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Sample records for paranasal sinus cancer

  1. What's New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer What’s New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research ... About Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers? What’s New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research ...

  2. Olfactory Training in Improving Sense of Smell After Radiation Therapy in Patients With Paranasal Sinus or Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-06

    Stage 0 Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage 0 Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage I Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage I Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage II Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage II Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IIA Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IIB Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage III Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IV Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVA Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVB Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVC Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVC Paranasal Sinus Cancer

  3. [Nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer].

    PubMed

    Peyraga, G; Lafond, C; Pointreau, Y; Giraud, P; Maingon, P

    2016-09-01

    The nasal cavity and parasinusal cancer are rare (10% of tumors of the head and neck) and are mainly represented by squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity or the maxillary sinus and adenocarcinoma of the ethmoid sinus (occupational disease, wood dust). The most common clinical sign is nasal obstruction, but tumors can also manifest as rhinorrhea and/or epistaxis (usually unilateral signs). A magnetic resonance imaging of the facial structure is systematic for staging before treatment. The treatment consists of a first surgery if the patient is operable with a resectable tumor. If it is not the case, the treatment consists of radiotherapy (RT) associated with chemotherapy (CT) according to the initial data (T3/T4 or N+). After first surgery, RT is indicated (except T1N0 with complete resection) associated with a CT based on postoperative data (capsular effraction or incomplete resection). Lymph node irradiation is considered case by case, but is indicated in any nodal involvement. RT must be an intensity modulated RT (IMRT), static or dynamic, and must be imagery guided (IGRT). According to ICRU 83, doses to organs at risk and target volumes must be carried. Finally, after a post-treatment baseline imaging between 2 and 4 months, monitoring will be alternated with the ENT surgeon every 2 or 3 months for 2 years, then every 4 to 6 months for 5 years.

  4. What Are the Key Statistics about Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses occur in the maxillary sinuses or in the nasal cavity. They are ... Diagnosis, and Staging Treatment After Treatment Back To Top Imagine a world free from cancer. Help make ...

  5. Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content ASCO Conquer Cancer Foundation Journal of Clinical Oncology Journal of Oncology Practice ASCO University Donate eNEWS SIGNUP f Cancer. ... of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. ...

  6. How Are Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nasal cavity or ethmoid sinuses. T categories for maxillary sinus cancer TX: Primary (main) tumor cannot be ... the nose from the brain), and/or the maxillary sinus. T4a: Tumor has grown into other structures ...

  7. Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer (Treatment Options by Stage)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor sizes. The following stages are used for maxillary sinus cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In ... are found in the innermost lining of the maxillary sinus . These abnormal cells may become cancer and ...

  8. Stages of Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor sizes. The following stages are used for maxillary sinus cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In ... are found in the innermost lining of the maxillary sinus . These abnormal cells may become cancer and ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor sizes. The following stages are used for maxillary sinus cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In ... are found in the innermost lining of the maxillary sinus . These abnormal cells may become cancer and ...

  10. General Information about Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor sizes. The following stages are used for maxillary sinus cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In ... are found in the innermost lining of the maxillary sinus . These abnormal cells may become cancer and ...

  11. What Happens After Treatment For Nasal Cavity or Paranasal Sinus Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back: Cancer Recurrence . Help for trouble swallowing and nutrition problems Cancers of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses and their treatments can sometimes cause problems such as trouble swallowing, dry ... due to poor nutrition. Some people may need to adjust what they ...

  12. ACR appropriateness criteria(®) nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancers.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Smith, Richard V; Yom, Sue S; Beitler, Jonathan J; Busse, Paul M; Cooper, Jay S; Hanna, Ehab Y; Jones, Christopher U; Koyfman, Shlomo A; Quon, Harry; Ridge, John A; Saba, Nabil F; Worden, Francis; Yao, Min; Salama, Joseph K

    2017-03-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Here, we present the Appropriateness Criteria for cancers arising in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses (maxillary, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinuses). This includes clinical presentation, prognostic factors, principles of management, and treatment outcomes. Controversies regarding management of cervical lymph nodes are discussed. Rare and unusual nasal cavity cancers, such as esthesioneuroblastoma and sinonasal undifferentiated carcinomas, are included. © 2016 American College of Radiology. Head Neck, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 407-418, 2017.

  13. A case-control study of cancer of the nose and paranasal sinuses and occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Comba, P; Battista, G; Belli, S; de Capua, B; Merler, E; Orsi, D; Rodella, S; Vindigni, C; Axelson, O

    1992-01-01

    The association between nasal cancer and various occupations was investigated in a case-control study in the provinces of Verona and Vicenza (northeastern Italy) and Siena (central Italy). Cases of malignant epithelial neoplasm of the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses diagnosed in the years 1982-1987 in the hospitals of Verona, Legnago, Bussolengo, Vicenza, and Siena comprised the study. Controls were patients admitted to the same hospitals as the cases, with any diagnosis except chronic rhino-sinusal disease and nasal bleeding. Age, gender, residency, and date of admission were taken into account by matching. Cases and controls, or their next of kin, were interviewed or required to fill in a mailed questionnaire; the overall response rate was 70%. Altogether, 78 cases and 254 controls provided information on occupational history. Significantly increased risks were associated (in males) with work in the wood industry (odds ratio [O.R.]: 5.8; 90% confidence interval [C.I.]: (2.2-16) and in the leather industry (6.8; 1.9-25). Textile workers, furnacemen, construction workers, and workers with possible exposure to organic dusts showed increased risks even if statistical significance was not reached.

  14. Cancer of the nose and paranasal sinuses in the metal industry: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Comba, P; Barbieri, P G; Battista, G; Belli, S; Ponterio, F; Zanetti, D; Axelson, O

    1992-03-01

    The association between nasal cancer and work in the metal industry was investigated in a case-control study located in the province of Brescia, north eastern Italy. Thirty five cases of malignant epithelial neoplasms of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses who were resident in the province of Brescia and diagnosed or treated by the ear, nose, and throat department and the radiotherapy unit (Centro Alte Energie) of the Brescia Hospital in the years 1980-9 were included in the study. Controls (102) were patients affected by benign and malignant neoplasms of the head and neck who were resident in the Brescia Province and matched the cases by age and sex. All the subjects were interviewed by telephone. Metal workers showed an increased risk of nasal cancer (odds ratio (OR) 3.1; 90% confidence interval (90% CI) 0.48-20); a higher risk was associated with work in foundries (OR 5.9; 90 CI 0.77-46). Work in wood, leather, and textile industries was also associated with increased risk of nasal cancer.

  15. Paranasal sinus obliteration in Wegener granulomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Roberts, R.L.; Fauci, A.S.

    1982-08-01

    The authors report 14 cases of Wegener granulomatosis in which one or more paranasal sinuses were obliterated by bone. The maxillary antra were involved in all cases, with the other sinuses being affected less frequently. These changes are thought to result from chronic bacterial sinusitis superimposed on the granulomatous vasculitic process. Computed tomography dramatically demonstrated the bone changes, consisting of a combination of sinus wall thickening and trabeculated new bone formation within the sinuses.

  16. The use of acrylic resin oral prosthesis in radiation therapy of oral cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Oral, K.; Aramamy, M.A.

    1982-07-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity and the paranasal sinuses, the extent to which the tissues of the oral cavity are included in the radiation treatment portals will determine the severity of the oral discomfort during treatment. This will affect the nutritional status of the patients, and may eventually affect the total dose of radiation which the patients can receive for treatment of their cancers. In cooperation with the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Department, an acrylic resin oral prosthesis was developed. This prosthesis is easy to use and can be made for each individual patient within 24 hours. It allows for maximum sparing of the normal tissues in the oral cavity and can be modified for shielding of backscattered electrons from heavy metals in the teeth. We have also found that acrylic resin extensions can be built onto the posterior edge of post-maxillectomy obturators; this extension can be used as a carrier for radioactive sources to deliver radiation to deep seated tumor modules in the paranasal sinuses.

  17. Paranasal sinus mucoceles: our clinical experiments

    PubMed Central

    Topdag, Murat; Iseri, Mete; Sari, Fatih; Erdogan, Selvet; Keskin, I Gurkan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We present the clinical and radiological features, treatment protocols, and medium-long-term results of our patients following surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele, along with a review of the relevant literature. Materials and methods: A total of 18 patients (11 women and 7 men) who underwent surgery for paranasal sinus mucocele at Kocaeli University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, between 2006 and 2013 were examined retrospectively. The mean patient age was 41 (range 4-73). Demographic and radiological features, symptoms, treatment protocols, and postoperative outcomes were recorded. Results: The most frequently affected sinus was the maxillary sinus (n=9, 50%) followed by the frontal sinus (n=6, 33%) and sphenoidal sinus (n=3, 16%). The main symptom was headache. Endoscopic marsupialization of the mucocele was applied in all 18 patients, while frontal sinus exploration with the osteoplastic flap procedure was performed in one patient and the Caldwell-Luc operation was performed in another patient. The Caldwell-Luc procedure was subsequently required in one patient (6%) and endoscopic revision surgery was required in another patient (6%). Conclusion: Sinus mucocele that enlarges, eroding the surrounding bone tissue, and induces various clinical symptoms due to the impression of the expansile mass, is treated surgically, and must be planned carefully to prevent serious complications. PMID:26770462

  18. Adenosquamous carcinoma of paranasal sinuses and Kartagener syndrome: an unusual combination.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Syeda Uzma; Hussain, Syed Iqbal; Quadri, Shaheen

    2014-03-01

    A 34 years old non-smoker male patient reported with growth of right maxillary region which on histopathology confirmed adenosquamous carcinoma of nose and paranasal sinus. Patient also had total situs inversus including dextrocardia, bronchiectasis and sinusitis. His blood group was AB negative. This association of Kartagener syndrome with adenosquamous carcinoma of paranasal sinuses has never been reported. Carcinoma of paranasal sinuses accounts only 0.3% of all cancers. Adenosquamous carcinoma makes only 2% of the nose and paranasal sinuses tumours. Kartagener syndrome, AB negative blood group and adenosquamous carcinoma of paranasal sinuses all are extremely rare clinical conditions found in populations and the combination of all three in the same patient have never been reported to the best of authors' knowledge.

  19. Paranasal Sinus Involvement in Metastatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Fadel, Francois; Smith, Peter R.; Ayaz, Asim; Sundaram, Krishnamurthi

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic carcinoma involving the paranasal sinuses is uncommon. One hundred-sixty seven cases have been published in the literature since 1951. Symptoms, signs, and rhinoscopic and imaging findings are often nonspecific, and the diagnosis may be missed for considerable time. Therefore, a high level of suspicion is warranted in patients with known malignancies presenting with persistent or recurrent rhinosinusitis or facial complaints. PMID:23946928

  20. Psittacine paranasal sinus--a new definition of compartments.

    PubMed

    Artmann, A; Henninger, W

    2001-12-01

    Documentation of the psittacine paranasal sinuses has been limited. To provide more published detail, spiral computed tomography (CT) was used to scan the cephalic and cervical region from cadavers of 10 psittacine birds (Ara ararauna, Ara chloroptera, Ara macao, and Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus). Skeletal studies, histologic examinations, and evaluation of deep-frozen sections and anatomic preparations confirmed the results of the CT scans. New morphologic details of the paranasal sinus and some compartments were discovered. The paranasal sinuses of these macaws consist of two unpaired rostral compartments, followed caudally by eight paired compartments. Histologic examinations revealed that the walls of the paranasal sinuses consist of flat or cubic monolayer epithelium with underlying connective tissue. The described method of CT examination of these macaws, especially the positioning, scan orientation and parameters, and documentation of the normal paranasal sinus, provides a basis for future clinical use of CT.

  1. Aspergillosis of the nose and paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed Central

    Milroy, C M; Blanshard, J D; Lucas, S; Michaels, L

    1989-01-01

    Fulminant aspergillosis was diagnosed on nasal biopsy in a 49 year old man who had features of an aspergilloma. Further postmortem examination of this area was performed and the results were contrasted with the histological features of other Aspergillus infections. The nasal biopsy specimen and postmortem examination showed infiltrating Aspergillus hyphae with tissue necrosis and little inflammatory response. The hyphae were easily seen with routine stains. This contrasts with the findings in invasive aspergillosis where there is fibrosis and a granulomatous response to the Aspergillus hyphae. The hyphae are seen in giant cells using fungal stains. In the saprophytic infections aspergilloma and allergic Aspergillus sinusitis there is no tissue invasion or destruction. Aspergillus infections of the nose and paranasal sinuses often require biopsy for accurate diagnosis. As treatment varies pathologists need to be able to distinguish the different patterns of infection. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 PMID:2921352

  2. The paranasal sinuses: the last frontier in craniofacial biology.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Samuel

    2008-11-01

    This special issue of the Anatomical Record explores the presence and diversity of paranasal sinuses in distinct vertebrate groups. The following topics are addressed in particular: dinosaur physiology; development; physiology; adaptation; imaging; and primate systematics. A variety of approaches and techniques are used to examine and characterize the diversity of paranasal sinus pneumatization in a wide spectrum of vertebrates. These range from dissection to histology, from plain X-rays to computer tomography, from comparative anatomy to natural experimental settings, from mathematical computation to computer model simulation, and 2D to 3D reconstructions. The articles in this issue are a combination of literature review and new, hypothesis-driven anatomical research that highlights the complexities of paranasal sinus growth and development; ontogenetic and disease processes; physiology; paleontology; primate systematics; and human evolution. The issue incorporates a wide variety of vertebrates, encompassing a period of over 65 million years, in an effort to offer insight into the diversity of the paranasal sinus complexes through time and space, and thereby providing a greater understanding and appreciation of these special spaces within the cranium.

  3. Paranasal sinuses malignancies: A 12-year review of clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sarafraz, Alireza; Chamani, Mojtaba; Derakhshandeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Inadequate epidemiologic investigations of the paranasal sinuses malignancies prompted this retrospective study with special emphasis on a major group of 111 tumors. Material and Methods Clinical records of 111 patients with histologically confirmed malignant tumors of the paranasal sinuses were investigated retrospectively from April 2000 to January 2012. Collection of data included demographic information, clinical manifestations, treatment plans, and histopathology of the tumor. Results There were 69 (62.16%) male and 42 (37.83%) female patients (male-to-female ratio of 1.6:1), with a median age of 49±12.2 years (range 21 to 88 years). A high level of occurrence was noticed in the fifth (26.3%) decade of life. The most frequent histological types were squamous cell carcinoma (43.5%) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (19%). Among clinical manifestations, nasal obstruction was the most frequent followed by diplopia, and facial swelling. Fifty three patients (47.74%) were treated with combined approach of surgery and radiation therapy. Conclusions Paranasal sinuses malignancies are rare conditions with nonspecific symptoms which make early diagnosis of the lesions more challenging. The optimal therapeutic protocol for patients suffering from these tumors is still a somewhat controversial entity and requires further studies. Key words:Paranasal sinuses, malignancy, surgery,radiotherapy. PMID:27475693

  4. Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the paranasal sinuses and orbit

    PubMed Central

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Menon, Kavitha R; Jones, Graeme L; Whittet, Heiki; Williams, Wynne

    2012-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastasis to the paranasal sinuses. The authors review RCC and its potential for sinonasal metastasis and discuss the variable presentation and need for clinical suspicion for early diagnosis and treatment. A 74-year-old man presented with numbness of the left side of the face, reduced visual acuity and ptosis 12 years after nephrectomy for RCC. Imaging studies showed a lesion in the left pterygopalatine fossa and the histological features supported the diagnosis of metastatic RCC. RCC metastasis to the paranasal sinuses is very rare and can present with various symptoms depending on the affected organ. These symptoms occasionally are the initial manifestation of renal RCC and it is very important to recognise them so that the patient receives the appropriate therapy to improve survival. PMID:22605794

  5. Anatomic variations of posterior paranasal sinuses and optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Efendić, Alma; Muharemović, Edin; Skomorac, Rasim; Bečulić, Hakija; Šestić, Sabina; Halilović, Benjamin; Mahmić-Kaknjo, Mersiha

    2017-02-01

    Aim To define direct anatomical relations of the sphenoidal (alae minores), ethmoidal sinuses and optic nerve, with an emphasis on determining the effect of age on pneumatisation and dehiscence. Methods This retrospective, descriptive study involved 60 consecutive patients: 30 patients younger than 30 and30 patients older than 60 years of age. All patients underwent computerized tomography(CT). The relationship of the optic nerve and the sphenoidal and ethmoidal sinuses was classified. The presence of dehiscence in the bone structures, forming the optic canal, was checked. Dehiscence was defined as absence of visible bone density located between the sinus and the optic nerve. Protrusion of the optic nerve into the sphenoidal sinus was defined as optic nerve surrounded by pneumatised space. Results The most common type of relation between the optic nerve and sphenoidal sinus was type I, where the optic nerve was immediately adjacent to the lateral or superior wall of the sphenoidal sinus, without impression on the sinus wall. Dehiscence was documented in 15 (25%) cases, it was more common in older patients (8, 27%) than in younger ones (7, 23%). The pneumatisation processes were more frequent in patients over 60 (5, 17%) than in those younger than 30 years (4, 13%). Conclusion Surgeons and ophthalmologists should be aware of high frequency of dehiscence of sphenoidal sinus walls when treating adult patients in our population, especially when evaluating risks and complications of surgical procedures or when diagnosing inflammatory or tumorous processes in the close vicinity of posterior paranasal sinuses.

  6. [Mucinous adenocarcinoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses, an occupational disease?].

    PubMed

    Rüttner, J R; Makek, M

    1985-12-21

    In Great Britain and other countries there have been reports of an increased frequency of adenocarcinoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses, mimicking histologically mucinous colonic carcinoma, among workers exposed to wood dust and workers in the leather industry. No such cases have been reported so far in Switzerland. 31 patients with this type of adenocarcinoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses observed between 1953 and 1984 have been reviewed. In 13 of these patients there was occupational exposure to wood dust, and 4 were shoemakers. The study suggests an association of this type of nasal carcinoma with occupational exposure to wood dust and leatherwork. The nature of the postulated carcinogen is unknown. The authors propose further investigations to define the magnitude of the cancer risk associated with exposure to wood dust and leather.

  7. Unresectable Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinuses: Outcomes and Toxicities

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Nelson, Carl J.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Stegman, Lauren D.; Wu, Abraham J.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Pfister, David G.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcomes and toxicity in patients with unresectable paranasal sinus carcinoma treated with radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1990 and December 2006, 39 patients with unresectable Stage IVB paranasal sinus carcinoma were treated definitively with chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (n = 35, 90%) or with radiotherapy alone (n = 4, 10%). Patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (n = 18, 46%), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (n = 12, 31%), or conventional radiotherapy (n = 9, 23%) to a median treatment dose of 70 Gy. Most patients received concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy (n = 32, 82%) and/or concomitant boost radiotherapy (n = 29, 74%). Results: With a median follow-up of 90 months, the 5-year local progression-free survival, regional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 21%, 61%, 51%, 14%, and 15%, respectively. Patients primarily experienced local relapse (n = 25, 64%), mostly within the irradiated field (n = 22). Nine patients developed neck relapses; however none of the 4 patients receiving elective neck irradiation had a nodal relapse. In 13 patients acute Grade 3 mucositis developed. Severe late toxicities occurred in 2 patients with radionecrosis and 1 patient with unilateral blindness 7 years after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (77 Gy to the optic nerve). The only significant factor for improved local progression-free survival and overall survival was a biologically equivalent dose of radiation {>=}65 Gy. Conclusions: Treatment outcomes for unresectable paranasal sinus carcinoma are poor, and combined-modality treatment is needed that is both more effective and associated with less morbidity. The addition of elective neck irradiation may improve regional control.

  8. Outcome of T4 (International Union Against Cancer Staging System, 7th edition) or Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma Treated With Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashii, Haruko; Ohkawa, Ayako; Moritake, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Tabuchi, Keiji; Wada, Tetsuro; Hara, Akira; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and toxicity of treatment for unresectable carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (NCPS) treated with proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients (13 men, 4 women) with unresectable carcinomas of the NCPS who underwent PBT at University of Tsukuba between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. The patients' median age was 62 years (range, 30-83 years). The tumors were located in the nasal cavity in 3 patients, the frontal sinus in 1, the ethmoid sinus in 9, and the maxillary sinus in 4. The clinical stage was Stage IVA in 5 cases, IVB in 10, and recurrent in 2. The tumors were deemed unresectable for medical reasons in 16 patients and because of refusal at a previous hospital 4 months earlier in 1 patient. All the patients received PBT irradiation dose of 22-82.5 GyE and a total of 72.4-89.6 GyE over 30-64 fractions (median 78 GyE over 36 fractions) with X-ray, with attention not exceeding the delivery of 50 GyE to the optic chiasm and brainstem. Results: The overall survival rate was 47.1% at 2 years and 15.7% at 5 years, and the local control rate was 35.0% at 2 years and 17.5% at 5 years. Invasion of the frontal or sphenoid sinus was a prognostic factor for overall survival or local control. Late toxicity of more than Grade 3 was found in 2 patients (brain necrosis in 1 and ipsilateral blindness in 1); however, no mortal adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy enabled a reduced irradiation dose to the optic chiasm and brainstem, enabling the safe treatment of unresectable carcinomas in the NCPS. Superior or posterior extension of the tumor influenced patient outcome.

  9. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as a Paranasal Sinus Mass: The Importance of Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Altissimi, Giancarlo; Turchetta, Rosaria; Rigante, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Metastases in the paranasal sinuses are rare; renal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer that metastasizes to this region. We present the case of a patient with a 4-month history of a rapidly growing mass of the nasal pyramid following a nasal trauma, associated with spontaneous epistaxis and multiple episodes of hematuria. Cranial CT scan and MRI showed an ethmoid mass extending to the choanal region, the right orbit, and the right frontal sinus with an initial intracranial extension. Patient underwent surgery with a trans-sinusal frontal approach using a bicoronal incision combined with an anterior midfacial degloving; histological exam was compatible with a metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Following histological findings, a total body CT scan showed a solitary 6 cm mass in the upper posterior pole of the left kidney identified as the primary tumor. Although rare, metastatic renal cell carcinoma should always be suspected in patients with nasal or paranasal masses, especially if associated with symptoms suggestive of a systemic involvement such as hematuria. A correct early-stage diagnosis of metastatic RCC can considerably improve survival rate in these patients; preoperative differential diagnosis with contrast-enhanced imaging is fundamental for the correct treatment and follow-up strategy. PMID:28168075

  10. Minimally invasive transnasal approach for primary ectopic meningioma of the paranasal sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Szczygielski, Kornel; Cierniak, Szczepan; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery is a standard procedure in the treatment of various pathologies such as chronic sinusitis or some types of neoplasms. The transnasal approach to tumours of paranasal sinuses is favourable due to functional and aesthetic reasons. We report a rare case of a large primary ectopic meningioma of the paranasal sinuses in a 48-year-old woman referred to the Otolaryngology Clinic due to the incidental finding of a pathologic mass visualised on the orthopantomography picture. After diagnosis, the patient was successfully treated with radical transnasal surgery performed under endoscopic vision. In a 1-year follow-up there were no signs of tumour recurrence. PMID:26649099

  11. Diseases of the nose and paranasal sinuses in child

    PubMed Central

    Stenner, Markus; Rudack, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of the pediatric nose and nasal sinuses as well as neighboring anatomical structures encompass a variety of pathologies, especially of inflammatory nature. Congenital disease, such as malformations and structural deviations of the nasal septum, as well as systemic metabolic pathologies affecting the nose and sinuses, rarely require medical therapy from an Otolaryngologist. The immunological function of the mucosa and genetic factors play a role in the development of disease in the pediatric upper airway tract, especially due to the constantly changing anatomy in this growth phase. Disease description of the nose and nasal sinuses due to mid-facial growth must also take developmental age differences (infant, toddler, preschool, and school age) into account. Epidemiological examinations and evidence based studies are often lacking in the pediatric population. The wide range of inflammatory diseases of the nose and paranasal sinuses, such as the acute and chronic rhinosinusitis, the allergic rhinitis, and adenoid disease, play a role in the susceptibility of a child to infection. The susceptibility to infection depends on the pediatric age structure (infant, young child) and has yet to be well defined. The acute rhinosinusitis in children develops after a viral infection of the upper airways, also referred to as the “common cold” in the literature. It usually spontaneously heals within ten days without any medical therapy. Antibiotic therapy is prudent in complicated episodes of ARS. The antibiotic therapy is reserved for children with complications or associated disease, such as bronchial asthma and/or chronic bronchitis. A chronic rhinosinusitis is defined as the inflammatory change in the nasal mucosa and nasal sinus mucosa, in which the corresponding symptoms persist for over 12 weeks. The indication for CT-imaging of the nasal sinuses is reserved for cases of chronic rhinosinusitis that have been successfully treated with medication. A staged

  12. Human paranasal sinuses and selective brain cooling: a ventilation system activated by yawning?

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Hack, Gary D

    2011-12-01

    The function of the paranasal sinuses has been a controversial subject since the time of Galen, with many different theories advanced about their biological significance. For one, the paranasal sinuses have been regarded as warmers of respiratory air, when in actuality these structures appear to function in cooling the blood. In fact, human paranasal sinuses have been shown to have higher volumes in individuals living in warmer climates, and thus may be considered radiators of the brain. The literature suggests that the transfer of cool venous blood from the paranasal sinuses to the dura mater may provide a mechanism for the convection process of cooling produced by the evaporation of mucus within human sinuses. In turn, the dura mater may transmit these temperature changes, initiated by the cool venous blood from the heat-dissipating surfaces of the sinuses, to the cerebrospinal fluid compartments. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated in cadaveric dissections that the thin bony posterior wall of the maxillary sinus serves as an origin for both medial and lateral pterygoid muscle segments, an anatomic finding that had been previously underappreciated in the literature. The present authors hypothesize that the thin posterior wall of the maxillary sinus may flex during yawning, operating like a bellows pump, actively ventilating the sinus system, and thus facilitating brain cooling. Such a powered ventilation system has not previously been described in humans, although an analogous system has been reported in birds.

  13. On-Board Imaging Validation of Optically Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Positioning System for Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Paranasal Sinus and Skull Base Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Murphy, James D.; Chu, Karen P.M.; Hsu, Annie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. Results: The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 {+-} 1.1 mm and 3.9 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Conclusion: Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

  14. [Cholesterol granuloma in paranasal sinus. An unfrequent pseudotumor in maxillary sinuses].

    PubMed

    García de Hombre, Alina María; Pérez Peñate, Armando

    2005-01-01

    The cholesterol granuloma is well known in the middle ear, in the mastoid antrum and the air cells of temporal bone, mostly related to a chronic infectious process. There are other localizations such as the pleura, lung, pericardium, kidneys, arterial wall, nerves, brain, testicles, lymphatic ganglion and in the paranasals sinuses. Its localization in the mediofacial area is very unfrequent, having only been described 44 cases up to the year 2002. We present a 42 year-old patient, who required surgical treatment because of a increase in the volume of area her left facial of one month's old. It resulted to be secundary to an expansion of the maxilar sinus, such as seen on the computerized tomography carried out on the patient. The diagnosis was cholesterol granuloma, performed, through the anatomo-pathology study. We review the litterature on this subject and analyse the possible etiologic cause of this lesion, its clinic, diagnostic methodology and treatment.

  15. Endoscopic approach to the resection of adenoid cystic carcinoma of paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity: case report and own experience.

    PubMed

    Wardas, Piotr; Tymowski, Michał; Piotrowska-Seweryn, Agnieszka; Kaspera, Wojciech; Ślaska-Kaspera, Aleksandra; Markowski, Jarosław

    2015-12-12

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant tumor that might occur in nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. It is characteristic for poor prognosis, especially the solid histopathological subtype of the tumor. ACC might spread along nerves and fascias and it is usually diagnosed at advanced stage. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging together with fine-needle biopsy are the gold standards in the diagnostic procedure of the cancer. Surgery with adjuvant therapy are the most common methods of treatment. Among the surgical approaches, the functional endonasal sinus surgery seems to be the most appropriate and favorable way of treatment. In the study, the authors present a case of a 62-year-old patient with T4aN0M0 ACC tumor treated endoscopically at the Department of Laryngology and ENT Oncology, WSS No. 5 in Sosnowiec. The authors indicate the usefulness of FESS procedure in the treatment of malignancies of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. They also review the recent publications on endonasal versus open approach in similar cases. In conclusions, the authors favor endonasal approach as a mini-invasive method of surgical treatment of ACC of paranasal sinuses that results in satisfactory oncological outcome and high quality of patient's life.

  16. Two- and Three-Dimensional Anatomy of Paranasal Sinuses in Arabian Foals

    PubMed Central

    BAHAR, Sadullah; BOLAT, Durmus; DAYAN, Mustafa Orhun; PAKSOY, Yahya

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 2- and 3-dimensional (3D) anatomy and the morphometric properties of the paranasal sinuses of the foal have received little or no attention in the literature. The aim of this study was to obtain details of the paranasal sinuses using multiplane CT imaging to create 3D models and to determine morphological and morphometric data for the sinuses using the 3D models. The heads of five female foals were used in this study. The heads were scanned using computed tomography (CT) in the rostrocaudal direction. After the heads had been frozen, anatomical sections were obtained in the scan position. The 3D models of sinuses and the skull were prepared using MIMICS®. These models were used to assess the surface area and volume of the sinuses, the width, height and orientation of the apertures connecting these sinuses and finally the planar relation of the sinuses with the skull. The right and left sides of all anatomical structures, except the sphenoid sinuses, had symmetric organization on CT images and anatomical sections. The total sinus surface area and volume on both sides were 214.4 cm2 and 72.9 ml, respectively. The largest and the smallest sinuses were the frontal sinus (41.5 ml) and the middle conchal sinus (0.2 ml), respectively. It was found that the planes bounding the sinuses passed through easily palpable points on the head. In conclusion, 3D modeling in combination with conventional sectional imaging of the paranasal sinuses of the foal may help anatomists, radiologists, clinicians and veterinary students. PMID:24004969

  17. Late presentation of a paranasal sinus glass foreign body: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mangwani, Jitendra; Su, Archibald Paul

    2009-05-29

    Foreign bodies in the paranasal sinuses are rare and mostly related to maxillo-facial trauma. We treated a 47-year-old man with a late complication arising from a foreign body in the nasoethmoid sinus present for 16 years after a road traffic accident. Patients presenting with maxillo-facial injuries, especially those with lacerations due to glass or car wind-screen trauma should have thorough examination and appropriate imaging of the injury.

  18. Anatomy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in Aegyptopithecus and early Miocene African catarrhines.

    PubMed

    Rossie, James B

    2005-03-01

    Neontological comparisons suggest that paranasal sinus anatomy is diagnostic of several catarrhine clades such as Cercopithecoidea, Hominoidea, Homininae, and Ponginae. However, while the loss of sinuses in cercopithecoids is generally recognized as a derived condition, determining the polarity of character-state changes within noncercopithecoid catarrhines requires knowledge of the primitive catarrhine condition. To address this problem, the paranasal sinus anatomy of Aegyptopithecus and several early Miocene catarrhines was investigated. Two partial facial skeletons of Aegyptopithecus were subjected to computed tomography in order to reveal their internal anatomy. These data were compared with facial and palatal specimens of Proconsul, Limnopithecus, Dendropithecus, Rangwapithecus, and Kalepithecus in the National Museums of Kenya in Nairobi, and to wet and dry specimens of living taxa. Results confirm that cercopithecoid paranasal anatomy is derived, and reveal that the sinus anatomy of stem catarrhines included a hominoid-like maxillary sinus as well as an ethmofrontal system like that of hominines. Accordingly, these two features do not constitute evidence for the hominoid, hominid, or hominine status of any fossil species. Conversely, the absence of the ethmofrontal sinus system in Sivapithecus and Pongo is synapomorphic. In addition, features of the nasal cavity of Limnopithecus and Kalepithecus support previous suggestions that these taxa are stem catarrhines rather than hominoids.

  19. The paranasal air sinuses of predatory and armored dinosaurs (archosauria: theropoda and ankylosauria) and their contribution to cephalic structure.

    PubMed

    Witmer, Lawrence M; Ridgely, Ryan C

    2008-11-01

    The paranasal air sinuses and nasal cavities were studied along with other cephalic spaces (brain cavity, paratympanic sinuses) in certain dinosaurs via CT scanning and 3D visualization to document the anatomy and examine the contribution of the sinuses to the morphological organization of the head as a whole. Two representatives each of two dinosaur clades are compared: the theropod saurischians Majungasaurus and Tyrannosaurus and the ankylosaurian ornithischians Panoplosaurus and Euoplocephalus. Their extant archosaurian outgroups, birds and crocodilians (exemplified by ostrich and alligator), display a diversity of paranasal sinuses, yet they share only a single homologous antorbital sinus, which in birds has an important subsidiary diverticulum, the suborbital sinus. Both of the theropods had a large antorbital sinus that pneumatized many of the facial and palatal bones as well as a birdlike suborbital sinus. Given that the suborbital sinus interleaves with jaw muscles, the paranasal sinuses of at least some theropods (including birds) were actively ventilated rather than being dead-air spaces. Although many ankylosaurians have been thought to have had extensive paranasal sinuses, most of the snout is instead (and surprisingly) often occupied by a highly convoluted airway. Digital segmentation, coupled with 3D visualization and analysis, allows the positions of the sinuses to be viewed in place within both the skull and the head and then measured volumetrically. These quantitative data allow the first reliable estimates of dinosaur head mass and an assessment of the potential savings in mass afforded by the sinuses.

  20. Anatomical variations in the human paranasal sinus region studied by CT

    PubMed Central

    PÉREZ-PIÑAS, I.; SABATÉ, J.; CARMONA, A.; CATALINA-HERRERA, C. J.; JIMÉNEZ-CASTELLANOS, J.

    2000-01-01

    A precise knowledge of the anatomy of the paranasal sinuses is essential for the clinician. Conventional radiology does not permit a detailed study of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, and has now largely been replaced by computerised tomographic (CT) imaging. This gives an applied anatomical view of the region and the anatomical variants that are very often found. The detection of these variants to prevent potential hazards is essential for the use of current of endoscopic surgery on the sinuses. In the present work, we have studied the anatomical variants observed in the nasal fossae and paranasal sinuses in 110 Spanish subjects, using CT in the coronal plane, complemented by horizontal views. We have concentrated on the variants of the nasal septum, middle nasal concha, ethmoid unciform process and ethmoid bulla, together with others of lesser frequency. The population studied showed great anatomical variability, and a high percentage (67%) presented one or more anatomical variants. Discounting agger nasi air cells and asymmetry of both cavities of the sphenoidal sinus, which were present in all our cases, the variations most often observed were, in order, deviation of the nasal septum, the presence of a concha bullosa, bony spurs of the nasal septum and Onodi air cells. PMID:11005714

  1. Automated contralateral subtraction of dental panoramic radiographs for detecting abnormalities in paranasal sinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takeshi; Mori, Shintaro; Kaneda, Takashi; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    Inflammation in the paranasal sinus is often observed in seasonal allergic rhinitis or with colds, but is also an indication for odontogenic tumors, carcinoma of the maxillary sinus or a maxillary cyst. The detection of those findings in dental panoramic radiographs is not difficult for radiologists, but general dentists may miss the findings since they focus on treatments of teeth. The purpose of this work is to develop a contralateral subtraction method for detecting the odontogenic sinusitis region on dental panoramic radiographs. We developed a contralateral subtraction technique in paranasal sinus region, consisting of 1) image filtering of the smoothing and sobel operation for noise reduction and edge extraction, 2) image registration of mirrored image by using mutual information, and 3) image display method of subtracted pixel data. We employed 56 cases (24 normal and 32 abnormal). The abnormal regions and the normal cases were verified by a board-certified radiologist using CT scans. Observer studies with and without subtraction images were performed for 9 readers. The true-positive rate at a 50% confidence level in 7 out of 9 readers was improved, but there was no statistical significance in the difference of area-under-curve (AUC) in each radiologist. In conclusion, the contralateral subtraction images of dental panoramic radiographs may improve the detection rate of abnormal regions in paranasal sinus.

  2. Traumatic globe dislocation into the paranasal sinuses: Literature review and treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Marcio Bruno Figueiredo; Nery, André Cardoso

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic globe dislocation into the paranasal sinuses is rare. Only 24 cases have been reported in the English-language literature indexed in PUBMED. This form of injury frequently occurs as a result of high-energy blunt trauma mainly associated to traffic accidents. Traumatic globe dislocation into the paranasal sinuses can be explained by the mechanism of blowout fracture when strong blunt trauma forces are applied to the globe fracturing the thin orbital walls and displacing the eyeball. Medical and surgical management of severe globe displacement is still controversial. However, the majority of researchers agreed that the globe should be replaced into the orbital cavity as soon as possible. The present study aims to describe a case of traumatic globe dislocation into the maxillary sinus suggesting treatment guidelines based on English-language literature from 1971 to 2015.

  3. Assessment of the Diagnostic Accuracy of Limited CT Scan of Paranasal Sinuses in the Identification of Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Noorian, Vahid; Motaghi, Arya

    2012-01-01

    Background Paranasal sinus CT has high sensitivity and specificity for sinusitis. However, this modality is costly and involves greater radiation exposure than plain radiographs. Objectives We tried to compare 10-cut limited CT scan and standard CT scan in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Materials and Methods We conducted a cross sectional case series from August to December 2010 on 150 patients with non-randomized sampling method in academic hospitals related to medical school of Shahid Beheshti University of medical sciences. Using standard CT scan as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of limited series were calculated for each sinus group. Results In our study limited CT scan had a sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 94%, positive predictive value of 90% and negative predictive value of 95%. Conclusions The limited CT scan is useful for confirming the clinical diagnosis of sinusitis. PMID:23396584

  4. Anatomic reference for computed tomography of paranasal sinuses and their communication in the Egyptian buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Alsafy, M A M; El-Gendy, S A A; El Sharaby, A A

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to present an anatomic reference for computed tomography (CT) for the paranasal sinuses of adult buffalo fit the use of anatomists, radiologists, clinicians and veterinary students. CT images with the most closely corresponding cross sections of the head were selected and studied serially in a rostral to caudal progression from the level of the interdental space to the level of the nuchal line. The anatomical features were compared with the dissected heads and skulls. The paranasal sinuses of buffalo comprise dorsal conchal, middle conchal, maxillary, frontal, palatine, sphenoidal (inconstant, small and shallow when present), lacrimal and ethmoidal that were identified and labelled according to the premolar and molar teeth as landmarks. The topographic description of all the compartments, diverticula, septa and communication of the paranasal sinuses in buffalo has been presented. The relationship between the various air cavities and paranasal sinuses was easily visualized.

  5. An Analysis of the Anatomic Variations of the Paranasal Sinuses and Ethmoid Roof Using Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kaplanoglu, Hatice; Kaplanoglu, Veysel; Dilli, Alper; Toprak, Ugur; Hekimoğlu, Baki

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the Keros classification and asymmetrical distribution rates of the ethmoid roof and the frequency of anatomic variations of the paranasal sinuses. Materials and Methods: Paranasal sinus scans of 500 patients obtained using computed tomography were evaluated retrospectively. Measurements were performed using a coronal plan with right-left comparison and with distance measurement techniques. The depth of the lateral lamella was calculated by subtracting the depth of the cribriform plate from the depth of the medial ethmoid roof. The results were classified according to their Keros classification. Any asymmetries in the ethmoid roof depth and fovea ethmoidalis configuration were examined. The anatomic variations frequently encountered in paranasal sinuses (pneumatized middle concha, paradoxical middle concha, agger nasi cells, Haller cells, Onodi cells, etc.) were defined. Results: The mean height of the lateral lamella cribriform plate (LLCP) was 4.92±1.70 mm. The cases were classified as 13.4% Keros Type I, 76.1% Keros Type II, and 10.5% Keros Type III. There was asymmetry in the LLCP depths of 80% of the cases, and a configuration asymmetry in the fovea in 35% of the cases. In 32% of the cases with fovea configuration asymmetry, there was also asymmetry in the height of the right and left LLCP. The most frequent variations were nasal septum deviation (81.8%), agger nasi cells (63.8%), intralamellar air cells (45%), and concha bullosa (30%). Conclusion: Using the Keros classification for LLCP height, higher rates of Keros Type I were found in other studies than in our study. The most frequent classification was Keros Type II. The paranasal sinus variations in each patient should be carefully evaluated. The data obtained from these evaluations can prevent probable complications by informing rhinologists performing endoscopic sinus surgery about preoperative and intraoperative processes. PMID:25610263

  6. CT-based manual segmentation and evaluation of paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Pirner, S; Tingelhoff, K; Wagner, I; Westphal, R; Rilk, M; Wahl, F M; Bootz, F; Eichhorn, Klaus W G

    2009-04-01

    Manual segmentation of computed tomography (CT) datasets was performed for robot-assisted endoscope movement during functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Segmented 3D models are needed for the robots' workspace definition. A total of 50 preselected CT datasets were each segmented in 150-200 coronal slices with 24 landmarks being set. Three different colors for segmentation represent diverse risk areas. Extension and volumetric measurements were performed. Three-dimensional reconstruction was generated after segmentation. Manual segmentation took 8-10 h for each CT dataset. The mean volumes were: right maxillary sinus 17.4 cm(3), left side 17.9 cm(3), right frontal sinus 4.2 cm(3), left side 4.0 cm(3), total frontal sinuses 7.9 cm(3), sphenoid sinus right side 5.3 cm(3), left side 5.5 cm(3), total sphenoid sinus volume 11.2 cm(3). Our manually segmented 3D-models present the patient's individual anatomy with a special focus on structures in danger according to the diverse colored risk areas. For safe robot assistance, the high-accuracy models represent an average of the population for anatomical variations, extension and volumetric measurements. They can be used as a database for automatic model-based segmentation. None of the segmentation methods so far described provide risk segmentation. The robot's maximum distance to the segmented border can be adjusted according to the differently colored areas.

  7. Topographic comparative study of paranasal sinuses in adult horses by computed tomography, sinuscopy, and sectional anatomy.

    PubMed

    De Zani, D; Borgonovo, S; Biggi, M; Vignati, S; Scandella, M; Lazzaretti, S; Modina, S; Zani, D

    2010-06-01

    Clinical and radiographic investigations of paranasal sinuses in horses are difficult due to the complex anatomy of these regions, the lack of patognomonic symptoms, and the low sensitivity of conventional diagnostic techniques. The aim of this study was to produce an anatomical atlas to support computed tomography (CT) and sinuscopy of the paranasal sinuses of the adult horse. Transverse, sagittal, and dorsal CT images were acquired, and sinuscopy with both rigid and flexible endoscopes was performed. The heads were frozen and sectioned using a band saw, with the cuts aligned as close as possible with the CT transverse slices. Each CT image was compared with its corresponding anatomical section and sinuscopy image to assist in the accurate identification of specific structures.

  8. Physiology and pathophysiology of respiratory mucosa of the nose and the paranasal sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Beule, Achim G.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, anatomy and physiology of the respiratory mucosa of nose and paranasal sinuses are summarized under the aspect of its clinical significance. Basics of endonasal cleaning including mucociliary clearance and nasal reflexes, as well as defence mechanisms are explained. Physiological wound healing, aspects of endonasal topical medical therapy and typical diagnostic procedures to evaluate the respiratory functions are presented. Finally, the pathophysiologies of different subtypes of non-allergic rhinitis are outlined together with treatment recommendations. PMID:22073111

  9. Proton Beam Therapy for Unresectable Malignancies of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Kohno, Ryosuke; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Arahira, Satoko; Nishio, Teiji; Tahara, Makoto; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Kishimoto, Seiji; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The cure rate for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is low. Because irradiation with proton beams, which are characterized by their rapid fall-off at the distal end of the Bragg peak and sharp lateral penumbra, depending on energy, depth, and delivery, provide better dose distribution than X-ray irradiation, proton beam therapy (PBT) might improve treatment outcomes for conditions located in proximity to risk organs. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical profile of PBT for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 39 patients in our database fulfilling the following criteria: unresectable malignant tumors of the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses or skull base; N0M0 disease; and treatment with PBT (>60 GyE) from January 1999 to December 2006. Results: Median patient age was 57 years (range, 22-84 years); 22 of the patients were men and 17 were women. The most frequent primary site was the nasal cavity (n = 26, 67%). The local control rates at 6 months and 1 year were 84.6% and 77.0%, respectively. With a median active follow-up of 45.4 months, 3-year progression-free and overall survival were 49.1% and 59.3%, respectively. The most common acute toxicities were mild dermatitis (Grade 2, 33.3%), but no severe toxicity was observed (Grade 3 or greater, 0%). Five patients (12.8%) experienced Grade 3 to 5 late toxicities, and one treatment-related death was reported, caused by cerebrospinal fluid leakage Grade 5 (2.6%). Conclusion: These findings suggest that the clinical profile of PBT for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses make it is a promising treatment option.

  10. Paranasal sinus anatomy of Aegyptopithecus: implications for hominoid origins.

    PubMed

    Rossie, James B; Simons, Elwyn L; Gauld, Suellen C; Rasmussen, D Tab

    2002-06-11

    The East African Early Miocene apes, or proconsulids, have often been considered to be among the earliest members of the Hominoidea, as defined by the divergence of the Cercopithecoidea, but this hypothesis is only weakly supported by available fossil evidence. The ethmofrontal sinus is one of a few morphological features that may link proconsulids with later hominoids. Here we present direct evidence of an ethmofrontal sinus in an early Oligocene stem catarrhine, Aegyptopithecus zeuxis. The presence of this sinus in Aegyptopithecus suggests that its presence in proconsulids is most likely to be a retained primitive condition. The morphological evidence bearing on proconsulids' purported hominoid affinities is further weakened by this conclusion, and alternative phylogenetic possibilities, such as the placement of proconsulids as stem catarrhines are considered more likely.

  11. Paranasal sinus anatomy of Aegyptopithecus: Implications for hominoid origins

    PubMed Central

    Rossie, James B.; Simons, Elwyn L.; Gauld, Suellen C.; Rasmussen, D. Tab

    2002-01-01

    The East African Early Miocene apes, or proconsulids, have often been considered to be among the earliest members of the Hominoidea, as defined by the divergence of the Cercopithecoidea, but this hypothesis is only weakly supported by available fossil evidence. The ethmofrontal sinus is one of a few morphological features that may link proconsulids with later hominoids. Here we present direct evidence of an ethmofrontal sinus in an early Oligocene stem catarrhine, Aegyptopithecus zeuxis. The presence of this sinus in Aegyptopithecus suggests that its presence in proconsulids is most likely to be a retained primitive condition. The morphological evidence bearing on proconsulids' purported hominoid affinities is further weakened by this conclusion, and alternative phylogenetic possibilities, such as the placement of proconsulids as stem catarrhines are considered more likely. PMID:12060786

  12. [Etiological epidemiology of tumors of the nasal cavities and the paranasal sinuses].

    PubMed

    Comba, P; Belli, S

    1992-01-01

    Etiologically-oriented epidemiologic studies on cancer of the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses have been carried out since the beginning of the century. These studies showed that several chemical agents (chromates, nickel compounds, isopropylic alcohol, and mustard gas), and two occupational exposures (wood dust in the furniture industry and exposure to leather in shoe factories) were causally associated with nasal cancer. An increased risk has also been associated with several occupations (i.e. metalworker, textile worker, construction worker, and farmer) even in the apparent absence of causal agents. The first reports of an increased risk of nasal cancer in woodworkers and leather workers in Italy date back to 1980. Subsequent studies have provided estimates of the relative risk, ranging from 3.0 to 11.0 among woodworkers and from 8.1 to 47.1 among leatherworkers. Increased risks have been associated to the metal industry (relative risk ranging from 3.1 to 5.9), the textile industry (ranging from 2.9 to 17.0), the mining and construction industry (ranging from 2.3 to 5.3), and the agricultural industry (ranging from 1.9 to 3.3); all of these estimates are time- and place-specific. Moreover, the estimates are not reliable because of the small sample size, resulting from the low occurrence of the disease. The etiologic fraction for the population, taking into account both verified and suspected carcinogenic exposures, ranges between 50% and 65% in males. Relatively few cases of nasal cancer (all of them occurring in woodworkers) have been notified for workman's compensation; woodworkers with nasal cancer have received monetary compensation in Italy since 1988. Nasal cancer is an often fatal but largely preventable disease. Several verified and suspected occupational exposures are associated with this neoplasm. The reduction of dust and fumes in the air of the above mentioned work environments is recommended for reducing the occurrence of this disease.

  13. Microendoscopy of the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses via their natural orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarz, Marietta; Hopf, Juergen U. G.; Gundlach, Peter; Scherer, Hans H.; Loerke, S.; Voege, Karl H.; Lutze-Koffroth, C.; Tschepe, Johannes; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1992-08-01

    Microendoscopy of the nasal cavities and the para-nasal sinuses is a new and atraumatical method to investigate these anatomical regions which were previously inaccessible for direct visual inspection due to their special topography. By means of superfine flexible and partly actively tip controllable fiberscopes the procedure only requires local anesthesia. Microendoscopes with outside diameters of 290 to 1600 micrometers are inserted through the natural orifices or ducts of the para-nasal sinuses partly guided by actively steerable microcatheters of 5 to 9 F. The eyepiece of the scope is connected with a chip-camera simultaneously carrying the endoscopic images onto a monitor system. This new procedure contributes to a better presurgical planning and risk assessment of endonasal sinus surgery and to the avoiding of repeated x-ray imaging during the therapeutic follow up of acute and chronic para-nasal infections. Furthermore, in combination with fiber delivered laser systems, it forms the basis and technical precondition for `minimal invasive laser-assisted microsurgery' of these anatomic regions.

  14. To Preserve or Not to Preserve the Orbit in Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Camilo; Mason, Eric; Solares, C. Arturo; Bush, Carrie; Carrau, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Context The effect on survival of orbital evisceration on patients with paranasal sinus neoplasms has not been well established. Objective To review systematically the available literature concerning survival in patients who undergo surgery for paranasal sinus neoplasm with and without preservation of the eye. Data Source A retrospective meta-analysis of English and non-English articles using Medline and the Cochrane database. Eligibility Criteria Studies analyzing 5-year survival rates in patients who had orbital evisceration compared with orbital preservation for the treatment of paranasal sinus neoplasms were included in the final analysis. Data Extraction Independent review by two authors using predefined data fields. Data Synthesis A meta-analysis of four articles involving 443 patients was performed using the DerSimonian-Laird random-effects method. Results Our analysis revealed a total effect size of 0.964 in favor of preservation of the eye; however, these results are not robust, having a true effect size anywhere from 0.785 to 1.142 with a 95% confidence interval. Limitations Only retrospective observational studies were included because a prospective randomized study cannot be performed in this population. Conclusion Our study supports the notion that in select patients preservation of the eye may yield a different outcome when compared with orbital evisceration. PMID:25844298

  15. [Can dental problems have influence on difficulties in treating paranasal sinusitis in children?].

    PubMed

    Malicka, Małgorzata; Zieliński, Rafał; Piotrowska, Violetta; Andrzejewski, Jarosław; Zakrzewska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Paranasal sinusitis is a condition that is treated by a General Practitioner and in case it fails it requires specialistic therapy. In most cases the inflammation is connected with nasal mucosa infection. However, in older children and adolescents sinusitis caused by spreading of tooth and gingiva inflammatory process can be an essential therapeutic and diagnostic problem. It is most often connected with periapical lesions, complications following dental procedures and oroantral fistula inflammation. Inflammatory process originally concerns maxillary sinus, however, it often undergoes generalization and it affects all or most of sinuses unilaterally or bilaterally. In microbiology of odontogenic sinusitis the dominant bacteria are the bacteria typical for peridental lesions (Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mutans and anaerobic bacteria). Odontogenic sinusitis frequently causes life threatening complications that require heroic drug and surgical treatment. Therapeutic and diagnostic problems are presented in case studies of 5 children aged from 10 to 17, who are treated in Children's Otolaryngology, Audiology and Phoniatrics Clinic in Łódź. There seems to be the need to emphasize the importance of thorough examination of oral cavity in all the children suffering from sinusitis, especially unilateral sinusitis. It is so essential on account of the gravity of the problem and serious complications that accompany the conditions.

  16. Using semi-automated segmentation of computed tomography datasets for three-dimensional visualization and volume measurements of equine paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Brinkschulte, Markus; Bienert-Zeit, Astrid; Lüpke, Matthias; Hellige, Maren; Staszyk, Carsten; Ohnesorge, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The system of the paranasal sinuses morphologically represents one of the most complex parts of the equine body. A clear understanding of spatial relationships is needed for correct diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy and volume of equine paranasal sinuses using three-dimensional (3D) reformatted renderings of computed tomography (CT) slices. Heads of 18 cadaver horses, aged 2-25 years, were analyzed by the use of separate semi-automated segmentation of the following bilateral paranasal sinus compartments: rostral maxillary sinus (Sinus maxillaris rostralis), ventral conchal sinus (Sinus conchae ventralis), caudal maxillary sinus (Sinus maxillaris caudalis), dorsal conchal sinus (Sinus conchae dorsalis), frontal sinus (Sinus frontalis), sphenopalatine sinus (Sinus sphenopalatinus), and middle conchal sinus (Sinus conchae mediae). Reconstructed structures were displayed separately, grouped, or altogether as transparent or solid elements to visualize individual paranasal sinus morphology. The paranasal sinuses appeared to be divided into two systems by the maxillary septum (Septum sinuum maxillarium). The first or rostral system included the rostral maxillary and ventral conchal sinus. The second or caudal system included the caudal maxillary, dorsal conchal, frontal, sphenopalatine, and middle conchal sinuses. These two systems overlapped and were interlocked due to the oblique orientation of the maxillary septum. Total volumes of the paranasal sinuses ranged from 911.50 to 1502.00 ml (mean ± SD, 1151.00 ± 186.30 ml). 3D renderings of equine paranasal sinuses by use of semi-automated segmentation of CT-datasets improved understanding of this anatomically challenging region.

  17. Paranasal sinus masses of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis).

    PubMed

    Fox, K A; Wootton, S K; Quackenbush, S L; Wolfe, L L; Levan, I K; Miller, M W; Spraker, T R

    2011-05-01

    This article describes 10 cases of paranasal sinus masses in Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis). Among 21 bighorns that were examined from 11 herds in Colorado, 10 individuals (48%) from 4 herds (36%) had masses arising from the paranasal sinuses. Affected animals included 9 of 17 females (53%) and 1 of 4 males (25%), ranging in age from approximately 2 years to greater than 10 years. Defining gross features of these masses included unilateral or bilateral diffuse thickening of the respiratory lining of the maxillary and/or frontal sinuses, with abundant seromucinous exudate in the affected sinus cavities. Defining histologic features of these masses included chronic inflammation and proliferation of mesenchymal and epithelial cells of the mucosa and submucosa. Epithelial changes included hyperplasia of mucosal epithelium, hyperplasia of submucosal glands and ducts, and neoplasia (adenocarcinoma). Mesenchymal changes included submucosal myxedema, submucosal fibroplasia/fibrosis, bone destruction, and neoplasia (myxomatous fibroma). Specific immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction for Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus and enzootic nasal tumor virus were performed with negative results.

