illustrations and cartoons. Computer software for opening a very large variety of different formats of digital image data is recommended, and if these fail, ways are described for opening bitmap based digital image data files whose format is unknown.

  9. Role of multiple scattering in formation of OCT skin images

    SciTech Connect

    Kirillin, M Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Myllylae, R

    2008-06-30

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of model human skin samples are obtained by using Monte Carlo simulations. The contributions of least and multiple scattering, diffusion and nondiffusion components and of separate scattering orders are studied by using a multilayer skin model based on experimental images. The model images are obtained by neglecting speckles or taking them into account. It is shown that least scattering forms the image of the upper skin layers, while the contribution of multiple scattering can be characterised as a blurred full image with a lower contrast. Repeated scattering mainly contributes to the OCT image at depths up to 1 mm. The diffusion component contributes to the image beginning from the epidermal basal layer. The partial image produced by this component is more blurred compared to the partial image produced by to multiple scattering. The nondiffusion component forms the OCT skin image at depths up to {approx}1.3 mm. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  10. Dissociable neural responses related to pain intensity, stimulus intensity, and stimulus awareness within the anterior cingulate cortex: a parametric single-trial laser functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Büchel, Christian; Bornhovd, Karin; Quante, Markus; Glauche, Volkmar; Bromm, Burkhard; Weiller, Cornelius

    2002-02-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated activations in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) related to the affective component of pain, but not to stimulus intensity. However, it is possible that the low spatial resolution of positron emission tomography, as used in the majority of these studies, obscured areas coding stimulus intensity. We revisited this issue, using a parametric single-trial functional magnetic resonance imaging design, and investigated pain, stimulus intensity, and stimulus awareness (i.e., pain unrelated) responses within the ACC in nine healthy volunteers. Four different stimulus intensities ranging from warm to painful (300-600 mJ) were applied with a thulium yttrium-aluminum granite infrared laser in a randomized order and rated by the subjects on a five point scale (P0-P4). Pain-related regions in the ventral posterior ACC showed a response that did not distinguish between innocuous trials (P0 and P1) but showed a positive linear relationship with the blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast signal for painful trials (P2-P4). Regions in the dorsal anterior ACC along the cingulate sulcus differentiated between P0 (not perceived) and P1 but exhibited no additional signal increase with P2; these regions are related to stimulus awareness and probably to cognitive processing. Most importantly, we identified a region in the dorsal posterior ACC showing a response that discriminated between nonpainful trials (P0 and P1); therefore, this region was simply related to basic sensory processing and not to pain intensity. Stimulus-related activations were all located adjacent to the cingulate motor area, highlighting the strategic link of stimulus processing and response generation in the posterior ACC.

  11. Direct 4D PET MLEM reconstruction of parametric images using the simplified reference tissue model with the basis function method for [¹¹C]raclopride.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Paul; Reader, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    This work assesses the one-step late maximum likelihood expectation maximization (OSL-MLEM) 4D PET reconstruction algorithm for direct estimation of parametric images from raw PET data when using the simplified reference tissue model with the basis function method (SRTM-BFM) for the kinetic analysis. To date, the OSL-MLEM method has been evaluated using kinetic models based on two-tissue compartments with an irreversible component. We extend the evaluation of this method for two-tissue compartments with a reversible component, using SRTM-BFM on simulated 3D + time data sets (with use of [(11)C]raclopride time-activity curves from real data) and on real data sets acquired with the high resolution research tomograph. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing voxel-level binding potential (BPND) estimates with those obtained from conventional post-reconstruction kinetic parameter estimation. For the commonly chosen number of iterations used in practice, our results show that for the 3D + time simulation, the direct method delivers results with lower (%)RMSE at the normal count level (decreases of 9-10 percentage points, corresponding to a 38-44% reduction), and also at low count levels (decreases of 17-21 percentage points, corresponding to a 26-36% reduction). As for the real 3D data set, the results obtained follow a similar trend, with the direct reconstruction method offering a 21% decrease in (%)CV compared to the post reconstruction method at low count levels. Thus, based on the results presented herein, using the SRTM-BFM kinetic model in conjunction with the OSL-MLEM direct 4D PET MLEM reconstruction method offers an improvement in performance when compared to conventional post reconstruction methods. PMID:25992999

  12. Some features of photolithography image formation in partially coherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsak, M A; Kitsak, A I

    2010-12-09

    The coherent-noise level in projection images of an opaque-screen sharp edge, formed in the model scheme of photolithography system at different degrees of spatial coherence of screen-illuminating light is studied experimentally. The spatial coherence of laser radiation was reduced by applying a specially developed device, used as a separate functional unit in the system model. The smoothing of the spatial fluctuations of radiation intensity caused by the random spatial inhomogeneity of the initial beam intensity in the obtained images is shown to be highly efficient. (imaging and image processing. holography)

  13. Parametric binary dissection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.; Crockett, Thomas W.; Nicol, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Binary dissection is widely used to partition non-uniform domains over parallel computers. This algorithm does not consider the perimeter, surface area, or aspect ratio of the regions being generated and can yield decompositions that have poor communication to computation ratio. Parametric Binary Dissection (PBD) is a new algorithm in which each cut is chosen to minimize load + lambda x(shape). In a 2 (or 3) dimensional problem, load is the amount of computation to be performed in a subregion and shape could refer to the perimeter (respectively surface) of that subregion. Shape is a measure of communication overhead and the parameter permits us to trade off load imbalance against communication overhead. When A is zero, the algorithm reduces to plain binary dissection. This algorithm can be used to partition graphs embedded in 2 or 3-d. Load is the number of nodes in a subregion, shape the number of edges that leave that subregion, and lambda the ratio of time to communicate over an edge to the time to compute at a node. An algorithm is presented that finds the depth d parametric dissection of an embedded graph with n vertices and e edges in O(max(n log n, de)) time, which is an improvement over the O(dn log n) time of plain binary dissection. Parallel versions of this algorithm are also presented; the best of these requires O((n/p) log(sup 3)p) time on a p processor hypercube, assuming graphs of bounded degree. How PBD is applied to 3-d unstructured meshes and yields partitions that are better than those obtained by plain dissection is described. Its application to the color image quantization problem is also discussed, in which samples in a high-resolution color space are mapped onto a lower resolution space in a way that minimizes the color error.

  14. Large-format distributed read-out imaging devices for X-ray imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, Roland; Kozorezov, A.; Martin, D.; Brammertz, G.; Verhoeve, P.; Peacock, A.; Scholze, F.; Goldie, D. J.

    2002-02-01

    We present an experimental study of the performance of Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs), based on two Ta/Al-based superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) placed on either side of a Ta absorber strip. We focus our discussion on the prospects of building large-format photon-counting imaging spectrometers for applications at optical, UV and soft X-ray energies. Tunnel-limited spectroscopic resolutions have already been demonstrated for optical photons. With a 20×100 μm2 absorber we have measured an intrinsic energy resolution of 2 eV FWHM for 500 eV photons. This demonstrates that at soft X-ray energies resolutions close to the tunnel limit are also feasible for this type of detectors. A detailed analysis of pulse-shapes with numerical models allows us to assess the main parameters that determine the performance of these detectors. Extrapolation of these models indicates that it is possible to extend the length of the absorber to 1.5 mm, without a serious degradation of the detector's performance. .

  15. Large-format distributed readout imaging devices for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, Roland H.; Kozorezov, Alex G.; Martin, Didier D.; Brammertz, G.; Verhoeve, Peter; Peacock, Anthony J.; Scholze, Frank; Goldie, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the performance of one-dimensional Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs), based on two Ta/Al-based STJs placed on either side of a Ta absorber strip. We focus our discussion on the prospects of building large-format photon-counting imaging spectrometers for applications at soft X-ray energies. Tunnel-limited spectroscopical resolutions have already been demonstrated for optical photons. With a 20 x 100 micrometers 2 absorber we have measured an intrinsic energy resolution of 2.1 eV FWHM for 500 eV photons. This demonstrates that at soft X-ray energies resolutions close to the tunnel limit are also feasible for these type of detectors. A detailed analysis of pulse-shapes with analytical models allows us to assess the main parameters that determine the performance of these detectors. In particular, we discuss the dependence of the quasiparticle diffusion constant on the temperature of the absorber. Extrapolation of these models indicates that it is possible to extend the length of the absorber to 1.5 mm, without a serious degradation of the detector's performance.

  16. Methodology for Localized and Accessible Image Formation and Elucidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patil, Sandeep R.; Katiyar, Manish

    2009-01-01

    Accessibility is one of the key checkpoints in all software products, applications, and Web sites. Accessibility with digital images has always been a major challenge for the industry. Images form an integral part of certain type of documents and most Web 2.0-compliant Web sites. Individuals challenged with blindness and many dyslexics only make…

  17. An automated normative-based fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography image-analysis procedure to aid Alzheimer disease diagnosis using statistical parametric mapping and interactive image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kewei; Ge, Xiaolin; Yao, Li; Bandy, Dan; Alexander, Gene E.; Prouty, Anita; Burns, Christine; Zhao, Xiaojie; Wen, Xiaotong; Korn, Ronald; Lawson, Michael; Reiman, Eric M.

    2006-03-01

    Having approved fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in some patients, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services suggested the need to develop and test analysis techniques to optimize diagnostic accuracy. We developed an automated computer package comparing an individual's FDG PET image to those of a group of normal volunteers. The normal control group includes FDG-PET images from 82 cognitively normal subjects, 61.89+/-5.67 years of age, who were characterized demographically, clinically, neuropsychologically, and by their apolipoprotein E genotype (known to be associated with a differential risk for AD). In addition, AD-affected brain regions functionally defined as based on a previous study (Alexander, et al, Am J Psychiatr, 2002) were also incorporated. Our computer package permits the user to optionally select control subjects, matching the individual patient for gender, age, and educational level. It is fully streamlined to require minimal user intervention. With one mouse click, the program runs automatically, normalizing the individual patient image, setting up a design matrix for comparing the single subject to a group of normal controls, performing the statistics, calculating the glucose reduction overlap index of the patient with the AD-affected brain regions, and displaying the findings in reference to the AD regions. In conclusion, the package automatically contrasts a single patient to a normal subject database using sound statistical procedures. With further validation, this computer package could be a valuable tool to assist physicians in decision making and communicating findings with patients and patient families.

  18. Combined PET/MRI: Multi-modality Multi-parametric Imaging Is Here: Summary Report of the 4th International Workshop on PET/MR Imaging; February 23-27, 2015, Tübingen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Bailey, D L; Pichler, B J; Gückel, B; Barthel, H; Beer, A J; Bremerich, J; Czernin, J; Drzezga, A; Franzius, C; Goh, V; Hartenbach, M; Iida, H; Kjaer, A; la Fougère, C; Ladefoged, C N; Law, I; Nikolaou, K; Quick, H H; Sabri, O; Schäfer, J; Schäfers, M; Wehrl, H F; Beyer, T

    2015-10-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both technical versatility and acceptance by clinical and research-driven users from the status quo of last year. Still, with only minimal evidence of progress made in exploiting the true complementary nature of the PET and MRI-based information, PET/MRI is still yet to achieve its potential. In that regard, the conclusion of last year's meeting "the real work has just started" still holds true.

  19. Models of formation and some algorithms of hyperspectral image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achmetov, R. N.; Stratilatov, N. R.; Yudakov, A. A.; Vezenov, V. I.; Eremeev, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Algorithms and information technologies for processing Earth hyperspectral imagery are presented. Several new approaches are discussed. Peculiar properties of processing the hyperspectral imagery, such as multifold signal-to-noise reduction, atmospheric distortions, access to spectral characteristics of every image point, and high dimensionality of data, were studied. Different measures of similarity between individual hyperspectral image points and the effect of additive uncorrelated noise on these measures were analyzed. It was shown that these measures are substantially affected by noise, and a new measure free of this disadvantage was proposed. The problem of detecting the observed scene object boundaries, based on comparing the spectral characteristics of image points, is considered. It was shown that contours are processed much better when spectral characteristics are used instead of energy brightness. A statistical approach to the correction of atmospheric distortions, which makes it possible to solve the stated problem based on analysis of a distorted image in contrast to analytical multiparametric models, was proposed. Several algorithms used to integrate spectral zonal images with data from other survey systems, which make it possible to image observed scene objects with a higher quality, are considered. Quality characteristics of hyperspectral data processing were proposed and studied.

  20. Floating volumetric image formation using a dihedral corner reflector array device.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Hirano, Noboru; Maeda, Yuki; Yamamoto, Siori; Mukai, Takaaki; Maekawa, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A volumetric display system using an optical imaging device consisting of numerous dihedral corner reflectors placed perpendicular to the surface of a metal plate is proposed. Image formation by the dihedral corner reflector array (DCRA) is free from distortion and focal length. In the proposed volumetric display system, a two-dimensional real image is moved by a mirror scanner to scan a three-dimensional (3D) space. Cross-sectional images of a 3D object are displayed in accordance with the position of the image plane. A volumetric image is observed as a stack of the cross-sectional images. The use of the DCRA brings compact system configuration and volumetric real image generation with very low distortion. An experimental volumetric display system including a DCRA, a galvanometer mirror, and a digital micro-mirror device was constructed to verify the proposed method. A volumetric image consisting of 1024×768×400 voxels was formed by the experimental system.

  1. Beamforming and holography image formation methods: an analytic study.

    PubMed

    Solimene, Raffaele; Cuccaro, Antonio; Ruvio, Giuseppe; Tapia, Daniel Flores; O'Halloran, Martin

    2016-04-18

    Beamforming and holographic imaging procedures are widely used in many applications such as radar sensing, sonar, and in the area of microwave medical imaging. Nevertheless, an analytical comparison of the methods has not been done. In this paper, the Point Spread Functions pertaining to the two methods are analytically determined. This allows a formal comparison of the two techniques, and to easily highlight how the performance depends on the configuration parameters, including frequency range, number of scatterers, and data discretization. It is demonstrated that the beamforming and holography basically achieve the same resolution but beamforming requires a cheaper (less sensors) configuration.. PMID:27137336

  2. Beamforming and holography image formation methods: an analytic study.

    PubMed

    Solimene, Raffaele; Cuccaro, Antonio; Ruvio, Giuseppe; Tapia, Daniel Flores; O'Halloran, Martin

    2016-04-18

    Beamforming and holographic imaging procedures are widely used in many applications such as radar sensing, sonar, and in the area of microwave medical imaging. Nevertheless, an analytical comparison of the methods has not been done. In this paper, the Point Spread Functions pertaining to the two methods are analytically determined. This allows a formal comparison of the two techniques, and to easily highlight how the performance depends on the configuration parameters, including frequency range, number of scatterers, and data discretization. It is demonstrated that the beamforming and holography basically achieve the same resolution but beamforming requires a cheaper (less sensors) configuration..

  3. Visual Formative Assessments: The Use of Images to Quickly Assess and Record Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aylward, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Visual formative assessments (VFAs) allow more free more time for direct instruction. VFA's guide students in using simple images to demonstrate the essential learnings within a unit to themselves and the teacher. VFAs are powerful because they engage students to coalesce their understanding into a concise visual image. (Contains 2 figures.)

  4. Parametric Transformation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allan

    2003-01-01

    Because twisted coronal features are important proxies for predicting solar eruptive events, and, yet not clearly understood, we present new results to resolve the complex, non-potential magnetic field configurations of active regions. This research uses free-form deformation mathematics to generate the associated coronal magnetic field. We use a parametric representation of the magnetic field lines such that the field lines can be manipulated to match the structure of EUV and SXR coronal loops. The objective is to derive sigmoidal magnetic field solutions which allows the beta greater than 1 regions to be included, aligned and non-aligned electric currents to be calculated, and the Lorentz force to be determined. The advantage of our technique is that the solution is independent of the unknown upper and side boundary conditions, allows non-vanishing magnetic forces, and provides a global magnetic field solution, which contains high- and low-beta regimes and is consistent with all the coronal images of the region. We show that the mathematical description is unique and physical.

  5. Geobase Information System Impacts on Space Image Formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonett, D. S. (Editor); Smith, T. R. (Editor); Tobler, W. (Editor); Marks, D. G. (Editor); Frew, J. E. (Editor); Dozier, J. C. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    As Geobase Information Systems increase in number, size and complexity, the format compatability of satellite remote sensing data becomes increasingly more important. Because of the vast and continually increasing quantity of data available from remote sensing systems the utility of these data is increasingly dependent on the degree to which their formats facilitate, or hinder, their incorporation into Geobase Information Systems. To merge satellite data into a geobase system requires that they both have a compatible geographic referencing system. Greater acceptance of satellite data by the user community will be facilitated if the data are in a form which most readily corresponds to existing geobase data structures. The conference addressed a number of specific topics and made recommendations.

  6. A survey of SAR image-formation processing for earth resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayma, R. W.; Jordan, R. L.; Manning, B. N.

    1977-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in active microwave sensors for earth resources applications. A particular example is the Seasat-A radar. However, to obtain spatial resolutions comparable to optical sensors at radar frequencies, sophisticated image formation processing techniques must be applied to the raw data. This paper briefly compares processing requirements for non-coherent optical and coherent radar imaging systems, and then discusses the image formation processing requirements for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. Both optical and digital techniques are addressed, and examples of hardware and imagery for each processing technique are presented.

  7. A survey of SAR image-formation processing for earth resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayma, R. W.; Jordan, R. L.; Manning, B. N.

    1977-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in active microwave sensors for earth resources applications, such as the SEASAT-A radar. However, to obtain spatial resolutions comparable to optical sensors at radar frequencies, sophisticated image formation processing techniques must be applied to the raw data. Processing requirements for non-coherent optical and coherent radar imaging systems are compared. The image formation processing requirements for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are discussed. Both optical and digital techniques are addressed, and examples of hardware and imagery for each processing technique are presented.

  8. A novel polar format algorithm for SAR images utilizing post azimuth transform interpolation.

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, Michael Warren; Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2005-09-01

    SAR phase history data represents a polar array in the Fourier space of a scene being imaged. Polar Format processing is about reformatting the collected SAR data to a Cartesian data location array for efficient processing and image formation. In a real-time system, this reformatting or ''re-gridding'' operation is the most processing intensive, consuming the majority of the processing time; it also is a source of error in the final image. Therefore, any effort to reduce processing time while not degrading image quality is valued. What is proposed in this document is a new way of implementing real-time polar-format processing through a variation on the traditional interpolation/2-D Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm. The proposed change is based upon the frequency scaling property of the Fourier Transform, which allows a post azimuth FFT interpolation. A post azimuth processing interpolation provides overall benefits to image quality and potentially more efficient implementation of the polar format image formation process.

  9. Stimulated Parametric Emission Microscope Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Isobe, Keisuke

    2006-10-01

    We present a novel microscopy technique based on the fourwave mixing (FWM) process that is enhanced by two-photon electronic resonance induced by a pump pulse along with stimulated emission induced by a dump pulse. A Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used as light sources for the pump and dump pulses, respectively. We demonstrate that our FWM technique can be used to obtain two-dimensional microscopic images of an unstained leaf of Camellia sinensis and an unlabeled tobacco BY2 Cell.

  10. Image Formation by Incoherent and Coherent Transition Radiation from Flat and Rough Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we derive equations for the image formation of transverse profile of a relativistic beam obtained by means of optical transition radiation (OTR) from flat and rough metal surfaces. The motivation behind this study lies in the desire to suppress coherent transition radiation (COTR) observed in experiments at modern free electron lasers. The physical mechanism behind the problem of COTR is that the OTR is predominantly radiated at small angles of order of 1/{gamma} where {gamma} is the relativistic factor of the beam. This means that the transverse formation size of the image is of order of {bar {lambda}}{gamma} where {bar {lambda}} = {lambda}/2{pi} with {lambda} the radiation wavelength. For relativistic beams this can be comparable or even exceed the transverse size of the beam, which would mean that the image of the beam has very little to do with its transverse profile. It is fortuitous, however, that the incoherent image is formed by adding radiation energy of electrons and results in the transverse formation size being of order of {bar {lambda}}/{theta}{sub a}, with {theta}{sub a} is the aperture angle of the optical system. The COTR image, in contrast, is formed by adding electromagnetic field of electrons, and leads to the formation size {bar {lambda}}{gamma}. In situations when the COTR intensity exceeds that of OTR the COTR imaging makes the diagnostic incapable of measuring the beam profile.

  11. Extended adaptive filtering for wide-angle SAR image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanwei; Roberts, William; Li, Jian

    2005-05-01

    For two-dimensional (2-D) spectral analysis, the adaptive filtering based technologies, such as CAPON and APES (Amplitude and Phase EStimation), are developed under the implicit assumption that the data sets are rectangular. However, in real SAR applications, especially for the wide-angle cases, the collected data sets are always non-rectangular. This raises the problem of how to extend the original adaptive filtering based algorithms for such kind of scenarios. In this paper, we propose an extended adaptive filtering (EAF) approach, which includes Extended APES (E-APES) and Extended CAPON (E-CAPON), for arbitrarily shaped 2-D data. The EAF algorithms adopt a missing-data approach where the unavailable data samples close to the collected data set are assumed missing. Using a group of filter-banks with varying sizes, these algorithms are non-iterative and do not require the estimation of the unavailable samples. The improved imaging results of the proposed algorithms are demonstrated by applying them to two different SAR data sets.

  12. 3D simulation of the image formation in soft x-ray microscopes.

    PubMed

    Selin, Mårten; Fogelqvist, Emelie; Holmberg, Anders; Guttmann, Peter; Vogt, Ulrich; Hertz, Hans M

    2014-12-15

    In water-window soft x-ray microscopy the studied object is typically larger than the depth of focus and the sample illumination is often partially coherent. This blurs out-of-focus features and may introduce considerable fringing. Understanding the influence of these phenomena on the image formation is therefore important when interpreting experimental data. Here we present a wave-propagation model operating in 3D for simulating the image formation of thick objects in partially coherent soft x-ray microscopes. The model is compared with present simulation methods as well as with experiments. The results show that our model predicts the image formation of transmission soft x-ray microscopes more accurately than previous models.

  13. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Particle Formation Energy and Imaging Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents particle formation energy balances and detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium during the Phase II testing in 2001. Solid particles of hydrogen were frozen in liquid helium and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. The particle formation efficiency is also estimated. Particle sizes from the Phase I testing in 1999 and the Phase II testing in 2001 were similar. Though the 2001 testing created similar particles sizes, many new particle formation phenomena were observed. These experiment image analyses are one of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles and it allows designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  14. Solid Hydrogen Experiments for Atomic Propellants: Particle Formation, Imaging, Observations, and Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    This report presents particle formation observations and detailed analyses of the images from experiments that were conducted on the formation of solid hydrogen particles in liquid helium. Hydrogen was frozen into particles in liquid helium, and observed with a video camera. The solid hydrogen particle sizes and the total mass of hydrogen particles were estimated. These newly analyzed data are from the test series held on February 28, 2001. Particle sizes from previous testing in 1999 and the testing in 2001 were similar. Though the 2001 testing created similar particles sizes, many new particle formation phenomena were observed: microparticles and delayed particle formation. These experiment image analyses are some of the first steps toward visually characterizing these particles, and they allow designers to understand what issues must be addressed in atomic propellant feed system designs for future aerospace vehicles.

  15. Passive synthetic aperture hitchhiker imaging of ground moving targets--Part 1: image formation and velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Wacks, Steven; Yazici, Birsen

    2014-06-01

    In the Part 1 of this two-part study, we present a method of imaging and velocity estimation of ground moving targets using passive synthetic aperture radar. Such a system uses a network of small, mobile receivers that collect scattered waves due to transmitters of opportunity, such as commercial television, radio, and cell phone towers. Therefore, passive imaging systems have significant cost, manufacturing, and stealth advantages over active systems. We describe a novel generalized Radon transform-type forward model and a corresponding filtered-backprojection-type image formation and velocity estimation method. We form a stack of position images over a range of hypothesized velocities, and show that the targets can be reconstructed at the correct position whenever the hypothesized velocity is equal to the true velocity of targets. We then use entropy to determine the most accurate velocity and image pair for each moving target. We present extensive numerical simulations to verify the reconstruction method. Our method does not require a priori knowledge of transmitter locations and transmitted waveforms. It can determine the location and velocity of multiple targets moving at different velocities. Furthermore, it can accommodate arbitrary imaging geometries. In Part 2, we present the resolution analysis and analysis of positioning errors in passive SAR images due to erroneous velocity estimation. PMID:24815619

  16. Passive synthetic aperture hitchhiker imaging of ground moving targets--Part 1: image formation and velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Wacks, Steven; Yazici, Birsen

    2014-06-01

    In the Part 1 of this two-part study, we present a method of imaging and velocity estimation of ground moving targets using passive synthetic aperture radar. Such a system uses a network of small, mobile receivers that collect scattered waves due to transmitters of opportunity, such as commercial television, radio, and cell phone towers. Therefore, passive imaging systems have significant cost, manufacturing, and stealth advantages over active systems. We describe a novel generalized Radon transform-type forward model and a corresponding filtered-backprojection-type image formation and velocity estimation method. We form a stack of position images over a range of hypothesized velocities, and show that the targets can be reconstructed at the correct position whenever the hypothesized velocity is equal to the true velocity of targets. We then use entropy to determine the most accurate velocity and image pair for each moving target. We present extensive numerical simulations to verify the reconstruction method. Our method does not require a priori knowledge of transmitter locations and transmitted waveforms. It can determine the location and velocity of multiple targets moving at different velocities. Furthermore, it can accommodate arbitrary imaging geometries. In Part 2, we present the resolution analysis and analysis of positioning errors in passive SAR images due to erroneous velocity estimation.

  17. Parametric Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, William I. F.; Evans, John S. O.

    The rapidity with which powder diffraction data may be collected, not only at neutron and X-ray synchrotron facilities but also in the laboratory, means that the collection of a single diffraction pattern is now the exception rather than the rule. Many experiments involve the collection of hundreds and perhaps many thousands of datasets where a parameter such as temperature or pressure is varied or where time is the variable and life-cycle, synthesis or decomposition processes are monitored or three-dimensional space is scanned and the three-dimensional internal structure of an object is elucidated. In this paper, the origins of parametric diffraction are discussed and the techniques and challenges of parametric powder diffraction analysis are presented. The first parametric measurements were performed around 50 years ago with the development of a modified Guinier camera but it was the automation afforded by neutron diffraction combined with increases in computer speed and memory that established parametric diffraction on a strong footing initially at the ILL, Grenoble in France. The theoretical parameterisation of quantities such as lattice constants and atomic displacement parameters will be discussed and selected examples of parametric diffraction over the past 20 years will be reviewed that highlight the power of the technique.

  18. A design approach to real-time formatting of high speed multispectral image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Kelly, W. L., IV

    1981-01-01

    A design approach to formatting multispectral image data in real time at very high data rates is presented for future onboard processing applications. The approach employs a microprocessor-based alternating buffer memory configuration whose formatting function is completely programmable. Data are read from an output buffer in the desired format by applying the proper sequence of addresses to the buffer via a lookup table memory. Sensor data can be processed using this approach at rates limited by the buffer memory access time and the buffer switching process delay time. This design offers flexible high speed data processing and benefits from continuing increases in the performance of digital memories.

  19. Laser scattered images observed from carbon plasma stagnation and following molecular formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K.; Shibata, R.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Sunahara, A.

    2014-06-16

    Two carbon targets were irradiated to create plasma plumes to collide at right angle with two UV laser pulses each other at 10 J/cm{sup 2}/pulse. The collision results in carbon plasma stagnation. Laser scattered imaging indicates that the carbon large molecular formation takes place much later in time after the laser irradiation and stagnation. Compared with the temporal history of electron density (n{sub e}), ion density (n{sub i}), and plasma self-emission dominated by carbon Swan band, it is estimated that the carbon large molecular formation has been initiated with the ion collision followed by the C{sub 2} formation.

  20. Using Image Processing Techniques for Cluster Analysis, and Droplet Formation in Phase Separating Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory; Oprisan, Ana; Hegseth, John; Oprisan, Sorinel; Lecoutre, Carole; Garrabos, Yves; Beysens, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    A series of experiments were performed using the Alice II apparatus in microgravity to study phase separation near critical temperature. Using image analysis techniques, we were able to obtain quantitative information regarding the morphology of gas-liquid interface near critical point of pure SF6 fluid in microgravity. Growth laws for liquid and gas clusters were extracted based on image segmentation both with thresholding and k-means clustering. By measuring the image features we analyzed the formation of spherical droplets during late stage of phase separation for a series of full view images. The growth of a wetting layer around the border of the cell containing the fluid was also investigated using image processing techniques.

  1. Image encryption schemes for joint photographic experts group and graphics interchange format formats based on three-dimensional baker with compound chaotic sequence generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shiyu; Tong, Xiaojun; Zhang, Miao

    2013-01-01

    We propose several methods to transplant the compound chaotic image encryption scheme with permutation based on three-dimensional (3-D) baker onto image formats such as the joint photographic experts group (JPEG) and graphics interchange format (GIF). The new methods avert the discrete cosine transform and quantization, which result in floating point precision loss, and succeed to encrypt and decrypt JPEG images lossless. The ciphered JPEG images generated by our solution own much better randomness than most other existing schemes. Our proposed method for GIF keeps the property of animation successfully. The security test results indicate the proposed methods have high security, and the speed of our algorithm is faster than classical solutions. Since JPEG and GIF image formats are popular contemporarily, we show that the prospect of chaotic image encryption is promising.

  2. The Effects of Images on Multiple-Choice Questions in Computer-Based Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martín-SanJosé, Juan Fernando; Juan, M.-Carmen; Vivó, Roberto; Abad, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Current learning and assessment are evolving into digital systems that can be used, stored, and processed online. In this paper, three different types of questionnaires for assessment are presented. All the questionnaires were filled out online on a web-based format. A study was carried out to determine whether the use of images related to each…

  3. Floating volumetric image formation using a dihedral corner reflector array device.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Hirano, Noboru; Maeda, Yuki; Yamamoto, Siori; Mukai, Takaaki; Maekawa, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A volumetric display system using an optical imaging device consisting of numerous dihedral corner reflectors placed perpendicular to the surface of a metal plate is proposed. Image formation by the dihedral corner reflector array (DCRA) is free from distortion and focal length. In the proposed volumetric display system, a two-dimensional real image is moved by a mirror scanner to scan a three-dimensional (3D) space. Cross-sectional images of a 3D object are displayed in accordance with the position of the image plane. A volumetric image is observed as a stack of the cross-sectional images. The use of the DCRA brings compact system configuration and volumetric real image generation with very low distortion. An experimental volumetric display system including a DCRA, a galvanometer mirror, and a digital micro-mirror device was constructed to verify the proposed method. A volumetric image consisting of 1024×768×400 voxels was formed by the experimental system. PMID:23292404

  4. Longitudinal in vivo imaging of bone formation and resorption using fluorescence molecular tomography.

    PubMed

    Lambers, F M; Stuker, F; Weigt, C; Kuhn, G; Koch, K; Schulte, F A; Ripoll, J; Rudin, M; Müller, R

    2013-02-01

    Bone research often focuses on anatomical imaging of the bone microstructure, but in order to gain better understanding in how bone remodeling is modulated through interventions also bone formation and resorption processes should be investigated. With this in mind, the purpose of this study was to establish a longitudinal in vivo imaging approach of bone formation and resorption using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). In this study the reproducibility, accuracy and sensitivity of FMT for bone imaging were assessed by performing longitudinal measurements with FMT and comparing it to in vivo micro-computed tomography on a set of control mice, and mice in which load-adaptation was induced in the sixth caudal vertebra. The precision error for FMT measurements, expressed as coefficient of variation, was smaller than 16%, indicating acceptable reproducibility. A correlation was found between bone resorption measured with FMT and bone resorption rate measured with in vivo micro-computed tomography only over the first 14days (R=0.81, p<0.01), but not between bone formation measured with FMT and bone formation rate measured with in vivo micro-CT. Bone formation measured by FMT was 89-109% greater (p<0.05) for mice subjected to mechanical loading than control mice. Bone resorption was 5-8% lower, but did not reach a significant difference between groups, indicating moderate sensitivity for FMT. In conclusion, in vivo FMT in mouse tail bones is feasible but needs to be optimized for monitoring load adaptation in living mice.

  5. DWPF welder parametric study

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, B.J.; Harbour, J.R.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the DWPF Startup Test Program, a parametric study has been performed to determine a range of welder operating parameters which will produce acceptable final welds for canistered waste forms. The parametric window of acceptable welds defined by this study is 90,000 {plus_minus} 15,000 lb of force, 248,000 {plus_minus} 22,000 amps of current, and 95 {plus_minus} 15 cycles (@ 60 cops) for the time of application of the current.

  6. Image formation in fluorescence coherence-gated imaging through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenca, A.; Lasser, T.; Ozcan, A.; Leitgeb, R. A.; Bouma, B. E.; Tearney, G. J.

    2007-03-01

    Recently, we have experimentally demonstrated a new form of cross-sectional, coherence-gated fluorescence imaging referred to as SD-FCT (‘spectral-domain fluorescence coherence tomography’). Imaging in SD-FCT is accomplished by spectrally detecting self-interference of the spontaneous emission of fluorophores, thereby providing depth-resolved information on the axial positions of fluorescent probes. Here, we present a theoretical investigation of the factors affecting the detected SD-FCT signal through scattering media. An imaging equation for SD-FCT is derived that includes the effects of defocusing, numerical-aperture, and the optical properties of the medium. A comparison between the optical sectioning capabilities of SD-FCT and confocal microscopy is also presented. Our results suggest that coherence gating in fluorescence imaging may provide an improved approach for depth-resolved imaging of fluorescently labeled samples; high axial resolution (a few microns) can be achieved with low numerical apertures (NA<0.09) while maintaining a large depth of field (a few hundreds of microns) in a relatively low scattering medium (6 mean free paths), whereas moderate NA’s can be used to enhance depth selectivity in more highly scattering biological samples.

  7. Monitoring hydrate formation and dissociation in sandstone and bulk with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, B A; Moradi-Araghi, A; Stevens, J C

    2003-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a very effective tool for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates because of the large intensity contrast between the images of the liquid components and the solid hydrate. Tetrahydrofuran/water hydrate was used because the two liquid components are miscible and form hydrate at ambient pressure. These properties made this feasibility study proceed much faster than using methane/water, which requires high pressure to form the hydrate. The formation and dissociation was monitored first in a THF/water-saturated Berea sandstone plug and second in the bulk. In both cases it appeared that nucleation was needed to begin the formation process, i.e., the presence of surfaces in the sandstone and shaking of the bulk solution. Dissociation appeared to be dominated by the rate of thermal energy transfer. The dissociation temperature of hydrate formed in the sandstone plug was not significantly different from the dissociation temperature in bulk.

  8. Patterns beyond Faraday waves: observation of parametric crossover from Faraday instabilities to the formation of vortex lattices in open dual fluid strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlin, Kjell; Berggren, Karl Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Faraday first characterised the behaviour of a fluid in a container subjected to vertical periodic oscillations. His study pertaining to hydrodynamic instability, the ‘Faraday instability’, has catalysed a myriad of experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies shedding light on the mechanisms responsible for the transition of a system at rest to a new state of well-ordered vibrational patterns at fixed frequencies. Here we study dual strata in a shallow vessel containing distilled water and high-viscosity lubrication oil on top of it. At elevated driving power, beyond the Faraday instability, the top stratum is found to ‘freeze’ into a rigid pattern with maxima and minima. At the same time there is a dynamic crossover into a new state in the form of a lattice of recirculating vortices in the lower layer containing the water. Instrumentation and the physics behind are analysed in a phenomenological way together with a basic heuristic modelling of the wave field. The study, which is based on relatively low-budget equipment, stems from related art projects that have evolved over the years. The study is of value within basic research as well as in education, especially as more advanced collective project work in e.g. engineering physics, where it invites further studies of pattern formation, the emergence of vortex lattices and complexity.

  9. Rigorous simulation of OCT image formation using Maxwell's equations in three dimensions (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Peter R. T.; Curatolo, Andrea; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Existing models of image formation in optical coherence tomography are based upon the extended Huygens-Fresnel formalism. These models all, to varying degrees, rely on scatterer ensemble averages, rather than deterministic scattering distributions. Whilst the former is sometimes preferable, there are a growing number of applications where the ability to predict image formation based upon deterministic refractive index distributions is of great interest, including, for example, image formation in turbid tissue. A rigorous model based upon three-dimensional solutions of Maxwell's equations offers a number of tantalising opportunities. For example, shedding light on features near or below the resolution of an OCT system and on the impact of phenomena usually described as diffraction, interference and scattering, but which more generally result from light scattering satisfying Maxwell's equations. A rigorous model allows inverse scattering methods to be developed not requiring the first-order Born approximation. Finally, a rigorous model can provide gold standard verification of myriad quantitative techniques currently being developed throughout the field. We have developed the first such model of image formation based upon three-dimensional solutions of Maxwell's equations, which has vastly different properties to models based on two-dimensional solutions. Although we present simulated B-scans, this model is equally applicable to C-scans. This has been made possible by advances in computational techniques and in computational resources routinely available. We will present the main features of our model, comparisons of measured and simulated image formation for phantoms and discuss the future of rigorous modelling in optical coherence tomography research and application.

  10. Parametric Mapping of Contrasted Ovarian Transvaginal Sonography

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Katrina; Moore, Ryan; Lyshchik, Andrej; Fleischer, Arthur C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of parametric analysis of transvaginal contrast-enhanced ultrasound (TV-CEUS) for distinguishing benign versus malignant ovarian masses. A total of 48 ovarian masses (37 benign and 11 borderline/malignant) were examined with TV-CEUS (Definity, Lantheus, North Bilreca, MA; Philips iU22, Bothell, WA). Parametric images were created offline with a quantification software (Bracco Suisse SA, Geneva, Switzerland) with map color scales adjusted such that abnormal hemodynamics were represented by the color red and the presence of any red color could be used to differentiate benign and malignant tumors. Using these map color scales, low values of the perfusion parameter were coded in blue, and intermediate values of the perfusion parameter were coded in yellow. Additionally, for each individual color (red, blue, or yellow), a darker shade of that color indicated a higher intensity value. Our study found that the parametric mapping method was considerably more sensitive than standard ROI analysis for the detection of malignant tumors but was also less specific than standard ROI analysis. Parametric mapping allows for stricter cut-off criteria, as hemodynamics are visualized on a finer scale than ROI analyses, and as such, parametric maps are a useful addition to TV-CEUS analysis by allowing ROIs to be limited to areas of highest malignant potential. PMID:26002525

  11. Formation of ghost images due to metal objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Bárbara Couto; da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, Jéssica Lourdes Costa; Souza, Priscilla Sena; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; Tuji, Fabrício Mesquita

    2016-01-01

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a study of the formation of panoramic radiograph ghost images caused by metal objects in the head and neck region of a dry skull, as well as to report a clinical case n order to warn dentists about ghost images and to raise awareness thereof. An understanding of the principles of the formation of ghost images in panoramic radiographs helps prevent incorrect diagnoses. PMID:27051642

  12. Diesel combustion and emissions formation using multiple 2-D imaging diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Dec, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    Understanding how emissions are formed during diesel combustion is central to developing new engines that can comply with increasingly stringent emission standards while maintaining or improving performance levels. Laser-based planar imaging diagnostics are uniquely capable of providing the temporally and spatially resolved information required for this understanding. Using an optically accessible research engine, a variety of two-dimensional (2-D) imaging diagnostics have been applied to investigators of direct-injection (DI) diesel combustion and emissions formation. These optical measurements have included the following laser-sheet imaging data: Mie scattering to determine liquid-phase fuel distributions, Rayleigh scattering for quantitative vapor-phase-fuel/air mixture images, laser induced incandescence (LII) for relative soot concentrations, simultaneous LII and Rayleigh scattering for relative soot particle-size distributions, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to obtain early PAH (polyaromatic hydrocarbon) distributions, PLIF images of the OH radical that show the diffusion flame structure, and PLIF images of the NO radical showing the onset of NO{sub x} production. In addition, natural-emission chemiluminescence images were obtained to investigate autoignition. The experimental setup is described, and the image data showing the most relevant results are presented. Then the conceptual model of diesel combustion is summarized in a series of idealized schematics depicting the temporal and spatial evolution of a reacting diesel fuel jet during the time period investigated. Finally, recent PLIF images of the NO distribution are presented and shown to support the timing and location of NO formation hypothesized from the conceptual model.

  13. Fast processing of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) metadata using multiseries DICOM format

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Mahmoud; Philbin, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) information model combines pixel data and its metadata in a single object. There are user scenarios that only need metadata manipulation, such as deidentification and study migration. Most picture archiving and communication system use a database to store and update the metadata rather than updating the raw DICOM files themselves. The multiseries DICOM (MSD) format separates metadata from pixel data and eliminates duplicate attributes. This work promotes storing DICOM studies in MSD format to reduce the metadata processing time. A set of experiments are performed that update the metadata of a set of DICOM studies for deidentification and migration. The studies are stored in both the traditional single frame DICOM (SFD) format and the MSD format. The results show that it is faster to update studies’ metadata in MSD format than in SFD format because the bulk data is separated in MSD and is not retrieved from the storage system. In addition, it is space efficient to store the deidentified studies in MSD format as it shares the same bulk data object with the original study. In summary, separation of metadata from pixel data using the MSD format provides fast metadata access and speeds up applications that process only the metadata. PMID:26158117

  14. Wolfenstein parametrization reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Z. )

    1995-04-01

    The Wolfenstein parametrization of the 3[times]3 Kobayashi-Maskawa (KM) matrix [ital V] is modified by keeping its unitarity up to an accuracy of [ital O]([lambda][sup 6]). This modification can self-consistently lead to the off-diagonal asymmetry of [ital V], [vert bar][ital V][sub [ital i][ital j

  15. The brain imaging data structure, a format for organizing and describing outputs of neuroimaging experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Auer, Tibor; Calhoun, Vince D.; Craddock, R. Cameron; Das, Samir; Duff, Eugene P.; Flandin, Guillaume; Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Glatard, Tristan; Halchenko, Yaroslav O.; Handwerker, Daniel A.; Hanke, Michael; Keator, David; Li, Xiangrui; Michael, Zachary; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, B. Nolan; Nichols, Thomas E.; Pellman, John; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rokem, Ariel; Schaefer, Gunnar; Sochat, Vanessa; Triplett, William; Turner, Jessica A.; Varoquaux, Gaël; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques has defined modern neuroimaging. Since its inception, tens of thousands of studies using techniques such as functional MRI and diffusion weighted imaging have allowed for the non-invasive study of the brain. Despite the fact that MRI is routinely used to obtain data for neuroscience research, there has been no widely adopted standard for organizing and describing the data collected in an imaging experiment. This renders sharing and reusing data (within or between labs) difficult if not impossible and unnecessarily complicates the application of automatic pipelines and quality assurance protocols. To solve this problem, we have developed the Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS), a standard for organizing and describing MRI datasets. The BIDS standard uses file formats compatible with existing software, unifies the majority of practices already common in the field, and captures the metadata necessary for most common data processing operations. PMID:27326542

  16. The brain imaging data structure, a format for organizing and describing outputs of neuroimaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Auer, Tibor; Calhoun, Vince D; Craddock, R Cameron; Das, Samir; Duff, Eugene P; Flandin, Guillaume; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Glatard, Tristan; Halchenko, Yaroslav O; Handwerker, Daniel A; Hanke, Michael; Keator, David; Li, Xiangrui; Michael, Zachary; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, B Nolan; Nichols, Thomas E; Pellman, John; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rokem, Ariel; Schaefer, Gunnar; Sochat, Vanessa; Triplett, William; Turner, Jessica A; Varoquaux, Gaël; Poldrack, Russell A

    2016-01-01

    The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques has defined modern neuroimaging. Since its inception, tens of thousands of studies using techniques such as functional MRI and diffusion weighted imaging have allowed for the non-invasive study of the brain. Despite the fact that MRI is routinely used to obtain data for neuroscience research, there has been no widely adopted standard for organizing and describing the data collected in an imaging experiment. This renders sharing and reusing data (within or between labs) difficult if not impossible and unnecessarily complicates the application of automatic pipelines and quality assurance protocols. To solve this problem, we have developed the Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS), a standard for organizing and describing MRI datasets. The BIDS standard uses file formats compatible with existing software, unifies the majority of practices already common in the field, and captures the metadata necessary for most common data processing operations. PMID:27326542

  17. BOREAS Level-2 MAS Surface Reflectance and Temperature Images in BSQ Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey (Editor); Lobitz, Brad; Spanner, Michael; Strub, Richard; Lobitz, Brad

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Staff Science Aircraft Data Acquisition Program focused on providing the research teams with the remotely sensed aircraft data products they needed to compare and spatially extend point results. The MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) images, along with other remotely sensed data, were collected to provide spatially extensive information over the primary study areas. This information includes biophysical parameter maps such as surface reflectance and temperature. Collection of the MAS images occurred over the study areas during the 1994 field campaigns. The level-2 MAS data cover the dates of 21-Jul-1994, 24-Jul-1994, 04-Aug-1994, and 08-Aug-1994. The data are not geographically/geometrically corrected; however, files of relative X and Y coordinates for each image pixel were derived by using the C130 navigation data in a MAS scan model. The data are provided in binary image format files.

  18. Oil Spill Detection by SAR Images: Dark Formation Detection, Feature Extraction and Classification Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Topouzelis, Konstantinos N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive review of the use of Synthetic Aperture Radar images (SAR) for detection of illegal discharges from ships. It summarizes the current state of the art, covering operational and research aspects of the application. Oil spills are seriously affecting the marine ecosystem and cause political and scientific concern since they seriously effect fragile marine and coastal ecosystem. The amount of pollutant discharges and associated effects on the marine environment are important parameters in evaluating sea water quality. Satellite images can improve the possibilities for the detection of oil spills as they cover large areas and offer an economical and easier way of continuous coast areas patrolling. SAR images have been widely used for oil spill detection. The present paper gives an overview of the methodologies used to detect oil spills on the radar images. In particular we concentrate on the use of the manual and automatic approaches to distinguish oil spills from other natural phenomena. We discuss the most common techniques to detect dark formations on the SAR images, the features which are extracted from the detected dark formations and the most used classifiers. Finally we conclude with discussion of suggestions for further research. The references throughout the review can serve as starting point for more intensive studies on the subject.

  19. The formation of quantum images and their transformation and super-resolution reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, D. A.; Belinsky, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Images formed by light with suppressed photon fluctuations are interesting objects for studies with the aim of increasing their limiting information capacity and quality. This light in the sub-Poisson state can be prepared in a resonator filled with a medium with Kerr nonlinearity, in which self-phase modulation takes place. Spatially and temporally multimode light beams are studied and the production of spatial frequency spectra of suppressed photon fluctuations is described. The efficient operation regimes of the system are found. A particular schematic solution is described, which allows one to realize the potential possibilities laid in the formation of the squeezed states of light to a maximum degree during self-phase modulation in a resonator for the maximal suppression of amplitude quantum noises upon two-dimensional imaging. The efficiency of using light with suppressed quantum fluctuations for computer image processing is studied. An algorithm is described for interpreting measurements for increasing the resolution with respect to the geometrical resolution. A mathematical model that characterizes the measurement scheme is constructed and the problem of the image reconstruction is solved. The algorithm for the interpretation of images is verified. Conditions are found for the efficient application of sub-Poisson light for super-resolution imaging. It is found that the image should have a low contrast and be maximally transparent.

  20. Parametric resonance in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lacitignola, Deborah; Saccomandi, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    We consider a simple mesoscopic model of DNA in which the binding of the RNA polymerase enzyme molecule to the promoter sequence of the DNA is included through a substrate energy term modeling the enzymatic interaction with the DNA strands. We focus on the differential system for solitary waves and derive conditions--in terms of the model parameters--for the occurrence of the parametric resonance phenomenon. We find that what truly matters for parametric resonance is not the ratio between the strength of the stacking and the inter-strand forces but the ratio between the substrate and the inter-strands. On the basis of these results, the standard objection that longitudinal motion is negligible because of the second order seems to fail, suggesting that all the studies involving the longitudinal degree of freedom in DNA should be reconsidered when the interaction of the RNA polymerase with the DNA macromolecule is not neglected. PMID:24510728

  1. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  2. IFP V4.0:a polar-reformatting image formation processor for synthetic aperture radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2005-09-01

    IFP V4.0 is the fourth generation of an extraordinarily powerful and flexible image formation processor for spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar. It has been successfully utilized in processing phase histories from numerous radars and has been instrumental in the development of many new capabilities for spotlight mode SAR. This document provides a brief history of the development of IFP, a full exposition of the signal processing steps involved, and a short user's manual for the software implementing this latest iteration.

  3. ColonyArea: an ImageJ plugin to automatically quantify colony formation in clonogenic assays.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Camilo; Bagga, Manish; Kaur, Amanpreet; Westermarck, Jukka; Abankwa, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The clonogenic or colony formation assay is a widely used method to study the number and size of cancer cell colonies that remain after irradiation or cytotoxic agent administration and serves as a measure for the anti-proliferative effect of these treatments. Alternatively, this assay is used to quantitate the transforming potential of cancer associated genes and chemical agents. Therefore, there is a need for a simplified and standardized analysis of colony formation assays for both routine laboratory use and for parallelized automated analysis. Here we describe the freely available ImageJ-plugin "ColonyArea", which is optimized for rapid and quantitative analysis of focus formation assays conducted in 6- to 24-well dishes. ColonyArea processes image data of multi-well dishes, by separating, concentrically cropping and background correcting well images individually, before colony formation is quantitated. Instead of counting the number of colonies, ColonyArea determines the percentage of area covered by crystal violet stained cell colonies, also taking the intensity of the staining and therefore cell density into account. We demonstrate that these parameters alone or in combination allow for robust quantification of IC50 values of the cytotoxic effect of two staurosporines, UCN-01 and staurosporine (STS) on human glioblastoma cells (T98G). The relation between the potencies of the two compounds compared very well with that obtained from an absorbance based method to quantify colony growth and to published data. The ColonyArea ImageJ plugin provides a simple and efficient analysis routine to quantitate assay data of one of the most commonly used cellular assays. The bundle is freely available for download as supporting information. We expect that ColonyArea will be of broad utility for cancer biologists, as well as clinical radiation scientists.

  4. Non-parametric cell-based photometric proxies for galaxy morphology: methodology and application to the morphologically defined star formation-stellar mass relation of spiral galaxies in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootes, M. W.; Tuffs, R. J.; Popescu, C. C.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Seibert, M.; Kelvin, L. S.

    2014-02-01

    We present a non-parametric cell-based method of selecting highly pure and largely complete samples of spiral galaxies using photometric and structural parameters as provided by standard photometric pipelines and simple shape fitting algorithms. The performance of the method is quantified for different parameter combinations, using purely human-based classifications as a benchmark. The discretization of the parameter space allows a markedly superior selection than commonly used proxies relying on a fixed curve or surface of separation. Moreover, we find structural parameters derived using passbands longwards of the g band and linked to older stellar populations, especially the stellar mass surface density μ* and the r-band effective radius re, to perform at least equally well as parameters more traditionally linked to the identification of spirals by means of their young stellar populations, e.g. UV/optical colours. In particular, the distinct bimodality in the parameter μ*, consistent with expectations of different evolutionary paths for spirals and ellipticals, represents an often overlooked yet powerful parameter in differentiating between spiral and non-spiral/elliptical galaxies. We use the cell-based method for the optical parameter set including re in combination with the Sérsic index n and the i-band magnitude to investigate the intrinsic specific star formation rate-stellar mass relation (ψ*-M*) for a morphologically defined volume-limited sample of local Universe spiral galaxies. The relation is found to be well described by ψ _* ∝ M_*^{-0.5} over the range of 109.5 ≤ M* ≤ 1011 M⊙ with a mean interquartile range of 0.4 dex. This is somewhat steeper than previous determinations based on colour-selected samples of star-forming galaxies, primarily due to the inclusion in the sample of red quiescent discs.

  5. Effect of Satellite Formations and Imaging Modes on Global Albedo Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nag, Sreeja; Gatebe, Charles K.; Miller, David W.; de Weck, Olivier L.

    2016-01-01

    We confirm the applicability of using small satellite formation flight for multi-angular earth observation to retrieve global, narrow band, narrow field-of-view albedo. The value of formation flight is assessed using a coupled systems engineering and science evaluation model, driven by Model Based Systems Engineering and Observing System Simulation Experiments. Albedo errors are calculated against bi-directional reflectance data obtained from NASA airborne campaigns made by the Cloud Absorption Radiometer for the seven major surface types, binned using MODIS' land cover map - water, forest, cropland, grassland, snow, desert and cities. A full tradespace of architectures with three to eight satellites, maintainable orbits and imaging modes (collective payload pointing strategies) are assessed. For an arbitrary 4-sat formation, changing the reference, nadir-pointing satellite dynamically reduces the average albedo error to 0.003, from 0.006 found in the static reference case. Tracking pre-selected waypoints with all the satellites reduces the average error further to 0.001, allows better polar imaging and continued operations even with a broken formation. An albedo error of 0.001 translates to 1.36 W/sq m or 0.4% in Earth's outgoing radiation error. Estimation errors are found to be independent of the satellites' altitude and inclination, if the nadir-looking is changed dynamically. The formation satellites are restricted to differ in only right ascension of planes and mean anomalies within slotted bounds. Three satellites in some specific formations show average albedo errors of less than 2% with respect to airborne, ground data and seven satellites in any slotted formation outperform the monolithic error of 3.6%. In fact, the maximum possible albedo error, purely based on angular sampling, of 12% for monoliths is outperformed by a five-satellite formation in any slotted arrangement and an eight satellite formation can bring that error down four fold to 3%. More

  6. Effect of satellite formations and imaging modes on global albedo estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Sreeja; Gatebe, Charles K.; Miller, David W.; de Weck, Olivier L.

    2016-05-01

    We confirm the applicability of using small satellite formation flight for multi-angular earth observation to retrieve global, narrow band, narrow field-of-view albedo. The value of formation flight is assessed using a coupled systems engineering and science evaluation model, driven by Model Based Systems Engineering and Observing System Simulation Experiments. Albedo errors are calculated against bi-directional reflectance data obtained from NASA airborne campaigns made by the Cloud Absorption Radiometer for the seven major surface types, binned using MODIS' land cover map - water, forest, cropland, grassland, snow, desert and cities. A full tradespace of architectures with three to eight satellites, maintainable orbits and imaging modes (collective payload pointing strategies) are assessed. For an arbitrary 4-sat formation, changing the reference, nadir-pointing satellite dynamically reduces the average albedo error to 0.003, from 0.006 found in the static referencecase. Tracking pre-selected waypoints with all the satellites reduces the average error further to 0.001, allows better polar imaging and continued operations even with a broken formation. An albedo error of 0.001 translates to 1.36 W/m2 or 0.4% in Earth's outgoing radiation error. Estimation errors are found to be independent of the satellites' altitude and inclination, if the nadir-looking is changed dynamically. The formation satellites are restricted to differ in only right ascension of planes and mean anomalies within slotted bounds. Three satellites in some specific formations show average albedo errors of less than 2% with respect to airborne, ground data and seven satellites in any slotted formation outperform the monolithic error of 3.6%. In fact, the maximum possible albedo error, purely based on angular sampling, of 12% for monoliths is outperformed by a five-satellite formation in any slotted arrangement and an eight satellite formation can bring that error down four fold to 3%. More than

  7. Image formation, resolution, and height measurement in scanning ion conductance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schaeffer, Tilman E.

    2009-05-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is an emerging tool for the noncontact investigation of biological samples such as live cells. It uses an ion current through the opening of a tapered nanopipette filled with an electrolyte for topography measurements. Despite its successful application to numerous systems no systematic investigation of the image formation process has yet been performed. Here, we use finite element modeling to investigate how the scanning ion conductance microscope images small particles on a planar surface, providing a fundamental characterization of the imaging process. We find that a small particle appears with a height that is only a fraction of its actual height. This has significant consequences for the quantitative interpretation of SICM images. Furthermore, small and low particles are imaged as rings in certain cases. This can cause small, closely spaced particles to appear with a lateral orientation that is rotated by 90 deg. Considering both real space and spatial frequency space we find that a reasonable and useful definition of lateral resolution of SICM is the smallest distance at which two small particles can clearly be resolved from each other in an image. We find that this resolution is approximately equal to three times the inner radius of the pipette tip opening.

  8. Extending a GTD-based image formation technique to EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoh, Andrew; Flagello, Donis G.; Milster, Thomas D.; Choi, Byoung-Il; Samudra, Ganesh S.; Wu, Yihong

    2003-06-01

    An image formation technique based on the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction was presented last conference. The technique is a scalar technique and is applicable to infinitely thin and perfectly conducting mask. We explore in this paper the extension of the technique to 1D Extreme Ultra-Violet(EUV) Lithography mask, taking into consideration both the material property and the topography of the mask. Vectorial nature of light is incorporated in the treatment. Results obtained are promising and encouraging. Computation time is relatively much shorter and the technique could simulate irradiance profile for any illumination angle. The technique is simple and elegant and lends understanding to image formation. We conclude that the asymmetry-through-focus characteristic usually found in EUV and Phase Mask imaging is an imaging phenomenon. We also conclude that corrections for proximity effect and pattern infidelity will be needed when EUV Lithography is introduced at the 32 nm node, assuming a system NA of 0.25. Lastly, for a partially coherent illumination, it appears necessary to compute the irradiance corresponding to each illumination point individually.

  9. The hippocampal formation participates in novel picture encoding: evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, C E; Corkin, S; González, R G; Guimaraes, A R; Baker, J R; Jennings, P J; Carr, C A; Sugiura, R M; Vedantham, V; Rosen, B R

    1996-01-01

    Considerable evidence exists to support the hypothesis that the hippocampus and related medial temporal lobe structures are crucial for the encoding and storage of information in long-term memory. Few human imaging studies, however, have successfully shown signal intensity changes in these areas during encoding or retrieval. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we studied normal human subjects while they performed a novel picture encoding task. High-speed echo-planar imaging techniques evaluated fMRI signal changes throughout the brain. During the encoding of novel pictures, statistically significant increases in fMRI signal were observed bilaterally in the posterior hippocampal formation and parahippocampal gyrus and in the lingual and fusiform gyri. To our knowledge, this experiment is the first fMRI study to show robust signal changes in the human hippocampal region. It also provides evidence that the encoding of novel, complex pictures depends upon an interaction between ventral cortical regions, specialized for object vision, and the hippocampal formation and parahippocampal gyrus, specialized for long-term memory. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8710927

  10. A correlative imaging based methodology for accurate quantitative assessment of bone formation in additive manufactured implants.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hua; Todd, Naomi M; Devlin-Mullin, Aine; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; Kim, Taek Bo; Madi, Kamel; Cartmell, Sarah; Mitchell, Christopher A; Jones, Julian R; Lee, Peter D

    2016-06-01

    A correlative imaging methodology was developed to accurately quantify bone formation in the complex lattice structure of additive manufactured implants. Micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry were combined, integrating the best features from both, while demonstrating the limitations of each imaging modality. This semi-automatic methodology registered each modality using a coarse graining technique to speed the registration of 2D histology sections to high resolution 3D μCT datasets. Once registered, histomorphometric qualitative and quantitative bone descriptors were directly correlated to 3D quantitative bone descriptors, such as bone ingrowth and bone contact. The correlative imaging allowed the significant volumetric shrinkage of histology sections to be quantified for the first time (~15 %). This technique demonstrated the importance of location of the histological section, demonstrating that up to a 30 % offset can be introduced. The results were used to quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of 3D printed titanium lattice implants.

  11. Assessment of MR Compatibility of a PET Insert Developed for Simultaneous Multi-parametric PET/MR Imaging on an Animal System Operating at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Wehrl, Hans F.; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Thielscher, Axel; Martirosian, Petros; Schick, Fritz; Pichler, Bernd J.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of PET and MR in one system is currently emerging and opens up new domains in the functional examinations of living systems. This paper reports on relevant influences of a PET insert on MR imaging. The basic conditions of main magnetic field and RF field homogeneity were measured as well as image quality and signal-to-noise ratio when applying the usual MR sequence types including echo-planar techniques. Moreover, the influence of the PET insert on the RF noise level and on RF interferences was measured by comparing results achieved with and without the PET insert. The temporal stability of EPI imaging with and without the PET insert was assessed. Small but significant decreases in the signal-to-noise ratio were revealed when the PET insert was present, whereas B0 and B1 homogeneity as well as RF noise level were not adversely affected. A higher signal intensity drift was found for EPI imaging studies; however, this can be compensated by post processing. In summary, this study shows that PET inserts can be designed for and used within an MR system practically, without substantially affecting the MR image quality. PMID:20806353

  12. Understanding Galaxy Formation from Deep Hubble Images: The Forward-Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We present a new approach to comparing models of galaxy formation with deep images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In particular, we generate simulated HST images by projecting the galaxy formation models all the way into observational domain, adding cosmological and instrumental effects, and we analyze these images in the same way as real HST images ("forward modeling"). This is a powerful method for testing the models, since it allows us to make unbiased comparisons between predictions and observations, while automatically taking into account all relevant selection effects. We model the evolving galaxy population by semi-empirical techniques based on cosmological simulations of dark matter halos, in which the baryonic evolution of galaxies follows closely that of their dark halos, as specified by a constant or evolving stellar mass-halo mass (SMHM) relation. We introduce a novel method to ensure that the star formation history in each simulated galaxy complies with the input SMHM relation. We compute the radiative spectra of simulated galaxies from stellar population synthesis models, taking into account absorption by gas and dust in the interstellar medium and by gas in the intergalactic medium. The appearance of our simulated galaxies is based on cutout images of real galaxies in the SDSS, but with luminosities and sizes rescaled to match those computed by our semi-empirical models. To determine which models are acceptable, we derive the distributions of luminosities, sizes, and surface brightnesses of galaxies in the simulated images (using SExtractor and other standard analysis tools) and compare these with the corresponding distributions derived from real HST images. We find remarkably good agreement between these distributions for reasonable values of the relatively few adjustable parameters in our models. As a byproduct of this analysis, we also quantify the potential biases and selection effects in the observations. The methods presented here

  13. New insights on the formation and assembly of M83 from deep near-infrared imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese; Dale, Daniel A.; Staudaher, Shawn; Bullock, James S.; Calzetti, Daniela; Chandar, Rupali; Dalcanton, Julianne J.

    2014-07-10

    We present results from new near-infrared (NIR) imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope that trace the low surface brightness features of the outer disk and stellar stream in the nearby spiral galaxy, M83. Previous observations have shown that M83 hosts a faint stellar stream to the northwest and a star-forming disk that extends to ∼3 times the optical radius (R{sub 25}). By combining the NIR imaging with archival far-ultraviolet (FUV) and H I imaging, we study the star formation history of the system. The NIR surface brightness profile has a break at ∼5.'8 (equivalent to 8.1 kpc and 0.9 R{sub 25}) with a shallower slope beyond this radius, which may result from the recent accretion of gas onto the outer disk and subsequent star formation. Additionally, the ratio of FUV to NIR flux increases with increasing radius in several arms throughout the extended star forming disk, indicating an increase in the ratio of the present to past star formation rate with increasing radius. This sort of inside-out disk formation is consistent with observations of gas infall onto the outer disk of M83. Finally, the flux, size, and shape of the stellar stream are measured and the origin of the stream is explored. The stream has a total NIR flux of 11.6 mJy, which implies a stellar mass of 1 × 10{sup 8} M{sub ☉} in an area subtending ∼80°. No FUV emission is detected in the stream at a level greater than the noise, confirming an intermediate-age or old stellar population in the stream.

  14. Using direct imaging to investigate the formation and migration histories of gas giant exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Henry

    2016-10-01

    Gas giant exoplanets are found around their host stars at orbital separations spanning more than four orders of magnitude (0.01 to 100 AU). However, it is not known whether the planets at the extreme ends of this range could have formed in situ or if they instead formed closer to ice lines between 1-10 AU and then migrated to their present day locations. In this study, we use two direct imaging surveys to explore the potential origins of hot Jupiters and to characterize the population of gas giant planets beyond the ice line. In our first survey, we focus on the role of stellar companions in hot Jupiter formation and migration. We determine that less than 20% of hot Jupiters have stellar companions capable of inducing migration via Kozai-Lidov oscillations. In addition, we find that hot Jupiter hosts are three times more likely to have a stellar companion between 50-2000 AU than field stars, suggesting that binary star systems may be favorable environments for gas giant planet formation. In our second study, we present the results from the first year of a two-year direct imaging planet survey of 200 young M-dwarf stars. By imaging in L-band (3.8 micron) and taking advantage of the new 80 milliarcsecond inner working angle "vortex" coronagraph on Keck NIRC2, we are sensitive to young planets with masses between 1-10 Jupiter masses with projected separations between 1-10 AU. We can compare the semi-major axis distribution of directly imaged planets beyond 10 AU to that of intermediate period gas giants from radial velocity surveys and determine whether or not these two populations form a continuous distribution. If so, this would imply these populations share common formation (core accretion) and migration channels.

  15. Image-based characterization of thrombus formation in time-lapse DIC microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brieu, Nicolas; Navab, Nassir; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Ouwehand, Willem H; Stemple, Derek L; Cvejic, Ana; Groher, Martin

    2012-05-01

    The characterization of thrombus formation in time-lapse DIC microscopy is of increased interest for identifying genes which account for atherothrombosis and coronary artery diseases (CADs). In particular, we are interested in large-scale studies on zebrafish, which result in large amount of data, and require automatic processing. In this work, we present an image-based solution for the automatized extraction of parameters quantifying the temporal development of thrombotic plugs. Our system is based on the joint segmentation of thrombotic and aortic regions over time. This task is made difficult by the low contrast and the high dynamic conditions observed in vivo DIC microscopic scenes. Our key idea is to perform this segmentation by distinguishing the different motion patterns in image time series rather than by solving standard image segmentation tasks in each image frame. Thus, we are able to compensate for the poor imaging conditions. We model motion patterns by energies based on the idea of dynamic textures, and regularize the model by two prior energies on the shape of the aortic region and on the topological relationship between the thrombus and the aorta. We demonstrate the performance of our segmentation algorithm by qualitative and quantitative experiments on synthetic examples as well as on real in vivo microscopic sequences.

  16. Imaging symptomatic bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced heterotopic bone formation within the spinal canal: case report.

    PubMed

    Chryssikos, Timothy; Crandall, Kenneth M; Sansur, Charles A

    2016-05-01

    Heterotopic bone formation within the spinal canal is a known complication of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and presents a clinical and surgical challenge. Imaging modalities are routinely used for operative planning in this setting. Here, the authors present the case of a 59-year-old woman with cauda equina syndrome following intraoperative BMP-2 administration. Plain film myelographic studies showed a region of severe stenosis that was underappreciated on CT myelography due to a heterotopic bony lesion mimicking the dorsal aspect of a circumferentially patent thecal sac. When evaluating spinal stenosis under these circumstances, it is important to carefully consider plain myelographic images in addition to postmyelography CT images as the latter may underestimate the true degree of stenosis due to the potentially similar radiographic appearances of evolving BMP-2-induced heterotopic bone and intrathecal contrast. Alternatively, comparison of sequentially acquired noncontrast CT scans with CT myelographic images may also assist in distinguishing BMP-2-induced heterotopic bony lesions from the thecal sac. Further studies are needed to elucidate the roles of the available imaging techniques in this setting and to characterize the connection between the radiographic and histological appearances of BMP-2-induced heterotopic bone. PMID:26824586

  17. A format standard for efficient interchange of high-contrast direct imaging science products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, Élodie; Vigan, Arthur; Soummer, Rémi; Chauvin, Gaël.; Pueyo, Laurent; Perrin, Marshall D.; Hines, Dean C.

    2014-07-01

    The present and next few years will see the arrival of several new coronagraphic instruments dedicated to the detection and characterization of planetary systems. These ground- and space-based instruments (Gemini/GPI, VLT/SPHERE, Subaru/ CHARIS, JWST NIRCam and MIRI coronagraphs among others), will provide a large number of new candidates, through multiple nearby-star surveys and will complete and extend those acquired with current generation instruments (Palomar P1640, VLT/NACO, Keck, HST). To optimize the use of the wealth of data, including non-detection results, the science products of these instruments will require to be shared among the community. In the long term such data exchange will significantly ease companion confirmations, planet characterization via different type of instruments (integral field spectrographs, polarimetric imagers, etc.), and Monte-Carlo population studies from detection and non-detection results. In this context, we initiated a collaborative effort between the teams developing the data reduction pipelines for SPHERE, GPI, and the JWST coronagraphs, and the ALICE (Archival Legacy Investigations of Circumstellar Environment) collaboration, which is currently reprocessing all the HST/NICMOS coronagraphic surveys. We are developing a standard format for the science products generated by high-contrast direct imaging instruments (reduced image, sensitivity limits, noise image, candidate list, etc.), that is directly usable for astrophysical investigations. In this paper, we present first results of this work and propose a preliminary format adopted for the science product. We call for discussions in the high-contrast direct imaging community to develop this effort, reach a consensus and finalize this standard. This action will be critical to enable data interchange and combination in a consistent way between several instruments and to stiffen the scientific production in the community.

  18. Parametric Trace Slicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosu, Grigore (Inventor); Chen, Feng (Inventor); Chen, Guo-fang; Wu, Yamei; Meredith, Patrick O. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A program trace is obtained and events of the program trace are traversed. For each event identified in traversing the program trace, a trace slice of which the identified event is a part is identified based on the parameter instance of the identified event. For each trace slice of which the identified event is a part, the identified event is added to an end of a record of the trace slice. These parametric trace slices can be used in a variety of different manners, such as for monitoring, mining, and predicting.

  19. Parametric Hazard Function Estimation.

    1999-09-13

    Version 00 Phaze performs statistical inference calculations on a hazard function (also called a failure rate or intensity function) based on reported failure times of components that are repaired and restored to service. Three parametric models are allowed: the exponential, linear, and Weibull hazard models. The inference includes estimation (maximum likelihood estimators and confidence regions) of the parameters and of the hazard function itself, testing of hypotheses such as increasing failure rate, and checking ofmore » the model assumptions.« less

  20. Multipass optical parametric amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Jeys, T.H.

    1996-08-01

    A compact, low-threshold, multipass optical parametric amplifier has been developed for the conversion of short-pulse (360-ps) 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser radiation into eye-safe 1572-nm radiation for laser ranging and radar applications. The amplifier had a threshold pump power of as low as 45{mu}J, and at three to four times this threshold pump power the amplifier converted 30{percent} of the input 1064-nm radiation into 1572-nm output radiation. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  1. Star formation properties of Hickson Compact Groups based on deep Hα imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenthaler, Paul; Ploeckinger, Sylvia; Verdugo, Miguel; Ziegler, Bodo

    2015-08-01

    We present deep Hα imaging of seven Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) using the 4.1-m Southern Astrophysics Research (SOAR) Telescope. The high spatial resolution of the observations allows us to study both the integrated star formation properties of the main galaxies as well as the 2D distribution of star-forming knots in the faint tidal arms that form during interactions between the individual galaxies. We derive star formation rates and stellar masses for group members and discuss their position relative to the main sequence of star-forming galaxies. Despite the existence of tidal features within the galaxy groups, we do not find any indication for enhanced star formation in the selected sample of HCGs. We study azimuthally averaged Hα profiles of the galaxy discs and compare them with the g' and r' surface brightness profiles. We do not find any truncated galaxy discs but reveal that more massive galaxies show a higher light concentration in Hα than less massive ones. We also see that galaxies that show a high light concentration in r', show a systematic higher light concentration in Hα. Tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates have been previously detected in R-band images for two groups in our sample but we find that most of them are likely background objects as they do not show any emission in Hα. We present a new TDG candidate at the tip of the tidal tail in HCG 91.

  2. MINC 2.0: A Flexible Format for Multi-Modal Images

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Robert D.; Neelin, Peter; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Janke, Andrew L.; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Robbins, Steven M.; Baghdadi, Leila; Lerch, Jason; Sled, John G.; Adalat, Reza; MacDonald, David; Zijdenbos, Alex P.; Collins, D. Louis; Evans, Alan C.

    2016-01-01

    It is often useful that an imaging data format can afford rich metadata, be flexible, scale to very large file sizes, support multi-modal data, and have strong inbuilt mechanisms for data provenance. Beginning in 1992, MINC was developed as a system for flexible, self-documenting representation of neuroscientific imaging data with arbitrary orientation and dimensionality. The MINC system incorporates three broad components: a file format specification, a programming library, and a growing set of tools. In the early 2000's the MINC developers created MINC 2.0, which added support for 64-bit file sizes, internal compression, and a number of other modern features. Because of its extensible design, it has been easy to incorporate details of provenance in the header metadata, including an explicit processing history, unique identifiers, and vendor-specific scanner settings. This makes MINC ideal for use in large scale imaging studies and databases. It also makes it easy to adapt to new scanning sequences and modalities. PMID:27563289

  3. MINC 2.0: A Flexible Format for Multi-Modal Images.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Robert D; Neelin, Peter; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Janke, Andrew L; Fonov, Vladimir S; Robbins, Steven M; Baghdadi, Leila; Lerch, Jason; Sled, John G; Adalat, Reza; MacDonald, David; Zijdenbos, Alex P; Collins, D Louis; Evans, Alan C

    2016-01-01

    It is often useful that an imaging data format can afford rich metadata, be flexible, scale to very large file sizes, support multi-modal data, and have strong inbuilt mechanisms for data provenance. Beginning in 1992, MINC was developed as a system for flexible, self-documenting representation of neuroscientific imaging data with arbitrary orientation and dimensionality. The MINC system incorporates three broad components: a file format specification, a programming library, and a growing set of tools. In the early 2000's the MINC developers created MINC 2.0, which added support for 64-bit file sizes, internal compression, and a number of other modern features. Because of its extensible design, it has been easy to incorporate details of provenance in the header metadata, including an explicit processing history, unique identifiers, and vendor-specific scanner settings. This makes MINC ideal for use in large scale imaging studies and databases. It also makes it easy to adapt to new scanning sequences and modalities. PMID:27563289

  4. Observation of image transfer and phase conjugation in stimulated down-conversion.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, P H; Caetano, D P; Almeida, M P; Huguenin, J A; dos Santos, B C; Khoury, A Z

    2001-09-24

    We observe experimentally the transfer of angular spectrum and image formation in the process of stimulated parametric down-conversion. Images and interference patterns can be transferred from either the pump or the auxiliary laser beams to the stimulated down-converted one. The stimulated field propagates as the complex conjugate of the auxiliary laser. The phase conjugation is observed through intensity pattern measurements.

  5. Combining parametric, semi-parametric, and non-parametric survival models with stacked survival models.

    PubMed

    Wey, Andrew; Connett, John; Rudser, Kyle

    2015-07-01

    For estimating conditional survival functions, non-parametric estimators can be preferred to parametric and semi-parametric estimators due to relaxed assumptions that enable robust estimation. Yet, even when misspecified, parametric and semi-parametric estimators can possess better operating characteristics in small sample sizes due to smaller variance than non-parametric estimators. Fundamentally, this is a bias-variance trade-off situation in that the sample size is not large enough to take advantage of the low bias of non-parametric estimation. Stacked survival models estimate an optimally weighted combination of models that can span parametric, semi-parametric, and non-parametric models by minimizing prediction error. An extensive simulation study demonstrates that stacked survival models consistently perform well across a wide range of scenarios by adaptively balancing the strengths and weaknesses of individual candidate survival models. In addition, stacked survival models perform as well as or better than the model selected through cross-validation. Finally, stacked survival models are applied to a well-known German breast cancer study.