  18. Comparison between manual and semi-automatic segmentation of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses from CT images.

    PubMed

    Tingelhoff, K; Moral, A I; Kunkel, M E; Rilk, M; Wagner, I; Eichhorn, K G; Wahl, F M; Bootz, F

    2007-01-01

    Segmentation of medical image data is getting more and more important over the last years. The results are used for diagnosis, surgical planning or workspace definition of robot-assisted systems. The purpose of this paper is to find out whether manual or semi-automatic segmentation is adequate for ENT surgical workflow or whether fully automatic segmentation of paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity is needed. We present a comparison of manual and semi-automatic segmentation of paranasal sinuses and the nasal cavity. Manual segmentation is performed by custom software whereas semi-automatic segmentation is realized by a commercial product (Amira). For this study we used a CT dataset of the paranasal sinuses which consists of 98 transversal slices, each 1.0 mm thick, with a resolution of 512 x 512 pixels. For the analysis of both segmentation procedures we used volume, extension (width, length and height), segmentation time and 3D-reconstruction. The segmentation time was reduced from 960 minutes with manual to 215 minutes with semi-automatic segmentation. We found highest variances segmenting nasal cavity. For the paranasal sinuses manual and semi-automatic volume differences are not significant. Dependent on the segmentation accuracy both approaches deliver useful results and could be used for e.g. robot-assisted systems. Nevertheless both procedures are not useful for everyday surgical workflow, because they take too much time. Fully automatic and reproducible segmentation algorithms are needed for segmentation of paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity.

  19. Immunoglobulin G4–related sclerosing disease of the paranasal sinuses: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) related sclerosing disease (RSD) of the paranasal sinuses is a rare lesion of dense lymphoplasmacytic tissue, with a high proportion of IgG4+ plasma cells. We presented a rare case of IgG4-RSD with isolated involvement of the paranasal sinuses in the absence of multiorgan involvement. Methods: A case report and comprehensive literature review. Results: To our knowledge, only 11 cases of IgG4-RSD with paranasal sinus involvement have been reported. Patients with IgG4-RSD commonly present with epistaxis and symptoms that mimic chronic rhinosinusitis, e.g., rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction, and facial pressure. On imaging, an expansive and erosive process is described. Surgery provides tissue for immunohistologic evaluation; however, there is a paucity of evidence about the direct extent of surgical resection or medical therapies. Postoperative steroids were typically started, although the regimen was not standardized. Conclusion: Few cases of paranasal sinus IgG4-RSD have been reported in the literature. Evidence-based recommendations regarding treatment and surveillance of paranasal sinus IgG4-RSD are lacking; however, most reports describe systemic steroids as the mainstay of treatment. This single subject analysis, with a review of previously reported cases adds to the expanding body of data related to this rare disorder. PMID:27658185

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of X-ray examinations of paranasal sinuses in pediatric patients*

    PubMed Central

    Cantalupo, Beatriz de Lucena Villa-Chan; Xavier, Aline Carvalho da Silva; da Silva, Clemanzy Mariano Leandro; Andrade, Marcos Ely Almeida; de Barros, Vinícius Saito Monteiro; Khoury, Helen Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the entrance surface air kerma (Ka,e) and air kerma in the region of radiosensitive organs in radiographs of pediatric paranasal sinuses. Materials and Methods Patient data and irradiation parameters were collected in examinations of the paranasal sinuses in children from 0 to 15 years of age at two children's hospitals in the city of Recife, PE, Brazil. We estimated the Ka,e using the X-ray tube outputs and selected parameters. To estimate the air kerma values in the regions of the eyes and thyroid, we used thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results The Ka,e values ranged from 0.065 to 1.446 mGy in cavum radiographs, from 0.104 to 7.298 mGy in Caldwell views, and from 0.113 to 7.824 mGy in Waters views. Air kerma values in the region of the eyes ranged from 0.001 to 0.968 mGy in cavum radiographs and from 0.011 to 0.422 mGy in Caldwell and Waters views . In the thyroid region, air kerma values ranged from 0.005 to 0.932 mGy in cavum radiographs and from 0.002 to 0.972 mGy in Caldwell and Waters views. Conclusion The radiation levels used at the institutions under study were higher than those recommended in international protocols. We recommend that interventions be initiated in order to reduce patient exposure to radiation and therefore the risks associated with radiological examination of the paranasal sinuses. PMID:27141129

  1. [Intestinal type adenocarcinoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Histological and immunohistochemical study of 14 cases].

    PubMed

    Bonato, M; Piantanida, R; Riva, C; Cis, C; Capella, C

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen cases of intestinal-type adenocarcinomas (IADC) of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses were studied at the Regional Hospital of Varese during the period from 1973 to 1988. They were 13 males and 1 female, mean age 57.5 years; the five year survival was 25% and tumors were preferentially located in the ethmoidal sinus. Morphological study and the use of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies made it possible to define the structural features of IADC and to detect specific antigenic markers such as CAR-5 (a glycoprotein contained within intestinal goblet-cells) and M1 (a glycoprotein contained within gastric foveolar cells). For comparison 10 cases of colonic adenocarcinomas and 14 cases of non-AIDC carcinomas of the nose and paranasal sinuses were also examined. The parallel morphological and immuno-histochemical investigations based on specific markers demonstrated that it was impossible to differentiate IADC from large bowel adenocarcinoma for both the structural pattern and antigenic expression. Moreover, AIDC also showed a CAR-5 and M1 immunoreactivity (IR) different from that displayed by the nasal carcinomas of different histotypes. From a histopathological standpoint IADC appears to be a distinctive entity even when compared to salivary gland tumors. In addition, the present immunohistochemical investigation demonstrates that gastric and intestinal glycoproteic antigens (M1 and CAR-5 respectively) occur in the normal nasosinusal mucosa. Both CAR-5 and M1 were observed in the mucous produced by nasal goblet cells with a distribution pattern resembling that of colonic goblet cells. Therefore, the present data confirm the similarity between nasal and colonic goblet cells which has already been pinpointed in previous morphological and ultrastructural studies. The common antigenic expression shared by the naso-sinusal and colonic mucosa might suggest a histogenetic hypothesis alternative to those of the malformative or metaplastic origin of naso-sinusal

  2. Atypical takotsubo cardiomyopathy associated with nasal packing for paranasal sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Il-Kwon; Sir, Jung-Ju; Jung, Hye-Jin; Jo, So-Young; Cho, Wook-Hyun; Choi, Suk-Koo

    2010-03-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is characterized by reversible left ventricular (LV) apical ballooning and no significant coronary artery stenosis. New variants of TC with localized wall motion abnormality or inversed pattern with hyperdynamic apex have been reported. We present the case of a 24-year-old female with atypical presentation of TC occurring in the setting of paranasal sinus surgery under local anaesthesia with post-surgical nasal packing. She did not demonstrate ST-segment elevation on electrocardiogram, but transient moderate LV systolic dysfunction and localized wall motion abnormality affecting basal to mid-ventricular anterior and anteroseptal wall. She rapidly and completely recovered without sequelae.

  3. Growth pattern of the maxillary sinus in the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata): reflections on the structural role of the paranasal sinuses

    PubMed Central

    KOPPE, THOMAS; NAGAI, HIROSHI

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the claim that the primate paranasal sinuses possess not a functional but a structural role associated with the skull architecture (Blaney, 1990), the relationship between the maxillary sinus and the skull architecture was studied ontogenetically in 30 skulls of male and female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). Coronal CT scan series and computerised 3-dimensional images served to evaluate the maxillary sinus. The definitive hemispherical shape of the sinus was already achieved after the completion of the primary dentition. Sinus volume increased with a trend indicating positive allometry. When compared with an ontogenetic data set of orang-utan (Koppe et al. 1995), however, the growth rate of the maxillary sinus of M. fuscata was significantly less. The maxillary sinus both of male and female macaques enlarged according to a common growth pattern. However, no sexual dimorphism could be established for the maxillary sinus size. Although the volume of the right maxillary sinus was normally bigger than that of the left side, the results suggested that asymmetry in maxillary sinus volume is related neither to skull size nor sex. Whereas a correlation analysis showed close relationships between the maxillary sinus volume and external cranial dimensions, the partial correlation coefficients revealed that these relationships were highly influenced by skull size. Although it cannot be ruled out that the paranasal sinuses are to some extent linked to the skull architecture, this study does not support a solely structural role for these air cavities. PMID:9183677

  4. Cobalt 60 radiotherapy for treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in three horses.

    PubMed

    Walker, M A; Schumacher, J; Schmitz, D G; McMullen, W C; Ruoff, W W; Crabill, M R; Hawkins, J F; Hogan, P M; McClure, S R; Vacek, J R; Edwards, J F; Helman, R G; Frelier, P F

    1998-03-15

    Three adult horses underwent aggressive treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, using course-fractionated cobalt 60 radiotherapy. Squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is not commonly diagnosed in horses. Historically, horses with this type of neoplasm have not been treated or have undergone some form of surgery. The prognosis for long-term survival or cure has been poor. Long-term results of cobalt 60 radiotherapy were good to excellent and exceeded those usually reported for horses treated surgically. On the basis of these results, use of radiotherapy for these neoplasms is recommended.

  5. A Rare Case of Aneurysmal Bone Cyst in the Paranasal Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyyed Mostafa; Heidarpour, Mitra; Eshaghian, Afrooz; Ansari, Peyman; Hashemi, Maryam Sadat; Yaghoobi, Maryam; Barati, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Aneurysmal Bone cysts (ABC) are extremely rare in the head and neck region and even rarer in sinuses. ABC is a benign multicystic mass that is locally-destructive and rapidly expandable. Hemorrhagic fluid content (like in this case) and septated appearance are the characteristic feature of ABC. Established treatment options for ABCs include sclerotherapy, embolization, radiotherapy, simple curettage, surgical excision, or a combination of methods. Case Report: In this article, a 5 year-old boy with a recurrent nasal mass is presented. The patient was finally diagnosed with this rare entity: ABC of the paranasal sinuses. The patient was treated through complete surgical removal. Conclusion: ABC can be considered as a rare differential diagnosis of recurrent nasal hemorrhagic mass in a pediatric population. PMID:26568945

  6. Reduction of Radiation Dosage in Visualization of Paranasal Sinuses in Daily Routine

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Isabell; Leicht, Julia; Mandapathil, Magis; Wilhelm, Thomas; Teymoortash, Afshin; Jahns, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Background. Preoperative imaging of the nose and paranasal sinus is standard in otorhinolaryngology. Previous studies on phantoms demonstrated the potential for dose reduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) by varying the application parameters. Methodology. Based on previous studies, the standard protocol of paranasal sinus imaging by CBCT was altered. One hundred and fifty examinations using the old protocol (01/2010–01/2011, high dosage) and 150 examinations using the new protocol (09/2012–09/2013, low dosage) were evaluated and compared for the visibility of 17 anatomical structures, the Lund-Mackay Score, and technical parameters. Results. Alteration of the protocol resulted in a significant reduction in dosage (6.64 mGy versus 2.88 mGy). Both groups showed the same amount of pathology (Lund-Mackay Score: 4.95 ± 3.79 versus 5.26 ± 5.77; p = 0.558). There was a significant better visibility of the anatomical structures (all visible = 1, nothing visible = 4) (results: 1.25 versus 1.17; p = 0.001) in the low-dosage group. Conclusion. Despite a significant reduction in the applied dosage, reliable visualization of the bony anatomy of the anterior skull base is possible by CBCT. This demonstrates the need for the discussion of the required clinical imaging quality. PMID:28255303

  7. Automatic segmentation and statistical shape modeling of the paranasal sinuses to estimate natural variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Ayushi; Leonard, Simon; Reiter, Austin; Ishii, Masaru; Taylor, Russell H.; Hager, Gregory D.

    2016-03-01

    We present an automatic segmentation and statistical shape modeling system for the paranasal sinuses which allows us to locate structures in and around the sinuses, as well as to observe the variability in these structures. This system involves deformably registering a given patient image to a manually segmented template image, and using the resulting deformation field to transfer labels from the template to the patient image. We use 3D snake splines to correct errors in this initial segmentation. Once we have several accurately segmented images, we build statistical shape models to observe the population mean and variance for each structure. These shape models are useful to us in several ways. Regular registration methods are insufficient to accurately register pre-operative computed tomography (CT) images with intra-operative endoscopy video of the sinuses. This is because of deformations that occur in structures containing erectile tissue. Our aim is to estimate these deformations using our shape models in order to improve video-CT registration, as well as to distinguish normal variations in anatomy from abnormal variations, and automatically detect and stage pathology. We can also compare the mean shapes and variances in different populations, such as different genders or ethnicities, in order to observe differences and similarities, as well as in different age groups in order to observe the developmental changes that occur in the sinuses.

  8. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Bucci, M. Kara; El-Sayed, Ivan; Xia Ping; Kaplan, Michael J.; Eisele, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 36 patients with malignancies of the sinonasal region were treated with IMRT. Thirty-two patients (89%) were treated in the postoperative setting after gross total resection. Treatment plans were designed to provide a dose of 70 Gy to 95% or more of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and 60 Gy to 95% or more of the clinical tumor volume (CTV) while sparing neighboring critical structures including the optic chiasm, optic nerves, eyes, and brainstem. The primary sites were: 13 ethmoid sinus, 10 maxillary sinus, 7 nasal cavity, and 6 other. Histology was: 12 squamous cell, 7 esthesioneuroblastoma, 5 adenoid cystic, 5 undifferentiated, 5 adenocarcinoma, and 2 other. Median follow-up was 51 months among surviving patients (range, 9-82 months). Results: The 2-year and 5-year estimates of local control were 62% and 58%, respectively. One patient developed isolated distant metastasis, and none developed isolated regional failure. The 5-year rates of disease-free and overall survival were 55% and 45%, respectively. The incidence of ocular toxicity was minimal with no patients reporting decreased vision. Late complications included xerophthalmia (1 patient), lacrimal stenosis (1 patient), and cataract (1 patient). Conclusion: Although IMRT for malignancies of the sinonasal region does not appear to lead to significant improvements in disease control, the low incidence of complications is encouraging.

  9. Orphan diseases of the nose and paranasal sinuses: Pathogenesis – clinic – therapy

    PubMed Central

    Laudien, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Rare rhinological diseases are a diagnostic challenge. Sometimes it takes months or even years from the primary manifestation of the disease until the definitive diagnosis is establibshed. During these times the disease proceeds in an uncontrolled or insufficiently treated way. (Irreversible) damage results and sometimes life-threatening situations occur. The unexpected course of a (misdiagnosed) disease should lead to further diagnostic reflections and steps in order to detect also rare diseases as early as possible. The present paper discusses granulomatous diseases of the nose and paranasal sinuses caused by mycobacteria, treponema, Klebsiella, fungi, and protozoa as well as vasculitis, sarcoidosis, rosacea, cocaine-induced midline destruction, nasal extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, and cholesterol granuloma. Furthermore, diseases with disorders of the mucociliary clearance such as primary ciliary dyskinesia and cystic fibrosis are presented, taking into consideration the current literature. PMID:26770278

  10. Radiotherapy of a recurrent ossifying fibroma in the paranasal sinuses of a horse.

    PubMed

    Orsini, James A; Baird, Debra K; Ruggles, Alan J

    2004-05-01

    A 7-year-old female Thoroughbred was admitted with a history of labored breathing, stridor, and exercise intolerance. Examination revealed a mass in the left paranasal sinuses that was determined to be an ossifying fibroma. Initial treatment consisted of surgical removal of the mass alone; however, the mass recurred 9 months after surgery. The mass was again removed, and adjunctive radiotherapy consisting of 3,000 cGy of cobalt radiation was administered. This time, the tumor did not recur for > 6 years. A third surgery was performed to remove the mass, and adjunctive radiotherapy consisting of 4,000 cGy of photon beam radiation from a linear accelerator was administered. The mass did not recur during the subsequent 3 years. Ossifying fibromas are uncommon tumors that frequently recur if incompletely excised. Results in this horse suggest that adjunctive radiotherapy may delay or prevent tumor recurrence in affected horses.

  11. Radiotherapy in late elderly (aged 75 or older) patients with paranasal sinus carcinoma: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hiroshi; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Tanooka, Masao; Terada, Tomonori; Noguchi, Kazuma; Takada, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Ishikura, Reiichi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the feasibility of radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced paranasal sinus carcinomas in late elderly patients (aged ≥75 years) from a single institution in Japan. From 2000 to 2015, we retrospectively analyzed 14 patients (11 maxillary and 3 ethmoid sinus carcinoma patients) who underwent RT for pathologically confirmed paranasal sinus carcinomas. RT was performed without unexpected cessations. Two patients, however, developed Grade 3 mucositis. The median follow-up duration was 13 months (range 2-54 months). The 1- and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 81.8 and 54.5 %, respectively. The local response rate after the initial treatment was 85.7 %. The 1- and 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 46.2 and 24.8 %, respectively. Univariate analysis of different clinicopathological parameters was conducted to identify associations with OS and PFS. We demonstrated that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of >60 Gy with concomitant intra-arterial (cisplatin-based) infusion chemoradiotherapy led to improved OS and PFS rates, although no statistical significance was observed. Moreover, none of the squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) patients who received 33 fractions of 66 Gy in IMRT died during the median follow-up period of 13 months (range 12-25 months). In conclusion, RT with concomitant intra-arterial (cisplatin-based) infusion chemoradiotherapy can be considered an effective, well-tolerated, and feasible treatment option for late elderly patients with paranasal sinus carcinomas. In addition, >60 Gy of RT in IMRT led to improved survival outcomes in elderly paranasal sinus carcinoma patients.

  12. Radiation therapy communication: nasal passage and paranasal sinus lymphoma in a pony.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Mathew; Pruitt, Amy; Thrall, Donald E

    2010-01-01

    An aged pony with extensive paranasal sinus and nasal passage B-cell lymphoma was treated with palliative radiation therapy. Sixteen gray were administered in two fractions, 7 days apart. A lateral field was used for the first fraction and a dorsal field for the second. Because of tumor being present in the left frontal sinus, gross tumor was knowingly excluded from the treated volume in the lateral field. The tumor regressed within 2 months and the pony remained free of clinical disease for 2.5 years. Acute, temporary blindness developed shortly after the second radiation fraction, but a direct causal relationship with the radiation therapy was not confirmed. The only radiation side effect was leukotrichia. Palliative treatment was successful in improving and prolonging the quality of life. These results suggest that localized equine B-cell lymphoma is radiosensitive, and that palliative radiation therapy is a reasonable consideration for large tumors, even when tumor volume prevents all gross tumor from being irradiated.

  13. Automated detection of abnormalities in paranasal sinus on dental panoramic radiographs by using contralateral subtraction technique based on mandible contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shintaro; Hara, Takeshi; Tagami, Motoki; Muramatsu, Chicako; Kaneda, Takashi; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    Inflammation in paranasal sinus sometimes becomes chronic to take long terms for the treatment. The finding is important for the early treatment, but general dentists may not recognize the findings because they focus on teeth treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the inflammation in paranasal sinus on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) by using the mandible contour and to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the CAD system by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. The detection scheme consists of 3 steps: 1) Contour extraction of mandible, 2) Contralateral subtraction, and 3) Automated detection. The Canny operator and active contour model were applied to extract the edge at the first step. At the subtraction step, the right region of the extracted contour image was flipped to compare with the left region. Mutual information between two selected regions was obtained to estimate the shift parameters of image registration. The subtraction images were generated based on the shift parameter. Rectangle regions of left and right paranasal sinus on the subtraction image were determined based on the size of mandible. The abnormal side of the regions was determined by taking the difference between the averages of each region. Thirteen readers were responded to all cases without and with the automated results. The averaged AUC of all readers was increased from 0.69 to 0.73 with statistical significance (p=0.032) when the automated detection results were provided. In conclusion, the automated detection method based on contralateral subtraction technique improves readers' interpretation performance of inflammation in paranasal sinus on DPRs.

  14. [The incidence of tumors of the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses in the district of Biella, 1970-1986].

    PubMed

    Magnani, C; Ciambellotti, E; Salvi, U; Zanetti, R; Comba, P

    1989-01-01

    The district of Biella in Piedmont (NW Italy) has one of the largest concentrations of the textile industry in Italy, traditionally manufacturing high quality wools. The present paper describes a survey of primitive cancers of the nasal fossae and paranasal sinuses diagnosed among residents of this area from 1970 to 1986. This study is a preliminary step in a case-control study aimed at investigating the association with occupational exposure in the textile industry. Seven cases were diagnosed in the 1970-75 period and 25 in the following ten years 1976-1986. The cut-off point corresponds to the year when the Hospital Admission and Discharge Registry became operative in Piedmont and Lombardy. The 1970-75 annual incidence rates (X 100,000, world standardized) were 0.5 both among males and females. Corresponding figures in 1976-86 were 1.2 and 0.2. Out of 32 cases, 16 were adenocarcinomas or adenoid-cystic carcinomas. Eleven cases are reported in the clinical record as wood or leather workers and seven as textile workers. Occupation was not reported for six cases. A case-control study is in progress.

  15. Alternaria-Associated Fungus Ball of Orbit Nose and Paranasal Sinuses: Case Report of a Rare Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Pesic, Zoran; Otasevic, Suzana; Mihailovic, Dragan; Petrovic, Sladjana; Arsic-Arsenijevic, Valentina; Stojanov, Dragan; Petrovic, Milica

    2015-08-01

    Alternaria-associated fungus ball of maxillar, ethmoidal paranasal sinuses, nasal cavity and orbit with bone erosion is extremely rare. Till recently, only two cases of this infection in immune competitive patients have been reported. We are herein describing the case of immune-competent woman who suffered of nasal congestion for 10 years. Patient was treated for tumor-like lesion in right maxillar sinus, where propagation in right nose cavity, right ethmoidal cells and right orbita was present. The organism that was seen in surgical removal of fungal debris by histological study, in using mycological testing, was proven as Alternaria alternata. Combination of surgical intervention and treatment with itraconazole eradicated fungal infection, and the disease was not relapsed in follow-up period of 2 years.

  16. The bovine paranasal sinuses: Bacterial flora, epithelial expression of nitric oxide and potential role in the in-herd persistence of respiratory disease pathogens.

    PubMed

    Murray, Gerard M; O'Neill, Rónan G; Lee, Alison M; McElroy, Máire C; More, Simon J; Monagle, Aisling; Earley, Bernadette; Cassidy, Joseph P

    2017-01-01

    The bovine paranasal sinuses are a group of complex cavernous air-filled spaces, lined by respiratory epithelium, the exact function of which is unclear. While lesions affecting these sinuses are occasionally reported in cattle, their microbial flora has not been defined. Furthermore, given that the various bacterial and viral pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease (BRD) persist within herds, we speculated that the paranasal sinuses may serve as a refuge for such infectious agents. The paranasal sinuses of clinically normal cattle (n = 99) and of cattle submitted for post-mortem examination (PME: n = 34) were examined by microbial culture, PCR and serology to include bacterial and viral pathogens typically associated with BRD: Mycoplasma bovis, Histophilus somni, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and bovine parainfluenza-3 virus (BPIV-3). Overall, the paranasal sinuses were either predominantly sterile or did not contain detectable microbes (83.5%: 94.9% of clinically normal and 50.0% of cattle submitted for PME). Bacteria, including BRD causing pathogens, were identified in relatively small numbers of cattle (<10%). While serology indicated widespread exposure of both clinically normal and cattle submitted for PME to BPIV-3 and BRSV (seroprevalences of 91.6% and 84.7%, respectively), PCR identified BPIV-3 in only one animal. To further explore these findings we investigated the potential role of the antimicrobial molecule nitric oxide (NO) within paranasal sinus epithelium using immunohistochemistry. Expression of the enzyme responsible for NO synthesis, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), was detected to varying degrees in 76.5% of a sub-sample of animals suggesting production of this compound plays a similar protective role in the bovine sinus as it does in humans.

  17. The bovine paranasal sinuses: Bacterial flora, epithelial expression of nitric oxide and potential role in the in-herd persistence of respiratory disease pathogens

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Rónan G.; Lee, Alison M.; McElroy, Máire C.; More, Simon J.; Monagle, Aisling; Earley, Bernadette; Cassidy, Joseph P.

    2017-01-01

    The bovine paranasal sinuses are a group of complex cavernous air-filled spaces, lined by respiratory epithelium, the exact function of which is unclear. While lesions affecting these sinuses are occasionally reported in cattle, their microbial flora has not been defined. Furthermore, given that the various bacterial and viral pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease (BRD) persist within herds, we speculated that the paranasal sinuses may serve as a refuge for such infectious agents. The paranasal sinuses of clinically normal cattle (n = 99) and of cattle submitted for post-mortem examination (PME: n = 34) were examined by microbial culture, PCR and serology to include bacterial and viral pathogens typically associated with BRD: Mycoplasma bovis, Histophilus somni, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and bovine parainfluenza-3 virus (BPIV-3). Overall, the paranasal sinuses were either predominantly sterile or did not contain detectable microbes (83.5%: 94.9% of clinically normal and 50.0% of cattle submitted for PME). Bacteria, including BRD causing pathogens, were identified in relatively small numbers of cattle (<10%). While serology indicated widespread exposure of both clinically normal and cattle submitted for PME to BPIV-3 and BRSV (seroprevalences of 91.6% and 84.7%, respectively), PCR identified BPIV-3 in only one animal. To further explore these findings we investigated the potential role of the antimicrobial molecule nitric oxide (NO) within paranasal sinus epithelium using immunohistochemistry. Expression of the enzyme responsible for NO synthesis, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), was detected to varying degrees in 76.5% of a sub-sample of animals suggesting production of this compound plays a similar protective role in the bovine sinus as it does in humans. PMID:28282443

  18. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance for the advanced imaging of the normal nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Bercier, Marjorie; Alexander, Kate; Gorow, April; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) for the cross-sectional imaging of the normal anatomy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), to provide reference figures for gross anatomy with corresponding CT and MR images and to compare the features of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the normal koala with that reported in other domestic species. Advanced imaging can be used to aid in diagnosis, to plan surgical intervention, and to monitor therapeutic responses to diseases of the nasal passages in koalas. One clinically normal koala was anesthetized twice for the separate acquisition of dorsal CT scan images and transverse, dorsal, and sagittal MR images of its nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Sagittal and transverse CT planes were reformatted. Three fresh koala skulls were also transected in one of each transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes and photographed. The CT and MR images obtained were matched with corresponding gross anatomic images and the normal bone, tissues and airway passages were identified. All anatomic structures were readily identifiable on CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and gross images. CT and MRI are both valuable diagnostic tools for imaging the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses of koalas. Images obtained from this project can be used as baseline references for future comparison with diseased koalas to help with diagnosis, surgical intervention, and response to therapy.

  19. Passive flooding of paranasal sinuses and middle ears as a method of equalisation in extreme breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Germonpré, Peter; Balestra, Costantino; Musimu, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    Breath-hold diving is both a recreational activity, performed by thousands of enthusiasts in Europe, and a high-performance competitive sport. Several 'disciplines' exist, of which the 'no-limits' category is the most spectacular: using a specially designed heavy 'sled,' divers descend to extreme depths on a cable, and then reascend using an inflatable balloon, on a single breath. The current world record for un-assisted descent stands at more than 200 m of depth. Equalising air pressure in the paranasal sinuses and middle-ear cavities is a necessity during descent to avoid barotraumas. However, this requires active insufflations of precious air, which is thus unavailable in the pulmonary system. The authors describe a diver who, by training, is capable of allowing passive flooding of the sinuses and middle ear with (sea) water during descent, by suppressing protective (parasympathetic) reflexes during this process. Using this technique, he performed a series of extreme-depth breath-hold dives in June 2005, descending to 209 m of sea water on one breath of air.

  20. CT Examination of Nose and Paranasal Sinuses of Egyptian Mummies and Three Distinct Human Population Groups: Anthropological and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Samuel; Lawson, William; Mowbray, Kenneth; Delman, Bradley N; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2015-06-01

    The interaction of nasal morphology and climatic conditions has resulted in diverse hard- and soft-tissue configurations across human population groups. While the processes of skull pneumatization are not fully understood, the invasions of the paranasal sinuses [PNS] into the cranium have contributed to assorted morphologies. Human migratory patterns and the strong association with climatic variables through time and space may explain this diversity. This study examined four multiregional populations of which two are from Egypt but of widely divergent eras. Three Egyptian mummies [EG-M] from the middle kingdom were CT scanned providing a unique opportunity to investigate the status of PNS anatomy within a time frame from 1567 BCE to 600 CE and compare it to a contemporary Egyptian [EG] (n = 12) population. Dry skulls of Inuit [IT] (n = 10) and East African [EA] (n = 8) provide out-group comparisons, as one group represents an isolated geographic environment far different from that of Egypt and the other group inhabiting distinct environmental conditions albeit located within the same continent. Results showed EG-M and EG frontal sinus volumes were diminutive in size with no statistically significant difference between them. Maxillary sinus size values of EG-M and EG clustered together while IT and EA significantly differed from each other (P = 0.002). The multiregional groups exhibited population specific morphologies in their PNS anatomy. Ecogeographic localities revealed anatomical differences among IT and EA, while the potential time span of about 3,500 years produced only a negligible difference between the Egyptian groups. The small sample sizes incorporated into this research requires confirmation of the results by analyses of larger samples from each geographic region and with the integration of a larger group of Egyptian mummified remains.

  1. [The state of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in the children presenting with congenital cleft of upper lip and palate].

    PubMed

    Bogoroditskaya, A V; Sarafanova, M E; Radtsig, E Yu; Prityko, A G

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the state of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses in the children presenting with congenital cleft of upper lip and palate (CLP). A total of 23 children at the age from 9 to 16 years who had undergone the surgical treatment of the above malformations during the first year of life were examined. The comprehensive study including routine ENT examination, endoscopic examination of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx, and computed tomography has demonstrated that 50% of the patients with congenital cleft of upper lift and palate suffered the deflection of the nasal septum associated with hyperplasia of inferior turbinal bones. The children with congenital cleft of upper lip and palate were characterized by enhanced pneumatization of the anterior end of the middle turbinate despite the absence of well apparent differences between their paranasal sinuses and those of the healthy children, with the degree of pneumatization being consistent with the patient's age in both groups.

  2. Fungus ball of the paranasal sinuses: Report of two cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Bosi, Guilherme Rasia; de Braga, Gustavo Lisbôa; de Almeida, Tobias Skrebsky; de Carli, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Fungal ball of the sinuses is a not invasive infection that if characterizes for its chronicity, being the majority related with previous endodontic treatment. Affect mainly the breasts to maxillary; even so all the breasts can be involved. The main etiological agent is the Aspergillus spp. The computed tomography, had to characteristic the radiological presentations, suggests the diagnosis that is carried through definitively through histopathological analyses. The treatment standard-gold is the sinus surgery with average meatal antrostomy. Objective: Reporting two cases of fungal ball of the sinuses and to stand out important aspects of this pathology. Story of the Cases: Case 1) Patient of the feminine sex, 78 years old, presented itself with complaints of face pain has 6 months and previous history of endodontic treatment. To the physical examination it was evidenced purulent secretion presence in left average meatus. Ray X presented complete veiling of the breasts to maxillary left, while the computed tomography showed injury calcified in this place. Sinusotomy was become fulfilled that evolved well. Case 2) Patient of the feminine sex, 70 years old, looked attendance for history of sinusitis of repetition. To the physical examination no particularity was not perceived. The computed tomography, as well as the magnetic resonance, detected thickening of the mucous wall of the breasts to maxillary left, beyond a calcified mass. It was become fulfilled same sequence of treatment and the patient also evolved well. Final Considerations: The fungal infection must be considered in the patients who if present with chronic sinusitis, that they do not answer to the antibiotic use and that they possess history of endodontic manipulation. PMID:25991948

  3. EUCOLEUS BOEHMI INFECTION IN THE NASAL CONCHAE AND PARANASAL SINUSES OF RED FOX (VULPES VULPES) ON PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, CANADA.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alfonso; Aburto, Enrique; Jones, Kathleen; Robbins, William; Conboy, Gary

    2016-04-28

    Eucoleus boehmi (Nematoda: Capillariidae) occurs in the nasal conchae and paranasal sinuses of wild and domestic canids. We surveyed the red fox ( Vulpes vulpes ) on Prince Edward Island, Canada, for E. boehmi infection and characterized the associated histopathology. Nasal capillarid infections were detected based on histologic examination of three coronal sections of the nasal cavity and by centrifugal flotation examination (CFE) of rectal feces. Capillarids were detected in histologic sections in 28 of 36 (78%) foxes; detection occurred most frequently in the caudal section (28 foxes) and least in the rostral section (10 foxes). Adult worm morphology was typical for capillarids (stichosome esophagus, bacillary bands, bipolar plugged eggs); E. boehmi eggs were specifically identified based on the characteristic pitted shell wall surface. Adult worms were detected in histologic sections in all 28 and E. boehmi eggs in 21 of the positive foxes. No eggs of Eucoleus aerophilus were observed in any of the sections. Affected foxes had an eosinophilic and lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis with goblet cell hyperplasia. Eggs of E. aerophilus were detected on CFE in 20 of 36 (56%) foxes; 19 of the histologically positive foxes were coinfected with E. aerophilus. Eggs of E. boehmi were detected on CFE in 26 of 36 (72%) foxes and were consistent in size and morphology with those described from wild canids, but they differed from those reported from cases of infection in dogs. Prevalence based on identification of eggs on histologic section or CFE indicated 27 of 36 (75%) red foxes examined were infected with E. boehmi.

  4. Sarcoidosis with involvement of the paranasal sinuses - a retrospective analysis of 12 biopsy-proven cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extrapulmonary involvement by sarcoidosis is observed in about 30–40% of patients with sarcoidosis. Little is known about the frequency and clinical characteristics of sinonasal sarcoidosis. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 12 cases of biopsy-proven sinonasal sarcoidosis. Patients were identified from a patient population of 1360 patients with sarcoidosis at the Outpatient Clinic for Sarcoidosis and Rare Lung Diseases at LungClinic Grosshansdorf, a tertiary care hospital for respiratory medicine. Results The most frequent signs and symptoms were nasal polyps (4 cases), epistaxis (3 cases), nasal crusts (8 cases) and anosmia (5 cases). Pulmonary sarcoidosis of the patients was staged as stage I (n = 1) and stage II (n = 11) on chest radiographs. Spirometry was normal in 11 patients. 7 patients had a diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide of less than 90% of predicted. Other organs were affected in 8 patients. All patients received systemic corticosteroid treatment and most patients received topical steroids. 5 patients received steroid sparing agents. Repeated sinus surgery had to be performed in 4 patients. Conclusions Sinonasal involvement is a rare disease manifestation of sarcoidosis with a frequency slightly lower than 1% in our patient population. The clinical course of sinonasal sarcoidosis can be complicated by relapse despite systemic immunosuppressive treatment and repeated sinus surgery. PMID:24070015

  5. The safe gate to the posterior paranasal sinuses: reassessing the role of the superior turbinate.

    PubMed

    Eweiss, Ahmed Z; Ibrahim, Ahmed A; Khalil, Hisham S

    2012-05-01

    Surgery of the posterior ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses can be challenging. In 1999, a technique was described for identification of the superior turbinate and utilizing it as a landmark in endoscopic posterior ethmoidectomy and sphenoidotomy. Although this was more than a decade ago, it has not been supported by further studies. In our practice, we have routinely adopted this technique, and have modified it to allow further orientation during endoscopic surgery of the posterior sinuses. To describe a review of our technique, and to prospectively assess the value of the superior turbinate as a useful landmark during endoscopic posterior ethmoidectomy and sphenoidotomy. Fifty patients listed for endoscopic posterior ethmoidectomy with or without sphenoidotomy were included in a prospective study utilising our surgical technique. Data were collated for the success or failure of identification of the landmarks, and for any complications during the surgery. A total of 93 sides of endoscopic posterior ethmoidectomy and 73 sides of endoscopic sphenoidotomy were performed. The superior turbinate was identified in 100% of the cases. The coronal part of the superior turbinate basal lamella was identified in 60.22% of the cases, and the axial part in 88.17% of the cases. The natural sphenoid ostium was identified medial to the posterior part of the superior turbinate in 98.63% of the cases. The axial part of the superior turbinate basal lamella was a constant landmark for the level of the sphenoid ostium. The number of transverse septae between the axial part of the superior turbinate basal lamella and the skull base was studied, and was found never to exceed one septum. No major complications were recorded. One case of small posterior septal perforation was detected with no post-operative effects. Our study represents the first report of identifying the two parts of the superior turbinate basal lamella intra-operatively. It also represents the first report of using the axial

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; Daly, Megan E.; Murphy, James D.; Abelson, Jonathan; Chapman, Chris H.; Chung, Melody; Yu, Yao; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for tumors of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity (PNS/NC). Methods/Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2009, 52 patients with tumors of the PNS/NC underwent postoperative or definitive radiation with IMRT. Twenty-eight (54%) patients had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Twenty-nine patients (56%) received chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 26.6 months (range, 2.9-118.4) for all patients and 30.9 months for living patients. Results: Eighteen patients (35%) developed local-regional failure (LRF) at median time of 7.2 months. Thirteen local failures (25%) were observed, 12 in-field and 1 marginal. Six regional failures were observed, two in-field and four out-of-field. No patients treated with elective nodal radiation had nodal regional failure. Two-year local-regional control (LRC), in-field LRC, freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and overall survival (OS) were 64%, 74%, 71%, and 66% among all patients, respectively, and 43%, 61%, 61%, and 53% among patients with SCC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, SCC and >1 subsite involved had worse LRC (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.046, respectively) and OS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.046, respectively). Cribriform plate invasion (p = 0.005) and residual disease (p = 0.047) also had worse LRC. Acute toxicities included Grade {>=}3 mucositis in 19 patients (37%), and Grade 3 dermatitis in 8 patients (15%). Six patients had Grade {>=}3 late toxicity including one optic toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT for patients with PNS/NC tumors has good outcomes compared with historical series and is well tolerated. Patients with SCC have worse LRC and OS. LRF is the predominant pattern of failure.

  7. Equine nasal and paranasal sinus tumours: part 2: a contribution of 28 case reports.

    PubMed

    Dixon, P M; Head, K W

    1999-05-01

    The clinical and pathological findings of 28 cases (27 horses, 1 donkey) of equid sinonasal tumours examined at the Edinburgh Veterinary School are presented and include: seven cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); five adenocarcinomas; three undifferentiated carcinomas; two adenomas; five fibro-osseous and bone tumours; and single cases of ameloblastoma, fibroma, fibrosarcoma, undifferentiated sarcoma, melanoma and lymphosarcoma. The median ages of animals affected with epithelial, and fibro-osseous/bone tumours were 14 and 4 years, respectively. Unilateral purulent or mucopurulent nasal discharge (81% of cases) and gross facial swellings (82% of cases) were the most common presenting signs with sinonasal tumours, with epistaxis recorded in just 23% of cases. Radiology and endoscopy were the most useful ancillary diagnostic techniques. The maxillary area was the most common site of tumour origin, and only three cases were definitively identified as originating in the nasal cavity. Four of the maxillary SCC lesions originated within the nasal cavities or maxillary sinuses, while two originated in the oral cavity. Fourteen of 15 carcinomas, but only two of the 13 remaining tumours, spread to other sites in the head. Only three cases of sinonasal tumour had lymph node metastases, and none had distant metastases. In the long term, surgical treatment with seven malignant tumours was unsuccessful (6 months median survival post-operatively), but was successful with four out of five benign tumours (no regrowth at a median of 4 years post-operatively).

  8. Fungus ball of the paranasal sinuses: Report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Guilherme Rasia; de Braga, Gustavo Lisbôa; de Almeida, Tobias Skrebsky; de Carli, Adriana

    2012-04-01

    Introdução: Bola fúngica dos seios paranasais é uma infecção não invasiva que se caracteriza por sua cronicidade, sendo a maioria relacionada com tratamento endodôntico prévio. Acomete principalmente o seio maxilar, embora todos os seios possam ser envolvidos. O principal agente etiológico é o Aspergillus spp. A tomografia computadorizada, devido às apresentações radiológicas características, sugere o diagnóstico que é realizado definitivamente através de análises histopatológicas. O tratamento padrão-ouro é a cirurgia sinusal endoscópica com antrostomia meatal média.Objetivo: Relatar dois casos de bola fúngica dos seios paranasais e ressaltar aspectos importantes desta patologia.Relato dos Casos: Caso 1) Paciente do sexo feminino, 78 anos, apresentou-se com queixas de dor facial há 6 meses e história prévia de tratamento endodôntico. Ao exame físico constatou-se a presença de secreção purulenta em meato médio esquerdo. O Raio X apresentou velamento completo do seio maxilar esquerdo, enquanto a tomografia computadorizada mostrou lesão calcificada neste local. Realizou-se sinusotomia que evoluiu bem. Caso 2) Paciente do sexo feminino, 70 anos, procurou atendimento por história de sinusites de repetição. Ao exame físico não se percebeu nenhuma particularidade. A tomografia computadorizada, assim como a ressonância magnética, detectou espessamento da parede mucosa do seio maxilar esquerdo, além de uma massa calcificada. Realizou-se a mesma sequência de tratamento e a paciente também evoluiu bem.Considerações finais: A infecção fúngica deve ser considerada nos pacientes que se apresentam com sinusite crônica, que não respondem ao uso de antibióticos e que possuem história de manipulação endodôntica.

  9. Sequential Combination Chemotherapy of Dacarbazine (DTIC) with Carboplatin and Paclitaxel for Patients with Metastatic Mucosal Melanoma of Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Omata, W.; Tsutsumida, A.; Namikawa, K.; Takahashi, A.; Oashi, K.; Yamazaki, N.

    2017-01-01

    By the recent introduction of molecular targeting drugs against BRAF mutation and immune checkpoint inhibitors, the prognosis of patients with melanoma in advanced stage is now improving, but still in the minority. Mucosal melanoma lacks the BRAF mutations, and hence conventional chemotherapeutic regimens must be improved. We have conventionally used dacarbazine (DTIC) for patients with metastatic mucosal melanoma. However, the efficacy of DTIC in patients with metastatic mucosal melanoma has been limited. Therefore, we explored other possibilities to improve the prognosis of patients suffering from metastatic mucosal melanoma. In this communication, we present a retrospective analysis of the sequential combination chemotherapy of DTIC with carboplatin and paclitaxel (CP) for metastatic mucosal melanoma of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. The objective response rate of seven patients is 14.3% by RECIST 1.1 and the overall survival (OS) is 12.5 months. These data indicate that the sequential combination chemotherapy of DTIC with CP could be an option for patients with metastatic mucosal melanoma of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses who are currently ending into dismal prognosis. PMID:28096700

  10. Sequential Combination Chemotherapy of Dacarbazine (DTIC) with Carboplatin and Paclitaxel for Patients with Metastatic Mucosal Melanoma of Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses.

    PubMed

    Omata, W; Tsutsumida, A; Namikawa, K; Takahashi, A; Oashi, K; Yamazaki, N

    2017-01-01

    By the recent introduction of molecular targeting drugs against BRAF mutation and immune checkpoint inhibitors, the prognosis of patients with melanoma in advanced stage is now improving, but still in the minority. Mucosal melanoma lacks the BRAF mutations, and hence conventional chemotherapeutic regimens must be improved. We have conventionally used dacarbazine (DTIC) for patients with metastatic mucosal melanoma. However, the efficacy of DTIC in patients with metastatic mucosal melanoma has been limited. Therefore, we explored other possibilities to improve the prognosis of patients suffering from metastatic mucosal melanoma. In this communication, we present a retrospective analysis of the sequential combination chemotherapy of DTIC with carboplatin and paclitaxel (CP) for metastatic mucosal melanoma of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. The objective response rate of seven patients is 14.3% by RECIST 1.1 and the overall survival (OS) is 12.5 months. These data indicate that the sequential combination chemotherapy of DTIC with CP could be an option for patients with metastatic mucosal melanoma of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses who are currently ending into dismal prognosis.

  11. Cetuximab and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Colon Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-06

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Colon

  12. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  13. A rare case of concomitant tuberculosis of the nose, paranasal sinuses and larynx: clinical, histological and immunohistochemical aspects. A case report.

    PubMed

    Budu, Vlad Andrei; Bulescu, Ioan Alexandru; Schnaider, Alexandra; Popp, Cristiana Gabriela; Toma, Claudia Lucia; Mogoantă, Carmen Aurelia; Mühlfay, Gheorghe

    2015-01-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is a rare condition determined by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It can affect any organ, and has a higher incidence with the increase of HIV infection, or in countries with high pulmonary tuberculosis. Diagnosis is difficult, mostly because of non-specific symptoms and a low rate of presentation for medical consult when symptoms do occur. Complete diagnosis is usually set by histological, immunohistochemical examinations, and also with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in selected cases. The authors present a case of concomitant tuberculosis of the nose, paranasal sinuses and subglottic larynx, without primary involvement of the lungs. The diagnosis was imposed by histological examination and immunostaining of probes obtained in surgery. The treatment was surgical debridement followed by specific antituberculosis medication.

  14. High-resolution computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses, pharynx and related regions: Impact of CT identification on diagnosis and patient management

    SciTech Connect

    Maatman, G.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this textbook is two-fold: to define the normal anatomic structure and pathologic conditions of the nose, paranasal sinuses, pharynx and soft tissues, and to discuss the diagnostic impact and ultimate-effect of computed tomography (CT) in the treatment of patients with head and neck disorders. The two chapters on normal gross and CT anatomic configuration are meticulously constructed. The subsequent sections on pathologic conditions are illustrated with examples of neoplastic disease. The CT scans are very good; a few of these were obtained in the direct sagittal plane. There is considerable discussion of the reasons that CT is equal to better than, or worse than other imaging modalities with respect to patient treatment in terms of both diagnosis and therapy.

  15. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... my acute sinusitis is caused by viruses or bacteria? Acute viral sinusitis is likely if you have ... to tell if my sinusitis is caused by bacteria? Because sinusitis is treated differently based on cause. ...

  16. Metastasis of prostate adenocarcinoma to the frontal and ethmoid sinus

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Fatih; Aldemir, Mustafa; Çakar, Hasan; Güler, Gülnur

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial metastasis of prostate cancer is rarely seen, and there are few studies in this regard in the literature. Most of these studies in the literature comprise the metastasis of prostate cancer to the sphenoid sinus, and metastasis to the frontal and ethmoid sinus is a much rare entity. Association of visual symptoms, epistaxis, headache, and hematuria may indicate a urologic malignancy in terms of the origin of the primary tumor. This study was aimed to present the prostate cancer case of a 73-year-old patient whose paranasal sinus tomograms revealed the presence of frontal and ethmoid sinus metastasis. PMID:27909626

  17. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Head and Neck Cancer or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus

  18. Radiography of the Paranasal Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... que el cabello húmedo, trenzas tirantes y ciertos tipos de pelucas o cabellos postizos pueden verse en ... cuidar de usted lo mejor posible. Para ciertos tipos de imágenes, el tecnólogo radiólogo podrá colocar esponjas ...

  19. Photodynamic Therapy Using HPPH in Treating Patients Undergoing Surgery for Primary or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the

  20. Bevacizumab, Fluorouracil, and Hydroxyurea Plus Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous

  1. Malignant neoplasms of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses: a series of 256 patients in Mexico City and Monterrey. Is air pollution the missing link?

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, L; Delgado, R; Calderón-Garcidueñas, A; Meneses, A; Ruiz, L M; De La Garza, J; Acuna, H; Villarreal-Calderón, A; Raab-Traub, N; Devlin, R

    2000-04-01

    Air pollution is a serious health problem in major cities in Mexico. The concentrations of monitored criteria pollutants have been above the US National Ambient Air Quality Standards for the last decade. To determine whether the number of primary malignant nasal and paranasal neoplasms has increased, we surveyed 256 such cases admitted to a major adult oncology hospital located in metropolitan Mexico City (MMC) for the period from 1976-1997 and to a tertiary hospital in Monterrey, an industrial city, for the period from 1993-1998. The clinical histories and histopathologic material were reviewed, and a brief clinical summary was written for each case. In the MMC hospital the number of newly diagnosed nasal and paranasal neoplasms per year for the period from 1976-1986 averaged 5.1, whereas for the next 11 years it increased to 12.5. The maximal increase was observed in 1995-1997, with an average of 20.3 new cases per year (P = 0.0006). The predominant neoplasms in these series were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma, adenocarcinoma, Schneiderian carcinoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In the Monterrey hospital a 2-fold increase in the numbers of newly diagnosed nasal and paranasal neoplasms was recorded between 1993 and 1998. The predominant MMC neoplasm in this series, namely nasal T-cell/natural killer cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, is potentially Epstein-Barr virus related. Nasal and paranasal malignant neoplasms are generally rare. Environmental causative factors include exposure in industries such as nickel refining, leather, and wood furniture manufacturing. Although epidemiologic studies have not addressed the relationship between outdoor air pollution and sinonasal malignant neoplasms, there is strong evidence for the nasal and paranasal carcinogenic effect of occupational aerosol complex chemical mixtures. General practitioners and ear, nose, and throat physicians working in highly polluted cities should be aware of the clinical

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  3. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  4. What Are the Risk Factors for Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in certain substances while at work, such as: Wood dusts from carpentry (such as furniture and cabinet builders), sawmills, and other wood-related industries Dusts from textiles (textile plants) Leather ...

  5. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis, High Risk Individuals, and Individuals With No History of Cancer (Control)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma; Breastcancer; Leukemia; Melanoma; Sarcoma; Unknown Primary Tumor; Multiple Myeloma; Ovarian Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Vaginal Cancer

  6. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... will develop sinusitis: Allergic rhinitis or hay fever Cystic fibrosis Going to day care Diseases that prevent the ... Nasal culture Nasal cytology Sweat chloride tests for cystic fibrosis Treatment SELF-CARE Try the following steps to ...

  7. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  8. 18F FPPRGD2 PET/CT or PET/MRI in Predicting Early Response in Patients With Cancer Receiving Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-12

    Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Male Breast Cancer; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Laryngeal Cancer; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Tongue Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. Paranasal pneumatization in extant and fossil Cercopithecoidea.

    PubMed

    Rae, Todd C

    2008-03-01

    Unlike most primates, extant cercopithecoids lack maxillary sinuses, which are pneumatic spaces in the facial skeleton lateral of the nasal cavity proper. Character state analysis of living cercopithecoids across well-supported topologies suggests that the sinus was lost at the origin of the superfamily, only to have evolved again convergently in extant macaques. Recent work has shown that a) the 'early loss' hypothesis is supported by the lack of any pneumatization in Victoriapithecus, a stem cercopithecoid, b) like extant macaques, the fossil cercopithecine Paradolichopithecus shows evidence of presence of the maxillary sinus (MS), and c) unlike extant colobines, the fossil colobine Libypithecus also possesses a maxillary sinus. To more fully assess the pattern of cercopithecoid sinus evolution, fossil taxa from both subfamilies (Colobinae, Cercopithecinae) were examined both visually and by computed tomography (CT). The observations were evaluated according to standard anatomical criteria for defining sinus spaces, and compared with data from all extant Old World monkey genera. Most taxa examined conformed to the pattern already discerned from extant cercopithecoids. Maxillary sinus absence in Theropithecus oswaldi, Mesopithecus, and Rhinocolobus is typical for all extant cercopithecids except Macaca. The fossil macaque Macaca majori possesses a well-developed maxillary sinus, as do all living species of the genus. Cercopithecoides, on the other hand, differs from all extant colobines in possessing a maxillary sinus. Thus, paranasal pneumatization has reemerged a minimum of two and possibly three times in cercopithecoids. The results suggest that maxillary sinus absence in cercopithecoids is due to suppression, rather than complete loss.

  10. Bevacizumab in Reducing CNS Side Effects in Patients Who Have Undergone Radiation Therapy to the Brain for Primary Brain Tumor, Meningioma, or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Malignant Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineocytoma; Malignant Neoplasm; Meningeal Melanocytoma; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  11. Bilateral Maxillary Sinus Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Khanduri, Sachin; Agrawal, Sumit; Goyal, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia (MSH) is an uncommon abnormality of paranasal sinuses noted in clinical practice. Computed tomography (CT) scan helps in diagnosing the anomaly along with any anatomical variation that may be associated with it. MSH is usually associated with other anomalies like uncinate process hypoplasia. Three types of MSH have been described. Type 1 MSH shows mild maxillary sinus hypoplasia, type 2 shows significant sinus hypoplasia with narrowed infundibular passage and hypoplastic or absent uncinate process, and type 3 is cleft like maxillary sinus hypoplasia with absent uncinate process. CT and endoscopic examination usually complement each other in diagnosing MSH. PMID:25548709

  12. Mucopyocele of the maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kshar, Avinash; Patil, Abhijeet; Umarji, Hemant; Kadam, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    Mucoceles are defined as chronic, cystic lesions in the paranasal sinuses. When the mucocele content becomes infected, the lesion is defined as mucopyocele. Most mucoceles are located in the frontal and anterior ethmoid sinuses and normally they involve the frontal-ethmoid complex, expanding to the superior-medial region of the orbit, leading to ocular disorders; maxillary sinus presentation is rare. In the present article, the authors described a rare case of mucopyocele in the maxillary sinus. PMID:24688571

  13. Malignant Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses: Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity With Emphasis on Hypothalamic-Pituitary Deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Snyers, An Janssens, Geert; Twickler, Marcel B.; Hermus, Ad R.; Takes, Robert P.; Kappelle, Arnoud C.; Merkx, Matthias A.W.; Dirix, Piet; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome after surgery and radiotherapy for patients with sinonasal cancer and assess late toxicity, with special emphasis on hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 168 patients treated for sinonasal cancer in a single institute between 1986 and 2006. A more detailed analysis was performed on a subgroup of 76 patients with adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma treated with curative intent. Long-term survivors were evaluated for late toxicity by a multidisciplinary team using the late effects of normal tissues (LENT SOMA) scoring system. Additional endocrinologic tests were performed for assessment of hypothalamic-pituitary function. Results: Five-year actuarial local control and overall survival rates were 62% and 35% for all patients and 64% and 42% for the subgroup with squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. In multivariate analysis, T stage was the only significant factor predicting local relapse (79% at 5 years for T1-T3 vs. 53% for T4; p = 0.006). Sinonasal mucosal melanomas had the highest rate of regional failure (33% at 5 years). Thirteen of 21 patients (62%) evaluated at the late morbidity clinic had hormonal disturbances, of whom 5 (24%) had definitive evidence of hypopituitarism with multiple hormonal deficiencies. Conclusion: Local failure is the dominant cause of treatment failure for patients with sinonasal cancer, with T4 stage the only independent predictor. Because of a high rate of radiation-induced hypopituitarism, we recommend endocrinologic surveillance for these patients.

  14. Erlotinib and Cetuximab With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Kidney, Colorectal, Head and Neck, Pancreatic, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx

  15. [The role of carbocystein in the treatment of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Piotr; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata; Mielcarek-Kuchta, Daniela

    2012-09-01

    Chronic sinusitis is one of the most common presenting complaints of all doctor visits in the United States and Europe, with more than 13% of people affected in any given year. This disease has a wide range of impact on communities. Patients with recurrent or chronic sinusitis report a deteriorative sense of general health and vitality, when compared to general population. In our Department we perform about 600 functional endoscopic sinus surgeries (FESS) per year. Chronic rhinosinusitis represents a spectrum of inflammatory and infectious processes concurrently affecting the nose and paranasal sinuses. Among chronic paranasal sinusitis one must single out paranasal sinusitis with and without polyps. In the paranasal sinusitis patomechanism the blockage of natural ostium plays one of the most important roles. The closure of sinus proper ventilation passages leads to the triggering of many pathological occurrences within mucous membrane of this region. The treatment of paranasal sinusitis is diversified and involves a surgical procedure as well as anti-inflammatory and antiallergic drugs (medications) and mucolytics. Its purpose is to clear the nose through the elimination of bacterial infection, liquidating and removal of lying discharge and the restoration of the proper muco-ciliary transportation, and through this the improvement of local condition and faster recovery. In this work the usage of carboxycysteine to treat paranasal sinus conditions has been presented.

  16. Treatment of chronic sinusitis in a horse with systemic and intra-sinus antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Danielle L; Radtke, Catherine L

    2017-03-01

    A 12-year-old Norwegian Fjord gelding was diagnosed with paranasal sinusitis as a post-operative complication of tooth repulsion surgery. The infection with inspissated purulent material persisted despite sinus trephination and lavage, and systemic antimicrobial therapy. Resolution occurred following infusion of a gelatin/penicillin mixture into the right rostral and caudal maxillary sinus.

  17. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-13

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity

  18. Sisters of the sinuses: cetacean air sacs.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, Joy S; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2008-11-01

    This overview assesses some distinguishing features of the cetacean (whale, dolphin, porpoise) air sac system that may relate to the anatomy and function of the paranasal sinuses in terrestrial mammals. The cetacean respiratory tract has been modified through evolution to accommodate living in water. Lack of paranasal sinuses in modern cetaceans may be a diving adaptation. Bone-enclosed air chambers are detrimental, as their rigid walls may fracture during descent/ascent due to contracting/re-expanding air volumes. Flexible-walled "sinuses" (extracranial diverticula) are a logical adaptation to diving. Odontocetes (toothed whales) exhibit several pairs of paranasal air sacs. Although fossil evidence indicates that paranasal sinuses occur in archaeocetes (ancestors/relatives of living cetaceans), it is not known whether the paranasal sacs derive from these sinuses. Sac pigmentation indicates that they derived from invaginations of the integument. Unlike sinuses, paranasal sacs are not circumferentially enclosed in bone, and therefore can accommodate air volume changes that accompany diving pressure changes. Paired pterygoid sacs, located ventrally along the cetacean skull, connect the pharynx and middle ear cavities. Mysticetes (baleen whales) have a large midline laryngeal sac. Although cetacean air sacs do not appear to be homologous to paranasal sinuses, they may serve some analogous respiratory, vocal, or structural functions. For example, these sacs may participate in gas exchange, thermoregulation, resonance, and skeletal pneumatization. In addition, they may subserve unique aquatic functions, such as increasing inspiratory volume, mitigating pressure-induced volume change, air shunting to reduce respiratory dead space, and facilitating underwater sound production and transmission.

  19. Comprehensive review on endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.; Hosemann, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery is the standard procedure for surgery of most paranasal sinus diseases. Appropriate frame conditions provided, the respective procedures are safe and successful. These prerequisites encompass appropriate technical equipment, anatomical oriented surgical technique, proper patient selection, and individually adapted extent of surgery. The range of endonasal sinus operations has dramatically increased during the last 20 years and reaches from partial uncinectomy to pansinus surgery with extended surgery of the frontal (Draf type III), maxillary (grade 3–4, medial maxillectomy, prelacrimal approach) and sphenoid sinus. In addition there are operations outside and beyond the paranasal sinuses. The development of surgical technique is still constantly evolving. This article gives a comprehensive review on the most recent state of the art in endoscopic sinus surgery according to the literature with the following aspects: principles and fundamentals, surgical techniques, indications, outcome, postoperative care, nasal packing and stents, technical equipment. PMID:26770282

  20. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Triple Negative Breast Cancer (Currently Accruing Only Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients Since 6/8/2007)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  1. Blindness associated with nasal/paranasal lymphoma in a stallion

    PubMed Central

    SANO, Yuto; OKAMOTO, Minoru; OOTSUKA, Youhei; MATSUDA, Kazuya; YUSA, Shigeki; TANIYAMA, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    A 29-year-old stallion presented with bilateral blindness following the chronic purulent nasal drainage. The mass occupied the right caudal nasal cavity and right paranasal sinuses including maxillary, palatine and sphenoidal sinuses, and the right-side turbinal and paranasal septal bones, and cribriform plate of ethmoid bone were destructively replaced by the mass growth. The right optic nerve was invaded and involved by the mass, and the left optic nerve and optic chiasm were compressed by the mass which was extended and invaded the skull base. Histologically, the optic nerves and optic chiasm were degenerated, and the mass was diagnosed as lymphoma which was morphologically and immunohistochemically classified as a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Based on these findings, the cause of the blindness in the stallion was concluded to be due to the degeneration of the optic nerves and chiasm associated with lymphoma occurring in the nasal and paranasal cavities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the equine blindness with optic nerve degeneration accompanied by lymphoma. PMID:28163275

  2. The Role of Palliative Radiosurgery When Cancer Invades the Cavernous Sinus

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Involvement of the cavernous sinus by direct invasion from skull base cancer or from metastatic spread of cancers is a challenging problem. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of patients who developed cavernous sinus metastases or direct invasion. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the data from 37 patients who had cavernous sinus metastases or had cavernous sinus invasion from adjacent skull base cancers and who underwent SRS between 1992 and 2006 at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The median patient age was 57.8 years. Previous adjuvant management included fractionated radiotherapy in 8, chemotherapy in 16, and both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in 5. The primary sites of metastases or invasion were nasopharyngeal carcinoma (n = 7), parotid gland carcinoma (n = 7), and metastases from systemic cancer (n = 23). The median target volume was 6.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.3-33.6), and the median margin dose was 14 Gy (range, 12-20). Results: At a mean of 12.9 months (range, 0.8-63.9), 32 patients had died and 5 were living. The overall survival rate after SRS was 36.6% and 19.4% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Progression-free survival was related to a greater marginal dose. After SRS, 12 (35.3%) of 34 patients with neurologic symptoms exhibited improvement. SRS early after diagnosis was significantly associated with improvement of cranial nerve dysfunction. Conclusion: SRS is a minimally invasive palliative option for patients whose cancer has invaded the cavernous sinus. The benefits for cranial nerve deficits are best when SRS is performed early.

  3. Pembrolizumab and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer or Salivary Gland Cancer That Is Metastatic and/or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-07

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharynx Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage III Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  4. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage

  5. Paranasal Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Osseous Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Koempel, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare histiocytic proliferative disorder of unknown etiology typically characterized by cervical lymphadenopathy. Extranodal involvement often manifests in the head and neck region. We present a 10-year-old male who presented to our hospital with left epiphora from an aggressive paranasal mass invading the left orbit with osseous destruction. The mass was surgically biopsied and debulked with histopathological examination revealing Rosai-Dorfman disease. Although rarely found in the sinuses, Rosai-Dorfman disease should be considered when evaluating sinonasal masses. PMID:28321353

  6. Cavernous sinus thrombosis caused by a dental infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gi-Sung; Kim, Hyun Young; Kwak, Eun-Jung; Jung, Young-Soo; Park, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis not only presents with constitutional symptoms including fever, pain and swelling but also with specific findings such as proptosis, chemosis, periorbital swelling, and cranial nerve palsies. It is known to occur secondary to the spread of paranasal sinus infections in the nose, ethmoidal and sphenoidal sinuses. However, paranasal sinus infection of dental origin is rare. The following is a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis due to the spread of an abscess in the buccal and pterygomandibular spaces via buccal mucosal laceration. PMID:25247150

  7. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-02

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of

  8. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis obscured by midfacial trauma.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Ryškienė, Silvija; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis whose sinonasal symptomatology was thought to be the consequence of a previous midfacial trauma. The patient was admitted to the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery after more than 10 years of exacerbations of sinonasal symptoms, which began to plague soon after a facial contusion. We decided to perform CT of paranasal sinuses, and despite the absence dental symptomatology, the dental origin of sinusitis was discovered. The majority of sinonasal symptoms resolved after appropriate dental treatment, and there was no need for nasal or sinus surgery.

  9. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  10. Capecitabine and Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Head and Neck Cancer; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

  11. Everolimus, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  12. S0420, Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  13. Lenalidomide and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck

  14. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ...

  15. Adult Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ...

  16. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-17

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  17. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation and Carboplatin Followed By Chemoradiation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Cancer

  18. Entolimod in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer Receiving Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-10

    Mucositis; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  19. Primary Paranasal Tuberculosis in a Diabetic Mimicking Odontogenic Infection: A Rare Case; A Unique Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mehendirratta, Monica; Sareen, Chanchal; Aggarwal, Anju

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of Tuberculosis (TB) is high especially in developing countries but primary para-nasal TB is still a rarity. The latter often remains quiescent until it reaches an advanced stage and offers a diagnostic challenge. In the present case report maxillary sinus TB mimicked a destructive periodontitis induced space infection, thus causing a delay in treatment. The present case report describes clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and outcome of a 50-year-old diabetic/HIV seronegative patient with histopathologically confirmed case of maxillary sinus TB. PMID:27135017

  20. Phase 1b Food Based Modulation of Biomarkers in Human Tissues at High-Risk for Oral Cancer.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage 0 Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Laryngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer; Stage 0 Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage 0 Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Stage IVA

  1. PI3K Inhibitor BKM120 and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  2. Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  3. Ossifying fibromas of the paranasal sinuses: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Ciniglio Appiani, M; Verillaud, B; Bresson, D; Sauvaget, E; Blancal, J-P; Guichard, J-P; Saint Maurice, J-P; Wassef, M; Karligkiotis, A; Kania, R; Herman, P

    2015-10-01

    Fibro-osseous benign lesions rarely affect the sinonasal tract and are divided into 3 different entities, namely osteoma, fibrous dysplasia and ossifying fibroma. They share several clinical, radiological and histological similarities, but have different behaviours. Ossifying fibroma, and in particular the "juvenile" histological subtype, may have a locally aggressive evolution and a high risk for recurrence if removal is incomplete. The purpose of the present study is to compare the clinical behaviour of ossifying fibroma with the other benign fibro-osseous lesions; highlight different behaviour between the histological subtypes; compare the advantages, limitations and outcomes of an endoscopic endonasal approach with reports in the literature. We retrospectively reviewed 11 patients treated for sinonasal ossifying fibroma at a tertiary care centre. All patients underwent CT scan, and MRI was performed in cases of cranial base involvement or recurrence. Pre-operative biopsy was performed in cases where it was possible to use an endoscopic approach. One patient underwent pre-operative embolisation with ipsilateral visual loss after the procedure. Depending on its location, removal of the tumour was performed using an endoscopic (n = 7), or an external (n = 3) or combined (n = 1) approach. Histopathologically, 5 patients presented the conventional type, 5 the juvenile psammomatoid variant, which was associated in 1 case with an aneurismal bone cyst, and 1 case presented the trabecular juvenile variant. Three patients affected by the juvenile psammomatoid histological variant presented invasion of the skull base and underwent a subtotal removal that subsequently required, due to the regrowth of the remnant, a transbasal approach. Clinical, radiological and histological findings should all be considered to establish differential diagnosis among fibrous osseous lesions. More studies are necessary to conclude if the localisation and extension of the disease at the time of diagnosis is more important than the histological variant. An endoscopic approach is the first choice in most of cases even if an external open approach may be necessary in selected patients.

  4. Prevalence of fungal infection among Iranian patients with chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Naghibzadeh, B; Razmpa, E; Alavi, Sh; Emami, M; Shidfar, M; Naghibzadeh, Gh; Morteza, A

    2011-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a major cause of morbidity today. Regional variations in the incidence of this disease have been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of fungal infection as the causative agent of chronic sinusitis among Iranian patients. A cross sectional hospital based study was designed; the patients underwent paranasal sinus washing and maxillary sinus biopsy. All specimens were studied by light microscopy. Fungal culturing was employed to confirm diagnosis. The patients underwent Computed Tomography for sinus evaluation. Of 162 participants, 12 samples from patients showed fungal elements, 2 of them Aspergillus fulvous (1.2%), 9 of them Alternaria species (5.56%) and 1 of them Psilomysis (0.6%). All patients presented radiologic evidence of sinusitis, ranging from mucosal thickening to total opacity. In conclusion, results obtained showed a low prevalence of fungal sinusitis among Iranian patients with chronic sinusitis. Findings also showed that Alternaria is the most causative agent.

  5. Talactoferrin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-30

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  6. Frontal sinus parameters in computed tomography and sex determination.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Mitra; Bakhtavar, Khadijeh; Moarefdoost, Jhale; Kamali, Artin; Rafeifar, Shahram

    2016-03-01

    The frontal sinus is a sturdy part of the skull that is likely to be retrieved for forensic investigations. We evaluated frontal sinus parameters in paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) images for sex determination. The study was conducted on 200 normal paranasal sinus CT images of 100 men and 100 women of Persian origin. We categorized the studied population into three age groups of 20-34, 35-49 and ⩾ 50 years. The number of partial septa in the right frontal sinus and the maximum height and width were significantly different between the two sexes. The highest precision for sex determination was for the maximum height of the left frontal sinus (61.3%). In the 20-34 years age-group, height and width of the frontal sinus were significantly different between the two sexes and the height of the left sinus had the highest precision (60.8%). In the 35-49 years age-group, right anterior-posterior diameter had a sex determination precision of 52.3%. No frontal sinus parameter reached a statistically significant level for sex determination in the ⩾ 50 years age-group. The number of septa and scallopings were not useful in sex determination. Frontal sinus parameters did not have a high precision in sex determination among Persian adults.

  7. Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in the anterior ethmoid area, where the maxillary and frontal sinuses connect with the nose. This ... chronic sinusitis by improving the drainage of the maxillary sinus, one of the cavities beneath the eye. ...

  8. Sinus Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... ANATOMY > Sinus Anatomy Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ...

  9. Chronic Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic sinusitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Chronic sinusitis is a common condition in which the cavities around nasal passages (sinuses) become inflamed and swollen for at least 12 weeks, despite treatment attempts. Also known as chronic rhinosinusitis, this condition ...

  10. Sinus Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... Achy feeling in your upper teeth Sinusitis or migraine? Migraines and headaches from sinusitis are easy to confuse ... types of headaches often overlap. Both sinusitis and migraine headache pain often gets worse when you bend ...

  11. Beyond the sniffer: frontal sinuses in Carnivora.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Abigail A; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2014-11-01

    Paranasal sinuses are some of the most poorly understood features of mammalian cranial anatomy. They are highly variable in presence and form among species, but their function is not well understood. The best-supported explanations for the function of sinuses is that they opportunistically fill mechanically unnecessary space, but that in some cases, sinuses in combination with the configuration of the frontal bone may improve skull performance by increasing skull strength and dissipating stresses more evenly. We used CT technology to investigate patterns in frontal sinus size and shape disparity among three families of carnivores: Canidae, Felidae, and Hyaenidae. We provide some of the first quantitative data on sinus morphology for these three families, and employ a novel method to quantify the relationship between three-dimensional sinus shape and skull shape. As expected, frontal sinus size and shape were more strongly correlated with frontal bone size and shape than with the morphology of the skull as a whole. However, sinus morphology was also related to allometric differences among families that are linked to biomechanical function. Our results support the hypothesis that frontal sinuses most often opportunistically fill space that is mechanically unnecessary, and they can facilitate cranial shape changes that reduce stress during feeding. Moreover, we suggest that the ability to form frontal sinuses allows species to modify skull function without compromising the performance of more functionally constrained regions such as the nasal chamber (heat/water conservation, olfaction), and braincase (housing the brain and sensory structures).

  12. Lymph Nodes and Cancer Metastasis: New Perspectives on the Role of Intranodal Lymphatic Sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Rui-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic system is essential for transporting interstitial fluid, soluble antigen, and immune cells from peripheral tissues to lymph nodes (LNs). Functional integrity of LNs is dependent on intact lymphatics and effective lymph drainage. Molecular mechanisms that facilitate interactions between tumor cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) during tumor progression still remain to be identified. The cellular and molecular structures of LNs are optimized to trigger a rapid and efficient immune response, and to participate in the process of tumor metastasis by stimulating lymphangiogenesis and establishing a premetastatic niche in LNs. Several molecules, e.g., S1P, CCR7-CCL19/CCL21, CXCL12/CXCR4, IL-7, IFN-γ, TGF-β, and integrin α4β1 play an important role in controlling the activity of LN stromal cells including LECs, fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and follicular dendritic cells (DCs). The functional stromal cells are critical for reconstruction and remodeling of the LN that creates a unique microenvironment of tumor cells and LECs for cancer metastasis. LN metastasis is a major determinant for the prognosis of most human cancers and clinical management. Ongoing work to elucidate the function and molecular regulation of LN lymphatic sinuses will provide insight into cancer development mechanisms and improve therapeutic approaches for human malignancy. PMID:28036019

  13. Surgery of the Sinuses and Eyes.

    PubMed

    Schleining, Jennifer A

    2016-11-01

    Conditions of the head requiring surgery in cattle are not uncommon when considering the incidence of conditions such as ocular squamous cell carcinoma and requests for surgical dehorning. Surgery involving the eyes in cattle is relatively common, whereas surgery of the paranasal sinuses is less common. Generally speaking, however, surgery for conditions of the head tend to have a more favorable prognosis when there is early intervention.

  14. An unusual foreign body in the maxillary sinus: Dental impression material.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Y; Zengin, A Z; Karli, R

    2016-01-01

    Foreign bodies in paranasal sinuses are very rare and most of them are encountered in the maxillary sinus. These foreign bodies may be organic or inorganic and can enter the maxillary sinus through an oro-antral fistula. The oro-antral fistula is formed by a break in the bony segment of the maxillary sinus floor and usually arises subsequent to maxillary premolar and molar extractions. A 63-year-old female patient evaluated for a nonhealing, left, toothless palate lesion and chronic headache occurring over 4 years. Radiography and computed tomography revealed bone discontinuity in the left floor of the maxillary sinus and calcifications within the antrum. A blue foreign body, later identified as dental impression material, was removed by intranasal endoscopy. A careful oral examination is recommended prior to prosthetic restorations. In addition, paranasal sinus foreign bodies should be surgically removed to prevent secondary soft tissue reactions.

  15. Invasive Aspergillus Sinusitis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, John M.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Gulick, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive Aspergillus (IA) sinusitis is a life-threatening opportunistic infection in immunocompromised individuals, but it is uncommon in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. To gain a better understanding of the characteristics of IA sinusitis in this population, we present a unique case of chronic IA sinusitis in an HIV-infected patient taking antiretroviral therapy and review the literature summarizing published cases of invasive aspergillosis of the paranasal (n = 41) and mastoid (n = 17) sinuses in HIV-infected individuals. Among these cases, only 4 were reported after 1999, and 98% of patients had acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Orbital invasion occurred in 54% of paranasal sinus cases, whereas intracranial invasion was reported in 53% of mastoid sinus cases. The overall mortality was 79%. We also discuss various clinical and immunologic factors that may play a role in the development of IA and consider the changing epidemiology of aspergillosis in the era of effective antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27800523

  16. [Sinusitis is common in small children].

    PubMed

    Herløv-Nielsen, Henrik; Højby, Niels

    2010-11-29

    Children have air-filled paranasal sinuses from birth. Acute sinusitis is common in early childhood and complicates 5-13% of common colds. Bacteriology comprises 30% Streptococcus pneumoniae, 20% Haemophilus influenzae, 20% Moraxella catarrhalis. While suppurative complications are rare, there has been an increasing focus on comorbidity affecting the lower airways (asthma). The diagnosis is based on clinical criteria developed through microbiological studies. Antibiotic treatment is controversial, but evidence suggests an effect when the diagnosis has been made correctly. We advocate antibiotic treatment in selected cases.

  17. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  18. Radiation therapy for cancer of the piriform sinus. A failure analysis.

    PubMed

    van Mierlo, I J; Levendag, P C; Eijkenboom, W M; Jansen, P P; Meeuwis, C A; van Assendelft, P J; van Putten, W L; Nowak, P J

    1995-12-01

    This paper analyzes the results of 109 piriform sinus (PS) cancers treated between 1973 and 1984 by surgery and/or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in a large comprehensive cancer center, and in particular tries to redefine the role of EBRT in the management of these tumors. At the time the policy was to start with EBRT to a dose of 40 Gy. A good response to a first series was to be continued by EBRT (RT-1); in case of poor responding tumors, the primary and neck were to be operated upon (RT-S). Poor responders unfit for S or those refusing S were also carried to a full course of EBRT (RT-2). The RT-S, RT-1, and RT-2 actuarial 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival (LR-RFS) and overall survival (OS) were 60%, 40%, and 20% and 40%, 30%, and 20%, respectively. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis the most important prognostic factor appeared to be N-stage, with hazard ratios of 1.16 (N1), 2.2 (N2), and 3.3 (N3). The RT-S treatment group fared best (hazard ratio 0.5). The risk of relapse for T3,4 was 1.3 times as high as opposed to T1,2. For stage I/II (19/21 treated by EBRT only), a LR-RFS and OS at 5 years of 60% and 40%, respectively, was observed. This analysis supports data for stage III/IV PS cancers to be treated by surgery combined with EBRT; in stage I/II there might be a role for EBRT alone. It is speculated that with further sophistication in RT-techniques, the locoregional control rates by EBRT alone could improve.

  19. Major orbital complications of endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rene, C; Rose, G; Lenthall, R; Moseley, I

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The paranasal sinuses are intimately related to the orbit and consequently sinus disease or surgery may cause severe orbital complications. Complications are rare but can result in serious morbidity, the most devastating of which is severe visual loss.
METHODS—A retrospective review was undertaken of four cases of severe orbital trauma during endoscopic sinus surgery.
RESULTS—All the cases suffered medial rectus damage, one had additional injury to the inferior rectus and oblique, and two patients were blinded as a result of direct damage to the optic nerve or its blood supply.
CONCLUSION—Some ophthalmic complications of endoscopic sinus surgery are highlighted, the mechanisms responsible are discussed, and recommendations for prevention, early recognition, and management are proposed. 

 PMID:11316724

  20. Retrospective cohort study of cancer morbidity in furniture makers exposed to wood dust.

    PubMed

    Barthel, E; Dietrich, M

    1989-05-01

    A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to examine the cancer morbidity in a group of 759 furniture makers of the Neubrandenburg District. During the study interval of 1973 to 1984, a total of 40 malignant tumors occurred in the exposed group. Except for bronchial cancer (SIR = 68) and prostate cancer (SIR = 43), all observed tumors were overrepresented in comparison to the incidence of such illnesses in the normal population of the study area. Significantly increased SIRs occurred for malignant melanoma (2 cases, SIR = 952) and for rectal cancer (6 cases, SIR = 239). Malignant tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses were not observed.

  1. Maxillary Sinus Sarcomas: Epidemiological and Clinicopathological Experience of 25 Years in a National Reference Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Hernández, Rosa Angélica; Lino-Silva, Leonardo Saúl; Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to report our experience with malignant soft tissue tumors of the maxillary sinus in the period between 1985 to 2010. This is a retrospective case study in a tertiary cancer center setting. Review of patient's records and new evaluation of pathological specimens were made for 20 patients (14 men and 6 women) still met present criteria. After review the most common histological diagnoses were malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. There are male sex predilection, the median age was 38.9 years; 95% of tumors were >5 cm, 80% were high grade, 0% have metastatic disease at the diagnosis and the tumors were initially treated by surgical resection had better survival (p = 0.02). We present the results of a one of the larger series published to date in maxillary sinus sarcomas where analyzed the clinicopathological characteristics of 20 cases.

  2. Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma of the Maxillary Sinus in a Spray Painter from an Automobile Repair Shop

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We report a case of a spray painter who developed malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) of the maxillary sinus following long-term exposure to chromium, nickel, and formaldehyde, implying that these agents are probable causal agents of MFH. Case report The patient developed right-sided prosopalgia that began twenty months ago. The symptom persisted despite medical treatment. After two months, he was diagnosed with MFH through imaging studies, surgery, and pathological microscopic findings at a university hospital in Seoul. His social, medical, and family history was unremarkable. The patient had worked for about 18 years at an automobile repair shop as a spray painter. During this period, he had been exposed to various occupational agents, such as hexavalent chromium, nickel, and formaldehyde, without appropriate personal protective equipment. He painted 6 days a week and worked for about 8 hours a day. Investigation of the patient’s work environment detected hexavalent chromium, chromate, nickel, and formaldehyde. Conclusions The study revealed that the patient had been exposed to hexavalent chromium, formaldehyde, and nickel compounds through sanding and spray painting. The association between paranasal cancer and exposure to the aforementioned occupational human carcinogens has been established. We suggest, in this case, the possibility that the paint spraying acted as a causal agent for paranasal cancer. PMID:24472378

  3. Ophthalmic complications after functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS).

    PubMed

    Ilieva, K; Evens, P A; Tassignon, M J; Salu, P

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to inform the ophthalmologist about the occurrence of ophthalmological complications after functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Due to the close anatomical relationship between the paranasal sinuses and the orbit, involvement and/or injury of the orbit from processes primarily located in the paranasal sinuses, may occur. The orbit, the extra-ocular muscles, the optic nerve and the lacrimal drainage system can be damaged during FESS. The risk of injury is correlated to the anatomical variations, the history of previous surgery, the extent and the gravity of the disease and the skill of the surgeon. We hereby present three cases, each showing a different ophthalmologic complication after FESS.

  4. Unilateral Maxillary Sinus Actinomycosis with a Closed Oroantral Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Lentner, Mark; Li, Hui; Nagorsky, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a bacterial infection due to Actinomyces israelii, a gram-positive, anaerobic organism that normally affects the cervicofacial region. However, facial injury or trauma (i.e., dental procedures) can allow this bacteria to inhabit other regions. There have been rare reports of actinomycosis of the paranasal sinuses. We present a case of a 50-year-old female who originally presented with a suspected oroantral fistula who subsequently was found to have actinomycosis involving her right maxillary sinus. Additionally, the dental extraction site revealed no connection with the maxillary sinus. We discuss the diagnostic approach and management of this patient as it relates to the limited existing literature.

  5. The maxillary sinus in three genera of new world monkeys: factors that constrain secondary pneumatization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy D; Rossie, James B; Cooper, Gregory M; Carmody, Kelly A; Schmieg, Robin M; Bonar, Christopher J; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2010-01-01

    The air filled cavities of paranasal sinuses are thought by some to appear opportunistically in spatial "gaps" within the craniofacial complex. Anthropoid primates provide excellent natural experiments for testing this model, since not all species possess a full complement of paranasal sinuses. In this study, two genera of monkeys (Saguinus and Cebuella) which form maxillary sinuses (MS) as adults were compared to squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.), in which a MS does not form. Using microCT and histomorphometric methods, the spatial position of paranasal spaces was assessed and size of the adjacent dental sacs was measured. In Saguinus, secondary pneumatization is underway perinatally, and the sinus extends alongside deciduous premolars (dp). The MS overlaps all permanent molars in the adult. In Saimiri, the homologous space (maxillary recess) extends no farther posterior than the first deciduous premolar at birth and extends no farther than the last premolar in the adult. Differences in dental size and position may account for this finding. For example, Saimiri has significantly larger relative dp volumes, and enlarged orbits, which encroach on the internasal space to a greater degree when compared to Saguinus. These factors limit space for posterior expansion of the maxillary recess. These findings support the hypothesis that secondary pneumatization is a novel, opportunistic growth mechanism that removes "unneeded" bone. Moreover, paranasal spaces occur in association with semiautonomous skeletal elements that border more than one functional matrix, and the spatial dynamics of these units can act as a constraint on pneumatic expansion of paranasal spaces.

  6. Pediatric Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your child’s sinuses are not fully developed until late in the teen years. Although small, the maxillary (behind the cheek) and ethmoid (between the eyes) sinuses are present at birth. Unlike in adults, pediatric sinusitis is difficult to ...

  7. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Maxillary Sinus Cancer: Long-Term Outcomes and Toxicities of Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bristol, Ian J. . E-mail: ijbristol@mdanderson.org; Ahamad, Anesa; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A.; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, K. Kian

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of three changes in radiotherapy technique on the outcomes for patients irradiated postoperatively for maxillary sinus cancer. Methods and Materials: The data of 146 patients treated between 1969 and 2002 were reviewed. The patients were separated into two groups according to the date of treatment. Group 1 included 90 patients treated before 1991 and Group 2 included 56 patients treated after 1991, when the three changes were implemented. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results: No differences were found in the 5-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, local control, nodal control, or distant metastasis rates between the two groups (51% vs. 62%, 51% vs. 57%, 76% vs. 70%, 82% vs. 83%, and 28% vs. 17% for Groups 1 and 2, respectively). The three changes were to increase the portals to cover the base of the skull in patients with perineural invasion, reducing their risk of local recurrence; the addition of elective neck irradiation in patients with squamous or undifferentiated histologic features, improving the nodal control, distant metastasis, and recurrence-free survival rates (64% vs. 93%, 20% vs. 3%, and 45% vs. 67%, respectively; p < 0.05 for all comparisons); and improving the dose distributions within the target volume, reducing the late Grade 3-4 complication rates (34% in Group 1 vs. 8% in Group 2, p = 0.014). Multivariate analysis revealed advancing age, the need for enucleation, and positive margins as independent predictors of worse overall survival. The need for enucleation also predicted for worse local control. Conclusion: The three changes in radiotherapy technique improved the outcomes for select patients as predicted. Despite these changes, little demonstrable overall improvement occurred in local control or survival for these patients and additional work must be done.

  8. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  9. Botanical Therapy in Treating Mucositis in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Who Have Undergone Chemoradiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-14

    Mucositis; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  10. Absence of pulmonary aspiration of sinus contents in patients with asthma and sinusitis

    SciTech Connect

    Bardin, P.G.; Van Heerden, B.B.; Joubert, J.R. )

    1990-07-01

    The frequent association of asthma and paranasal sinusitis has been ascribed to a nasobronchial reflex, aspiration of sinus secretions, or enhanced beta-adrenergic blockade. We investigated possible pulmonary aspiration in a pilot study (eight patients) and follow-up study (13 patients) by means of a radionuclide technique. In the pilot study, the aim was to demonstrate aspiration as well as visibility of the radionuclide in the thorax during a period of 24 hours. The radionuclide was initially placed bronchoscopically in the bronchial tree in four patients and was still clearly visible in the same position after 24 hours in three patients. Aspiration from the nasopharynx was unequivocally demonstrated in two of four patients with depressed consciousness. The follow-up study population consisted of four patients with maxillary sinusitis only and nine patients with sinusitis and asthma. The radionuclide was placed in a maxillary sinus during therapeutic puncture. In the patients with only sinusitis as well as patients with asthma and sinusitis the radionuclide could be demonstrated in the maxillary sinus, nasopharynx, esophagus, and lower gastrointestinal tract during a 24-hour period. However, no pulmonary aspiration of radionuclide could be demonstrated in any patient. We conclude that seeding of the lower airways by mucopurulent secretions is unlikely to account for coexistent pulmonary disease. The association is probably related to generalized mucosal disease affecting both upper and lower airways.

  11. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis concomitant with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, in a patient with epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Oda, Naohiro; Sakugawa, Makoto; Bessho, Akihiro; Horiuchi, Takeshi; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Toyota, Yosuke; Fukamatsu, Nobuaki; Nishii, Kazuya; Watanabe, Yoichi

    2014-12-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with dizziness, after two weeks of experiencing symptoms. Chest computed tomography revealed a peripheral nodule in her left upper lobe, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated the presence of multiple brain masses. The patient underwent whole-brain radiotherapy based on a tentative diagnosis of lung cancer with multiple brain metastases. The diagnosis was confirmed by endobronchial biopsy as T4N3M1b, stage IV lung adenocarcinoma with an epidermal growth factor receptor mutation. On the 31st day of hospitalization, the patient developed severe headache. Subsequent magnetic resonance venography revealed defects in the superior sagittal, right sigmoid, and right transverse venous sinuses and the right internal jugular vein. Anticoagulation therapy with unfractionated heparin and warfarin was immediately administered following diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Brain MRI demonstrated leptomeningeal gadolinium enhancement in front of the pons and medulla. Positive cerebrospinal fluid tumor cytology confirmed the diagnosis of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Following four weeks of antithrombotic therapy, complete thrombolysis was confirmed by magnetic resonance venography. Effective treatment with gefitinib was administered, and the patient survived for 10 months after the diagnosis of CVST and leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Adequate early diagnosis and treatment of CVST enabled an excellent survival rate for the patient, despite leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Following the development of headaches in patients with lung cancer, CVST, although rare, should be considered. Furthermore, following a diagnosis of CVST, leptomeningeal carcinomatosis should be investigated as an underlying cause.

  12. Maxillary reconstruction and placement of dental implants after treatment of a maxillary sinus fungus ball.

    PubMed

    Colletti, Giacomo; Felisati, Giovanni; Biglioli, Federico; Tintinelli, Roberto; Valassina, Davide

    2010-01-01

    A fungus ball is one of the fungal diseases that can affect the paranasal sinuses. It requires surgical treatment. Because there is only one previously reported case of dental implant placement after treatment of a maxillary sinus fungus ball, the authors here report on a case of a maxillary sinus fungus ball with bone erosion that was treated surgically with a combined endoscopic endonasal and endoral (Caldwell-Luc) approach. One year later, a graft from the ilium was obtained and a sinus elevation was performed to allow the placement of dental implants. Three months later, the dental implants were placed, and they were all osseointegrated at the 9-month follow-up.

  13. Giant Primary Schwannoma of the Left Nasal Cavity and Ethmoid Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Justin; Oh, Lawrence; Cox, Daniel; Forer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A unilateral tumour in the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses is commonly caused by polyps, cysts, and mucoceles, as well as invasive tumours such as papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Schwannomas, in contrast, are rare lesions in this area (Minhas et al., 2013). We present a case of a 52-year-old female who presented with a 4-year progressive history of mucous hypersecretion, nasal obstruction, pain, and fullness. Imaging of the paranasal sinuses showed complete opacification of the entire left nasal cavity and sinuses by a tumour causing subsequent obstruction of the frontal and maxillary sinuses. The tumour was completely excised endoscopically. Histopathology was consistent with that of a schwannoma. PMID:27379190

  14. Configuration of frontal sinuses: A forensic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Jhansi Lakshmi; Jaisanghar, Nallusamy; Elangovan, Somasundaram; Mahaboob, Nazargi; Senthilkumar, Balasubramaniyan; Yoithapprabhunath, Thukanayakanpalayam Ragunathan; Srichinthu, Kenniyan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Identification of an individual whether living or deceased is of paramount importance in maintaining the integrity of the society. A simple, reliable, and efficacious method always finds a way for easier acceptance and inclusion in any discipline. Likewise, identification of an individual using the radiographic frontal sinus patterns is a simple technique which emphasized to conduct the study with a proven result. Objective: The objective of the study is to evaluate the radiographic configurations of frontal sinuses for their uniqueness based on different parameters. Study Group and Methods: Study group consisted of thirty individuals (15 males and 15 females) of age between 20 and 30. Individuals with the history of sinusitis, surgery, or any trauma were not included in the study. Paranasal sinus views were taken using standard exposure parameters, and the radiographs were assessed for their uniqueness. Results: The radiographs were assessed for area size, area asymmetry, superiority of the upper border, outline of the upper border, presence or absence of partial septa and supraorbital cells, and based on these results, a unique code number was assigned to each individual to prove the uniqueness. Conclusion: A frontal sinus comparison is particularly useful when no other means of an individual identification are available. Caution must be taken regarding the physiological and pathological changes (trauma, infection, old age, surgery, etc.) and postmortem changes and about the technical issues while taking a radiograph (distance, angle, orientation of the skull). In spite of all these issues, the configuration of frontal sinus is an excellent individualizing feature. PMID:27829755

  15. Fungal Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... presence of large granules that attract the reddish-orange eosin stain) to attack fungi, and the eosinophils irritate the membranes in the nose. As long as fungi remain, so will the irritation. Chronic Indolent Sinusitis is an invasive form of fungal sinusitis in ...

  16. Removal of an Upper Third Molar from the Maxillary Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Klinger de Souza; da Silva, Vanessa Tavares; da Cunha, Rafael Soares; Souto, Maria Luisa Silveira; São Mateus, Carla Rocha; Souza, Liane Maciel de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary sinus or antrum is the largest of the paranasal sinuses. It is located in the maxillary bone and has a proximity to the apexes of upper molars and premolars, which allows it to form a direct link between the sinus and the oral cavity. Dislocation of a foreign body or tooth to the interior of a paranasal sinus is a situation that can occur as a result of car accidents, firearm attacks, or iatrogenic in surgical procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to know how to treat this kind of situation. This study's objective is to report the case of a 23-year-old female patient, leucoderma, who sought treatment from the Surgical Unit at the Dental Faculty of the Federal University of Sergipe. She had a history of pain and edema in the right side of the genian region and two failed attempts at removing dental unit (DU) 18. The extraoral clinical exam revealed intense edema of the left hemiface with signs of infection, excoriation of the labial commissure, hematoma, a body temperature of 39°C, and a limited ability to open her mouth. The patient was medicated and treated surgically. The tooth was removed from the maxillary sinus with caution, as should have been done initially. PMID:25705524

  17. Intraoral Mass Presenting as Maxillary Sinus Carcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Omid; Boostani, Najmehalsadat; Karimi, Sharareh; Tabesh, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma is an extremely rare malignancy of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. It is of unknown etiology, and occurs more commonly in the elderly men, with a routinely shown aggressive behavior and poor prognosis for survival. Radiographically, it looks like severe osteomyelitis. Histopathologic study is essential to confirm diagnosis, and the undifferentiated histologic appearance often necessitates immunohistochemical studies for differentiation from other high-grade neoplasms. We present an 83-year-old man complaining of pain and unilateral swelling on the left side of the face due to a rare malignant tumor of maxillary sinus origin, a sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma. He underwent hemimaxillectomy and radiotherapy, but refused chemotherapy. Maxillary sinus malignancy may be presented with unspecific symptoms mimicking sinusitis or dental pain. Coming across such symptoms, the physician or dentist must consider malignancies as well, and carry out medical and dental workups. PMID:24910668

  18. Primary carcinoid tumor of the frontal sinus: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chu, Michael W; Karakla, Daniel W; Silverberg, Marc; Han, Joseph K

    2010-10-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, indolent, neuroendocrine tumors that are most commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract and lungs. They occasionally develop in the head and neck, either as a primary tumor or, more commonly, as a metastasis. The most common sites of head and neck carcinoids are the larynx and middle ear. Only a few cases of carcinoid in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses have been reported. We describe a case of primary typical carcinoid of the frontal sinus in a 61-year-old man, and we review the clinical, imaging, surgical, and histochemical findings in this case. The patient was treated with endoscopic resection. A subsequent workup for metastatic and occult primary disease was negative, confirming that the frontal sinus was the primary source. At follow-up 12 months postoperatively, the patient remained without disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a primary typical carcinoid tumor originating in the frontal sinus.

  19. Bilateral Synchronous Ectopic Ethmoid Sinus Olfactory Neuroblastoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Soriano, Elena; Alfonso, Carolina; Yebenes, Laura; Garcia-Polo, Julio; Lassaletta, Luis; Gavilan, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 41 Final Diagnosis: Olfactory neuroblastoma Symptoms: Left nasal obstruction • occasional left epistaxis • headache Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Nasal endoscopic examination • neck palpation • CT • bilateral endoscopic resection • MRI • PET-CT • postoperative radiotherapy Specialty: Otolaryngology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB), also known as esthesioneuroblastoma, is a rare malignant head and neck cancer thought to originate from the olfactory epithelium. It typically invades contiguous structures at presentation. We report a very rare case of multifocal and ectopic ONB. Case Report: A 41-year-old man presented with left nasal obstruction and occasional left epistaxis associated with headache. Endoscopic examination of the nasal cavities and computed tomography suggested bilateral polypoid masses. Histopathological diagnosis after endoscopic resection established bilateral olfactory neuroblastoma of the ethmoid sinuses. The patient received postoperative radiotherapy. He remains free of disease 4 years after treatment. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge this is the second documented case of multifocal ectopic olfactory neuroblastoma. Clinicians should consider ONB in the differential diagnosis of bilateral synchronous nasal and paranasal masses to avoid delayed diagnosis. Endoscopic resection of ONB could be an option in selected cases. PMID:27097989

  20. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ...

  1. Sinusitis Q and A

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ...

  2. Metallic foreign body in the sphenoid sinus after ballistic injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Akhaddar, A; Abouchadi, A; Jidal, M; Gazzaz, M; Elmostarchid, B; Naama, O; Rzin, A; Boucetta, M

    2008-05-01

    Paranasal sinus injuries by foreign bodies have a lower incidence compared with facial injuries. Among them, penetrating maxillofacial injuries to the sphenoid sinus and skull base remain rare. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who presented with, after a missile-related maxillofacial injury, a metallic foreign body enclosed within the sphenoid sinus with carotid-canal fracture. Angiographic evaluation showed a mass in the right internal carotid artery. The foreign object was successfully extracted through a transmaxillary sublabial approach with a good outcome. We discuss the extensive preoperative evaluation and interdisciplinary management of this unusual injury.

  3. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Cetuximab, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  4. Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Wald, Ellen R

    2011-05-01

    Acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis are 2 of the most common indications for antimicrobial agents in children. Together, they are responsible for billions of dollars of health care expenditures. The pathogenesis of the 2 conditions is identical. In the majority of children with each condition, a preceding viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of the acute bacterial complication. It has been shown that viral upper respiratory tract infection predisposes to the development of acute otitis media in 37% of cases. Currently, precise microbiologic diagnosis of acute otitis media and acute bacterial sinusitis requires performance of tympanocentesis in the former and sinus aspiration in the latter. The identification of a virus from the nasopharynx in either case does not obviate the need for antimicrobial therapy. Furthermore, nasal and nasopharyngeal swabs are not useful in predicting the results of culture of the middle ear or paranasal sinus. However, it is possible that a combination of information regarding nasopharyngeal colonization with bacteria and infection with specific viruses may inform treatment decisions in the future.

  5. [Nasal septal abscess complicating acute sinusitis in a child].

    PubMed

    Hassani, R; Aderdour, L; Maliki, O; Boumed, A; Elfakiri, M M; Bouchoua, F; Raji, A

    2011-01-01

    Nasal septal abscess is a rare complication of acute sinusitis in children. We report the case of a 9-year-old girl who presented at the emergency unit with a bilateral eyelid edema evolving over 2 days, associated with bilateral rhinorrhea and nasal obstruction. Clinical examination found a tumefied nasal septum and nasal obstruction. A computed tomography scan of the nose and paranasal sinuses showed pansinusitis with an abscess of the nasal septum. Treatment consisted in the evacuation of the abscess associated with a triple antibiotic therapy. Progression was favorable. Acute sinusitis is seldom complicated by an abscess of the nasal septum, and very few cases are reported in the literature. Early diagnosis and treatment can avoid complications, which engage not only the functional but also the vital prognosis.

  6. Industries and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ward, E M; Burnett, C A; Ruder, A; Davis-King, K

    1997-05-01

    Epidemiologic evidence on the relationship between selected industries and cancer is reviewed. This article will focus on several industries which have not been covered elsewhere in this volume, briefly describe current research on cancer in the agricultural and construction industries, and discuss surveillance data on cancer mortality in relation to industry listed on US death certificates. Employment in the rubber industry has been associated with bladder cancer, leukemia, stomach, and lung cancer and is considered by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) to have 'sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in humans.' Studies of workers exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have reported excess mortality from gastrointestinal neoplasms, hematologic neoplasms, and skin cancer (specifically malignant melanoma); IARC considers that the evidence for carcinogenicity in humans is 'limited.' Employment in the boot and shoe industry has been associated with nasal adenocarcinomas in England and Italy ('sufficient'). Hairdressers and barbers have been found to have excess bladder cancer and less consistent evidence for several other sites ('limited'). Workers exposed to wood dust have excess mortality from cancer of the nasal sinuses and paranasal cavities; there is less consistent evidence for excess laryngeal cancer ('sufficient'). Workers employed in the petroleum industry have limited evidence for excess leukemia and other lymphatic and hematopoietic neoplasms, and skin cancer (particularly malignant melanoma) ('limited').

  7. The nasal and paranasal architecture of the Middle Miocene ape Pierolapithecus catalaunicus (primates: Hominidae): phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Los Ríos, Miriam; Moyà-Solà, Salvador; Alba, David M

    2012-09-01

    The internal (nasal and paranasal) cranial anatomy of the Middle Miocene (11.9 Ma [millions of years ago]) great ape Pierolapithecus catalaunicus (Hominidae: Dryopithecini) is described on the basis of computed-tomography scans of the holotype specimen (IPS21350), with particular emphasis on its phylogenetic implications. Pierolapithecus displays the following characters: an anteriorly-restricted maxillary sinus that posteriorly spreads towards the ethmoidal area (thus resembling the pongine condition), although being situated well above the molar roots (as in kenyapithecins, other dryopithecins and pongines); lack of frontal sinus (a synapomorphy of derived pongines, independently acquired by both cercopithecoids and hylobatids); posteriorly-situated turbinals (as in Pongo); anteriorly-projecting nasolacrimal canal (as in Pongo); and probably stepped nasal floor with non-overlapping premaxillary-maxillary contact (as in dryopithecines and stem hominoids, although it cannot be conclusively shown due to bone damage). Overall, Pierolapithecus displays a mosaic of primitive hominid and derived pongine features that are inconsistent with this taxon being a hominine (as previously suggested). Two alternative phylogenetic interpretations are possible: Pierolapithecus may be a stem member of the Hominidae as previously suggested in its original description, or alternatively this taxon may be a stem member of the Ponginae s.l. (with the European dryopithecines being the sister taxon to the Asian pongines).

  8. [Secondary lung diseases in patients with nasotracheal intubation. Role of nosocomial sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Meyer, P; Guérin, J M; Habib, Y; Lévy, C

    1988-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is a frequent infectious complication in ICU patients. All the patients with prolonged nasotracheal intubation presenting with nosocomial pneumonia according to Salata's criteria were examined for sinusitis in the prospective study. Diagnosis was confirmed via CT-scan views and transnasal sinus puncture. In eleven nasally intubated patients, CT-scan views showed air fluid levels and multiple sinus involvement. Bacteriological studies isolated the same gram negative bacilli in both sinus and bronchial aspirates. In four cases, a polymicrobial sinusitis was found with a single organism predominant. This predominant germ was always found in bronchial aspirate. Recovery from pneumonia was obtained only after sinus drainage. Treatment included removing the nasal tubes, or performing tracheostomy and systemic antibiotics. One patient required surgical maxillary sinus drainage after failure of medical management. The occurrence of nosocomial pneumonia in nasotracheally intubated patients should lead physicians to explore the paranasal sinuses. Sinus CT-scan views should be routinely obtained in the assessment of pulmonary sepsis in patients with prolonged nasotracheal intubation. Persistent or ignored nosocomial sinusitis in such circumstances could be a major source of treatment failure.

  9. Combined Endoscopic and Trans Palpebral Orbital Reconstruction for Silent Sinus Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tieghi, Riccardo; Malagutti, Nicola; Valente, Luisa; Carnevali, Giulia; Clauser, Luigi C

    2017-01-31

    Silent Sinus Syndrome is defined as a painless spontaneous and progressive enophthalmos and hypoglobus with maxillary sinus hypoplasia and orbital floor resorption. It is caused by maxillary sinus atelectasis in a setting of ipsilateral chronic maxillary sinus hypoventilation. The syndrome was first described in 1964 by Montgomery, but the term "Silent Sinus Syndrome" was not coined until 1994 by Soparkar. The aetiology is still controversial: some authors postulate a basal hypoplastic sinus, other suggest an acquired process due to an obstruction of the ostium in the medium meatus. Silent Sinus Syndrome presents in the third to fifth decades of life, very rarely in childhood with no gender predilection and it is usually a unilateral disorder. The symptoms are not shown to be related to chronic sinuses disease. The clinical signs are: enophthalmos, hypoglobus, upper lid retraction secondary to dystopia of the globe, sinking of the eye and orbital asymmetry, deepened upper lid sulcus, disappearance of the palpebral fold line, lagophthalmos, vertical diplopia, malar depression, and facial asymmetry. Extraocular muscle function is generally preserved and usually there is no visual impairment. The diagnosis is confirmed by computed tomography scan of the orbits and paranasal sinuses. The treatment consists of orbital reconstruction and functional rehabilitation of the maxillary sinuses.

  10. Cephalometric Analysis for Gender Determination Using Maxillary Sinus Index: A Novel Dimension in Personal Identification

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ritika

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Radiography is important in forensic odontology for the identification of humans. The maxillary sinus is the largest of the paranasal sinuses and first to develop. Sinus radiography has been used for identification of skeletal remains and determination of gender. Hence, the aim and objectives of the present study were to establish a new method for gender determination using maxillary sinus index from lateral cephalometric radiographs and to establish the reliability of maxillary sinus for gender determination. Methods. A total of 50 adult digital lateral cephalometric radiographs (25 males and 25 females) were included in the study. The maxillary sinus analysis was performed on these radiographs using the height and width measurement tools of Sidexis XG software. Maxillary sinus index was calculated, discriminant function analysis performed, and discriminant equation derived for determination of gender. Results. The mean maxillary sinus height and width were found to be higher in males, whereas the maxillary sinus index was greater in females. The discriminant function analysis derived in the study was able to differentiate the sex groups with sensitivity of 68% and specificity of 76%. Conclusions. From the results of the present study, it may be concluded that morphometric analysis of maxillary sinus can be used as a reliable tool in gender determination. PMID:28373883

  11. IL-32: A Novel Pluripotent Inflammatory Interleukin, towards Gastric Inflammation, Gastric Cancer, and Chronic Rhino Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A vast variety of nonstructural proteins have been studied for their key roles and involvement in a number of biological phenomenona. Interleukin-32 is a novel cytokine whose presence has been confirmed in most of the mammals except rodents. The IL-32 gene was identified on human chromosome 16 p13.3. The gene has eight exons and nine splice variants, namely, IL-32α, IL-32β, IL-32γ, IL-32δ, IL-32ε, IL-32ζ, IL-32η, IL-32θ, and IL-32s. It was found to induce the expression of various inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β as well as macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and has been reported previously to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of a number of inflammatory disorders, namely, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), gastric inflammation and cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the current review, we have highlighted the involvement of IL-32 in gastric cancer, gastric inflammation, and chronic rhinosinusitis. We have also tried to explore various mechanisms suspected to induce the expression of this extraordinary cytokine as well as various mechanisms of action employed by IL-32 during the mediation and progression of the above said problems. PMID:27143819

  12. Introduction to sinus disease: I. Anatomy and physiology.

    PubMed

    Krouse, J H

    1999-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis is the most common chronic illness in the United States. An understanding of the anatomy of the paranasal sinuses, their functioning in health and in disease, and the contributing factors that are critical to the pathogenesis of rhinosinusitis is essential for nurses caring for patients with this prevalent disease. This paper will provide the otorhinolaryngology (ORL) nurse with an overview of the scientific principles important in rhinosinusitis, as well as presenting a framework for the understanding of rhinosinusitis and its treatment. (This paper is the first in a series of two articles. The second part will review the diagnosis and treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis.)

  13. [Metastasis in maxilar sinus as only manifestation of disseminate renal adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Torres Muros, B; Bonilla Parrilla, R; Solano Romero, J R; Rodríguez Baró, J G; Verge González, J

    2007-01-01

    Paranasal sinuses and nose metastasis are very uncommon. About 50 have been reported. Renal cell carcinoma is the primary neoplasm which most frequently metastasizes in the nasosinusal region, followed by breast and lug. Symptoms are unspecific, but the epistaxis constitutes the most common sign due to the significant vascularizations of the tumor. Prognosis is poor. The survival rate fluctuates between 15-30% at 5 years. Surgery is the elective treatment.

  14. Unusual venous sinuses.

    PubMed

    Srijit, D; Shipra, P

    2007-01-01

    The dural venous sinuses lie in between the two layers of the dura mater. The dural venous sinuses are important, because they receive blood from the brain and the cranial bones. All sinuses are related to the inner surface of the skull, except for the inferior sagittal and the straight sinus. The sinuses related to the inner surface of the skull produce impressions on it. During routine ostelogical teaching for undergraduate medical students, we observed an unusual oblique sinus, which connected the right and the left transverse sinuses. This unusual oblique sinus measured 2 cm and had a course from the right to the left side. The superior sagittal sinus turned onto the right but at a much higher level than the left transverse sinus. Although these sinuses communicated with each other, the normal position of the confleunce of the sinus (meeting point of superior sagittal sinus, right and left transverse sinus and the occipital sinus) was not seen. The impression meant for the posterior lobe of the left cerebral hemisphere was distinctly greater than that of the right side. The presence of such an anomaly suggests a possible developmental defect or handedness of the individual. The knowledge of the anatomical variations of the dural venous sinuses may have great clinical implications during venography, shunt surgeries and also helpful for neurologists and radiologists in addition to academic interest (Fig. 2, Ref 10) Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  15. Normal Variations of Sphenoid Sinus and the Adjacent Structures Detected in Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Azadeh; Ghafari, Roshanak; AnjomShoa, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The sphenoid sinus is a common target of paranasal surgery. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery is likely to endanger the anatomic variations of vital structures adjacent to the sphenoid sinus. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the variations of sphenoid sinus and the related structures by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Method In this descriptive-analytic study, CBCT images of 103 patients aged above 20-years were selected (206 sides). Degree of pneumatization of sphenoid sinus, pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process, pterygoid process, protrusion of optic canal, vidian canal, and foramen rotundum, as well as prevalence of sinus septa were recorded. Examinations were performed using On-Demand software (Version 1); data were analyzed by using chi-square test. Results There was a statistically significant correlation between the pterygoid pneumatization and vidian canal protrusion (p< 0.001), and foramen rotundum protrusion (p< 0.001). The optic canal protrusion was found to be significantly associated with the anterior clinoid pneumatization and pterygoid process (p< 0.001). Statistically significant relationship was also observed between the carotid canal protrusion and pterygoid process pneumatization (p< 0.001). Conclusion The anatomical variations of the sphenoid sinus tend to give rise to a complexity of symptoms and potentially serious complications. This variability necessitates a comprehensive understanding of the regional sphenoid sinus anatomy by a detailed CBCT sinus examination. PMID:26966706

  16. U-shaped osteotomy in management of paranasal deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Alfaro, F; García, E; Martí, C; Porta, A

    2006-12-01

    When paranasal deficiencies are not accompanied by occlusal alterations, mobilization of the maxilla via Le Fort I osteotomy may not be justified. In this preliminary, report for the first time is presented a U-shaped osteotomy (USO) that mobilizes anteriorly and/or superiorly the maxillary bone surrounding the pirifom aperture. Advantages and indications of this new procedure are discussed.