  6. Assessment of Feasibility to Use Computer Aided Texture Analysis Based Tool for Parametric Images of Suspicious Lesions in DCE-MR Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Mehmet Cemil; Fleig, John David; İmal, Nazım

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze the feasibility of computer aided malignant tumor detection using the traditional texture analysis applied on two-compartment-based parameter pseudoimages of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) breast image data. A major contribution of this research will be the through-plane assessment capability. Texture analysis was performed on two-compartment-based pseudo images of DCE-MRI datasets of breast data of eight subjects. The resulting texture parameter pseudo images were inputted to a feedforward neural network classification system which uses the manual segmentations of a primary radiologist as a gold standard, and each voxel was assigned as malignant or nonmalignant. The classification results were compared with the lesions manually segmented by a second radiologist. Results show that the mean true positive fraction (TPF) and false positive fraction (FPF) performance of the classifier vs. primary radiologist is statistically as good as the mean TPF and FPF performance of the second radiologist vs. primary radiologist with a confidence interval of 95% using a one-sample t-test with α = 0.05. In the experiment implemented on all of the eight subjects, all malignant tumors marked by the primary radiologist were classified to be malignant by the computer classifier. Our results have shown that neural network classification using the textural parameters for automated screening of two-compartment-based parameter pseudo images of DCE-MRI as input data can be a supportive tool for the radiologists in the preassessment stage to show the possible cancerous regions and in the postassessment stage to review the segmentations especially in analyzing complex DCE-MRI cases. PMID:23653668

  7. Assessment of feasibility to use computer aided texture analysis based tool for parametric images of suspicious lesions in DCE-MR mammography.

    PubMed

    Kale, Mehmet Cemil; Fleig, John David; Imal, Nazım

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze the feasibility of computer aided malignant tumor detection using the traditional texture analysis applied on two-compartment-based parameter pseudoimages of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) breast image data. A major contribution of this research will be the through-plane assessment capability. Texture analysis was performed on two-compartment-based pseudo images of DCE-MRI datasets of breast data of eight subjects. The resulting texture parameter pseudo images were inputted to a feedforward neural network classification system which uses the manual segmentations of a primary radiologist as a gold standard, and each voxel was assigned as malignant or nonmalignant. The classification results were compared with the lesions manually segmented by a second radiologist. Results show that the mean true positive fraction (TPF) and false positive fraction (FPF) performance of the classifier vs. primary radiologist is statistically as good as the mean TPF and FPF performance of the second radiologist vs. primary radiologist with a confidence interval of 95% using a one-sample t-test with α = 0.05. In the experiment implemented on all of the eight subjects, all malignant tumors marked by the primary radiologist were classified to be malignant by the computer classifier. Our results have shown that neural network classification using the textural parameters for automated screening of two-compartment-based parameter pseudo images of DCE-MRI as input data can be a supportive tool for the radiologists in the preassessment stage to show the possible cancerous regions and in the postassessment stage to review the segmentations especially in analyzing complex DCE-MRI cases.

  8. Simultaneous multi-parametric analysis of Leishmania and of its hosting mammal cells: A high content imaging-based method enabling sound drug discovery process.

    PubMed

    Forestier, Claire-Lise; Späth, Gerald Frank; Prina, Eric; Dasari, Sreekanth

    2015-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease for which only limited therapeutic options are available. The disease is ranked among the six most important tropical infectious diseases and represents the second-largest parasitic killer in the world. The development of new therapies has been hampered by the lack of technologies and methodologies that can be integrated into the complex physiological environment of a cell or organism and adapted to suitable in vitro and in vivo Leishmania models. Recent advances in microscopy imaging offer the possibility to assess the efficacy of potential drug candidates against Leishmania within host cells. This technology allows the simultaneous visualization of relevant phenotypes in parasite and host cells and the quantification of a variety of cellular events. In this review, we present the powerful cellular imaging methodologies that have been developed for drug screening in a biologically relevant context, addressing both high-content and high-throughput needs. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of intra-vital microscopy imaging in the context of the anti-leishmanial drug discovery process.

  9. Multi-parametric MRI Characterization of Healthy Human Thigh Muscles at 3.0T - Relaxation, Magnetization Transfer, Fat/Water, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Dortch, Richard D.; Welch, E. Brian; Bryant, Nathan D.; Buck, Amanda K.W.; Towse, Theodore F.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Does, Mark D.; Damon, Bruce M.; Park, Jane H.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle diseases commonly have clinical presentations of inflammation, fat infiltration, fibrosis, and atrophy. However, the results of existing laboratory tests and clinical presentations are not well correlated. Advanced quantitative MRI techniques may allow the assessment of myo-pathological changes in a sensitive and objective manner. To progress towards this goal, an array of quantitative MRI protocols was implemented for human thigh muscles, their reproducibility was assessed, and the statistical relationships among parameters were determined. These quantitative methods included fat/water imaging, multiple spin-echo T2 imaging (with and without fat signal suppression, FS), selective inversion recovery for T1 and quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) imaging (with and without FS), and diffusion tensor imaging. Data were acquired at 3.0 T from nine healthy subjects. To assess the repeatability of each method, the subjects were re-imaged on an average of 35 days later. Pre-testing lifestyle restrictions were applied to standardize physiological conditions across scans. Strong between-day intra-class correlations were observed in all quantitative indices except for the macromolecular-to-free water pool size ratio (PSR) with FS, a metric derived from qMT data. Two-way analysis of variance revealed no significant between-day differences in the mean values for any parameter estimate. The repeatability was further assessed with Bland-Altman plots, and low repeatability coefficients were obtained for all parameters. Among-muscle differences in the quantitative MRI indices and inter-class correlations among the parameters were identified. There were inverse relationships between fractional anisotropy (FA) and the 2nd eigenvalue, the 3rd eigenvalue, and the standard deviation of first eigenvector. The FA was positively related to the PSR, while the other diffusion indices were inversely related to the PSR. These findings support the use of these T1, T2, fat

  10. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot-based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan-cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF-7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot-based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology. PMID:27572664

  11. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  12. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology. PMID:27572664

  13. Statistical synthesis of radiometric imaging formation in scanning radiometers with signal weight processing by Kravchenko windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosyuk, V. K.; Kravchenko, V. F.; Pavlikov, V. V.; Pustovoit, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    Statistical optimization of the radiometric images (RMIs) algorithms formation in scanning radiometers with weight correction of the antenna amplitude-phase distribution and synchronous sliding strobing of the received noise-like signal by a function describing the antenna pattern corrected by temporal Kravchenko windows is performed for the first time. The ambiguity function (AF) of the scanning radiometer, which determines the RMI quality, is found. It is established that the AF shape substantially depends on the amplitude field distribution (AFD) in the antenna. It is shown that the use of the AFD in the antenna in the form of weight functions (classic and Kravchenko) makes it possible to correct the AF shape and to increase the RMI quality. A simulation of the RMI formation algorithm is performed. It follows from the analysis of simulation data that the use of the weight Kravchenko functions provides higher accuracy of the RMI restoration compared with classic weight functions.

  14. Preferential Isomer Formation Observed in H3+ + CO by Crossed Beam Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The proton transfer reaction H3+ + CO is one of the cornerstone chemical processes in the interstellar medium. Here, the dynamics of this reaction have been investigated using crossed beam velocity map imaging. Formyl product cations are found to be predominantly scattered into the forward direction irrespective of the collision energy. In this process, a high amount of energy is transferred to internal product excitation. By fitting a sum of two distribution functions to the measured internal energy distributions, the product isomer ratio is extracted. A small HOC+ fraction is obtained at a collision energy of 1.8 eV, characterized by an upper limit of 24% with a confidence level of 84%. At lower collision energies, the data indicate purely HCO+ formation. Such low values are unexpected given the previously predicted efficient formation of both HCO+ and HOC+ isomers for thermal conditions. This is discussed in light of the direct reaction dynamics that are observed. PMID:27352138

  15. Near-infrared image formation and processing for the extraction of hand veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzida, Nabila; Hakim Bendada, Abdel; Maldague, Xavier P.

    2010-10-01

    The main objective of this work is to extract the hand vein network using a non-invasive technique in the near-infrared region (NIR). The visualization of the veins is based on a relevant feature of the blood in relation with certain wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. In the present paper, we first introduce the image formation in the NIR spectral band. Then, the acquisition system will be presented as well as the method used for the image processing in order to extract the vein signature. Extractions of this pattern on the finger, on the wrist and on the dorsal hand are achieved after exposing the hand to an optical stimulation by reflection or transmission of light. We present meaningful results of the extracted vein pattern demonstrating the utility of the method for a clinical application like the diagnosis of vein disease, of primitive varicose vein and also for applications in vein biometrics.

  16. Feature-enhanced synthetic aperture radar image formation based on nonquadratic regularization.

    PubMed

    Cetin, M; Karl, W C

    2001-01-01

    We develop a method for the formation of spotlight-mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images with enhanced features. The approach is based on a regularized reconstruction of the scattering field which combines a tomographic model of the SAR observation process with prior information regarding the nature of the features of interest. Compared to conventional SAR techniques, the method we propose produces images with increased resolution, reduced sidelobes, reduced speckle and easier-to-segment regions. Our technique effectively deals with the complex-valued, random-phase nature of the underlying SAR reflectivities. An efficient and robust numerical solution is achieved through extensions of half-quadratic regularization methods to the complex-valued SAR problem. We demonstrate the performance of the method on synthetic and real SAR scenes.

  17. Effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the formation of mouse dentin and bone

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong-Hing, A.; Sandhu, H.S.; Prato, F.S.; Frappier, J.R.; Kavaliers, M. )

    1989-10-01

    The effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on dentin and bone formation in mice were examined using standard autoradiographic and liquid scintillation procedures. It was observed that exposure to a standard 23.2 min clinical multislice MRI (0.15T) procedure caused a significant increase in the synthesis of the collagenous matrix of dentin in the incisors of mice. There were no significant effects on alveolar and tibial bone matrix synthesis. These results suggest that the magnetic fields associated with MRI can affect the activity of cells and/or tissues that are involved in rapid synthetic activity.

  18. imaging survey of Wolf-Rayet galaxies: morphologies and star formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Omar, A.

    2016-10-01

    The Hα and optical broad-band images of 25 nearby Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies are presented. The WR galaxies are known to have a recent (≤10 Myr) and massive star formation episode. The photometric Hα fluxes are estimated and corrected for extinction and line contamination in the filter pass-bands. The star formation rates (SFRs) are estimated using Hα images and from archival data in the far-ultraviolet (FUV), far-infrared (FIR) and 1.4-GHz radio continuum wavebands. A comparison of SFRs estimated from different wavebands is made after including similar data available in the literature for other WR galaxies. The Hα-based SFRs are found to be tightly correlated with SFRs estimated from the FUV data. The correlations also exist with SFR estimates based on the radio and FIR data. The WR galaxies also follow the radio-FIR correlation known for normal star-forming galaxies, although it is seen here that the majority of dwarf WR galaxies have a radio deficiency. An analysis using the ratio of non-thermal to thermal radio continuum and the ratio of the FUV to Hα SFRs indicates that WR galaxies have lower non-thermal radio emission compared to normal galaxies, most likely due to a lack of supernovae in the very young star formation episode in the WR galaxies. The morphologies of 16 galaxies in our sample are highly suggestive of an ongoing tidal interaction or a past merger in these galaxies. This survey strengthens the conclusions obtained from previous similar studies indicating the importance of tidal interactions in triggering star-formation in WR galaxies.

  19. Theoretical aspects of image formation in the aberration-corrected electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Rose, H

    2010-04-01

    The theoretical aspects of image formation in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) are outlined and revisited in detail by taking into account the elastic and inelastic scattering. In particular, the connection between the exit wave and the scattering amplitude is formulated for non-isoplanatic conditions. Different imaging modes are investigated by utilizing the scattering amplitude and employing the generalized optical theorem. A novel obstruction-free anamorphotic phase shifter is proposed which enables one to shift the phase of the scattered wave by an arbitrary amount over a large range of spatial frequencies. In the optimum case, the phase of the scattered wave and the introduced phase shift add up to -pi/2 giving negative contrast. We obtain these optimum imaging conditions by employing an aberration-corrected electron microscope operating at voltages below the knock-on threshold for atom displacement and by shifting optimally the phase of the scattered electron wave. The optimum phase shift is achieved by adjusting appropriately the constant phase shift of the phase plate and the phase shift resulting from the defocus and the spherical aberration of the corrected objective lens. The realization of this imaging mode is the aim of the SALVE project (Sub-A Low-Voltage Electron microscope).

  20. MTRC compensation in high-resolution ISAR imaging via improved polar format algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Hao; Li, Na; Xu, Shiyou; Chen, Zengping

    2014-10-01

    Migration through resolution cells (MTRC) is generated in high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging. A MTRC compensation algorithm for high-resolution ISAR imaging based on improved polar format algorithm (PFA) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, in the situation that a rigid-body target stably flies, the initial value of the rotation angle and center of the target is obtained from the rotation of radar line of sight (RLOS) and high range resolution profile (HRRP). Then, the PFA is iteratively applied to the echo data to search the optimization solution based on minimum entropy criterion. The procedure starts with the estimated initial rotation angle and center, and terminated when the entropy of the compensated ISAR image is minimized. To reduce the computational load, the 2-D iterative search is divided into two 1-D search. One is carried along the rotation angle and the other one is carried along rotation center. Each of the 1-D searches is realized by using of the golden section search method. The accurate rotation angle and center can be obtained when the iterative search terminates. Finally, apply the PFA to compensate the MTRC by the use of the obtained optimized rotation angle and center. After MTRC compensation, the ISAR image can be best focused. Simulated and real data demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Histotripsy Lesion Formation Using an Ultrasound Imaging Probe Enabled by a Low-Frequency Pump Transducer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    When histotripsy pulses shorter than 2 cycles are applied, the formation of a dense bubble cloud relies only on the applied peak negative pressure (p-) exceeding the "intrinsic threshold" of the medium (absolute value of 26-30 MPa in most soft tissues). It has been found that a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse (3 MHz) can be enabled by a sub-threshold low-frequency pump pulse (500 kHz) where the sum exceeds the intrinsic threshold, thus generating lesion-producing dense bubble clouds ("dual-beam histotripsy"). Here, the feasibility of using an imaging transducer to provide the high-frequency probe pulse in the dual-beam histotripsy approach is investigated. More specifically, an ATL L7-4 imaging transducer (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA, USA), pulsed by a V-1 Data Acquisition System (Verasonics, Redmond, WA, USA), was used to generate the high-frequency probe pulses. The low-frequency pump pulses were generated by a 20-element 345-kHz array transducer, driven by a custom high-voltage pulser. These dual-beam histotripsy pulses were applied to red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantoms at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz, and optical imaging was used to visualize bubble clouds and lesions generated in the red blood cell phantoms. The results indicated that dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were generated when the p- of the sub-threshold pump and probe pulses combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The average size of the smallest reproducible lesions using the imaging probe pulse enabled by the sub-threshold pump pulse was 0.7 × 1.7 mm, whereas that using the supra-threshold pump pulse alone was 1.4 × 3.7 mm. When the imaging transducer was steered laterally, bubble clouds and lesions were steered correspondingly until the combined p- no longer exceeded the intrinsic threshold. These results were also validated with ex vivo porcine liver experiments. Using an imaging transducer for dual-beam histotripsy can have two

  2. Histotripsy Lesion Formation using an Ultrasound Imaging Probe Enabled by a Low-Frequency Pump Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Hall, Timothy L.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    When applying histotripsy pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the formation of a dense bubble cloud only relies on the applied peak negative pressure (p-) exceeding the “intrinsic threshold” of the medium (absolute value of 26 – 30 MPa in most soft tissue). A previous study conducted by our research group showed that a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse (3 MHz) can be enabled by a sub-threshold low-frequency pump pulse (500 kHz) where the sum exceeds the intrinsic threshold, thus generating lesion-producing dense bubble clouds (“dual-beam histotripsy”). This paper investigates the feasibility of using an imaging transducer to provide the high-frequency probe pulse in the dual-beam histotripsy approach. More specifically, an ATL L7–4 imaging transducer, pulsed by a Verasonics V-1 Data Acquisition System, was used to generate the high-frequency probe pulses. The low-frequency pump pulses were generated by a 20-element 345 kHz array transducer, driven by a custom high voltage pulser. These dual-beam histotripsy pulses were applied to red-blood-cell (RBC) tissue-mimicking phantoms at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz, and optical imaging was used to visualize bubble clouds and lesions generated in the RBC phantoms. The results showed that dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were generated when the p- of the sub-threshold pump and probe pulses combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The average size of the smallest reproducible lesions using the imaging probe pulse enabled by the sub-threshold pump pulse was 0.7 × 1.7 mm while that using the supra-threshold pump pulse alone was 1.4 × 3.7 mm. When the imaging transducer was steered laterally, bubble clouds and lesions were steered correspondingly until the combined p- no longer exceeded the intrinsic threshold. These results were also validated with ex vivo porcine liver experiments. Using an imaging transducer for dual-beam histotripsy can have two advantages, 1) lesion

  3. Optical parametrically gated microscopy in scattering media

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Youbo; Adie, Steven G.; Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Graf, Benedikt W.; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution imaging in turbid media has been limited by the intrinsic compromise between the gating efficiency (removal of multiply-scattered light background) and signal strength in the existing optical gating techniques. This leads to shallow depths due to the weak ballistic signal, and/or degraded resolution due to the strong multiply-scattering background – the well-known trade-off between resolution and imaging depth in scattering samples. In this work, we employ a nonlinear optics based optical parametric amplifier (OPA) to address this challenge. We demonstrate that both the imaging depth and the spatial resolution in turbid media can be enhanced simultaneously by the OPA, which provides a high level of signal gain as well as an inherent nonlinear optical gate. This technology shifts the nonlinear interaction to an optical crystal placed in the detection arm (image plane), rather than in the sample, which can be used to exploit the benefits given by the high-order parametric process and the use of an intense laser field. The coherent process makes the OPA potentially useful as a general-purpose optical amplifier applicable to a wide range of optical imaging techniques. PMID:25321724

  4. A view of the world through the bat's ear: the formation of acoustic images in echolocation.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J A

    1989-11-01

    , but the bat perceives unitary images that require fusion of these features to create a synthetic psychological dimension of range. The bat's use of cross-correlation-like images reveals neural computations that achieve fusion of stimulus features and offers an example of high-level operations involved in the formation of perceptual "wholes".

  5. Characterising the dynamics of expirated bloodstain pattern formation using high-speed digital video imaging.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Andrea E; Walker, Nicole K; Lamont, Iain L; Cordiner, Stephen J; Taylor, Michael C

    2011-11-01

    During forensic investigations, it is often important to be able to distinguish between impact spatter patterns (blood from gunshots, explosives, blunt force trauma and/or machinery accidents) and bloodstain patterns generated by expiration (blood from the mouth, nose or lungs). These patterns can be difficult to distinguish on the basis of the size of the bloodstains. In this study, high-speed digital video imaging has been used to investigate the formation of expirated bloodstain patterns generated by breathing, spitting and coughing mechanisms. Bloodstain patterns from all three expiration mechanisms were dominated by the presence of stains less than 0.5 mm in diameter. Video analysis showed that in the process of coughing blood, high-velocity, very small blood droplets were ejected first. These were followed by lower velocity, larger droplets, strands and plumes of liquid held together in part by saliva. The video images showed the formation of bubble rings and beaded stains, traditional markers for classifying expirated patterns. However, the expulsion mechanism, the distance travelled by the blood droplets, and the type of surface the blood was deposited on were all factors determining whether beaded stains were generated.

  6. Evaluation of PpIX formation in Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia I (CIN) using widefield fluorescence images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia M.; Fortunato, Thereza C.; Lombardi, Welington; da Silva, Eduardo V.; Vollet Filho, José D.; Kurachi, Cristina; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-03-01

    Optical techniques has been described as auxiliary technology for screening of neoplasia because shows the potential for tissues differentiation in real-time and it is a noninvasive detection and safe. However, only endogenous fluorophores presents the lesion may be insufficient and needed of the administration of the fluorophores synthesized, such as, precursor molecule of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) induced by 5- aminolevulinic acid and your derivatives. Topical application of methylaminolevulinate (MAL), induces formation of the endogenous photosensitizer, PpIX in tissues where carcinogenesis has begun. The PpIX tend to accumulate in premalignant and malignant tissues and the illumination with light with appropriate wavelength beginning to excitation of PpIX fluorescence, which helps to localize PpIX-rich areas and identify potentially malignant tissues. The aim of the study is to evaluate the production of PpIX in the cervix with CIN I through of the fluorescence images captured after 1 hour of cream application. It was possible to visualize PpIX fluorescence in cervix and it was possible to observe the selectivity in fluorescence in squamous-columnar junction, which a pre-cancerous condition (CIN) and usually is localized. Through the image processing it was possible to quantify the increase of red fluorescence. For the CIN I the increase of red fluorescence was approximately of 4 times indicating a good PpIX formation.

  7. The effects of prior knowledge and instruction on understanding image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galili, Igal; Bendall, Sharon; Goldberg, Fred

    This paper reports on a study that was designed to investigate the knowledge about image formation exhibited by students following instruction in geometrical optics in an activity-based college physics course for prospective elementary teachers. Students were interviewed individually, using several tasks involving simple apparatus (plane and curved mirrors, lenses, and prisms). The diagrams drawn by the students and the verbal comments they made provide evidence that their knowledge can be described as an intermediate state, a hybridization of preinstruction knowledge (which is dominated by a holistic conceptualization) and formal physics knowledge. We infer from our data the core concepts and main ideas of the postinstruction students' hybrid knowledge. Finally, by comparing preinstruction and formal physics conceptualizations of image formation we argue that a strong type of knowledge restructuring (in the sense of Carey, S., 1986: American Psychologist, 41, 1123-1130; Vosianou, S., & Brewer, W.F., 1987: Review of Educational Research, 57, 51-67) is required for students to acquire the latter.

  8. Nanoscale electromechanical parametric amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Aleman, Benjamin Jose; Zettl, Alexander

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a parametric amplifier. In one aspect, a device includes an electron source electrode, a counter electrode, and a pumping electrode. The electron source electrode may include a conductive base and a flexible conductor. The flexible conductor may have a first end and a second end, with the second end of the flexible conductor being coupled to the conductive base. A cross-sectional dimension of the flexible conductor may be less than about 100 nanometers. The counter electrode may be disposed proximate the first end of the flexible conductor and spaced a first distance from the first end of the flexible conductor. The pumping electrode may be disposed proximate a length of the flexible conductor and spaced a second distance from the flexible conductor.

  9. Mechanical Parametric Oscillations and Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William; Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2013-01-01

    Usually parametric oscillations are not the topic of general physics courses. Probably it is because the mathematical theory of this phenomenon is relatively complicated, and until quite recently laboratory experiments for students were difficult to implement. However parametric oscillations are good illustrations of the laws of physics and can be…

  10. Tract-specific and age-related variations of the spinal cord microstructure: a multi-parametric MRI study using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and inhomogeneous magnetization transfer (ihMT).

    PubMed

    Taso, Manuel; Girard, Olivier M; Duhamel, Guillaume; Le Troter, Arnaud; Feiweier, Thorsten; Guye, Maxime; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Callot, Virginie

    2016-06-01

    Being able to finely characterize the spinal cord (SC) microstructure and its alterations is a key point when investigating neural damage mechanisms encountered in different central nervous system (CNS) pathologies, such as multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or myelopathy. Based on novel methods, including inhomogeneous magnetization transfer (ihMT) and dedicated SC probabilistic atlas post-processing, the present study focuses on the in vivo characterization of the healthy SC tissue in terms of regional microstructure differences between (i) upper and lower cervical vertebral levels and (ii) sensory and motor tracts, as well as differences attributed to normal aging. Forty-eight healthy volunteers aged from 20 to 70 years old were included in the study and scanned at 3 T using axial high-resolution T2 *-w imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and ihMT, at two vertebral levels (C2 and C5). A processing pipeline with minimal user intervention, SC segmentation and spatial normalization into a reference space was implemented in order to assess quantitative morphological and structural parameters (cross-sectional areas, scalar DTI and MT/ihMT metrics) in specific white and gray matter regions of interest. The multi-parametric MRI metrics collected allowed upper and lower cervical levels to be distinguished, with higher ihMT ratio (ihMTR), higher axial diffusivity (λ∥ ) and lower radial diffusivity (λ⊥ ) at C2 compared with C5. Significant differences were also observed between white matter fascicles, with higher ihMTR and lower λ∥ in motor tracts compared with posterior sensory tracts. Finally, aging was found to be associated with significant metric alterations (decreased ihMTR and λ∥ ). The methodology proposed here, which can be easily transferred to the clinic, provides new insights for SC characterization. It bears great potential to study focal and diffuse SC damage in neurodegenerative and demyelinating diseases. Copyright

  11. uvmcmcfit: Parametric models to interferometric data fitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussmann, Shane; Leung, Tsz Kuk (Daisy); Conley, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Uvmcmcfit fits parametric models to interferometric data. It is ideally suited to extract the maximum amount of information from marginally resolved observations with interferometers like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), Submillimeter Array (SMA), and Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). uvmcmcfit uses emcee (ascl:1303.002) to do Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and can measure the goodness of fit from visibilities rather than deconvolved images, an advantage when there is strong gravitational lensing and in other situations. uvmcmcfit includes a pure-Python adaptation of Miriad’s (ascl:1106.007) uvmodel task to generate simulated visibilities given observed visibilities and a model image and a simple ray-tracing routine that allows it to account for both strongly lensed systems (where multiple images of the lensed galaxy are detected) and weakly lensed systems (where only a single image of the lensed galaxy is detected).

  12. GAPS IN THE HD 169142 PROTOPLANETARY DISK REVEALED BY POLARIMETRIC IMAGING: SIGNS OF ONGOING PLANET FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Avenhaus, Henning; Garufi, Antonio; Schmid, Hans Martin; Buenzli, Esther; Wolf, Sebastian

    2013-03-20

    We present H-band Very Large Telescope/NACO polarized light images of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 169142 probing its protoplanetary disk as close as {approx}0.''1 to the star. Our images trace the face-on disk out to {approx}1.''7 ({approx}250 AU) and reveal distinct substructures for the first time: (1) the inner disk ({approx}<20 AU) appears to be depleted in scattering dust grains; (2) an unresolved disk rim is imaged at {approx}25 AU; (3) an annular gap extends from {approx}40 to 70 AU; (4) local brightness asymmetries are found on opposite sides of the annular gap. We discuss different explanations for the observed morphology among which ongoing planet formation is a tempting, but yet to be proven, one. Outside of {approx}85 AU the surface brightness drops off roughly {proportional_to}r {sup -3.3}, but describing the disk regions between 85-120 AU and 120-250 AU separately with power laws {proportional_to}r {sup -2.6} and {proportional_to}r {sup -3.9} provides a better fit hinting toward another discontinuity in the disk surface. The flux ratio between the disk-integrated polarized light and the central star is {approx}4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}. Finally, combining our results with those from the literature, {approx}40% of the scattered light in the H band appears to be polarized. Our results emphasize that HD 169142 is an interesting system for future planet formation or disk evolution studies.

  13. Galaxy image processing and morphological modeling: Applications to understanding galaxy formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Joseph B.

    This dissertation presents improvements in methods of processing and analyzing data from optical telescopes. With my collaborators, I have developed software tools which have been successfully used on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). I have participated in applying this software in studies of the properties of galaxies. These studies have led to advances in the understanding of early-type galaxies, including some of the brightest and most massive galaxies in the Universe. The software package we have developed, called GALM ORPH, has been made publicly available to enable other researchers to use it in their studies. We present the models and the methods used by GALM ORPH to model the light distribution in images of galaxies. We used simulations to test the effects of errors which come from noise, background light, blending of sources, and incorrect model selection. We present a method which effectively chooses the best class of model for a given data image. We use GALMORPH in various observational studies of galaxies. With 50,000 early-type galaxies, we measure the correlations of size, luminosity, and velocity dispersion. Our precision measurements of all these quantities provides a useful benchmark for theoretical models of galaxy formation and evolution. We study the brightest galaxies in clusters (BCGs) to see how their properties differ from the bulk population of galaxies. We find a qualitative agreement between the observed scaling relations of BCGs and the prediction of models which incorporate merger-driven growth with quenched star formation in more massive halos. We present the first observational limit of the highest velocity dispersion using the large galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, ruling out line-of-sight superpositions using the Hubble Space Telescope. We also present a method for measuring the optical light from images of galaxies which contain active galactic nuclei (AGN), and a

  14. Simulation of image formation in x-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics.

    PubMed

    Korecki, P; Roszczynialski, T P; Sowa, K M

    2015-04-01

    In x-ray coded aperture microscopy with polycapillary optics (XCAMPO), the microstructure of focusing polycapillary optics is used as a coded aperture and enables depth-resolved x-ray imaging at a resolution better than the focal spot dimensions. Improvements in the resolution and development of 3D encoding procedures require a simulation model that can predict the outcome of XCAMPO experiments. In this work we introduce a model of image formation in XCAMPO which enables calculation of XCAMPO datasets for arbitrary positions of the object relative to the focal plane as well as to incorporate optics imperfections. In the model, the exit surface of the optics is treated as a micro-structured x-ray source that illuminates a periodic object. This makes it possible to express the intensity of XCAMPO images as a convolution series and to perform simulations by means of fast Fourier transforms. For non-periodic objects, the model can be applied by enforcing artificial periodicity and setting the spatial period larger then the field-of-view. Simulations are verified by comparison with experimental data.

  15. A study on statistically reliable and computationally efficient algorithms for generating local cerebral blood flow parametric images with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Dagan; Wang, Zhizhong . Basser Dept. of Computer Science); Huang, Sung Cheng . Dept. of Radiological Sciences)

    1993-06-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), a variety of techniques have been developed to measure local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) noninvasively in humans. It is essential that the techniques developed should be statistically reliable and computationally efficient. A potential class of techniques, which includes linear least squares (LS), linear weighted least squares (WLS), linear generalized least squares (GLS), and linear generalized weighted least squares (GWLS), is proposed. The statistical characteristics of the new methods were examined by computer simulation. The authors present a comparison of these four methods with two other rapid estimation techniques developed by Huang et al. and Alpert, and two classical methods, the unweighted and weighted nonlinear least squares regression which are supposed to have optimal statistical properties. The results show that the new methods can take full advantage of the contribution from the fine temporal sampling data of modern tomographs, and thus provide statistically reliable estimates that are comparable to those obtained from nonlinear least squares regression. The new methods also have high computational efficiency, and the parameters can be estimated directly from operational equations in one single step. Therefore, they can potentially be used in image-wide estimation of local cerebral blood flow and distribution volume with positron emission tomography.

  16. Delayed Methylene Blue Improves Lesion Volume, Multi-Parametric Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements, and Behavioral Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Talley Watts, Lora; Long, Justin Alexander; Boggs, Robert Cole; Manga, Hemanth; Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a primary cause of death and disability in both civilian and military populations worldwide. There is a critical need for the development of neuroprotective agents that can circumvent damage and provide functional recovery. We previously showed that methylene blue (MB), a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-grandfathered drug with energy-enhancing and antioxidant properties, given 1 and 3 h post-TBI, had neuroprotective effects in rats. This study aimed to further investigate the neuroprotection of delayed MB treatment (24 h postinjury) post-TBI as measured by lesion volume and functional outcomes. Comparisons were made with vehicle and acute MB treatment. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral studies were performed at 1 and 3 h and 2, 7, and 14 days after an impact to the primary forelimb somatosensory cortex. We found that delaying MB treatment 24 h postinjury still minimized lesion volume and functional deficits, compared to vehicle-treated animals. The data further support the potential for MB as a neuroprotective treatment, especially when medical teatment is not readily available. MB has an excellent safety profile and is clinically approved for other indications. MB clinical trials on TBI can thus be readily explored. PMID:25961471

  17. Delayed Methylene Blue Improves Lesion Volume, Multi-Parametric Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements, and Behavioral Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Talley Watts, Lora; Long, Justin Alexander; Boggs, Robert Cole; Manga, Hemanth; Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a primary cause of death and disability in both civilian and military populations worldwide. There is a critical need for the development of neuroprotective agents that can circumvent damage and provide functional recovery. We previously showed that methylene blue (MB), a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-grandfathered drug with energy-enhancing and antioxidant properties, given 1 and 3 h post-TBI, had neuroprotective effects in rats. This study aimed to further investigate the neuroprotection of delayed MB treatment (24 h postinjury) post-TBI as measured by lesion volume and functional outcomes. Comparisons were made with vehicle and acute MB treatment. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral studies were performed at 1 and 3 h and 2, 7, and 14 days after an impact to the primary forelimb somatosensory cortex. We found that delaying MB treatment 24 h postinjury still minimized lesion volume and functional deficits, compared to vehicle-treated animals. The data further support the potential for MB as a neuroprotective treatment, especially when medical teatment is not readily available. MB has an excellent safety profile and is clinically approved for other indications. MB clinical trials on TBI can thus be readily explored.

  18. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF LEO T FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Zucker, Daniel B.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Martin, Nicolas F.; De Jong, Jelte T. A.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Bell, Eric F.; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N. Wyn

    2012-04-01

    We present the star formation history (SFH) of the faintest known star-forming galaxy, Leo T, based on deep imaging taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). The HST/WFPC2 color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of Leo T is exquisitely deep, extending {approx}2 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, permitting excellent constraints on star formation at all ages. We use a maximum likelihood CMD fitting technique to measure the SFH of Leo T assuming three different sets of stellar evolution models: Padova (solar-scaled metallicity) and BaSTI (both solar-scaled and {alpha}-enhanced metallicities). The resulting SFHs are remarkably consistent at all ages, indicating that our derived SFH is robust to the choice of stellar evolution model. From the lifetime SFH of Leo T, we find that 50% of the total stellar mass formed prior to z {approx} 1 (7.6 Gyr ago). Subsequent to this epoch, the SFH of Leo T is roughly constant until the most recent {approx}25 Myr, where the SFH shows an abrupt drop. This decrease could be due to a cessation of star formation or stellar initial mass function sampling effects, but we are unable to distinguish between the two scenarios. Overall, our measured SFH is consistent with previously derived SFHs of Leo T. However, the HST-based solution provides improved age resolution and reduced uncertainties at all epochs. The SFH, baryonic gas fraction, and location of Leo T are unlike any of the other recently discovered faint dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, and instead bear strong resemblance to gas-rich dwarf galaxies (irregular or transition), suggesting that gas-rich dwarf galaxies may share common modes of star formation over a large range of stellar mass ({approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }).

  19. Analysis of MESSENGER high-resolution images of Mercury's hollows and implications for hollow formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewett, David T.; Stadermann, Amanda C.; Susorney, Hannah C.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Xiao, Zhiyong; Chabot, Nancy L.; Denevi, Brett W.; Murchie, Scott L.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Kinczyk, Mallory J.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-09-01

    High-resolution images from MESSENGER provide morphological information on the nature and origin of Mercury's hollows, small depressions that likely formed when a volatile constituent was lost from the surface. Because graphite may be a component of the low-reflectance material that hosts hollows, we suggest that loss of carbon by ion sputtering or conversion to methane by proton irradiation could contribute to hollows formation. Measurements of widespread hollows in 565 images with pixel scales <20 m indicate that the average depth of hollows is 24 ± 16 m. We propose that hollows cease to increase in depth when a volatile-depleted lag deposit becomes sufficiently thick to protect the underlying surface. The difficulty of developing a lag on steep topography may account for the common occurrence of hollows on crater central peaks and walls. Disruption of the lag, e.g., by secondary cratering, could restart growth of hollows in a location that had been dormant. Images at extremely high resolution (~3 m/pixel) show that the edges of hollows are straight, as expected if the margins formed by scarp retreat. These highest-resolution images reveal no superposed impact craters, implying that hollows are very young. The width of hollows within rayed crater Balanchine suggests that the maximum time for lateral growth by 1 cm is ~10,000 yr. A process other than entrainment of dust by gases evolved in a steady-state sublimation-like process is likely required to explain the high-reflectance haloes that surround many hollows.

  20. A variable parameter parametric snake method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, A.; Houacine, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach to parametric snake method by using variable snake parameters. Adopting fixed parameter values for all points of the snake, as usual, constitutes by itself a limitation that leads to poor performances in terms of convergence and tracking properties. A more adapted choice should be the one that allows selection depending on the image region properties as on the contour shape and position. However, such variability is not an easy task in general and a precise method need to be defined to assure contour point dependent tuning at iterations. We were particularly interested in applying this idea to the recently presented parametric method [1]. In the work mentioned, an attraction term is used to improve the convergence of the standard parametric snake without a significant increase in computational load. We show here, that improved performances can ensue from applying variable parameter concepts. For this purpose, the method is first analyzed and then a procedure is developed to assure an automatic variable parameter tuning. The interest of our approach is illustrated through object segmentation results.

  1. Monitoring process of human keloid formation based on second harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. S.; Chen, S.; Chen, J. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zheng, L. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Wang, D. J.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, the morphological variation of collagen among the whole dermis from keloid tissue was investigated using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. In the deep dermis of keloids, collagen bundles show apparently regular gap. In the middle dermis, the collagen bundles are randomly oriented and loosely arranged in the pattern of fine mesh while the collagen bundles are organized in a parallel manner in the superficial dermis near the epidermis. The developed parameters COI and BD can be used to further quantitatively describe these changes. Our results demonstrate the potential of SHG microscopy to understand the formation process of human keloid scar at the cellular level through imaging collagen variations in different depth of dermis.