  17. New ways to diagnose and treat equine dental-related sinus disease.

    PubMed

    Easley, Jeremiah T; Freeman, David E

    2013-08-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of equine dental-related sinus disease is often challenging. Dental-related sinus disease is common and knowledge of these diseases is becoming increasingly important in veterinary medicine. Diagnostic capabilities are continually improving, leading to early diagnostic and therapeutic successes. With advanced imaging modalities, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, understanding of the intimate anatomic relationship between teeth and the paranasal sinuses continues to progress. There are many therapeutic options available for the treatment of these common and challenging disorders. A complete understanding of the disease, therapeutic options, and potential complications is vital to overall successful resolution of clinical signs in equine dental-related sinus disorders.

  18. The occurrence of molds in patients with chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Twarużek, Magdalena; Soszczyńska, Ewelina; Winiarski, Piotr; Zwierz, Aleksander; Grajewski, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common inflammatory condition of nasal and paranasal sinus mucosa. Although pathogenic bacteria were postulated as main etiological factor responsible for most cases of CRS, the involvement of molds was recently proved in some cases. The aim of the study was to conduct mycological analysis of material obtained from patients operated on due to chronic sinusitis. The study included 107 patients, 45 women and 62 men. During the surgery, a fragment of mucosa from the region of the ethmoid bulla was obtained as microbiological characteristics of this material closely resemble those of sinus mucosa. In addition, maxillary sinus lavage was obtained. The control group comprised patients without chronic sinusitis. The dithiothreitol solution method was used for the lavage examination. The tissue material (mucosal fragment from the region of the ethmoid bulla) was incubated in 2% liquid Sabouraud medium for 24 h. The material was inoculated onto culture media. The presence of molds was detected in 67% of examined samples. Overall, 41 species belonging to 12 genera were isolated. The most frequently detected genera included Penicillium spp. (46%) and Aspergillus spp. (16%). In addition, Cladosporium spp. (11%), Fusarium spp. (7%), Acremonium spp. (4%), Eurotium spp. (4%), Alternaria spp. (2%), Chaetomium spp. (1%), Geotrichum spp. (1%), Verticillium spp. (1%), Rhizopus spp. (1%), and some unidentified colonies (5%) were isolated. Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium citrinum, Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium cladosporioides, and Fusarium verticillioides were the most prevalent species.

  19. Nasal Septal Deviation and Concha Bullosa – Do They Have an Impact on Maxillary Sinus Volumes and Prevalence of Maxillary Sinusitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kucybała, Iwona; Janik, Konrad Adam; Ciuk, Szymon; Storman, Dawid; Urbanik, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of the study was to assess if the presence of nasal septal deviation and concha bullosa is connected with the development of sinuses and the incidence of inflammation within them. Material/Methods We retrospectively analysed 214 patients who underwent paranasal sinus computed tomography. There were 125 females and 89 males, the mean age being 47.67±16.74 years (range 18–97). Exclusion criteria included: age under 18 years, prior sinonasal surgery and S-shaped septum. Results Mean volume of the right maxillary sinus was 17.794 cm3, while for the left one it was 17.713 cm3. Nasal septal deviation was found in 79.9% of computed tomography examinations and concha bullosa was observed in 42.1% of the patients’ examinations. There was an association between the presence of unilateral or dominant concha bullosa and contralateral direction of septal deviation [right-sided (p=0.039), left-sided (p=0.003)]. There was higher incidence of bilateral maxillary sinusitis in patients with septal deviation (p=0.007). Bilateral concha bullosa did not influence the incidence of bilateral maxillary sinusitis (p=0.495). Neither septal deviation (right sided: p=0.962; left-sided: p=0.731), nor unilateral/dominant concha bullosa (right: p=0.512; left: p=0,430) affected the asymmetry in volumes of maxillary sinuses. Bilateral concha bullosa was connected with larger volume of maxillary sinuses (right sinus: p=0.005; left sinus: p=0.048). Conclusions Nasal septal deviation, contrary to concha bullosa, has influence on the development of maxillary sinusitis. There is a connection between the presence of concha bullosa and direction of septal deviation. Only bilateral concha bullosa affects maxillary sinus volumes. PMID:28348652

  20. [Omeprazole: a new treatment for paranasal sinus polyps in Widal syndrome. Preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Serra, J; Piñas, J; Arnaiz, J A; Quesada, P; Naches, S; Lorente, J; Carne, X

    1998-05-01

    A preliminary report is made of the potential therapeutic effect of omeprazol in reducing nasosinusal polyps. This study is based on the empirical observation of nasal airflow improvement in patients suffering from nasosinusal polyposis after administering omeprazol. Different phases of the study suggested that patients with Widal's syndrome benefited the most. Based on the results of this study, we have undertaken a randomized, parallel, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

  1. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement CONDITIONS Adult Sinusitis Pediatric Sinusitis ... information in the popular media may not reflect reality. Although useful, balloon sinuplasty is not for everyone. ...

  2. Sinusitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and mucus can become trapped in the sinuses. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi can grow there and lead to ... cases of sinusitis thought to be caused by bacteria. Some doctors may recommend ... usually goes away without medical treatment. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, ...

  3. Sinusitis (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by infection. Our sinuses are the moist air spaces within the bones of the face around the nose. The frontal sinuses are located in the area near the eyebrows; the ... our sinuses are filled with air, making our facial bones less dense and much ...

  4. Sinusitis in adults - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000563.htm Sinusitis in adults - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your sinuses are chambers in ... They are filled with air. Sinusitis is an infection of these chambers, which causes ...

  5. [Accidental discovery of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT-positive papilloma in sinus sphenoidalis in a patient with recurrence of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lasse Berg

    2015-02-02

    A patient suspected for metastatic breast cancer went through an 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT). Along with metastatic lymph nodes in the neck it showed high 18F-FDG uptake in a polypoidal structure in the sinus sphenoidalis. When asked she had no related symptoms due to the sphenoid polyp and the CT-scan showed no bone destruction. To rule out malignancy a biopsy was made showing benign sinonasal papilloma of oncocytic origin. High 18F-FDG PET uptake can be seen in benign structures and should therefore not be the only predictor for malignancy.

  6. Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Correll, Daniel P; Luzi, Scott A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2015-12-01

    A 42 year old male presents with worsening pain and an increase in thick chronic drainage of the left sinus. Image studies show complete opacification of the left frontal sinus, left sphenoid sinus, and the left maxillary sinus. The patient was taken to the operating room and tissue for microscopic evaluation was obtained. The microscopic findings were classic for allergic fungal sinusitis: areas of alternating mucinous material and inflammatory cell debris and abundant Charcot-Leyden crystals. Cultures were performed and the patient began steroid therapy and desensitization therapy.

  7. Open Sinus Lift Surgery and the Importance of Preoperative Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Scan: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Open sinus lift surgery is a form of pre-prosthetic surgery for increasing the quality and quantity of bone in the posterior region of the maxilla. Pre-operative assessment of the maxillary sinus is essential for the success of this surgery. PubMed search was carried out in English language literature for open sinus lift surgery and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The results focused on anatomic variants, vascular anatomy, complications, osteotomy/ostectomy window dimensions and thickness of the Schneiderian Membrane. 59 articles were included in this review. Features other than the height and the width of the residual alveolar ridge that should be evaluated in preoperative CBCT scan include the thickness of the lateral maxillary sinus wall, the presence of the alveolar antral artery and its diameter, the maxillary sinus floor width and angulation, irregularity of sinus floor, intimate relation of Schneiderian membrane with the roots of the adjacent teeth, sinus septum, and the quality of subantral bone. Other conditions that occasionally may be observed in special situations are also explained. More than ten parameters should be checked in evaluating CBCT images of paranasal sinuses other than the width and the length of the residual ridge in the posterior region of the maxilla. Each of them may have a significant impact on the results of the open sinus lift surgery. PMID:26435632

  8. Sphenoid sinus fungall ball: a retrospective study over a 10- year period.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Ph; Grenier, J; Pirlet, A; Poirrier, A L; Stephens, J S; Rombaux, Ph

    2013-06-01

    A fungal ball consists of a dense conglomerate of fungal hyphae growing at the surface of the sinus mucosa without tissue infiltration. The maxillary sinus is by far the most commonly involved paranasal sinus cavity followed by the sphenoid sinus. The present study is a retrospective study of 25 consecutive cases treated during the last 10 years in the two hospitals be- longing to the Catholic University of Louvain (CHU Mont-Godinne and UCL Saint Luc). We report the symptomatology, the imaging and discuss the different surgical managements. We conclude that the clinician must have a high index of suspicion when dealing with a unilateral rhinosinusitis persisting despite a maximal and well conducted medical treatment. This is particularly so in elderly women when associated with facial pain and post nasal drip, particularly when the computed tomography shows an unilateral opacity of the sphenoid sinus with or without a sclerosis or an erosion of the bony walls, a polyp in the sphenoethmoidal recess or a hyperdensity mimicking a foreign body. An endonasal endoscopic sphenoidotomy is the treatment of choice in most cases, allowing good ventilation of the sinus and radical removal of all the fungal concretion. A biopsy of the sinus mucosa adjacent to fungal elements is of upmost important to confirm the non- invasiveness of the fungi within the tissue. Antifungal medication is not required in uncomplicated forms. All host factors producing some degree of immunosuppression must be corrected when present and must alert the clinician to rule out any forms of invasive disease.

  9. Unusual Synchronous Presentation of Maxillary Sinus Fibrosarcoma and Gemistocytic Astrocytoma with a Complication Called Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cadir, Bilge; Karahan, Nermin; Nasir, Serdar; Aydin, M. Asim; Turkaslan, S. Suha

    2009-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma of the paranasal sinuses is extremely rare pathology and there is limited report in the literature. We report synchronous presentation of maxillary sinus fibrosarcoma and gemistocytic astrocytoma which is, to our knowledge, unique in the literature. Both tumors metastases to other organ rarely and the metastatic spread of gemistocytic astrocytoma to fibrosarcoma or vice versa have also not been reported in the literature yet. This report discusses the clinical course of the disease, outcome of the treatment approach and survival as well as an unusual occurrence of leukocytoclastic vasculitis during the course of radiotherapy in such unusual presentation. PMID:19756200

  10. Invasive maxillary sinus aspergillosis: A case report successfully treated with voriconazole and surgical debridement

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-González, Luis-Miguel; Verrier-Hernández, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Invasive aspergillosis of the paranasal sinuses is a rare disease and often misdiagnosed; however, its incidence has seen substancial growth over the past 2 decades. Definitive diagnosis of these lesions is based on histological examination and fungal culture. Case Report: An 81-year-old woman with a history of pain in the left maxillary region is presented. The diagnosis was invasive maxillary aspergillosis in immunocompetent patient, which was successfully treated with voriconazole and surgical debridement. Possible clinical manifestations, diagnostic imaging techniques and treatment used are discussed. Since the introduction of voriconazole, there have been several reports of patients with invasive aspergillosis who responded to treatment with this new antifungal agent. Conclusions: We report the importance of early diagnosis and selection of an appropriate antifungal agent to achieve a successful treatment. Key words:Invasive aspergillosis, voriconazole, fungal sinusitis, antifungal agent, open sinus surgery. PMID:25593673

  11. The status of the middle turbinate and the risk of sinusitis after endoscopic transnasal sphenoidotomy.

    PubMed

    Süslü, Ahmet Emre; Savaş, Özden; Özer, Serdar; Önerci, Metin

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the occurrence of postoperative middle turbinate lateralization and the relationship between this lateralization and the risk of iatrogenic sinusitis after endoscopic transnasal sphenoidotomy procedure. Patients who undergone endoscopic transnasal sphenoidotomy and came under the surveillance of our otorhinolaryngology department between the January of 2010 and the December of 2015 were retrospectively scanned. Among them, the patients who were evaluated with paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) postoperatively were included in the study. The amount of middle turbinate lateralization in each patient was evaluated by comparing their routine preoperative CT image with the postoperative CT image. The air-fluid levels or soft tissue opacifications in the sinuses or obstruction of the ostiomeatal complex were accepted as the evidence of sinusitis on the images. The patients were asked questions regarding their symptoms of sinusitis on a phone interview for the statistical evaluation of their preoperative and postoperative Visual Analog Scale scores of complaints of sinusitis. The difference between preoperative and postoperative measurements was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001, 95% CI). The middle turbinate position was lateralized in 31 patients (81.6%), medialized in four patients (10.5%), and remained unchanged in three patients (7.9%). Overall, the sinus opacification and mucosal thickening rates did not change significantly which suggested the operation did not pose patients at increased risk of sinusitis. Mean VAS scores of complaints of sinusitis did not change significantly except for sensation of facial pressure, which showed a minor but statistically significant decrease (p < 0.001). This study revealed the lateralization of the middle turbinate after transnasal sphenoidotomy. However, it seemed that this lateralization did not create a predisposing factor for the development of acute and

  12. Microbiology of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2011-03-01

    Most sinus infections are viral, and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. Rhinoviruses, influenza viruses, and parainfluenza viruses are the most common causes of sinusitis. The most common bacteria isolated from pediatric and adult patients with community-acquired acute purulent sinusitis are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Staphylococcus aureus and anaerobic bacteria (Prevotella and Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium and Peptostreptococcus spp.) are the main isolates in chronic sinusitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic and facultative gram-negative rods are commonly isolated from patients with nosocomial sinusitis, the immunocompromised host, those with HIV infection, and in cystic fibrosis. Fungi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most common isolates in neutropenic patients. The microbiology of sinusitis is influenced by the previous antimicrobial therapy, vaccinations, and the presence of normal flora capable of interfering with the growth of pathogens.

  13. The effects of gender and age on forensic personal identification from frontal sinus in a Turkish population

    PubMed Central

    Tatlisumak, Ertugrul; Asirdizer, Mahmut; Bora, Aydin; Hekimoglu, Yavuz; Etli, Yasin; Gumus, Orhan; Keskin, Siddik

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To define the dimensions of the frontal sinus in groups standardized for age and gender and to discuss the reasons and the effects of the variations. Methods: Frontal sinus measurements were obtained from paranasal CT scans of 180 males and 180 females in the Radiology Department of Dursun Odabas Medical Center of Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, which is located in Eastern Turkey, between February and March 2016. The width and height of sinuses were measured on a coronal plane, and the anteroposterior length was measured on an axial plane. Volumes were calculated using the Hospital Information Management Systems and Image Archiving and Management System program. The Statistical Package of the Social Science version 13 was used for statistical analyses. Results: We determined differences in the frontal sinus measurements of different age groups in a Turkish adult population. Frontal sinus dimensions were usually higher in females and lower in males after 40-49 years of age than their younger counterparts, but the measurements were lower in females and higher in males in 70≤ years of age group than 60-69 years of age. Left frontal sinus was dominant in young age groups but right frontal sinus was dominant in groups 40-49 years of age or older. Conclusion: We observed crossing of the measurements between the different age groups, which we could not find clear explanations. The results of such studies may affect forensic identification from frontal sinus measurements. PMID:28042629

  14. Experimental Transmission of Bighorn Sheep Sinus Tumors to Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis) and Domestic Sheep.

    PubMed

    Fox, K A; Wootton, S; Marolf, A; Rouse, N; LeVan, I; Spraker, T; Miller, M; Quackenbush, S

    2016-11-01

    Bighorn sheep sinus tumors are a recently described disease affecting the paranasal sinuses of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis). Several features of this disease suggest an infectious cause, although a specific etiologic agent has not been identified. To test the hypothesis that bighorn sheep sinus tumors are caused by an infectious agent, we inoculated 4 bighorn sheep lambs and 4 domestic sheep lambs intranasally with a cell-free filtrate derived from a naturally occurring bighorn sheep sinus tumor; we held 1 individual of each species as a control. Within 18 months after inoculation, all 4 inoculated domestic sheep (100%) and 1 of the 4 inoculated bighorn sheep (25%) developed tumors within the ethmoid sinuses or nasal conchae, with features similar to naturally occurring bighorn sheep sinus tumors. Neither of the uninoculated sheep developed tumors. Histologically, the experimentally transmitted tumors were composed of stellate to spindle cells embedded within a myxoid matrix, with marked bone production. Tumor cells stained positively with vimentin, S100, alpha smooth muscle actin, and osteocalcin, suggesting origin from a multipotent mesenchymal cell. A periosteal origin for these tumors is suspected. Immunohistochemical staining for the envelope protein of JSRV (with cross-reactivity to ENTV) was equivocal, and PCR assays specific for these agents were negative.

  15. Recurrent sinusitis and impairment of eustachian tube function in air passengers and crew.

    PubMed

    Moser, M; Wolf, G

    1990-07-01

    Chronic and recurrent sinusitis, and thus impaired tubular function, are usually caused by isolated lesions of the ethmoid cells. Purulent nasal secretions are transported over the openings of the tubes into the epipharynx. Inflammation and swelling of the mucosa of the tube openings causes stenosis or blockage. Inflammatory foci, usually hidden in the anterior ethmoid cell system, are not always apparent in a plain film of the paranasal sinuses. They appear only in a computed-tomography scan or in a conventional tomogram. Once the diagnosis has been made, a simple, guided endoscopic procedure suffices to alleviate a stenosis, open inflamed ethmoid cells, and restitute ventilation of the nasal sinuses and, thus, tubal function. Radical procedures on the maxillary and frontal sinuses, and plastic operations on deviated nasal septa (which impair the function of the nose and the nasal sinuses only in extreme cases), are thus often unnecessary. Septum deviations are irrelevant to the fitness-to-fly of air personnel as long as the tube and the ventilation of the sinuses function freely. The Valsalva maneuver with otoscopic visualization of the excursion of the eardrum is the most reliable test of tubal function. Tympanometry is used mainly for documentation.

  16. Attachment Style and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Predict Post-Treatment Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Fagundes, Christopher P.; Jaremka, Lisa M.; Malarkey, William B.; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor among women in the industrialized world. The vast majority of these tumors can now be successfully treated. A subset of breast cancer survivors report quality of life (QOL) difficulties well after treatment is completed. The current study examined how individual differences in attachment style and self-regulatory capacity (as indexed by RSA) were associated quality of life among post-treatment breast cancer survivors. Methods Women who had completed treatment for stage 0-IIIA breast cancer within the past two years participated in the study (N = 96). RSA was assessed using Electrocardiography (ECG) data that was continuously measured non-invasively for 10 minutes. Attachment orientation was measured using a modified version of the Experiences in Close relationships Scale, and Overall QOL by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast scale. Results Breast cancer survivors with more attachment anxiety reported poorer QOL than those with less attachment anxiety. Women who were more avoidantly attached also reported poorer QOL compared with those who were less avoidantly attached. Furthermore, attachment avoidance interacted with RSA to predict QOL such that those with higher attachment avoidance were only vulnerable to poorer QOL if they also had lower self-regulatory capacity, as indexed by lower RSA. Conclusion A better understanding of how attachment style and RSA contribute to breast cancer survivor QOL will help identify people at risk for QOL problems after treatment completion. PMID:24532423

  17. Idiopathic bilateral antral exostoses: A rare case in maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Borie, Eduardo; Watanabe, Plauto C.A.; Orsi, Iara A.; Fuentes, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Exostoses in paranasal sinuses have been reported in the otolaryngology literature, but they have not been described in the dental literature to our knowledge. The aim of this article is to describe an idiopathic and rare case of bilateral exostosis obtained by cone-beam computed tomography. PRESENTATION OF CASE The case shows a healthy and asymptomatic patient with a different size and form of exostoses in both maxillary sinuses. DISCUSSION It is difficult to clinically diagnose the antral exostosis due the asymptomatic nature of this condition, unless the approach would be through endoscope. Sometimes this condition is related with nasal irrigants, however in this case the patient asserted not having used nasal irrigation ever; thus, it is impossible to relate this kind of treatment as a principal cause. CONCLUSION The published data of exostoses in maxillary sinus seem to be limited in the dental literature, and this condition is important to consider in an implant treatment planning. Also, it is important to perform a follow-up of the cases in trying to find the possible causes of exostosis. PMID:25128728

  18. Acute sinusitis in children: do antibiotics have any role?

    PubMed

    Abzug, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria can be recovered from paranasal sinuses in the majority of patients given the diagnosis of acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS), and bacteriologic cure can be achieved with appropriate antibiotic treatment. The critical question is whether bacteriologic cure correlates with meaningful clinical endpoints such as clinical improvement, reduction in recurrent disease, or prevention of complications. Of the 4 pediatric placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials (PCRCTs), 2 suggest superiority of antibiotic treatment and 2 suggest lack of superiority. PCRCTs in adults are mixed as to clinical benefit. Pediatric and adult meta-analyses demonstrate modest benefit of antibiotic therapy and rates of spontaneous recovery without antibiotics of 60-65%. Although retrospective studies indicate that some patients who develop orbital or neurologic complications of sinusitis were pre-treated with antibiotic therapy, a low rate of complications precludes determination of whether antibiotic treatment prevents complications in some proportion of patients. Like the literature evidence, expert guideline recommendations are mixed. Although the evidence base is incomplete and conflicting, the limited data suggest that antibiotics probably do have a role in the treatment of pediatric ABS. The most compelling rationale is prevention of serious complications, but proof for this rationale is lacking.

  19. Complications of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... further intracranial surgeries. Impaired sense of taste or smell : The sense of smell usually improves after the procedure because airflow is ... in their voice after sinus surgery. Impairment of smell or taste: (see above) Infection: The most common ...

  20. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... sinuses. The test is noninvasive. MRI uses powerful magnets and radio waves instead of radiation. Signals from ... in the eyes. Because the MRI contains a magnet, metal-containing objects such as pens, pocketknives, and ...

  1. [Efficacy and safety of mometasone furoate nasal spray in the treatment of sinusitis or acute rhinosinusitis].

    PubMed

    Klossek, J M

    2007-01-01

    Sinusitis or acute rhinosinusitis, is defined as an acute viral or bacterial infection characterised by inflammation of the mucosa of the nose and paranasal sinuses. Although antibiotics are routinely prescribed for the treatment of acute sinusitis, most cases are caused by viral infections and will resolve without antibiotic therapy. Given concerns about global antibacterial resistance, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines recommend a conservative approach to antibiotic treatment, with mild or moderately severe acute sinusitis managed symptomatically. Intranasal corticosteroids act on the nasal mucosa to relieve inflammation and its associated symptoms, and may be a useful symptomatic treatment option. Two randomised, placebo-controlled trials have demonstrated that the corticosteroid mometasone furoate, administered as a nasal spray (MFNS), is effective as an adjunct to antibiotics in acute sinusitis. The design of these studies show a therapeutic approach known in Europe, but this attitude is still different from the current French guidelines. Furthermore, the efficacy and safety of MFNS monotherapy has been compared with antibiotic therapy in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in adults with acute uncomplicated sinusitis and probably viral. In this study, twice-daily (BID) MFNS 200 microg produced statistically greater improvements in overall symptoms and most individual symptoms compared with amoxicillin or placebo, even though Amoxicillin is not the one recommended by the French guidelines for this indication. These findings suggest that MFNS may play an important role in the management of acute sinusitis, either as monotherapy or as adjunctive treatment to antibiotics. These results lead also to think over its interest in the treatment of uncomplicated common forms of sinusitis, where antibiotics are still widely prescribed in daily practice.

  2. CE: Human Papillomavirus-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Review of Nursing Considerations.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Janet; Thom, Bridgette

    2016-08-01

    : The overall incidence of head and neck cancer-which includes laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, nasal cavity, paranasal sinus, nasopharyngeal, oral, oropharyngeal, and salivary gland cancers-has declined in the United States over the past 30 years with the concomitant reduction in tobacco use. Over that same period, however, the worldwide incidence of oropharyngeal cancer has escalated significantly, most notably among men and women under age 60 who live in developed countries. This epidemic rise in oropharyngeal cancer is largely attributed to certain genotypes of the human papillomavirus (HPV). In the United States, HPV prevalence in oropharyngeal tumors increased dramatically, from roughly 16% between 1984 and 1989 to nearly 73% between 2000 and 2004, and the annual incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer is expected to surpass that of HPV-related cervical cancer by 2020.This article provides an overview of head and neck cancer-its incidence, risk factors, treatment, and posttreatment sequelae-with a focus on HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. Unlike other forms of head and neck cancer, HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer tends to affect younger patients with few or none of the traditional risk factors and has a distinctive presentation, histology, and natural course. In order to provide appropriate patient education and to help these patients monitor and manage late and long-term treatment effects, it is important for nurses to be aware of this disease and its treatment, and of the unique survivorship issues that arise for affected patients.

  3. Airflow in the Human Nasal Passage and Sinuses of Chronic Rhinosinusitis Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Haribalan; Jain, Ravi; Douglas, Richard G.; Tawhai, Merryn H.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic surgery is performed on patients with chronic inflammatory disease of the paranasal sinuses to improve sinus ventilation. Little is known about how sinus surgery affects sinonasal airflow. In this study nasal passage geometry was reconstructed from computed tomographic imaging from healthy normal, pre-operative, and post-operative subjects. Transient air flow through the nasal passage during calm breathing was simulated. Subject-specific differences in ventilation of the nasal passage were observed. Velocity magnitude at ostium was different between left and right airway. In FESS, airflow in post-surgical subjects, airflow at the maxillary sinus ostium was upto ten times higher during inspiration. In a Lothrop procedure, airflow at the frontal sinus ostium can be upto four times higher during inspiration. In both post-operative subjects, airflow at ostium was not quasi-steady. The subject-specific effect (of surgery) on sinonasal interaction evaluated through airflow simulations may have important consequences for pre- and post-surgical assessment and surgical planning, and design for improvement of the delivery efficiency of nasal therapeutics. PMID:27249219

  4. Danger points, complications and medico-legal aspects in endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Hosemann, W; Draf, C

    2013-12-13

    Endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery represents the overall accepted type of surgical treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis. Notwithstanding raised and still evolving quality standards, surgeons performing routine endoscopic interventions are faced with minor complications in 5% and major complications in 0.5-1%. A comprehensive review on all minor and major complications of endoscopic surgery of the paranasal sinuses and also on the anterior skull base is presented listing the actual scientific literature. The pathogenesis, signs and symptoms of each complication are reviewed and therapeutic regimens are discussed in detail relating to actual publication references. Potential medico-legal aspects are explicated and recent algorithms of avoidance are mentioned taking into account options in surgical training and education.

  5. Danger points, complications and medico-legal aspects in endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hosemann, W.; Draf, C.

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery represents the overall accepted type of surgical treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis. Notwithstanding raised and still evolving quality standards, surgeons performing routine endoscopic interventions are faced with minor complications in 5% and major complications in 0.5–1%. A comprehensive review on all minor and major complications of endoscopic surgery of the paranasal sinuses and also on the anterior skull base is presented listing the actual scientific literature. The pathogenesis, signs and symptoms of each complication are reviewed and therapeutic regimens are discussed in detail relating to actual publication references. Potential medico-legal aspects are explicated and recent algorithms of avoidance are mentioned taking into account options in surgical training and education. PMID:24403974

  6. Sinus preservation management for frontal sinus fractures in the endoscopic sinus surgery era: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kenny B; Poetker, David M; Rhee, John S

    2010-09-01

    We systematically reviewed the existing literature supporting the efficacy and safety of sinus preservation management for frontal sinus fractures in the modern era of endoscopic frontal sinus surgery. A systematic review of the English literature for the targeted objective was conducted using the PubMed database between January 1995 and August 2008. The PubMed database was queried using two major search terms of frontal sinus fracture or frontal sinus injury along with manual review of citations within bibliographies. Citations acquired from the primary search were filtered and relevant abstracts were identified that merited full review. Articles were identified that included any cohort of patients with frontal sinus fractures involving the frontal sinus outflow tract or posterior wall with sinus preservation management. A total of 231 citations were generated, and 56 abstracts were identified as potentially relevant articles. Sixteen articles merited full review, with seven articles meeting inclusion criteria for sinus preservation. There were 515 total patients in the studies with 350 patients managed with frontal sinus preservation. Similar short-term complications and effectiveness were found between fractures managed with sinus preservation and those with traditional management. Sinus preservation appears to be a safe and effective management strategy for select frontal sinus fractures. More transparent reporting of management strategies for individual cases or cohorts is needed. A standardized algorithm and categorization framework for future studies are proposed. Longer-term follow-up and larger prospective studies are necessary to assess the safety and efficacy of sinus preservation protocols.

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer Involving the Base of the Skull

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy Y.

    2007-10-01

    Tumors invading the skull base pose a difficult problem for the treating radiation oncologist. When confronting these highly complex tumors where the gross tumor abuts the optic apparatus or brain stem, the physician often has to make a difficult choice regarding coverage of the tumor, i.e., underdosing portions of the tumor to protect the critical normal tissues versus accepting the risk of late complication while ensuring full coverage of the tumor. This situation is often encountered in advanced T4 disease originating either in the paranasal sinuses or the nasopharynx. In this case report, the author presents a case in which difficult decisions were made when treating a complex, locally advanced, T4 nasopharyngeal cancer that invaded the skull base.

  8. Image-guided, navigation-assisted Relieva Stratus MicroFlow Spacer insertion into the ethmoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Taulu, Rami; Numminen, Jura; Bizaki, Argyro; Rautiainen, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Anatomical complexity presents the main challenge in the administration of topical corticosteroid therapy to the paranasal sinus mucosa. This often leads to suboptimal drug delivery due to low concentrations of the therapeutic agent to the intended target area. The Relieva Stratus™ MicroFlow Spacer (Relieva Stratus) is a drug-eluting stent that is temporarily implanted into the ethmoid sinus. The reservoir of the stent is filled with triamcinolone acetonide, which is then slowly released from the device into the ethmoid sinus mucosa. The Relieva Stratus provides local and targeted delivery of the anti-inflammatory agent to the diseased mucosa. This minimally invasive implant is an option when treating ethmoid sinusitis. From January 2011 to November 2013, a total of 52 Relieva Stratus implantations into the ethmoidal cells were performed at the Department of Ear and Oral Diseases at Tampere University Hospital, Finland. C-arm fluoroscopy guidance was employed for 26 sinuses (13 patients) and optical image-guided surgery (IGS)-assisted insertions were performed on another 26 sinuses (13 patients). The accuracy of fluoroscopic insertion is not optimal, but this method is accurate enough to prevent the violation of the skull base and lamina papyracea. IGS enables the precise treatment of the diseased cells. From a technical perspective, IGS-guided insertion is a faster, safer and more exact procedure that guarantees the optimal positioning and efficacy of the implant. Moreover, IGS guidance does not entail the use of ionizing radiation.

  9. Headaches and sinus disease.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, H J

    2001-10-01

    Modern diagnostic tools like fiberoptic nasal endoscopy and CT imaging of the sinuses are very sensitive in helping clinicians diagnose sinus disease; we may now reevaluate the symptoms and signs most useful in making a clinical diagnosis of rhinosinusitis. Two major systems of classification and diagnostic criteria relating headaches and sinus disease have achieved currency-that of the International Headache Society (IHS) (1988) and the more recent task force recommendations of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) (1997). This report compares and contrasts the different starting points, certain assumptions, and conflicting conclusions of these two classification systems and recommends a cooperative alliance of the IHS and AAO-HNS when these diagnostic criteria are revised.

  10. Cystic Shape Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma of Ethmoid Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Shejbal, Dražen; Vonsović, Gabrijela; Baudoin, Tomislav; Vagic, Davor

    2015-01-01

    Cemento-ossifying fibromas are a group of rarely occurring benign tumours, developing from the periodontal membrane and varying considerably in appearance and in the progress of the disease. Their common feature is higher or lower production of cemental tissue. In most cases the tumours are small because their cementoma mature quickly and become inactive, which causes the tumour to stop growing. They develop most frequently in the mandible and also in the maxilla. Other sites, such as paranasal cavities, soft tissues and bones of the head, are extremely rare. The case of a cemento-fibrosing tumour with psammoma infiltrations, developing from the ethmoid sinus in a nine-year-old girl is reported. Due to frontal headaches and sight defects as well as impaired vision on the right side, NMR was done, which showed a mucocele of the front and rear ethmoid with destruction of the orbital wall and a breakthrough into the orbit. The right maxillary sinus showed a visible retention and a thickened mucous membrane. A rhinoscopy revealed a ball-shaped spherical mass in the medial nasal meatus, which was defined as concha bullosa. An endoscopic examination showed that the tumour protruded in front of the medium nasal concha into the right nasal cavity, softened the ethmoid roof, penetrated toward the base of the skull, adhered and pushed the orbit. It was removed by FESS technique, and PHD revealed subsequently that it was not a mucocele but a cemento-ossifying fibroma. PMID:27688399

  11. Standing equine sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Barakzai, Safia Z; Dixon, Padraic M

    2014-04-01

    Trephination of the equine sinuses is a common surgical procedure in sedated standing horses. Standing sinus flap surgery has become increasingly popular in equine referral hospitals and offers several advantages over sinusotomy performed under general anesthesia, including reduced patient-associated risks and costs; less intraoperative hemorrhage, allowing better visualization of the operative site; and allows surgeons to take their time. Other minimally invasive surgical procedures include sinoscopic surgery, balloon sinuplasty, and transnasal laser sinonasal fenestration. Despite the procedure used, appropriate indications for surgery, good patient selection, and familiarity with regional anatomy and surgical techniques are imperative for good results.

  12. [Histopathologic study of chronic sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Wayoff, M; Parache, R M; Bodelet, B; Gazel, P

    1983-01-01

    The conventional histopathology of the sinus is a criterium for the therapeutic indication, since it is possible to distinguish between granulomatous chronic sinusitis, chronic sinusitis with oedema and nasal polyposis. Each one of these clinical pictures has his own etiology and requires a specific therapeutic approach.

  13. Chronic odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ugincius, Paulius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gervickas, Albinas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate average age of the patients in both sexes treated for MS, distribution by sex, amount of dexter and sinister MS with and without the fistulas into the maxillary sinus, with and without the foreign-bodies, length of stay in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine during the period from 1999 till 2004. The retrospective data analysis of the patients' treated from chronic MS was made. 346 patients (213 females and 133 males) were treated for chronic MS. 55 cases of chronic dexter MS with a fistula into maxillary sinus, 98 cases of chronic dexter MS without a fistula, 45 cases of chronic sinister MS with a fistula, 112 cases chronic sinister MS without a fistula, 16 cases of foreign-bodies in dexter maxillary sinus, 20 cases of foreign-bodies in sinister maxillary sinus have been detected. The main age of the female was 46.6+/-15.0, the main age of the men was 42.1+/-14.4. Statictically significant difference in the age difference of the women and the men was found (p=0.0024). It was determined, that females diagnosed and treated with chronic MS were 1.6 times more than males during the period from 1999 till 2004 in Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine. Females treated for chronic MS were 4.5 years older than males.

  14. Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract in Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyung Ja; Khang, Shin Kwang; Lee, Seung Sook; Koh, Jae Soo; Chung, Jin Haeng; Lee, Yong Sik; Shim, Yoon Sang

    2002-01-01

    Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) constitute 3.5-4% of all malignancies. Since the majority of cases are squamous cell carcinomas which are related with epidemiologic factors, a different pattern of UADT cancer might be present between the Western and Asian populations. We performed a pathology based statistical study on UADT cancers in Korean patients. Cases from Korea Cancer Center Hospital, from January 1, 1988 through December 31, 1998, were subjected to the study. Among 2,842 cases, epithelial malignancies accounted for 87.8%, with squamous cell carcinoma as the major type (76.5%). The larynx was the most commonly affected site (26%), followed by the oral cavity (25.1%), oropharynx (13%), nasopharynx (9%), hypopharynx (8.4%), paranasal sinuses (6.4%), nasal cavity (6%) and salivary glands (6.1%). The percentage of squamous cell carcinoma was highest (98.7%) at the hypopharynx, and lowest at the nasal cavity (42.3%), which showed the most diverse tumor entities. Korean patients with UADT cancers presented with a higher incidence of non-epidermoid malignancy including sarcoma (1.5%) and malignant melanoma (1.4%), and a higher frequency of involvement of the sinonasal tract, compared with the Western patients. PMID:11850583

  15. Thrombotic Microangiopathy Revealing Bone Metastases from an Ethmoid Sinus Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morisse, Mony Chenda; Kontar, Loay; Bihan, Céline; Boone, Mathieu; Lachaier, Emma; Titeca-Beauport, Dimitri; Maizel, Julien; Chauffert, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare entity whose clinical and biological characteristics have been described in various tumors. Here we describe the first case of cancer-related TMA revealing diffuse bone metastases from an ethmoid sinus carcinoma. PMID:27721770

  16. [Postoperative radiotherapy in carcinoma of the pyriform sinus. Work of the "Groupe radiothérapie de la Féderation national des centres de lutte le cancer"].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T D; Malissard, L; Eschwege, F; Panis, X; Hoffstetter, S; Jung, G M; Bachaud, J M; Prevost, B; Quint, R; Chaplain, G

    1995-01-01

    Between January 1980 to December 1985, 248 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the pyriform sinus were retrospectively analysed. Criteria for inclusion in the study were the following: no previous treatment and treatment combining total pharyngolaryngectomy and postoperative radiotherapy. Mean follow up was 5 years with a minimum of 3 years. Seventy-one patients had a local regional recurrence (27.4%). Clinical staging at presentation and residual tumor at the primary site after surgery were factors significantly associated with higher local failure rates. The 5 year survival rate was 33% and the median survival time was 32 months (plateau was reached after the 6th year). The most frequent severe complication observed was pharyngeal stenosis occurring in 6% of the cases. This study confirms the poor prognosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the pyriform sinus, in spite of the combination of radical surgery and high dose postoperative radiotherapy.

  17. The pathophysiological role of bacterial biofilms in chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Dlugaszewska, Jolanta; Leszczynska, Malgorzata; Lenkowski, Marcin; Tatarska, Agnieszka; Pastusiak, Tomasz; Szyfter, Witold

    2016-08-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a very common disorder that remains poorly understood from a pathogenic standpoint. Recent research on the pathogenesis of CRS has been focused on the potential role of biofilms in this chronic infection. The aim of this study was to assess the sinuses' microflora and biofilm formation on the sino-nasal mucosa in patients with CRS. Paranasal sinus mucosa specimens were harvested at the time of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Classical microbiology techniques for the isolation and identification of sinus mucosa microbial flora were used. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to detect biofilm on the surface of mucosa. A microtiter plate assay for in vitro biofilm formation was employed, divided into three aliquots. One part was assessed for bacterial presence, utilizing an API manual system and the Vitek(®) 2 Compact system. The two remaining aliquots were tested by in vitro conventional microbiological assay with the use of the Infinite M200 (Tecan) microtiter plate reader, and also by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A microbiological examination of mucosal specimens had taken during FESS operation revealed the presence of various types of bacteria in 29 out of 30 tested samples. Out of 62 different strains isolated from patients with CRS, 23 strains of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis and 6 strains of Escherichia coli were the most frequently isolated microorganisms, accounting for 37.1 and 9.7 %, respectively. Among the 62 isolated strains, 58 were used to assess biofilm formation. From the total of 58 isolates, 8.6 % were strong biofilm producers, 20.7 % were moderate, and 70.7 % of isolates were considered to be non- or weak biofilm producers. SEM of the 30 nasal concha mucosal samples taken from patients with CRS revealed biofilm in 23 specimens. A marked destruction of the epithelium was observed, with variation in degrees of severity, from disarrayed cilia to complete absence of cilia

  18. A case-control study of carcinomas of the nose and paranasal sinuses in the woolen textile manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Magnani, C; Comba, P; Ferraris, F; Ivaldi, C; Meneghin, M; Terracini, B

    1993-01-01

    A population-based case-control study was conducted in Biella, which is located in northwestern Italy, to investigate the reported association between sinonasal carcinomas and woolen fabrics production. The study included 33 cases diagnosed during 1976-1988 (14 adenocarcinomas, 11 epidermoid carcinomas, 3 other specified carcinomas, 1 unspecified carcinoma, and 4 cases without histologic confirmation) and 131 controls. No association was found with smoking. As reported previously, excess risks were observed in wood and furniture workers (odds ratio [OR] = 4.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.41-13.4) and in the leather industry (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 0.6-20.3). Odds ratios in the wood and furniture industry were 22.0 (95% CI = 4.4-124.0) for adenocarcinomas and 0.9 (95% CI = 0.4-8.3) for epidermoid carcinomas. No association was found with the woolen textile or garment industries (OR = 0.8, 95% CI = 0.2-2.8), nor with farming, construction, metal works, and transport. Odds ratios for the textile industry did not vary with length of exposure or histologic type. Power for detecting an odds ratio of 3.0 at the 95% level of significance was 40%.

  19. [Experimental studies of wound healing in the paranasal sinuses. III. Endoscopy and histology of the surgical area after endonasal ethmoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Hosemann, W; Dunker, I; Göde, U; Wigand, M E

    1991-03-01

    Twenty two patients underwent standardized endoscopic follow-up for a period 3 months after a partial or complete intranasal ethmoidectomy. 370 endoscopic photographs were taken from the healing ethmoidal wound. After precise documentation of the site of removal, 157 biopsies of the regenerating mucosa were made. The endoscopic appearance of the wound was compared with the histological structure. Endoscopy showed that the process of wound healing of the respiratory mucosa could be subdivided into 4 phases: 1. Hemorrhagic crusting lasting up to 10 days 2. Obstructive lymphatic edema lasting up to 30 days 3. Mesenchymal tissue reaction lasting up to 3 months 4. Scar formation beginning after 3 months. The subdivision of wound healing phases enables the endoscopist to recognize retardation of healing and may lead to a staging of the postoperative therapeutic regime.

  20. Early and Delayed Effect of Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery on Intraocular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Abdelhady, Mohammad; Amer, Hazem Saeed; Ghali, Manar A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to the close anatomical relationship between the paranasal sinuses and the orbit, involvement or injury of the orbit from paranasal sinuses procedures may occur. Objectives We aimed to study the early and delayed effect of endoscopic sinus surgery on intraocular pressure (IOP). Methods We included in the study 38 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), undergoing FESS. We performed FESS with the standard anterior to posterior approach. We measured IOP at the same time one day before surgery as well as day 1 and 6 weeks after surgery. Results One day after surgery, mean IOP in the right eye was 14.176 ± 1.91 mm Hg and in the left eye was 13.79 ± 2.42 mm Hg with statistically non-significant difference from preoperative values. Six weeks postoperative, the mean IOP in the right eye was 15.14 ± 2.28 mm Hg. The difference between the mean preoperative and postoperative IOP values was found to be statistically significant (p = 0.0012). While in the left eye, mean postoperative IOP was 15.14 + 2.23mm Hg. The difference between the mean preoperative and postoperative IOP values was also found to be highly statistically significant (p = 0.0005). Conclusion Delayed significant increase in IOP can occur after FESS, Thus, special measures must be taken to reduce IOP to protect the patient́s eye from the risk of increased IOP, especially in patients with glaucoma. PMID:27746840

  1. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is a well-known condition in both the dental and otolaryngology communities. It occurs when the Schneiderian membrane is violated by conditions arising from dentoalveolar unit. This type of sinusitis differs in its pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics and management from sinusitis of other causes, therefore, failure to accurately identify a dental cause in these patients usually lead to persistent symptomatology and failure of medical and surgical therapies directed toward sinusitis. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is a most common feature of odontogenic sinusitis. Also, high-resolution CT scans and cone-beam volumetric computed tomography can assist in identifying dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent functional endoscopic sinus surgery or Caldwell-Luc operation is required. The aim of this article is to give a review of the most common causes, symptoms, diagnostic and treatment methods of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Search on Cochrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct data bases by key words resulted in 35 articles which met our criteria. It can be concluded that the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis is likely underreported in the available literature.

  2. Difference between Sinusitis and a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted ... is an inflammation of the lining of the nose and sinuses. It is a very common infection in children. Viral sinusitis usually accompanies a cold. Allergic sinusitis may ...

  3. Correlating planned radiation dose to the cochlea with primary site and tumor stage in patients with head and neck cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jeanette; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine tumor characteristics that predict higher planned radiation (RT) dose to the cochlea in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From 2004 to 2012, 99 patients with HNC underwent definitive IMRT to a median dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions, with the right and left cochlea-vestibular apparatus contoured for IMRT optimization as avoidance structures. If disease involvement was adjacent to the cochlea, preference was given to tumor coverage by prescription dose. Descriptive statistics were calculated for dose-volume histogram planning data, and mean planning dose to the cochlea (from left or right cochlea, receiving the greater amount of RT dose) was correlated to primary site and tumor stage. Mean (standard deviation) cochlear volume was 1.0 (0.60) cm{sup 3} with maximum and mean planned doses of 31.9 (17.5) Gy and 22.1 (13.7) Gy, respectively. Mean planned dose (Gy) to cochlea by tumor site was as follows: oral cavity (18.6, 14.4), oropharynx (21.7, 9.1), nasopharynx (36.3, 10.4), hypopharynx (14.9, 7.1), larynx (2.1, 0.62), others including the parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus (33.6, 24.0), and unknown primary (25.6, 6.7). Average mean planned dose (Gy) to the cochlea in T0-T2 and T3-T4 disease was 22.0 and 29.2 Gy, respectively (p = 0.019). By site, a significant difference was noted for nasopharynx and others (31.6 and 50.7, p = 0.012) but not for oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx. Advanced T category predicted for higher mean cochlear dose, particularly for nasopharyngeal, parotid gland, temporal bone, and paranasal sinus HNC sites.

  4. Volumetric analysis of bone substitute material performance within the human sinus cavity of former head and neck cancer patients: A prospective, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Jonas; Eichler, Kathrin; Barbeck, Mike; Lerner, Henriette; Stübinger, Stefan; Seipel, Catherine; Vogl, Thomas J.; Kovács, Adorján F.; Ghanaati, Shahram; Sader, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In numerous animal and human studies, it could be detected that in bone augmentation procedures, material's physicochemical characteristics can influence the cellular inflammatory pattern and therefore the integration in the host tissue. Histological, histomorphometrical, and clinical analyses of the integration of the biomaterial in the surrounding tissue are well established methodologies; however, they do not make a statement on volume and density changes of the augmented biomaterial. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the volume and density of a xenogeneic (Bio-Oss®, BO) and a synthetic (NanoBone®, NB) bone substitute material in split-mouth sinus augmentations in former tumor patients to complete histological and histomorphometrical assessment. Methods: Immediately and 6 months after sinus augmentation computed tomography scans were recorded, bone grafts were marked, and the volume was calculated with radiologic RIS-PACS software (General Electric Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, Great Britain) to determine the integration and degradation behavior of both biomaterials. Results: Radiographic analysis revealed a volume reduction of the initial augmented bone substitute material (i.e. 100%) to 77.36 (±11.68) % in the BO-group, respectively, 75.82 (±22.28) % in the NB-group six months after augmentation. In both materials, the volume reduction was not significant. Bone density significantly increased in both groups. Conclusion: The presented radiological investigation presents a favorable method to obtain clinically relevant information concerning the integration and degradation behavior of bone substitute materials. PMID:28299254

  5. Acute bacterial sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    DeMuri, Gregory; Wald, Ellen R

    2013-10-01

    On the basis of strong research evidence, the pathogenesis of sinusitis involves 3 key factors: sinusostia obstruction, ciliary dysfunction, and thickening of sinus secretions. On the basis of studies of the microbiology of otitis media, H influenzae is playing an increasingly important role in the etiology of sinusitis, exceeding that of S pneumoniae in some areas, and b-lactamase production by H influenzae is increasing in respiratory isolates in the United States. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the presentation of acute bacterial sinusitis conforms to 1 of 3 predicable patterns; persistent, severe, and worsening symptoms. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,the diagnosis of sinusitis should be made by applying strict clinical criteria. This approach will select children with upper respiratory infection symptoms who are most likely to benefit from an antibiotic. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,imaging is not indicated routinely in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging provides useful information when complications of sinusitis are suspected. On the basis of some research evidence and consensus,amoxicillin-clavulanate should be considered asa first-line agent for the treatment of sinusitis.

  6. Invagination of the Sphenoid Sinus Mucosa after Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach and Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Hong, Yong-Kil; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Park, Jae-Sung; Jung, Ki Hwan; Kim, Soo Whan; Cho, Jin Hee; Park, Yong Jin; Kang, Yun Jin; Kim, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical features of invagination of the sphenoid sinus mucosa (ISM) and compare them with other similar cases using a visual analog scale (VAS) to assess the various nasal symptoms and to discuss its clinical significance and means of prevention. Study Design Retrospective chart review at a tertiary referral center. Methods Between 2010 and 2015, 8 patients who had undergone EETSA surgery displayed postoperative ISM. The comparison group consisted of 147 patients who underwent the same surgical procedures and were diagnosed with the same diseases. Pre- or postoperative paranasal sinus computed tomography (PNS CT) and VAS were performed and subsequently analyzed. Results The clinical features of ISM of the sphenoid sinus showed sellar floor invagination and regenerated inverted ingrowing sphenoid mucosa on endoscopic imaging. PNS CT also showed a bony defect and invaginated air densities at the sellar turcica. Pre- and postoperative VAS scores revealed that the ISM group had much less of an improvement in headaches after surgery than that of the comparison group (p = 0.049). Conclusion ISM may occur because of a change in pressure, sphenoid mucosal status, or arachnoid membrane status. Moreover, ISM is related to improvements in headaches. Therefore, EETSA patients should avoid activities that cause rapid pressure changes during the healing process. In addition, sellar reconstruction that is resistant to physical pressure changes should be mandated despite the absence of an intraoperative CSF leak. PMID:27622454

  7. Extramedullary Plasmacytoma of the Frontal Sinus: Case Report and Turkish Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Verim, Ayşegül; Sheidaii, Shahrouz; Bilaç, Ömer; Karaca, Çiğdem Tepe; Naiboğlu, Barış

    2014-01-01

    Solitary extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMPs) are nonepithelial neoplasms of plasma cell origin categorized among non-Hodgkin lymphomas, without the bone marrow involvement and systemic spread seen in multiple myeloma. They are uncommon tumors comprising 3% of all plasma cell neoplasias. Although they usually occur in the upper respiratory tract, only 1 case of EMP localized to the frontal sinus has been reported in the English literature. We present in this report a rare case of EMP originated from the left frontal sinus leading to left eyeball proptosis and movement restriction. A survey of sinonasal EMPs in the Turkish literature is reported, as well. Paranasal computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of a 69-year-old female who presented with left eyeball proptosis and left-sided headache revealed a solid mass in the left frontal sinus. Histopathological analysis of the completely excised mass supported the diagnosis of plasmacytoma. The definitive diagnosis of solitary EMP was confirmed with further investigations at hematology and oncology clinics. The patient was treated with surgery followed by local radiotherapy to the head and neck region, and she was disease-free at her 1-year follow-up. Treatment of sinonasal EMP is surgery alone or surgery combined with radiotherapy. Long-term follow-up is a requisite for systemic control because of the disease’s high potential to transform into multiple myeloma. PMID:25330525

  8. Extramedullary plasmacytoma of the frontal sinus: case report and Turkish literature review.

    PubMed

    Verim, Ayşegül; Sheidaii, Shahrouz; Bilaç, Omer; Tepe Karaca, Ciğdem; Naiboğlu, Barış

    2014-09-05

    Solitary extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMPs) are nonepithelial neoplasms of plasma cell origin categorized among non-Hodgkin lymphomas, without the bone marrow involvement and systemic spread seen in multiple myeloma. They are uncommon tumors comprising 3% of all plasma cell neoplasias. Although they usually occur in the upper respiratory tract, only 1 case of EMP localized to the frontal sinus has been reported in the English literature. We present in this report a rare case of EMP originated from the left frontal sinus leading to left eyeball proptosis and movement restriction. A survey of sinonasal EMPs in the Turkish literature is reported, as well. Paranasal computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of a 69-year-old female who presented with left eyeball proptosis and left-sided headache revealed a solid mass in the left frontal sinus. Histopathological analysis of the completely excised mass supported the diagnosis of plasmacytoma. The definitive diagnosis of solitary EMP was confirmed with further investigations at hematology and oncology clinics. The patient was treated with surgery followed by local radiotherapy to the head and neck region, and she was disease-free at her 1-year follow-up. Treatment of sinonasal EMP is surgery alone or surgery combined with radiotherapy. Long-term follow-up is a requisite for systemic control because of the disease's high potential to transform into multiple myeloma.

  9. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment of Isolated Pathologies of the Sphenoid Sinus: Retrospective Study of 46 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Marcolini, Thomas Ribeiro; Safraider, Maryane Cristine; Socher, Jan Alessandro; Lucena, Guilherme Olinto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Isolated disease of the sphenoid is rare and has often been overlooked due to its remote location and difficult access. Objective A retrospective study of the main causes of isolated sphenoid sinus diseases with discussion of the most appropriate methods of diagnosis and treatment. Methods A total of 46 cases of isolated sphenoid disease treated between January 2008 and December 2013 were evaluated by objective ear, nose, and throat examination and video endoscopy, computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses, and, in some cases, magnetic resonance imaging. In each case, we decided between drug and/or endoscopic treatment. Results We identified 12 cases of isolated sphenoiditis (26.1%), 3 cases of fungal sphenoiditis (6.5%), 3 cases of sphenochoanal polyps (6.5%), 22 cases of mucocele (47.8%), 2 cases of cerebrospinal fluid leak (4.3%), and 1 case each of meningoencephalocele (2.1%), inverted papilloma (2.1%), fibrous dysplasia (2.1%), and squamous cell carcinoma (2.1%). Conclusion A prevalence of inflammatory and infectious diseases was found, and endoscopic surgery for the sphenoid sinus approach is effective in treating various diseases of the isolated sphenoid, whether complicated or not. PMID:25992167

  10. Temsirolimus With or Without Cetuximab in Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer Who Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma

  11. Northern Sinus Meridiani Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-341, 25 April 2003

    This is a stereo (3-d anaglyph) composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle images of northern Sinus Meridiani near 2oN, 0oW. The light-toned materials at the south (bottom) end of the picture are considered to be thick (100-200 meters; 300-600 ft) exposures of sedimentary rock. Several ancient meteor impact craters are being exhumed from within these layered materials. To view in stereo, use '3-d' glasses with red over the left eye, and blue over the right. The picture covers an area approximately 113 km (70 mi) wide; north is up.