  2. A Novel General Imaging Formation Algorithm for GNSS-Based Bistatic SAR.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong-Cheng; Wang, Peng-Bo; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Ge, LinLin; Yang, Wei

    2016-02-26

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)-based bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) recently plays a more and more significant role in remote sensing applications for its low-cost and real-time global coverage capability. In this paper, a general imaging formation algorithm was proposed for accurately and efficiently focusing GNSS-based bistatic SAR data, which avoids the interpolation processing in traditional back projection algorithms (BPAs). A two-dimensional point target spectrum model was firstly presented, and the bulk range cell migration correction (RCMC) was consequently derived for reducing range cell migration (RCM) and coarse focusing. As the bulk RCMC seriously changes the range history of the radar signal, a modified and much more efficient hybrid correlation operation was introduced for compensating residual phase errors. Simulation results were presented based on a general geometric topology with non-parallel trajectories and unequal velocities for both transmitter and receiver platforms, showing a satisfactory performance by the proposed method.

  3. A Novel General Imaging Formation Algorithm for GNSS-Based Bistatic SAR

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hong-Cheng; Wang, Peng-Bo; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Ge, LinLin; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)-based bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) recently plays a more and more significant role in remote sensing applications for its low-cost and real-time global coverage capability. In this paper, a general imaging formation algorithm was proposed for accurately and efficiently focusing GNSS-based bistatic SAR data, which avoids the interpolation processing in traditional back projection algorithms (BPAs). A two-dimensional point target spectrum model was firstly presented, and the bulk range cell migration correction (RCMC) was consequently derived for reducing range cell migration (RCM) and coarse focusing. As the bulk RCMC seriously changes the range history of the radar signal, a modified and much more efficient hybrid correlation operation was introduced for compensating residual phase errors. Simulation results were presented based on a general geometric topology with non-parallel trajectories and unequal velocities for both transmitter and receiver platforms, showing a satisfactory performance by the proposed method. PMID:26927117

  4. A Novel General Imaging Formation Algorithm for GNSS-Based Bistatic SAR.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong-Cheng; Wang, Peng-Bo; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Ge, LinLin; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)-based bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) recently plays a more and more significant role in remote sensing applications for its low-cost and real-time global coverage capability. In this paper, a general imaging formation algorithm was proposed for accurately and efficiently focusing GNSS-based bistatic SAR data, which avoids the interpolation processing in traditional back projection algorithms (BPAs). A two-dimensional point target spectrum model was firstly presented, and the bulk range cell migration correction (RCMC) was consequently derived for reducing range cell migration (RCM) and coarse focusing. As the bulk RCMC seriously changes the range history of the radar signal, a modified and much more efficient hybrid correlation operation was introduced for compensating residual phase errors. Simulation results were presented based on a general geometric topology with non-parallel trajectories and unequal velocities for both transmitter and receiver platforms, showing a satisfactory performance by the proposed method. PMID:26927117

  5. [Bases for the formation of an ultrasound diagnostic image of orbital tissue].

    PubMed

    Kharlap, S I; Vashkulatova, E A; Safonova, T N; Skvortsova, N V

    2010-01-01

    The paper touches upon the specific features of the structure of orbital formations, by considering their anatomic topography and biophysical properties. By studying the results of investigations of the morphological and biophysical studies of orbital tissues, the authors analyze their features and compare their relationships. These results unraveling each of the considered orbital anatomic elements from the acoustic profile ranges may be useful in understanding the nature of clinical changes, which will be able to interpret these or those diagnostic signs--guides and to trace their evolution. In addition, this approach can help interpret the texture of an ultrasound digital image of eye socket soft tissue and permit one to look at pathological clinical manifestations from the so-called biophysical essence. This will allow additional information to be gleaned, by analyzing the usual signs.

  6. Parametric Mass Reliability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) systems are designed based upon having redundant systems with replaceable orbital replacement units (ORUs). These ORUs are designed to be swapped out fairly quickly, but some are very large, and some are made up of many components. When an ORU fails, it is replaced on orbit with a spare; the failed unit is sometimes returned to Earth to be serviced and re-launched. Such a system is not feasible for a 500+ day long-duration mission beyond low Earth orbit. The components that make up these ORUs have mixed reliabilities. Components that make up the most mass-such as computer housings, pump casings, and the silicon board of PCBs-typically are the most reliable. Meanwhile components that tend to fail the earliest-such as seals or gaskets-typically have a small mass. To better understand the problem, my project is to create a parametric model that relates both the mass of ORUs to reliability, as well as the mass of ORU subcomponents to reliability.

  7. Parametric scramjet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jongseong

    The performance of a hypersonic flight vehicle will depend on existing materials and fuels; this work presents the performance of the ideal scramjet engine for three different combustion chamber materials and three different candidate fuels. Engine performance is explored by parametric cycle analysis for the ideal scramjet as a function of material maximum service temperature and the lower heating value of jet engine fuels. The thermodynamic analysis is based on the Brayton cycle as similarly employed in describing the performance of the ramjet, turbojet, and fanjet ideal engines. The objective of this work is to explore material operating temperatures and fuel possibilities for the combustion chamber of a scramjet propulsion system to show how they relate to scramjet performance and the seven scramjet engine parameters: specific thrust, fuel-to-air ratio, thrust-specific fuel consumption, thermal efficiency, propulsive efficiency, overall efficiency, and thrust flux. The information presented in this work has not been done by others in the scientific literature. This work yields simple algebraic equations for scramjet performance which are similar to that of the ideal ramjet, ideal turbojet and ideal turbofan engines.

  8. An Acoustic Charge Transport Imager for High Definition Television Applications: Reliability Modeling and Parametric Yield Prediction of GaAs Multiple Quantum Well Avalanche Photodiodes. Degree awarded Oct. 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, W. D.; Brennan, K. F.; Summers, C. J.; Yun, Ilgu

    1994-01-01

    Reliability modeling and parametric yield prediction of GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) avalanche photodiodes (APDs), which are of interest as an ultra-low noise image capture mechanism for high definition systems, have been investigated. First, the effect of various doping methods on the reliability of GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (MQW) avalanche photodiode (APD) structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. Reliability is examined by accelerated life tests by monitoring dark current and breakdown voltage. Median device lifetime and the activation energy of the degradation mechanism are computed for undoped, doped-barrier, and doped-well APD structures. Lifetimes for each device structure are examined via a statistically designed experiment. Analysis of variance shows that dark-current is affected primarily by device diameter, temperature and stressing time, and breakdown voltage depends on the diameter, stressing time and APD type. It is concluded that the undoped APD has the highest reliability, followed by the doped well and doped barrier devices, respectively. To determine the source of the degradation mechanism for each device structure, failure analysis using the electron-beam induced current method is performed. This analysis reveals some degree of device degradation caused by ionic impurities in the passivation layer, and energy-dispersive spectrometry subsequently verified the presence of ionic sodium as the primary contaminant. However, since all device structures are similarly passivated, sodium contamination alone does not account for the observed variation between the differently doped APDs. This effect is explained by the dopant migration during stressing, which is verified by free carrier concentration measurements using the capacitance-voltage technique.

  9. Approximation and bounding of distortion errors in polar format SAR imaging for squinted geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Matt S.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2012-05-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging is a powerful tool that can be utilized where other conventional surveillance methods fail. It has a variety of applications including reconnaissance and surveillance for defense purposes, natural resource exploration, and environmental monitoring, among others. SAR systems generally create large datasets that need to be processed to form a final image. Processing this data can be computationally intensive, and applications may demand algorithms that can form images quickly. The goal and motivation of this research is to analyze algorithms that permit a large SAR dataset to be efficiently processed into a high-resolution image of a large scene. The backprojection algorithm (BPA)1 can serve as a baseline for performance relative to other SAR imaging algorithms. It results in accurately formed images for a vast variety of imaging scenarios. The tradeoff comes in its computational complexity which is O(N3) for an N × N pixel image. The polar format algorithm (PFA)2 is a long-standing and popular alternative to the BPA. The PFA allows the use of fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs), leading to a computational complexity of O(N2 logN) for an N × N pixel image. However, the PFA relies on a far-field approximation, wherein the curved wavefront of the transmitted pulses is approximated as a planar wavefront, thereby introducing spatially variant phase errors and hence distortion and defocus in the PFA formed image. The defocus and distortion errors can be corrected, but this is a non-trivial process.3 It can be shown that first-order Taylor expansion of a differential range expression yields the assumed received signal phase used to generate images from SAR phase history data with the PFA.4 This work focuses on error terms introduced by the PFA assumption that introduce geometric distortion in the resulting image. This distortion causes a point scatterer located at a true (x, y) coordinate to appear at some (x, y) in the formed image, i

  10. F-Formation Detection: Individuating Free-Standing Conversational Groups in Images

    PubMed Central

    Setti, Francesco; Russell, Chris; Bassetti, Chiara; Cristani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Detection of groups of interacting people is a very interesting and useful task in many modern technologies, with application fields spanning from video-surveillance to social robotics. In this paper we first furnish a rigorous definition of group considering the background of the social sciences: this allows us to specify many kinds of group, so far neglected in the Computer Vision literature. On top of this taxonomy we present a detailed state of the art on the group detection algorithms. Then, as a main contribution, we present a brand new method for the automatic detection of groups in still images, which is based on a graph-cuts framework for clustering individuals; in particular, we are able to codify in a computational sense the sociological definition of F-formation, that is very useful to encode a group having only proxemic information: position and orientation of people. We call the proposed method Graph-Cuts for F-formation (GCFF). We show how GCFF definitely outperforms all the state of the art methods in terms of different accuracy measures (some of them are brand new), demonstrating also a strong robustness to noise and versatility in recognizing groups of various cardinality. PMID:25996922

  11. Color-Coded Imaging of Breast Cancer Metastatic Niche Formation in Nude Mice.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Momiyama, Masashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Shimizu, Masahito; Saji, Shigetoyo; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-12-01

    We report here a color-coded imaging model in which metastatic niches in the lung and liver of breast cancer can be identified. The transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing nude mouse was used as the host. The GFP nude mouse expresses GFP in all organs. However, GFP expression is dim in the liver parenchymal cells. Mouse mammary tumor cells (MMT 060562) (MMT), expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP), were injected in the tail vein of GFP nude mice to produce experimental lung metastasis and in the spleen of GFP nude mice to establish a liver metastasis model. Niche formation in the lung and liver metastasis was observed using very high resolution imaging systems. In the lung, GFP host-mouse cells accumulated around as few as a single MMT-RFP cell. In addition, GFP host cells were observed to form circle-shaped niches in the lung even without RFP cancer cells, which was possibly a niche in which future metastasis could be formed. In the liver, as with the lung, GFP host cells could form circle-shaped niches. Liver and lung metastases were removed surgically and cultured in vitro. MMT-RFP cells and GFP host cells resembling cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) were observed interacting, suggesting that CAFs could serve as a metastatic niche.

  12. FTIR spectro-imaging of collagen scaffold formation during glioma tumor development.

    PubMed

    Noreen, Razia; Chien, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Bobroff, Vladimir; Moenner, Michel; Javerzat, Sophie; Hwu, Yeukuang; Petibois, Cyril

    2013-11-01

    Evidence has recently emerged that solid and diffuse tumors produce a specific extracellular matrix (ECM) for division and diffusion, also developing a specific interface with microvasculature. This ECM is mainly composed of collagens and their scaffolding appears to drive tumor growth. Although collagens are not easily analyzable by UV-fluorescence means, FTIR imaging has appeared as a valuable tool to characterize collagen contents in tissues, specially the brain, where ECM is normally devoid of collagen proteins. Here, we used FTIR imaging to characterize collagen content changes in growing glioma tumors. We could determine that C6-derived solid tumors presented high content of triple helix after 8-11 days of growth (typical of collagen fibrils formation; 8/8 tumor samples; 91 % of total variance), and further turned to larger α-helix (days 12-15; 9/10 of tumors; 94 % of variance) and β-turns (day 18-21; 7/8 tumors; 97 % of variance) contents, which suggest the incorporation of non-fibrillar collagen types in ECM, a sign of more and more organized collagen scaffold along tumor progression. The growth of tumors was also associated to the level of collagen produced (P < 0.05). This study thus confirms that collagen scaffolding is a major event accompanying the angiogenic shift and faster tumor growth in solid glioma phenotypes. PMID:24068168

  13. Imaging the buried MgO/Ag interface: Formation mechanism of the STM contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malashevich, Andrei; Altman, Eric I.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2014-10-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) provides real-space electronic state information at the atomic scale that is most commonly used to study materials surfaces. An intriguing extension of the method is to attempt to study the electronic structure at an insulator/conductor interface by performing low-bias imaging above the surface of an ultrathin insulating layer on the conducting substrate. We use first-principles theory to examine the physical mechanisms giving rise to the formation of low-bias STM images in the MgO/Ag system. We show that the main features of the low-bias STM contrast are completely determined by the atoms on the surface of MgO which overcomes prior ambiguities in assigning observed STM features to atomic positions of the substrate or thin film in such an epitaxial thin film system. Hence, the low-bias contrast is formed by states at the Fermi level in the Ag that propagate evanescently through the lattice and atomic orbitals of the MgO on their way to the surface. We develop a number of analysis techniques based on an ab initio tight-binding representation that allows identification of the origin of the STM contrast in cases where previous approaches have proven ambiguous.

  14. Parametric Equations, Maple, and Tubeplots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feicht, Louis

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity that establishes a graphical foundation for parametric equations by using a graphing output form called tubeplots from the computer program Maple. Provides a comprehensive review and exploration of many previously learned topics. (ASK)

  15. X-ray fluorescence imaging of the hippocampal formation after manganese exposure.

    PubMed

    Robison, Gregory; Zakharova, Taisiya; Fu, Sherleen; Jiang, Wendy; Fulper, Rachael; Barrea, Raul; Zheng, Wei; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) intoxication results in neurological conditions similar, but not identical, to idiopathic Parkinson's disease. While the mechanism(s) by which Mn exposure leads to neurotoxic effects remains unclear, studies by magnetic resonance imaging demonstrate a high Mn accumulation in the hippocampal formation (HPCf) of the brain. Metal quantification using this method is not possible. Using X-ray fluorescence imaging, we measured the distribution of Mn in the HPCf for a rodent model of chronic Mn exposure and quantitatively compared it with distributions of other biologically relevant metals. We found considerable increases in average Mn concentrations in all analyzed areas and we identified the dentate gyrus (DG) and the cornus ammonis 3 (CA3) layer as areas accumulating the highest Mn content (∼1.2 μg Mn per g tissue). The DG is significantly enriched with iron (Fe), while the CA3 layer has high zinc (Zn) content. Additionally, significant spatial correlations were found for Mn-Zn concentrations across the HPCf substructures and for Mn-Fe concentrations in the DG. Combined results support that at least two mechanisms may be responsible for Mn transport and/or storage in the brain, associated with either Fe or Zn. Subcellular resolution images of metal distribution in cells of the CA3 show diffuse Mn distributions consistent with Mn localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Mn was not increased in localized intracellular Fe or copper accumulations. A consistent Mn-Zn correlation both at the tissue (40 μm × 40 μm) and cellular (0.3 μm × 0.3 μm) levels suggests that a Zn transport/storage mechanism in the HPCf is likely associated with Mn accumulation. PMID:23999853

  16. Entangled-photon compressive ghost imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zerom, Petros; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; Howell, John C.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2011-12-15

    We have experimentally demonstrated high-resolution compressive ghost imaging at the single-photon level using entangled photons produced by a spontaneous parametric down-conversion source and using single-pixel detectors. For a given mean-squared error, the number of photons needed to reconstruct a two-dimensional image is found to be much smaller than that in quantum ghost imaging experiments employing a raster scan. This procedure not only shortens the data acquisition time, but also suggests a more economical use of photons for low-light-level and quantum image formation.

  17. Phase-shift effect of amplitude spread function on spectrum and image formation in coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukutake, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    Coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy, which includes coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microspectroscopy, permits label-free hyperspectral imaging. We report the theoretical study of the phase-shift effect of the impulse response function on the spectral and image-forming properties of coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy. We show that the spectrum and image are influenced by not only the NA of objective for excitation (NA(ex)) but also that for signal collection (NA(col)), in association with the phase-shift effect. We discuss that, under the condition NA(ex)≠NA(col), both the spectrum and the image become deformed by the phase-shift effect, which can be applied to the direct measurement of the imaginary part of the nonlinear susceptibility in CARS spectroscopy. We point out that, even in SRS microscopy, the nonresonant background can contribute to the image formation and cause the artifact in the image.

  18. Image formation of holographic three-dimensional display based on spatial light modulator in paraxial optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junchang; Lin, Yu-Chih; Tu, Han-Yen; Gui, Jinbin; Li, Chongguang; Lou, Yuli; Cheng, Chau-Jern

    2015-10-01

    This work describes the image formation and properties of holographic three-dimensional (3-D) display based on spatial light modulators (SLMs) combined with optical imaging systems. Existing pixelated SLMs with periodic mesh structures affect the holographic reconstruction and display properties. According to a holographic 3-D display architecture based on SLM in paraxial optical systems, this study applied the ray matrix optics and scalar diffraction theory to regard the light wave emitting from the holographic plane to the image plane as an optical system composed of four matrix elements. The image quality and depth of field (DOF) of the holographic 3-D display system are investigated, and the relationship between the impulse response and the matrix elements of the holographic imaging system is derived. In addition, the imaging properties and DOF are explored and verified through optical experimentation.

  19. SPATIALLY RESOLVED STAR FORMATION IMAGE AND THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE POPULATION IN NGC 2207/IC 2163

    SciTech Connect

    Mineo, S.; Rappaport, S.; Steinhorn, B.; Levine, A.; Gilfanov, M.; Pooley, D. E-mail: sar@mit.edu E-mail: bsteinho@mit.edu E-mail: gilfanov@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-07-10

    The colliding galaxy pair NGC 2207/IC 2163, at a distance of {approx}39 Mpc, was observed with Chandra, and an analysis reveals 28 well resolved X-ray sources, including 21 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with L{sub X} {approx}> 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}, as well as the nucleus of NGC 2207. The number of ULXs is comparable with the largest numbers of ULXs per unit mass in any galaxy yet reported. In this paper we report on these sources, and quantify how their locations correlate with the local star formation rates seen in spatially resolved star formation rate density images that we have constructed using combinations of GALEX FUV and Spitzer 24 {mu}m images. We show that the numbers of ULXs are strongly correlated with the local star formation rate densities surrounding the sources, but that the luminosities of these sources are not strongly correlated with star formation rate density.

  20. Parametric design using IGRIP

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford site near Richland, Washington is being cleaned up after 50 years of nuclear materials production. One of the most serious problems at the site is the waste stored in single-shell underground storage tanks. There are 149 of these tanks containing the spent fuel residue remaining after the fuel is dissolved in acid and the desired materials (primarily plutonium and uranium) are separated out. The tanks are upright cylinders 75 ft. in diameter with domed tops. They are made of reinforced concrete, have steel liners, and each tank is buried under 7--12 ft. of overburden. The tanks are up to 40-ft. high, and have capacities of 500,000, 750,000, or 1,000,000 gallons of waste. As many as one-third of these tanks are known or suspected to leak. The waste form contained in the tanks varies in consistency from liquid supernatant to peanut-butter-like gels and sludges to hard salt cake (perhaps as hard as low-grade concrete). The current waste retrieval plan is to insert a large long-reach manipulator through a hole cut in the top of the tank, and use a variety of end-effectors to mobilize the waste and remove it from the tank. PNL has, with the assistance of Deneb robotics employees, developed a means of using the IGRIP code to perform parametric design of mechanical systems. This method requires no modifications to the IGRIP code, and all design data are stored in the IGRIP workcell. The method is presented in the context of development of a passive articulated mechanism that is used to deliver down-arm services to a gantry robot. The method is completely general, however, and could be used to design a fully articulated manipulator. Briefly, the method involves using IGCALC expressions to control manipulator joint angles, and IGCALC variables to allow user control of link lengths and offsets. This paper presents the method in detail, with examples drawn from PNL`s experience with the gantry robot service-providing mechanism.

  1. Deep Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of IC 1613. II. The Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Tolstoy, Eline; Cole, Andrew A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Saha, Abhijit; Gallagher, J. S.; Dohm-Palmer, R. C.; Mateo, Mario

    2003-10-01

    We have taken deep images of an outlying field in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 with the WFPC2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope in the standard broadband F555W (V, 8 orbits) and F814W (I, 16 orbits) filters. The photometry reaches to V=27.7 (MV=+3.4) and I=27.1 (MI=+2.8) at the 50% completeness level, the deepest to date for an isolated dwarf irregular galaxy. We analyze the resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and compare it with CMDs created from theoretical stellar models using three different methods to derive a star formation history (SFH) as well as constrain the chemical evolution for IC 1613. All three methods find an enhanced star formation rate (SFR), at roughly the same magnitude (factor of 3), over roughly the same period (from 3 to 6 Gyr ago). Additionally, all three methods were driven to similar age-metallicity relationships (AMR) that show an increase from [Fe/H]~-1.3 at earliest times to [Fe/H]~-0.7 at present. Good agreement is found between the AMR which is derived from the CMD analysis and that which can be inferred from the derived SFH at all but the earliest ages. The agreement between the three models and the self-consistency of the derived chemical enrichment history support the reality of the derived SFH of IC 1613 and, more generally, are supportive of the practice of constructing galaxy SFHs from CMDs. A comparison of the newly observed outer field with an earlier studied central field of IC 1613 shows that the SFR in the outer field has been significantly depressed during the last Gyr. This implies that the optical scale length of the galaxy has been decreasing with time and that comparison of galaxies at intermediate redshift with present-day galaxies should take this effect into account. Comparing the CMD of the outer field of IC 1613 with CMDs of Milky Way dSph companions, we find strong similarities between IC 1613 and the more distant dSph companions (Carina, Fornax, Leo I, and Leo II) in that all are dominated

  2. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sacci, Robert L; Black, Jennifer M.; Wisinger, Nina; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2015-02-23

    The performance characteristics of Li-ion batteries are intrinsically linked to evolving nanoscale interfacial electrochemical reactions. To probe the mechanisms of solid electrolyte interphase formation and Li electrodeposition from a standard battery electrolyte, we use in situ electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy for controlled potential sweep-hold electrochemical measurements with simultaneous BF and ADF STEM image acquisition. Through a combined quantitative electrochemical measurement and quantitative STEM imaging approach, based upon electron scattering theory, we show that chemically sensitive ADF STEM imaging can be used to estimate the density of evolving SEI constituents and distinguish contrast mechanisms of Li-bearing components in the liquid cell.

  3. Monitoring the lesion formation during histotripsy treatment using shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Bastien; Lee, Wei-Ning; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2012-11-01

    Monitoring the lesion formation induced by histotripsy has mainly relied on the quantitative change in backscatter intensity using ultrasound B-mode imaging. However, how the mechanical properties of the histotripsy-treated tissue region alter during the procedure is yet to be fully investigated. We thus proposed here to monitor such a therapeutic process based on shear modulus estimated by shear wave imaging (SWI). In the therapeutic procedure, a single-element piezo-composite focused transducer (Imasonic, Besançon, France) with a center frequency of 660 kHz, a focal length of 45 mm, and an fnumber of 1 was driven by a function generator (AFG 3101, Tektronix, Beaverton, OR) and a gated RF power amplifier (GA-2500A, RITEC Inc., USA) to generate ultrasound histotripsy pulses. Histotripsy pulses were delivered for 20 seconds and then followed by a 30-second pause and a rapid monitoring step. Such a treatment and monitoring scheme was repeated for 10 mins. Both the reference measurement and monitoring were realized by SWI, where plane shear waves were generated by an 8 MHz linear array probe connected to a prototype ultrasound scanner, and acquired at a frame rate of 10000 Hz. Shear modulus was estimated and mapped in 2D through a time-of-flight algorithm. Gelatin (8%)-agar (2%) phantoms and ex-vivo porcine liver samples were tested. Regions of interests (ROI's) of 2 mm-by-2 mm in both untreated and treated regions were selected to compute the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). In all three scenarios where different PD's and PRF's were implemented, during the first 100 seconds of the treatment, 50% decrease in the shear modulus within the histotripsy-targeted zone was already observed, and the CNR of the shear modulus increased by 18 dB. In contrast, the backscatter intensity began to reduce and the corresponding CNR was found to increase by 6 dB only after 120 seconds of treatment. The results demonstrated that SWI can map quantitatively the change of mechanical

  4. Investigations on field-ion image formation and field evaporation sequences of DO3-ordered Fe3Al.

    PubMed

    Frommeyer, Georg; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Wesemann, Jürgen; Wanderka, Nelja

    2002-07-01

    The field-ion image formation of DO3-ordered Fe3Al was reinvestigated performing the atomic plane counting technique and the analysis of field evaporation sequences of different crystallographic plane sets with supporting atom probe microanalysis. For comparative studies a hypostoichiometric iron aluminide with B2 ordering was also imaged in the field-ion microscopy (FIM). The results show that Al atoms are the brightly imaging species. However, on DO3 superlattice plane sets, such as (222) and (226), iron atom layers have been imaged with atomic resolution. The B2-ordered iron aluminide does not exhibit prominent (222) and (226) poles in the FIM image. Video controlled field evaporation sequences of different atomic planes and image analysis lead to the conclusion that preferential field desorption of Fe atoms and the stronger field-ionization of Al atoms are the important mechanism for the formation of field-ion images of Fe3Al. The B2-ordered iron aluminide exhibits preferentially double layer field evaporation, and topmost Fe atom layers are not visible in the FIM.

  5. Biomimetic Strategies Employed in the Formation of Biotargeted Metal Nanoparticles for Optical Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Kvar Carl Lee, IV

    Diseases resistant to current treatment protocols like chemo resistant cancers and antibiotic resistant bacterial infections require treatments with novel mechanisms of action. Metal nanoparticles (NPs) have unique dielectric properties that give rise to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which causes these materials to interact strongly with light. With multifunctional surface modifications, metal NPs have the potential to diagnose and treat diseases like cancer and bacterial infections with optical imaging techniques and light-activated photothermal therapy. With the ability to interact strongly with metals and organics, versatile catecholamine molecules inspired by marine mussels can be used to synthesize metal NPs and functionalize them with a variety of molecules. With this biomimetic tool, these metal NPs can be formed and stabilized in physiological environments and functionalized to specifically target diseased cell surfaces. Herein, molecules containing catechols and amines are used to form gold and silver NPs and tune their SPR optical properties throughout the visible and near-infrared (NIR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum with shape and compositional control. A variety of chemical mechanisms including catechol redox activity are employed in the metal NP formation and functionalization to engineer robust metal-organic interfaces for biomedical applications. Antibodies are functionalized onto metal NPs to provide specific targeting to cancer and bacterial cell surfaces. For cancer, the epidermal growth factor receptor, overexpressed in a variety of cancers, is targeted in oral and breast cancer cells. For bacteria, NPs are targeted to endotoxins on gram-negative escherichia coli membranes and lipoteichoic acids in gram-positive staphylococcus epidermidis cell walls. Optical techniques including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and bright field microscopy are used to identify NPs on cells, and photothermal therapy is successfully demonstrated

  6. The formation of IRIS diagnostics. III. Near-ultraviolet spectra and images

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, T. M. D.; Leenaarts, J.; De Pontieu, B.; Carlsson, M.; Uitenbroek, H. E-mail: jorritl@astro.uio.no E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2013-12-01

    The Mg II h and k lines are the prime chromospheric diagnostics of NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). In the previous papers of this series, we used a realistic three-dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamics model to calculate the h and k lines in detail and investigated how their spectral features relate to the underlying atmosphere. In this work, we employ the same approach to investigate how the h and k diagnostics fare when taking into account the finite resolution of IRIS and different noise levels. In addition, we investigate the diagnostic potential of several other photospheric lines and near-continuum regions present in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) window of IRIS and study the formation of the NUV slit-jaw images. We find that the instrumental resolution of IRIS has a small effect on the quality of the h and k diagnostics; the relations between the spectral features and atmospheric properties are mostly unchanged. The peak separation is the most affected diagnostic, but mainly due to limitations of the simulation. The effects of noise start to be noticeable at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 20, but we show that with noise filtering one can obtain reliable diagnostics at least down to a S/N of 5. The many photospheric lines present in the NUV window provide velocity information for at least eight distinct photospheric heights. Using line-free regions in the h and k far wings, we derive good estimates of photospheric temperature for at least three heights. Both of these diagnostics, in particular the latter, can be obtained even at S/Ns as low as 5.

  7. Developing Understanding of Image Formation by Lenses through Collaborative Learning Mediated by Multimedia Computer-Assisted Learning Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Ping-Kee

    2004-01-01

    This article reports the use of a computer-based collaborative learning instruction designed to help students develop understanding of image formation by lenses. The study aims to investigate how students, working in dyads and mediated by multimedia computer-assisted learning (CAL) programs, construct shared knowledge and understanding. The…

  8. Teaching Image Formation by Extended Light Sources: The Use of a Model Derived from the History of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedes, Christos; Ravanis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    This research, carried out in Greece on pupils aged 12-16, focuses on the transformation of their representations concerning light emission and image formation by extended light sources. The instructive process was carried out in two stages, each one having a different, distinct target set. During the first stage, the appropriate conflict…

  9. Formation of toxic iodinated disinfection by-products from compounds used in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Duirk, Stephen E; Lindell, Cristal; Cornelison, Christopher C; Kormos, Jennifer; Ternes, Thomas A; Attene-Ramos, Matias; Osiol, Jennifer; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J; Richardson, Susan D

    2011-08-15

    Iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) were investigated as a source of iodine in the formation of iodo-trihalomethane (iodo-THM) and iodo-acid disinfection byproducts (DBPs), both of which are highly genotoxic and/or cytotoxic in mammalian cells. ICM are widely used at medical centers to enable imaging of soft tissues (e.g., organs, veins, blood vessels) and are designed to be inert substances, with 95% eliminated in urine and feces unmetabolized within 24 h. ICM are not well removed in wastewater treatment plants, such that they have been found at elevated concentrations in rivers and streams (up to 100 μg/L). Naturally occurring iodide in source waters is believed to be a primary source of iodine in the formation of iodo-DBPs, but a previous 23-city iodo-DBP occurrence study also revealed appreciable levels of iodo-DBPs in some drinking waters that had very low or no detectable iodide in their source waters. When 10 of the original 23 cities' source waters were resampled, four ICM were found--iopamidol, iopromide, iohexol, and diatrizoate--with iopamidol most frequently detected, in 6 of the 10 plants sampled, with concentrations up to 2700 ng/L. Subsequent controlled laboratory reactions of iopamidol with aqueous chlorine and monochloramine in the absence of natural organic matter (NOM) produced only trace levels of iodo-DBPs; however, when reacted in real source waters (containing NOM), chlorine and monochloramine produced significant levels of iodo-THMs and iodo-acids, up to 212 nM for dichloroiodomethane and 3.0 nM for iodoacetic acid, respectively, for chlorination. The pH behavior was different for chlorine and monochloramine, such that iodo-DBP concentrations maximized at higher pH (8.5) for chlorine, but at lower pH (6.5) for monochloramine. Extracts from chloraminated source waters with and without iopamidol, as well as from chlorinated source waters with iopamidol, were the most cytotoxic samples in mammalian cells. Source waters with iopamidol but no

  10. Optimal feedback in efficient single-cavity optical parametric oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Petnikova, V M; Shuvalov, Vladimir V

    2010-09-10

    An approach based on the description of competition of quadratic processes of merging and decomposition of quanta resulting in the formation of cnoidal waves on an effective cascade cubic Kerr-type nonlinearity is used to optimise the scheme of a single-cavity optical parametric oscillator. It is shown that the use of a feedback circuit (cavity) decreases the period of cnoidal waves produced in a nonlinear crystal, while the optimisation procedure of the transfer constant of this circuit (reflectivity of the output mirror of the cavity) is reduced to matching this period with the nonlinear crystal length. (optical parametric oscillators)

  11. The influence of stimulus format on drawing—a functional imaging study of decision making in portrait drawing

    PubMed Central

    Miall, R.C.; Nam, Se-Ho; Tchalenko, J.

    2014-01-01

    To copy a natural visual image as a line drawing, visual identification and extraction of features in the image must be guided by top-down decisions, and is usually influenced by prior knowledge. In parallel with other behavioral studies testing the relationship between eye and hand movements when drawing, we report here a functional brain imaging study in which we compared drawing of faces and abstract objects: the former can be strongly guided by prior knowledge, the latter less so. To manipulate the difficulty in extracting features to be drawn, each original image was presented in four formats including high contrast line drawings and silhouettes, and as high and low contrast photographic images. We confirmed the detailed eye–hand interaction measures reported in our other behavioral studies by using in-scanner eye-tracking and recording of pen movements with a touch screen. We also show that the brain activation pattern reflects the changes in presentation formats. In particular, by identifying the ventral and lateral occipital areas that were more highly activated during drawing of faces than abstract objects, we found a systematic increase in differential activation for the face-drawing condition, as the presentation format made the decisions more challenging. This study therefore supports theoretical models of how prior knowledge may influence perception in untrained participants, and lead to experience-driven perceptual modulation by trained artists. PMID:25128710

  12. Rods-cones and melanopsin detect light and dark to modulate sleep independent of image formation

    PubMed Central

    Altimus, C. M.; Güler, A. D.; Villa, K. L.; McNeill, D. S.; LeGates, T. A.; Hattar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Light detected in the retina modulates several physiological processes including circadian photo-entrainment and pupillary light reflex. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) convey rod-cone and melanopsin-driven light input to the brain. Using EEGs and electromyograms, we show that acute light induces sleep in mice during their nocturnal active phase whereas acute dark awakens mice during their diurnal sleep phase. We used retinal mutant mouse lines that lack (i) the ipRGCs, (ii) the photo-transduction pathways of rods and cones, or (iii) the melanopsin protein and showed that the influence of light and dark on sleep requires both rod-cone and melanopsin signaling through ipRGCs and is independent of image formation. We further show that, although acute light pulses overcome circadian and homeostatic drives for sleep, upon repeated light exposures using a 3.5 h/3.5 h light/dark cycle, the circadian and homeostatic drives override the light input. Thus, in addition to their known role in aligning circadian physiology with day and night, ipRGCs also relay light and dark information from both rod-cone and melanopsin-based pathways to modulate sleep and wakefulness. PMID:19060203

  13. Images in the rocket ultraviolet - Star formation and extinction in the M51 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlin, Ralph C.; Cornett, Robert H.; Hill, Jesse K.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1990-01-01

    UV images of M51 with up to 15 arcsec resolution were obtained by a rocket-borne telescope. The bandwidth was 970 A with maximum response at 2650 A. The two most prominent features of M51 in the UV are the bright central region and a region of intense star formation about 2.5 NE of the nucleus toward the companion NGC 5195. This complex is the source of 20 percent of the total UV flux in M51. The companion is much less prominent in the UV than in optical bands. Spiral arms show much higher contrast in UV and U bands than in the R band. The nuclear region in the UV band shows clumped emission from probable star-forming regions, possibly associated with the inner Lindblad resonance. These regions are probably the UV counterparts of FIR sources discovered in an EW scan across the nucleus. UV/U colors of most bright H II regions with known extinction are consistent with O star spectra reddened by amounts estimated from radio and Balmer line measurements. However, some of the brightest H II regions have redder UV/U colors, probably indicating the presence of cooler stars which contribute in the U band. CO and IR observations indicate that the companion NGC 5195 may be a reddened starburst in spite of its faintness in the UV.

  14. Parametric infrared tunable laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.; Sutter, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    A parametric tunable infrared laser system was built to serve as transmitter for the remote detection and density measurement of pollutant, poisonous, or trace gases in the atmosphere. The system operates with a YAG:Nd laser oscillator amplifier chain which pumps a parametric tunable frequency converter. The completed system produced pulse energies of up to 30 mJ. The output is tunable from 1.5 to 3.6 micrometers at linewidths of 0.2-0.5 /cm (FWHM), although the limits of the tuning range and the narrower line crystals presently in the parametric converter by samples of the higher quality already demonstrated is expected to improve the system performance further.

  15. Large-format imaging plate and weissenberg camera for accurate protein crystallographic data collection using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, K; Sasaki, K; Watanabe, N; Suzuki, M; Wang, Z G; Miyahara, J; Sakabe, N

    1997-05-01

    Off-line and on-line protein data-collection systems using an imaging plate as a detector are described and their components reported. The off-line scanner IPR4080 was developed for a large-format imaging plate ;BASIII' of dimensions 400 x 400 mm and 400 x 800 mm. The characteristics of this scanner are a dynamic range of 10(5) photons pixel(-1), low background noise and high sensitivity. A means of reducing electronic noise and a method for finding the origin of the noise are discussed in detail. A dedicated screenless Weissenberg camera matching IPR4080 with synchrotron radiation was developed and installed on beamline BL6B at the Photon Factory. This camera can attach one or two sheets of 400 x 800 mm large-format imaging plate inside the film cassette by evacuation. The positional reproducibility of the imaging plate on the cassette is so good that the data can be processed by batch job. Data of 93% completeness up to 1.6 A resolution were collected on a single axis rotation and the value of R(merge) becomes 4% from a tetragonal lysozyme crystal using a set of two imaging-plate sheets. Comparing two types of imaging plates, the signal-to-noise ratio of the ST-VIP-type imaging plate is 25% better than that of the BASIII-type imaging plate for protein data collection using 1.0 and 0.7 A X-rays. A new on-line protein data-collection system with imaging plates is specially designed to use synchrotron radiation X-rays at maximum efficiency.