  12. Management of Frontal Sinus Tumors.

    PubMed

    Selleck, Anne Morgan; Desai, Dipan; Thorp, Brian D; Ebert, Charles S; Zanation, Adam M

    2016-08-01

    The most common primary tumors of the frontal sinus are osteomas and inverted papillomas, although a variety of other tumors involving this space have been reported. With the advent of new surgical techniques and instrumentation, an endoscopic approach to this region has become feasible. The preoperative assessment and decision making must take into account the complexity of frontal sinus anatomy, tumor type, tumor location, and associated attachments. These procedures allow adequate visualization, tumor removal, and postoperative monitoring, and preserve fairly normal sinus function. Open techniques may also be required and should be in the surgeon's armamentarium.

  13. Sinus Rinsing and Neti Pots

    MedlinePlus

    ... D, Van Dyke R, Stern H, Xiao L, Beach MJ. The first association of a primary amebic ... B, Kahler AM, Schneeberger C, da Silva AJ, Beach MJ. Deaths from Naegleria fowleri associated with sinus ...

  14. [Surgical dilemmas. Sinus floor elevation].

    PubMed

    ten Bruggenkate, C M; Schulten, E A J M; Zijderveld, S A

    2008-12-01

    Limited alveolar bone height prevents the placement of dental implants. Sinus floor elevation is an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus that allows implants to be placed. The principle of this surgical procedure is the preparation of a 'top hinge door', that is raised together with the Schneiderian membrane in the cranial direction. The space which created under this lid is filled with a bone transplant. Autogenous bone is the standard transplant material, despite the fact that a second surgery site is necessary. Under certain circumstances bone substitutes can be used, with a longer healing phase. If sufficient alveolar bone height is available to secure implant stability, simultaneous implantation and sinus floor elevation are possible. Considering the significant anatomical variation in the region of the maxillary sinus, a sound knowledge of the anatomy is of great importance.

  15. Evaluating Complications of Chronic Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Phillip; Pereyra, Charles A.; Breslin, Adam; Melville, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a relatively common diagnosis throughout the US. In patients with an otherwise unremarkable medical history the treatment is typically supportive, requiring only clinical evaluation. We present the case of a 25-year-old male with a history of chronic sinusitis that was brought to our emergency department with new-onset seizure. Three days before he had presented to his usual care facility with two days of headache and fever and was discharged stating headache, subjective fever, and neck stiffness. After further investigation he was diagnosed with a mixed anaerobic epidural abscess. The evaluation and management of chronic sinusitis are based on the presence of symptoms concerning for complication. Prompt investigation of complicated sinusitis is essential in preventing debilitating and fatal sequelae. Our case study underscores the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:28163938

  16. [Bacteriological study of maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Renon, P; Casanova, M; Verdier, M; Asperge, A; Le Mouel, C

    1984-01-01

    Suppurated maxillary sinusitis are frequent diseases. Diameatic puncture allows bacteriological investigations. Our results are positive in two thirds of cases. The bacterial flora is very varied, whose identification and antibiograms involve efficient treatment with daily washing and in situ antibiotherapy.

  17. [Sinusitis--judicious antibiotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents different forms of sinusitis in children and adults as well as the patomechanism of sinusitis of infective and non-infective origin. The role of bacterial infection has been discussed. Participation of major pathogens of URTI such as S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis has been highlighted and the factors influencing growth of their antibiotic-resistant stains. Guidelines concerning antibiotic therapy in children and adults, depending on disease course, age and factors influencing growth of resistant stains have been presented. Causes of failure in treatment of sinusitis have been analysed eg. in case of bacterial biofilm growth or non-neutrophilic inflammation forms. Antimicrobial treatment concerns mainly acute and aggravated infections. In case of chronic sinusitis, antibiotic therapy is complementary to surgical treatment.

  18. Sinus Venosus Atrial Septal Defect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    chest CT was performed to evaluate for pulmonary embolism (figure 2). The chest radiograph (figure 1) demonstrates increased central pulmonary ...Fig. 5 Sinus venosus defect at birth . The shaded area in purple represents the sinus venosum. The anomalous right pulmonary venous anatomy...department (ED) with chest pain and an ankle fracture after being hit by a car while riding a horse. Chest imaging noted enlarged central pulmonary

  19. MC-19 Margaritifer Sinus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mars digital-image mosaic merged with color of the MC-19 quadrangle, Margaritifer Sinus region of Mars. Heavily cratered highlands, which dominate the Margaritifer Sinus quadrangle, are marked by large expanses of chaotic terrain. In the northwestern part, the major rift zone of Valles Marineris connects with a broad canyon filled with chaotic terrain. Latitude range -30 to 0, longitude range 0 to 45 degrees.

  20. MC-20 Sinus Sabeus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mars digital-image mosaic merged with color of the MC-20 quadrangle, Sinus Sabeus region of Mars. Heavily cratered highlands dominate the Sinus Sabeus quadrangle. The northern part is marked by a large impact crater, Schiaparelli. Schiaparelli is an ancient remnant of the many large impact events that occurred during the period of heavy bombardment. Latitude range -30 to 0 degrees, longitude range -45 to 0.

  1. Frontal Sinus Fractures: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Strong, E. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Frontal sinus injuries may range from isolated anterior table fractures resulting in a simple aesthetic deformity to complex fractures involving the frontal recess, orbits, skull base, and intracranial contents. The risk of long-term morbidity can be significant. Optimal treatment strategies for the management of frontal sinus fractures remain controversial. However, it is critical to have a thorough understanding of frontal sinus anatomy as well as the current treatment strategies used to manage these injuries. A thorough physical exam and thin-cut, multiplanar (axial, coronal, and sagittal) computed tomography scan should be performed in all patients suspected of having a frontal sinus fracture. The most appropriate treatment strategy can be determined by assessing five anatomic parameters including the: frontal recess, anterior table integrity, posterior table integrity, dural integrity, and presence of a cerebrospinal fluid leak. A well thought out management strategy and meticulous surgical techniques are critical to success. The primary surgical goal is to provide a safe sinus while minimizing patient morbidity. This article offers an anatomically based treatment algorithm for the management of frontal sinus fractures and highlights the key steps to surgical repair. PMID:22110810

  2. Indoor radon and lung cancer in the radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuberger, J.S.; Rundo, J.

    1996-12-31

    Internally deposited radium has long been known to have tumorigenic effects in the form of sarcomas of the bone and carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. However, the radium dial workers were also exposed to radiation hazards other than that occurring from ingestion of the radium paint, viz., external gamma radiation and elevated concentrations of airborne radon. The uranium miners were also exposed to high concentrations of radon in the 1950s and later, and numerous cases of lung cancer have occurred in that population. However, unlike the atmosphere in the uranium mines, the air in the dial painting plants was probably rather clean and perhaps not much different from the air in many houses. In view of the current concern over the possibility of lung cancer fin the general population being caused by radon (progeny) in houses, it is important to examine the mortality due to this usually fatal disease in the dial workers and to attempt to relate it to their exposure to radon, to the extent that this is possible.

  3. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  4. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  5. A novel multipurpose mini-endoscope for frontal sinus endoscopy "sinus view".

    PubMed

    Al Kadah, Basel; Bozzato, Victoria; Bozzato, Alessandro; Papaspyrou, George; Schick, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopic frontal sinus surgery has been proven to enable the treatment of most frontal sinus pathologies but may be challenging for the surgeon in regard to the variable frontal sinus anatomy. Frontal sinus drainage identification and frontal sinus visualization are an essential part of successful frontal sinus surgery. We demonstrate a novel modular mini-endoscopic system for frontal sinus surgery. Fifty-two patients (37 male, 15 female) with a chronic rhino-sinusitis were enrolled. In this study, all patients were subjected to standard endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery with use of the fibre optic endoscope "Sinus View" (1.1 mm diameter, 10,000 pixels, irrigation channel and additional working channel) accessing the frontal sinus. A frontal sinus drainage type I in 38 cases, a frontal sinus drainage type IIa in 9 cases and a frontal sinus drainage type IIb in 5 cases according to Draf were performed. The modular mini-endoscopic system "Sinus view" was used to identify frontal sinus drainage in ten patients before ethmoidectomy and in the remaining patients (N = 42) after ethmoidectomy. Visualization of the frontal sinus drainage or the frontal sinus itself was easily carried out after irrigation. A clear identification of the frontal sinus by illumination was achieved in all cases. In addition the working channel of the endoscope was successfully used to perform visualized balloon dilatation at the frontal sinus drainage or for biopsy. The endonasal visualization of the frontal sinus drainage and frontal sinus itself is facilitated by also using a modular mini-endoscope with the option to use the working channel of the endoscope for biopsy or balloon dilatation.

  6. Sex determination using maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kanthem, Ranjith Kumar; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao; Yeluri, Sivaranjani; Kumari, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individual identification is a subtle concept and often one of the most important priorities in mass disasters, road accidents, air crashes, fires, and even in the investigation of criminal cases. Matching specific features detected on the cadaver with data recorded during the life of an individual is an important aspect in forensics, and can be performed by fingerprint analysis, deoxyribonucleic acid matching, anthropological methods, radiological methods and other techniques which can facilitate age and sex identification. Sinus radiography is one such method that has been used for determination of the sex of an individual. Hence, an attempt is being made to use the different dimensions of the maxillary sinus in the determination of sex using coronal and axial sections of plain computed tomography (CT) scan. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients including 17 male and 13 female, visiting the Outpatient Department of the Mamata General Hospital were included as the study subjects. The dimensions of right and left maxillary sinuses of 30 subjects from plain CT were measured using SYNGO software and statistical analysis was done. Results: Sex determination using height, length, width, and volume of the maxillary sinus on both sides showed statistically significant results with a higher percentage of sexual dimorphism in the case of volume. Conclusion: Volume of the right maxillary sinus can be used as accurate diagnostic parameter for sex determination. PMID:26005308

  7. Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENT Doctor Near You Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients Patient ... for evaluation and possible surgical management. Sources For Aging Patients: Administration on Aging (AoA), U.S. Department of ...

  8. Unexpected location of pilonidal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Sion-Vardy, N; Osyntsov, L; Cagnano, E; Osyntsov, A; Vardy, D; Benharroch, D

    2009-12-01

    Pilonidal sinuses usually occur in the sacrococcygeal area in young men, and occasionally can be found in other ectopic sites. We present a retrospective case review on unusual locations of pilonidal sinuses in the past 4 years. The lesion sites were as follows: one on the penis, two on the scalp, two on the abdomen, one on the neck, two in the groin and two in the axilla. Abdominal and penile lesions are uncommon, but the other locations reported are unusually rare. To our knowledge, the groin has not been reported previously as a site of a pilonidal sinus, although the histological appearance of hidradenitis suppurativa may well resemble it. When trying to clarify the pathogenesis of these occurrences, we found that recurrent hair removal was a common characteristic of the patients we contacted, and this may have been the initiating trauma.

  9. Modeling the Carotid Sinus Baroreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramachandra; Nudelman, Harvey B.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the relationship between sinus pressure and nerve discharge frequency of the carotid sinus baroreceptor is presented. It is partly based upon the single-fiber data obtained by Clarke from the sinus nerve of a dog. The model takes into account what is currently known about the physiology of the baroreceptor. It consists of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations and eight free parameters. With one set of values for these eight parameters, the model reproduces well the experimental results reported by Clarke for positive ramp pressure inputs. Only three parameters needed to be adjusted in order to fit the dynamic data. The remaining five were obtained from static and steady-state data. PMID:5056961

  10. Pneumatization of Mastoid Air Cells, Temporal Bone, Ethmoid and Sphenoid Sinuses. Any Correlation?

    PubMed

    Hindi, Khalid; Alazzawi, Sarmad; Raman, Rajagopalan; Prepageran, Narayanan; Rahmat, Kartini

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the pneumatization of the paranasal sinuses (PNS) and other parts of temporal bone such as mastoid air cells and to investigate if there was any association between the aeration of these structures among the three major ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malay, Chinese, Indian) as this would be representative of Asia. A retrospective review of 150 computed tomography (CT) scans of PNS and temporal bones was done and analysed. The pneumatization of each area was obtained and compared using statistical analysis. Patients with a history of previous medical or surgical problems in the intended areas were excluded from the study. The pneumatization of the mastoid air cells and other temporal bone parts were noted to be symmetrical in more than 75 %. There was a positive correlation between the pneumatization of mastoid air cells and that of the sphenoid sinus. The prevalence of Agger nasi, Haller's and Onodi cells was observed to be significantly higher in the Chinese group. Preoperative assessment of the temporal bone and PNS with CT scan may be helpful in the evaluation of their anatomical landmark and decrease the possibility of surgical complications related to 3D structures.

  11. Acute Vision Loss Following Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Antisdel, Jastin

    2017-01-01

    A 41-year-old female with a history of uterine cancer and Celiac and Raynaud's Disease presented to our institution with frequent migraines and nasal congestion. She underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and experienced acute unilateral vision loss postoperatively. Rapid recognition of the etiology and effective treatment are paramount given the permanent and irreversible vision loss that can result. Arterial vasospasm following FESS is rare. Patients with autoimmune diseases have perhaps an increased risk for vasospasm secondary to an increased vasoreactive profile. We present the first documented case of nitroglycerin sublingual therapy to successfully treat ophthalmic artery vasospasm following FESS. Nitroglycerin sublingual therapy is a promising treatment for ophthalmic vasospasm secondary to its ability to cross the blood-ocular barrier, its rapid onset of action, and its ability to promote relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. PMID:28286685

  12. Bacterial colonization or infection in chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Pandak, Nenad; Pajić-Penavić, Ivana; Sekelj, Alen; Tomić-Paradžik, Maja; Cabraja, Ivica; Miklaušić, Božana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was the determination of bacteria present in maxillary and ethmoid cavities in patients with chronic sinusitis and to correlate these findings with bacteria simultaneously present in their nasopharynx. The purpose of this correlation was to establish the role of bacteria found in chronically inflamed sinuses and to evaluate if the bacteria present colonized or infected sinus mucosa. Nasopharyngeal and sinus swabs of 65 patients that underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery were cultivated and at the same time the presence of leukocytes were determined in each swab. The most frequently found bacteria in nasopharynx were Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus spp., Streptococcus viridans and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Maxillary or ethmoidal sinus swabs yielded bacterial growth in 47 (72.31%) patients. The most frequently found bacteria in sinuses were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Streptococci (pneumoniae, viridans and spp.). The insignificant number of leukocytes was present in each sinus and nasopharyngeal swab. Every published microbiology study of chronic sinusitis proved that sinus mucosa were colonized with bacteria and not infected, yet antibiotic therapy was discussed making no difference between infection and colonization. Chronic sinusitis should be considered a chronic inflammatory condition rather than bacterial infection, so routine antibiotic therapy should be avoided. Empiric antibiotic therapy should be prescribed only in cases when the acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis occurs and the antibiotics prescribed should aim the usual bacteria causing acute sinusitis. In case of therapy failure, antibiotics should be changed having in mind that under certain circumstances any bacteria colonizing sinus mucosa can cause acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis.

  13. When Sinuses Attack! (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have a cold? continue When Good Sinuses Go Bad What about that cold that won't go away? A cold virus can: damage the delicate ... if you are feeling well enough, you can go to school or go outside and play. In ...

  14. Pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Terra, E R; Guedes, F R; Manzi, F R; Bóscolo, F N

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a case of pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus in the pterygoid process and greater wing of the sphenoid bone, observed on a panoramic radiograph. Conventional radiographs and computerized tomography in axial and coronal sections confirmed the presence of the pneumatization of these structures.

  15. Anatomic findings in revision endoscopic sinus surgery: Case series and review of contributory factors

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Jessica; Egro, Francesco M.; Masterson, Liam; Javer, Amin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is recognized that patients who undergo endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) do not always achieve control of their disease. The causes are multifactorial; variations in surgical practice have been identified as possible factors in refractory disease. Objective: To reflect on the frequent anatomic findings of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) who require revision ESS. Methods: A retrospective review of patients who required revision ESS at a tertiary institution over a 3-year period. Patients for whom maximal medical therapy failed for CRS underwent computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses and image-guided surgery. Surgical records of anatomic findings were reviewed and analyzed. Results: Over 3 years, a total of 75 patients underwent revision procedures, 28% of all ESS performed in the unit. The most frequent finding was a residual uncinate process in 64% of the patients (n = 48); other findings included a maxillary antrostomy not based on the natural ostium of the maxillary sinus in 47% (n = 35), an oversized antrostomy in 29% (n = 22), resected middle turbinates in 35% (n = 26), middle meatal stenosis in 15% (n = 11), synechiae in 29% (n = 22), and osteitic bone that required drilling in 13% (n = 10). Conclusion: Surgical technique can give rise to anatomic variations that may prevent adequate mucociliary clearance and medication delivery, which leads to failure in ESS in patients with CRS. This study demonstrated the surgical findings encountered in revision ESS that should be highlighted in the training of Ear, Nose and Throat surgeons to help prevent primary failure and reduce health care costs. PMID:28107148

  16. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  17. Anatomical aspects of sinus floor elevations.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh, J P; ten Bruggenkate, C M; Disch, F J; Tuinzing, D B

    2000-06-01

    Inadequate bone height in the lateral part of the maxilla forms a contra-indication for implant surgery. This condition can be treated with an internal augmentation of the maxillary sinus floor. This sinus floor elevation, formerly called sinus lifting, consists of a surgical procedure in which a top hinge door in the lateral maxillary sinus wall is prepared and internally rotated to a horizontal position. The new elevated sinus floor, together with the inner maxillary mucosa, will create a space that can be filled with graft material. Sinus lift procedures depend greatly on fragile structures and anatomical variations. The variety of anatomical modalities in shape of the inner aspect of the maxillary sinus defines the surgical approach. Conditions such as sinus floor convolutions, sinus septum, transient mucosa swelling and narrow sinus may form a (usually relative) contra-indication for sinus floor elevation. Absolute contra-indications are maxillary sinus diseases (tumors) and destructive former sinus surgery (like the Caldwell-Luc operation). The lateral sinus wall is usually a thin bone plate, which is easily penetrated with rotating or sharp instruments. The fragile Schneiderian membrane plays an important role for the containment of the bonegraft. The surgical procedure of preparing the trap door and luxating it, together with the preparation of the sinus mucosa, may cause a mucosa tear. Usually, when these perforations are not too large, they will fold together when turning the trap door inward and upward, or they can be glued with a fibrin sealant, or they can be covered with a resorbable membrane. If the perforation is too large, a cortico-spongious block graft can be considered. However, in most cases the sinus floor elevation will be deleted. Perforations may also occur due to irregularities in the sinus floor or even due to immediate contact of sinus mucosa with oral mucosa. Obstruction of the antro-nasal foramen is, due to its high location, not a

  18. One stage combined endoscopic and per-oral buccal fat pad approach for large oro-antral-fistula closure with secondary chronic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Gilad; Koren, Ilan; Carmel, Narin Nard; Balaban, Sagi; Abu-Ghanem, Sara; Fliss, Dan M; Kleinman, Shlomi; Reiser, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous surgical approaches for oro-antral-fistula (OAF) closure. Secondary sinus disease is still considered by many experts a relative contra indication for primary closure. To describe a single-stage combined endoscopic sinus surgery and per-oral buccal fat pad (BFP) flap approach for large OAF causing chronic maxillary sinusitis. The records of all the patients with OAF and chronic manifestations of secondary rhinosinusitis that were treated between 2010 and 2013 in our tertiary care medical center were reviewed. The exclusion criteria were: OAF ≤ 5 mm, resolved sino-nasal disease, OAF secondary to malignancy, recurrent fistula, medical history that included radiotherapy to the maxillary bone and age <18 years. Each procedure was performed by a team consisting of a rhinologist and a maxillofacial surgeon. The surgical approach included an endoscopic middle antrostomy with maxillary sinus drainage, and a per-oral BFP regional flap for OAF closure. Total OAF closure, complications and need for revision surgeries. Forty-five patients that underwent OAF closure together with sinus surgery using a combined endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) and BFP flap approach met the inclusion criteria. There were 28 males and 17 females with a mean ± SD age of 53.5 ± 14.9 years (range 22-80 years). The presenting signs and symptoms included purulent rhinorrhea (n = 22, 48.9 %), foreign body in sinus (n = 10, 22.2 %) nasal congestion (n = 7, 15.5 %), halitosis (n = 6, 13.3 %) and pain (n = 5, 12.2 %). Surgical complications included local pain (n = 2, 4.4 %), persistent rhinitis (n = 2, 4.4 %) and synechia (n = 1, 2.2 %). One patient required revision surgery due to an unresolved OAF. The OAF of all the other 44 patients (97.8 %) was closed after the first procedure and the paranasal sinuses on the treated side were completely recovered. The mean follow-up time for the group was 7.6 ± 4.3 months (7-21 months), and no untoward sequelae or recurrence were reported

  19. SU-F-BRB-14: Dosimetric Effects at Air- Tissue Boundary Due to Magnetic Field in MR-Guided IMRT/VMAT Delivery for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, P; Chen, X; Schultz, C; Li, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The advent of the MR-Linac enables real-time and high soft tissue contrast image guidance in radiation therapy (RT) delivery. Potential hot-spots at air-tissue interfaces, such as the sphenoid sinus, in RT for head and neck cancer (HNC), could potentially occur due to the electron return effect (ERE). In this study, we investigate the dosimetric effects of ERE on the dose distribution at air-tissues interfaces in HNC IMRT treatment planning. Methods: IMRT plans were generated based on planning CT’s acquired for HNC cases (nasopharynx, base of skull and paranasal sinus) using a research planning system (Monaco, v5.09.06, Elekta) employing Monte Carlo dose calculations with or without the presence of a transverse magnetic field (TMF). The dose in the air cavity was calculated in a 1 & 2 mm thick tissue layer, while the dose to the skin was calculated in a 1, 3 and 5 mm thick tissue layer. The maximum dose received in 1 cc volume, D1cc, were collected at different TMF strengths. Plan qualities generated with or without TMF or with increasing TMF were compared in terms of commonly-used dose-volume parameters (DVPs). Results: Variations in DVPs between plans with and without a TMF present were found to be within 5% of the planning CT. The presence of a TMF results in <5% changes in sinus air tissue interface. The largest skin dose differences with and without TMF were found within 1 mm of the skin surface Conclusion: The presence of a TMF results in practically insignificant changes in HNC IMRT plan quality, except for skin dose. Planning optimization with skin DV constraints could reduce the skin doses. This research was partially supported by Elekta Inc. (Crowley, U.K.)

  20. C-arm cone beam CT guidance of sinus and skull base surgery: quantitative surgical performance evaluation and development of a novel high-fidelity phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescan, A. D.; Chan, H.; Daly, M. J.; Witterick, I.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2009-02-01

    Surgical simulation has become a critical component of surgical practice and training in the era of high-precision image-guided surgery. While the ability to simulate surgery of the paranasal sinuses and skull base has been conventionally limited to 3D digital simulation or cadaveric dissection, we have developed novel methods employing rapid prototyping technology and 3D printing to create high-fidelity models from real patient images (CT or MR). Such advances allow creation of patient-specific models for preparation, simulation, and training before embarking on the actual surgery. A major challenge included the development of novel material formulations compatible with the rapid prototyping process while presenting anatomically realistic flexibility, cut-ability, drilling purchase, and density (CT number). Initial studies have yielded realistic models of the paranasal sinuses and skull base for simulation and training in image-guided surgery. The process of model development and material selection is reviewed along with the application of the phantoms in studies of high-precision surgery guided by C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT). Surgical performance is quantitatively evaluated under CBCT guidance, with the high-fidelity phantoms providing an excellent test-bed for reproducible studies across a broad spectrum of challenging surgical tasks. Future work will broaden the atlas of models to include normal anatomical variations as well as a broad spectrum of benign and malignant disease. The role of high-fidelity models produced by rapid prototyping is discussed in the context of patient-specific case simulation, novel technology development (specifically CBCT guidance), and training of future generations of sinus and skull base surgeons.

  1. Selenomethionine in Reducing Mucositis in Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Who Are Receiving Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-08

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Mucositis; Radiation Toxicity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Xerostomia

  2. Sphenoid sinus barotrauma after scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Hyeok; Kim, Kuk; Cho, Seok Hyun; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of an 18-year-old male patient operated on for sphenoid sinus barotrauma after scuba diving. The patient attended our emergency department because of intractable headache but did not improve with conservative treatment. After computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination, he was diagnosed with sphenoid sinusitis that extended to the nasal septum. He therefore underwent surgery for sinus ventilation and abscess drainage.

  3. Fungal rhinitis and sinusitis in three cats.

    PubMed

    Tomsa, Kamil; Glaus, Tony M; Zimmer, Cindy; Greene, Craig E

    2003-05-15

    Localized infection of the nasal or paranasal cavities caused by Aspergillus spp or Penicillium spp was diagnosed in 3 cats. Clinical signs included chronic mucopurulent nasal discharge, epistaxis, and mandibular lymphadenopathy. Rhinoscopic and diagnostic imaging findings were compatible with severe inflammation of the nasal mucosa and destruction of the turbinates. Fungal plaques were observed rhinoscopically in 2 cats, and histologic examination of biopsy specimens revealed fungal colonies with surrounding inflammatory infiltrates in all 3. Results of fungal culture were negative for all 3 cats. Results of serum immunoelectrophoresis for antibodies against Aspergillus spp were positive in 2 cats. Treatment with itraconazole was effective in controlling clinical signs in 1 cat, but hepatotoxicosis developed. A single intranasal infusion of clotrimazole subsequently led to long-term resolution of clinical signs in this cat. Localized aspergillosis-penicilliosis is clinically indistinguishable from other pathologic conditions of the nasal and paranasal cavities in cats and should be considered when examining cats with chronic nasal discharge.

  4. Treating Sinusitis: Don't Rush to Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... AAAAI) Treating Sinusitis (AAAAI) Don’t rush to antibiotics DOWNLOAD PDF The sinuses are small, hollow spaces ... or teeth. Each year, millions of people use antibiotic drugs to treat sinus problems. However, they usually ...

  5. Sinus Pain: Can Over-the-Counter Medications Help?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Near You Sinus Pain: Can Over-the-Counter Medications Help? Sinus Pain: Can Over-the-Counter Medications ... OTC) medications. What Is The Role Of OTC Medication For Sinus Pain? There are many different OTC ...

  6. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for previously irradiated, recurrent head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Kuo, Jeffrey V; Ramsinghani, Nilam S; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S A L

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate our initial experience in treating previously irradiated, recurrent head-and-neck cancers using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Between July 1997 and September 1999, 12 patients with previously irradiated, locally recurrent head-and-neck cancers were treated with IMRT. These included cancers of the nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, paranasal sinus, skin of the head-and-neck region, and malignant melanoma. Five of these 12 patients had received radiation as the primary treatment, with doses ranging from 66.0 to 126.0 Gy, and the remaining 7 patients had undergone definitive surgeries followed by an adjuvant course of radiation treatment, with doses ranging between 36.0 and 64.8 Gy. Recurrence after the initial course of radiation occurred in periods ranging from 4 to 35 months, with 11 of 12 cases recurring fully in the fields of previous irradiation. Recurrent tumors were treated with IMRT to total doses between 30 to 70 Gy (> 50 Gy in 10 cases) prescribed at the 75% to 92% isodose lines with daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy. The results revealed that acute toxicities were acceptable except in 1 patient who died of aspiration pneumonia during the course of retreatment. There were 4 complete responders, 2 partial responders, and 2 patients with stable disease in the IMRT-treated volumes. Three patients received IMRT as adjuvant treatment following salvage surgery. At 4 to 16 months of follow-up, 7 patients were still alive, with 5 revealing no evidence of disease. In conclusion, this pilot study demonstrates that IMRT offers a viable mode of re-irradiation for recurrent head-and-neck cancers in previously irradiated sites. Longer follow-up time and a larger number of patients are needed to better define the therapeutic advantage of IMRT in recurrent, previously irradiated head-and-neck cancers.

  7. Pseudomeningoceles of the sphenoid sinus masquerading as sinus pathology

    PubMed Central

    Vaezi, Alec; Snyderman, Carl H.; Saleh, Hesham A.; Carrau R., Ricardo L.; Zanation, Adam; Gardner, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical presentation, pathophysiology and treatment of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks of the sphenoid bone, with an emphasis on a previously undescribed form in this location, in which CSF is trapped under the mucosa of the sinonasal cavity or in the soft tissue of the skull base. Study design Case series and literature review. Level of evidence 4. Methods Analysis of cases through medical records and literature review. Results Four examples of unusual spontaneous CSF leaks of the skull base are presented. In each case, a CSF collection was contained behind the sinonasal mucosa of the sphenoid sinus, resembling a nasal polyp or mucocele on exam or imaging. In one case, the fluid collection was also associated with significant bone resorption and extravasation into the soft tissue of the infratemporal fossa. In each case, small defects of the ventral skull base (sphenoid bone) were the source of the CSF leaks. Successful treatment was achieved after transnasal endoscopic repair of the skull base defects using a combination of free abdominal fat grafts, free fascial grafts and pedicled nasoseptal flaps. Postoperatively, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed if the intracranial pressure was elevated. Conclusions Spontaneous CSF leaks arising in the sphenoid sinus may not always present with overt CSF rhinorrhea but with a submucosal fluid collection (pseudomeningocele) that may mimic a mucocoele or nasal polyp. These bona fide pseudomeningoceles of the skull base may be associated with elevated intracranial pressure and can be managed using endoscopic endonasal surgery. PMID:22052361

  8. [Dural sinus thrombosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Pontalti, João Luis; Teles, Alisson Roberto

    2006-06-01

    We report the case of a 24 year-old pregnant woman, seen at the neurology service by presenting agitation, hallucinations, mental confusion, headache, vision loss, aphasia and seizures. The neuroradiologic exam was compatible with thrombosis in dural sinus and cortical veins. Treatment with abciximab was accomplished and the mechanical lysis of the thrombus was made obtaining restoration of cerebral vein flow. After the procedure, she presented frontal hematoma which was withdrawn surgically. We discuss this infrequent pathology in clinical picture, pathogenesis, image exams and therapeutics.

  9. Cavernous sinus thrombosis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Santamarta, Elena; Martínez, Patricia; Sáiz-Ayala, Antonio; Llorente, José L

    2017-04-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) represents a rare but devastating disease process that may be associated with significant long-term patient morbidity or mortality. Rapid diagnosis and aggressive medical and surgical management are imperative for patients with CST. We present the case of a 24-year-old pregnant woman with intraorbital abscess and CST secondary to Streptococcus milleri. Surgical intervention included orbital abscess drainage and dental extraction, medical therapy included intravenous antibiotic, heparin, and methylprednisolone and an elective cesarean section was performed. The latter was the key point to resolution the disease.

  10. Allergic fungal sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Thorp, Brian D; McKinney, Kibwei A; Rose, Austin S; Ebert, Charles S

    2012-06-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a subtype of eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) characterized by type I hypersensitivity, nasal polyposis, characteristic computed tomography scan findings, eosinophilic mucus, and the presence of fungus on surgical specimens without evidence of tissue invasion. This refractory subtype of CRS is of the great interest in the pediatric population, given the relatively early age of onset and the difficulty in managing AFS through commercially available medical regimens. Almost universally, a diagnosis of AFS requires operative intervention. Postoperative adjuvant medical therapy is a mainstay in the treatment paradigm of pediatric AFS.

  11. Maxillary sinus hemangioma: MR and CT studies.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M V; Bonner, F M; Abdo, G J

    1989-01-01

    A maxillary sinus hemangioma was detected as an incidental finding during magnetic resonance imaging of the head. The CT findings are more characteristic for the diagnosis of this lesion. Preoperative diagnosis of maxillary sinus hemangioma is important since these lesions can frequently cause a large amount of hemorrhage during surgery.

  12. Cholesterol granuloma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ting-Kuang

    2006-06-01

    Cholesterol granuloma (CG) of the maxillary sinus is very rare. In this study, the searching of the literature was performed with the keywords of cholesterol granuloma and maxillary sinus. All retrieved literature were reviewed throughout to identify and analyze all individual characteristics. Two additional cases in our hospital were also included. The result showed that, in the overall 37 cases, the ratio of male to female was about 3:1. Caucasian (14/37) and Turkish (10/37) were reported more frequently. CG of maxillary sinus had an opposite sex predilection compared with the fungus balls of the maxillary sinus. In addition, the comorbidity of these two diseases was found only in one patient in the literature. These results suggested that the different mechanisms other than poor aeration of the maxillary sinus played a role in the formation of CG of maxillary sinus. The diagnosis for CG of the maxillary sinus before operation is difficult, but the clear golden yellow rhinorrhea and hemorrhagic signs may provide a good diagnostic evidence. The symptoms were vague and about half of the patients presented with non-specific symptoms. Therefore, it seemed reasonable that CG of the maxillary sinus was under diagnosed in the clinical practice. Treatment consists of complete excision via Caldwell-Luc or endoscopic approach and provides a good prognosis. Bilateral involvements are rare but possible in this disease entity.

  13. Organizing Hematoma of the Maxillary Sinus Mimicking Malignancy Diagnosed by Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron-Emission Tomography (FDG PET/CT): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Kyun; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Organizing hematoma of the paranasal sinuses is a diagnostic dilemma clinically and radiographically, mimicking benign or malignant neoplastic processes. Although the diagnostic rate of this disease has increased as characteristic imaging findings are somewhat elucidated, endoscopic examination, preoperative biopsy, and computed tomography (CT) imaging do not give helpful information in differentiating these lesions from malignant neoplastic processes. A 55-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of recurrent nasal bleeding. He also complained of a left-sided nasal obstruction. CT findings were highly suggestive of a malignant tumor of the maxillary sinus. However, based on fluorodeoxyglucose F18 positron-emission tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the provisional diagnosis of benign tumor rather than malignancy was made. Complete resection of the mass was achieved by simple transnasal endoscopic surgery using the Caldwell-Luc approach. Organizing hematoma of the maxillary sinus was diagnosed by histopathologic evaluation. The clinical, radiological, and histopathologic findings of the patient are presented. In this report, we have presented 18FDG-PET findings of organized hematoma of the maxillary sinus (OHMS) that showed an increased FDG uptake in the peripheral rim of the mass with central photopenia. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature reporting FDG-PET/CT findings of OHMS. Careful interpretation of metabolic (FDG-PET/CT) and anatomic (CT and MRI) images should be performed to accurately characterize the expansile lesion of the maxillary sinus in order to increase specificity and reduce equivocal findings significantly. PMID:26587203

  14. [X-Ray and clinical study of the nose, sinuses and maxilla in patients with severe iron deficiency disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Reimann, F; Kayhan, V; Talati, U; Gökmen

    1975-11-01

    A definite relation between ozaena and iron deficiency disease could not be verified. However, the examination of 88 patients with severe iron deficiency disease, mostly of juvenile age, revealed that X-ray pictures of the nose and the paranasal sinuses showed abnormal alterations indicating the existence of a non-inflammatory process. There were few symptoms from the nose and the neighbouring structures as well as insignificant clinical findings by inspection of these structures. The increased opacity of the maxillary sinuses on the roentgenograms and some other changes are considered to be partially due to the insufficient pneumatisation which is related to the retarded development and maturation of juvenile patients with iron deficiency disease. Furthermore, it is caused by the enlargement and thickening of the facial bones resulting from the expansive growth of the hyperplastic and hypertrophic red marrow filling completely the cancelous substance. The space of the maxillary sinuses is narrowed in many cases, the penetration power of the X-ray diminished and the clearing effect of the air containing cavities decreased.

  15. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling.

    PubMed

    Zampetti, Benedetta; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Loli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88-100% and 67-100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50-70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres.

  16. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling

    PubMed Central

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing’s syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88–100% and 67–100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50–70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  17. Evaluation of Correlation of Cell Cycle Proteins and Ki-67 Interaction in Paranasal Sinus Inverted Papilloma Prognosis and Squamous Cell Carcinoma Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Yung-An; Huang, Hung-Jin; Wang, Tang-Chuan; Tai, Chih-Jaan

    2014-01-01

    The recurrent sinonasal inverted papilloma (IP) could be transformed to sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma. We use protein expression patterns by immunohistochemical method to see whether the expression of p53, p16, p21, and p27 belongs to cell-cycle-regulators and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) and Ki-67 the proliferation markers in sixty patients with sinonasal inverted papilloma, and 10 of them with squamous cell carcinoma transformation. Significantly elevated levels of Ki-67, p27, and PCNA in IP with squamous cell carcinoma transformation of sinonasal tract compared with inverted papilloma were revealed. No variation of p16, p21, PLUNC (palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone protein) and p53 expression was correlated to sinonasal IP malignant transformation by multivariate survey. However, we found elevated PLUNC expression in IPs with multiple recurrences. Finally, we found that PCNA, p27 may interact with CDK1 which promote IP cell proliferation and correlate to sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma. Ki-67 could work throughout the cell cycles to cause malignant transformation. In conclusion, this is a first study showing the correlation of Ki-67, PCNA interacted with CDK1 might lead to malignant transformation. Elevated PLUNC expression in the sinonasal IPs was related to multiple recurrences in human. PMID:25013792

  18. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and face. You may also need imaging tests. Treatments include antibiotics, decongestants, and pain relievers. Using heat pads on the inflamed area, saline nasal sprays, and vaporizers can also help. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  19. Presentation of Preauricular Sinus and Preauricular Sinus Abscess in Southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adegbiji, W. A.; Alabi, B. S.; Olajuyin, O. A.; Nwawolo, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Preauricular sinus abscess is a common congenital external ear disease. This abscess is usually misdiagnosed because it is commonly overlooked during physical examination. In Nigeria, the prevalence was 9.3% in Ilorin, north central Nigeria This study is to determine the distribution and clinical presentation of the preauricular sinus abscess in Ekiti, south west Nigeria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospective hospital based study of all patients with diagnosis of preauricular sinus abscess seen in our clinic carried out between April 2008 to March 2010. Detailed clinical history, administered interviewer’s assisted questionnaires full examination and. Data obtained were collated and analysed. RESULTS: Preauricular sinus were noticed in 184 (4.4%) out of 4170 patients seen during the study period. Preauricular sinus abscess were noticed in 21 (11.4%) of the preauricular sinuses especially in children. Unilateral preauricular sinus abscess accounted for 90.5%. Common presenting complaints were preauricular swelling (81.0%), 90.5% with recurrent earaches, 76.2% with ear discharges. All patients had antibiotic / analgesic while 17 out of 21 (81.0%) had surgical excisions. CONCLUSION: Preauricular sinus abscess were noticed among 11.4% of the preauricular sinuses especially in children, unilateral preauricular sinus abscess accounted for 90.5%. Common complaints were otorrhoea, earaches, and swelling and they were mostly managed surgically. PMID:24711764

  20. Correlations between anatomic variations of maxillary sinus ostium and postoperative complication after sinus lifting

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The maxillary sinus mucosa is reported to recover to preoperative sterility after sinus floor elevation. However, when drainage of maxillary sinus is impaired, recovery can be delayed and maxillary sinusitis can occur. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the correlations between anatomic variants that can interrupt the ostium of the maxillary sinus and incidence of complication after sinus lifting. Materials and Methods The subjects are 81 patients who underwent sinus lifting in Wonkwang University Dental Hospital (Iksan, Korea). Computed tomography (CT) images of the subjects were reviewed for presence of nasal septum deviation, anatomic variants of the middle turbinate, and Haller cells. Correlations between anatomic variations and occurrence of maxillary sinusitis were statistically analyzed. Results Patients with anatomic variants of ostio-meatal units, such as deviated nasal septum, concha bullosa or paradoxical curvature of the middle turbinate, or Haller cells, showed a higher rate of complication. However, only presence of Haller cell showed statistically significant. Conclusion Before sinus lifting, CT images are recommended to detect anatomic variants of the ostio-meatal complex. If disadvantageous anatomic variants are detected, the use of nasal decongestants should be considered to reduce the risk of postoperative sinusitis. PMID:27847736

  1. [Compound odontoma as a cause of chronic maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Crespo Del Hierro, Jorge; Ruiz González, Manuel; Delgado Portela, Margarita; García Del Castillo, Eduardo; Crespo Serrano, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Sinusitis of dental origin is a relatively frequent entity, but the presence of an odontoma in the sinus as a source of this pathology is exceptional. Here we present a case of a young patient who presented chronic maxillary sinusitis over 2 years, originating in an odontoma located in the sinus drainage area.

  2. Petrosal sinus sampling: technique and rationale.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Doppman, J L

    1991-01-01

    Bilateral simultaneous sampling of the inferior petrosal sinuses is an extremely sensitive, specific, and accurate test for diagnosing Cushing disease and distinguishing between that entity and the ectopic ACTH syndrome. It is also valuable for lateralizing small hormone-producing adenomas within the pituitary gland. The inferior petrosal sinuses connect the cavernous sinuses with the ipsilateral internal jugular veins. The anatomy of the anastomoses between the inferior petrosal sinus, the internal jugular vein, and the venous plexuses at the base of the skull varies, but it is almost always possible to catheterize the inferior petrosal sinus. In addition, variations in size and anatomy are often present between the two inferior petrosal sinuses in a patient. Advance preparation is required for petrosal sinus sampling. Teamwork is a critical element, and each member of the staff should know what he or she will be doing during the procedure. The samples must be properly labeled, processed, and stored. Specific needles, guide wires, and catheters are recommended for this procedure. The procedure is performed with specific attention to the three areas of potential technical difficulty: catheterization of the common femoral veins, crossing the valve at the base of the left internal jugular vein, and selective catheterization of the inferior petrosal sinuses. There are specific methods for dealing with each of these areas. The sine qua non of correct catheter position in the inferior petrosal sinus is demonstration of reflux of contrast material into the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. Images must always be obtained to document correct catheter position. Special attention must be paid to two points to prevent potential complications: The patient must be given an adequate dose of heparin, and injection of contrast material into the inferior petrosal sinuses and surrounding veins must be done gently and carefully. When the procedure is performed as outlined, both inferior

  3. Isolated sphenoid sinus lesion: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Alazzawi, Sarmad; Shahrizal, Tengku; Prepageran, Narayanan; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Isolated sphenoid sinus lesions are an uncommon entity and present with non-specific symptoms. In this case report, the patient presented with a history of headaches for a duration of one month without sinonasal symptoms. A computed tomography scan showed a soft tissue mass occupying the sphenoid sinus. An endoscopic biopsy revealed fungal infection. Endoscopic wide sphenoidotomy with excision of the sphenoid sinus lesion was then performed however, the microbiological examination post-surgery did not show any fungal elements. Instead, Citrobacter species was implicated to be the cause of infection. PMID:25320694

  4. Chronic Cutaneous Draining Sinus of Dental Origin

    PubMed Central

    Sisodia, N; Manjunath, MK

    2014-01-01

    Extra oral sinus of odontogenic origin occurs when the purulent by-products of dental pulp necrosis spread along the path of least resistance from the root apex to the skin on the face. Patients presenting with cutaneous sinus usually visit a general physician or dermatologist first, as the lesion can mimic various dermatologic pathologies, ranging from an infected sebaceous cysts to a basal cell carcinoma. Despite systemic antibiotics, symptoms often persist causing further confusion, and at times leading to unnecessary surgical interventions. The location of this sinus in the head and neck region should lead the physician to seek a dental opinion in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:25506495

  5. Salvage Re-Irradiation for Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy . E-mail: Leen2@mskcc.org; Chan, Kelvin; Bekelman, Justin E.; Zhung, Joanne; Mechalakos, James; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To present a retrospective review of treatment outcomes for recurrent head and neck (HN) cancer patients treated with re-irradiation (re-RT) at a single medical center. Methods and Materials: From July 1996-September 2005, 105 patients with recurrent HN cancer underwent re-RT at our institution. Sites included were: the neck (n = 21), nasopharynx (n 21), paranasal sinus (n = 18), oropharynx (n = 16), oral cavity (n = 9), larynx (n = 10), parotid (n = 6), and hypopharynx (n = 4). The median prior RT dose was 62 Gy. Seventy-five patients received chemotherapy with their re-RT (platinum-based in the majority of cases). The median re-RT dose was 59.4 Gy. In 74 (70%), re-RT utilized intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Results: With a median follow-up of 35 months, 18 patients were alive with no evidence of disease. The 2-year loco-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival rates were 42% and 37%, respectively. Patients who underwent IMRT, compared to those who did not, had a better 2-year LRPF (52% vs. 20%, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, non-nasopharynx and non-IMRT were associated with an increased risk of loco-regional (LR) failure. Patients with LR progression-free disease had better 2-year overall survival vs. those with LR failure (56% vs. 21%, p < 0.001). Acute and late Grade 3-4 toxicities were reported in 23% and 15% of patients. Severe Grade 3-4 late complications were observed in 12 patients, with a median time to development of 6 months after re-RT. Conclusions: Based on our data, achieving LR control is crucial for improved overall survival in this patient population. The use of IMRT predicted better LR tumor control. Future aggressive efforts in maximizing tumor control in the recurrent setting, including dose escalation with IMRT and improved chemotherapy, are warranted.

  6. A Rational Approach to Sinus Augmentation: The Low Window Sinus Lift

    PubMed Central

    Zaniol, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Sinus augmentation is a well-known approach to treating alveolar bone ridge atrophy in the posterior maxilla. The preparation of the lateral window is crucial. Its size, design, and position in the vestibular sinus wall may affect the intra- and postsurgical complication rates and affect the intrasurgical activity of both surgeons and assistants. The present paper describes a rational technique that also exploits the guided surgery approach for design and preparation of a lateral window for sinus augmentation, the Low Window Sinus Lift. To illustrate the use of this approach, a case is presented in which the 50-year-old patient had the left maxillary first molar extracted, followed two months later by sinus augmentation and placement of three implants. One year after delivery of the definitive prosthesis, all three implants were successful, and the prosthesis was fully functional. Controlled studies should be undertaken to assess whether this technique provides significant advantages compared to other sinus augmentation approaches. PMID:28337349

  7. Sympathoinhibition and hypotension in carotid sinus hypersensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity is a known cause of syncope in humans. The condition is characterized by cardioinhibition and vasodepression, each to varying degrees. The extent and importance of sympathoinhibition has not been determined in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. This study reports on the extent of sympathoinhibition measured directly directly during carotid massage with and without atrioventricular sequential pacing, in a patient with symptomatic carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity. Carotid massage elicited asystole, hypotension and complete inhibition of muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Carotid massage during atrioventricular pacing produced similar sympathoinhibition, but with minimal hypotension. Therefore, sympathoinhibition did not contribute importantly to the hypotension during carotid massage in the supine position in this patient. Further investigations are required to elucidate the relation of sympathoinhibition to hypotension in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity in the upright position.

  8. Palatal sinus elevation revisited: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Rudolf; Wagner, Florian; Ewers, Rolf; Ulm, Christian

    2013-08-01

    The palatal sinus lift is a good choice for patients with scarred buccal soft tissue and those with poor wound healing such as smokers or diabetics or when visual side effects such as swelling must be concealed. We provide a surgical protocol for palatal sinus lifting without a vertical release incision. The incision is started in a slightly palatal aspect, at the distal end of the dental arch, and describes a curve laterally on the alveolar crest while running in a mesial direction. As a marginal incision, it can continue to the central incisor. Submucosal exposure will lift the gum and the greater palatine artery. After insertion of a tongue depressor, the sinus is opened on the palatal side, opposite the zygomaticoalveolar crest, using a rose bur or a piezotome. After sinus augmentation, the incision is easy to close, and the wound will heal smoothly.

  9. Frontal sinus recognition for human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falguera, Juan Rogelio; Falguera, Fernanda Pereira Sartori; Marana, Aparecido Nilceu

    2008-03-01

    Many methods based on biometrics such as fingerprint, face, iris, and retina have been proposed for person identification. However, for deceased individuals, such biometric measurements are not available. In such cases, parts of the human skeleton can be used for identification, such as dental records, thorax, vertebrae, shoulder, and frontal sinus. It has been established in prior investigations that the radiographic pattern of frontal sinus is highly variable and unique for every individual. This has stimulated the proposition of measurements of the frontal sinus pattern, obtained from x-ray films, for skeletal identification. This paper presents a frontal sinus recognition method for human identification based on Image Foresting Transform and shape context. Experimental results (ERR = 5,82%) have shown the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. The forensic importance of frontal sinus radiographs.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rhonan Ferreira; Prado, Felippe Bevilacqua; Caputo, Isamara Geandra Cavalcanti; Devito, Karina Lopes; Botelho, Tessa de Luscena; Daruge Júnior, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The identification of unidentified human remains through the comparison of antemortem and postmortem radiographs has found wide acceptance in recent years. Reported here is the forensic case of an unidentified adult male who had died as the result of a traffic accident, after which the body was identified by matching images of ante- and postmortem radiographs of the frontal sinus. A general discussion on identification using frontal sinus radiographs is presented, highlighting the reliability of this method, in reference to the uniqueness of the frontal sinus in humans. However, it also notes a few difficulties, especially in reference to the X-ray technique in cases where antemortem radiographs are available and a potentially larger number of anatomical, pathological or traumatic features are present. The comparison of frontal sinus outlines is recommended when it may become necessary to provide quantitative substantiation for forensic identification based on these structures.

  11. Subpubic sinus: a remnant of cloaca.

    PubMed

    Chou, T D; Chu, C C; Diau, G Y; Chiang, J H

    1995-05-01

    A 14-month-old girl had purulent discharge from a sinus over the subpubic region for 2 weeks. Radiography and voiding cystourethrography revealed a 4.5 cm. long fistula extending to the retropubic region without any connection to the lower urinary tract. The fistula was excised. Histological findings revealed that the fistula had 3 different types of epithelium: stratified squamous, transitional and columnar. Clinical and pathological findings indicated that the sinus was most likely a remnant of the cloaca.

  12. [A case of cavernous sinus aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Hase, Tomomi; Kurita, Hideharu; Matsumoto, Eiji; Kuroda, Hajime; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Shinoda, Souji

    2013-10-01

    We reported a case of cavernous sinus aspergillosis. A 62-year-old man complained of trigeminal neuralgia in the right V1 region. Neurological examination on admission showed ptosis, loss of light reflex and ophthalmoplegia externa in the right side. MRI enhanced with gadolinium demonstrated sphenoid sinusitis and mass lesion in the right cavernous sinus. MRA revealed right internal carotid artery occlusion. An open biopsy using the extradural temporopolar approach was performed. Pus discharge was observed from the cavernous sinus and histological examination showed hypha of Aspergillus. With early voriconazole treatment, the patient had improvement in headache, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia externa. Cavernous sinus aspergillosis is often found after sphenoiditis. It results in invasion to an internal carotid artery and worsens the patient's prognosis by cerebral infarction, so early diagnosis and treatment are important. We should consider aspergillosis as one of the differential diagnoses of a mass in the cavernous sinus. The epidural approach to this lesion was available to obviate aspergillus dissemination into the medullary cavity.

  13. The role of High Mobility Group Box 1 chromosomal protein in the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis and nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Bellussi, L M; Chen, L; Chen, D; Passali, F M; Passali, D

    2012-12-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis is considered to be a multifactorial disease where different stimuli (mechanical, viral, bacterial, fungal infection, immunological disorders or dysreactivity, environmental pollution), acting on the mucosa of nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses, lead to epithelial damage and mucosal inflammation. Inflammatory cell infiltration (predominantly eosinophils, but also neutrophils, mast cells, macrophages and lymphocytes), cytokine release and sub-epithelial oedema are the histological pictures that are associated, from the clinical point of view, with nasal congestion, secretion and/or post-nasal drip and facial pain/headache. Recently, the importance of the HMG B-1 protein in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases has been demonstrated. This protein is released from necrotic/damaged cells or immune-activated cells, and by acting on specific membrane receptors causes the release of pro-inflammatory mediators, endothelial activation and the survival of inflammatory cells. The objective of the present study was: i) to determine whether HMG B1 is augmented in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps; ii) if its expression is associated with eosinophils, TNF-α, IL 5 and IL 8 cytokines typically present in chronic inflammation of the nose and paranasal sinuses; iii) to investigate a hypothetical role of this protein in the pathogenesis of nasal polyposis. Nasal polyps tissue from 21 patients affected by CRSwNP and nasal mucosa from 8 controls was collected at the ENT Department of the Chinese PLA General Hospital and underwent immunohistological staining for detection of HMG B1 protein and IL -5, IL -8 and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines. The degree of HMG B1 protein expression was evaluated by dividing the stained sections in 4 portions: 1) nucleus of epithelial cells, 2) cytoplasm of epithelial cells, 3) focal extracellular infiltration, 4) inflammatory cells. HMG B1 was more expressed in the nucleus of epithelial

  14. Alvespimycin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-09

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Melanoma; Stage III Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip

  15. Rheoreceptors in the carotid sinus of dog.

    PubMed Central

    Hajduczok, G; Chapleau, M W; Abboud, F M

    1988-01-01

    The arterial baroreceptors are known to be sensitive to changes in pressure but there are no known sensors in the cardiovascular system for changes in flow. We tested the hypothesis that changes in flow at constant pressure alter carotid sinus multi-unit nerve activity. In anesthetized dogs with vascularly isolated carotid sinuses, increases in flow at constant pressure resulted in increases in carotid sinus nerve activity in relation to the increase in flow. The increased activity during flow was not caused by an increase in strain of the sinus wall but was directly related to the increase in shear stress (36.6 +/- 11.7% increase in activity per dyne/cm2; 1 dyne = 0.1 MN). The pressure threshold of single baroreceptor units was determined during a slow pressure ramp with and without flow. Flow caused a significant decrease in pressure threshold from 81.1 +/- 6.1 mmHg (1 mmHg = 1.333 x 10(2) Pa) in the absence of flow to 69.3 +/- 5.7 mmHg with flow. We conclude that there are arterial "rheoreceptors" in the carotid sinus that respond to flow at constant pressure and strain. The results with single baroreceptor units indicate also that baroreceptors may be sensitized by increases in flow. Thus, changes in flow per se in addition to changes in arterial pressure may be important determinants of reflex circulatory adjustments. PMID:3174642

  16. Paecilomyces lilacinus as the cause of chronic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rockhill, R C; Klein, M D

    1980-01-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus was isolated on two separate occasions from the left antrum of a patient with chronic maxillary sinusitis. The clinical presentation and characteristics of the fungus and the sinus debris histopathology are discussed. Images PMID:7430339

  17. Epidural Abscess Masquerading as Lateral Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Brodner, David C.; Cutler, Jeff; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants, the evacuation of the sinus, or the use of medical treatment alone surrounds the treatment of lateral sinus thrombosis. Treatment of an epidural abscess associated with coalescent mastoiditis is much less controversial-drainage is usually recommended. The differing treatments of these complications mandate accurate diagnosis. The advent of more sophisticated radiological studies has facilitated diagnosis of these complications; however, tests are not infallible. We present three cases in which preoperative imaging demonstrates an epidural abscess mimicking lateral sinus thrombosis by compression of the vessel. A false-positive computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study may lead to the wrong diagnosis and, consequently, improper treatment. In light of this possibility, we recommend surgical exploration in all such cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171148

  18. Medical management of pediatric chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, L L; Brown, K R

    2000-10-01

    Pediatric sinusitis can be a challenging disease to treat, whether by a primary care physician or an otolaryngologist. When initial appropriate therapy fails to resolve the disorder, frustration may develop on the part of the patient, the family, and the physician. In addition to treatment with appropriate antibiotics for a sufficient length of time, other associated conditions that can exacerbate the condition must be considered and addressed as necessary. These may include viral upper respiratory infections, allergic rhinitis, immune deficiencies, asthma, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Unless all associated conditions have been optimized, treatment of chronic sinusitis will often be unsuccessful. Recognition that there may be another factor contributing to the patient's continuing illness should prompt appropriate evaluation and occasionally referral to appropriate specialists. Except for the unusual pediatric patient with a truly anatomic disorder or an underlying chronic illness such as cystic fibrosis, proper medical management will almost always resolve chronic sinusitis.