  16. Deep near-infrared imaging of W3 Main: constraints on stellar cluster formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bik, A.; Stolte, A.; Gennaro, M.; Brandner, W.; Gouliermis, D.; Hußmann, B.; Tognelli, E.; Rochau, B.; Henning, Th.; Adamo, A.; Beuther, H.; Pasquali, A.; Wang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Embedded clusters like W3 Main are complex and dynamically evolving systems that represent an important phase in the star formation process. Aims: We aim to characterize of the entire stellar content of W3 Main in a statistical sense, which will then identify possible differences in the evolutionary phase of the stellar populations and find clues about the formation mechanism of this massive embedded cluster. Methods: Deep JHKs imaging is used to derive the disk fraction, Ks-band luminosity functions, and mass functions for several subregions in W3 Main. A two-dimensional completeness analysis using artificial star experiments is applied as a crucial ingredient for assessing realistic completeness limits for our photometry. Results: We find an overall disk fraction of 7.7 ± 2.3%, radially varying from 9.4 ± 3.0% in the central 1 pc to 5.6 ± 2.2% in the outer parts of W3 Main. The mass functions derived for three subregions are consistent with a Kroupa and Chabrier mass function. The mass function of IRSN3 is complete down to 0.14 M⊙ and shows a break at M ~ 0.5 M⊙. Conclusions: We interpret the higher disk fraction in the center as evidence that the cluster center is younger. We find that the evolutionary sequence observed in the low-mass stellar population is consistent with the observed age spread among the massive stars. An analysis of the mass function variations does not show evidence of mass segregation. W3 Main is currently still actively forming stars, showing that the ionizing feedback of OB stars is confined to small areas (~0.5 pc). The FUV feedback might be influencing large regions of the cluster as suggested by the low overall disk fraction. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in Germany, Italy, and the United States. LBT Corporation partners are LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max Planck Society, the Astrophysical

  17. Coronagraphic imaging of pre-main-sequence stars: Remnant evvelopes of star formation seen in reflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakajima, Tadashi; Golimowski, David A.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained R- and I-band coronagraphic images of the vicinities of 11 pre-main sequence (PMS) stars to search for faint, small-scale reflection nebulae. The inner radius of the search and the field of view are 1.9 arcsec and 1x1 arcmin, respectively. Reflection nebulae were imaged around RY Tau, T Tau,DG Tau, SU Aur, AB Aur, FU Ori, and Z CMa. No nebulae were detected around HBC 347, GG Tau, V773 Tau, and V830 Tau. Categorically speaking, most of the classical T Tauri program stars and all the FU Orionis-type program stars are associated with the reflection nebulae, while none of the weak-line T Tauri program stars are associated with nebulae. The detected nebulae range in size from 250 to 37 000 AU. From the brightness ratios of the stars and nebulae, we obtain a lower limit to the visual extinction of PMS star light through the nebulae of (A(sub V))(sub neb) = 0.1. The lower limits of masses and volume densities of the nebulae associated with the classical T Tauri stars are 10(exp-6) Solar mass and N(sub H) = 10(exp 5)/cu cm, respectively. Lower limits for the nebulae around FU Orionis stars are 10(exp -5) Solar mass and n(sub H) = 10 (exp 5)/cu cm, respectively. Some reflection nebulae may trace the illuminated surfaces of the optically thick dust nebulae, so these mass estimates are not stringent. All the PMS stars with associated nebulae are strong far-infrared emitters. Both the far-infrared emission and the reflection nebulae appear to originate from the remnant envelopes of star formation. The 100 micrometers emitting regions of SU Aur and FU Ori are likely to be cospatial with the reflection nebulae. A spatial discontinuity between FU Ori and its reflection nebula may explain the dip in the far-infrared spectral energy distribution at 60 micrometers. The warped, disk-like nebulae around T Tau and Z CMa are aligned with and embrace the inner star/circumstellar disk systems. The arc-shaped nebula around DG Tau may be in contact with the coaligned inner

  18. Evidence from SOFIA Imaging of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Formation along a Recent Outflow in NGC 7027

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Ryan M.; Werner, Michael W.; Sahai, Raghvendra; Ressler, Michael E.

    2016-06-01

    We report spatially resolved (FWHM ~ 3.8 - 4.6'') mid-IR imaging observations of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7027 taken with the 2.5-m telescope aboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Images of NGC 7027 were acquired at 6.3, 6.6, 11.1, 19.7, 24.2, 33.6, and 37.1 μm using the Faint Object Infrared Camera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST). The observations reveal emission from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) and warm dust (TD ~ 90 K) from the ionized inner edge of the molecular envelope surrounding the central star of the planetary nebula (CSPN). The DustEM code was used to fit the spectral energy distribution of fluxes obtained by FORCAST and the archival infrared spectrum of NGC 7027 acquired by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Best-fit dust models reveal a total dust mass of ~6 × 10-3 M⊙, where carbonaceous large (a = 1.5 μm) and very small (a ~ 12 Å) grains, and PAHs (3.1 Å < a <12 Å) compose 96.5, 2.2, and 1.3% of the dust by mass, respectively. The 37 μm optical depth map reveals minima in the dust column density at regions in the envelope that are coincident with a previously identified highly collimated outflow from the CSPN. The column density minima are also spatially coincident with enhancements in the 6.2 μm PAH feature, which is derived from the 6.3 and 6.6 μm maps. We interpret the spatial anti-correlation of the dust column density and PAH 6.2 μm feature strength and their alignment with the outflow from the CSPN as evidence of dust processing and rapid PAH formation via grain-grain collisions in the post-shock environment of the dense photo-dissociation region (PDR) and molecular envelope.

  19. Multipixel spectral imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in COS-7 cells: folding kinetics and chromophore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Lior; Rothmann, Chana; Hanania, Judith; Malik, Zvi

    2000-12-01

    Spectrally resolved imaging of Green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed in living COS-7 kidney cells distinguished the subcellular localization and demarcated the processes of protein folding and chromophore formation. COS-7 kidney cells were transfected by a plasmid pEGFP-N1 plasmid followed by incubation for 15 hours for gen expression. At different intervals the cells were examined by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed by a spectral imaging system. After 7 hours, GFP was detected in the cytoplasm, concentrated in a localized form. Spectra of the initial GFP evinced several components that belong both tot he typical fluorescent signal as well as to unspecific fingerprints. At 10 and 15 hours, GFP was seen spread in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus, and the specific spectra of the GFP were dominant at the later time. The typical GFP spectral fingerprint is the result of protein folding and chromophore formation following internal oxidation reactions. This folding and chromophore formation process, up to final conformation, was detected by spectral imaging as localized in the nucleus rather than in the cytosol. Thus, the method of fluorescence microscopy combined with multiplex spectral imaging demonstrates distinct biochemical pathways leading to GFP conformation.

  20. SMA Imaging of Massive Star Formation in NGC6334I and I(N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Megeath, S. T.; Beuther, H.; Zhang, Q.; Brogan, C. L.; Menten, K. M.; Thorwirth, S.

    We present high-resolution observations (1.3" x 2.3") of the massive star-formation regions NGC 6334 I and I(N) in the 230 GHz band (1.3 millimeters). Data were obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) interferometer, a joint venture of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the Academica Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Various pieces of past evidence, including a molecular line survey by Thorwirth et al. (2003), have suggested that these two fields exist in different evolutionary stages, with field I(N) being younger. Our new observations help to explore this hypothesis. In both fields, we have resolved the strong continuum emission into multiple sources. Most of the continuum arises from dust grains. In source I, there are four major components, the third brightest of which coincides with the compact HII region. In source I(N), we have resolved at least seven sources. One of the fainter ones is associated with a weak 3.5 cm source while the others have no centimeter continuum counterpart. In addition to the millimeter continuum emission, we have detected and imaged a number of molecular lines that trace the outflow activity and the location of dense gas in both fields. So far, our results suggest that both fields contain protostellar clusters, each with at least one line-rich core and a number of other (perhaps younger) cores that exhibit no known compact phenomena at centimeter wavelengths. These observations demonstrate the power and promise of high-resolution submillimeter observations.

  1. Imaging Proton Transfer and Dihalide Formation Pathways in Reactions of F(-) + CH3I.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, Eduardo; Michaelsen, Tim; Stei, Martin; Bastian, Björn; Meyer, Jennifer; Mikosch, Jochen; Wester, Roland

    2016-07-14

    Ion-molecule reactions of the type X(-) + CH3Y are commonly assumed to produce Y(-) through bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2). Beyond this reaction, additional reaction products have been observed throughout the last decades and have been ascribed to different entrance channel geometries differing from the commonly assumed collinear approach. We have performed a crossed beam velocity map imaging experiment on the F(-) + CH3I reaction at different relative collision energies between 0.4 and 2.9 eV. We find three additional channels competing with nucleophilic substitution at high energies. Experimental branching ratios and angle- and energy differential cross sections are presented for each product channel. The proton transfer product CH2I(-) is the main reaction channel, which competes with nucleophilic substitution up to 2.9 eV relative collision energy. At this level, the second additional channel, the formation of IF(-) via halogen abstraction, becomes more efficient. In addition, we present the first evidence for an [FHI](-) product ion. This [FHI](-) product ion is present only for a narrow range of collision energies, indicating possible dissociation at high energies. All three products show a similar trend with respect to their velocity- and scattering angle distributions, with isotropic scattering and forward scattering of the product ions occurring at low and high energies, respectively. Reactions leading to all three reaction channels present a considerable amount of energy partitioning in product internal excitation. The internally excited fraction shows a collision energy dependence only for CH2I(-). A similar trend is observed for the isoelectronic OH(-) + CH3I system. The comparison of our experimental data at 1.55 eV collision energy with a recent theoretical calculation for the same system shows a slightly higher fraction of internal excitation than predicted, which is, however, compatible within the experimental accuracy. PMID:26799548

  2. Imaging Proton Transfer and Dihalide Formation Pathways in Reactions of F– + CH3I

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ion–molecule reactions of the type X– + CH3Y are commonly assumed to produce Y– through bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2). Beyond this reaction, additional reaction products have been observed throughout the last decades and have been ascribed to different entrance channel geometries differing from the commonly assumed collinear approach. We have performed a crossed beam velocity map imaging experiment on the F– + CH3I reaction at different relative collision energies between 0.4 and 2.9 eV. We find three additional channels competing with nucleophilic substitution at high energies. Experimental branching ratios and angle- and energy differential cross sections are presented for each product channel. The proton transfer product CH2I– is the main reaction channel, which competes with nucleophilic substitution up to 2.9 eV relative collision energy. At this level, the second additional channel, the formation of IF– via halogen abstraction, becomes more efficient. In addition, we present the first evidence for an [FHI]− product ion. This [FHI]− product ion is present only for a narrow range of collision energies, indicating possible dissociation at high energies. All three products show a similar trend with respect to their velocity- and scattering angle distributions, with isotropic scattering and forward scattering of the product ions occurring at low and high energies, respectively. Reactions leading to all three reaction channels present a considerable amount of energy partitioning in product internal excitation. The internally excited fraction shows a collision energy dependence only for CH2I–. A similar trend is observed for the isoelectronic OH– + CH3I system. The comparison of our experimental data at 1.55 eV collision energy with a recent theoretical calculation for the same system shows a slightly higher fraction of internal excitation than predicted, which is, however, compatible within the experimental accuracy. PMID:26799548

  3. Experimental Sentinel-2 LAI estimation using parametric, non-parametric and physical retrieval methods - A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrelst, Jochem; Rivera, Juan Pablo; Veroustraete, Frank; Muñoz-Marí, Jordi; Clevers, Jan G. P. W.; Camps-Valls, Gustau; Moreno, José

    2015-10-01

    Given the forthcoming availability of Sentinel-2 (S2) images, this paper provides a systematic comparison of retrieval accuracy and processing speed of a multitude of parametric, non-parametric and physically-based retrieval methods using simulated S2 data. An experimental field dataset (SPARC), collected at the agricultural site of Barrax (Spain), was used to evaluate different retrieval methods on their ability to estimate leaf area index (LAI). With regard to parametric methods, all possible band combinations for several two-band and three-band index formulations and a linear regression fitting function have been evaluated. From a set of over ten thousand indices evaluated, the best performing one was an optimized three-band combination according to (ρ560 -ρ1610 -ρ2190) / (ρ560 +ρ1610 +ρ2190) with a 10-fold cross-validation RCV2 of 0.82 (RMSECV : 0.62). This family of methods excel for their fast processing speed, e.g., 0.05 s to calibrate and validate the regression function, and 3.8 s to map a simulated S2 image. With regard to non-parametric methods, 11 machine learning regression algorithms (MLRAs) have been evaluated. This methodological family has the advantage of making use of the full optical spectrum as well as flexible, nonlinear fitting. Particularly kernel-based MLRAs lead to excellent results, with variational heteroscedastic (VH) Gaussian Processes regression (GPR) as the best performing method, with a RCV2 of 0.90 (RMSECV : 0.44). Additionally, the model is trained and validated relatively fast (1.70 s) and the processed image (taking 73.88 s) includes associated uncertainty estimates. More challenging is the inversion of a PROSAIL based radiative transfer model (RTM). After the generation of a look-up table (LUT), a multitude of cost functions and regularization options were evaluated. The best performing cost function is Pearson's χ -square. It led to a R2 of 0.74 (RMSE: 0.80) against the validation dataset. While its validation went fast

  4. Brain Signal Variability is Parametrically Modifiable

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Douglas D.; McIntosh, Anthony R.; Grady, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Moment-to-moment brain signal variability is a ubiquitous neural characteristic, yet remains poorly understood. Evidence indicates that heightened signal variability can index and aid efficient neural function, but it is not known whether signal variability responds to precise levels of environmental demand, or instead whether variability is relatively static. Using multivariate modeling of functional magnetic resonance imaging-based parametric face processing data, we show here that within-person signal variability level responds to incremental adjustments in task difficulty, in a manner entirely distinct from results produced by examining mean brain signals. Using mixed modeling, we also linked parametric modulations in signal variability with modulations in task performance. We found that difficulty-related reductions in signal variability predicted reduced accuracy and longer reaction times within-person; mean signal changes were not predictive. We further probed the various differences between signal variance and signal means by examining all voxels, subjects, and conditions; this analysis of over 2 million data points failed to reveal any notable relations between voxel variances and means. Our results suggest that brain signal variability provides a systematic task-driven signal of interest from which we can understand the dynamic function of the human brain, and in a way that mean signals cannot capture. PMID:23749875

  5. WFPC2 Imaging of Dust Structures and Star Formation in the Disk-Halo Interface of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Blair

    1999-07-01

    WFPC2 images of five edge-on spirals to study star formation and dusty interstellar clouds in the disk-halo interface of these galaxies. Ground-based and HST images of the nearby {9 Mpc} edge-on spiral NGC 891 show an unexpected web of hundreds of dust structures at heights 0.4 <= z <= 1.7 kpc {Howk & Savage 1997}. With masses >10^5-10^6 M{sun}, the more prominent extraplanar dust complexes may be sites of star formation at high-z, and there is evidence for H II regions associated with unresolved continuum sources far above the plane of NGC 891. We have established that such high-z dust features and H II regions are not unique to NGC 891. We propose to image five edge-on spiral galaxies {D 17 - 70 Mpc} with the WFPC2. The proposed BVI images will be used to identify sites of on- going star formation in the thick disks of these galaxies, all of which show evidence for high-z dust complexes, and with ground-based H Alpha images will be used to study the stellar content o f any such regions. The resolution and point-source sensitivity of the WFPC2 are crucial for studying these star-forming regions. We will also use these images to study interstellar matter in the thick disks of these galaxies with unprecedented detail and derive the fundamental properties of high-z dusty clouds-including sizes, extinctions, column densities, masses, and gravitational potential energies.

  6. In-situ visual observation for the formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in porous media by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiafei; Lv, Qin; Li, Yanghui; Yang, Mingjun; Liu, Weiguo; Yao, Lei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhang, Yi; Song, Yongchen

    2015-05-01

    In this work, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed to observe the in-situ formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in porous media. Methane hydrate was formed in a high-pressure cell with controlled temperature, and then the hydrate was dissociated by thermal injection. The process was photographed by the MRI, and the pressure was recorded. The images confirmed that the direct visual observation was achieved; these were then employed to provide detailed information of the nucleation, growth, and decomposition of the hydrate. Moreover, the saturation of methane hydrate during the dissociation was obtained from the MRI intensity data. Our results showed that the hydrate saturation initially decreased rapidly, and then slowed down; this finding is in line with predictions based only on pressure. The study clearly showed that MRI is a useful technique to investigate the process of methane hydrate formation and dissociation in porous media.

  7. A Bayesian non-parametric Potts model with application to pre-surgical FMRI data.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy D; Liu, Zhuqing; Bartsch, Andreas J; Nichols, Thomas E

    2013-08-01

    The Potts model has enjoyed much success as a prior model for image segmentation. Given the individual classes in the model, the data are typically modeled as Gaussian random variates or as random variates from some other parametric distribution. In this article, we present a non-parametric Potts model and apply it to a functional magnetic resonance imaging study for the pre-surgical assessment of peritumoral brain activation. In our model, we assume that the Z-score image from a patient can be segmented into activated, deactivated, and null classes, or states. Conditional on the class, or state, the Z-scores are assumed to come from some generic distribution which we model non-parametrically using a mixture of Dirichlet process priors within the Bayesian framework. The posterior distribution of the model parameters is estimated with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm, and Bayesian decision theory is used to make the final classifications. Our Potts prior model includes two parameters, the standard spatial regularization parameter and a parameter that can be interpreted as the a priori probability that each voxel belongs to the null, or background state, conditional on the lack of spatial regularization. We assume that both of these parameters are unknown, and jointly estimate them along with other model parameters. We show through simulation studies that our model performs on par, in terms of posterior expected loss, with parametric Potts models when the parametric model is correctly specified and outperforms parametric models when the parametric model in misspecified. PMID:22627277

  8. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Poststarburst Quasar UN J1025-0040: Evidence for Recent Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotherton, Michael S.; Grabelsky, Matthew; Canalizo, Gabriela; van Breugel, Wil; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Croom, Scott; Boyle, Brian; Shanks, Tom

    2002-06-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera images of the poststarburst quasar UN J1025-0040, which contains both an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and a 400 Myr old nuclear starburst of similar bolometric luminosity (~1011.6 Lsolar). The F450W and F814W images resolve the AGN from the starburst and show that the bulk of the starlight (~6×1010 Msolar) is contained within a central radius of about 600 pc and lacks clear morphological structures at this scale. Equating the point-source light in each image with the AGN contribution, we determined the ratio of AGN-to-starburst light. This ratio is 69% in the red F814W image, consistent with our previous spectral analysis, but <=50% in the blue F450W image, whereas we had predicted 76%. The HST images are consistent with previous photometry, ruling out variability (a fading AGN) as a cause for this result. We can explain the new data if there is a previously unknown young stellar population present, 40 Myr or younger, with as much as 10% of the mass of the dominant 400 Myr old population. This younger starburst may represent the trigger for the current nuclear activity. The multiple starburst ages seen in UN J1025-0040 and its companion galaxy indicate a complex interaction and star formation history.

  9. A numerical analysis of the Born approximation for image formation modeling of differential interference contrast microscopy for human embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trattner, Sigal; Feigin, Micha; Greenspan, Hayit; Sochen, Nir

    2008-03-01

    The differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope is commonly used for the visualization of live biological specimens. It enables the view of the transparent specimens while preserving their viability, being a non-invasive modality. Fertility clinics often use the DIC microscope for evaluation of human embryos quality. Towards quantification and reconstruction of the visualized specimens, an image formation model for DIC imaging is sought and the interaction of light waves with biological matter is examined. In many image formation models the light-matter interaction is expressed via the first Born approximation. The validity region of this approximation is defined in a theoretical bound which limits its use to very small specimens with low dielectric contrast. In this work the Born approximation is investigated via the Helmholtz equation, which describes the interaction between the specimen and light. A solution on the lens field is derived using the Gaussian Legendre quadrature formulation. This numerical scheme is considered both accurate and efficient and has shortened significantly the computation time as compared to integration methods that required a great amount of sampling for satisfying the Whittaker - Shannon sampling theorem. By comparing the numerical results with the theoretical values it is shown that the theoretical bound is not directly relevant to microscopic imaging and is far too limiting. The numerical exhaustive experiments show that the Born approximation is inappropriate for modeling the visualization of thick human embryos.

  10. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sacci, Robert L; Black, Jennifer M.; Wisinger, Nina; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2015-02-23

    The performance characteristics of Li-ion batteries are intrinsically linked to evolving nanoscale interfacial electrochemical reactions. To probe the mechanisms of solid electrolyte interphase formation and Li electrodeposition from a standard battery electrolyte, we use in situ electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy for controlled potential sweep-hold electrochemical measurements with simultaneous BF and ADF STEM image acquisition. Through a combined quantitative electrochemical measurement and quantitative STEM imaging approach, based upon electron scattering theory, we show that chemically sensitive ADF STEM imaging can be used to estimate the density of evolving SEI constituents and distinguish contrast mechanisms of Li-bearing components in the liquidmore » cell.« less

  11. Narrow-band Imaging of Massive Star-Forming Regions: Tracing Outflows and the Rate of Star-Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Kendall; Willis, Sarah; Hora, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Narrowband images targeting ionized hydrogen (Brackett gamma, 2.17 microns) and molecular hydrogen (2.12 microns) were obtained for six massive star-forming regions within the Milky Way, NGC 6334, G305, G3333, G3264, G3266, and G351. These regions are within 1-4 kpc from our solar system. The narrowband flux in Brackett gamma was used as a star-formation tracer to calculate a star-formation rate for each region. This is compared with other star-formation rates found using other methods such as the count of young stars and YSOs, and rates calculated from using other tracers (e.g. 70 micron monochromatic luminosity). The molecular hydrogen narrowband images were manually searched to locate outflows from young stars. Once these outflows are identified, it may help to get a better survey of the young stellar population. A better understanding of the stellar population distribution can lead to more accurate star-formation rates to compare to those calculated from star-formation tracers. We found the regions NGC 6334 and G3266 to have the highest levels of ongoing star formation activity as indicated by the number of molecular hydrogen objects (MHOs) detected. There are a total of 279 cataloged MHOs in 181 categorized systems for the six regions. There are a total of 150 identified potential driving sources.This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  12. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-05-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength.

  13. Experience with parametric binary dissection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1993-01-01

    Parametric Binary Dissection (PBD) is a new algorithm that can be used for partitioning graphs embedded in 2- or 3-dimensional space. It partitions explicitly on the basis of nodes + (lambda)x(edges cut), where lambda is the ratio of time to communicate over an edge to the time to compute at a node. The new algorithm is faster than the original binary dissection algorithm and attempts to obtain better partitions than the older algorithm, which only takes nodes into account. The performance of parametric dissection with plain binary dissection on 3 large unstructured 3-d meshes obtained from computational fluid dynamics and on 2 random graphs were compared. It was showm that the new algorithm can usually yield partitions that are substantially superior, but that its performance is heavily dependent on the input data.

  14. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bruno E.; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-01-01

    Today’s ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength. PMID:24805968

  15. Imaging transient formation of diffusion layers with fluorescence-enabled electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Oja, Stephen M; Zhang, Bo

    2014-12-16

    Fluorescence-enabled electrochemical microscopy (FEEM) is demonstrated as a new technique to image transient concentration profiles of redox species generated on ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs). FEEM converts an electrical signal into an optical signal by electrically coupling a conventional redox reaction to a fluorogenic reporter reaction on a closed bipolar electrode. We describe the implementation of FEEM for diffusion layer imaging and use an array of thousands of parallel bipolar electrodes to image the diffusion layers of UMEs in two and three dimensions. This new technique provides a way to image an entire 2-dimensional lateral cross section of a dynamic diffusion layer in a single experiment. By taking several of these lateral cross sections at different axial positions in the diffusion layer, a 3-dimensional image of the diffusion layer can be built. We image the diffusion layer of a 10 μm diameter carbon fiber electrode over the course of a cyclic voltammetry experiment and compare the FEEM-generated images to concentration profiles generated from numerical simulation. We also image the diffusion layer of a two electrode array consisting of two 10 μm diameter carbon fibers over the course of a potential step experiment.

  16. Factors Affecting University Image Formation among Prospective Higher Education Students: The Case of International Branch Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Stephen; Huisman, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has found that the images of universities formed by prospective students greatly influence their choices. With the advent of international branch campuses in several higher education hubs worldwide, many international students now attempt to construct images of these institutions when deciding where to study. The aim of this…

  17. Parametric Modeling for Fluid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Martinez, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Fluid Systems involves different projects that require parametric modeling, which is a model that maintains consistent relationships between elements as is manipulated. One of these projects is the Neo Liquid Propellant Testbed, which is part of Rocket U. As part of Rocket U (Rocket University), engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida have the opportunity to develop critical flight skills as they design, build and launch high-powered rockets. To build the Neo testbed; hardware from the Space Shuttle Program was repurposed. Modeling for Neo, included: fittings, valves, frames and tubing, between others. These models help in the review process, to make sure regulations are being followed. Another fluid systems project that required modeling is Plant Habitat's TCUI test project. Plant Habitat is a plan to develop a large growth chamber to learn the effects of long-duration microgravity exposure to plants in space. Work for this project included the design and modeling of a duct vent for flow test. Parametric Modeling for these projects was done using Creo Parametric 2.0.

  18. Optically induced parametric magnetic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Ricardo; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2011-05-01

    Optically pumped vector magnetometers based on zero-field resonances have reached very high sensitivities by operating at high atomic densities where dephasing due to spin-exchange collisions can be suppressed. Simplified setups, with just one laser beam have measured magnetic fields from the human brain and heart. A key feature in these magnetometers is the introduction of an rf magnetic field along the measurement axis to generate a parametric resonance. Lock-in detection of the transmitted light, at an odd harmonic of the modulation frequency, allows the reduction of the low frequency noise and generates a resonance with dispersive shape. Here we study a zero-field vector magnetometer where the parametric resonances are induced by the vector AC stark-shift of light. This approach does not produce any external magnetic field that could disturb the reading of other magnetometers in the vicinity and could provide an alternative in applications where an applied AC-field cannot be used. We have characterized the vector AC stark-shift effect of light on Rb atoms contained in a micromachined vapor cell with buffer gas. We have obtained parametric resonances induced by modulation of the light-shift. We also analyze the detunings and intensities of the light-shift beam that maintain the magnetometer within the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime.

  19. CHARACTERIZING THE STAR FORMATION OF THE LOW-MASS SHIELD GALAXIES FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Simones, Jacob E.; Cannon, John M.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Salzer, John J.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Elson, Ed C.; Ott, Jürgen

    2015-03-20

    The Survey of Hi in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs is an on-going multi-wavelength program to characterize the gas, star formation, and evolution in gas-rich, very low-mass galaxies that populate the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. The galaxies were selected from the first ∼10% of the Hi Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey based on their low Hi mass and low baryonic mass. Here, we measure the star formation properties from optically resolved stellar populations for 12 galaxies using a color–magnitude diagram fitting technique. We derive lifetime average star formation rates (SFRs), recent SFRs, stellar masses, and gas fractions. Overall, the recent SFRs are comparable to the lifetime SFRs with mean birthrate parameter of 1.4, with a surprisingly narrow standard deviation of 0.7. Two galaxies are classified as dwarf transition galaxies (dTrans). These dTrans systems have star formation and gas properties consistent with the rest of the sample, in agreement with previous results that some dTrans galaxies may simply be low-luminosity dwarf irregulars. We do not find a correlation between the recent star formation activity and the distance to the nearest neighboring galaxy, suggesting that the star formation process is not driven by gravitational interactions, but regulated internally. Further, we find a broadening in the star formation and gas properties (i.e., specific SFRs, stellar masses, and gas fractions) compared to the generally tight correlation found in more massive galaxies. Overall, the star formation and gas properties indicate these very low-mass galaxies host a fluctuating, non-deterministic, and inefficient star formation process.

  20. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Sacci, Robert L; Black, Jennifer M; Balke, Nina; Dudney, Nancy J; More, Karren L; Unocic, Raymond R

    2015-03-11

    The performance characteristics of Li-ion batteries are intrinsically linked to evolving nanoscale interfacial electrochemical reactions. To probe the mechanisms of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation and to track Li nucleation and growth mechanisms from a standard organic battery electrolyte (LiPF6 in EC:DMC), we used in situ electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy (ec-S/TEM) to perform controlled electrochemical potential sweep measurements while simultaneously imaging site-specific structures resulting from electrochemical reactions. A combined quantitative electrochemical measurement and STEM imaging approach is used to demonstrate that chemically sensitive annular dark field STEM imaging can be used to estimate the density of the evolving SEI and to identify Li-containing phases formed in the liquid cell. We report that the SEI is approximately twice as dense as the electrolyte as determined from imaging and electron scattering theory. We also observe site-specific locations where Li nucleates and grows on the surface and edge of the glassy carbon electrode. Lastly, this report demonstrates the investigative power of quantitative nanoscale imaging combined with electrochemical measurements for studying fluid-solid interfaces and their evolving chemistries.

  1. The formation of chlorine-induced alterations in daguerreotype image particles: a high resolution SEM-EDS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, Silvia A.; Schulte, Franziska; Kennedy, Nora W.; Schrott, Alejandro G.

    2011-10-01

    The daguerreotype image, composed of nanosized silver-mercury or silver-mercury-gold amalgam particles formed on a polished silver substrate, is particularly sensitive to deterioration by chlorine-containing compounds resulting in the formation of AgCl that generates redeposited silver upon exposure to UV and visible lights. In the present study, alterations caused by chlorides on daguerreotype test samples prepared following 19th century recipes were studied. The dependence of variations in the production steps of daguerreotypes, such as multiple sensitization and gilding, on the impact of the exposure to chlorine were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), complemented by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Raman spectroscopy. It was observed that AgCl nucleates on the image particles and in the substrate defects, regardless of the particle density or the sensitization process. In gilded samples, Au was observed over the image particles and the polished silver substrate as a tightly packed grainy layer, which conformably follows the polishing irregularities. For the first time it is shown that Au preferentially accumulates on top of the image particles. This gold layer does not protect the image from chlorine-induced deterioration.

  2. Analyzing the effect of absorption and refractive index on image formation in high numerical aperture transmission microscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Ryan L.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-02-01

    Transmission bright-field microscopy is the clinical mainstay for disease diagnosis where image contrast is provided by absorptive and refractive index differences between tissue and the surrounding media. Different microscopy techniques often assume one of the two contrast mechanisms is negligible as a means to better understand the tissue scattering processes. This particular work provides better understanding of the role of refractive index and absorption within Optical Projection Tomographic Microscopy (OPTM) through the development of a generalized computational model based upon the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. The model mimics OPTM by simulating axial scanning of the objective focal plane through the cell to produce projection images. These projection images, acquired from circumferential positions around the cell, are reconstructed into isometric three-dimensional images using the filtered backprojection normally employed in Computed Tomography (CT). The model provides a platform to analyze all aspects of bright-field microscopes, such as the degree of refractive index matching and the numerical aperture, which can be varied from air-immersion to high NA oil-immersion. In this preliminary work, the model is used to understand the effects of absorption and refraction on image formation using micro-shells and idealized nuclei. Analysis of absorption and refractive index separately provides the opportunity to better assess their role together as a complex refractive index for improved interpretation of bright-field scattering, essential for OPTM image reconstruction. This simulation, as well as ones in the future looking at other effects, will be used to optimize OPTM imaging parameters and triage efforts to further improve the overall system design.

  3. Image Formation in High Contrast Optical Systems: The Role of Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, James B.

    2004-01-01

    To find evidence of life in the Universe outside our solar system is one of the most compelling and visionary adventures of the 21st century. The technologies to create the telescopes and instruments that will enable this discovery are now within the grasp of mankind. Direct imaging of a very faint planet around a neighboring bright star requires high contrast or a hypercontrast optical imaging system capable of controlling unwanted radiation within the system to one part in ten to the 11th. This paper identifies several physical phenomena that affect image quality in high contrast imaging systems. Polarization induced at curved metallic surfaces and by anisotropy in the deposition process (Smith-Purcell effect) along with beam shifts introduced by the Goos-Hachen effect are discussed. A typical configuration is analyzed, and technical risk mitigation concepts are discussed.

  4. Use of photoelectronic image formation devices (electron photography, electron optical converters, television)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokofyeva, V. V.

    1973-01-01

    Electronic image amplification methods are used in variable star observations to increase significantly the volume of recorded information. Electronic cameras are the most efficient, while television cameras increase contrast of weak stars against the background of the sky.

  5. Image formation in detuned interference-filter-aided in-line Fraunhofer holography.

    PubMed

    Vikram, C S

    1996-11-10

    Detuned interference filters as Fourier processors can be used to enhance the poor fringe contrast often encountered with in-line Fraunhofer holography of small or many far-fields-away micro-objects. The subsequent effect on the reconstructed-image irradiance distribution is described. The modified aperture-limited image shape and size, and the possible consequences on the quantitative analysis are discussed.

  6. BOREAS RSS-2 Level-1B ASAS Image Data: At-Sensor Radiance in BSQ Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Dabney, P. W.; Kovalick, W.; Graham, D.; Bur, Michael; Irons, James R.; Tierney, M.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-2 team used the ASAS instrument, mounted on the NASA C-130 aircraft, to create at-sensor radiance images of various sites as a function of spectral wavelength, view geometry (combinations of view zenith angle, view azimuth angle, solar zenith angle, and solar azimuth angle), and altitude. The level-1b ASAS images of the BOREAS study areas were collected from April to September 1994 and March to July 1996.

  7. Functional Ultrasound Imaging for Assessment of Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds Used for Liver Organoid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Ryan C.; Hanson, Ariel D.; Feingold, Steven; Cashion, Avery T.; Corcimaru, Ana; Wu, Bryant T.; Mullins, Christopher R.; Aylward, Stephen R.; Reid, Lola M.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    A method of 3D functional ultrasound imaging has been developed to enable non-destructive assessment of extracellular matrix scaffolds that have been prepared by decellularization protocols and are intended for recellularization to create organoids. A major challenge in organ decellularization is retaining patent micro-vascular structures crucial for nutrient access and functionality of organoids. The imaging method described here provides statistical distributions of flow rates throughout the tissue volumes, 3D vessel network architecture visualization, characterization of microvessel volumes and sizes, and delineation of matrix from vascular circuits. The imaging protocol was tested on matrix scaffolds that are tissue-specific, but not species-specific, matrix extracts, prepared by a process that preserved >98% of the collagens, collagen-associated matrix components, and matrix-bound growth factors and cytokines. Image-derived data are discussed with respect to assessment of scaffolds followed by proof-of-concept studies in organoid establishment using Hep3B, human hepatoblast-like cells. Histology showed that the cells attached to scaffolds with patent vasculature within minutes, achieved engraftment at near 100%, expressed liver-specific functions within 24h, and yielded evidence of proliferation and increasing differentiation of cells throughout the two weeks of culture studies. This imaging method should prove valuable in analyses of such matrix scaffolds. PMID:24011714

  8. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC DIAGNOSTICS ON THE FORMATION OF TWO MAGNETIC FLUX ROPES REVEALED BY SDO/AIA AND IRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Fang, C.

    2015-05-10

    Helical magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a fundamental structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and has been discovered recently to exist as a sigmoidal channel structure prior to its eruption in the EUV high-temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). However, when and where the MFR is built up are still elusive. In this paper, we investigate two MFRs (MFR1 and MFR2) in detail, whose eruptions produced two energetic solar flares and CMEs on 2014 April 18 and 2014 September 10, respectively. The AIA EUV images reveal that for a long time prior to their eruption, both MFR1 and MFR2 are under formation, which is probably through magnetic reconnection between two groups of sheared arcades driven by the shearing and converging flows in the photosphere near the polarity inversion line. At the footpoints of the MFR1, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph Si iv, C ii, and Mg ii lines exhibit weak to moderate redshifts and a non-thermal broadening in the pre-flare phase. However, a relatively large blueshift and an extremely strong non-thermal broadening are found at the formation site of the MFR2. These spectral features consolidate the proposition that the reconnection plays an important role in the formation of MFRs. For the MFR1, the reconnection outflow may propagate along its legs, penetrating into the transition region and the chromosphere at the footpoints. For the MFR2, the reconnection probably takes place in the lower atmosphere and results in the strong blueshift and non-thermal broadening for the Mg ii, C ii, and Si iv lines.

  9. Dust Formation in Hot Stellar Winds: Infra-Red Imaging of the Wolf-Rayet Binary WR137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Anthony

    1997-07-01

    We propose to use NICMOS on HST to image the dust formed in the bow shock region of the 12.6-year elliptical-orbit binary WR 137 = HD 192641 {WC7+OB}, within a year after periastron passage, predicted to occur in late 1996 or early 1997. Ground -based IR photometry has shown that copious amounts of carbon- rich dust are formed just after periastron passage, when wind- wind collision compression is at its peak. WR 137 is the currently most favorable system for the direct detection of the extended dust formation region among all known WR episodic dust emitters. Imaging of the dust emitting region will directly test for the first time the concept of wind-wind collision and allow one to study how and where dust can form in such a hostile environment.