  19. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Reirradiation of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, Keith R.; Lominska, Christopher E.; Deeken, John F.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an appealing treatment option after previous radiotherapy because of its precision, conformality, and reduced treatment duration. We report our experience with reirradiation using fractionated SRS for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2008, 65 patients received SRS to the oropharynx (n = 13), hypopharynx (n = 8), nasopharynx (n = 7), paranasal sinus (n = 7), neck (n = 7), and other sites (n = 23). Thirty-eight patients were treated definitively and 27 patients with metastatic disease and/or untreated local disease were treated palliatively. Nine patients underwent complete macroscopic resection before SRS. Thirty-three patients received concurrent chemoradiation. The median initial radiation dose was 67 Gy, and the median reirradiation SRS dose was 30 Gy (21-35 Gy) in 2-5 fractions. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 16 months. Fifty-six patients were evaluable for response: 30 (54%) had complete, 15 (27%) had partial, and 11 (20%) had no response. Median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 12 months. For definitively treated patients, the 2-year OS and locoregional control (LRC) rates were 41% and 30%, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that higher total dose, surgical resection, and nasopharynx site were significantly associated with improved LRC; surgical resection and nonsquamous histology were associated with improved OS. Seven patients (11%) experienced severe reirradiation-related toxicity, including one treatment-attributed death. Conclusion: SRS reirradiation for head-and-neck cancer is feasible. This study demonstrates encouraging response rates with acceptable toxicity. Fractionated SRS reirradiation with concurrent chemotherapy in select patients warrants further study.

  20. Fourth branchial pouch sinus: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, R M; Biller, H F

    1991-07-01

    The fourth branchial pouch sinus (FBPS) is a rare translaryngeal anomaly with diverse manifestations, including neonatal stridor and recurrent deep neck infection. Review of the world literature reveals 23 reports of sinuses consistent with fourth pouch origin. We present two additional cases, including the only example of a right-sided FBPS. Retrograde excision, beginning at the piriform apex, ensures complete removal of the tract and protection of the recurrent nerve. The posterior border of the thyroid ala must be resected or retracted for adequate exposure. Failure to remove the translaryngeal portion of the tract almost guarantees recurrence.

  1. [Anorexia with sinus bradycardia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-fang; Xu, Ling; Chen, Bao-xia; Cui, Ming; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-02-18

    As anorexia patients always go to the psychiatric clinic, little is concerned about the occurrence of sinus bradycardia in these patients for cardiologists and psychiatrists. The aim of this paper is to discuss the relationship between anorexia and sinus bradycardia, and the feature analysis, differential diagnosis and therapeutic principles of this type of sinus bradycardia. We report a case of sinus bradycardia in an anorexia patient with the clinical manifestations, laboratory exams, auxiliary exams, therapeutic methods, and her prognosis, who was admitted to Peking University Third Hospital recently. The patient was a 19-year-old female, who had the manifestation of anorexia. She lost obvious weight in a short time (about 15 kg in 6 months), and her body mass index was 14.8 kg/m(2). The patient felt apparent palpitation, chest depression and short breath, without dizziness, amaurosis or unconsciousness. Vitals on presentation were notable for hypotension, and bradycardia. The initial exam was significant for emaciation, but without lethargy or lower extremity edema. The electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia with her heart rate being 32 beats per minute. The laboratory work -up revealed her normal blood routine, electrolytes and liver function. But in her thyroid function test, the free thyroid (FT) hormones 3 was 0.91 ng/L (2.3-4.2 ng/L),and FT4 was 8.2 ng/L (8.9-18.0 ng/L), which were all lower; yet the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was normal 1.48 IU/mL (0.55-4.78 IU/mL). Ultrasound revealed her normal thyroid. Anorexia is an eating disorder characterized by extremely low body weight, fear of gaining weight or distorted perception of body image, and amenorrhea. Anorexia patients who lose weight apparently in short time enhance the excitability of the parasympathetic nerve, and inhibit the sympathetic nerve which lead to the appearance of sinus bradycardia, and functional abnormalities of multiple systems such as hypothyroidism. But this kind of sinus

  2. Rhinoplasty and Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, George L.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are opting for combining sinus surgery and cosmetic rhinoplasty. The author has been performing rhinoplasty with FESS since April of 1990. The technique and equipment used in early cases is much different than that used in more recent surgeries. Specific advances include high definition monitor, intraoperative navigation system, and powered dissecting instruments. The benefits of these advances are illustrated by a review of the more recent cases performed by the author. Combined rhinoplasty and FESS can be performed with good results (functional and cosmetic) and minimal complications. Advances in sinus surgery technique and equipment have made the procedure safer, faster, more precise, and more comfortable. PMID:22567242

  3. CSF hydrodynamics in superior sagittal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, B; Malm, J; Markgren, P; Ekstedt, J

    1992-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics were investigated with a constant pressure infusion method in patients with superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Ten patients were studied with serial examinations up to 15 years after the onset of the disease. A total of 70 CSF hydrodynamic examinations were performed. A clear increase in intracranial pressure due to raised pressure in the major dural sinus was seen in all patients. A striking feature was the persistent intracranial pressure increase that declined only gradually. This had no obvious clinical impact. Change in CSF resorption facility played only a minor role in the intracranial pressure elevation. None of the patients developed hydrocephalus. PMID:1583513

  4. Pilonidal sinus (Nadi vrana): A case study

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Pradeep; Toshikhane, Hemant

    2010-01-01

    Pilonidal sinus (PNS) occurs in the cleavage between the buttocks (natal cleft) and can cause discomfort, embarrassment and absence from work for thousands of young people (mostly men) annually. The incidence of the disease is calculated to be 26 per 100,000 people. It occurs 2.2 times more often in men than in women. Age at presentation is 21 years for men and 19 years for women this case report describes a 22-year-old man with pilonidal sinus who was treated with ksharasutra. PMID:21170212

  5. Superior sinus of the pericardium: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Aronberg, D.J.; Peterson, R.R.; Glazer, H.S.; Sagel, S.S.

    1984-11-01

    On computed tomography, a mass-like density is often observed, just posterior to the ascending aorta, that occasionally has been mistaken for mediastinal lymph node enlargement. Cadaver studies confirmed this retroaortic structure to be an extension of the periocardial cavity, the superior sinus. Anatomic studies revealed the presence of a superior sinus in all of the 28 cadavers studied. Retrospective review of 116 consecutive adult chest computed tomographic examinations disclosed its presence in 49%. This normal variant has a characteristic location, shape, and attenuation value by CT that should allow recognition and prevent misinterpretation.

  6. Compressive Optic Neuropathy from Allergic Fungal Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jessica; Jefferson, Niall; Chaganti, Joga; Fraser, Clare L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ophthalmic manifestations of allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) are rare, but can occur in advanced disease. A 32-year-old man with advanced AFS presented with severe bilateral vision loss and restricted ocular motility. Magnetic resonance imaging and histological analysis confirmed active chronic AFS. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was performed, with adjunctive steroid therapy. Although AFS is a reasonably well-recognised entity, severe disease causing bilateral visual deficits is rarely encountered. This can confound the diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Ophthalmologists should thus be aware of compressive optic neuropathy as a complication of advanced AFS to prompt early treatment and mitigate visual loss. PMID:27928361

  7. Different types of fungal sinusitis occurring concurrently: implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Rupa, V; Thomas, Meera

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the clinical and histopathological features, management and outcome of a series of patients with simultaneous occurrence of invasive and non-invasive fungal sinusitis (mixed fungal sinusitis). The histopathological records of patients with fungal sinusitis seen over the last 6 years were reviewed. The clinical, histopathological, treatment and follow up details of all cases with mixed fungal sinusitis were noted. Six cases of mixed fungal sinusitis with concurrent occurrence of chronic granulomatous fungal sinusitis and allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) were seen during the study period. Most (83.3 %) had bilateral disease. All patients had undergone prior endoscopic sinus surgery at least once within the previous 2 years. Histopathological features showed predominance of invasive disease in half the patients. Except for one patient who did not report for follow up, all patients with predominant chronic granulomatous fungal sinusitis received systemic antifungal therapy and inhaled steroids. Those with predominant features of AFS received oral and inhaled steroids. Five patients with mixed fungal sinusitis who had follow up ranging from 6 months to 5 years were disease free following treatment. Mixed fungal sinusitis should be recognized by the surgeon and pathologist as a separate category of fungal sinusitis whose treatment depends on accurate histological diagnosis. A good outcome may be expected with appropriate therapy.

  8. Sinusitis associated with nasogastric intubation in 3 horses

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Jorge E.; Yamout, Sawsan; Dechant, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Sinusitis has not been reported as a complication of long-term nasogastric intubation in horses. We describe 3 horses that developed nosocomial sinusitis following abdominal surgery with associated perioperative nasogastric intubation. Sinusitis was suspected by the presence of malodorous discharge and confirmed by percussion, upper airway endoscopy, radiographs (n = 3), and bacterial culture (n = 1). PMID:24891638

  9. Supracricoid hemilaryngopharyngectomy for selected pyriform sinus carcinoma patients – a retrospective chart review

    PubMed Central

    Papacharalampous, George X; Kotsis, Georgios P; Vlastarakos, Petros V; Georgolios, Alexandros; Seggas, Ioannis; Yiotakis, Ioannis E; Manolopoulos, Leonidas

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to assess the functional and oncologic results of supracricoid hemilaryngopharyngectomy and report our experience in the technique, local control and overall survival rates. Materials and methods 18 selected patients with pyriform sinus cancer treated by supracricoid hemilaryngopharyngectomy in a University Hospital setting. Retrospective chart review was used to assess functional and oncologic results of the procedure. Results The actuarial 5 year survival rate in our study was 55.56% and the actuarial neck recurrence rate was 16.67%. All patients were successfully decannulated. Aspiration pneumonia was the most common postoperative complication (22.23%) and was treated mostly conservatively. One patient required a temporary gastrostomy but no patient needed total laryngectomy in the postoperative period. Conclusion Supracricoid hemilaryngopharyngectomy in experienced hands is a reliable technique for selected patients with pyriform sinus cancer. PMID:19671141

  10. [Endonasal ethmoidectomy in the treatment of nasal sinus polyposis].

    PubMed

    Chevalier, D; Darras, J A; Sarini, J; Piquet, J J

    1995-01-01

    Endonasal surgery of paranasal polyposis. Two hundred and fifty one microscopical sphenoethmoidectomies with a major complication rate of 2.6% are reported. Long term results are analysed. Nasal obstruction disappears in 96% and persists in 70% of the cases 5 years later. Through topical steroid therapy and surgical experience polyp recurrence rate is reduced to 30%.

  11. CT maxillary sinus evaluation-A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Paula; Faria-Almeida, Ricardo; Braga, Ana-Cristina; Felino, António

    2015-01-01

    Background Proximity of the dental roots to the sinus floor makes dental disease a probable cause of maxillary sinusitis. The aim of this study was to find out if maxillary sinus pathologic changes were more prevalent in patients with dental disease and to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) in analyzing and detecting apical periodontitis and other odontogenic causes on the maxillary sinusitis etiology in a Portuguese Caucasian population. Material and Methods Retrospective cohort study. The total sample of 504 patients and their CT was included in this study. The patients were from a private dental clinic, specializing in oral surgery, where the first complaint was not directly related to sinus disease, but with dental pathology. For each patient, the etiological factors of maxillary sinusitis and the imaging CT findings were analyzed. All the axial, coronal and sagittal CT slices were evaluated and general data were registered. The latter was selected based on the maxillary sinus CT published literature. Results 32.40% of patients presented normal sinus (without any etiological factor associated), 29.00% showed presence of etiological and imaging findings in the maxillary sinus, 20.60% had only imaging changes in the maxillary sinus and 18.00% of patients presented only etiological factors and no change in the maxillary sinus. Conclusions Radiological imaging is an important tool for establishing the diagnosis of maxillary sinus pathology. These results indicate that the CT scan should be an excellent tool for complement the odontogenic sinusitis diagnosis. Key words: Maxillary sinusitis/etiology, odontogenic, computed tomography, maxillary sinus. PMID:25858084

  12. Giant-cell granuloma of the sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Rhea, J.T.; Weber, A.L.

    1983-04-01

    Three cases are presented which illustrate giant-cell granulomas in the maxillary, ethmoid, and sphenoid sinuses. The radiographic features are nonspecific, and the lesion can mimic carcinoma. Ossification can be demonstrated, especially with computed tomography, and may indicate a benign lesion.

  13. [Congenital left sinus of Valsalva aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Simões, M V; Figueira, R R; Barbato, D; Miziara, H L

    1991-01-01

    Two cases of left sinus of Valsalva congenital aneurysm (SVCA), incidentally found are described. The authors call attention on rarity of them, and present new concepts about their morphogenesis and incidence. They also suggested a higher incidence of asymptomatic and undiagnosed cases of SVCA should be considered.

  14. Stent hypersensitivity and infection in sinus cavities

    PubMed Central

    Soufras, George D.; Hahalis, George

    2013-01-01

    Persistent mucosal inflammation, granulation tissue formation, hypersensitivity, and multifactorial infection are newly described complications of retained drug-eluting stents from endoscopic sinus surgery for refractory rhinosinusitis. In an important report published in Allergy and Rhinology, a 45-year-old male patient suffering from recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery and was found, for the first time, to have steroid-eluting catheters that were inadvertently left in the ethmoid and frontal sinuses. The retained catheters had caused persistent mucosal inflammation and formation of granulation tissue denoting hypersensitivity reaction. These consequences had induced perpetuation of symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Meticulous removal of the retained stents with the nitinol wings from inflamed tissues of the frontal, ethmoidal, and sphenoethmoidal recesses in which they were completely imbedded was successfully performed without polypoid regrowth. Cultures of specimens taken from both left and right stents showed heavy growth of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and moderate growth of Klebsiella oxytoca, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, and beta-hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus. Fungal infection was not detected. The current knowledge and experience regarding stent hypersensitivity and infection in relation with the use of stents in sinus cavities is reviewed. PMID:24498522

  15. Carcinoma of Maxillary Sinus Masquerading as Odontogenic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ramachamparambathu, Ashir Kolikkal; Vengal, Manoj; Siyo, Nizaro; Ahmed, Anis

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumours of maxillary sinus are rare. They are usually diagnosed in the late stages when they perforate the sinus walls. The presence of large air space in the maxillary sinus facilitates asymptomatic growth of the sinus malignancy. The clinical presentation of these tumours depends on the sinus wall involved by the disease. The medial wall is usually the first to become eroded, leading to nasal obstruction, epistaxis or discharge. Rarely, symptoms of maxillary sinus carcinoma can resemble dental infection and the affected patients may visit dental clinic seeking treatment. This report presents a case of carcinoma of maxillary sinus mimicking odontogenic infection. Computed tomographic findings explained the reason for the present lesion to masquerade as an inflammatory condition. The importance of advanced imaging modalities for prompt identification of such lesions is discussed. PMID:27790593

  16. Cancer and wood-related occupational exposure in the Amazon region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Arias Bahia, Sílvia Helena; Echenique Mattos, Inês; Koifman, Sergio

    2005-09-01

    The occurrence of neoplasms, particularly nasal cavities and paranasal sinus tumors, has been associated with exposure to wood dust. The wood industry occupies an important place in the State of Pará, Brazil, where are located 90% of all the wood-related companies in the Brazilian Amazon market as a whole. The aim of this study was an exploratory analysis of cancer occurrence in woodworkers in the State of Pará. The proportional cancer incidence ratio (PCIR) was calculated for a group of 138 male woodworkers 20 years or older with a histological diagnosis of neoplasm treated at the Ofir Loyola Cancer Hospital in the state capital of Belém from 1991 to 1999. The cancer mortality odds ratio (CMOR) was also calculated in order to compare the cancer mortality among men 20 years or older residing in the State of Pará whose occupations involved wood exposure with that of men of the same age and place of residence but with different occupations. High and statistically significant PCIRs were observed for tumors of the oral cavity/pharynx, 2.44 (1.44--3.85), and stomach, 3.57 (2.41--5.10), in comparison to the population of Goiânia as well as in comparison to the population of Porto Alegre (oral cavity/pharynx, 1.97 (1.17--3.12), stomach, 3.12 (2.11--4.47)). We also observed a high and statistically significant PCIR for Hodgkin's disease, 5.30 (1.09--15.47), in comparison to the population of Goiânia. A CMOR of 8.86 (5.26--14.83) was observed for liver cancer. CMORs greater than 1 but not statistically significant were observed for neoplasms of the larynx. In agreement with the literature, woodworkers in Pará presented a high cancer incidence in specific anatomical sites. The results highlight the need for further epidemiological investigation to better evaluate this occupational exposure in the Amazon region.

  17. Capecitabine and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-01

    Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  18. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented as cavernous sinus tumour.

    PubMed

    Moona, Mohammad Shafi; Mehdi, Itrat

    2011-12-01

    A 32 year Libyan male presented with the complaints of headache and diplopia. He was diagnosed with a cavernous sinus meningioma on the basis of MRI findings but no initial biopsy was taken. Depending on the radiologic diagnosis the patient was treated with gamma knife surgery twice, abroad. During follow up he developed left ear deafness and left cervical lymph adenopathy. An ENT evaluation with biopsy from the nasopharynx and cervical lymph node was taken. The histopathologic diagnosis of the resected tumour showed a nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cervical lymph node metastasis (poorly differentiated lympho-epithelial carcinoma). The cavernous sinus tumour which was initially treated as a meningioma was in fact metastasis from the nasopharyngeal carcinoma, making this an interesting and rare occurrence.

  19. Sinus pause in association with Lyme carditis.

    PubMed

    Oktay, A Afsin; Dibs, Samer R; Friedman, Harvey

    2015-06-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in the United States. It is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cardiac involvement is seen in 4% to 10% of patients with Lyme disease. The principal manifestation of Lyme carditis is self-limited conduction system disease, with predominant involvement of the atrioventricular node. On rare occasions, Lyme carditis patients present with other conduction system disorders such as bundle branch block, intraventricular conduction delay, and supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia. We report the unusual case of a 59-year-old man who presented with new-onset symptomatic sinus pauses one month after hiking in upstate New York. To our knowledge, this is the first case report from North America that describes the relationship between symptomatic sinus pause and Lyme carditis.

  20. Infantile Maxillary Sinus Osteomyelitis Mimicking Orbital Cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Nagarajan; Ramamoorthy, Nathan; Panchanathan, Suresh; Balasundaram, Jothiramalingam S

    2014-01-01

    Periorbital soft tissue swelling may result due to primary orbital pathology or from adjacent facio-maxillary or sino-nasal inflammatory causes. Osteomyelitis of maxilla in the pediatric age group is a rare entity in this era of antibiotics. We present an 11-month-old female infant who was brought with peri-orbital selling and purulent nasal discharge. Computed Tomography showed erosions of the walls of maxillary sinus suggestive of osteomyelitis. Culture of sinus scraping showed Staphylococcus aureus growth and the child improved with intravenous cloxacillin therapy. This case is presented due to the rarity of its presentation in this age group and for awareness to consider this entity in children having fever and peri-orbital swelling. PMID:25191055

  1. Cavernous sinus syndrome: need for early diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Jaime; Burbano, Lisseth Estefania; Reyes, Saúl; Barreras, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome (CSS) is a rare condition characterised by ophthalmoplegia, proptosis, ocular and conjunctival congestion, trigeminal sensory loss and Horner’s syndrome. These signs and symptoms result from the involvement of the cranial nerves passing through the cavernous sinus. We report the case of a 53-year-old man with a history of daily stabbing headache associated with dizziness, progressive blurred vision, right ocular pain, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. After working up the patient, a meningioma was identified as the cause of the CSS. Despite advances in neuroimaging techniques, in some cases, the aetiology of CSS remains difficult to determine. We highlight the clinical and radiological features of a meningioma, one of the causes of CSS. Early diagnosis and treatment of CSS play a key role in a better prognosis. PMID:25819816

  2. Sinus Pause in Association with Lyme Carditis

    PubMed Central

    Dibs, Samer R.; Friedman, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in the United States. It is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cardiac involvement is seen in 4% to 10% of patients with Lyme disease. The principal manifestation of Lyme carditis is self-limited conduction system disease, with predominant involvement of the atrioventricular node. On rare occasions, Lyme carditis patients present with other conduction system disorders such as bundle branch block, intraventricular conduction delay, and supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia. We report the unusual case of a 59-year-old man who presented with new-onset symptomatic sinus pauses one month after hiking in upstate New York. To our knowledge, this is the first case report from North America that describes the relationship between symptomatic sinus pause and Lyme carditis. PMID:26175640

  3. Septic Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arian, Mahdieh; Kamali, Azadeh; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh; Arashnia, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is a rare condition that can result in high mortality and morbidity rates if not treated immediately. CST may be aseptic or septic. Less common primary sites of infection include the tonsils, soft palate, middle ear, and orbit. Reported cases of middle ear infection are very rare, and response to treatment is poor. Case Presentation The present study is a case report of acute otitis media which led to septic cavernous sinus thrombosis in a 56-year-old woman in Bojnord city, North Khorasan, Iran. Conclusions Findings of laboratory tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Clinical-based medical care led to successful management of the patient with broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics that prevented serious complications. PMID:27781123

  4. [Invasive maxilar sinusitis by Rhizopus oryzae].

    PubMed

    Perea, S; del Palacio, A; Gil, R; de la Serna, J; Mata, R; Arribi, A

    1997-12-01

    We herein present a diabetic with non Hodgkin lymphoma patient that had been treated with steroids and developed fungal invasive sinusitis. The patient had intensive facial pain that did not respond to antibiotics and on clinical inspection had a necrotic lesion on right nasal area. A smear and biopsy tissue showed broad non septate hyphae and on cultures Rhizopus oryzae was isolated. There was an unfavorable outcome, and the patient died even though liposomal Amphotericin B was administered and surgical treatment was performed.

  5. Impact of tumour volume on prediction of progression-free survival in sinonasal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hennersdorf, Florian; Mauz, Paul-Stefan; Adam, Patrick; Welz, Stefan; Sievert, Anne; Ernemann, Ulrike; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to analyse potential prognostic factors, with emphasis on tumour volume, in determining progression free survival (PFS) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses. Patients and methods Retrospective analysis of 106 patients with primary sinonasal malignancies treated and followed-up between March 2006 and October 2012. Possible predictive parameters for PFS were entered into univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Kaplan-Meier curve analysis included age, sex, baseline tumour volume (based on MR imaging), histology type, TNM stage and prognostic groups according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) classification. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis concerning the predictive value of tumour volume for recurrence was also conducted. Results The main histological subgroup consisted of epithelial tumours (77%). The majority of the patients (68%) showed advanced tumour burden (AJCC stage III–IV). Lymph node involvement was present in 18 cases. The mean tumour volume was 26.6 ± 21.2 cm3. The median PFS for all patients was 24.9 months (range: 2.5–84.5 months). The ROC curve analysis for the tumour volume showed 58.1% sensitivity and 75.4% specificity for predicting recurrence. Tumour volume, AJCC staging, T- and N- stage were significant predictors in the univariate analysis. Positive lymph node status and tumour volume remained significant and independent predictors in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions Radiological tumour volume proofed to be a statistically reliable predictor of PFS. In the multivariate analysis, T-, N- and overall AJCC staging did not show significant prognostic value. PMID:26401135

  6. [Third cranial nerve palsy in sphenoid sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dores, Luís Almeida; Simão, Marco Alveirinho; Marques, Marta Canas; Dias, Éscar

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus disease is particular not only for its clinical presentation, as well as their complications. Although rare, these may present as cranial nerve deficits, so it is important to have a high index of suspicion and be familiar with its diagnosis and management. Symptoms are often nonspecific, but the most common are headache, changes in visual acuity and diplopia due to dysfunction of one or more ocular motor nerves. The authors report a case of a 59 years-old male, who was referred to the ENT emergency department with frontal headaches for one week which had progressively worsened and were associated, since the last 12 hours, with diplopia caused by left third cranial nerve palsy. Neurologic examination was normal aside from the left third cranial nerve palsy. Anterior and posterior rhinoscopy excluded the presence of nasal masses and purulent rhinorrhea. The CT scan revealed a soft tissue component and erosion of the roof of the left sphenoid sinus. Patient was admitted for intravenous antibiotics and steroids treatment without any benefit after 48 hours. He was submitted to endoscopic sinus surgery with resolution of the symptoms 10 days after surgery. The authors present this case for its rarity focusing on the importance of differential diagnosis in patients with headaches and cranial nerves palsies.

  7. Isolated Sphenoid Sinus Lesions: Experience with a Few Rare Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Sadashiva, Nishanth; Nandeesh, B. N.; Shukla, Dhaval; Bhat, Dhananjaya; Somanna, Sampath; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The sphenoid sinus is often neglected because of its difficult access. The deep position of the sphenoid sinus hinders early diagnosis of pathologies in that location. Delayed diagnosis can cause serious complications due to proximity to many important structures. Objectives: The aim of this study is to demonstrate different pathologies which can affect the sphenoid sinus and elucidate the findings. Methods: Cases of isolated sphenoid sinus lesions encountered in the neurosurgical setting which had rare pathologies are discussed. Pathologies such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis, solitary plasmacytoma, chordoma, pituitary adenoma, leiomyosarcoma, fungal infection, and mucocele which appeared primarily in sphenoid sinus are discussed along with their imaging features and pathological findings. Conclusion: Multitude of different pathologies can occur in sphenoid sinus. Detailed preoperative imaging is very helpful, but transnasal biopsy and histological study are required often for definitive diagnosis. The possible advantages of early diagnosis before spread of pathology for prognosis cannot be overemphasized. PMID:28149092

  8. Differential diagnosis of allergic rhinitis and sinusitis an expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Creider, R.D.; Sundar Singh, P.S.

    1996-12-31

    Nasal congestion is a common problem for many people. It is a symptom of chronic sinusitis and also a characteristic of allergic rhinitis. Individuals frequently confuse sinusitis and allergic rhinitis. The expert system described below will diagnose the problem to be either rhinitis or sinusitis. In this paper we describe the expert system, the need for such an expert system and the process of developing the system.

  9. Pleomorphic adenoma of the frontal sinus masquerading as a mucocele.

    PubMed

    Chew, Yok Kuan; Brito-Mutunayagam, Sushil; Chong, Aun Wee; Prepageran, Narayanan; Chandran, Patricia Ann; Khairuzzana, Baharudin; Lingham, Omkara Rubini

    2015-12-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common type of benign salivary gland tumor. It can also be found in the larynx, ear, neck, and nasal septum. It is rarely found in the maxillary sinus, and it has never been reported in the frontal sinus. We report a case of pleomorphic adenoma of the frontal sinus that masqueraded as a mucocele. We discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this patient, and we review the literature.

  10. [Use of bone blocks by sinus floor lifting].

    PubMed

    Nazarian, D N; Karaian, A S; Zakharov, G K; Seniuk, A N; Aliev, S E

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents clinical cases illustrating two sinus floor lifting technique performed for dental implant placement in areas with maxillary sinus floor atrophy: bone block fixation for vertical augmentation (used for immediate implant placement by sinus floor atrophy to 1 mm thickness) and perforation closure. Sinus floor perforations wider than 5 mm were repaired by mandible bone graft providing the possibility of immediate implantation. Bone block was fixed between cortical layers of the maxilla with no internal fixation. Free bone blocks provide additional primary stability of dental implants.

  11. Coronary Flow Impacts Aortic Leaflet Mechanics and Aortic Sinus Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon L; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical stresses on aortic valve leaflets are well-known mediators for initiating processes leading to calcific aortic valve disease. Given that non-coronary leaflets calcify first, it may be hypothesized that coronary flow originating from the ostia significantly influences aortic leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics. High resolution time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to map the spatiotemporal characteristics of aortic sinus blood flow and leaflet motion with and without physiological coronary flow in a well-controlled in vitro setup. The in vitro setup consists of a porcine aortic valve mounted in a physiological aorta sinus chamber with dynamically controlled coronary resistance to emulate physiological coronary flow. Results were analyzed using qualitative streak plots illustrating the spatiotemporal complexity of blood flow patterns, and quantitative velocity vector and shear stress contour plots to show differences in the mechanical environments between the coronary and non-coronary sinuses. It is shown that the presence of coronary flow pulls the classical sinus vorticity deeper into the sinus and increases flow velocity near the leaflet base. This creates a beneficial increase in shear stress and washout near the leaflet that is not seen in the non-coronary sinus. Further, leaflet opens approximately 10% farther into the sinus with coronary flow case indicating superior valve opening area. The presence of coronary flow significantly improves leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics in a manner that would reduce low wall shear stress conditions while improving washout at the base of the leaflet.

  12. Maxillary sinus atelectasis in a wild born gibbon (Hylobates moloch).

    PubMed

    Koppe, Thomas; Röhrer-Ertl, Olav; Breier, Silvana; Wallner, Claus-Peter

    2006-04-01

    In a mixed sex sample of ten adult gibbon (Hylobates moloch) skulls, one cranium of a male with maxillary sinus atelectasis of the left side was identified. While external inspection revealed a slight drop of the left orbital floor, serial coronal computer tomography (CT) scans show characteristic changes of the left maxillary sinus and its surrounding structures. In addition to the sunken orbital floor, radiological features of the specimen include an inward bowing of the medial sinus wall, sinus opacification, and a reduction in maxillary sinus size to a slit-like cavity, which suggest a diagnosis of silent sinus syndrome. This report is the first, to our knowledge, of maxillary sinus atelectasis in a non-human primate. This finding is valuable for the understanding of the pathogenesis and etiology of maxillary sinus atelectasis. At the same time, however, paleoanthropologists and primatologists may refer to this information when dealing with the interpretation of maxillary sinus pneumatization of partially broken archaeological and fossil skulls.

  13. Paranasal bone: the prime factor affecting the decision to use transsinus vs zygomatic implants for biomechanical support for immediate function in maxillary dental implant reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ole T; Adams, Mark W; Smith, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Paranasal bone affects the decision-making process for placement of implants for immediate function in the highly resorbed maxilla. The most important bone for apical fixation of implants in this setting is the lateral nasal bone mass. Maximum available bone mass found at the pyriform above the nasal fossa, designated M point, can most often engage two implants placed at 30-degree angles. The second most important area of paranasal bone mass is the subnasal bone of the premaxilla, which is required to engage an angled implant at the alveolar crest. However, only 4 to 5 mm in height is needed when implants are angled posterior to engage M point. The third most important paranasal bone site for implant fixation is the midline nasal crest extending upward to the vomer. This site, which is usually type 1/2 bone, can engage implants apically and provide enough fixation for immediate function even if implants are short. These anatomical bone sites enable placement of implants to obtain a 12- to 15-mm anterior-posterior spread, which is favorable for immediate function.

  14. Midfacial soft-tissue changes after mandibular setback surgery with or without paranasal augmentation: cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) volume superimposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Byung; Kim, Yong-Il; Hwang, Dae-Seok; Lee, Jae-Yeol

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this article is to compare the soft-tissue changes in the midfacial areas of patients who had undergone mandibular setback sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) with that of mandibular setback SSRO with paranasal augmentation. The subjects included 15 patients (group I), SSRO with paranasal augmentation and 20 patients (group II), SSRO alone. To evaluate the difference of the midfacial soft-tissue changes between groups, cone-beam computed tomography superimposition was utilized and the soft-tissue changes were measured both preoperatively and postoperatively by a 10 × 27 grid. In group I, the soft tissues were changed at the areas bounded superiorly by the infraorbital foramen, zygomatic eminence, posteriorly by the masseteric muscle and medially by the lateral aspect of the nose and following the nasolabial fold. In group II, the midfacial soft-tissue measurements were unchanged. This study may help clinicians to predict improvement in the midfacial region from mandibular setback SSRO with or without a paranasal augmentation procedure in class III deformities.

  15. Primary endoscopic management of the frontal sinus.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, F A; Javer, A R

    2001-02-01

    Surgical treatment of the frontal sinus continues to be an area of much interest and controversy. The complex anatomy and confined space of this region require the endoscopic surgeon to be knowledgeable and delicate to obtain a positive result. Proper instrumentation is crucial and continues to evolve over time. Postoperative endoscopic care is integral to the success of endoscopic frontal sinusotomy and the availability of proper office equipment to perform this care is critical. In most instances, the intranasal endoscopic approach can be accomplished successfully without the need for an external procedure.

  16. Calcium hydroxide paste in the maxillary sinus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fava, L R

    1993-09-01

    A case is reported in which a perforation of the sinus floor of the maxillary sinus occurred with extrusion of a calcium hydroxide paste during routine root canal treatment of a maxillary premolar. All clinical manifestations are described as well as the results of a follow-up evaluation.

  17. Primary pleural malignant mesothelioma with delayed metastasis to the piriform sinus: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Umit; Yigit, Ozgur; Aricigil, Mithat; Huq, Gulben

    2013-06-01

    Piriform sinus tumors are uncommon and silent lesions. Their prognosis is poor because these tumors are usually not detected until they have reached an advanced stage. Almost all piriform sinus cancers are primary squamous cell carcinomas; other primary and metastatic tumors of the hypopharynx are exceedingly rare. One of the rare tumors in the laryngopharyngeal area is sarcomatoid carcinoma, which is an unusual type of squamous cell carcinoma. Another uncommon malignant tumor that is histologically similar to sarcomatoid carcinoma is malignant mesothelioma, which is a rare form of lung carcinoma. The macroscopic appearance and histologic characteristics of sarcomatoid carcinoma and malignant mesothelioma are so similar that differentiation is usually achieved by immunohistochemical examination. To the best of our knowledge, no case of primary or metastatic laryngohypopharyngeal malignant mesothelioma has been previously reported in the literature. In this article, we describe a case of isolated malignant mesothelioma of the piriform sinus that resembled a sarcomatoid carcinoma in a 50-year-old man with a history of lung mesothelioma.

  18. [Current controversies in the treatment of frontal sinus fractures].

    PubMed

    Litschel, Ralph; Tasman, A-J

    2009-09-01

    The surgical treatment of frontal sinus fractures is foreshadowed by fears of late complications. Complications such as meningitis and mucoceles should be prevented by cranialization or obliteration of the frontal sinus. These procedures are still standard treatment despite of recent developments over the last two decades in endoscopic sinus surgery, in medical imaging and surgical instrumentation. Nowadays the role of cranialization and obliteration is challenged by refined endoscopic frontal sinus surgery techniques, the widely-used image-guided systems and the multiplanar high-resolution computed tomography along with new data about postoperative complications. This overview summarizes the current literature, taking into account the existing evidence in the treatment of frontal sinus fractures.

  19. [Cerebellar abscesses secondary to infection of an occipital dermal sinus].

    PubMed

    García Galera, A; Martínez León, M I; Pérez da Rosa, S; Ros López, B

    2013-09-01

    A dermal sinus is a congenital defect arising from a closure failure of the neural tube that results in different degrees of communication between the skin and the central nervous system. A dermal sinus can occur anywhere from the root of the nose to the conus medullaris, and the occipital location is the second most common. Dermal sinuses are often found in association with dermoid or epidermoid cysts and less frequently with teratomas. Patients with an occipital dermoid cyst associated with a dermal sinus can develop meningitis and/or abscesses as the first clinical manifestation of the disease due to the dermoid cyst itself becoming abscessed or to the formation of secondary abscesses; few cases of the formation of secondary abscesses have been reported. We present a case of a dermoid cyst associated with an infected dermal sinus and posterior development of cerebellar abscesses and hydrocephalus.

  20. Meta-analytic study of implant survival following sinus augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Barona-Dorado, Cristina; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Fernández-Cáliz, Fernando; Martínez-González, José-María

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate graft types used for maxillary sinus augmentation and review success rates of dental implants inserted in these areas, analyzing the graft materials used, implant surface types and the moment of implant placement. Study Design: A meta-analytic study reviewing articles on sinus augmentation published during the last ten years. Results: 3,975 implants placed in sinus augmentations (with bony windows) were registered, of which 3,749 implants survived, a survival rate of 94.3%. Conclusions: When performing sinus augmentation, bone substitute materials are just as effective as autologous bone, whether used alone or in combination with autologous bone. Implant surface treatments can have an important effect on implant survival and it would appear that roughened surfaces are the best option. When implants are inserted simultaneously to grafting, a higher failure rate can be expected. Key words: Sinus augmentation, bone implant, bone regeneration, dental implant. PMID:22157658

  1. Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Korkmazer, Bora; Kocak, Burak; Tureci, Ercan; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Carotid cavernous sinus fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Several classification schemes have described carotid cavernous sinus fistulas according to etiology, hemodynamic features, or the angiographic arterial architecture. Increased pressure within the cavernous sinus appears to be the main factor in pathophysiology. The clinical features are related to size, exact location, and duration of the fistula, adequacy and route of venous drainage and the presence of arterial/venous collaterals. Noninvasive imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, Doppler) is often used in the initial work-up of a possible carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Cerebral angiography is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis, classification, and planning of treatment for these lesions. The endovascular approach has evolved as the mainstay therapy for definitive treatment in situations including clinical emergencies. Conservative treatment, surgery and radiosurgery constitute other management options for these lesions. PMID:23671750

  2. Management of orbital complications of sinusitis in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kinis, Vefa; Ozbay, Musa; Bakir, Salih; Yorgancilar, Ediz; Gun, Ramazan; Akdag, Mehmet; Sahin, Muhammed; Topcu, Ismail

    2013-09-01

    The most common reason of orbital infections is sinusitis. Orbital complications of sinusitis are mostly seen in children. Loss of vision and intracranial infections are among the complications of sinusitis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is very important in the management of orbital complications. The orbital complication can be in the form of cellulitis or abscess. A retrospective review of 26 pediatric patients with orbital complications due to sinusitis was presented in this study. Of 26 patients, there were 13 cases of preseptal cellulitis, 2 cases of orbital cellulitis, and 11 cases of subperiosteal abscess. We grouped the preseptal and orbital cellulites in one category and the subperiosteal abscess in the other. All patients in the cellulitis group recovered by medical treatment. All the patients were treated by surgical drainage. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment method are vital for the treatment of orbital complications secondary to sinusitis.

  3. Ruptured aneurysms of sinuses of Valsalva

    PubMed Central

    Jugdutt, B. I.; Fraser, R. S.; Rossall, R. E.; Lee, S. J. K.

    1974-01-01

    At least one additional cardiac lesion was present in 18 consecutive patients with ruptured aneurysms of the sinuses of Valsalva who were investigated between 1956 and 1973 at the University of Alberta Hospital. Clinical diagnosis was made in 78% (14/18) of the patients. Confirmation at cardiac catheterization, operation or autopsy was obtained in all but one. The main sites of rupture were the right ventricle (seven cases), right atrium (five) and left ventricle (five). Fifty percent (9/18) are alive and well following prompt operative repair, an average of 8.2 years later (range, six months to 15 years). Replacement of the aortic valve was associated with a high mortality (50% early, 13% late, total 63%) which could be explained by the higher operative risk in this group of very ill patients. Eight patients (44.4%) had had bacterial endocarditis prior to presentation and this may have played a significant role in the rupture of the sinus of Valsalva aneurysm. ImagesFIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4278257

  4. Nasal nitric oxide in unilateral sinus disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Tseng, Hsiao-Jung; Huang, Chi-Che; Chang, Po-Hung; Chen, Yi-Wei; Lee, Ta-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Unilateral sinus disease (USD) can sometimes be difficult to accurately diagnose before surgery. The application of nasal nitric oxide (nNO) for USD diagnosis and its surgical outcome in USD has not been reported in the literature. We prospectively enrolled sixty-six USD patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery for fungal rhinosinusitis (n = 19), chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) without nasal polyps (n = 13), CRS with nasal polyps (n = 12) and sinonasal mass lesions (n = 22). nNO levels were measured preoperatively and at three and six months postoperatively. Correlations between nNO levels and potential clinical parameters, type of disease, disease severity, and disease-related quality of life (QOL) were assessed. Unlike bilateral CRS, in USD, nNO levels did not correlate with disease severity or postoperative QOL improvements. Except for fungus group, there were no differences in nNO levels between lesion and non-lesion sides in all the other groups. nNO levels on both sides were significantly elevated six months postoperatively in all groups. Fungal rhinosinusitis patients had the lowest preoperative nNO levels, and a cutoff of 239.3 ppb had the best sensitivity (79.0%) and specificity (87.2%) for preoperative diagnosis. While preoperative nNO levels cannot serve as an alternative marker for disease severity of USD, they were lower in fungal rhinosinusitis patients than in other USD patients and may be useful for more accurate diagnosis prior to surgery. PMID:28199369

  5. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Driskill, Brent R; Clenney, Timothy L; Gessler, Eric M

    2015-10-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a condition that has an allergic basis caused by exposure to fungi in the sinonasal tract leading to chronic inflammation. Despite standard treatment modalities, which typically include surgery and medical management of allergies, patients still have a high rate of recurrence. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been used as adjuvant treatment for AFS. Evidence exists to support the use of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) as a safe and efficacious method of treating allergies, but no studies have assessed the utility of SLIT in the management of allergic fungal sinusitis. A record review of cases of AFS that are currently or previously treated with sublingual immunotherapy from 2007 to 2011 was performed. Parameters of interest included serum IgE levels, changes in symptoms, Lund-McKay scores, decreased sensitization to fungal allergens associated with AFS, and serum IgE levels. Ten patients with diagnosed AFS were treated with SLIT. No adverse effects related to the use of SLIT therapy were identified. Decreases in subjective complaints, exam findings, Lund-McKay scores, and serum IgE levels were observed. Thus, sublingual immunotherapy appears to be a safe adjunct to the management of AFS that may improve patient outcomes.

  6. Simulating cell apoptosis induced sinus node dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kharche, Sanjay; Beling, John; Biktasheva, Irina V; Zhang, Henggui; Biktashev, Vadim N

    2013-01-01

    Sinus node dysfunction (SND) is correlated to the pacemaker sinoatrial node (SAN) cell apoptosis. This study explores the effect of such a dysfunctional SAN on electrical propagation into neighboring atrial tissue. The Fenton Karma model was extended to simulate mouse SAN and atrial cell action potentials. The cell models were incorporated into a 2D model consisting of a central SAN region surrounded by atrial tissue. The intercellular gap junctional coupling, as quantified by the diffusion constant, was estimated to give conduction speeds as observed in mouse atrial tissue. The size of mouse SAN pacemaking region was estimated using the 2D model. In multiple simulations, the effects of an increasing proportion of apoptotic pacemaker cells on atrial tissue pacing were simulated and quantified. The SAN size that gave a basal mouse atrial cycle length (ACL) of 295 ms was found to be 0.6 mm in radius. At low pacemaker cell apoptosis proportion, there was a drastic increase of ACL. At modest increase in the number of apoptotic cells, bradycardia was observed. The incidence of sinus arrest was also found to be high. When the number of apoptotic cells were 10% of the total number of pacemaking cells, all pacemaking was arrested. Phenomenological models have been developed to study mouse atrial electrophysiology and confirm experimental findings. The results show the significance of cell apoptosis as a major mechanism of SND.

  7. Near-infrared imaging of the sinuses: preliminary evaluation of a new technology for diagnosing maxillary sinusitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Usama; Cerussi, Albert; Dehdari, Reza; Nguyen, Quoc; Kelley, Timothy; Tromberg, Bruce; Wong, Brian

    2010-05-01

    Diagnosing sinusitis remains a challenge for primary care physicians. There is a need for a simple, office-based technique to aid in the diagnosis of sinusitis without the cost and radiation risk of conventional radiologic imaging. We designed a low-cost near-infrared (NIR) device to transilluminate the maxillary sinuses. The use of NIR light allows for greater interrogation of deep-tissue structures as compared to visible light. NIR imaging of 21 patients was performed and compared with computed tomography (CT) scans. Individual maxillary sinuses were scored on a scale from 0 to 2 based on their degree of aeration present on CT and similarly based on the NIR signal penetration into the maxilla on NIR images. Our results showed that air-filled and fluid/tissue-filled spaces can be reasonably distinguished by their differing NIR signal penetration patterns, with average NIR imaging scores for fluid-filled maxillary sinuses (0.93+/-0.78, n=29) significantly lower than those for normal maxillary sinuses (1.62+/-0.57, n=13) (p=0.003). NIR imaging of the sinuses is a simple, safe, and cost-effective modality that can potentially aid in the diagnosis of sinusitis. Long-term, significant device refinement and large clinical trials will be needed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of this technique.

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With High Risk Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-07

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  9. Isolated lateral sinus thrombosis presenting as cerebellar infarction in a patient with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Park, Kyung-Jae; Chung, Yong-Gu; Kang, Shin-Hyuk

    2013-07-01

    As a rare cerebrovascular disease, cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is caused by various conditions including trauma, infection, oral contraceptive, cancer and hematologic disorders. However, iron deficiency anemia is not a common cause for CVT in adult. Posterior fossa infarction following CVT is not well demonstrated because posterior fossa has abundant collateral vessels. Here, we report a case of a 55-year-old man who was admitted with complaints of headache, nausea, and mild dizziness. The patient was diagnosed with isolated lateral sinus thrombosis presenting as cerebellar infarction. Laboratory findings revealed normocytic normochromic anemia due to iron deficiency, and the patient's symptoms were improved after iron supplementation.

  10. [Origin of the common pulmonary vein, septation of the primary sinus venosus atrial situs and theory of the "sinus man"].

    PubMed

    Dor, X; Corone, P; Jonhson, E

    1987-04-01

    Situated at the entry to the heart, the sinus venosus regulates at an early stage the distribution of the veins. Originally symmetrical, it receives on either side an omphalomesenteric vein, a common cardinal vein (duct of Cuvieri, ductus cuvieri) and a common pulmonary vein. This symmetrical pattern disappears with the obliteration of the rough right pulmonary vein and the invagination of the left ductus cuvieri into the sinusal cavity. Thus, the pulmonary venous blood is kept on the left side and the systemic venous blood is transferred to the right side. This is the usual situs solitus arrangement. Situs inversus is the opposite arrangement. In situs ambiguus the original symmetry is preserved. A sufficiently early cauterization of the left wall of the sinus venosus prevents the left ductus cuvieri from invaginating and results in "absence of coronary sinus"; this arrangement, where part of the original symmetry is preserved, is in fact similar to situs ambiguus. The situs of the liver and stomach is thought not to be determined by these organs but imposed to them by the sinus venosus, more precisely by the invagination--or lack of invagination--of a ductus cuvieri. This would explain the concordance between their situs and that of the sinus venosus and atria. It would appear that two errors are frequently made: the common pulmonary vein is said to originate from the left atrium, whereas it originates from the sinus venosus and only belongs to the left atrium when the sinus is incorporated in the atrium; the transverse septation of the sinus is incorporated to a shift to the right of the left sinoatrial fold which separates the sinus from the primitive atrium. This fold is indeed displaced to the right, but it is more distal and corresponds, in fact, to the cephalic border of the left ductus cuvieri, and its shift is produced by the invagination of that duct.

  11. VX-970, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced HPV-Negative Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma at maxillary sinus: clinicopathologic data in a single Brazilian institution with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Marcello Roter M; Servato, João Paulo S; Cardoso, Sérgio Vitorino; de Faria, Paulo Rogério; Eisenberg, Ana Lúcia A; Dias, Fernando Luiz; Loyola, Adriano Mota

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma arising at maxillary sinus is a rare neoplasm, characterized by aggressive growth pattern and glooming prognosis. There are no studies describing specifically its epidemiology in the South America. The aim of the current paper is to characterize a Brazilian maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma sample and to compare such data with others worldwide relevant series. The records of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (1997-2006) were gathered and plotted. Additionally, an extensive literature review was carry out using electronic database (PUBMED/MEDLINE and LILACS) over a period of 54 years. A descriptive statistics and univariate survival test (log rank) were employed. Maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest malignancy of sinonasal epithelium found. It affected mainly mid-age white men and most of them were diagnosed at advanced stage. Surgery combined with radiotherapy was the most therapeutic modalities given. The overall mortality rate in our sample was of 65.5%. Overall 1-, 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57.9%, 44.8%, and 17.7%, respectively. Maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma is an aggressive tumor normally diagnosed at the advanced stage and most patients present an unfavorable prognosis and reduced survival rate. PMID:25674251

  13. Squamous cell carcinoma at maxillary sinus: clinicopathologic data in a single Brazilian institution with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marcello Roter M; Servato, João Paulo S; Cardoso, Sérgio Vitorino; de Faria, Paulo Rogério; Eisenberg, Ana Lúcia A; Dias, Fernando Luiz; Loyola, Adriano Mota

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma arising at maxillary sinus is a rare neoplasm, characterized by aggressive growth pattern and glooming prognosis. There are no studies describing specifically its epidemiology in the South America. The aim of the current paper is to characterize a Brazilian maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma sample and to compare such data with others worldwide relevant series. The records of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (1997-2006) were gathered and plotted. Additionally, an extensive literature review was carry out using electronic database (PUBMED/MEDLINE and LILACS) over a period of 54 years. A descriptive statistics and univariate survival test (log rank) were employed. Maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest malignancy of sinonasal epithelium found. It affected mainly mid-age white men and most of them were diagnosed at advanced stage. Surgery combined with radiotherapy was the most therapeutic modalities given. The overall mortality rate in our sample was of 65.5%. Overall 1-, 2- and 5-year survival rate was 57.9%, 44.8%, and 17.7%, respectively. Maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma is an aggressive tumor normally diagnosed at the advanced stage and most patients present an unfavorable prognosis and reduced survival rate.

  14. Clinical Study on the Etiology of Postthyroidectomy Skin Sinus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wuyuntu; Borkhuu, Oyungerel; Yang, Yun-Tian

    2017-01-01

    Background. Thyroidectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures worldwide. Despite technical advances and high experience of thyroidectomy of specialized centers, it is still burdened by a significant rate of postoperative complications. Among them, the skin sinus formation is an extremely rare postthyroidectomy complication. Here, we first report the incidence of the skin sinus formation after thyroidectomy to identify the causes for skin sinus formation after thyroidectomy and to discuss its prevention and treatment options. Methods. A retrospective analysis was carried out of patients who underwent excision operation of fistula for postthyroidectomy skin sinus formation. Data were retrieved from medical records department of the Affiliated Hospital of Inner Mongolia Medical University. Results. Of the 5,686 patients who underwent thyroid surgery, only 5 patients (0.088%) had developed skin sinus formation. All 5 patients successfully underwent complete excision of fistula. Conclusion. Infection, foreign body, thyroid surgery procedure, combined disease, and iatrogenic factors may be related with skin sinus formation after thyroidectomy. To reduce the recurrence of postoperative infections and sinus formation, intra- and postoperative compliance with aseptic processing, intraoperative use absorbable surgical suture/ligature, repeated irrigation and drainage, and postoperative administration of anti-inflammatory treatment are to be followed. PMID:28386584

  15. Abducens nerve palsy due to inferior petrosal sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Siddiqui, Junaid; Katirji, Bashar

    2017-02-24

    Isolated unilateral abducens nerve palsy is usually due to ischemia, trauma or neoplasm. Dorello's canal is the space between the petrous apex and superolateral portion of the clivus, bound superiorly by Gruber's ligament. The abducens nerve travels with inferior petrosal sinus (IPS) though the Dorello's canal before entering the cavernous sinus. A 31-year-old man presented with neck pain, and binocular horizontal diplopia, worse looking towards left and at distance. He had a history of intravenous drug abuse but no history of hypertension or diabetes. On examination, he had complete left 6th nerve palsy with normal fundi, pupils, and other cranial nerves. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia was detected with naïve tricuspid valve endocarditis and multiple septic emboli to lungs with infarcts. His cerebrospinal fluid was normal. MRI of the brain was normal. MRV of head and neck showed thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein, left sigmoid sinus and left inferior petrosal sinus with normal cavernous sinus and no evidence of mastoiditis. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics. He was not anticoagulated for fear of pulmonary hemorrhage from pulmonary infarcts. Although cerebral venous sinus thrombosis commonly presents with elevated intracranial pressure, isolated ipsilateral 6th nerve palsy from its compression in Dorello's canal due to thrombosis of the ipsilateral inferior petrosal sinus is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only two patients have been reported with isolated abducens palsy due to IPS thrombosis; one caused by septic emboli and the other developed it during IPS cortisol level sampling.

  16. CT features of alveolitis and sinusitis in horses.

    PubMed

    Henninger, Wolfgang; Frame, E Mairi; Willmann, Michael; Simhofer, Hubert; Malleczek, Dieter; Kneissl, Sibylle M; Mayrhofer, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    Sinusitis is a common disorder in horses and may result from trauma, dental diseases, or space-occupying lesions. Radiography can only provide a limited amount of information. Computed tomography (CT) has been documented as an alternative imaging method. Eighteen horses (mostly Warmblood) with signs of chronic sinusitis were examined preoperatively with CT to assist in diagnosis of the underlying cause. There was a group of common CT features in horses with dental disease and sinusitis. The first molar was the most frequently affected maxillary cheek tooth. Hypoattenuation of the cementum, destruction of the enamel, and filling of the infundibular cavity with gas were the most frequent CT findings associated with caries. Gas bubbles within the bulging root area or fragmentation of the root in combination with swelling of the adjacent sinus lining were the most important CT features of dental decay. CT findings associated with sinusitis included excessive thickening of the respiratory epithelium in the rostral maxillary sinus; the caudal maxillary sinus was less often involved. The infraorbital canal, the nasomaxillary duct, and the frontomaxillary aperture were usually involved. The maxillary bone, however, especially the facial crest, was involved in nearly every horse, being characterized by endosteal sclerosis, thickening, periosteal reaction, and deformation leading to facial swelling in chronic infections. CT images allowed identification of involvement of individual teeth more clearly to reveal the diseased one for treatment. Three-dimensional imaging allowed improved understanding of the extent and severity of the pathologic change.