  10. A genome-wide imaging-based screening to identify genes involved in synphilin-1 inclusion formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Yang, Qian; Zheng, Ju; Zhu, Xuefeng; Hao, Xinxin; Song, Jia; Lebacq, Tom; Franssens, Vanessa; Winderickx, Joris; Nystrom, Thomas; Liu, Beidong

    2016-01-01

    Synphilin-1 is a major component of Parkinson’s disease (PD) inclusion bodies implicated in PD pathogenesis. However, the machinery controlling synphilin-1 inclusion formation remains unclear. Here, we investigated synphilin-1 inclusion formation using a systematic genome-wide, high-content imaging based screening approach (HCI) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By combining with a secondary screening for mutants showing significant changes on fluorescence signal intensity, we filtered out hits that significantly decreased the expression level of synphilin-1. We found 133 yeast genes that didn’t affect synphilin-1 expression but that were required for the formation of synphilin-1 inclusions. Functional enrichment and physical interaction network analysis revealed these genes to encode for functions involved in cytoskeleton organization, histone modification, sister chromatid segregation, glycolipid biosynthetic process, DNA repair and replication. All hits were confirmed by conventional microscopy. Complementation assays were performed with a selected group of mutants, results indicated that the observed phenotypic changes in synphilin-1 inclusion formation were directly caused by the loss of corresponding genes of the deletion mutants. Further growth assays of these mutants showed a significant synthetic sick effect upon synphilin-1 expression, which supports the hypothesis that matured inclusions represent an end stage of several events meant to protect cells against the synphilin-1 cytotoxicity. PMID:27440388

  11. The high precision control of the satellites formation for diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; He, Liang; Song, Ting; Sun, Binglei; Hao, Tianwei

    2016-01-01

    To satisfy need of high resolution observation from space. This article elaborates a method of high precision spacecraft formation control based on file diffraction theory. Improving the spacecraft control accuracy to millimeter is a challenge. With the method in this article this challenge can be solved. The algorithm in this article concerning the vibration of spacecraft and based on dynamic modeling of even relative quaternion theory deduced a method of attitude and orbit integrated control. Using this control algorithm to simulation can get the result that it can make the spacecraft integrate formation control as the technical basis of space high resolution observation.

  12. Infrared absorption imaging of 2D supersonic jet expansions: Free expansion, cluster formation, and shock wave patterns.

    PubMed

    Zischang, Julia; Suhm, Martin A

    2013-07-14

    N2O/He gas mixtures are expanded through a 10 × 0.5 mm(2) slit nozzle and imaged by direct absorption vibrational spectroscopy, employing a HgCdTe focal plane array detector after interferometric modulation. N2O cluster formation in the free supersonic expansion is visualized. The expansion structure behind the frontal shock is investigated as a function of background pressure. At high pressures, a sequence of stationary density peaks along a narrow directed flow channel is characterized. The potential of the technique for the elucidation of aggregation mechanisms is emphasized.

  13. Optical parametric osicllators with improved beam quality

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Arlee V.; Alford, William J.

    2003-11-11

    An optical parametric oscillator (OPO) having an optical pump, which generates a pump beam at a pump frequency greater than a desired signal frequency, a nonlinear optical medium oriented so that a signal wave at the desired signal frequency and a corresponding idler wave are produced when the pump beam (wave) propagates through the nonlinear optical medium, resulting in beam walk off of the signal and idler waves, and an optical cavity which directs the signal wave to repeatedly pass through the nonlinear optical medium, said optical cavity comprising an equivalently even number of non-planar mirrors that produce image rotation on each pass through the nonlinear optical medium. Utilizing beam walk off where the signal wave and said idler wave have nonparallel Poynting vectors in the nonlinear medium and image rotation, a correlation zone of distance equal to approximately .rho.L.sub.crystal is created which, through multiple passes through the nonlinear medium, improves the beam quality of the OPO output.

  14. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Foy, Bernard R; Wohlberg, Brendt E; Scovel, James C

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  15. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Moon S.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2012-03-01

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially lifethreatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duodenoscopes account for the highest number of reported endoscopic infections where microbial biofilm is one of the major causes for these infections. We applied a hyperspectral imaging method to detect biofilm contamination on the surface of several common materials used for medical devices. Such materials include stainless steel, titanium, and stainless-steeltitanium alloy. Potential uses of hyperspectral imaging technique to monitor biofilm attachment to different material surfaces are discussed.

  16. Statistical analysis of polarizing maps of blood plasma laser images for the diagnostics of malignant formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungurian, V. P.; Ivashchuk, O. I.; Ushenko, V. O.

    2012-01-01

    This work is aimed at searching the interconnections between the statistic structure of blood plasma microscopic images and manifestations of optical anisotropy of liquid crystal protein network. The model of linear birefringence of albumin and globulin crystals underlies in the ground of this work. The results of investigating the interrelation between statistical moments of the 1st-4th order are presented that characterize the coordinate distributions of polarization ellipticity of laser images of blood plasma smears and pathological changes in human organism. The diagnostic criteria of breast cancer nascency and its severity degree differentiation are determined.

  17. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach. PMID:19736969

  18. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach.

  19. Formation of Toxic Iodinated Disinfection By-Products from Compounds Used in Medical Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) were investigated as a source of iodine in the formation of iodo-trihalomethane (iodo-THM) and iodo-acid disinfection byproducts (DBPs), both of which are highly genotoxic and/or cytotoxic in mammalian cells. ICM are widely used at medical cen...

  20. Image formation mechanism on the Shroud of Turin: a solar reflex radiation model (the optical aspect).

    PubMed

    Mouraviev, S N

    1997-12-01

    Unprejudiced logical analysis of the main available data, in the first instance, those collected in 1978 by the American interdisciplinary team known as STURP, suggests that the image of the dead man on the Shroud of Turin resulted from (a) the reflection by the anointed body of transmitted solar rays and their projection onto the inner side of the cloth and (b) the chemical registration of this reflex image by the topmost fibers of the linen, probably with a water or oil solution of aloes and myrrh acting as a catalyzer. This reflex radiation model requires the following: (1) action at the shortest possible distance (i.e., a maximum clinging of the Shroud to the body except for a narrow intervening liquid film), which explains the high resolution and the absence of serious distortions, and (2) double exposure-of both the face and the back-of the enveloped corpse to the sun, which accounts for the presence and optical symmetry of both the frontal and the dorsal images. An attempt is also made to reinterpret the so-called three-dimensional information encoded in the image. Although some chemical issues are also mentioned and a historical reconstruction of the burial procedure is suggested, first and foremost the optical aspect of this mechanism is addressed here. PMID:18264452

  1. An Emphasis on Perception: Teaching Image Formation Using a Mechanistic Model of Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Sue; And Others

    An effective way to teach the concept of image is to give students a model of human vision which incorporates a simple mechanism of depth perception. In this study two almost identical versions of a curriculum in geometrical optics were created. One used a mechanistic, interpretive eye model, and in the other the eye was modeled as a passive,…

  2. Three-dimensional imaging system for analyses of dynamic droplet impaction and deposition formation on leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A system was developed to assess the dynamic processes of droplet impact, rebound and retention on leaf surfaces with three-dimensional (3-D) images. The system components consisted of a uniform-size droplet generator, two high speed digital video cameras, a constant speed track, a leaf holder, and ...

  3. Triminimal parametrization of quark mixing matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Li, Shi-Wen; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2008-12-01

    Starting from a new zeroth order basis for quark mixing (CKM) matrix based on the quark-lepton complementarity and the tribimaximal pattern of lepton mixing, we derive a triminimal parametrization of a CKM matrix with three small angles and a CP-violating phase as its parameters. This new triminimal parametrization has the merits of fast convergence and simplicity in application. With the quark-lepton complementary relations, we derive relations between the two unified triminimal parametrizations for quark mixing obtained in this work and for lepton mixing obtained by Pakvasa-Rodejohann-Weiler. Parametrization deviating from quark-lepton complementarity is also discussed.

  4. Analysis of parametric transformer with rectifier load

    SciTech Connect

    Ichinokura, O.; Jinzenji, T. ); Tajima, K. )

    1993-03-01

    This paper describes a push-pull parametric transformer constructed using a pair of orthogonal-cores. The operating characteristics of the parametric transformer with a rectifier load were analyzed based on SPICE simulations. The analysis results show good agreement with experiment. It was found that the input surge current of the full-wave rectifier circuit with a smoothing capacitor can be compensated by the parametric transformer. Use of the parametric transformer as a power stabilizer is anticipated owing to its various functions such as for voltage regulation and overload protection.

  5. Software for Managing Parametric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; McCann, Karen M.; DeVivo, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    The Information Power Grid Virtual Laboratory (ILab) is a Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) graphical-user-interface computer program that generates shell scripts to facilitate parametric studies performed on the Grid. (The Grid denotes a worldwide network of supercomputers used for scientific and engineering computations involving data sets too large to fit on desktop computers.) Heretofore, parametric studies on the Grid have been impeded by the need to create control language scripts and edit input data files painstaking tasks that are necessary for managing multiple jobs on multiple computers. ILab reflects an object-oriented approach to automation of these tasks: All data and operations are organized into packages in order to accelerate development and debugging. A container or document object in ILab, called an experiment, contains all the information (data and file paths) necessary to define a complex series of repeated, sequenced, and/or branching processes. For convenience and to enable reuse, this object is serialized to and from disk storage. At run time, the current ILab experiment is used to generate required input files and shell scripts, create directories, copy data files, and then both initiate and monitor the execution of all computational processes.

  6. Spheromak Formation and Sustainment Studies at the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment Using High-Speed Imaging and Magnetic Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Romero-Talamas, C A; Holcomb, C; Bellan, P M; Hill, D N

    2005-11-09

    A high-speed imaging system with shutter speeds as fast as 2 ns and double frame capability has been used to directly image the formation and evolution of the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX). Reproducible plasma features have been identified with this diagnostic and divided in three groups, according to the stage in the discharge at which they occur: (1) breakdown and ejection, (2) sustainment, and (3) decay. During the first stage, plasma descends into the flux conserver shortly after breakdown and a transient plasma column is formed. The column then rapidly bends and simultaneously becomes too dim to photograph a few microseconds after formation. We conjecture that this rapid bending precedes the transfer of toroidal to poloidal flux. During sustainment, a stable plasma column different from the transient one is observed. It has been possible to measure the column diameter and compare it to CORSICA, an MHD equilibrium reconstruction code which showed good agreement with the measurements. Elongation and velocity measurements were made of cathode patterns also seen during this stage, possibly caused by pressure gradients or E x B drifts. The patterns elongate in a toroidal-only direction which depends on the magnetic field polarity. During the decay stage the column diameter expands as the current ramps down, until it eventually dissolves into filaments. With the use of magnetic probes inserted in the gun region, a X-point which moved axially depending on current level and toroidal mode number, was observed in all the stages of the SSPX plasma discharge.

  7. Digital Image Correlation Strain Analysis for the Study of Wrinkle Formation on Facial Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Nagisa; Arikawa, Shuichi; Yoneyama, Satoru; Koike, Miyako; Murakami, Motoko; Tanno, Osamu

    Strain measurements around the eye during the blink are performed for four human subjects in order to investigate the relationship between the wrinkle formation with aging and the strains by daily motion. In addition to the strain measurement, the moisture content, the flexibility and the elasticity of the skin surface are measured for investigating the skin condition. For observing the wrinkle formed on the facial skin, the replicas of the skin surfaces are also collected. Results show that the relationship between the wrinkle and the strain distribution at the inner corner of the eye is different from that at the corner of the eye. The results indicate that different methods for the corner of the eye and the inner corner of the eye are required for avoiding the wrinkle formation.

  8. Real-time optical processor for synthetic aperture radar image formation

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, K.T.; Molley, P.A.; Dickey, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    An acousto-optic processor which forms synthetic aperture radar images in real-time is described. It employs a space and time integrating architecture to perform the required two dimensional matched filtering operation as a sequence of one dimensional processes. The matched filtering in range is performed on each radar return pulse using the acousto-optic device. The azimuthal matched filtering is performed using a fixed reference mask and a charge-coupled device operating in the time delay and integrate mode. This fixed mask architecture has been modified to include a background subtraction capability to reduce the effects of unwanted bias terms on image quality. The effectiveness of this technique will be analyzed for two different time bandwidth product cases. SAR imagery formed using the real-time optical processor is also presented.

  9. Wave-theory analysis of acousto-optic Bragg diffraction image formation.

    PubMed

    Mehrl, D J; Liu, Z C; Korpel, A

    1993-09-10

    We analyze anastigmatic Bragg diffraction imaging by use of an efficient numerical method that makes use of a plane-wave spectrum formalism applicable to weak acousto-optic diffraction involving threedimensional light and sound fields. Results from this wave-theory analysis are compared with previous results derived on the basis of ray theory, and are shown to be in good agreement, thus corroborating the validity of both techniques.

  10. Analysis of surface parametrizations for modern photometric stereo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecca, Roberto; Rodolà, Emanuele; Cremers, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Tridimensional shape recovery based on Photometric Stereo (PS) recently received a strong improvement due to new mathematical models based on partial differential irradiance equation ratios.1 This modern approach to PS faces more realistic physical effects among which light attenuation and radial light propagation from a point light source. Since the approximation of the surface is performed with single step method, accurate reconstruction is prevented by sensitiveness to noise. In this paper we analyse a well-known parametrization2 of the tridimensional surface extending it on any auxiliary convex projection functions. Experiments on synthetic data show preliminary results where more accurate reconstruction can be achieved using more suitable parametrization specially in case of noisy input images.

  11. Sensitivity enhancement in swept-source optical coherence tomography by parametric balanced detector and amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jiqiang; Wei, Xiaoming; Li, Bowen; Wang, Xie; Yu, Luoqin; Tan, Sisi; Jinata, Chandra; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a sensitivity enhancement method of the interference-based signal detection approach and applied it on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system through all-fiber optical parametric amplifier (FOPA) and parametric balanced detector (BD). The parametric BD was realized by combining the signal and phase conjugated idler band that was newly-generated through FOPA, and specifically by superimposing these two bands at a photodetector. The sensitivity enhancement by FOPA and parametric BD in SS-OCT were demonstrated experimentally. The results show that SS-OCT with FOPA and SS-OCT with parametric BD can provide more than 9 dB and 12 dB sensitivity improvement, respectively, when compared with the conventional SS-OCT in a spectral bandwidth spanning over 76 nm. To further verify and elaborate their sensitivity enhancement, a bio-sample imaging experiment was conducted on loach eyes by conventional SS-OCT setup, SS-OCT with FOPA and parametric BD at different illumination power levels. All these results proved that using FOPA and parametric BD could improve the sensitivity significantly in SS-OCT systems. PMID:27446655

  12. Surface of the comet 67P from PHILAE/CIVA images as clues to the formation of the comet nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, Francois; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Carter, John; Eng, Pascal; Gondet, Brigitte; Jorda, Laurent; Langevin, Yves; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Pilorget, Cédric

    2015-04-01

    The CIVA cameras onboard PHILAE provided the first ever in situ images of the surface of a comet (Bibring et al., this conf). The panorama acquired by CIVA at the landing site reveals a rough terrain dominated by agglomerates of consolidated materials similar to cm-sized pebbles. While the composition of these materials is unknown, their nature will be discussed in relation to both endogenic and exogenic processes that may sculpted the landscape of the landing site. These processes includes erosion (spatially non-uniform) by sublimation, redeposition of particles after ejection, fluidization and transport of cometary material on the surface, sintering effect, thermal fatigue, thermal stress, size segregation due to shaking, eolian erosion due to local outflow of cometary vapor and impact cratering at various scales. Recent advancements in planet formation theory suggest that the initial planetesimals (or cometestimals) may grow directly from the gravitational collapse of aerodynamically concentrated small particles, often referred to as "pebbles" (Johansen et al. 2007, Nature 448, 1022; Cuzzi et al. 2008, AJ 687, 1432). We will then discuss the possibility that the observed pebble pile structures are indicative of the formation process from which the initial nucleus formed, and how we can use this idea to learn about protoplanetary disks and the early processes involved in the Solar System formation.

  13. A New Display Format Relating Azimuth-Scanning Radar Data and All-Sky Images in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Wesley E.; Seker, Ilgin; Mathews, John D.; Aponte, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Here we correlate features in a sequence of all-sky images of 630 nm airglow with the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of electron densities in the F region above Arecibo. Pairs of 180 azimuth scans (using the Gregorian and line feeds) of the two-beam incoherent scatter radar (ISR) have been plotted in cone pictorials of the line-of-sight electron densities. The plots include projections of the 630 nm airglow onto the ground using the same spatial scaling as for the ISR data. Selected sequential images from the night of 16-17 June 2004 correlate ionospheric plasma features with scales comparable to the ISR density-cone diameter. The entire set of over 100 images spanning about eight hours is available as a movie. The correlation between the airglow and the electron densities is not unexpected, but the new display format shows the 3-D structures better than separate 2-D plots in latitude and longitude for the airglow and in height and time for the electron densities. Furthermore, the animations help separate the bands of airglow from obscuring clouds and the star field.

  14. Large-Format AlGaN PIN Photodiode Arrays for UV Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, Shahid; Franz, David

    2010-01-01

    A large-format hybridized AlGaN photodiode array with an adjustable bandwidth features stray-light control, ultralow dark-current noise to reduce cooling requirements, and much higher radiation tolerance than previous technologies. This technology reduces the size, mass, power, and cost of future ultraviolet (UV) detection instruments by using lightweight, low-voltage AlGaN detectors in a hybrid detector/multiplexer configuration. The solar-blind feature eliminates the need for additional visible light rejection and reduces the sensitivity of the system to stray light that can contaminate observations.

  15. Parametric analysis of ATT configurations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a Lockheed parametric analysis of the performance, environmental factors, and economics of an advanced commercial transport envisioned for operation in the post-1985 time period. The design parameters investigated include cruise speeds from Mach 0.85 to Mach 1.0, passenger capacities from 200 to 500, ranges of 2800 to 5500 nautical miles, and noise level criteria. NASA high performance configurations and alternate configurations are operated over domestic and international route structures. Indirect and direct costs and return on investment are determined for approximately 40 candidate aircraft configurations. The candidate configurations are input to an aircraft sizing and performance program which includes a subroutine for noise criteria. Comparisons are made between preferred configurations on the basis of maximum return on investment as a function of payload, range, and design cruise speed.

  16. Why preferring parametric forecasting to nonparametric methods?

    PubMed

    Jabot, Franck

    2015-05-01

    A recent series of papers by Charles T. Perretti and collaborators have shown that nonparametric forecasting methods can outperform parametric methods in noisy nonlinear systems. Such a situation can arise because of two main reasons: the instability of parametric inference procedures in chaotic systems which can lead to biased parameter estimates, and the discrepancy between the real system dynamics and the modeled one, a problem that Perretti and collaborators call "the true model myth". Should ecologists go on using the demanding parametric machinery when trying to forecast the dynamics of complex ecosystems? Or should they rely on the elegant nonparametric approach that appears so promising? It will be here argued that ecological forecasting based on parametric models presents two key comparative advantages over nonparametric approaches. First, the likelihood of parametric forecasting failure can be diagnosed thanks to simple Bayesian model checking procedures. Second, when parametric forecasting is diagnosed to be reliable, forecasting uncertainty can be estimated on virtual data generated with the fitted to data parametric model. In contrast, nonparametric techniques provide forecasts with unknown reliability. This argumentation is illustrated with the simple theta-logistic model that was previously used by Perretti and collaborators to make their point. It should convince ecologists to stick to standard parametric approaches, until methods have been developed to assess the reliability of nonparametric forecasting.

  17. Laser imaging of chemistry-flowfield interactions: Enhanced soot formation in time-varying diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, J.E.; Shaddix, C.R.; Smyth, K.C.

    1994-12-31

    Models of detailed flame chemistry and soot formation are based upon experimental results obtained in steady, laminar flames. For successful application of these descriptions to turbulent combustion, it is instructive to test predictions against measurements in time-varying flowfields. This paper reports the use of optical methods to examine soot production and oxidation processes in a co-flowing, axisymmetric CH{sub 4}/air diffusion flame in which the fuel flow rate is acoustically forced to create a time-varying flowfield. For a particular forcing condition in which tip clipping occurs (0.75 V loudspeaker excitation), elastic scattering of vertically polarized light from the soot particles increases by nearly an order of magnitude with respect to that observed for a steady flame with the same mean fuel flow rate. The visible flame luminosity and laser-induced fluorescence attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are also enhanced. Peak soot volume fractions, as measured by time-resolved laser extinction/tomography at 632.8 and 454.5 nm and calibrated laser-induced incandescence (LII), show a factor of 4--5 enhancement in this flickering flame. The LII method is found to track the soot volume fraction closely and to give better signal-to-noise than the extinction measurements in both the steady and time-varying flowfields. A Mie analysis suggests that most of the enhanced soot production results from the formation of larger particles in the time-varying flowfield.

  18. Electron microscopy of Staphylococcus epidermidis fibril and biofilm formation using image-enhancing ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Chisato; Kalita, Golap; Ogawa, Noriko; Moriguchi, Keiichi; Tanemura, Masaki; Kawashima, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Hiromitsu

    2015-02-01

    We established an optimized biofilm observation method using a hydrophilic ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]). In the present study, a biofilm was formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Using field emission (FE) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the colonization of assemblages formed by microbial cells was observed as a function of the cultivation time. FE-TEM analysis revealed that the fibril comprises three types of protein. In addition, the ultrastructure of each protein monomer was visualized. It was expected that the curly-structured protein plays an important role in extension during fibril formation. Compared to the conventional sample preparation method for electron microscopy, a fine structure was easily obtained by the present method using IL. This observation technique can provide valuable information to characterize the ultrastructure of the fibril and biofilm that has not been revealed till date. Furthermore, these findings of the molecular architecture of the fibril and the colonization behavior of microbial cells during biofilm formation are useful for the development of antibacterial drugs and microbial utilization.

  19. Electron microscopy of Staphylococcus epidermidis fibril and biofilm formation using image-enhancing ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Chisato; Kalita, Golap; Ogawa, Noriko; Moriguchi, Keiichi; Tanemura, Masaki; Kawashima, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Hiromitsu

    2015-02-01

    We established an optimized biofilm observation method using a hydrophilic ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]). In the present study, a biofilm was formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Using field emission (FE) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the colonization of assemblages formed by microbial cells was observed as a function of the cultivation time. FE-TEM analysis revealed that the fibril comprises three types of protein. In addition, the ultrastructure of each protein monomer was visualized. It was expected that the curly-structured protein plays an important role in extension during fibril formation. Compared to the conventional sample preparation method for electron microscopy, a fine structure was easily obtained by the present method using IL. This observation technique can provide valuable information to characterize the ultrastructure of the fibril and biofilm that has not been revealed till date. Furthermore, these findings of the molecular architecture of the fibril and the colonization behavior of microbial cells during biofilm formation are useful for the development of antibacterial drugs and microbial utilization. PMID:25542577

  20. A nanosensor for in vivo selenol imaging based on the formation of Au-Se bonds.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Cheng, Ranran; Liu, Xiaojun; Pan, Xiaohong; Kong, Fanpeng; Gao, Wen; Xu, Kehua; Tang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Selenol is a key metabolite of Na2SeO3 and plays an important role in many physiological and pathological processes. The real-time monitoring of selenol is of scientific interest for understanding the anti-cancer mechanism of Na2SeO3. Based on selenol's ability to specifically break AuS bonds and form more stable AuSe bonds on the surfaces of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), we developed a novel near-infrared fluorescent nanosensor (Cy5.5-peptide-AuNPs) for detecting selenol. The nanosensor exhibited rapid response to selenol with high selectivity and sensitivity, and it was successfully used to image changes in the selenol level in HepG2 cells during Na2SeO3-induced apoptosis. Moreover, in vivo fluorescence imaging of selenol was obtained from H22 tumor-bearing mice injected with both the nanosensor and sodium selenite. The results showed that the tumor cell apoptosis induced by Na2SeO3 is correlated with high-level of selenol under hypoxic conditions. We believe that this nanosensor could serve as a powerful tool for monitoring selenol and exploring the physiological function of selenol in a variety of physiological and pathological contexts and that the probe-designed strategy will provide a new platform for research on relevant selenium chemistry. PMID:27043769

  1. Science with ODI: An overview of ongoing and upcoming research with the WIYN Observatory's new large format imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric; Harbeck, D. R.; Consortium, WIYN

    2014-01-01

    The WIYN Observatory's One Degree Imager (ODI) project has completed the initial construction phase by populating a partial focal plane, referred to as pODI. This first milestone of the larger project provides a core imaging area of 24 arcmin x 24 arcmin, along with four 8 arcmin x 8 arcmin regions offset from the core area. The 0.11 arcsec pixels provide good sampling for WIYN's often excellent seeing. Astronomers at each of WIYN's university partners, Wisconsin, Indiana, and Yale, as well as observers at other institutions using national access time provided by NOAO, have observed with pODI in support of a variety of investigations. The subjects of the research projects include very nearby targets, such as a main belt asteroid that exhibits a tail nearly a quarter of a degree long (Rajagopal et al.). Farther away, Friel et al. are studying the effects of rotation and tidal fields on Galactic globular clusters. Examples of extragalactic projects include a wide-field, multi-color imaging survey of the globular cluster populations of giant spiral, S0, and elliptical galaxies, with the aim of investigating the galaxies' formation and evolution (Rhode et al.) and the search for low surface brightness optical counterparts to HI sources revealed by the ALFALFA survey (Salzer et al.). Two complementary pipelines, one written in IRAF and the other in python, are processing the pODI data within the Pipeline, Portal, and Archive (PPA) structure developed by Indiana University's Pervasive Technology Institute. Users are able to access the data entirely within the portal interface, or they can download the processed images to a local machine. The pODI instrument is expected to continue operations through spring 2014, at which time it will be removed for an upgrade to the next stage of the instrument. It will return to the telescope approximately 6 months later with a 48 arcmin x 48 arcmin filled field of view.

  2. Non-parametric estimation of morphological lopsidedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Nadine; van der Hulst, Thijs; Serra, Paolo; Oosterloo, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetries in the neutral hydrogen gas distribution and kinematics of galaxies are thought to be indicators for both gas accretion and gas removal processes. These are of fundamental importance for galaxy formation and evolution. Upcoming large blind H I surveys will provide tens of thousands of galaxies for a study of these asymmetries in a proper statistical way. Due to the large number of expected sources and the limited resolution of the majority of objects, detailed modelling is not feasible for most detections. We need fast, automatic and sensitive methods to classify these objects in an objective way. Existing non-parametric methods suffer from effects like the dependence on signal to noise, resolution and inclination. Here we show how to correctly take these effects into account and show ways to estimate the precision of the methods. We will use existing and modelled data to give an outlook on the performance expected for galaxies observed in the various sky surveys planned for e.g. WSRT/APERTIF and ASKAP.

  3. Pattern formation and control in polymeric systems: From Minkowski measures to in situ AFM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Thin liquid polymer films are not only of great technical importance, they also exhibit a variety of dynamical instabilities. Some of them may be desired, some rather not. To analyze and finally control pattern formation, modern thin film theories are as vital as techniques to characterize the morphologies and structures in and on the films. Examples for the latter are atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as scattering techniques. The talk will introduce into the practical applications of Minkowski measures to characterize patterns and explain what thin film properties (e.g. capillary number, solid/liquid boundary condition, glass transition temperature, chain mobility) can further be extracted including new technical possibilities by AFM and scattering techniques.

  4. Intercellular interactions in early biofilm formation probed with image analysis and laser trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Vernita; Conrad, Jacinta; Gibiansky, Maxsim; Jin, Fan; Haque, Nyrene; Motto, Dominick; Mathewson, Margie; Spalding, Gabe; Parsek, Matthew; Shrout, Joshua; Wong, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    Inter-bacterial interactions are essential to such fundamental phenomena as motility and biofilm development. Many of these interactions are mediated by quorum sensing to coordinate gene expression among groups of cells. Other influences include contact with a common surface and proximity of neighboring cells. All such mechanisms depend strongly on the spatial structure of the system. We investigate the early stages of biofilm formation. These cells show striking cooperative behavior: neighbor proximity and number correlate with the post-division detachment likelihood of daughter cells. To better study the effects of such spatial structure, we develop a platform that uses laser trapping to control bacterial patterning. We place bacteria on a surface with micron-lengthscale precision and reproducibility. This platform allows systematic study of the effects of neighbor number, density, and orientation on intercellular interactions.

  5. Application of Imaging-Based Assays in Microplate Formats for High-Content Screening.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Adam I; Martin, Scott E; Hasson, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    The use of multiparametric microscopy-based screens with automated analysis has enabled the large-scale study of biological phenomena that are currently not measurable by any other method. Collectively referred to as high-content screening (HCS), or high-content analysis (HCA), these methods rely on an expanding array of imaging hardware and software automation. Coupled with an ever-growing amount of diverse chemical matter and functional genomic tools, HCS has helped open the door to a new frontier of understanding cell biology through phenotype-driven screening. With the ability to interrogate biology on a cell-by-cell basis in highly parallel microplate-based platforms, the utility of HCS continues to grow as advancements are made in acquisition speed, model system complexity, data management, and analysis systems. This chapter uses an example of screening for genetic factors regulating mitochondrial quality control to exemplify the practical considerations in developing and executing high-content campaigns. PMID:27317002

  6. Application of Imaging-Based Assays in Microplate Formats for High-Content Screening.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Adam I; Martin, Scott E; Hasson, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    The use of multiparametric microscopy-based screens with automated analysis has enabled the large-scale study of biological phenomena that are currently not measurable by any other method. Collectively referred to as high-content screening (HCS), or high-content analysis (HCA), these methods rely on an expanding array of imaging hardware and software automation. Coupled with an ever-growing amount of diverse chemical matter and functional genomic tools, HCS has helped open the door to a new frontier of understanding cell biology through phenotype-driven screening. With the ability to interrogate biology on a cell-by-cell basis in highly parallel microplate-based platforms, the utility of HCS continues to grow as advancements are made in acquisition speed, model system complexity, data management, and analysis systems. This chapter uses an example of screening for genetic factors regulating mitochondrial quality control to exemplify the practical considerations in developing and executing high-content campaigns.

  7. A Study of Planetary System Formation and Evolution Using a Dual Channel Adaptive Optics Imaging Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Daniel E.

    2003-01-01

    The award I received from the Graduate Student Research Program in 2001, and the renewal award in 2002, supported the gathering and processing of my thesis data, and the presentation of my scientific results at astronomy conferences. Ultimately, this led to a successful defense of my PhD thesis. In the thesis work, I built, calibrated, and observed with the first dual imaging polarimeter ever used in series with a high order adaptive optics system and on an 8 meter class telescope. The instrument was arguably the most sensitive instrument for the high-contrast detection of the scattered light from circumstellar disks. The success of the instrument has provided the impetus for the construction of several similar simultaneous adaptive optics imaging polarimeters. In the course of the observations, a number of circumstellar disks were resolved for the first time in their scattered light, such as the disk around the classical T-tauri stars, LkCa 15 and LkHa 262. A sample of 24 young, nearby, solar-analog stars were observed with the instrument in search of the scattered light signature from debris disks around these stars. Although none of the stars revealed any obvious scattered light signatures, a meaningful limit was placed on the dust population around these stars. Also, a brown dwarf binary system was found to be a companion to one of the solar-analog stars observed, HD130948. A careful monitoring of the orbit of the binary brown dwarf will result in a dynamical mass determination of the objects, providing a valuable calibration of the physical models explaining brown dwarf evolution.

  8. Image encryption using P-Fibonacci transform and decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yicong; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos; Chen, C. L. Philip

    2012-03-01

    Image encryption is an effective method to protect images or videos by transferring them into unrecognizable formats for different security purposes. To improve the security level of bit-plane decomposition based encryption approaches, this paper introduces a new image encryption algorithm by using a combination of parametric bit-plane decomposition along with bit-plane shuffling and resizing, pixel scrambling and data mapping. The algorithm utilizes the Fibonacci P-code for image bit-plane decomposition and the 2D P-Fibonacci transform for image encryption because they are parameter dependent. Any new or existing method can be used for shuffling the order of the bit-planes. Simulation analysis and comparisons are provided to demonstrate the algorithm's performance for image encryption. Security analysis shows the algorithm's ability against several common attacks. The algorithm can be used to encrypt images, biometrics and videos.

  9. Atomic force microscopy imaging reveals the formation of ASIC/ENaC cross-clade ion channels.

    PubMed

    Jeggle, Pia; Smith, Ewan St J; Stewart, Andrew P; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Edwardson, J Michael

    2015-08-14

    ASIC and ENaC are co-expressed in various cell types, and there is evidence for a close association between them. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits are able to form cross-clade hybrid ion channels. ASIC1a and ENaC could be co-isolated from detergent extracts of tsA 201 cells co-expressing the two subunits. Isolated proteins were incubated with antibodies against ENaC and Fab fragments against ASIC1a. AFM imaging revealed proteins that were decorated by both an antibody and a Fab fragment with an angle of ∼120° between them, indicating the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers. PMID:26032502

  10. Formation of mesoscopic metallic filaments in manganite thin films imaged by microwave impedance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Lai, Keji; Yang, Yongliang; Ma, Yue; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Nakamura, Masao; Sheng, Zhigao; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshi

    2012-02-01

    We study the ferromagnetic metallic domains from the charge-order insulating background at mesoscopic length scale in a Pr0.55Ca0.75Sr0.25MnO3 thin film using a variable temperature microwave impedance microscope (MIM). The metallic state in this compound can be easily induced at a moderate magnetic field as low as 2 T observed by both the transport and MIM. The temperature dependent transport under 1.2 T shows a large hysteresis loop. MIM allows us to observe the formation and melting of metallic domains at different temperatures during the cooling and warming processes. At higher temperatures, the metallic domains first emerge in small isolated filaments along certain crystal axes of the LSAT(110) substrate, suggesting that the local strain plays an important role. Surprisingly, small insulating islands remain in the metallic ground state and persist up to very high magnetic fields, indicating strong pining sites. Lastly, the sizes of the insulating islands at the ground state increase when the film is field cooled at lower speeds, suggesting s glassy order in this compound.

  11. Characteristics of stereo reproduction with parametric loudspeakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Shigeaki; Toba, Masayoshi; Tsujita, Norihisa

    2012-05-01

    A parametric loudspeaker utilizes nonlinearity of a medium and is known as a super-directivity loudspeaker. The parametric loudspeaker is one of the prominent applications of nonlinear ultrasonics. So far, the applications have been limited monaural reproduction sound system for public address in museum, station and street etc. In this paper, we discussed characteristics of stereo reproduction with two parametric loudspeakers by comparing with those with two ordinary dynamic loudspeakers. In subjective tests, three typical listening positions were selected to investigate the possibility of correct sound localization in a wide listening area. The binaural information was ILD (Interaural Level Difference) or ITD (Interaural Time Delay). The parametric loudspeaker was an equilateral hexagon. The inner and outer diameters were 99 and 112 mm, respectively. Signals were 500 Hz, 1 kHz, 2 kHz and 4 kHz pure tones and pink noise. Three young males listened to test signals 10 times in each listening condition. Subjective test results showed that listeners at the three typical listening positions perceived correct sound localization of all signals using the parametric loudspeakers. It was almost similar to those using the ordinary dynamic loudspeakers, however, except for the case of sinusoidal waves with ITD. It was determined the parametric loudspeaker could exclude the contradiction between the binaural information ILD and ITD that occurred in stereo reproduction with ordinary dynamic loudspeakers because the super directivity of parametric loudspeaker suppressed the cross talk components.

  12. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-06-07

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  13. Protein-polyelectrolyte interactions: Monitoring particle formation and growth by nanoparticle tracking analysis and flow imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sediq, Ahmad S; Nejadnik, M Reza; El Bialy, Inas; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Jiskoot, Wim

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the formation and growth kinetics of complexes of proteins and oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. Equal volumes of IgG and dextran sulfate (DS) solutions, 0.01 mg/ml each in 10mM phosphate, pH 6.2, were mixed. At different time points, samples were taken and analyzed by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), Micro-Flow Imaging (MFI) and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). SEC showed a huge drop in monomer content (approximately 85%) already 2 min after mixing, while a very high nanoparticle (size up to 500 nm) concentration (ca. 9 × 10(8)/ml) was detected by NTA. The nanoparticle concentration gradually decreased over time, while the average particle size increased. After a lag time of about 1.5h, a steady increase in microparticles was measured by MFI. The microparticle concentration kept increasing up to about 1.5 × 10(6)/ml until it started to slightly decrease after 10h. The average size of the microparticles remained in the low-μm range (1-2 μm) with a slight increase and broadening of the size distribution in time. The experimental data could be fitted with Smoluchowski's perikinetic coagulation model, which was validated by studying particle growth kinetics in IgG:DS mixtures of different concentrations. In conclusion, the combination of NTA and MFI provided novel insight into the kinetics and mechanism of protein-polyelectrolyte complex formation. PMID:25936855

  14. Atomic force microscopy imaging reveals the formation of ASIC/ENaC cross-clade ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Jeggle, Pia; Smith, Ewan St. J.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2015-08-14

    ASIC and ENaC are co-expressed in various cell types, and there is evidence for a close association between them. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits are able to form cross-clade hybrid ion channels. ASIC1a and ENaC could be co-isolated from detergent extracts of tsA 201 cells co-expressing the two subunits. Isolated proteins were incubated with antibodies against ENaC and Fab fragments against ASIC1a. AFM imaging revealed proteins that were decorated by both an antibody and a Fab fragment with an angle of ∼120° between them, indicating the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers. - Highlights: • There is evidence for a close association between ASIC and ENaC. • We used AFM to test whether ASIC1a and ENaC subunits form cross-clade ion channels. • Isolated proteins were incubated with subunit-specific antibodies and Fab fragments. • Some proteins were doubly decorated at ∼120° by an antibody and a Fab fragment. • Our results indicate the formation of ASIC1a/ENaC heterotrimers.

  15. Segregation in horizontal rotating cylinders: radial and axial band formation, band traveling and merging studied by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thoa; Sederman, Andrew; Gladden, Lynn

    2007-03-01

    Radial and axial segregations are investigated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). For the first time, full 3D structures and real-time 2D MRI movies showing the progress of segregation over many hours are reported. Data were acquired with high temporal (74 ms) and in-plane spatial resolutions (1 mm x 1 mm), giving new insights into the underlying mechanisms. The mixture composition can be quantified throughout segregation. The cylinder to be considered is 48 mm in diameter, up to 50 cm long and filled to 50 -- 82% by volume with millet and poppy seeds at a 3:1 ratio. In particular, the effects of filling fraction, cylinder length and rotational speed on segregation are addressed. Radial segregation is found to be driven by both core diffusion and the free surface. The former is dominant in the cylindrical core buried under the avalanche layer in systems over 75% full while the latter is significant at lower filling levels. Axial segregation is characterized by band formation, traveling, and merging. In all cases studied, the formation of poppy-rich bands is observed, after which individual bands start to travel at ˜3 μm s-1 until they are within ˜3 cm of a stationary band. Adjacent bands then merge into a single, enlarged poppy band as millet seeds move out of the merging region.

  16. Investigating flow properties of partially cemented fractures in Travis Peak Formation using image-based pore-scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokan-Lawal, Adenike; Prodanović, Maša.; Eichhubl, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Natural fractures can provide preferred flow pathways in otherwise low-permeability reservoirs. In deep subsurface reservoirs including tight oil and gas reservoirs, as well as in hydrothermal systems, fractures are frequently lined or completely filled with mineral cement that reduces or occludes fracture porosity and permeability. Fracture cement linings potentially reduce flow connectivity between the fracture and host rock and increase fracture wall roughness, which constricts flow. We combined image-based fracture space characterization, mercury injection capillary pressure and permeability experiments, and numerical simulations to evaluate the influence of fracture-lining cement on single-phase and multiphase flows along a natural fracture from the Travis Peak Formation, a tight gas reservoir sandstone in East Texas. Using X-ray computed microtomographic image analysis, we characterized fracture geometry and the connectivity and geometric tortuosity of the fracture pore space. Combining level set method-based progressive quasistatic and lattice Boltzmann simulations, we assessed the capillary-dominated displacement properties and the (relative) permeability of a cement-lined fracture. Published empirical correlations between aperture and permeability for barren fractures provide permeability estimates that vary among each other, and differ from our results, vary by several orders of magnitude. Compared to barren fractures, cement increases the geometric tortuosity, aperture variation of the pore space, and capillary pressure while reducing the single-phase permeability by up to 2 orders of magnitude. For multiphase displacement, relative permeability and fluid entrapment geometry resemble those of porous media and differ from those characteristic of barren fractures.

  17. 3-D laser images of splash-form tektites and their use in aerodynamic numerical simulations of tektite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, C.; Butler, S.; Fry, C.; McCausland, P. J. A.; Herd, R. K.; Sharomi, O.; Spiteri, R. J.; Ralchenko, M.

    2014-05-01

    Ten splash-form tektites from the Australasian strewn field, with masses ranging from 21.20 to 175.00 g and exhibiting a variety of shapes (teardrop, ellipsoid, dumbbell, disk), have been imaged using a high-resolution laser digitizer. Despite challenges due to the samples' rounded shapes and pitted surfaces, the images were combined to create 3-D tektite models, which captured surface features with a high fidelity (≈30 voxel mm-2) and from which volume could be measured noninvasively. The laser-derived density for the tektites averaged 2.41 ± 0.11 g cm-3. Corresponding densities obtained via the Archimedean bead method averaged 2.36 ± 0.05 g cm-3. In addition to their curational value, the 3-D models can be used to calculate the tektites' moments of inertia and rotation periods while in flight, as a probe of their formation environment. Typical tektite rotation periods are estimated to be on the order of 1 s. Numerical simulations of air flow around the models at Reynolds numbers ranging from 1 to 106 suggest that the relative velocity of the tektites with respect to the air must have been <10 m s-1 during viscous deformation. This low relative velocity is consistent with tektite material being carried along by expanding gases in the early time following the impact.

  18. Multiparametric Functional MRI: Non-Invasive Imaging of Inflammation and Edema Formation after Kidney Transplantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gutberlet, Marcel; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Jang, Mi-Sun; Thorenz, Anja; Chen, Rongjun; Hertel, Barbara; Barrmeyer, Amelie; Schmidbauer, Martina; Meier, Martin; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle; Khalifa, Abedalrazag; Hartung, Dagmar; Haller, Hermann; Wacker, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation (ktx) in mice is used to learn about rejection and to develop new treatment strategies. Past studies have mainly been based on histological or molecular biological methods. Imaging techniques to monitor allograft pathology have rarely been used. Methods Here we investigated mice after isogenic and allogenic ktx over time with functional MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and mapping of T2-relaxation time (T2-mapping) to assess graft inflammation and edema formation. To characterize graft pathology, we used PAS-staining, counted CD3-positive T-lymphocytes, analyzed leukocytes by means flow cytometry. Results DWI revealed progressive restriction of diffusion of water molecules in allogenic kidney grafts. This was paralleled by enhanced infiltration of the kidney by inflammatory cells. Changes in tissue diffusion were not seen following isogenic ktx. T2-times in renal cortex were increased after both isogenic and allogenic transplantation, consistent with tissue edema due to ischemic injury following prolonged cold ischemia time of 60 minutes. Lack of T2 increase in the inner stripe of the inner medulla in allogenic kidney grafts matched loss of tubular autofluorescence and may result from rejection-driven reductions in tubular water content due to tubular dysfunction and renal functional impairment. Conclusions Functional MRI is a valuable non-invasive technique for monitoring inflammation, tissue edema and tubular function. It permits on to differentiate between acute rejection and ischemic renal injury in a mouse model of ktx. PMID:27632553

  19. Applying Chemical Imaging Analysis to Improve Our Understanding of Cold Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, A.; Knopf, D. A.; Wang, B.; Alpert, P. A.; Roedel, T.; Gilles, M. K.; Moffet, R.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    The impact that atmospheric ice nucleation has on the global radiation budget is one of the least understood problems in atmospheric sciences. This is in part due to the incomplete understanding of various ice nucleation pathways that lead to ice crystal formation from pre-existing aerosol particles. Studies investigating the ice nucleation propensity of laboratory generated particles indicate that individual particle types are highly selective in their ice nucleating efficiency. This description of heterogeneous ice nucleation would present a challenge when applying to the atmosphere which contains a complex mixture of particles. Here, we employ a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical methods to relate particle physical and chemical properties with observed water uptake and ice nucleation. Field-collected particles from urban environments impacted by anthropogenic and marine emissions and aging processes are investigated. Single particle characterization is provided by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). A particle-on-substrate approach coupled to a vapor controlled cooling-stage and a microscope system is applied to determine the onsets of water uptake and ice nucleation including immersion freezing and deposition ice nucleation as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. We observe for urban aerosol particles that for T > 230 K the oxidation level affects initial water uptake and that subsequent immersion freezing depends on particle mixing state, e.g. by the presence of insoluble particles. For T < 230 K the particles initiate deposition ice nucleation well below the homogeneous freezing limit. Particles collected throughout one day for similar meteorological conditions show very similar

  20. Next-Generation Microshutter Arrays for Large-Format Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, Samuel; Kutyrev, Alexander; Brown, Ari; Li, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A next-generation microshutter array, LArge Microshutter Array (LAMA), was developed as a multi-object field selector. LAMA consists of small-scaled microshutter arrays that can be combined to form large-scale microshutter array mosaics. Microshutter actuation is accomplished via electrostatic attraction between the shutter and a counter electrode, and 2D addressing can be accomplished by applying an electrostatic potential between a row of shutters and a column, orthogonal to the row, of counter electrodes. Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology is used to fabricate the microshutter arrays. The main feature of the microshutter device is to use a set of standard surface micromachining processes for device fabrication. Electrostatic actuation is used to eliminate the need for macromechanical magnet actuating components. A simplified electrostatic actuation with no macro components (e.g. moving magnets) required for actuation and latching of the shutters will make the microshutter arrays robust and less prone to mechanical failure. Smaller-size individual arrays will help to increase the yield and thus reduce the cost and improve robustness of the fabrication process. Reducing the size of the individual shutter array to about one square inch and building the large-scale mosaics by tiling these smaller-size arrays would further help to reduce the cost of the device due to the higher yield of smaller devices. The LAMA development is based on prior experience acquired while developing microshutter arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), but it will have different features. The LAMA modular design permits large-format mosaicking to cover a field of view at least 50 times larger than JWST MSA. The LAMA electrostatic, instead of magnetic, actuation enables operation cycles at least 100 times faster and a mass significantly smaller compared to JWST MSA. Also, standard surface micromachining technology will simplify the fabrication process, increasing

  1. Self-seeding ring optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Arlee V.; Armstrong, Darrell J.

    2005-12-27

    An optical parametric oscillator apparatus utilizing self-seeding with an external nanosecond-duration pump source to generate a seed pulse resulting in increased conversion efficiency. An optical parametric oscillator with a ring configuration are combined with a pump that injection seeds the optical parametric oscillator with a nanosecond duration, mJ pulse in the reverse direction as the main pulse. A retroreflecting means outside the cavity injects the seed pulse back into the cavity in the direction of the main pulse to seed the main pulse, resulting in higher conversion efficiency.

  2. Optimal Parametric Feedback Excitation of Nonlinear Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, David J.

    2016-01-01

    An optimal parametric feedback excitation principle is sought, found, and investigated. The principle is shown to provide an adaptive resonance condition that enables unprecedentedly robust movement generation in a large class of oscillatory dynamical systems. Experimental demonstration of the theory is provided by a nonlinear electronic circuit that realizes self-adaptive parametric excitation without model information, signal processing, and control computation. The observed behavior dramatically differs from the one achievable using classical parametric modulation, which is fundamentally limited by uncertainties in model information and nonlinear effects inevitably present in real world applications.

  3. Optimal Parametric Feedback Excitation of Nonlinear Oscillators.

    PubMed

    Braun, David J

    2016-01-29

    An optimal parametric feedback excitation principle is sought, found, and investigated. The principle is shown to provide an adaptive resonance condition that enables unprecedentedly robust movement generation in a large class of oscillatory dynamical systems. Experimental demonstration of the theory is provided by a nonlinear electronic circuit that realizes self-adaptive parametric excitation without model information, signal processing, and control computation. The observed behavior dramatically differs from the one achievable using classical parametric modulation, which is fundamentally limited by uncertainties in model information and nonlinear effects inevitably present in real world applications. PMID:26871336

  4. Target recognition using HRR profile-based incoherent SAR (InSAR) image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoughue, Nicholas A.; Kuklinski, Walter S.; Arabadjis, Constantine

    2008-04-01

    Feature-aided target verification is a challenging field of research, with the potential to yield significant increases in the confidence of re-established target tracks after kinematic confusion events. Using appropriate control algorithms airborne multi-mode radars can acquire a library of HRR (High Range Resolution) profiles for targets as they are tracked. When a kinematic confusion event occurs, such as a vehicle dropping below MDV (Minimum Detectable Velocity) for some period of time, or two target tracks crossing, it is necessary to utilize feature-aided tracking methods to correctly associate post-confusion tracks with pre-confusion tracks. Many current HRR profile target recognition methods focus on statistical characteristics of either individual profiles or sets of profiles taken over limited viewing angles. These methods have not proven to be very effective when the pre- and post- confusion libraries do not overlap in azimuth angle. To address this issue we propose a new approach to target recognition from HRR profiles. We present an algorithm that generates 2-D imagery of targets from the pre- and post-confusion libraries. These images are subsequently used as the input to a target recognition/classifier process. Since, center-aligned HRR Profiles, while ideal for processing, are not easily computed in field systems, as they require the airborne platform's center of rotation to line up with the geometric center of the moving target (this is impossible when multiple targets are being tracked), our algorithm is designed to work with HRR profiles that are aligned to the leading edge (the first detection above a threshold, commonly referred to as Edge-Aligned HRR profiles). Our simulated results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method for classifying target vehicles based on simulations using both overlapping and non-overlapping HRR profile sets. The algorithm was tested on several test cases using an input set of .28 m resolution XPATCH generated HRR

  5. Airy beam optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aadhi, A.; Chaitanya, N. Apurv; Jabir, M. V.; Vaity, Pravin; Singh, R. P.; Samanta, G. K.

    2016-05-01

    Airy beam, a non-diffracting waveform, has peculiar properties of self-healing and self-acceleration. Due to such unique properties, the Airy beam finds many applications including curved plasma wave-guiding, micro-particle manipulation, optically mediated particle clearing, long distance communication, and nonlinear frequency conversion. However, many of these applications including laser machining of curved structures, generation of curved plasma channels, guiding of electric discharges in a curved path, study of nonlinear propagation dynamics, and nonlinear interaction demand Airy beam with high power, energy, and wavelength tunability. Till date, none of the Airy beam sources have all these features in a single device. Here, we report a new class of coherent sources based on cubic phase modulation of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), producing high-power, continuous-wave (cw), tunable radiation in 2-D Airy intensity profile existing over a length >2 m. Based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal pumped at 1064 nm, the Airy beam OPO produces output power more than 8 W, and wavelength tunability across 1.51–1.97 μm. This demonstration gives new direction for the development of sources of arbitrary structured beams at any wavelength, power, and energy in all time scales (cw to femtosecond).

  6. Airy beam optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Aadhi, A; Chaitanya, N Apurv; Jabir, M V; Vaity, Pravin; Singh, R P; Samanta, G K

    2016-01-01

    Airy beam, a non-diffracting waveform, has peculiar properties of self-healing and self-acceleration. Due to such unique properties, the Airy beam finds many applications including curved plasma wave-guiding, micro-particle manipulation, optically mediated particle clearing, long distance communication, and nonlinear frequency conversion. However, many of these applications including laser machining of curved structures, generation of curved plasma channels, guiding of electric discharges in a curved path, study of nonlinear propagation dynamics, and nonlinear interaction demand Airy beam with high power, energy, and wavelength tunability. Till date, none of the Airy beam sources have all these features in a single device. Here, we report a new class of coherent sources based on cubic phase modulation of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), producing high-power, continuous-wave (cw), tunable radiation in 2-D Airy intensity profile existing over a length >2 m. Based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal pumped at 1064 nm, the Airy beam OPO produces output power more than 8 W, and wavelength tunability across 1.51-1.97 μm. This demonstration gives new direction for the development of sources of arbitrary structured beams at any wavelength, power, and energy in all time scales (cw to femtosecond). PMID:27143582

  7. Airy beam optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Aadhi, A; Chaitanya, N Apurv; Jabir, M V; Vaity, Pravin; Singh, R P; Samanta, G K

    2016-05-04

    Airy beam, a non-diffracting waveform, has peculiar properties of self-healing and self-acceleration. Due to such unique properties, the Airy beam finds many applications including curved plasma wave-guiding, micro-particle manipulation, optically mediated particle clearing, long distance communication, and nonlinear frequency conversion. However, many of these applications including laser machining of curved structures, generation of curved plasma channels, guiding of electric discharges in a curved path, study of nonlinear propagation dynamics, and nonlinear interaction demand Airy beam with high power, energy, and wavelength tunability. Till date, none of the Airy beam sources have all these features in a single device. Here, we report a new class of coherent sources based on cubic phase modulation of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), producing high-power, continuous-wave (cw), tunable radiation in 2-D Airy intensity profile existing over a length >2 m. Based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal pumped at 1064 nm, the Airy beam OPO produces output power more than 8 W, and wavelength tunability across 1.51-1.97 μm. This demonstration gives new direction for the development of sources of arbitrary structured beams at any wavelength, power, and energy in all time scales (cw to femtosecond).

  8. Airy beam optical parametric oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Aadhi, A.; Chaitanya, N. Apurv; Jabir, M. V.; Vaity, Pravin; Singh, R. P.; Samanta, G. K.

    2016-01-01

    Airy beam, a non-diffracting waveform, has peculiar properties of self-healing and self-acceleration. Due to such unique properties, the Airy beam finds many applications including curved plasma wave-guiding, micro-particle manipulation, optically mediated particle clearing, long distance communication, and nonlinear frequency conversion. However, many of these applications including laser machining of curved structures, generation of curved plasma channels, guiding of electric discharges in a curved path, study of nonlinear propagation dynamics, and nonlinear interaction demand Airy beam with high power, energy, and wavelength tunability. Till date, none of the Airy beam sources have all these features in a single device. Here, we report a new class of coherent sources based on cubic phase modulation of a singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), producing high-power, continuous-wave (cw), tunable radiation in 2-D Airy intensity profile existing over a length >2 m. Based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal pumped at 1064 nm, the Airy beam OPO produces output power more than 8 W, and wavelength tunability across 1.51–1.97 μm. This demonstration gives new direction for the development of sources of arbitrary structured beams at any wavelength, power, and energy in all time scales (cw to femtosecond). PMID:27143582

  9. Pre-Launch Algorithm and Data Format for the Level 1 Calibration Products for the EOS AM-1 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, Bruce W.; Godden, Gerald D.; Xiong, Xiao-Xiong; Knight, Edward J.; Qiu, Shi-Yue; Montgomery, Harry; Hopkins, M. M.; Khayat, Mohammad G.; Hao, Zhi-Dong; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) radiometric calibration product is described for the thermal emissive and the reflective solar bands. Specific sensor design characteristics are identified to assist in understanding how the calibration algorithm software product is designed. The reflected solar band software products of radiance and reflectance factor both are described. The product file format is summarized and the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) Homepage location for the current file format is provided.

  10. Multi-Parametric Neuroimaging Reproducibility: A 3T Resource Study

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Bennett A.; Huang, Alan J.; Gifford, Aliya; Vikram, Deepti S.; Lim, Issel Anne L.; Farrell, Jonathan A.D.; Bogovic, John A.; Hua, Jun; Chen, Min; Jarso, Samson; Smith, Seth A.; Joel, Suresh; Mori, Susumu; Pekar, James J.; Barker, Peter B.; Prince, Jerry L.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Modern MRI image processing methods have yielded quantitative, morphometric, functional, and structural assessments of the human brain. These analyses typically exploit carefully optimized protocols for specific imaging targets. Algorithm investigators have several excellent public data resources to use to test, develop, and optimize their methods. Recently, there has been an increasing focus on combining MRI protocols in multi-parametric studies. Notably, these have included innovative approaches for fusing connectivity inferences with functional and/or anatomical characterizations. Yet, validation of the reproducibility of these interesting and novel methods has been severely hampered by the limited availability of appropriate multi-parametric data. We present an imaging protocol optimized to include state-of-the-art assessment of brain function, structure, micro-architecture, and quantitative parameters within a clinically feasible 60 minute protocol on a 3T MRI scanner. We present scan-rescan reproducibility of these imaging contrasts based on 21 healthy volunteers (11 M/10 F, 22–61 y/o). The cortical gray matter, cortical white matter, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid, thalamus, putamen, caudate, cerebellar gray matter, cerebellar white matter, and brainstem were identified with mean volume-wise reproducibility of 3.5%. We tabulate the mean intensity, variability and reproducibility of each contrast in a region of interest approach, which is essential for prospective study planning and retrospective power analysis considerations. Anatomy was highly consistent on structural acquisition (~1–5% variability), while variation on diffusion and several other quantitative scans was higher (~<10%). Some sequences are particularly variable in specific structures (ASL exhibited variation of 28% in the cerebral white matter) or in thin structures (quantitative T2 varied by up to 73% in the caudate) due, in large part, to variability in automated ROI placement. The

  11. A uniform parametrization of moment tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, Walter; Tape, Carl

    2015-09-01

    A moment tensor is a 3 × 3 symmetric matrix that expresses an earthquake source. We construct a parametrization of the 5-D space of all moment tensors of unit norm. The coordinates associated with the parametrization are closely related to moment tensor orientations and source types. The parametrization is uniform, in the sense that equal volumes in the coordinate domain of the parametrization correspond to equal volumes of moment tensors. Uniformly distributed points in the coordinate domain therefore give uniformly distributed moment tensors. A cartesian grid in the coordinate domain can be used to search efficiently over moment tensors. We find that uniformly distributed moment tensors have uniformly distributed orientations (eigenframes), but that their source types (eigenvalue triples) are distributed so as to favour double couples.

  12. Parametrically disciplined operation of a vibratory gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Peay, Chris S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Parametrically disciplined operation of a symmetric nearly degenerate mode vibratory gyroscope is disclosed. A parametrically-disciplined inertial wave gyroscope having a natural oscillation frequency in the neighborhood of a sub-harmonic of an external stable clock reference is produced by driving an electrostatic bias electrode at approximately twice this sub-harmonic frequency to achieve disciplined frequency and phase operation of the resonator. A nearly symmetric parametrically-disciplined inertial wave gyroscope that can oscillate in any transverse direction and has more than one bias electrostatic electrode that can be independently driven at twice its oscillation frequency at an amplitude and phase that disciplines its damping to zero in any vibration direction. In addition, operation of a parametrically-disciplined inertial wave gyroscope is taught in which the precession rate of the driven vibration pattern is digitally disciplined to a prescribed non-zero reference value.

  13. Parametric models for samples of random functions

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriu, M.

    2015-09-15

    A new class of parametric models, referred to as sample parametric models, is developed for random elements that match sample rather than the first two moments and/or other global properties of these elements. The models can be used to characterize, e.g., material properties at small scale in which case their samples represent microstructures of material specimens selected at random from a population. The samples of the proposed models are elements of finite-dimensional vector spaces spanned by samples, eigenfunctions of Karhunen–Loève (KL) representations, or modes of singular value decompositions (SVDs). The implementation of sample parametric models requires knowledge of the probability laws of target random elements. Numerical examples including stochastic processes and random fields are used to demonstrate the construction of sample parametric models, assess their accuracy, and illustrate how these models can be used to solve efficiently stochastic equations.

  14. Parametric instabilities in weakly magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherall, J.C.; Goldman, M.V.; Nicholson, D.R.

    1981-05-15

    Parametric instabilities in a weakly magnetized plasma are discussed. The results are applied to waves excited by electron streams which travel outward from the Sun along solar-wind magnetic field lines, as in a type III solar radio burst.

  15. Parametric instability in the formation of plasma waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, J.H.; Antonsen, T.M.; Milchberg, H.M.; Fan, J.; Margolin, L.; Pyatnitskii, L.

    2006-03-15

    Plasma waveguides generated by focusing a moderate intensity laser into neutral gas with an axicon lens can be unstable to the generation of axial modulations in the channel parameters. A model is proposed in which the modulations are due to the nonlinear coupling between the axicon field and a scattered mode in the evolving channel. Good agreement is found with experimental measurements of these modulations.

  16. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO.

    PubMed

    Evans, Matthew; Gras, Slawek; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana X; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Adams, Carl; Aston, Stuart; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; Pele, Arnaud; Romie, Janeen; Thomas, Michael; Thorne, Keith; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Sigg, Daniel; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Heinze, Matthew; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-04-24

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this Letter, we describe the first observation of parametric instability in a gravitational wave detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress. PMID:25955042

  17. Chaos control of parametric driven Duffing oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Leisheng; Mei, Jie; Li, Lijie

    2014-03-31

    Duffing resonators are typical dynamic systems, which can exhibit chaotic oscillations, subject to certain driving conditions. Chaotic oscillations of resonating systems with negative and positive spring constants are identified to investigate in this paper. Parametric driver imposed on these two systems affects nonlinear behaviours, which has been theoretically analyzed with regard to variation of driving parameters (frequency, amplitude). Systematic calculations have been performed for these two systems driven by parametric pumps to unveil the controllability of chaos.

  18. A Hamiltonian approach to the parametric excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, V.; Bacri, J.-C.; Hocquet, T.; Devaud, M.

    2006-05-01

    We propose a solution of the parametrically excited oscillator problem using the Hamiltonian formalism introduced by Glauber. The main advantage is that, within the framework of this formalism, the different possible approximations appear much more naturally than in the standard textbook presentation. Experiments on adiabatic and resonant parametric excitations of a pendulum are presented as an illustration, with particular attention being paid to the role played by the phase of the excitation.

  19. Obscured Star-Formation in Merging Galaxies: High Resolution Radio Imaging of a Time-Ordered Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, S. G.; Campion, S. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    We present new, deep, high resolution 6cm and 4cm radio continuum images of the central regions of a time-ordered sequence of seven large galaxy mergers. The radio observations are able to detect star-forming re- gions that are completely obscured at optical wavelengths. In all systems, we detect numerous compact radio sources embedded in more diffuse ra- dio emission, with limiting luminosities of approx. 1-5 x 10(exp l8) W Hz or approx. 1-5 times the luminosity of Cas A. Many of the compact radio sources are loosely associated with active starforming regions but not with specific optical or W emission sources. Several of the compact radio sources are coincident with Ultra-luminous X-ray objects (ULX's). In most systems, we are able to measure reliable spectral indices for the stronger sources. We find that the fraction of compact radio cources with nominally flat radio spectral indices (indicating they ae dominated by thermal radio emission from HII regions) decreases with merger age, while the fraction of sources with nonimally steep spectral indices (indicating they are dominated by nonthermal emission from supernova remnants) increases. For the flat-spectrum sources, we estimate the numbers of young massive stars, associated ionized gas masses, we estimate supernova rates and required star-formation rates, We compare these results with those from other well-studied merging galaxy systems and from other determinations of star-formation rates. We gratefully acknowledge use of the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) and the VLA Archive. NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  20. DIRECT IMAGING OF THE WATER SNOW LINE AT THE TIME OF PLANET FORMATION USING TWO ALMA CONTINUUM BANDS

    SciTech Connect

    Banzatti, A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Pinilla, P.; Ricci, L.; Birnstiel, T.; Ciesla, F.

    2015-12-10

    Molecular snow lines in protoplanetary disks have been studied theoretically for decades because of their importance in shaping planetary architectures and compositions. The water snow line lies in the planet formation region at ≲10 AU, and so far its location has been estimated only indirectly from spatially unresolved spectroscopy. This work presents a proof-of-concept method to directly image the water snow line in protoplanetary disks through its physical and chemical imprint on the local dust properties. We adopt a physical disk model that includes dust coagulation, fragmentation, drift, and a change in fragmentation velocities of a factor of 10 between dry silicates and icy grains as found by laboratory work. We find that the presence of a water snow line leads to a sharp discontinuity in the radial profile of the dust emission spectral index α{sub mm} due to replenishment of small grains through fragmentation. We use the ALMA simulator to demonstrate that this effect can be observed in protoplanetary disks using spatially resolved ALMA images in two continuum bands. We explore the model dependence on the disk viscosity and find that the spectral index reveals the water snow line for a wide range of conditions, with opposite trends when the emission is optically thin rather than thick. If the disk viscosity is low (α{sub visc} < 10{sup −3}), the snow line produces a ringlike structure with a minimum at α{sub mm} ∼ 2 in the optically thick regime, possibly similar to what has been measured with ALMA in the innermost region of the HL Tau disk.

  1. Direct Imaging of the Water Snow Line at the Time of Planet Formation using Two ALMA Continuum Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzatti, A.; Pinilla, P.; Ricci, L.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Birnstiel, T.; Ciesla, F.

    2015-12-01

    Molecular snow lines in protoplanetary disks have been studied theoretically for decades because of their importance in shaping planetary architectures and compositions. The water snow line lies in the planet formation region at ≲10 AU, and so far its location has been estimated only indirectly from spatially unresolved spectroscopy. This work presents a proof-of-concept method to directly image the water snow line in protoplanetary disks through its physical and chemical imprint on the local dust properties. We adopt a physical disk model that includes dust coagulation, fragmentation, drift, and a change in fragmentation velocities of a factor of 10 between dry silicates and icy grains as found by laboratory work. We find that the presence of a water snow line leads to a sharp discontinuity in the radial profile of the dust emission spectral index αmm due to replenishment of small grains through fragmentation. We use the ALMA simulator to demonstrate that this effect can be observed in protoplanetary disks using spatially resolved ALMA images in two continuum bands. We explore the model dependence on the disk viscosity and find that the spectral index reveals the water snow line for a wide range of conditions, with opposite trends when the emission is optically thin rather than thick. If the disk viscosity is low (αvisc < 10‑3), the snow line produces a ringlike structure with a minimum at αmm ∼ 2 in the optically thick regime, possibly similar to what has been measured with ALMA in the innermost region of the HL Tau disk.

  2. Direct Imaging of the Water Snow Line at the Time of Planet Formation using Two ALMA Continuum Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzatti, A.; Pinilla, P.; Ricci, L.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Birnstiel, T.; Ciesla, F.

    2015-12-01

    Molecular snow lines in protoplanetary disks have been studied theoretically for decades because of their importance in shaping planetary architectures and compositions. The water snow line lies in the planet formation region at ≲10 AU, and so far its location has been estimated only indirectly from spatially unresolved spectroscopy. This work presents a proof-of-concept method to directly image the water snow line in protoplanetary disks through its physical and chemical imprint on the local dust properties. We adopt a physical disk model that includes dust coagulation, fragmentation, drift, and a change in fragmentation velocities of a factor of 10 between dry silicates and icy grains as found by laboratory work. We find that the presence of a water snow line leads to a sharp discontinuity in the radial profile of the dust emission spectral index αmm due to replenishment of small grains through fragmentation. We use the ALMA simulator to demonstrate that this effect can be observed in protoplanetary disks using spatially resolved ALMA images in two continuum bands. We explore the model dependence on the disk viscosity and find that the spectral index reveals the water snow line for a wide range of conditions, with opposite trends when the emission is optically thin rather than thick. If the disk viscosity is low (αvisc < 10-3), the snow line produces a ringlike structure with a minimum at αmm ˜ 2 in the optically thick regime, possibly similar to what has been measured with ALMA in the innermost region of the HL Tau disk.

  3. Parametric Analysis of the Factors Controlling the Costs of Sedimentary Geothermal Systems - Preliminary Results (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, C.

    2013-10-01

    Parametric analysis of the factors controlling the costs of sedimentary geothermal systems was carried out using a modified version of the Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). The sedimentary system modeled assumed production from and injection into a single sedimentary formation.

  4. Teaching Image Formation by Extended Light Sources: The Use of a Model Derived from the History of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedes, Christos; Ravanis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    This research, carried out in Greece on pupils aged 12-16, focuses on the transformation of their representations concerning light emission and image formation by extended light sources. The instructive process was carried out in two stages, each one having a different, distinct target set. During the first stage, the appropriate conflict conditions were created by contrasting the subjects’ predictions with the results of experimental situations inspired by the History of Science, with a view to destabilizing the pupils’ alternative representations. During the second stage, the experimental teaching intervention was carried out; it was based on the geometrical optics model and its parameters were derived from Kepler’s relevant historic experiment. For the duration of this process and within the framework of didactical interactions, an effort was made to reorganize initial limited representations and restructure them at the level of the accepted scientific model. The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated two weeks later, using experimental tasks which had the same cognitive yet different empirical content with respect to the tasks conducted during the intervention. The results of the study showed that the majority of the subjects accepted the model of geometrical optics, that is, the pupils were able to correctly predict and adequately justify the experimental results based on the principle of punctiform light emission. Educational and research implications are discussed.

  5. Auditory scene analysis and sonified visual images. Does consonance negatively impact on object formation when using complex sonified stimuli?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David J.; Simpson, Andrew J. R.; Proulx, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    A critical task for the brain is the sensory representation and identification of perceptual objects in the world. When the visual sense is impaired, hearing and touch must take primary roles and in recent times compensatory techniques have been developed that employ the tactile or auditory system as a substitute for the visual system. Visual-to-auditory sonifications provide a complex, feature-based auditory representation that must be decoded and integrated into an object-based representation by the listener. However, we don’t yet know what role the auditory system plays in the object integration stage and whether the principles of auditory scene analysis apply. Here we used coarse sonified images in a two-tone discrimination task to test whether auditory feature-based representations of visual objects would be confounded when their features conflicted with the principles of auditory consonance. We found that listeners (N = 36) performed worse in an object recognition task when the auditory feature-based representation was harmonically consonant. We also found that this conflict was not negated with the provision of congruent audio–visual information. The findings suggest that early auditory processes of harmonic grouping dominate the object formation process and that the complexity of the signal, and additional sensory information have limited effect on this. PMID:26528202

  6. Direct Exoplanet Imaging with JWST NIRCam: Low-Mass Stars, Low-Mass Planets, and Critical Constraints on Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlieder, Joshua E.; Meyer, Michael; Reggiani, Maddalena; Quanz, Sascha; Beichman, Charles A.; Greene, Thomas P.; Burrows, Adam Seth

    2016-01-01

    As next generation exoplanet imagers are making their first discoveries, the largest population of stars in the Galaxy, the M dwarfs, are largely unaccounted for in their surveys. However, RV trends and micro lensing have revealed that M dwarfs host a substantial population of Neptune to Jupiter mass planets between ~1-10 AU. The unprecedented sensitivity of NIRCam on the JWST provides direct access to this population of gas-giants. A NIRCam 3 - 5 μm survey for such planets will place critical constraints on planet formation by: 1) measuring the luminosities of young, sub-Jupiter mass planets, 2) providing constraints on the peak in the companion surface density vs. separation distribution, and 3) measuring the frequency of ≤Jupiter mass giants in the outskirts of these systems (>10 AU). We have carefully constructed a sample of nearby, young, late-type stars, performed NIRCam survey simulations, and will report on the expected yield and advantages of JWST compared to current ground based capabilities.

  7. NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER MAGNITUDE-STAR FORMATION RATE RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Randriamanakoto, Z.; Väisänen, P.; Escala, A.; Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Mattila, S.; Ryder, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster (SSC) magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near-infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ∼40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M{sub K} ∼ –2.6log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying together cluster-internal effects and host SFR properties to possibly explain the observed brightest SSC magnitude versus SFR dependency.

  8. Dirigent Protein-Mediated Lignan and Cyanogenic Glucoside Formation in Flax Seed: Integrated Omics and MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dalisay, Doralyn S; Kim, Kye Won; Lee, Choonseok; Yang, Hong; Rübel, Oliver; Bowen, Benjamin P; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2015-06-26

    An integrated omics approach using genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics (MALDI mass spectrometry imaging, MSI), and bioinformatics was employed to study spatiotemporal formation and deposition of health-protecting polymeric lignans and plant defense cyanogenic glucosides. Intact flax (Linum usitatissimum) capsules and seed tissues at different development stages were analyzed. Transcriptome analyses indicated distinct expression patterns of dirigent protein (DP) gene family members encoding (-)- and (+)-pinoresinol-forming DPs and their associated downstream metabolic processes, respectively, with the former expressed at early seed coat development stages. Genes encoding (+)-pinoresinol-forming DPs were, in contrast, expressed at later development stages. Recombinant DP expression and DP assays also unequivocally established their distinct stereoselective biochemical functions. Using MALDI MSI and ion mobility separation analyses, the pinoresinol downstream derivatives, secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) and SDG hydroxymethylglutaryl ester, were localized and detectable only in early seed coat development stages. SDG derivatives were then converted into higher molecular weight phenolics during seed coat maturation. By contrast, the plant defense cyanogenic glucosides, the monoglucosides linamarin/lotaustralin, were detected throughout the flax capsule, whereas diglucosides linustatin/neolinustatin only accumulated in endosperm and embryo tissues. A putative biosynthetic pathway to the cyanogens is proposed on the basis of transcriptome coexpression data. Localization of all metabolites was at ca. 20 μm resolution, with the web based tool OpenMSI enabling not only resolution enhancement but also an interactive system for real-time searching for any ion in the tissue under analysis.

  9. Understanding the formation of self-organized micro/nanostructures on metal surfaces from femtosecond laser ablation using stop-motion SEM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhlke, Craig A.; Anderson, Troy P.; Alexander, Dennis R.

    2014-03-01

    There are a growing number of unique self-organized micro/nanostructures created using femtosecond laser surface processing that have been demonstrated. Although researchers have provided insight into the formation processes for distinctive morphologies on specific materials, there is a need for a broader understanding of the physics behind the formation of a wide range of morphologies and what parameters affect their formation. In this work, the formation processes for mound structures on 316 stainless steel (SS) with growth above the original sample surface are studied. The formation process for the structures on 316 SS is compared to similar structures formed on nickel using the same technique. The structures are formed using 800 nm, 50 fs laser pulses, and are self-organized, meaning the structure dimensions are much smaller than the spot size of the pulses used to create them. The formation dynamics were studied using a stop-motion scanning electron microscope (SEM) technique, where the same location of an irradiated sample was imaged in the SEM at various pulse counts. The result is a series of images showing the developmental progress with increasing pulse counts. The structures form through a combination of fluid flow of the surface melt that results after irradiation, preferential ablation of the center of the pits between structures, and material/nanoparticle redeposition.

  10. Grating lobe elimination in steerable parametric loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chuang; Gan, Woon-Seng

    2011-02-01

    In the past two decades, the majority of research on the parametric loudspeaker has concentrated on the nonlinear modeling of acoustic propagation and pre-processing techniques to reduce nonlinear distortion in sound reproduction. There are, however, very few studies on directivity control of the parametric loudspeaker. In this paper, we propose an equivalent circular Gaussian source array that approximates the directivity characteristics of the linear ultrasonic transducer array. By using this approximation, the directivity of the sound beam from the parametric loudspeaker can be predicted by the product directivity principle. New theoretical results, which are verified through measurements, are presented to show the effectiveness of the delay-and-sum beamsteering structure for the parametric loudspeaker. Unlike the conventional loudspeaker array, where the spacing between array elements must be less than half the wavelength to avoid spatial aliasing, the parametric loudspeaker can take advantage of grating lobe elimination to extend the spacing of ultrasonic transducer array to more than 1.5 wavelengths in a typical application.

  11. Parametric excitation of magnetization by electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Jin; Lee, Han Kyu; Verba, Roman; Katine, Jordan; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Slavin, Andrei; Barsukov, Igor; Krivorotov, Ilya

    Manipulation of magnetization by electric field is of primary importance for development of low-power spintronic devices. We present the first experimental demonstration of parametric generation of magnetic oscillations by electric field. We realize the parametric generation in CoFeB/MgO/SAF nanoscale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The magnetization of the free layer is perpendicular to the sample plane while the magnetizations of the synthetic antiferromagnet (SAF) lie in the plane. We apply microwave voltage to the MTJ at 2 f, where f is the ferromagnetic resonance frequency of the free layer. In this configuration, the oscillations can only be driven parametrically via voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) whereby electric field across the MgO barrier modulates the free layer anisotropy. The parametrically driven oscillations are detected via microwave voltage from the MTJ near f and show resonant character, observed only in a narrow range of drive frequencies near 2 f. The excitation also exhibits a well-pronounced threshold drive voltage of approximately 0.1 Volts. Our work demonstrates a low threshold for parametric excitation of magnetization by VCMA that holds promise for the development of energy-efficient nanoscale spin wave devices.