  17. Near-infrared imaging for management of chronic maxillary sinusitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Joon S.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Kim, James; Ison, Sean; Wong, Brian; Cui, Haotian; Bhandarkar, Naveen

    2015-03-01

    Efficient management of chronic sinusitis remains a great challenge for primary care physicians. Unlike ENT specialists using Computed Tomography scans, they lack an affordable and safe method to accurately screen and monitor sinus diseases in primary care settings. Lack of evidence-based sinusitis management leads to frequent under-treatments and unnecessary over-treatments (i.e. antibiotics). Previously, we reported low-cost optical imaging designs for oral illumination and facial optical imaging setup. It exploits the sensitivity of NIR transmission intensity and their unique patterns to the sinus structures and presence of fluid/mucous-buildup within the sinus cavities. Using the improved NIR system, we have obtained NIR sinus images of 45 subjects with varying degrees of sinusitis symptoms. We made diagnoses of these patients based on two types of evidence: symptoms alone or NIR images along. These diagnostic results were then compared to the gold standard diagnosis using computed tomography through sensitivity and specificity analysis. Our results indicate that diagnosis of mere presence of sinusitis that is, distinguishing between healthy individuals vs. diseased individuals did not improve much when using NIR imaging compared to the diagnosis based on symptoms alone (69% in sensitivity, 75% specificity). However, use of NIR imaging improved the differential diagnosis between mild and severe diseases significantly as the sensitivity improved from 75% for using diagnosis based on symptoms alone up to 95% for using diagnosis based on NIR images. Reported results demonstrate great promise for using NIR imaging system for management of chronic sinusitis patients in primary care settings without resorting to CT.

  18. Bradycardia: sinus and AV node dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Cara N; Scheinman, Melvin M

    2015-09-01

    The surface electrocardiogram (ECG) holds many clues with regard to the etiology of bradycardia and site of atrioventricular (AV) block. Bedside maneuvers may prove helpful in cases of 2:1 AV block or situations where the data is not all concordant. Wenckebach conduction may occur in any region of the heart, and there are nonpathologic mimickers of Mobitz II AV block as well. The surface ECG may aid in the inference of etiology for better than expected or slowed rather than blocked AV conduction. Sinus node dysfunction may present in several forms and often accompanies other conduction system disease. On occasion invasive studies may be required to help elucidate the mechanism of bradycardia.

  19. Giant complex odontoma in maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Visioli, Adriano Rossini; de Oliveira e Silva, Cléverson; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present a rare case report of giant complex odontoma in the maxillary sinus, where the applied therapy included complete excision of the lesion with a conservative approach. Odontomas are also called benign growth abnormalities or hamartomas. They represent a more common type of odontogenic tumor and are related to various disorders such as bad dental placements, expansion, increased volumetric bone, and no eruption of permanent teeth. Usually they have an asymptomatic evolutionary course. The etiologic factors, although obscure, are related to local trauma, infection, and genetic factor. The structural composition of an odontoma consists of mature dental tissues. Odontomas can be differentiated according to their anatomical presentations: Compound odontoma-clusters of several denticles and complex odontoma-well defined tumefaction mass. The diagnosis can be performed by radiographic examination. PMID:26389051

  20. Aneurysm of the sinus of valsalva.

    PubMed

    Ott, David A

    2006-01-01

    Aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva (ASVs) are rare. They can be congenital or acquired through infection, trauma, or degenerative diseases. They frequently co-occur with ventricular septal defects, aortic valve dysfunction, or other cardiac abnormalities. Although unruptured ASVs are usually asymptomatic, ruptured ASVs often cause symptoms similar to those of heart failure and produce a continuous, mechanical-sounding murmur. Transsternal or transesophageal echocardiography is usually effective in detecting ASVs. Because symptomatic ASVs pose significant risks for the patient, and because the repair of asymptomatic ASVs generally produces excellent outcomes, surgery is indicated in most cases. The primary goals of surgical repair are to close the ASV securely, remove or obliterate the aneurysmal sac, and repair any associated defects. Operative mortality is generally low except in patients with concomitant bacterial endocarditis or other infections. Late events are uncommon and tend to be related to aortic valve prothesis or Marfan syndrome.

  1. Measurement of velocity of air flow in the sinus maxillaris.

    PubMed

    Müsebeck, K; Rosenberg, H

    1979-03-01

    Anemometry with the hot wire and hot film technique previously described, enables the rhinologist to record slow and rapidly changing air flow in the maxillary sinus. The advantages and disadvantages of this method are considered. Anemometry together with manometry may be designated sinumetry and used as a diagnostic procedure following sinuscopy in chronic maxillary sinus disease. The value of the function from velocity of time allows the estimation of flow-volume in the sinus. Furthermore, the method is useful to evaluate the optimal therapy to restore ventilation in the case of an obstructed ostium demonstrated before and after surgical opening in the inferior meatus.

  2. Effects of amiodarone on sinus node in man.

    PubMed Central

    Touboul, P; Atallah, G; Gressard, A; Kirkorian, G

    1979-01-01

    The effects of amiodarone on the sinuatrial node were studied in 24 patients after an intravenous injection of the drug (5 mg/kg). Sinuatrial function was assessed by rapid atrial pacing and premature atrial stimulation. Sinus cycle length did not change significantly, but the corrected sinus node recovery time was prolonged. While there was no significant change in sinuatrial conduction time, prolongation of the non-reset zone in 14 cases, as well as the abolition of the platesu in 2/24 patients, suggested that conduction of the atrial responses to the sinus node might have been depressed. PMID:518781

  3. Aplasia and hypoplasia of the maxillary sinus: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Jafari-Pozve, Nasim; Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Ataie-Khorasgani, Masoud; Jafari-Pozve, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinus aplasia and hypoplasia are rare conditions that can cause symptoms such as headaches and voice alteration. The majority of patients are asymptomatic, but these conditions must be noticed for importance of differential diagnosis such as infection and neoplasms. Conventional radiographs could not differentiate between inflammatory mucosal thickening, neoplasm, and hypoplasia of the sinus. Computed tomography (CT) and also cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are the proper modalities to detect these conditions. In the present study, CBCT findings of three cases with maxillary sinus hypoplasia and aplasia are reported. PMID:25426156

  4. MR imaging of cavernous sinus lesions: Pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Chandrashekhara, Sheragaru Hanumanthappa; Kumar, Atin; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The main purpose of this pictorial review is to highlight the important MR imaging findings of various conditions involving the cavernous sinus in addition to brief description of normal anatomy. The pathological conditions that can involve the cavernous sinus can be categorized into infective, inflammatory, granulomatous, vascular and neoplastic causes. Imaging, especially with MRI, plays an important role not only in detection but also in definition of disease extent and in characterization of the pathology. Currently, high-resolution MR images clearly show various components of cavernous sinus which help in making a proper diagnosis and thus appropriate further management.

  5. Prevalence of bony septa, antral pathology, and dimensions of the maxillary sinus from a sinus augmentation perspective: A retrospective cone-beam computed tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Elnaz; Al-Salman, Wesam; Jambhekar, Shantanu; Katechia, Bina; Almas, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Sinus elevation procedures have become a routine and reliable way to gain bone volume in the edentulous maxilla for dental implant placement. Presence of bony septations and pathology in the maxillary sinus often cause complications leading to graft or implant failure or both. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the prevalence of pathology, direction of the septa, and sinus width measured at 2 mm, 5 mm, and 10 mm from the sinus floor in maxillary sinuses using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods Seventy-two sinuses from 36 random preoperative CBCT scans referred for implant therapy were retrospectively evaluated for the number, prevalence, and direction of bony septations and presence of pathology. Width of the sinus was also measured at 2 mm, 5 mm, and 10 mm from the sinus floor to account for the amount of bone available for implant placement. Results Maxillary sinus septa were found in 59.7%. Presence of a single septum was noted in 20 sinuses (27.7%), followed by two septa in 17 sinuses. The most common direction of the septum was the transverse direction. Retention pseudocyst and mucosal thickening were the most commonly seen abnormality/pathology. Conclusion Based on the high prevalence of septa and sinus pathology in this sample, a preoperative CBCT scan might be helpful in minimizing complications during sinus augmentation procedures for dental implant therapy. PMID:27358818

  6. Osmotic self-expanding dilation technology for treatment of sinusitis: the Vent-Os sinus dilation system.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Peter; Hester, Jerome; Mandrusov, Evgenia

    2015-01-01

    The Vent-Os Sinus Dilation System is an osmotically driven device that provides a means to access the sinus space and to dilate the maxillary sinus ostia and associated spaces in adults for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Unlike balloon dilation devices that use rapid, high-pressure inflation, this self-expanding device is designed to gently and gradually open the maxillary ostia. The procedure can be safely and easily completed in-office with minimal anesthetics and analgesics on board. Clinical results support excellent patency and safety outcomes with the use of this product in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

  7. Sinusitis in children and adolescents with chronic or recurrent headache: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Senbil, Nesrin; Gürer, Y K Yavuz; Uner, Ciğdem; Barut, Yaşar

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of misdiagnosis of sinus headache in migraine and other primary headache types in the children and adolescents with chronic or recurrent headaches. Children with chronic or recurrent headaches (n = 310) were prospectively evaluated. Data collection for each patient included history of previously diagnosed sinusitis due to headache, and additional sinusitis complaints (such as fever, cough, nasal discharge, postnasal discharge) at the time of sinusitis diagnosis, and improvement of the headache following treatment of sinusitis. If sinus radiographs existed they were recorded. The study included 214 patients with complete data. One hundred and sixteen (54.2%) patients have been diagnosed as sinusitis previously and 25% of them had at least one additional complaint, while 75% of them had none. Sinusitis treatment had no effect on the headaches in 60.3% of the patients. Sinus graphy had been performed in 52.8%, and 50.4% of them were normal. The prevalence of sinus headache concomitant with primary headache, and only sinus headache was detected in 7 and 1%, respectively, in our study. Approximately 40% of the patients with migraine and 60% of the patients with tension-type headache had been misdiagnosed as "sinus headache". Children with chronic or recurrent headaches are frequently misdiagnosed as sinus headache and receive unnecessary sinusitis treatment and sinus graphy.

  8. Nasal Sinus Tract of Odontogenic Origin: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Sagar; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Divya; Sajjanhar, Isha; Goel, Kopal; Gupta, Vaibhav Sheel

    2015-01-01

    Extraoral sinus tract often poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician owing to its rare occurrence and absence of symptoms. The accurate diagnosis and comprehensive management are inevitable as the aetiology of such lesions is often masked and requires holistic approach. The present case report encompasses the management of an extraoral discharging sinus tract at the base of the right nostril in a chronic smoker. The lesion which was earlier diagnosed to be of nonodontogenic origin persisted even after erratic treatment modalities. Our investigations showed the aetiology of sinus tract to be odontogenic. Initially, a five-step program as recommended by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality was used for smoking cessation followed by root canal therapy (RCT) and surgical management of the sinus tract. The patient has been under stringent follow-up and no reoccurrence has been noted. PMID:26649208

  9. Environmental Risk Factors in Patients with Noninvasive Fungal Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Badr Eldin; El Sharnoubi, Mohammed M. K.; El-Sersy, Hesham A. A.; Mahmoud, Mohammed S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to try to determine the possible environmental risk factors for noninvasive fungal sinusitis in Egyptian patients. Methods. This is a prospective epidemiological case control study on the environmental risk factors of noninvasive fungal sinusitis. It included 60 patients and 100 age and sex matched controls. Results. There was a statistically significant relation between apartment floor, surface area, exposure to dust, exposure to cockroaches, poor air conditioning, and fungal sinusitis. Yet, no statistical significance was found between allergy related occupations, exposure to animals or plants, although their percentages were higher among cases, smoking, and urban or rural residence. Conclusion. We suggest that for patients with noninvasive fungal sinusitis a change in their living environment must be implied with better exposure to sunlight, larger well ventilated homes, proper cleaning of dust and cockroach extermination, and if possible the judicious use of air conditioners. PMID:27274885

  10. Extreme clinical presentations of venous stasis: coronary sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kachalia, Amit; Sideras, Panagiotis; Javaid, Mian; Muralidharan, Sethu; Stevens-Cohen, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    Sixty six year old male with history of heart failure was admitted for dysphagia, weight loss. CT scan chest revealed diffuse oesophageal wall thickening. Upper endoscopy, oesophagogram confirmed diagnosis of achalasia. TTE revealed severely reduced biventricular systolic function with LVEF 10%; PASP 75-80 mmHg. Parasternal long views showed dilated coronary sinus with a visible, mobile 2.0 cm thrombus. Pro-thrombotic workup was negative. Coronary sinus thrombosis has been identified as a rare complication to invasive cardiac procedures causing damage to coronary sinus endothelium and in hypercoagulable states.Typically acute thrombosis presents with chest pain, dynamic ECG changes, but chronic development does not present with ischaemic signs due to formation of efficient collateral circulation. We present a case report of stable primary coronary sinus thrombus incidentally diagnosed, secondary to chronic venous stasis in coronary circulation. Currently, there are no guidelines to assist physicians in long term management of such patients and thus warrants further investigations.

  11. A concha bullosa crusher for use in endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Woolford, T J; Jones, N S

    2000-03-01

    A concha bullosa may require surgical reduction to facilitate access to the middle meatus during endoscopic sinus surgery. Here we describe an original instrument which enables this procedure to be performed simply with minimal mucosal damage.

  12. Cavernous sinus syndrome secondary to intracranial lymphoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Guevar, Julien; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Peplinski, George; Helm, Jenny R; Penderis, Jacques

    2014-06-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome is characterised by internal and external ophthalmoplegia and sensory deficits over the head due to combined deficits of the three cranial nerves (CNs) responsible for the eye movements and pupil function (CN III, IV, VI) and at least one branch of the trigeminal nerve (CN V). It has rarely been described in cats and may occur secondarily to inflammatory, infectious or neoplastic lesions within the region of the cavernous sinus on the ventral aspect of the calvarium. This report describes the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings in a 14-year-old domestic shorthair cat with neurological deficits compatible with cavernous sinus syndrome caused by presumptive extranodal lymphoma. Treatment with chemotherapy resulted in clinical and imaging remission. Identification of the neurological deficits in cavernous sinus syndrome allows accurate neuroanatomical localisation in order to target diagnostic imaging studies.

  13. Sinus Trouble Can Lead to Depression, Lost Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_164035.html Sinus Trouble Can Lead to Depression, Lost Work For people with chronic nasal problems, ... or otherwise -- the severity of depressed mood and depression symptomatology was the predominant factor associated with how ...

  14. Evaluation of the microbiology of chronic ethmoid sinusitis.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, P W; Woodham, J D

    1991-01-01

    In a prospective study, patients with the diagnosis of chronic ethmoid sinusitis were evaluated microbiologically by using biopsy specimens of the ethmoid sinus mucosa. Microbiology cultures were performed on 94 specimens from 59 patients. Staphylococcus aureus and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae were the most frequent classical pathogenic bacteria isolated. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common overall isolates. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae were infrequent isolates. No anaerobes, viruses, or Chlamydia trachomatis organisms were identified. Results of this study showed organism isolation frequencies different from those found in other studies of chronic sinusitis reported in the literature. The predominance of S. aureus and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae could have an effect on the antimicrobial therapy for chronic ethmoid sinusitis. PMID:1774242

  15. [Venous sinuses of the dura mater of the bird brain].

    PubMed

    Krasnikov, Iu A

    1988-04-01

    By means of corrosive, injection and tracheoscopy methods venous formations of the brain have been studied in 19 species of birds--endemical for Far East--from 12 orders. Four types of the venous sinuses structure have been distinguished in the dura mater: the first type of the structure is specific for birds that live an inactive and quiet life (blue rock pigeon, Ussuric pheasant, Tetrastes bonasia, domestic hen). The second type of the sinus structure occurs in birds, that sharply change the speed and height of their flight (Otus bakkamoena). The most manifested changes in the sinus structure are noted in waterfowl and diving birds, that spend much time in flight, in dendrocolaptidae and in day predaceous birds; in them the longitudinal sinus forms a rhombus.

  16. [The maxillary sinus: evolution and function in aging].

    PubMed

    Dargaud, J; Cotton, F; Buttin, R; Morin, A

    2003-03-01

    The maxillary sinus, or Highmore's antrum, is located in the maxillary bone. The maxillary, above the buccal cavity, below the orbital cavity and outside the nasal fossa, is going to take a part in the formation of the three cavities which surround it. Although voluminous, it is consists of a light bone. This distinctive feature is essentially due to the fact that the maxillary has a cavity. The maxillary sinus occupies the upper 2/3s of this maxillary bone. It is the largest of the facial structure's cavities. Its volume is very variable, depending on the individual, the condition of their edentulousness and their age. We find small, average or large sinuses. This sinus communicates with the corresponding nasal fossa by a canal. It opens at the level of the nasofrontalis duct by a meatic ostium, an ostium located at the top of the meatus nasi medius, i.e. under the floor of the sinus. This highly positioned drainage location easily explains the problems that sinus pathologies can come up against. The sinus is lined with a mucous membrane and we can point out that in the normal condition this mucous membrane adheres weakly to the bone. It is more or less thick as a function of the pathologies to which the sinus has been subjected, or even as a function of the geographical location where the individual lives. The imaging of this sinus as a function of age is not obvious due to the fact that it is invisible throughout embryonic and foetal development, and that it only becomes visible to X-rays relatively late, at about 6 years old. Its role is important at the level of the growth of the facial structure because it is always easier to have growth around cavities. It also has a mechanical role concerning the transmission of shockwaves during traumas. In old individuals, due to the condition of the edentulousness, the volume of the sinus is larger; in fact one can note the resorption of the alveolar bone. The maxillary sinus is a cavity which plays a very important role

  17. Ectopic ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma of the sphenoid sinus: case report of endoscopic endonasal resection and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Justin; Lucas, Joshua; Commins, Deborah; Lerner, Olga; Lerner, Alexander; Carmichael, John D; Zada, Gabriel

    2015-02-01

    from 16 to 76 years, and there were 15 women and 4 men. The mean and median diameters of the resected sphenoid masses were 13.9 and 8 mm, respectively, with a range of 3-55 mm. Seven were microadenomas (< 1 cm). Fifteen of the 19 cases reported serum ACTH and morning cortisol levels, the means of which were 106.7 pg/ml and 32.5 μg/dl, respectively. Gross-total tumor resection was achieved in all patients except one, and in all of them durable hormonal remission of Cushing syndrome was achieved (mean follow-up time 20 months). Ectopic pituitary adenomas are rare but important causes of Cushing syndrome and related endocrinopathies, particularly because of the rapid onset and severity of symptoms with atypical presentation. Ectopic pituitary adenomas, especially those in the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, or paranasal sinuses, are easily misidentified. Any patient presenting with signs and symptoms of Cushing syndrome without any obvious pituitary adenoma or other sources of hypercortisolemia should be thoroughly screened for an ectopic adenoma. However, as with the case presented here, the coincident existence of a sellar mass should not preclude the possibility of an ectopic source. There should be a high degree of clinical suspicion for any mass in the general area surrounding the sella when evaluating Cushing syndrome.

  18. Pediatric Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Andrea; England, Jasmin; Gausche-Hill, Marianne

    2015-11-01

    Acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS) is a common complication of a simple upper respiratory infection. Acute bacterial sinusitis and an upper respiratory infection, however, have different management plans. This article will help clinicians establish when a diagnosis of ABS can be made based on the latest guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Also covered will be the pathophysiology of ABS, the role of diagnostic imaging, the recognition of complications of ABS, and treatment options.

  19. Chronic invasive fungal sinusitis associated with intranasal drug use.

    PubMed

    Pekala, Kelly R; Clavenna, Matthew J; Shockley, Ross; Weiss, Vivian L; Turner, Justin H

    2015-12-01

    Chronic invasive fungal sinusitis (CIFS) is a rare but potentially aggressive form of invasive fungal disease that occurs in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of CIFS in an otherwise healthy young adult associated with intranasal illicit drug abuse. The patient presented with nonhealing nasal septal and palatal perforations. Biopsy demonstrated invasive Aspergillus flavus requiring surgical debridement and extended intravenous antifungal therapy. Tissue necrosis and ulceration related to intranasal drug use should be recognized as a potential risk factor for invasive fungal sinusitis.

  20. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano; Alves da Silva, Ricardo Henrique

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects.

  1. [Permanent idiopathic sinus tachycardia in pregnancy. Description of a case].

    PubMed

    Proclemer, A; Feruglio, G A

    1988-04-01

    A 35 year old primigravida presented a rare arrhythmia defined as persistent idiopathic sinus tachycardia, which appeared strongly symptomatic during the first weeks of pregnancy. Based on electrophysiological evaluation and pharmacological tests, we retained that the pathogenetic mechanism was due to enhanced automaticity in the sinus node, or in a near "atrial ectopic focus", as a result of a localized autonomic dysfunction. The maternal-foetal prognosis resulted extremely favorable thanks to antiarrhythmic drug association during the last six months of pregnancy.

  2. Sick sinus syndrome as a complication of mediastinal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjola-Sintonen, S.; Toetterman, K.J.K.; Kupari, M. )

    1990-06-01

    A 33-year-old man who had received mediastinal radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease 12 years earlier developed a symptomatic sick sinus syndrome requiring the implantation of a permanent pacemaker. The sick sinus syndrome and a finding of an occult constrictive pericarditis were considered to be due to the previous mediastinal irradiation. A ventricular pacemaker was chosen because mediastinal radiotherapy also increases the risk of developing atrioventricular conduction defects.

  3. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano

    2016-01-01

    Absract The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects. PMID:27847394

  4. Is silent sinusitis a cause of chronic urticaria in children?

    PubMed

    Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Sangacharoenkit, Preeda; Pongpreuksa, Sureerat; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Vichyanond, Pakit

    2009-01-01

    The etiologies of chronic urticaria (CU) comprise a wide variety of disorders including chronic infections. The association of sinusitis and CU is controversial due to the lack of a control group. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of silent sinusitis as a cause of CU in children. A sinus X-ray (SXR) was performed in 107 children with CU. SXR abnormalities were found in 52.3% of the patients. Nine patients (8.4%) had symptoms of sinusitis and were treated with amoxicillin/clavulanate. Five of these patients (55.6%) had CU remission. Forty-seven patients (43.9%) who had an abnormal SXR without sinusitis symptoms were randomized into treated (23 patients) and control (24 patients) groups. Eighteen patients (78.3%) in the treated group and 15 patients (62.5%) in the control group had CU remission (p = 0.24). These data did not support a causal relationship of sinusitis and CU in children.

  5. Sinusitis in people living in the medieval ages.

    PubMed

    Teul, Iwona; Lorkowski, Jacek; Lorkiewicz, Wieslaw; Nowakowski, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Breathing vitally serves body homeostasis. The prevalence of upper airway infections is often taken as an indicator of overall health status of a population living at a given time. In the present study we examined the unearthed remains of skulls from the XIII-XV century inhabitants searching for signs of maxillary sinusitis. Maxillary sinuses of the skulls of 92 individuals were inspected macroscopically and, if necessary, endoscopically. Osseous changes, including the pitting and abnormal spicule formation were present in 69 cases (75.0 %). It was found that, overall, dental infection was a major cause of maxillary sinusitis (18.8 %). Severe bone changes were observed in the adults' skulls, but were also present in the sinus walls of children's skulls. Post-inflammatory changes were manifest as remodeling and damage to the sinus walls. The results indicate that both children and adults of the Middle Ages suffered from chronic sinusitis. These observations confirm that the climate, environment, and lifestyle of the medieval populations contributed to the morbidity of the upper respiratory tract.

  6. Revision endoscopic sinus surgery: the Thomas Jefferson University experience.

    PubMed

    Moses, R L; Cornetta, A; Atkins, J P; Roth, M; Rosen, M R; Keane, W M

    1998-03-01

    Since its introduction, functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) has demonstrated success rates of 76% to 98%. A small group of the patients in whom initial FESS and optimal medical therapy fail require revision endoscopic sinus surgery (RESS). This group has recently been studied by several authors, and we have evaluated a group of 90 RESS patients selected from 753 consecutive primary FESS patients. Patients were followed for a mean of 22.8 months. Extent of disease, history of polyps, allergy, previous traditional endonasal sinus surgery, male gender, chronic steroid use, and the presence of a deviated septum all appeared to adversely affect RESS outcome. The surgeon's knowledge of the sinus anatomy is critical, especially in revision sinus cases in which landmarks are distorted or absent. In our review, RESS was associated with a 1% major complication rate and was successful in 67% of patients. Computer-assisted endoscopic sinus surgery integrates preoperative imaging with realtime endoscopic visualization, augments the surgeon's knowledge of anatomy, and helps to minimize patient risk.

  7. Role of Anatomic variations of Uncinate Process in Frontal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mohit; Tyagi, Sushant

    2016-12-01

    The osteomeatal complex plays an important role in the development of Chronic rhinosinusitis. The ethmoidal infundibulum is bordered medially by the uncinate process, and the anatomic relationship between the ethmoidal infundibulum and the frontal recess may depend upon the types of attachment of the uncinate process. The osteomeatal complex is the main area targeted in chronic rhinosinusitis and within it uncinate process is the first anatomical structure encountered. The aim of this study was to evaluate the types of attachment of the uncinate process and its implications in the development of sinus inflammation. The significance of anatomical variations of uncinate process in chronic sinusitis were evaluated. A prospective CT scan study on 64 patients of chronic sinusitis (128 uncinate processes) was done. The results were tabulated and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science 16.0. Type I superior attachment of uncinate process into the lamina papyracea was the most common variety in all ages and both sexes and a statistically significant association between Type 1 Uncinate process and frontal sinusitis was found. (P < 0.05). The superior attachment of uncinate process alters the frontal sinus drainage and causes the frontal sinusitis.

  8. Effect of sinus membrane perforation on dental implant integration: a retrospective study on 128 patients.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eric; Kraut, Richard A

    2011-02-01

    A common complication of sinus augmentation is perforation of the sinus membrane during augmentation and/or implant placement. This retrospective study examines the effect of sinus membrane perforation with regard to graft survival and implant integration. A total of 175 sinuses were augmented with 115 of the membranes being reported intact at the time of surgery. A total of three infections occurred in patients who sustained perforated sinuses and one infection occurred in a patient who had an intact sinus. All four infections resolved after culture sensitivity and placement of the patient on an appropriate antibiotic for 10 days. Of 438 dental implants placed in the augmented sinuses, five implants failed, four of which were associated with perforated sinuses and and which was not associated with a perforated grafted sinus.

  9. Historical and clinical features of 200 cases of equine sinus disease.

    PubMed

    Dixon, P M; Parkin, T D; Collins, N; Hawkes, C; Townsend, N B; Fisher, G; Ealey, R; Barakzai, S Z

    2011-10-22

    The historical and clinical findings in 200 referred cases of equine sinus disease were reviewed retrospectively. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to detect significant differences in historical or clinical features between various categories of sinus disease. The causes of sinus disease were classified as subacute primary (less than two months duration) (n=52), chronic primary (more than two months duration) (n=37), dental (n=40), sinus cyst (n=26), traumatic (n=13) or mycotic sinusitis (n=7), sinus neoplasia (n=10), dental-related oromaxillary fistula (n=8) and intrasinus progressive ethmoid haematoma (n=7). The majority of sinus disorders were of chronic duration at the time of referral and most (including 97 per cent of chronic primary sinusitis cases) had not responded to previous antibiotic therapy and/or sinus lavage in some cases. Clinical signs included unilateral nasal discharge in most cases, including purulent or mucopurulent discharge in all horses with primary, dental and mycotic sinusitis. Haemorrhagic nasal discharge was a feature of traumatic sinusitis and intrasinus progressive ethmoid haematomas. Firm facial swellings and nasal airflow obstruction were features of sinus cysts and neoplasms. Ipsilateral lymphadenitis was a more prominent feature of sinus disease with active infections such as primary, dental or mycotic sinusitis.

  10. Leukotriene B4 levels in rabbit maxillary sinusitis: limitations of the current model.

    PubMed

    Hurley, D B; Smith, G S; Vogler, G A; Desponde, Y; Citardi, M J

    2001-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the rabbit model for sinusitis has been widely used for experimental studies on sinusitis; however, the clinical relevance of these experimental data has been questioned. To elucidate the role of leukotrienes in the pathogenesis of sinusitis, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) levels were determined in acute Streptococcus pneumoniae sinusitis in this model. The rabbit model for acute maxillary sinusitis was utilized. Briefly, the right maxillary ostium of each New Zealand white rabbit was occluded with cyanoacrylate under general anesthesia. Twenty-four hours after occlusion, the occluded sinus received an inoculation of 10(8) Streptococcus pneumoniae (ATCC 10813) or a sham inoculation of saline alone. Rabbits were then sacrificed one week later, and the maxillary sinus mucosae were harvested. Leukotriene B4 levels were determined by ELISA assay. LTB4 levels in the sinuses inoculated with bacteria tended to be higher; however, statistical analysis did not reveal significant differences between the experimental and control groups. It is possible to reliably assess leukotriene B4 levels in this model of sinusitis. Although the data suggest a trend for elevated LTB4 levels, statistical analysis did not support this conclusion. The study also demonstrated significant limitations in the current rabbit model for sinusitis; that is, the standard human sinus bacterial pathogens are minimally pathogenic in rabbit sinuses and the small size of the sinus limits the material available for assay. Further modifications of the model are necessary. After such adjustments, the role of leukotrienes in sinusitis may be further explored.

  11. Sinus node dysfunction during long-term lithium treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenqvist, M; Bergfeldt, L; Aili, H; Mathé, A A

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE--Lithium has occasionally been reported to cause symptomatic sinus node bradyarrhythmias. The prevalence and mechanism of these arrhythmias during long-term treatment are unknown. The aims of this study were (a) to evaluate the systemic effects of lithium treatment on cardiac conduction in individuals who were free from cardiovascular disorders; (b) to assess the prevalence of lithium treatment in a group of patients with pacemakers; and (c) to evaluate the interaction between the parasympathetic limb of the autonomous nervous system and the sinus node cells during long-term lithium treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS--45 patients who had been treated with lithium for > 12 months were investigated in a long-term electrocardiography study. Only patients without cardiovascular disease, or concomitant chronotropic medication, or metabolic disorders known to cause rhythm disturbances were included. An age-stratified population was used as a reference group. 21 patients also underwent analysis of carotid sinus pressure and sinus cycle length before and after atropine to clarify whether neural mechanisms were involved. The prevalence of lithium treated patients was determined in 650 patients with pacemakers. RESULTS--(a) Signs of moderate sinus node dysfunction (sinus arrest > 1.5 s, minimum heart rate < 50 beats/min) were found in 56% and 78% respectively in the lithium-treated group compared with 30% and 30% respectively in the reference group (p < 0.01). Severe sinus node dysfunction was equally common in both groups. (b) The prevalence of chronic lithium treatment in the pacemaker population was 0.46%. (c) Sinus cycle variations were abnormal in the basal state in three (14%) patients and in 11 (52%) patients after atropine despite signs of intact and normal parasympathetic innervation. CONCLUSIONS--Depressed sinus node function was significantly more common in a lithium-treated population than in an age-stratified reference group. Clinically

  12. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors and Liver or Kidney Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Subependymoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Esophageal Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer

  13. Dimensions, septation, and pattern of pneumatization of the sphenoidal sinus.

    PubMed

    Idowu, O E; Balogun, B O; Okoli, C A

    2009-11-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach (EEA) to treat sellar, parasellar, and suprasellar tumours continues to gain increased significance. Due to the close proximity of the sphenoid sinus to the carotid artery and the optic canal, it is very important for surgeons to know the anatomical features and variations of the sphenoid sinus as relevant to EEA. A prospective study of the sphenoid sinus morphology was carried out on the cranial tomographic (CT) scan images of 60 Nigerian adult patients. The CTs were reviewed regarding the different anatomical variations of the sphenoid sinus: dimensions, septation, and pattern of pneumatisation. There were 37 males and 23 females. The patients' ages ranged from 18 years to 85 years, with a mean of 47.2 years. There was a main single intersphenoid septum in most patients (95%). The insertion of the septum was usually to the right posteriorly (38%) and in the midline anterior (65%). Although there is usually a main septum, the septa present were multiple in 29 of the sinuses studied. There was no gender difference with respect to the attachment of the main sphenoid sinus septum. The sphenoid anterior, posterior, and transverse dimensions were not significantly dependent on age, but they were longer in males than in females. Sellar pneumatization was present in the majority of the patients (83%), with 4 patients having postsellar pneumatization (6.7%) and 3 patients having presellar pneumatization (5%). There were no cases with conchal pneumatization or lateral pneumatization of the greater wing of the sphenoid. The present study provides anatomical information about the sphenoid sinus dimensions morphology that is essential for avoiding complications in performing an endoscopic sphenoidotomy.

  14. Strategies for Diagnosing and Treating Suspected Acute Bacterial Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Ethan M; Zucker, Deborah R; Engels, Eric A; Wong, John B; Williams, John W; Lau, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Symptoms suggestive of acute bacterial sinusitis are common. Available diagnostic and treatment options generate substantial costs with uncertain benefits. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of alternative management strategies to identify the optimal approach. DESIGN For such patients, we created a Markov model to examine four strategies: 1) no antibiotic treatment; 2) empirical antibiotic treatment; 3) clinical criteria-guided treatment; and 4) radiography-guided treatment. The model simulated a 14-day course of illness, included sinusitis prevalence, antibiotic side effects, sinusitis complications, direct and indirect costs, and symptom severity. Strategies costing less than $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year gained were considered “cost-effective.” MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS For mild or moderate disease, basing antibiotic treatment on clinical criteria was cost-effective in clinical settings where sinusitis prevalence is within the range of 15% to 93% or 3% to 63%, respectively. For severe disease, or to prevent sinusitis or antibiotic side effect symptoms, use of clinical criteria was cost-effective in settings with lower prevalence (below 51% or 44%, respectively); empirical antibiotics was cost-effective with higher prevalence. Sinus radiography-guided treatment was never cost-effective for initial treatment. CONCLUSIONS Use of a simple set of clinical criteria to guide treatment is a cost-effective strategy in most clinical settings. Empirical antibiotics are cost-effective in certain settings; however, their use results in many unnecessary prescriptions. If this resulted in increased antibiotic resistance, costs would substantially rise and efficacy would fall. Newer, expensive antibiotics are of limited value. Additional testing is not cost-effective. Further studies are needed to find an accurate, low-cost diagnostic test for acute bacterial sinusitis. PMID:11679039

  15. Definitive Radiotherapy for T1-T2 Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Pyriform Sinus

    SciTech Connect

    Rabbani, Anna; Amdur, Robert J.; Mancuso, Anthony A.; Werning, John W.; Kirwan, Jessica; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term results after definitive radiotherapy (RT) for T1-T2 pyriform sinus squamous cell carcinoma. Patients and Methods: The data from 123 patients with T1-T2 pyriform sinus squamous cell carcinoma treated with RT with or without neck dissection between November 1964 and June 2003 were analyzed. The median follow-up for all patients was 3.2 years, and the median follow-up for living patients was 10.7 years. Results: The 5-year local control, locoregional control, freedom from distant metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rate was 85%, 70%, 75%, 61%, and 35%, respectively. The ultimate local control rate, including successful salvage of RT failure, for T1 and T2 cancer patients was 96% and 94%, respectively. The overall local control rate with a functional larynx was 83%. Pretreatment computed tomography tumor volume data were available for 55 patients. The median computed tomography tumor volume was 4.2 cm{sup 3} (range, 0-22.4). Local control was worse for patients with a tumor volume >6.5 cm{sup 3} compared with those with a smaller tumor volume. Of the 123 patients, 16% developed moderate to severe acute (2%), late (9%), or postoperative (5%) complications. Conclusions: Local control with larynx preservation after definitive RT for T1-T2 pyriform sinus squamous cell carcinoma likely results in local control and survival similar to that after total laryngectomy or larynx-conserving surgery. Two-thirds of our living patients retained a functional larynx.

  16. Cavernous sinus meningiomas: imaging and surgical strategy.

    PubMed

    Sindou, Marc; Nebbal, Mustapha; Guclu, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) meningiomas which are by definition those meningiomas which originate from the parasellar region are difficult skull base tumors to deal with. For deciding the most appropriate surgical strategy, surgeons need detailed preoperative neuroimaging. The vicinity of the tumor with the vital and highly functional neurovascular structures, tumor extensions into the basal cisterns and skull base structures, and the arterial vascularization and venous drainage pathways, as they shape operative strategy, are important preoperative data to take into account. Thin section CT scan with bone windows, 3D spiral CT reconstruction, MRI, MR angiography, and DSA performed with selective arteriography including late venous phases give those required detailed informations about the tumor and its relation with neurovascular and bony structures. The type of craniotomy and complementary osteotomy and the usefulness of an extradural anterior clinoidectomy with unroofing the optic canal can be decided from preoperative neuroimaging. Data collected also help in determining whether extensive exposure of the middle cranial fossa is necessary to ensure substantial devascularization of the tumor and whether proximal control of the internal carotid artery (ICA) at its intrapetrosal portion might be useful. Study of the capacity of blood supply of the Willis circle is wise for deciding the need and way of performing an extra-intracranial bypass together with tumor removal. Currently the concept of operating only the tumors with extracavernous extensions and to limit resection to only their extracavernous portions is the most accepted way of treating these tumors. It was that strategy that was adopted in the senior author's 220-patient series.Radiosurgery or stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy may complement surgery or can be only reserved for growing remnants.

  17. Asymptomatic sinus bradycardia following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Malik, Manish G; Franklin, Sona M; Whigham, Latrisha A; Castellanos, Andres; Fontaine, John M

    2014-03-15

    Approximately 121,000 bariatric surgical procedures are performed annually, and salutary effects include a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, risk factor modification, and improvement in sympathovagal tone. There are anecdotal accounts of unexplained sinus bradycardia (SB) after significant weight loss but no systematic studies have been conducted. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of incident SB, its timing, and association with weight loss, clinical characteristics, and predictors. We evaluated various clinical characteristics including resting heart rate, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), heart rate reserve (HRR), basal metabolic rate, and exercise regimen in 151 consecutive patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of SB. Twenty-five of 137 patients (18%) experienced postoperative SB. Patients with SB had significantly greater reduction in BMI than those without bradycardia (35 ± 9.6% and 25.7 ± 13%, respectively, p = 0.002). HRR was significantly greater in patients with SB (116 ± 14 beats/min) compared with those without bradycardia (105 ± 14 beats/min, p = 0.007). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds of developing SB were 1.96 and 1.91 and associated with the percent decrease in BMI (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 3.0, p = 0.002) or increase in HRR (95% confidence interval 1.28 to 2.85, p = 0.002), respectively. In conclusion, SB occurred 14 ± 11 months postoperatively and its predictors were the percent reduction in BMI or increase in HRR.

  18. Sinus Bradycardia in Habitual Cocaine Users.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Sona M; Thihalolipavan, Sudarone; Fontaine, John M

    2017-03-01

    Common physiological manifestations of cocaine are related to its adrenergic effects, due to inhibition of dopamine and norepinephrine uptake at the postsynaptic terminal. Few studies have documented bradycardia secondary to cocaine use, representing the antithesis of its adrenergic effects. We assessed the prevalence of sinus bradycardia (SB) in habitual cocaine users and postulated a mechanism for this effect. One hundred sixty-two patients with a history of cocaine use were analyzed and compared with age- and gender-matched controls. SB was defined as a rate of <60 beats/min and habitual cocaine use as 2 or more documented uses >30 days apart. Propensity score-matching analysis was applied to balance covariates between cocaine users and nonusers and reduce selection bias. Patients with a history of bradycardia, hypothyroidism, or concomitant beta-blocker use were excluded. Mean age of study patients was 44 ± 8 years. SB was observed in 43 of 162 (27%) cocaine users and in 9 of 149 (6%) nonusers (p = 0.0001). Propensity score-matching analysis matched 218 patients from both groups. Among matched patients SB was observed in 25 of 109 (23%) cocaine users and in 5 of 109 (5%) nonusers (p = 0.0001). Habitual cocaine use was an independent predictor of SB and associated with a sevenfold increase in the risk of SB (95% CI 2.52 to 19.74, p = 0.0002). In conclusion, habitual cocaine use is a strong predictor of SB and was unrelated to recency of use. A potential mechanism for SB may be related to cocaine-induced desensitization of the beta-adrenergic receptor secondary to continuous exposure. Symptomatic SB was not observed; thus, pacemaker therapy was not indicated.

  19. Electrical carotid sinus stimulation in treatment resistant arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Tank, Jens

    2012-12-24

    Treatment resistant arterial hypertension is commonly defined as blood pressure that remains above goal in spite of the concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents of different classes. The sympathetic nervous system promotes arterial hypertension and cardiovascular as well as renal damage, thus, providing a logical treatment target in these patients. Recent physiological studies suggest that baroreflex mechanisms contribute to long-term control of sympathetic activity and blood pressure providing an impetus for the development of electrical carotid sinus stimulators. The concept behind electrical stimulation of baroreceptors or baroreflex afferent nerves is that the stimulus is sensed by the brain as blood pressure increase. Then, baroreflex efferent structures are adjusted to counteract the perceived blood pressure increase. Electrical stimulators directly activating afferent baroreflex nerves were developed years earlier but failed for technical reasons. Recently, a novel implantable device was developed that produces an electrical field stimulation of the carotid sinus wall. Carefully conducted experiments in dogs provided important insight in mechanisms mediating the depressor response to electrical carotid sinus stimulation. Moreover, these studies showed that the treatment success may depend on the underlying pathophysiology of the hypertension. Clinical studies suggest that electrical carotid sinus stimulation attenuates sympathetic activation of vasculature, heart, and kidney while augmenting cardiac vagal regulation, thus lowering blood pressure. Yet, not all patients respond to treatment. Additional clinical trials are required. Patients equipped with an electrical carotid sinus stimulator provide a unique opportunity gaining insight in human baroreflex physiology.

  20. Chronic Maxillary Sinusitis Caused by Denture Lining Material.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Chie; Murakami, Kazuhiro; Matsusue, Yumiko; Horita, Satoshi; Sakagami, Go; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of chronic maxillary sinusitis caused by denture lining material entering through an oroantral fistula after tooth extraction. The patient was an 80-year-old female who visited us with a complaint of pus discharge from the right posterior maxilla. She had extraction of the upper right second molar and had her upper denture relined with silicone lining material. The patient noticed swelling of the right cheek and purulent rhinorrhea 20 days before her first visit to our clinic. Oral examination showed an oroantral fistula with a diameter of 3 mm in the posterior alveolar ridge of the right maxilla. Computed tomography revealed a hyperdense foreign body in the right maxillary sinus and thickening of the mucosal lining. Under diagnosis of maxillary sinusitis caused by a foreign body, endoscopic maxillary surgery was performed simultaneously with the removal of the foreign body. The foreign body removed was 12 × 6 mm in size, oval in shape, light pink in color, and compatible with silicone denture lining material. During the follow-up it was observed that the oroantral fistula closed spontaneously after the removal of the foreign body. The maxillary sinus was in a good shape without recurrence of sinusitis seven months after surgery.

  1. Hyperprolactinemia Secondary to Allergic Fungal Sinusitis Compressing the Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Chapurin, Nikita; Wang, Cynthia; Steinberg, David M.; Jang, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aim to describe the first case in the literature of allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) presenting with hyperprolactinemia due to compression of the pituitary gland. Case Presentation. A 37-year-old female presented with bilateral galactorrhea and occipital headaches of several weeks. Workup revealed elevated prolactin of 94.4, negative pregnancy test, and normal thyroid function. MRI and CT demonstrated a 5.0 × 2.7 × 2.5 cm heterogeneous expansile mass in the right sphenoid sinus with no pituitary adenoma as originally suspected. Patient was placed on cabergoline for symptomatic control until definitive treatment. Results. The patient underwent right endoscopic sphenoidotomy, which revealed nasal polyps and fungal debris in the sphenoid sinus, consistent with AFS. There was bony erosion of the sella and clivus. Pathology and microbiology were consistent with allergic fungal sinusitis caused by Curvularia species. Prolactin levels normalized four weeks after surgery with resolution of symptoms. Conclusion. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery alone was able to reverse the patient's pituitary dysfunction. To our knowledge, this is the first case of AFS presenting as hyperprolactinemia due to pituitary compression. PMID:26998375

  2. Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma of Ethmoid Sinus Recurring as an Orbital Mass

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Bahram; Ameli, Kambiz

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a primitive, malignant, round cell neoplasm derived from mesenchymal tissue that exhibits partial skeletal muscle differentiation. We describe a rare case of alveolar RMS of ethmoid sinus, recurring as an orbital mass. A 23-year-old man with the chief complaint of anosmia and mild proptosis was diagnosed with RMS of the left ethmoid sinus and orbit following an endoscopic biopsy of the mass. He was treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. At 12 months after diagnosis, while still on maintenance chemotherapy, he presented to our eye hospital with a large medial canthal mass and lateral globe displacement. Orbital computed tomography revealed an extraconal mass in the medial orbit of the left eye, extending posteriorly and compressing the medial rectus muscle. Notably, the ethmoid sinus was clear. Incisional biopsy was performed and the recurrence of alveolar RMS was confirmed. Alveolar RMS of the ethmoid sinus may recur as an orbital mass, even if the sinus where it originated is clear at the time of recurrence. PMID:27190854

  3. Unroofed coronary sinus in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Luciano Pereira; Meyer, Maria Rita F.; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Trevisan, Patrícia; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the uncommon association between neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and unroofed coronary sinus. CASE DESCRIPTION: Girl with four years and six months old who was hospitalized for heart surgery. The cardiac problem was discovered at four months of life. On physical examination, the patient presented several café-au-lait spots in the trunk and the limbs and freckling of the axillary and groin regions. Her father had similar skin findings, suggesting the NF1 diagnosis. The cardiac evaluation by echocardiography disclosed an atrial septal defect of unroofed coronary sinus type. This cardiac finding was confirmed at surgery. The procedure consisted of the atrial septal defect repair with autologous pericardium. COMMENTS: NF1 is a common autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the NF1 gene. Among the NF1 findings, congenital heart defects are considered unusual. In the literature review, there was no association between NF1 and unroofed coronary sinus, which is a rare cardiac malformation, characterized by a communication between the coronary sinus and the left atrium, resultant from the partial or total absence of the coronary sinus roof. It represents less than 1% of atrial septal defect cases. More reports are important to determine if this association is real or merely casual, since NF1 is a common condition. PMID:24473962

  4. Geological features and evolution history of Sinus Iridum, the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Le; Xiao, Long; Zhao, Jiannan; Huang, Qian; Haruyama, Junichi

    2014-10-01

    The Sinus Iridum region is one of the important candidate landing areas for the future Chinese lunar robotic and human missions. Considering its flat topography, abundant geomorphic features and complex evolutionary history, this region shows great significance to both lunar science and landing exploration, including powered descent, surface trafficability and in-situ exploration. First, we use Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Altimeter (LOLA) and Camera (LROC) data to characterize regional topographic and geomorphological features within Sinus Iridum, e.g., wrinkle ridges and sinuous rilles. Then, we deduce the iron and titanium content for the mare surface using the Clementine ultraviolet-visible (UVVIS) data and generate mineral absorption features using the Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectrometer data. Later, we date the mare surface using crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) method. CSFD measurements show that this region has experienced four major lava infilling events with model ages ranging from 3.32 Ga to 2.50 Ga. The regional magmatic activities evolved from Imbrian-aged low-titanium to Eratosthenian-aged medium-titanium. The inner Sinus Iridum is mainly composed of pyroxene-rich basalts with olivine abundance increasing with time, while the surrounding highlands have a feldspar-dominated composition. In the northern wall of Sinus Iridum, some potential olivine-rich materials directly excavated from the lunar mantle are visible. The Sinus Iridum region is an ideal target for future landing exploration, we propose two candidate landing sites for the future Chinese robotic and human missions.

  5. Sinus Microbiome Diversity Depletion and Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum Enrichment Mediates Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuanlin; Roediger, Frederick C.; Pletcher, Steven D.; Goldberg, Andrew N.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent mucosal inflammation and microbial infection are characteristics of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Mucosal microbiota dysbiosis is found in other chronic inflammatory diseases; however, the relationship between sinus microbiota composition and CRS is unknown. Using comparative microbiome profiling of a cohort of CRS patients and healthy subjects, we demonstrate that the sinus microbiota of CRS patients exhibits significantly reduced bacterial diversity compared with that of healthy controls. In our cohort of CRS patients, multiple, phylogenetically distinct lactic acid bacteria were depleted concomitant with an increase in the relative abundance of a single species, Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum. We recapitulated the conditions observed in our human cohort in a murine model and confirmed the pathogenic potential of C. tuberculostearicum and the critical necessity for a replete mucosal microbiota to protect against this species. Moreover, Lactobacillus sakei, which was identified from our comparative microbiome analyses as a potentially protective species, defended against C. tuberculostearicum sinus infection, even in the context of a depleted sinus bacterial community. These studies demonstrate that sinus mucosal health is highly dependent on the composition of the resident microbiota as well as identify both a new sino-pathogen and a strong bacterial candidate for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22972842

  6. Chronic Maxillary Sinusitis Caused by Denture Lining Material

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Chie; Murakami, Kazuhiro; Matsusue, Yumiko; Horita, Satoshi; Sakagami, Go; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of chronic maxillary sinusitis caused by denture lining material entering through an oroantral fistula after tooth extraction. The patient was an 80-year-old female who visited us with a complaint of pus discharge from the right posterior maxilla. She had extraction of the upper right second molar and had her upper denture relined with silicone lining material. The patient noticed swelling of the right cheek and purulent rhinorrhea 20 days before her first visit to our clinic. Oral examination showed an oroantral fistula with a diameter of 3 mm in the posterior alveolar ridge of the right maxilla. Computed tomography revealed a hyperdense foreign body in the right maxillary sinus and thickening of the mucosal lining. Under diagnosis of maxillary sinusitis caused by a foreign body, endoscopic maxillary surgery was performed simultaneously with the removal of the foreign body. The foreign body removed was 12 × 6 mm in size, oval in shape, light pink in color, and compatible with silicone denture lining material. During the follow-up it was observed that the oroantral fistula closed spontaneously after the removal of the foreign body. The maxillary sinus was in a good shape without recurrence of sinusitis seven months after surgery. PMID:27386012

  7. Absence of the superior petrosal veins and sinus: Surgical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Ken; Ribas, Eduardo Santamaria Carvalhal; Kiyosue, Hiro; Komune, Noritaka; Miki, Koichi; Rhoton, Albert L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The superior petrosal vein, one of the most constant and largest drainage pathways in the posterior fossa, may result in complications if occluded. This study calls attention to a unique variant in which the superior petrosal veins and sinus were absent unilaterally, and the venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial drainage groups. Methods: This study examines one venogram and another anatomic specimen in which the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent. Results: The superior petrosal veins, described as 1–3 bridging veins, emptying into the superior petrosal sinus, are the major drainage pathways of the petrosal group of posterior fossa veins. In the cases presented, the superior petrosal vein and sinus were absent and venous drainage was through the galenic and tentorial groups, including the lateral mesencephalic or bridging vein on the tentorial cerebellar surface. Conclusions: In cases in which the superior petrosal sinus and veins are absent, care should be directed to preserving the collateral drainage through the galenic and tentorial tributaries. Although surgical strategies for intraoperative management and preservation of venous structures are still controversial, knowledge of the possible anatomical variations is considered to be essential to improve surgical outcomes. PMID:25745589

  8. [Case of transient cortical blindness due to thrombosis of the transverse sinus].

    PubMed

    Mitaki, Shingo; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kitani, Mitsuhiro

    2008-05-01

    An 62-year-old man presented visual impairment and generalized seizure. Brain CT performed on the day of admission showed thrombus in the right transverse sinus, and DWI showed high intensity areas in the bilateral occipital and parietal lobes. According to bilateral occipital lobe lesions, we considered his visual impairment as cortical blindness. He was diagnosed as venous sinus thrombosis and intravenous heparin, edaravone and osmotic diuretics were administered. MR venography performed after starting of intravenous treatment showed flow gap in the left transverse sinus but no abnormalities in the right transverse sinus. On the second day of hospitalization, his cortical blindness showed improvement and thrombus in the right transverse sinus were disappeared. This indicated that his left transverse sinus originally hypoplastic, thrombus and hemostatis in the right transverse sinus (his dominant side) caused his cortical blindness and generalized seizure. There was a recanalization in the right transverse sinus after heparin therapy.

  9. 77 FR 61417 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ...: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... entitled ``Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's... an indication for the treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS). This guidance finalizes...

  10. Assessment of human sinus cavity air volume using tunable diode laser spectroscopy, with application to sinusitis diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Li, Tianqi; Lin, Huiying; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune

    2015-11-01

    Sinusitis is a very common disease and improved diagnostic tools are desirable also in view of reducing over-prescription of antibiotics. A non-intrusive optical technique called GASMAS (GAs in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy), which has a true potential of being developed into an important complement to other means of detection, was utilized in this work. Water vapor in the frontal sinuses, related to the free gas volume, was studied at around 937 nm in healthy volunteers. The results show a good stability of the GASMAS signals over extended times for the frontal sinuses for all volunteers, showing promising applicability to detect anomalies due to sinusitis. Measurements were also performed following the application of a decongestion spray. No noticeable signal change was observed, which is consistent with the fact that the water vapor concentration is given by the temperature only, and is not influenced by changes in cavity ventilation. Evaluated GASMAS data recorded on 6 consecutive days show signal stability for the left and right frontal sinus in one of the test volunteers.

  11. [Occipital dermal sinus associated to a cerebellar abscess. Case].

    PubMed

    Costa, J M; de Reina, L; Guillén, A; Claramunt, E

    2004-10-01

    Congenital dermal sinuses are tubular tracts which communicate the skin with deeper structures. It is a manifestation of defective separation of the ectoderm and neuroderm. The incidence is 1/2500-3000 births alive. Almost 10 % of congenital dermal sinuses are localized in the occipitocervical region. They are usually asymptomatic, unless an infectious process is concurrent (meningitis, abscess). We are presenting the case of a 12 months girl with unnoticed cutaneous stigmata in the occipital region, who was admitted with a meningeal syndrome and secondary neurological impairment. She had a cerebellar abscess and was treated with decompression by puncture of the abscess and antibiotics. When infection was resolved, congenital dermal sinus was excised. Process solves without morbidity. We reviewed the clinical and therapeutic features in cases reported previously in the literature.