  12. Optimization of noncollinear optical parametric amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, D. N.; Rothardt, J.; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.

    2007-02-01

    Noncollinearly phase-matched optical parametric amplifiers (NOPAs) - pumped with the green light of a frequency doubled Yb-doped fiber-amplifier system 1, 2 - permit convenient generation of ultrashort pulses in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) 3. The broad bandwidth of the parametric gain via the noncollinear pump configuration allows amplification of few-cycle optical pulses when seeded with a spectrally flat, re-compressible signal. The short pulses tunable over a wide region in the visible permit transcend of frontiers in physics and lifescience. For instance, the resulting high temporal resolution is of significance for many spectroscopic techniques. Furthermore, the high magnitudes of the peak-powers of the produced pulses allow research in high-field physics. To understand the demands of noncollinear optical parametric amplification using a fiber pump source, it is important to investigate this configuration in detail 4. An analysis provides not only insight into the parametric process but also determines an optimal choice of experimental parameters for the objective. Here, the intention is to design a configuration which yields the shortest possible temporal pulse. As a consequence of this analysis, the experimental setup could be optimized. A number of aspects of optical parametric amplifier performance have been treated analytically and computationally 5, but these do not fully cover the situation under consideration here.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of PET image using event information bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hankyeol; Kwak, Shin Hye; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Woo, Sang-Keun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the effect in the PET image quality according to event bootstrap of small animal PET data. In order to investigate the time difference condition, realigned sinograms were generated from randomly sampled data set using bootstrap. List-mode data was obtained from small animal PET scanner for Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 20 min and Y-90 60 min. PET image was reconstructed by Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization(OSEM) 2D with the list-mode format. Image analysis was investigated by Signal to Noise Ratio(SNR) of Ge-68 and Y-90 image. Non-parametric resampled PET image SNR percent change for the Ge-68 30 sec, Y-90 60 min, and Y-90 20 min was 1.69 %, 7.03 %, and 4.78 %, respectively. SNR percent change of non-parametric resampled PET image with time difference condition was 1.08 % for the Ge-68 30 sec, 6.74 % for the Y-90 60 min and 10.94 % for the Y-90 29 min. The result indicated that the bootstrap with time difference condition had a potential to improve a noisy Y-90 PET image quality. This method should be expected to reduce Y-90 PET measurement time and to enhance its accuracy.

  14. Parametric instabilities in the LCGT arm cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Uchiyama, T.; Miyoki, S.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K.; Numata, K.

    2008-07-01

    We evaluated the parametric instabilities of LCGT (Japanese interferometric gravitational wave detector project) arm cavity. The number of unstable modes of LCGT is 10-times smaller than that of Advanced LIGO (USA). Since the strength of the instabilities of LCGT depends on the mirror curvature more weakly than that of Advanced LIGO, the requirement of the mirror curvature accuracy is easier to be achieved. The difference in the parametric instabilities between LCGT and Advanced LIGO is because of the thermal noise reduction methods (LCGT, cooling sapphire mirrors; Advanced LIGO, fused silica mirrors with larger laser beams), which are the main strategies of the projects. Elastic Q reduction by the barrel surface (0.2 mm thickness Ta2O5) coating is effective to suppress instabilities in the LCGT arm cavity. Therefore, the cryogenic interferometer is a smart solution for the parametric instabilities in addition to thermal noise and thermal lensing.

  15. Parametric analysis of ATM solar array.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, B. K.; Adkisson, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The paper discusses the methods used for the calculation of ATM solar array performance characteristics and provides the parametric analysis of solar panels used in SKYLAB. To predict the solar array performance under conditions other than test conditions, a mathematical model has been developed. Four computer programs have been used to convert the solar simulator test data to the parametric curves. The first performs module summations, the second determines average solar cell characteristics which will cause a mathematical model to generate a curve matching the test data, the third is a polynomial fit program which determines the polynomial equations for the solar cell characteristics versus temperature, and the fourth program uses the polynomial coefficients generated by the polynomial curve fit program to generate the parametric data.

  16. Parametric instabilities in helicon-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, Yu.M.; Kraemer, M.

    2005-07-15

    Parametric instabilities arising in the pump field of a helicon wave are analyzed for typical parameters of helicon-produced plasmas. The pump wavenumber parallel to the magnetic field is assumed to be finite according to recent experimental findings obtained on a high-density helicon discharge. The parametric decay of the helicon pump wave into ion-sound and Trivelpiece-Gould waves is investigated. The approach takes into account that the damping rate of the Trivelpiece-Gould wave is generally much higher than the ion-sound frequency. The theoretical results are in agreement with the growth rates and thresholds of this instability, as well as the dispersion properties of the decay waves observed in helicon experiments. Estimates of the level of the decay parametric turbulence turn out to be sufficiently high to account for the strong absorption observed in helicon-produced plasmas.

  17. Parametric modelling of a knee joint prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Khoo, L P; Goh, J C; Chow, S L

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the establishment of a parametric model of knee joint prosthesis. Four different sizes of a commercial prosthesis are used as an example in the study. A reverse engineering technique was employed to reconstruct the prosthesis on CATIA, a CAD (computer aided design) system. Parametric models were established as a result of the analysis. Using the parametric model established and the knee data obtained from a clinical study on 21 pairs of cadaveric Asian knees, the development of a prototype prosthesis that suits a patient with a very small knee joint is presented. However, it was found that modification to certain parameters may be inevitable due to the uniqueness of the Asian knee. An avenue for rapid modelling and eventually economical production of a customized knee joint prosthesis for patients is proposed and discussed.

  18. Modeling personnel turnover in the parametric organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1991-01-01

    A model is developed for simulating the dynamics of a newly formed organization, credible during all phases of organizational development. The model development process is broken down into the activities of determining the tasks required for parametric cost analysis (PCA), determining the skills required for each PCA task, determining the skills available in the applicant marketplace, determining the structure of the model, implementing the model, and testing it. The model, parameterized by the likelihood of job function transition, has demonstrated by the capability to represent the transition of personnel across functional boundaries within a parametric organization using a linear dynamical system, and the ability to predict required staffing profiles to meet functional needs at the desired time. The model can be extended by revisions of the state and transition structure to provide refinements in functional definition for the parametric and extended organization.

  19. Parametric Amplification of Scattered Atom Pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Gretchen K.; Mun, Jongchul; Boyd, Micah; Streed, Erik W.; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Pritchard, David E.

    2006-01-20

    We have observed parametric generation and amplification of ultracold atom pairs. A {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate was loaded into a one-dimensional optical lattice with quasimomentum k{sub 0} and spontaneously scattered into two final states with quasimomenta k{sub 1} and k{sub 2}. Furthermore, when a seed of atoms was first created with quasimomentum k{sub 1} we observed parametric amplification of scattered atoms pairs in states k{sub 1} and k{sub 2} when the phase-matching condition was fulfilled. This process is analogous to optical parametric generation and amplification of photons and could be used to efficiently create entangled pairs of atoms. Furthermore, these results explain the dynamic instability of condensates in moving lattices observed in recent experiments.

  20. Parametric number covariance in quantum chaotic spectra.

    PubMed

    Vinayak; Kumar, Sandeep; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-03-01

    We study spectral parametric correlations in quantum chaotic systems and introduce the number covariance as a measure of such correlations. We derive analytic results for the classical random matrix ensembles using the binary correlation method and obtain compact expressions for the covariance. We illustrate the universality of this measure by presenting the spectral analysis of the quantum kicked rotors for the time-reversal invariant and time-reversal noninvariant cases. A local version of the parametric number variance introduced earlier is also investigated.

  1. Parametrically driven surface waves on viscous ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Hanns Walter

    1998-11-01

    Standing waves on the surface of a ferrofluid in a normal magnetic field can be excited by a vertical vibration of the container. A stability theory for the onset of these parametrically driven waves is developed, taking viscous dissipation and finite depth effects into account. It will be shown that a careful choice of the filling level permits the normal and anomalous dispersion branches to be measured. Furthermore it will be demonstrated that the parametric driving mechanism may lead to a delay of the Rosensweig instability. A bicritical situation can be achieved when Rosensweig and Faraday waves interact.

  2. Parametric Amplification For Detecting Weak Optical Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Chen, Chien; Chakravarthi, Prakash

    1996-01-01

    Optical-communication receivers of proposed type implement high-sensitivity scheme of optical parametric amplification followed by direct detection for reception of extremely weak signals. Incorporates both optical parametric amplification and direct detection into optimized design enhancing effective signal-to-noise ratios during reception in photon-starved (photon-counting) regime. Eliminates need for complexity of heterodyne detection scheme and partly overcomes limitations imposed on older direct-detection schemes by noise generated in receivers and by limits on quantum efficiencies of photodetectors.

  3. Parametric injection for monoenergetic electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, A.; Zhidkov, A.; Takano, K.; Hotta, E.; Nemoto, K.; Nakajima, K.

    2008-05-01

    Electrons are accelerated in the laser wakefield (LWFA). This mechanism has been studied by 2D or 3D Particle In Cell simulation. However, how the electrons are injected in the wakefield is not understood. In this paper, we consider about the process of self -injection and propose new scheme. When plasma electron density modulates, parametric resonance of electron momentum is induced. The parametric resonance depends on laser waist modulation. We carried out 2D PIC simulation with the initial condition decided from resonance condition. Moreover, we analyze experimental result that generated 200-250 MeV monoenergetic electron beam with 400TW intense laser in CAEP in China.

  4. Hamiltonian dynamics of the parametrized electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero G, J. Fernando; Margalef-Bentabol, Juan; Villaseñor, Eduardo J. S.

    2016-06-01

    We study the Hamiltonian formulation for a parametrized electromagnetic field with the purpose of clarifying the interplay between parametrization and gauge symmetries. We use a geometric approach which is tailor-made for theories where embeddings are part of the dynamical variables. Our point of view is global and coordinate free. The most important result of the paper is the identification of sectors in the primary constraint submanifold in the phase space of the model where the number of independent components of the Hamiltonian vector fields that define the dynamics changes. This explains the non-trivial behavior of the system and some of its pathologies.

  5. Comparing School Science Explanations in Books and Computer-Based Formats: The Role of Images, Image/Text Relations and Hyperlinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Len

    2004-01-01

    The affordances of computer-based texts, such as hypertext, windows, articulation of audio with text and image, and the inclusion of dynamic images, have fundamentally transformed many of the literacy practices derived from interaction with conventional texts. This means people need to reconceptualize the ways in which text form relates to text…

  6. Parametrized post-Einsteinian framework for gravitational wave bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutrel, Nicholas; Yunes, Nicolás; Pretorius, Frans

    2014-11-01

    The population of stellar-mass, compact object binaries that merge with non-negligible eccentricity may be large enough to motivate searches with ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Such events could be exceptional laboratories to test General Relativity in the dynamical, strong-field regime, as a larger fraction of the energy is emitted at high velocities, compared to quasicircular inspirals. A serious obstacle here, however, is the challenge of computing theoretical waveforms for eccentric systems with the requisite accuracy for use in a matched-filter search. The corresponding waveforms are more a sequence of concentrated bursts of energy emitted near periapse than a continuous waveform. Based on this, an alternative approach, stacking excess power over the set of time-frequency tiles coincident with the bursts, was recently suggested as a more practical (though suboptimal) detection strategy. The leading-order "observable" that would be inferred from such a detection would be a sequence of discrete numbers characterizing the position and size of each time-frequency tile. In General Relativity, this (possibly large) sequence of numbers is uniquely determined by the small set of parameters describing the binary at formation. In this paper, following the spirit of the parametrized post-Einsteinian framework developed for quasicircular inspiral, we propose a simple, parametrized deformation of the baseline general relativistic burst algorithm for eccentric inspiral events that would allow for model-independent tests of Einstein's theory in this high-velocity, strong-field regime.

  7. MIiSR: Molecular Interactions in Super-Resolution Imaging Enables the Analysis of Protein Interactions, Dynamics and Formation of Multi-protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Fabiana A; Dirk, Brennan S; Tam, Joshua H K; Cavanagh, P Craig; Goiko, Maria; Ferguson, Stephen S G; Pasternak, Stephen H; Dikeakos, Jimmy D; de Bruyn, John R; Heit, Bryan

    2015-12-01

    Our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking has been enabled by conventional biochemical and microscopy techniques. However, these methods often obscure the heterogeneity of the cellular environment, thus precluding a quantitative assessment of the molecular interactions regulating these processes. Herein, we present Molecular Interactions in Super Resolution (MIiSR) software which provides quantitative analysis tools for use with super-resolution images. MIiSR combines multiple tools for analyzing intermolecular interactions, molecular clustering and image segmentation. These tools enable quantification, in the native environment of the cell, of molecular interactions and the formation of higher-order molecular complexes. The capabilities and limitations of these analytical tools are demonstrated using both modeled data and examples derived from the vesicular trafficking system, thereby providing an established and validated experimental workflow capable of quantitatively assessing molecular interactions and molecular complex formation within the heterogeneous environment of the cell.

  8. MIiSR: Molecular Interactions in Super-Resolution Imaging Enables the Analysis of Protein Interactions, Dynamics and Formation of Multi-protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Fabiana A.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Tam, Joshua H. K.; Cavanagh, P. Craig; Goiko, Maria; Ferguson, Stephen S. G.; Pasternak, Stephen H.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; de Bruyn, John R.; Heit, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking has been enabled by conventional biochemical and microscopy techniques. However, these methods often obscure the heterogeneity of the cellular environment, thus precluding a quantitative assessment of the molecular interactions regulating these processes. Herein, we present Molecular Interactions in Super Resolution (MIiSR) software which provides quantitative analysis tools for use with super-resolution images. MIiSR combines multiple tools for analyzing intermolecular interactions, molecular clustering and image segmentation. These tools enable quantification, in the native environment of the cell, of molecular interactions and the formation of higher-order molecular complexes. The capabilities and limitations of these analytical tools are demonstrated using both modeled data and examples derived from the vesicular trafficking system, thereby providing an established and validated experimental workflow capable of quantitatively assessing molecular interactions and molecular complex formation within the heterogeneous environment of the cell. PMID:26657340

  9. Investigation of coupled optical parametric oscillators for novel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yujie J.

    2016-03-01

    In this proceedings article, we summarize our previous results on the novel applications using the coupled optical parametric oscillators (OPO's). In a conventional OPO, a single pump wavelength is capable of generating a pair of the signal and idler beams by placing a bulk nonlinear crystal inside an OPO cavity. When a nonlinear crystal composite consisting of periodically-inverted KTiOPO4 (KTP) plates bonded together by the adhesive-free-bonded (AFB) technique is used instead of the bulk nonlinear crystal, the optical parametric oscillation takes place at two sets of the new wavelengths for the signal and idler beams due to the phase shifts occurring at the interfaces of the adjacent domains making up the composite. These two sets of the signal and idler waves are effectively generated by the two OPO's being coupled to each other. These signals and idlers exhibit ultrastability in terms of their frequency separation. We review the progress made by us on the applications being realized by using such coupled OPO's such as THz generation and restoration of the blurred images after propagating through a distortion plate and a phase plate simulating atmospheric turbulence.

  10. A novel SURE-based criterion for parametric PSF estimation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Blu, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    We propose an unbiased estimate of a filtered version of the mean squared error--the blur-SURE (Stein's unbiased risk estimate)--as a novel criterion for estimating an unknown point spread function (PSF) from the degraded image only. The PSF is obtained by minimizing this new objective functional over a family of Wiener processings. Based on this estimated blur kernel, we then perform nonblind deconvolution using our recently developed algorithm. The SURE-based framework is exemplified with a number of parametric PSF, involving a scaling factor that controls the blur size. A typical example of such parametrization is the Gaussian kernel. The experimental results demonstrate that minimizing the blur-SURE yields highly accurate estimates of the PSF parameters, which also result in a restoration quality that is very similar to the one obtained with the exact PSF, when plugged into our recent multi-Wiener SURE-LET deconvolution algorithm. The highly competitive results obtained outline the great potential of developing more powerful blind deconvolution algorithms based on SURE-like estimates.

  11. A novel SURE-based criterion for parametric PSF estimation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Blu, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    We propose an unbiased estimate of a filtered version of the mean squared error--the blur-SURE (Stein's unbiased risk estimate)--as a novel criterion for estimating an unknown point spread function (PSF) from the degraded image only. The PSF is obtained by minimizing this new objective functional over a family of Wiener processings. Based on this estimated blur kernel, we then perform nonblind deconvolution using our recently developed algorithm. The SURE-based framework is exemplified with a number of parametric PSF, involving a scaling factor that controls the blur size. A typical example of such parametrization is the Gaussian kernel. The experimental results demonstrate that minimizing the blur-SURE yields highly accurate estimates of the PSF parameters, which also result in a restoration quality that is very similar to the one obtained with the exact PSF, when plugged into our recent multi-Wiener SURE-LET deconvolution algorithm. The highly competitive results obtained outline the great potential of developing more powerful blind deconvolution algorithms based on SURE-like estimates. PMID:25531950

  12. Noise figure of hybrid optical parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Marhic, Michel E

    2012-12-17

    Following a fiber optical parametric amplifier, used as a wavelength converter or in the phase-sensitive mode, by a phase-insensitive amplifier (PIA) can significantly reduce four-wave mixing between signals in broadband systems. We derive the quantum mechanical noise figures (NF) for these two hybrid configurations, and show that adding the PIA only leads to a moderate increase in NF.

  13. New Logic Circuit with DC Parametric Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugahara, Masanori; Kaneda, Hisayoshi

    1982-12-01

    It is shown that dc parametric excitation is possible in a circuit named JUDO, which is composed of two resistively-connected Josephson junctions. Simulation study proves that the circuit has large gain and properties suitable for the construction of small, high-speed logic circuits.

  14. Parametric modelling for electrical impedance spectroscopy system.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Hamzaoui, L; Brown, B H; Rigaud, B; Smallwood, R H; Barber, D C; Morucci, J P

    1996-03-01

    Three parametric modelling approaches based on the Cole-Cole model are introduced. Comparison between modelling only the real part and modelling both the real and imaginary parts is carried out by simulations, in which random and systematic noise are considered, respectively. The results of modelling the in vitro data collected from sheep are given to reach the conclusions.

  15. Measurement selection for parametric IC fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, A.; Meador, J.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results obtained with the use of measurement reduction for statistical IC fault diagnosis are described. The reduction method used involves data pre-processing in a fashion consistent with a specific definition of parametric faults. The effects of this preprocessing are examined.

  16. Parametric acoustic arrays: A state of the art review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenlon, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    Following a brief introduction to the concept of parametric acoustic interactions, the basic properties of parametric transmitting and receiving arrays are considered in the light of conceptual advances resulting from experimental and theoretical investigations that have taken place since 1963.

  17. Simple parametrization of fragment reduced widths in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R K; Townsend, L W

    1994-04-01

    A systematic analysis of the observed reduced widths obtained in relativistic heavy ion fragmentation reactions is used to develop a phenomenological parametrization of these data. The parametrization is simple, accurate, and completely general in applicability.

  18. Image

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Amber; Harsch, Tim; Pitt, Julie; Firpo, Mike; Lekin, April; Pardes, Elizabeth

    2007-08-31

    The computer side of the IMAGE project consists of a collection of Perl scripts that perform a variety of tasks; scripts are available to insert, update and delete data from the underlying Oracle database, download data from NCBI's Genbank and other sources, and generate data files for download by interested parties. Web scripts make up the tracking interface, and various tools available on the project web-site (image.llnl.gov) that provide a search interface to the database.

  19. A pilot study using deep infrared imaging to constrain the star formation history of the XUV stellar populations in NGC 4625

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, Stephanie J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Bresolin, Fabio

    2014-09-20

    In a ΛCDM universe, disk galaxies' outer regions are the last to form. Characterizing their contents is critical for understanding the ongoing process of disk formation, but observing outer disk stellar populations is challenging due to their low surface brightness. We present extremely deep 3.6 μm observations (Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera) of NGC 4625, a galaxy known for its radially extended ultraviolet-emitting stellar population. We combine the new imaging with archival UV imaging from the GALEX mission to derive multi-wavelength radial profiles for NGC 4625 and compare them to stellar populations models. The colors can be explained by the young stellar population that is responsible for the UV emission and indicate that the current star formation rates in the outermost disk are recent. Extended star formation in NGC 4625 may have been initiated by an interaction with neighboring galaxies NGC 4618 and NGC 4625a, supporting speculation that minor interactions are a common trigger for outer disk star formation and late stage disk growth.

  20. Parametric distortion-adaptive neighborhood for omnidirectional camera.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yazhe; Li, Youfu; Luo, Jun

    2015-08-10

    Catadioptric omnidirectional images exhibit serious nonlinear distortion due to the involved quadratic mirror. Conventional pinhole model-based methods perform poorly when directly applied to the deformed omnidirectional images. This study constructs a catadioptric geometry system to analyze the variation of the neighborhood of an object in terms of the elevation and azimuth directions in a spherical coordinate system. To accurately represent the distorted visual information, a parametric neighborhood mapping model is proposed based on the catadioptric geometry. Unlike the conventional catadioptric models, the prior information of the system is effectively integrated into the neighborhood formulation framework. Then the distortion-adaptive neighborhood can be directly calculated based on its measurable image radial distance. This method can significantly improve the computational efficiency of algorithm since statistical neighborhood sampling is not used. On the basis of the proposed neighborhood model, a distortion-invariant Haar wavelet transform is presented to perform the robust human detection and tracking in catadioptric omnidirectional vision. The experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed neighborhood mapping model and prove that the distorted neighborhood in the omnidirectional image follows a nonlinear pattern.

  1. Meta-Analysis of Candidate Gene Effects Using Bayesian Parametric and Non-Parametric Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Gianola, Daniel; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.; Weigel, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    Candidate gene (CG) approaches provide a strategy for identification and characterization of major genes underlying complex phenotypes such as production traits and susceptibility to diseases, but the conclusions tend to be inconsistent across individual studies. Meta-analysis approaches can deal with these situations, e.g., by pooling effect-size estimates or combining P values from multiple studies. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of two types of statistical models, parametric and non-parametric, for meta-analysis of CG effects using simulated data. Both models estimated a “central” effect size while taking into account heterogeneity over individual studies. The empirical distribution of study-specific CG effects was multi-modal. The parametric model assumed a normal distribution for the study-specific CG effects whereas the non-parametric model relaxed this assumption by posing a more general distribution with a Dirichlet process prior (DPP). Results indicated that the meta-analysis approaches could reduce false positive or false negative rates by pooling strengths from multiple studies, as compared to individual studies. In addition, the non-parametric, DPP model captured the variation of the “data” better than its parametric counterpart. PMID:25057320

  2. Single-mode approximation of parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yongmin; Mikami, Hideharu; Wang Haibo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2005-12-15

    In this paper, we study the theory of spontaneous parametric down-conversion pumped by a short coherent pulse. It is shown that when single spatial mode filters and narrow band optical filters are used to filter the output state of parametric down-conversion, the postselected state of parametric down-conversion can be approximately described by a simple single-mode theory.

  3. Resolved H I imaging of a population of massive H I-rich galaxies with suppressed star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonias, Jenna J.; Schiminovich, David; Catinella, Barbara; Heckman, Timothy M.; Moran, Sean M.

    2014-07-20

    Despite the existence of well-defined relationships between cold gas and star formation, there is evidence that some galaxies contain large amounts of H I that do not form stars efficiently. By systematically assessing the link between H I and star formation within a sample of galaxies with extremely high H I masses (log M{sub H{sub I}}/M{sub ☉} > 10), we uncover a population of galaxies with an unexpected combination of high H I masses and low specific star formation rates that exists primarily at stellar masses greater than log M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} ∼ 10.5. We obtained H I maps of 20 galaxies in this population to understand the distribution of the H I and the physical conditions in the galaxies that could be suppressing star formation in the presence of large quantities of H I. We find that all of the galaxies we observed have low H I surface densities in the range in which inefficient star formation is common. The low H I surface densities are likely the main cause of the low specific star formation rates, but there is also some evidence that active galactic nuclei or bulges contribute to the suppression of star formation. The sample's agreement with the global star formation law highlights its usefulness as a tool for understanding galaxies that do not always follow expected relationships.

  4. Relationship of college student characteristics and inquiry-based geometrical optics instruction to knowledge of image formation with light-ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Hakan

    This study is premised on the fact that student conceptions of optics appear to be unrelated to student characteristics of gender, age, years since high school graduation, or previous academic experiences. This study investigated the relationships between student characteristics and student performance on image formation test items and the changes in student conceptions of optics after an introductory inquiry-based physics course. Data was collected from 39 college students who were involved in an inquiry-based physics course teaching topics of geometrical optics. Student data concerning characteristics and previous experiences with optics and mathematics were collected. Assessment of student understanding of optics knowledge for pinholes, plane mirrors, refraction, and convex lenses was collected with, the Test of Image Formation with Light-Ray Tracing instrument. Total scale and subscale scores representing the optics instrument content were derived from student pretest and posttest responses. The types of knowledge, needed to answer each optics item correctly, were categorized as situational, conceptual, procedural, and strategic knowledge. These types of knowledge were associated with student correct and incorrect responses to each item to explain the existences and changes in student scientific and naive conceptions. Correlation and stepwise multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify the student characteristics and academic experiences that significantly predicted scores on the subscales of the test. The results showed that student experience with calculus was a significant predictor of student performance on the total scale as well as on the refraction subscale of the Test of Image Formation with Light-Ray Tracing. A combination of student age and previous academic experience with precalculus was a significant predictor of student performance on the pretest pinhole subscale. Student characteristic of years since high school graduation

  5. apART: system for the acquisition, processing, archiving, and retrieval of digital images in an open, distributed imaging environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Uwe; Strack, Ruediger

    1992-04-01

    apART reflects the structure of an open, distributed environment. According to the general trend in the area of imaging, network-capable, general purpose workstations with capabilities of open system image communication and image input are used. Several heterogeneous components like CCD cameras, slide scanners, and image archives can be accessed. The system is driven by an object-oriented user interface where devices (image sources and destinations), operators (derived from a commercial image processing library), and images (of different data types) are managed and presented uniformly to the user. Browsing mechanisms are used to traverse devices, operators, and images. An audit trail mechanism is offered to record interactive operations on low-resolution image derivatives. These operations are processed off-line on the original image. Thus, the processing of extremely high-resolution raster images is possible, and the performance of resolution dependent operations is enhanced significantly during interaction. An object-oriented database system (APRIL), which can be browsed, is integrated into the system. Attribute retrieval is supported by the user interface. Other essential features of the system include: implementation on top of the X Window System (X11R4) and the OSF/Motif widget set; a SUN4 general purpose workstation, inclusive ethernet, magneto optical disc, etc., as the hardware platform for the user interface; complete graphical-interactive parametrization of all operators; support of different image interchange formats (GIF, TIFF, IIF, etc.); consideration of current IPI standard activities within ISO/IEC for further refinement and extensions.

  6. Multicolor stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with a rapidly tunable optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingjie; Ji, Minbiao; Holtom, Gary R; Fu, Dan; Freudiger, Christian W; Xie, X Sunney

    2013-01-15

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy allows label-free chemical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Narrowband excitation with picosecond lasers creates the highest signal levels and enables imaging speeds up to video-rate, but it sacrifices chemical specificity in samples with overlapping bands compared to broadband (multiplex) excitation. We develop a rapidly tunable picosecond optical parametric oscillator with an electro-optical tunable Lyot filter, and demonstrate multicolor SRS microscopy with synchronized line-by-line wavelength tuning to avoid spectral artifacts due to sample movement. We show sensitive imaging of three different kinds of polymer beads and live HeLa cells with moving intracellular lipid droplets.

  7. Entanglement of Coupled Optomechanical Systems Improved by Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Guixia; Xiao, Ruijie; Zhou, Ling

    2016-08-01

    A scheme to generate the stationary entanglement of two distant coupled optical cavities placed optical parametric amplifiers is proposed. We study how the optical parametric amplifiers can affect the entanglement behaviors of the movable mirrors and the cavity fields. With the existence of optical parametric amplifiers, we show that larger stationary entanglement of optical and mechanical modes can be obtained and the entanglement increases with the increasing parametric gain. Especially, the degree of entanglement between the two cavity fields is more pronouncedly enhanced. Moreover, for a fixed parametric gain, the entanglement of distant cavity optomechanical systems increases as the input laser power is increased.

  8. Formation of uniform fringe pattern free from diffraction noise at LDA measurement volume using holographic imaging configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study we have proposed a technique for improving fringe quality at laser Doppler anemometry measurement volume in real time using single hololens imaging configuration over conventional imaging configuration with Gaussian beam optics. In order to remove interference fringe gradients as well as higher order diffraction noise formed at measurement volume in the former approach, a combined hololens imaging system has also been proposed. For qualitative as well as quantitative analysis of fringes formed at measurement volume, atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis has been performed.

  9. Parametric amplification by coupled flux qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Rehák, M.; Neilinger, P.; Grajcar, M.; Oelsner, G.; Hübner, U.; Meyer, H.-G.; Il'ichev, E.

    2014-04-21

    We report parametric amplification of a microwave signal in a Kerr medium formed from superconducting qubits. Two mutually coupled flux qubits, embedded in the current antinode of a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator, are used as a nonlinear element. Shared Josephson junctions provide the qubit-resonator coupling, resulting in a device with a tunable Kerr constant (up to 3 × 10{sup −3}) and a measured gain of about 20 dB. This arrangement represents a unit cell which can be straightforwardly extended to a quasi one-dimensional quantum metamaterial with large tunable Kerr nonlinearity, providing a basis for implementation of wide-band travelling wave parametric amplifiers.

  10. A multimode electromechanical parametric resonator array

    PubMed Central

    Mahboob, I.; Mounaix, M.; Nishiguchi, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Electromechanical resonators have emerged as a versatile platform in which detectors with unprecedented sensitivities and quantum mechanics in a macroscopic context can be developed. These schemes invariably utilise a single resonator but increasingly the concept of an array of electromechanical resonators is promising a wealth of new possibilities. In spite of this, experimental realisations of such arrays have remained scarce due to the formidable challenges involved in their fabrication. In a variation to this approach, we identify 75 harmonic vibration modes in a single electromechanical resonator of which 7 can also be parametrically excited. The parametrically resonating modes exhibit vibrations with only 2 oscillation phases which are used to build a binary information array. We exploit this array to execute a mechanical byte memory, a shift-register and a controlled-NOT gate thus vividly illustrating the availability and functionality of an electromechanical resonator array by simply utilising higher order vibration modes. PMID:24658349

  11. Rayleigh-type parametric chemical oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-09-28

    We consider a nonlinear chemical dynamical system of two phase space variables in a stable steady state. When the system is driven by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter at a frequency twice the output frequency and the strength of perturbation exceeds a threshold, the system undergoes sustained Rayleigh-type periodic oscillation, wellknown for parametric oscillation in pipe organs and distinct from the usual forced quasiperiodic oscillation of a damped nonlinear system where the system is oscillatory even in absence of any external forcing. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric chemical oscillation is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well known models of chemical dynamics, chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and iodine-clock reactions.

  12. Dynamics of weakly coupled parametrically forced oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado Sánchez, P.; Porter, J.; Tinao, I.; Laverón-Simavilla, A.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of two weakly coupled parametric oscillators are studied in the neighborhood of the primary subharmonic instability. The nature of both primary and secondary instabilities depends in a critical way on the permutation symmetries, if any, that remain after coupling is considered, and this depends on the relative phases of the parametric forcing terms. Detailed bifurcation sets, revealing a complex series of transitions organized in part by Bogdanov-Takens points, are calculated for representative sets of parameters. In the particular case of out-of-phase forcing the predictions of the coupled oscillator model are compared with direct numerical simulations and with recent experiments on modulated cross waves. Both the initial Hopf bifurcation and the subsequent saddle-node heteroclinic bifurcation are confirmed.

  13. Diode-pumped optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, A.R.; Hemmati, H.; Farr, W.H.

    1996-02-01

    Diode-pumped optical parametric oscillation has been demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge in a single Nd:MgO:LiNbO{sub 3} nonlinear crystal. The crystal is pumped by a semiconductor diode laser array at 812 nm. The Nd{sup 3+} ions absorb the 812-nm radiation to generate 1084-nm laser oscillation. On internal {ital Q} switching the 1084-nm radiation pumps the LiNbO{sub 3} host crystal that is angle cut at 46.5{degree} and generates optical parametric oscillation. The oscillation threshold that is due to the 1084-nm laser pump with a pulse length of 80 ns in a 1-mm-diameter beam was measured to be {approx_equal}1 mJ and produced 0.5-mJ output at 3400-nm signal wavelength. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  14. Rayleigh-type parametric chemical oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-09-01

    We consider a nonlinear chemical dynamical system of two phase space variables in a stable steady state. When the system is driven by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter at a frequency twice the output frequency and the strength of perturbation exceeds a threshold, the system undergoes sustained Rayleigh-type periodic oscillation, wellknown for parametric oscillation in pipe organs and distinct from the usual forced quasiperiodic oscillation of a damped nonlinear system where the system is oscillatory even in absence of any external forcing. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric chemical oscillation is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well known models of chemical dynamics, chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and iodine-clock reactions.

  15. Nondegenerate optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Jovanovic, Igor; Ebbers, Christopher A.

    2005-03-22

    A system provides an input pump pulse and a signal pulse. A first dichroic beamsplitter is highly reflective for the input signal pulse and highly transmissive for the input pump pulse. A first optical parametric amplifier nonlinear crystal transfers part of the energy from the input pump pulse to the input signal pulse resulting in a first amplified signal pulse and a first depleted pump pulse. A second dichroic beamsplitter is highly reflective for the first amplified signal pulse and highly transmissive for the first depleted pump pulse. A second optical parametric amplifier nonlinear crystal transfers part of the energy from the first depleted pump pulse to the first amplified signal pulse resulting in a second amplified signal pulse and a second depleted pump pulse. A third dichroic beamsplitter receives the second amplified signal pulse and the second depleted pump pulse. The second depleted pump pulse is discarded.

  16. Rayleigh-type parametric chemical oscillation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-09-28

    We consider a nonlinear chemical dynamical system of two phase space variables in a stable steady state. When the system is driven by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter at a frequency twice the output frequency and the strength of perturbation exceeds a threshold, the system undergoes sustained Rayleigh-type periodic oscillation, wellknown for parametric oscillation in pipe organs and distinct from the usual forced quasiperiodic oscillation of a damped nonlinear system where the system is oscillatory even in absence of any external forcing. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric chemical oscillation is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well known models of chemical dynamics, chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and iodine-clock reactions.

  17. Dynamics of weakly coupled parametrically forced oscillators.

    PubMed

    Salgado Sánchez, P; Porter, J; Tinao, I; Laverón-Simavilla, A

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of two weakly coupled parametric oscillators are studied in the neighborhood of the primary subharmonic instability. The nature of both primary and secondary instabilities depends in a critical way on the permutation symmetries, if any, that remain after coupling is considered, and this depends on the relative phases of the parametric forcing terms. Detailed bifurcation sets, revealing a complex series of transitions organized in part by Bogdanov-Takens points, are calculated for representative sets of parameters. In the particular case of out-of-phase forcing the predictions of the coupled oscillator model are compared with direct numerical simulations and with recent experiments on modulated cross waves. Both the initial Hopf bifurcation and the subsequent saddle-node heteroclinic bifurcation are confirmed.

  18. Rayleigh-type parametric chemical oscillation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shyamolina; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-09-28

    We consider a nonlinear chemical dynamical system of two phase space variables in a stable steady state. When the system is driven by a time-dependent sinusoidal forcing of a suitable scaling parameter at a frequency twice the output frequency and the strength of perturbation exceeds a threshold, the system undergoes sustained Rayleigh-type periodic oscillation, wellknown for parametric oscillation in pipe organs and distinct from the usual forced quasiperiodic oscillation of a damped nonlinear system where the system is oscillatory even in absence of any external forcing. Our theoretical analysis of the parametric chemical oscillation is corroborated by full numerical simulation of two well known models of chemical dynamics, chlorite-iodine-malonic acid and iodine-clock reactions. PMID:26429035

  19. Parametric Model of an Aerospike Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    A suite of computer codes was assembled to simulate the performance of an aerospike engine and to generate the engine input for the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories. First an engine simulator module was developed that predicts the aerospike engine performance for a given mixture ratio, power level, thrust vectoring level, and altitude. This module was then used to rapidly generate the aerospike engine performance tables for axial thrust, normal thrust, pitching moment, and specific thrust. Parametric engine geometry was defined for use with the engine simulator module. The parametric model was also integrated into the iSIGHT multidisciplinary framework so that alternate designs could be determined. The computer codes were used to support in-house conceptual studies of reusable launch vehicle designs.

  20. Parametric Model of an Aerospike Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    A suite of computer codes was assembled to simulate the performance of an aerospike engine and to generate the engine input for the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories. First an engine simulator module was developed that predicts the aerospike engine performance for a given mixture ratio, power level, thrust vectoring level, and altitude. This module was then used to rapidly generate the aerospike engine performance tables for axial thrust, normal thrust, pitching moment, and specific thrust. Parametric engine geometry was defined for use with the engine simulator module. The parametric model was also integrated into the iSIGHTI multidisciplinary framework so that alternate designs could be determined. The computer codes were used to support in-house conceptual studies of reusable launch vehicle designs.