  12. Minimally Invasive Surgical Approach to Complicated Recurrent Pilonidal Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Vahit Onur; Destek, Sebahattin; Ozer, Serhat; Etkin, Ergin; Ahioglu, Serkan; Ince, Mehmet; Cimin, Vedat; Sen, Deniz; Erbil, Yesim

    2015-01-01

    Pilonidal sinus is considered as a simple and frequently occurring disease localized at the sacrococcygeal area. However, at the intergluteal region, it can often turn into a chronic and complicated disease. In some cases, it can fistulize up to the gluteal region and appear at the secondary orifices. Minimally invasive surgical techniques are becoming widespread in recent years due to the increased experience and development of new instruments. Limited excision of the pilonidal sinus tract can be a better treatment option compared with large excisions in terms of recovery time and patient's comfort. This case study reports the single-phase surgical treatment of complicated and recurrent pilonidal sinus localized at the gluteal area, with minimal tissue loss and inflammation. PMID:26576314

  13. Managing the Cutaneous Sinus Tract of Dental Origine

    PubMed Central

    Janev, Edvard; Redzep, Enis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Draining cutaneous sinus tract in chin area may be caused by chronic periapical dental infections. Misdiagnosis of these lesions usually leads to destructive invasive treatment of the sinus tract that is not correct and curative. CASE REPORT: A 31-year-old male patient referred to us with a chronically draining lesion on his chin. The lesion previously was misdiagnosed by medical doctors and had undergone two times surgery with a focus on the skin lesion and had received antibiotic therapy for a prolonged period of time. After clinical and radiologic examination the dental origin of the lesion was evident and proper endodontic and surgical treatment was performed. Three months later, after the treatment, the lesion showed total healing and reoccurrence occurred. CONCLUSION: The key to successful treatment of cutaneous sinus tract of dental origin must be in appropriate communication between the dentist and the physician in order to achieve correct diagnosis and therapy in such cases. PMID:27703580

  14. Functional morphological characteristics of the interdigital sinus in the sheep.

    PubMed

    Pourlis, A F

    2010-05-01

    The present paper describes two distinct morphological features of ovine interdigital sinus, which were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy. In the sweat glandular component, acini with epithelial cells exhibiting a paved appearance and apocrine secretion were observed. In the same gland, other acini with cells exhibiting different luminal surfaces and simultaneous apocrine and merocrine secretion were recorded. The numerous hairs embedded within the waxy material of the sinus exhibited two types. The first type, with a round profile, had a special leaflet structure on the tip, whereas the second type had a convex profile. The comparative differences and probable functional relations of these integumentary structures are discussed. The mixed picture of the epithelial cells of the sweat glands suggests the release of different products. The hair microstructure correlated with the mechanism of hold and release of the secretory material of the interdigital sinus.

  15. Obstructive neonatal respiratory distress: infected pyriform sinus cyst.

    PubMed

    de Buys Roessingh, Anthony S; Quintal, Marie-Claude; Dubois, Josée; Bensoussan, Arié L

    2008-05-01

    Infected lateral cervical cysts in newborn are rare. We present the case of a baby born at 41 weeks of gestation. At day 3, persistent cyanosis was noted, and a mass appeared in the left cervical region next to the sternocleidomastoid muscle. No cutaneous sinus was visible. Ultrasound imaging showed no sign of blood flow within the mass and no septae. The mass extended down to the aortic arch and pushed the trachea to the right. A cervical lymphangioma was first suspected. Puncture of the mass evacuated 80 mL of pus, and a drain was put in place. Opacification through the drain showed a tract originating from the left pyriform fossa. Preoperative laryngoscopy and catheterization of the fistula tract confirmed the diagnosis. The cyst was totally excised up to the sinus with the assistance of a guidewire inserted orally through a rigid laryngoscope. This is a rare case of an infected pyriform sinus cyst in the neonatal period.

  16. SPATIO-TEMPORAL COMPLEXITY OF THE AORTIC SINUS VORTEX.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-06-01

    The aortic sinus vortex is a classical flow structure of significant importance to aortic valve dynamics and the initiation and progression of calific aortic valve disease. We characterize the spatio-temporal characteristics of aortic sinus voxtex dynamics in relation to the viscosity of blood analog solution as well as heart rate. High resolution time-resolved (2KHz) particle image velocimetry was conducted to capture 2D particle streak videos and 2D instantaneous velocity and streamlines along the sinus midplane using a physiological but rigid aorta model fitted with a porcine bioprosthetic heart valve. Blood analog fluids used include a water-glycerin mixture and saline to elucidate the sensitivity of vortex dynamics to viscosity. Experiments were conducted to record 10 heart beats for each combination of blood analog and heart rate condition. Results show that the topological characteristics of the velocity field vary in time-scales as revealed using time bin averaged vectors and corresponding instantaneous streamlines. There exist small time-scale vortices and a large time-scale main vortex. A key flow structure observed is the counter vortex at the upstream end of the sinus adjacent to the base (lower half) of the leaflet. The spatio-temporal complexity of vortex dynamics is shown to be profoundly influenced by strong leaflet flutter during systole with a peak frequency of 200Hz and peak amplitude of 4 mm observed in the saline case. While fluid viscosity influences the length and time-scales as well as the introduction of leaflet flutter, heart rate influences the formation of counter vortex at the upstream end of the sinus. Higher heart rates are shown to reduce the strength of the counter vortex that can greatly influence the directionality and strength of shear stresses along the base of the leaflet. This study demonstrates the impact of heart rate and blood analog viscosity on aortic sinus hemodynamics.

  17. Unroofed Coronary Sinus Presenting as Cerebral Abscess: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Avinash; Jain, Ankit; El-Hajjar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    A sixty eight year-old woman with a long-standing history of hypertension, dizziness and a history of congenital heart disease presented with speech difficulties and disorientation. She was diagnosed with a brain abscess, confirmed by a stereotactic biopsy. Transthoracic echocardiographic evaluation revealed a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) with an unroofed coronary sinus (URCS) along with a small secundum atrial septal defect. Her heart catheterization showed a partially unroofed coronary sinus along with a bidirectional shunt. She was referred for surgical closure of her unroofed coronary sinus and the secundum atrial septal defect. Her brain abscess responded well to antibiotic treatment. While waiting for open-heart surgery, she suffered from an acute myocardial infarction and underwent emergent percutaneous coronary intervention to the right coronary artery. Subsequently, she underwent elective surgical repair of the unroofed coronary sinus, along with closure of the atrial septal defect. When she was seen in follow-up she reported a complete resolution of her dizziness and felt more energetic. Unroofed coronary sinus syndrome (URCS) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly in which there is a communication between the coronary sinus and the left atrium. While non-invasive imaging with echocardiography, MRI or CT is helpful in making the diagnosis, cardiac catheterization remains integral in the evaluation and management planning. Management is guided by the presence of clinical symptoms with consideration of repair when patients become symptomatic. Prognosis after surgery is excellent, recently transcatheter based treatment therapies are becoming more frequent. We present a rare case of URCS with PLSVC presenting as a cerebral abscess in late adulthood. She had bidirectional shunting manifesting as a cerebral abscess. She responded well to the corrective surgery and was doing well on follow up.

  18. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. Dangerous Headache: A Case of Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis with Protein S Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Deepthi, D Angeline; Singh, Deepak Ningombam; Virupakshappa, Banu; Rahul, R

    2017-01-01

    Dural Venous Sinus Thrombosis (DVST) is a sporadic cause of headache. DVST is a recherché complication of maxillary sinus infection. Maxillary sinusitis infection may spread directly to orbit via lamina papyracea and it is expedited by the presence veins of breschet. The authors present a clinical case of dural sinus thrombosis with protein S deficiency and also describe an effective management approach for DVST. PMID:28274079

  20. Effect of topical ofloxacin on bacterial biofilms in refractory post-sinus surgery rhino-sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, W F; Fawaz, S A; Rabie, H; Hamdy, T A; Shokry, Y A

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms have been shown to play a major role in many chronic infections, in addition, there is growing evidence that bacterial biofilms may play a role in some forms of refractory CRS that persists despite proper surgery and culture directed antibiotic therapy. The objective is to determine the effect of application of topical ofloxacin on nasal and sinus mucosa in patients with proven existence of bacterial biofilms and persistent chronic sinusitis after FESS. The study design is a prospective controlled study. The study included a total of 12 patients who had refractory CRS in spite of undergoing FESS for that specific reason (study group), and control group (involved 25 patients), for whom FESS was done, with complete improvement postoperatively in 15 of them, and persistence of symptoms in the other ten. Topical ofloxacin eye drops (0.3 %) tds for 12 weeks were prescribed for (study group), culture and sensitivity and scanning electron microscopy were done for middle meatal mucosal specimens for all patients and controls, all of them were followed up for a minimum of 9 months (range 9-18 months). Of the study group, 80 % showed marked improvement in the structure of the mucosa, with the regaining of normal respiratory epithelium, with complete disappearance of the biofilm surface, and the remaining 20 % showed only reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and regaining cilia with scattered patches of very thin biofilm. Biofilms formation plays an active role in perpetuating inflammation in CRS patients and enhanced the recurrence and resistance in those patients, we found a statistically significant improvement in patients' group (P < 0.001), after 12 weeks of topical ofloxacin (without any evidence of any side effects). So, we concluded that topical ofloxacin seems to be an effective, tolerable, convenient, cheap and even safe mode of treatment of refractory CRS after FESS due to biofilms' formation. Thus, we recommend such modality of

  1. Chronic dermal sinuses as a manifestation of histiocytosis X.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, S H; Hall, I; Ragge, N; Pritchard, J

    1986-01-01

    Two young patients presented with generalised lymphadenopathy, otorrhoea, otitis, and rash. Over the next few years chronically discharging sinuses began to form over enlarged nodes and histological appearances were typical of histiocytosis X. In neither case were micro-organisms isolated from the lesions, and in both patients healing occurred with immunosuppressive agents. Chronic dermal sinus formation secondary to lymph node disease has never before been recorded as a manifestation of histiocytosis X. Histiocytosis X should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of "suppurative" lymphadenopathy so that appropriate treatment may be given without delay. Images Case 1 PMID:3084014

  2. Sinus tachycardia: don't blame the whistle-blower.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Michel; Tromp, Fiona; De Buyzere, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Sinus tachycardia due to sympathetic activation may be the ultimate response to support cardiac output. Abrupt heart rate reduction in this condition may be deleterious as is illustrated by two cases. Both patients were referred in cardiogenic shock after inappropriate treatment with a beta-blocking agent, initiated as a symptomatic treatment of a sinus tachycardia.Thus even if beta-blocking agents provoked a paradigm shift in the understanding of heart failure and became a cornerstone of the treatment, therapy should be initiated with knowledge of the underlying condition.

  3. Facial vein thrombophlebitis: an uncommon complication of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Cotes, Claudia; Riascos, Roy; Swischuk, Leonard E

    2015-07-01

    Facial vein thrombophlebitis is an uncommon complication of sinusitis. In cases where periorbital swelling complicating sinusitis is diagnosed, clinical findings of swelling and erythema extending beyond the orbital region into the cheek should alert the physician about this unusual complication and the need for further contrast-enhanced imaging and venography. The radiologist must be particularly careful in the evaluation of vascular structures of the face and neck in these children. CT and MRI with contrast material and MR venography are studies that clearly demonstrate the vascular anatomy and possible complications. However, MR venography confirms flow abnormalities within the venous system with the advantage of avoiding radiation exposure to the pediatric patient.

  4. Advanced cocaine-related necrotising sinusitis presenting with restrictive ophthalmolplegia.

    PubMed

    Lascaratos, Gerassimos; McHugh, James; McCarthy, Karon; Bunting, Howard

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of bilateral infero-medial orbital wall destruction, associated with loss of sinonasal architecture. The patient presented with intermittent horizontal diplopia following an acute on chronic infective sinusitis. Eight months previously the patient had developed a midline hard palate fistula for which a palatine prosthesis had been fitted. The broad differential diagnosis is discussed, though in this patient chronic cocaine abuse was identified as the underlying aetiology. Eye movement restriction worsened progressively with bilateral inflammation around the medial and inferior rectus muscles. Attempts to resolve the recurring cycle of sinus infection and inflammation by palatal fistula closure failed despite augmented techniques mobilising flaps from both nasal and palatal sides.

  5. Primary sinonasal tuberculosis confined to the unilateral maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Yeon; Bae, Jung Ho; Park, Jee Soo; Lee, Seung-Sin

    2014-01-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is not rare and occurs mainly in the head and neck region. Cervical tuberculous lymphadenopathy is the most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Sinonasal tuberculosis is known to occur very rarely due to the protective functions of sinonasal mucosa. Although some signs of sinonasal tuberculosis may be present, such as associated facial abscesses, the symptoms and signs are usually nonspecific. Clinical suspicion is important for timely diagnosis and proper management of sinonasal tuberculosis due to its rarity and nonspecific clinical presentation. We report a case of tuberculosis confined to the unilateral maxillary sinus that was first misdiagnosed as recurrent rhinosinusitis after endoscopic sinus surgery.

  6. Lithostratigraphical analysis in northern Sinus Meridiani, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baioni, D.; Sgavetti, M.; Tampella, G.; Wezel, F. C.

    2012-04-01

    In the Terra Meridiani- Arabia Terra region of Mars, layered rock units with a range of stratal patterns have been widely reported in the literature, and the record of the spectral signatures indicative of hydrate minerals suggests the existence of aqueous activity in at least some of the stratigraphic units. . In this work we investigated the area in the northern region of Sinus Meridiani located between 2°N to 3°N latitude and 2°W to 1°E longitude, using multiple remote sensing data sets to identify, characterize in detail, and understand the origin and evolution of the selected units in this region of Mars. MOLA and HiRISE data were used in combination to classify and correlate surface units recorded in distinct stratigraphic logs, based on planimetric configuration, topography, morphological and litho-facies characteristics. In particular, detailed analyses were focused on the layered units discovered in the walls of two impact craters located at a distance of about 100 km to each other within the study area. The stratigraphic interval analysed here corresponds to the upper part of the well known "light-toned layered deposits" identified by several authors. Distinct competent layers are observed in the internal slopes of both craters. Our observations indicate that the lithostratigraphic sections can be divided in three units. The lower unit consists of very thick bodies of light-toned bouldery breccia deposits. In the HiRISE images these white-coloured beds are composed of irregularly-shaped, white nodules which are either isolated or coalescent, distributed between bedding planes. The middle unit mainly consists of alternating thin strong layers and thicker sequences of relatively weak layers, horizontally bedded. The strong, competent layers maintain steeper erosional profiles and play a major role in controlling the overall shape and geomorphology of the wall slopes. The upper unit can be traced laterally in the surrounding ground level, displaying mesa

  7. Single surgical step for endoscopic surgery and orbital reconstruction of a silent sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cardesín, Alda; Escamilla, Yolanda; Romera, Manuel; Molina, Juan Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Silent sinus syndrome (SSS) is an uncommon disease characterised by enophthalmos, caused by ipsilateral maxillary sinus atelectasis. The diagnosis is clinical with radiological confirmation. The treatment has two objectives: to regulate the aeration of the maxillary sinus through achieving normal nasal cavity drainage and to restore the orbital architecture. A case of SSS treated in our hospital in a single surgical intervention is reported.

  8. Inadequate vertical bone dimension managed by indirect sinus grafting technique and simultaneous implant placement

    PubMed Central

    Nandal, Shikha; Ghalaut, Pankaj; Nandal, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    Implant placement into the posterior maxilla often creates a challenge due to inadequate bone height because of close sinus proximity. This article presents a case report of indirect sinus lift technique involving hydraulic pressure to elevate the floor of the maxillary sinus. PMID:28356698

  9. Ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm from left coronary sinus into right atrium: a rare anomaly with an odd presentation

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Ramalingam; Rohit, Manoj Kumar; Yadav, Mukesh

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 42-year-old man presenting with shortness of breath and palpitation on exertion, who was evaluated to have left sinus of Valsalva aneurysm rupturing into right atrium. This is a very rare congenital cardiac anomaly with variable clinical presentation ranging from asymptomatic detection on imaging to acute coronary syndrome and sudden cardiac death. Rupture is the most dreaded complication and usually manifests as an acute event. Aneurysmal dilation less commonly affects the left sinus and rupture into the right atrium is still rarer and a chronic insidious presentation as in this case is odd. PMID:23531926

  10. Surviving All Odds: A Unique Case of Multiple Congenital Unruptured Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysms Involving Both Left and Right Coronary Sinuses with Biventricular Dysfunction and Heart Block

    PubMed Central

    Vijay B, Aniketh; Mathew, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the sinus of Valsalva are very uncommon, with an incidence ranging from 0.1 to 3.5% of all congenital heart defects. Very few cases have been reported in the literature that presented with involvement of two or more sinuses. We report a case of 27-year-old male with a history of exertional breathlessness of one-month duration. After complete evaluation using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and multiple detector computed tomography (MDCT) scanning, the patient was diagnosed to have large congenital unruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysms involving both left and right coronary sinuses with extension into the interventricular septum. The patient also displayed second-degree heart block (Mobitz type 2) and biventricular dysfunction. The patient was managed successfully. We present the case with an aim to highlight the management challenges including intraoperative and postoperative complications that are associated with unruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysms of ≥2 sinuses. PMID:27882249

  11. [Endoscopic sclerosis with pneumatic distension for pyriform sinus fistula treatment].

    PubMed

    Sanchís Blanco, G; Gutiérrez San Román, C; Bordallo Vázquez, M; Cortés Sáez, J; Barrios Fontoba, J E; Lluna González, J; Esteban Ricós, M J; Vila Carbó, J J

    2014-01-01

    Classic treatment for pyriform sinus fistula (PSF) has been surgical excision; however, less invasive therapeutic alternatives whose aim is the obliteration of the sinus have been described subsequently. The authors present a technical modification of endoscopic sclerosis with diathermy (ESD): continuous infusion of air flow through the flexible endoscope was used to distend the pyriform sinus and facilitate recognition of the fistula opening. The sinus obliteration was performed with a wire guide and diathermy. In the last 15 years, 9 patients were diagnosed of suffering from PSF in our institution. Initial treatment was antibiotics therapy associated in some cases to cervical abscess drainage. Fistulectomy was performed in 4 cases and ESD in 4. The ninth patient received both treatments, performing electrocauterization after a surgical recurrence. Three of the patients who underwent surgery relapsed; none treated by ESD did, or had any complications. In our experience, endoscopic sclerosis with pneumatic distension is a simple technique, reproducible, not invasive and very effective; hence we consider it might become a first line therapy for PSF.

  12. [On sinusitis in swimmers in Lake Constance (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Waggershauser, C P

    1980-04-01

    Since the expansion of water-cleaning plants at Lake Constance, the rate of diseases in swimmers, like the sinusitis and otitis in swimmers gradually declined. These sickness almost only occur in teenagers by diving at water temperatures of some 20 degrees centigrade. The rhinogene complications of orbita develop fulminantly.

  13. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with cavernous sinus involvement - An unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Namdarian, Dinaz; Hiranandani, N L; Hathiram, Bachi; Rajeevan, C P; Agarwal, Ritu

    2003-10-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibrama (JNA) is a benign vascular tumour which is locally aggressive and occasionally extends intracranially. It occurs mainly in adolescent males. We report an interesting case of a targe JNA with intracranial extention encroaching on the cavernous sinus which we treated surgically by the conventional lateral rhinotomy and transpalatal approach.

  14. Anatomical and functional characteristics of carotid sinus stimulation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querry, R. G.; Smith, S. A.; Stromstad, M.; Ide, K.; Secher, N. H.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    Transmission characteristics of pneumatic pressure to the carotid sinus were evaluated in 19 subjects at rest and during exercise. Either a percutaneous fluid-filled (n = 12) or balloon-tipped catheter (n = 7) was placed at the carotid bifurcation to record internal transmission of external neck pressure/neck suction (NP/NS). Sustained, 5-s pulses, and rapid ramping pulse protocols (+40 to -80 Torr) were recorded. Transmission of pressure stimuli was less with the fluid-filled catheter compared with that of the balloon-tipped catheter (65% vs. 82% negative pressure, 83% vs. 89% positive pressure; P < 0.05). Anatomical location of the carotid sinus averaged 3.2 cm (left) and 3.6 cm (right) from the gonion of the mandible with a range of 0-7.5 cm. Transmission was not altered by exercise or Valsalva maneuver, but did vary depending on the position of the carotid sinus locus beneath the sealed chamber. These data indicate that transmission of external NP/NS was higher than previously recorded in humans, and anatomical variation of carotid sinus location and equipment design can affect transmission results.

  15. Infant Visual Sustained Attention and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, John E.

    1987-01-01

    Tested the model which posits that heart-rate deceleration and respiratory sinus arrhythmia are indices of infant attention. Infants studied cross-sectionally at 14, 20, and 26 weeks of age were presented with complex patterns on a TV screen which were accompanied by an "interrupting stumulus". (Author/BN)

  16. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section 870.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3850 Carotid...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section 870.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3850 Carotid...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section 870.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3850 Carotid...

  19. Recurrent sinus pauses: an atypical presentation of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Amor, Martin Miguel; Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Osofsky, Jeffrey; Holland, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction related to seizures may give rise to a broad spectrum of cardiovascular abnormalities. Among these, ictal bradycardia and conduction delays may be encountered. Failure to recognize these abnormalities may contribute to sudden, unexplained death in epilepsy patients. We report a case of a Haitian female with temporal lobe epilepsy associated with recurrent sinus pauses.

  20. Fat deposition in the cavernous sinus in Cushing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bachow, T.B.; Hesselink, J.R.; Aaron, J.O.; Davis, K.R.; Taveras, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    Fat density in the cavernous sinus on computed tomography (CT) is described in 6 out of 16 (37.5%) patients with Cushing disease. This finding may aid in making a specific diagnosis in patients with a pituitary mass. It was not seen in 30 random CT studies of the sella; however, supra seller fat was incidentally noted in the patient with acromegaly.

  1. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section 870.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and Drug Administration on or...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section 870.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and Drug Administration on or...

  3. Recurrent sinus arrest in association with neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parry, A K; Ormerod, L P; Hamlin, G W; Saleem, P T

    1994-05-01

    We report a case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome where the catatonia clearly followed the administration of neuroleptics and where the neurovegetative disturbance was remarkably severe, including episodes of tracheal spasm, apnoea and episodes of bradycardia, and sinus arrest requiring insertion of a temporary external pacing wire. To our knowledge, such severe disturbance has not previously been reported.

  4. Human identification study by means of frontal sinus imaginological aspects.

    PubMed

    Soares, Caio Belém Rodrigues Barros; Almeida, Manuella Santos Carneiro; Lopes, Patrícia de Medeiros Loureiro; Beltrão, Ricardo Villar; Pontual, Andrea dos Anjos; Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes; Figueroa, José Naral; Pontual, Maria Luiza dos Anjos

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the applicability of human identification parameters, established by Tatlisumak et al. (2007), by means of cone-beam computed tomography and extraoral radiographs of the frontal sinus region. From a total of 58 dry skulls, 26 were selected. Posteroanterior, profile cephalometric radiographs and cone-beam computed tomography images were acquired, adopting a specific method for reproducibility purposes. The images were evaluated by two examiners, previously calibrated, in a darkened environment and at two distinct sessions, with a minimum of 15 days between them. The characteristics of the frontal sinus were analyzed using the Cohen's kappa test, for categorical variables, and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for continuous variables. Acceptable values of inter method variability for the categorical variables were found, while same cannot be told for continuous variables. The parameters evaluated for the frontal sinus on extraoral radiographs and cone-beam computed tomographs were mostly concordant, with the exception of three. Categorical and discrete variables showed an intra- and interexaminer concordance ranging from good to perfect, and the quantitative continuous variables showed concordance ranging from moderate to excellent. The parameters examined are applicable and reproducible using multiplanar reconstructions of cone-beam computed tomography and extraoral radiographs of the frontal sinus.

  5. Trichosporon inkin, an unusual agent of fungal sinusitis: a report from south India.

    PubMed

    Janagond, Anand; Krishnan, K Mohana; Kindo, A J; Sumathi, G

    2012-01-01

    The aetiology of fungal sinusitis is diverse and changing. Aspergillus species has been the most common cause for fungal sinusitis, especially in dry and hot regions like India. Trichosporon species as a cause for fungal sinusitis has been very rarely reported the world over. Here, we report a rare case of allergic fungal sinusitis caused by Trichosporon inkin in a 28-year-old immunocompetent woman. Bilateral nasal obstruction, nasal discharge and loss of smell were her presenting complaints. Diagnostic nasal endoscopy showed bilateral multiple polyps. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was performed and many polyps were removed. Based on mycological and histopathological studies, the pathogen was identified as T. inkin.

  6. Flexible microsensor technology for real-time navigation tracking in balloon sinus ostial dilation

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kent; Bigcas, Jo-Lawrence; Luong, Amber; Yao, William

    2017-01-01

    Background: Microsensor navigation has the potential to aid balloon sinus ostial dilation by providing real-time tracking of balloon devices within the complex anatomy of the sinonasal cavities. Objective: This feasibility study evaluated the incorporation of a new microsensor technology into a flexible guidewire for use with current instruments in balloon sinus ostial dilation. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted to include seven men and one woman (age range, 33–68 years), who underwent balloon sinus ostial dilation with flexible microsensor navigation in the operating room setting. All the procedures were performed at target sinuses with the patient under general anesthesia, in conjunction with subsequent endoscopic sinus surgery. Results: Balloon dilation was attempted at the maxillary (n = 3), frontal (n = 14), and sphenoid (n = 1) sinuses. In all the cases, the surgical navigation system displayed the flexible wire tip as it was advanced to the target sinus ostia; this visual feedback for wire position guided the balloon placement. Successful balloon dilation with assistance of flexible microsensor navigation was performed on most sinuses, except a single frontal sinus with adjacent type 2 frontal cells. Conclusion: Flexible navigation technology may be combined with balloon sinus technology to facilitate localization of instruments in the sinus anatomy. Additional optimization of both the device and software technology is warranted. PMID:28381323

  7. Cyst decreased in size post maxillary sinus floor augmentation surgery in diabetic patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sijia; Song, Yingliang; Wei, Hongbo; Ren, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Whether mucosal cyst of maxillary sinus is contraindication for sinus floor augmentation surgery has been a controversial hot spot for years. Presentation of case This case aims to present the surgical procedure of sinus floor augmentation surgery with cyst (18.72 mm × 24.61 mm) in diabetic patient. And 6 months later, the cyst decreased in size. The authors elevated the sinus floor and cyst simultaneously. The surgery was carried out successfully without sinus membrane perforation and the alveolar ridge gained about 8 mm height. Six months later, the cyst decreased in size and osseointegration was observed. Discussion Interdisciplinary cooperation is encouraged to diagnose benign mucosal cyst. The isolation between sinus lumen and the grafted sub-sinus space is important. Graft contamination or dispersion into the sinus lumen should be avoided. The integrity of the sinus membrane and use of antibiotics are very important to prevent the occurrence of postoperative sinus infection Conclusion The authors conclude that sinus augmentation surgery could be done with mucosal cyst in diabetic patient. PMID:26479781

  8. Morphometric analysis of sinus depth in the posterior maxilla and proposal of a novel classification

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Florian; Dvorak, Gabriella; Nemec, Stefan; Pietschmann, Peter; Traxler, Hannes; Schicho, Kurt; Seemann, Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the posterior maxillary sinus based on its extension into the alveolar process and to provide a simple clinical classification. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in CT scans of 200 dentate and 200 edentulous patients (100 women and 100 men, respectively). After manual placement of 12 reference points morphometric analysis was performed and sinus depth, residual alveolar ridge height (RH) and the sinus opening angle were calculated. Sinuses were classified according to the quartiles of sinus depth: class I (above the hard palate), class II (0–6 mm below the hard palate) and class III (>6 mm below the hard palate). Sinus depth was found to be a reliable anatomical landmark and did not vary significantly between gender (p = 0.8940) or dentition groups (p = 0.9723). Alveolar height varied significantly between sinus classes (p < 2 × 10−16) and dentition groups (p < 2 × 10−16) but not between genders (p = 0.5178). The sinus opening angle was significantly different between sinus classes (p < 2.2 × 10−16) but not between gender or dentition groups. We propose a novel classification built upon the quartiles of sinus depth, dividing the sinuses into three classes. Our classification is the first one that represents the anatomy of the patient independent of gender and dentition. PMID:28338085

  9. Are nasopharyngeal cultures useful in diagnosis of acute bacterial sinusitis in children?

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Nader; Hoberman, Alejandro; Colborn, D Kathleen; Kearney, Diana H; Jeong, Jong H; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Barbadora, Karen A; Bowen, A'delbert; Flom, Lynda L; Wald, Ellen R

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis of acute bacterial sinusitis can be challenging because symptoms of acute sinusitis and an upper respiratory tract infection (URI) overlap. A rapid test, if accurate in differentiating sinusitis from URI, could be helpful in the diagnostic process. We examined the utility of nasopharyngeal cultures in identifying the subgroup of children with a clinical diagnosis of acute sinusitis who are least likely to benefit from antimicrobial therapy (those with completely normal sinus radiographs). Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 204 children meeting a priori clinical criteria for acute sinusitis. All children had sinus X-rays at the time of diagnosis. To determine if negative nasopharyngeal culture results could reliably identify the subgroup of children with normal radiographs, we calculated negative predictive values and negative likelihood ratios. Absence of pathogens in the nasopharynx was not helpful in identifying this low-risk subgroup.

  10. Ontogeny of the Middle-Ear Air-Sinus System in Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria: Crocodylia).

    PubMed

    Dufeau, David L; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2015-01-01

    Modern crocodylians, including Alligator mississippiensis, have a greatly elaborated system of pneumatic sinuses invading the cranium. These sinuses invade nearly all the bones of the chondrocranium and several bony elements of the splanchnocranium, but patterns of postnatal paratympanic sinus development are poorly understood and documented. Much of crocodylomorph--indeed archosaurian--evolution is characterized by the evolution of various paratympanic air sinuses, the homologies of which are poorly understood due in large part to the fact that individual sinuses tend to become confluent in adults, obscuring underlying patterns. This study seeks to explore the ontogeny of these sinuses primarily to clarify the anatomical relations of the individual sinuses before they become confluent and thus to provide the foundation for later studies testing hypotheses of homology across extant and extinct Archosauria. Ontogeny was assessed using computed tomography in a sample of 13 specimens covering an almost 19-fold increase in head size. The paratympanic sinus system comprises two major inflations of evaginated pharyngeal epithelium: the pharyngotympanic sinus, which communicates with the pharynx via the lateral (true) Eustachian tubes and forms the cavum tympanicum proprium, and the median pharyngeal sinus, which communicates with the pharynx via the median pharyngeal tube. Each of these primary inflations gives rise to a number of secondary inflations that further invade the bones of the skull. The primary sinuses and secondary diverticula are well developed in perinatal individuals of Alligator, but during ontogeny the number and relative volumes of the secondary diverticula are reduced. In addition to describing the morphological ontogeny of this sinus system, we provide some preliminary exploratory analyses of sinus function and allometry, rejecting the hypothesis that changes in the volume of the paratympanic sinuses are simply an allometric function of braincase

  11. Ontogeny of the Middle-Ear Air-Sinus System in Alligator mississippiensis (Archosauria: Crocodylia)

    PubMed Central

    Dufeau, David L.; Witmer, Lawrence M.

    2015-01-01

    Modern crocodylians, including Alligator mississippiensis, have a greatly elaborated system of pneumatic sinuses invading the cranium. These sinuses invade nearly all the bones of the chondrocranium and several bony elements of the splanchnocranium, but patterns of postnatal paratympanic sinus development are poorly understood and documented. Much of crocodylomorph—indeed archosaurian—evolution is characterized by the evolution of various paratympanic air sinuses, the homologies of which are poorly understood due in large part to the fact that individual sinuses tend to become confluent in adults, obscuring underlying patterns. This study seeks to explore the ontogeny of these sinuses primarily to clarify the anatomical relations of the individual sinuses before they become confluent and thus to provide the foundation for later studies testing hypotheses of homology across extant and extinct Archosauria. Ontogeny was assessed using computed tomography in a sample of 13 specimens covering an almost 19-fold increase in head size. The paratympanic sinus system comprises two major inflations of evaginated pharyngeal epithelium: the pharyngotympanic sinus, which communicates with the pharynx via the lateral (true) Eustachian tubes and forms the cavum tympanicum proprium, and the median pharyngeal sinus, which communicates with the pharynx via the median pharyngeal tube. Each of these primary inflations gives rise to a number of secondary inflations that further invade the bones of the skull. The primary sinuses and secondary diverticula are well developed in perinatal individuals of Alligator, but during ontogeny the number and relative volumes of the secondary diverticula are reduced. In addition to describing the morphological ontogeny of this sinus system, we provide some preliminary exploratory analyses of sinus function and allometry, rejecting the hypothesis that changes in the volume of the paratympanic sinuses are simply an allometric function of braincase

  12. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  13. Is the Maxillary Sinus Really Suitable in Sex Determination? A Three-Dimensional Analysis of Maxillary Sinus Volume and Surface Depending on Sex and Dentition.

    PubMed

    Möhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Heussen, Nicole; Peters, Florian; Steiner, Timm; Hölzle, Frank; Modabber, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The morphometric analysis of maxillary sinus was recently presented as a helpful instrument for sex determination. The aim of the present study was to examine the volume and surface of the fully dentate, partial, and complete edentulous maxillary sinus depending on the sex. Computed tomography data from 276 patients were imported in DICOM format via special virtual planning software, and surfaces (mm) and volumes (mm) of maxillary sinuses were measured. In sex-specific comparisons (women vs men), statistically significant differences for the mean maxillary sinus volume and surface were found between fully dentate (volume, 13,267.77 mm vs 16,623.17 mm, P < 0.0001; surface, 3480.05 mm vs 4100.83 mm, P < 0.0001) and partially edentulous (volume, 10,577.35 mm vs 14,608.10 mm, P = 0.0002; surface, 2980.11 mm vs 3797.42 mm, P < 0.0001) or complete edentulous sinuses (volume, 11,200.99 mm vs 15,382.29 mm, P < 0.0001; surface, 3118.32 mm vs 3877.25 mm, P < 0.0001). For males, the statistically different mean values were calculated between fully dentate and partially edentulous (volume, P = 0.0022; surface, P = 0.0048) maxillary sinuses. Between the sexes, no differences were only measured for female and male partially dentate fully edentulous sinuses (2 teeth missing) and between partially edentulous sinuses in women and men (1 teeth vs 2 teeth missing). With a corresponding software program, it is possible to analyze the maxillary sinus precisely. The dentition influences the volume and surface of the pneumatic maxillary sinus. Therefore, sex determination is possible by analysis of the maxillary sinus event through the increase in pneumatization.

  14. Bortezomib With or Without Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  15. Modified Primary Closure Method for the Treatment of Pilonidal Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sukru; Karadeniz, Erdem; Ozturk, Gurkan; Aydinli, Bulent; Bayraktutan, Muhammed Cagri; Atamanalp, Sabri Selcuk

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pilonidal sinus (PS) is considered to be the acquired disease of especially in the sacrococcygeal region. Various primary or secondary or flap methods, accompanied by one of local curettage, phenol application, electro-cauterization and total sinus excision methods, are used for the treatment of pilonidal sinus. However, currently there is not a single widely accepted treatment method. Materials and Methods: Ninety-eight patients who had operation for PS in Atatürk University, Department of General Surgery between January 2012 and August 2014 were included in this study. The patients were categorized into two groups: first, the patients undergone total sinus excision with primary closure (Group 1), and second, patients undergone total sinus excision with modified primary closure (MPC) (Group 2). Among all 98 patients participated in this study, age, sex, type of operation, duration of operation, amount of excised skin, duration of postoperative stay at hospital and complications were evaluated. Results: Forty-four patients (44.9%) underwent primary closure method, while 54 patients (55.1%) underwent MPC method. Mean duration of operation was 39.1 (30–60) minutes, mean diameter of excised material was 9.3 (8–11) cm2 and mean duration of stay at hospital was 1.4 (1–3) days for the patients in the first group. Meanwhile, duration of operation was 52.2 (35–70) minutes, mean diameter of excised material was 2.6 (2–4) cm2 and mean duration of stay at hospital was 1.6 (1–3) days for the patients in the second group. There was statistically significant difference between the two groups by means of duration of operation, dehiscence of surgical wound, recurrence and development of general complications (p<0.001, p<0.05, p<0.05 and p<0.005, respectively). According to the multivariate analysis, during surgical treatment of pilonidal sinus, primary closure method increases the rate of complication 6.65 times and MPC method increases the duration of

  16. Simultaneous sinus lift and implantation using platelet-rich fibrin as sole grafting material.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung-Mi; Lee, Chun-Ui; Son, Jeong-Seog; Oh, Ji-Hyeon; Fang, Yiqin; Choi, Byung-Ho

    2014-09-01

    Recently, several authors have shown that simultaneous sinus lift and implantation using autologous platelet-rich fibrin as the sole filling material is a reliable procedure promoting bone augmentation in the maxillary sinus. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simultaneous sinus lift and implantation using platelet-rich fibrin as the sole grafting material on bone formation in a canine sinus model. An implant was placed after sinus membrane elevation in the maxillary sinus of six adult female mongrel dogs. The resulting space between the membrane and sinus floor was filled with autologous platelet-rich fibrin retrieved from each dog. The implants were left in place for six months. Bone tissue was seen at the lower part of the implants introduced into the sinus cavity. The height of the newly formed bone around the implants ranged from 0 mm to 4.9 mm (mean; 2.6 ± 2.0 mm) on the buccal side and from 0 mm to 4.2 mm (mean; 1.3 ± 1.8 mm) on the palatal side. The findings from this study suggest that simultaneous sinus lift and implantation using platelet-rich fibrin as sole grafting material is not a predictable and reproducible procedure, especially with respect to the bone formation around the implants in the sinus cavity.

  17. Occult sinusitis may be a key feature for non-controlled asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, G L; Caimmi, S; Marseglia, A; Pagella, F; Ciprandi, G; La Rosa, M; Leonardi, S; Miraglia Del Giudice, M; Caimmi, D

    2012-01-01

    Sinusitis is frequently associated with asthma. The diagnosis and management of patients with asthma associated with sinusitis are often challenging, though sometimes unsatisfactory. Detection and treatment of sinusitis in asthmatics may lead to a better control of asthma symptoms. Most of the studies regarding the relationship between sinusitis and asthma have been conducted in adults. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of sinusal comorbidity in children with un-controlled asthma both clinically and through nasal endoscopy after the first 6 months of treatment. The present study included 294 consecutive asthmatic children (97 males, mean age 7.3 years). Asthma diagnosis, severity assessment and treatment were performed according to GINA guidelines. Twenty-one patients with non-controlled asthma presented with endoscopic features of sinusitis, but without any clinical sign or symptom. We defined such condition occult sinusitis. Not only overt sinusitis, but also occult sinusitis could be a significant comorbidity in asthmatic patients. For this reason, it may be beneficial to determine the presence of sinus inflammation in children with non-controlled asthma, even when they do not present clinical signs or symptoms of upper airways involvement.

  18. Sinus irrigations before and after surgery – visualization through computational fluid dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Craig, John R.; Cohen, Noam A.; Adappa, Nithin D.; Khalili, Sammy; Palmer, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Topical sinus irrigations play a critical role in the management of sinonasal disease, and the improvement in irrigant penetration into the sinuses postoperatively greatly contributes to the success of the endoscopic sinus surgery. Prior investigations on postoperative sinus irrigations have been mostly limited to cadaver studies, which are labor intensive, and do not capture the full dynamics of the flows. A pilot study was conducted to investigate the impact of surgery on sinus irrigation through Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Study Design Retrospective computational study Methods Pre- and postoperative CT scans were obtained on a patient who underwent standard Endoscopic surgeries for all sinuses, including a Draf III frontal sinusotomy. CT based pre- and postoperative CFD models then simulated irrigations of 120 mL saline per nostril at 12mL/s (typical of Sinugator®) and 60mL/s (SinusRinse Bottle®), in two head positions: face parallel and at 45° angle to the ground. Results Overall, surgery most significantly improved frontal sinus irrigation, but surprisingly resulted in less maxillary and ethmoid sinuses penetration. This may due to the partial removal of septum during the Draf III, causing most fluid to exit pre-maturely across the resected septum. Higher flow rate slightly improved ethmoid sinus irrigation, but resulted in less contralateral maxillary sinus penetration. Conclusions CFD modeling of sinonasal irrigations is a novel technique for evaluating irrigant penetration of individual sinus cavities. It may prove useful in determining the optimal degree of surgery or the ideal irrigation strategy to allow for maximal and targeted sinus irrigant penetration. PMID:26467934

  19. [Presacral tumor as a differential diagnosis of recurrent pilonidal sinus].

    PubMed

    Mengual-Ballester, Mónica; Pellicer-Franco, Enrique; Valero-Navarro, Graciela; Alcaraz-Mateos, Eduardo; Soria-Aledo, Victoriano; Aguayo-Albasini, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: durante el desarrollo embriológico, el espacio retrorrectal o presacro está ocupado por células pluripotenciales y, por tanto, puede contener un grupo heterogéneo de tumores. Caso clínico: se comunica el caso de un paciente masculino de 22 años de edad, intervenido de sinus pilonidal recidivado. Con estudios de tomografía computada de pelvis y resonancia magnética nuclear se sospechó la existencia de un tumor quístico presacro compatible con tumor germinal; la lesión se extirpó quirúrgicamente por vía abdominal y se estableció el diagnóstico definitivo de teratoma quístico. Conclusiones: los tumores retrorrectales son lesiones poco habituales que es necesario descartar en caso de sinus recidivantes.

  20. [Pott's puffy tumor: a rare complication of frontal sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Aínsa Laguna, D; Pons Morales, S; Muñoz Tormo-Figueres, A; Vega Senra, M I; Otero Reigada, M C

    2014-05-01

    Pott's puffy tumor is a rare complication of frontal sinusitis characterized by swelling and edema in the brow due to a subperiosteal abscess associated with frontal osteomyelitis. Added complications are cellulitis by extension to the orbit and intracranial infection by posterior extension, with high risk of meningitis, intracranial abscess, and venous sinus thrombosis. Early diagnosis and aggressive medical or surgical treatment are essential for optimal recovery of affected patients. In the antibiotic age it is extremely rare, with very few cases described in the recent literature. A case is presented of a Pott inflammatory tumor in a 7 year-old boy, as a complication of acute pansinusitis who presented with front preseptal swelling and intracranial involvement with thrombosis of ophthalmic and superior orbital veins and frontal epidural abscess extending to the subarachnoid space.

  1. A Case of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Intracranial Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Gathwala, Geeta; Dalal, Poonam; Gehlawat, Virender; Singh, Jasbir; Arya, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Severe pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) complicated by deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in adults has been reported previously in the medical literature; however, childhood extrapulmonary TB complicated by DVT is rare. We report a 13-year-old girl who presented to the Department of Pediatrics at the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences in Rohtak, India, in 2012 with abdominal TB complicated by DVT and intracranial sinus thrombosis. She was treated with a course of four antitubercular drugs and short-term anticoagulation therapy with a positive outcome over the next six months. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no previous reports have yet suggested a possible association between childhood TB and intracranial sinus thrombosis. PMID:28003904

  2. Surgical treatment of recurring preauricular sinus: supra-auricular approach

    PubMed Central

    Leopardi, G; Chiarella, G; Conti, S; Cassandro, E

    2008-01-01

    Summary Congenital preauricular sinus is a malformation of the preauricular soft tissues with an incidence ranging between 0.1 and 0.9% in Europe and the United States. It presents a high risk of recurrence when treated by a standard surgical technique (simple sinectomy), the incidence of which is reported to be between 19% and 40%. The supra-auricular approach, proposed by Prasad et al. in 1990, is easier to perform and presents a lower recurrence risk. Personal experience is presented in the treatment of congenital preauricular sinus with the supra-auricular approach as first choice or in the case of recurrence following previous standard surgery. This report includes a short review of the literature in order not only to focus on the supra-auricular approach and check the efficacy as far as concerns reduction of recurrence risk but also to contribute to a more widespread use of this method. PMID:19205595

  3. An Alternative Maxillary Sinus Lift Technique – Sinu Lift System

    PubMed Central

    T, Parthasaradhi; B, Shivakumar; Kumar, T.S.S.; P, Suganya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Maxillary sinus augmentation surgical techniques have evolved greatly allowing successful placement of dental implants in the atrophic posterior maxillary region. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and postoperative morbidity of sinus floor elevation procedures performed using the minimally invasive surgical technique the Sinu lift system. Materials and Methods: Sinus lift procedure was done using the sinu lift system by a transcrestal approach and bone augmentation was done on ten systemically healthy patients using β- tricalcium phosphate and platelet rich plasma mix. The study was evaluated upto six months period with bone related parameters being assessed at base line using CT scan, OPG and after six months the results were analysed using SPSS Version 18.0 software (p < 0.01 (0.005). Wilcoxson signed rank sum test was used to correlate between preoperative and postoperative measurements. Implant placements were done at the desired area of sinus augmentation with a two year follow up. (Nobel Biocare, Nobel Biocare Holding AG, Zürich-Flughafen, Switzerland) Results: The augmented sites had a significant increase in the bone parameters at the desired grafted region. The mean gain in bone height as observed in CT Scan had revealed increased measurements from 5.80mm±0.98 to 10.20mm±1.68 at the sixth month evaluation. This was statistically significant (0.005). Clinically, no complications were observed during or after the surgical procedure. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the Sinu lift system with a controlled working action resulted in high procedural success and this procedure may be an alternative to the currently used surgical methods. PMID:25954702

  4. Local Intrasinus Thrombolysis for Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Karanam, Lakshmi sudha Prasanna; Baddam, Sridhar Reddy; Pamidimukkala, Vijaya; Vemuri, Ramatharaknath; Byrapaneni, Sravanthi; Polavarapu, Raghavasarma

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral venous strokes due to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) have varied presentation and clinical outcome. Despite aggressive medical treatment with optimal anticoagulation, some patients develop progressive neurologic deterioration causing significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present series is to analyze the safety and efficacy of in situ thrombolysis in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in severe clinical grade and refractory to conventional medical management. Materials and methods Twenty-nine patients with cerebral venous thrombosis who received in situ thrombolysis during a 3-year period (April 2013 to April 2016) were included in the study. Tissue plasminogen activator (tpa) was used in all the patients. The lytic agent was infused into the sinus via the micro catheter. Data regarding demographic, clinical, and radiologic features were analyzed in all the patients. Results Recanalization of the affected sinuses was achieved in all the cases. Twenty-four patients had good outcome (mRs 0 or1) and three patients had mild deficits (mRs 2). One patient had moderate disability (mRs 3). One patient succumbed due to increased hematoma causing midline shift and transtentorial herniation. At 3 months follow–up, 26 patients were asymptomatic and two patients had minor symptoms. Conclusion Local intrasinus thrombolysis (LIST) is safe and effective method in patients with poor clinical grade and the present study highlights the benefit of thrombolysis, particularly in patients unresponsive to anticoagulation. The improved efficacy of this therapy depends on early recognition of worsening symptoms and timely intervention. PMID:27829970

  5. Cryptococcal meningitis presenting as sinusitis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Iyer, S P; Movva, K; Wiebel, M; Chandrasekar, P; Alangaden, G; Carron, M; Tranchida, P; Revankar, S G

    2013-10-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a relatively common invasive fungal infection in immunocompromised patients, especially in solid organ transplant recipients. Clinical presentation typically includes fever, headache, photophobia, neck stiffness, and/or altered mental status. Unusual presentations may delay diagnosis. Therapy is challenging in renal transplant patients because of the nephrotoxicity associated with amphotericin B, the recommended treatment. We present a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a renal transplant recipient presenting as acute sinusitis with successful treatment using fluconazole as primary therapy.

  6. Topical Mitomycin C in functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vaidyanathan; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Suria; Saxena, Sunil Kumar; Shanmugasundaram, Nirmal

    2012-07-01

    In recent literature, there has been an interest in the use of Mitomycin C to reduce post-operative complications following endoscopic sinus surgery. We report our results on a prospective, randomized controlled trial involving 50 patients with chronic bilateral rhino sinusitis. We eliminated various confounding factors by studying a single group of patients, with symmetrical disease, without pre-existing gross anatomical abnormalities. Patients requiring revision sinus surgery were excluded. On completion of the surgery, a cotton pledget soaked in Mitomycin C was placed in one nostril (test) and saline-soaked pledget (control) was placed in the other side of the nose, both in the middle meatus. The side of the nasal cavity receiving the topical Mitomycin C was randomized. The patients were assessed periodically (first week, first month, third month and sixth month) for synechiae formation and presence or absence of their symptoms. At the first week follow up, there was a statistically significant difference in the incidence of synechiae between the saline and Mitomycin C side. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant improvement with regards to patient symptoms (nasal block and discharge) in the Mitomycin C side when compared to the saline side. At the third and sixth month, there was no difference between the two groups. The incidence of adverse tissue reaction (granulation, discharge, polypoidal mucosa and crusting) was less in the Mitomycin C side when compared to the saline side at the first month follow up. Topically applied Mitomycin C reduces the incidence of synechiae in the immediate post-operative period in patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery. There is also an improvement in nasal obstruction and discharge with a reduction in the incidence of adverse tissue reaction in the early post-operative period.

  7. Quantitative analyses of maxillary sinus using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Perella, Andréia; Rocha, Sara Dos Santos; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmão Paraiso

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision and accuracy of linear measurements of maxillary sinus made in tomographic films, by comparing with 3D reconstructed images. Linear measurements of both maxillary sinus in computed tomography CT of 17 patients, with or without lesion by two calibrated examiners independently, on two occasions, with a single manual caliper. A third examiner has done the same measurements electronically in 3D-CT reconstruction. The statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA (analyses of variance). Intra-observer percentage error was little in both cases, with and without lesion; it ranged from 1.14% to 1.82%. The inter-observer error was a little higher reaching a 2.08% value. The accuracy presented a higher value. The perceptual accuracy error was higher in samples, which had lesion compared to that which had not. CT had provided adequate precision and accuracy for maxillary sinus analyses. The precision in cases with lesion was considered inferior when compared to that without lesion, but it can't affect the method efficacy.

  8. Modified Off-Midline Closure of Pilonidal Sinus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Aly

    2014-01-01

    Background: Numerous surgical procedures have been described for pilonidal sinus disease, but treatment failure and disease recurrence are frequent. Conventional off-midline flap closures have relatively favorable surgical outcomes, but relatively unfavorable cosmetic outcomes. Aim: The author reported outcomes of a new simplified off-midline technique for closure of the defect after complete excision of the sinus tracts. Patients and Methods: Two hundred patients of both sexes were enrolled for modified D-shaped excisions were used to include all sinuses and their ramifications, with a simplified procedure to close the defect. Results: The overall wound infection rate was 12%, (12.2% for males and 11.1% for females). Wound disruption was necessitating laying the whole wound open and management as open technique. The overall wound disruption rate was 6%, (6.1% for males and 5.5% for females) and the overall recurrence rate was 7%. Conclusion: Our simplified off-midline closure without flap appeared to be comparable to conventional off-midline closure with flap, in terms of wound infection, wound dehiscence, and recurrence. Advantages of the simplified procedure include potentially reduced surgery complexity, reduced surgery time, and improved cosmetic outcome. PMID:24926445

  9. Predicting response to antimicrobial therapy in children with acute sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nader; Wald, Ellen R.; Jeong, Jong H.; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Bowen, A’Delbert; Flom, Lynda L.; Hoberman, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine prognostic factors that independently predict response to antimicrobial therapy in children with acute sinusitis. Study design 206 children meeting a priori clinical criteria for acute sinusitis who were given antimicrobial therapy by their primary care provider were included. The severity of symptoms in the 8 to 12 days after treatment was initiated was followed using a validated scale. We examined the univariate and multivariate association between factors present at the time of diagnosis (symptoms, signs, nasopharyngeal culture result, radiograph results) and time to resolution of symptoms. This study was conducted 8 to 10 years after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination was introduced, but before introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination. Results Children with proven nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae improved more rapidly (6.5 vs. 8.5 median days to symptom resolution) than those who were not colonized with S. pneumoniae. Age and radiograph findings did not predict time to symptom resolution. Conclusions In children with acute sinusitis, proven nasopharyngeal colonization with S. pneumoniae at presentation independently predicted time to symptom resolution. Future randomized, placebo-controlled trials could investigate the usefulness of testing for the presence of nasopharyngeal pathogens as a predictor of response to treatment. PMID:24367985

  10. Intracranial brain abscess preceded by orbital cellulitis and sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Chen, Wen-Chao; Lin, Maggie S F; Huang, Hua-Tzu; Chao, Shih-Chun; Lo, Yi-Chen

    2010-05-01

    A 17-year-old boy with pyrexia, headache, and frequent drop attacks reported an acute onset of periorbital pain and swelling 1 month previously. Coronal computed tomography (CT) identified an ethmoid sinusitis, which was treated with functional endoscopic sinus surgery and intravenous gentamicin, prostaphylline, and metronidazone. Because of persistent symptoms, the patient returned 1 month later. The CT identified accumulation of debris in both frontal sinuses and a multilobulated lesion over the right frontal lobe. Bicoronal craniotomy was performed, and a mass located in the right frontal lobe was excised; the mass comprised chronic inflammatory tissues without evidence of malignancy. A postoperative brain CT confirmed the absence of a residual mass, and no recurrence or neurologic deficits were noted during the 3-month follow-up period. Intracranial complications cannot be prevented entirely even with the judicious use of antibiotics. Early application of the appropriate imaging modality and institution of aggressive therapy in any patient, not just pediatric patients, to prevent potential long-term disabilities and death are essential.

  11. Carotid-cavernous fistula after functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Emin; Isildak, Huseyin; Haciyev, Yusuf; Kaytaz, Asim; Enver, Ozgun

    2009-03-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are anomalous communications between the carotid arterial system and the venous cavernous sinus. They can arise because of spontaneous or trauma causes. Most caroticocavernous fistulas are of spontaneous origin and unknown etiology. Spontaneous CCF may also be associated with cavernous sinus pathology such as arteriosclerotic changes of the arterial wall, fibromuscular dysplasia, or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. Traumatic CCFs may occur after either blunt or penetrating head trauma. Their clinical presentation is related to their size and to the type of venous drainage, which can lead to a variety of symptoms, such as visual loss, proptosis, bruit, chemosis, cranial nerve impairment, intracranial hemorrhage (rare), and so on. Treatment by endovascular transarterial embolization with electrolytically detachable coils is a very effective method for CCF with good outcomes. Carotid-cavernous fistulas have been rarely reported after craniofacial surgery and are uncommon pathologies in otolaryngology practice. In this study, we report a 40-year-old woman with CCF secondary to blunt trauma of functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

  12. Fractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Benign Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Jerry D.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Chung, Arthur; Bush, David A.; Patyal, Baldev; Johnson, Walter D.; Hsu, Frank P.K.; Slater, James M.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of fractionated proton radiotherapy for a population of patients with benign cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2002, 72 patients were treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center with proton therapy for cavernous sinus meningiomas. Fifty-one patients had biopsy or subtotal resection; 47 had World Health Organization grade 1 pathology. Twenty-one patients had no histologic verification. Twenty-two patients received primary proton therapy; 30 had 1 previous surgery; 20 had more than 1 surgery. The mean gross tumor volume was 27.6 cm{sup 3}; mean clinical target volume was 52.9 cm{sup 3}. Median total doses for patients with and without histologic verification were 59 and 57 Gy, respectively. Mean and median follow-up periods were 74 months. Results: The overall 5-year actuarial control rate was 96%; the control rate was 99% in patients with grade 1 or absent histologic findings and 50% for those with atypical histology. All 21 patients who did not have histologic verification and 46 of 47 patients with histologic confirmation of grade 1 tumor demonstrated disease control at 5 years. Control rates for patients without previous surgery, 1 surgery, and 2 or more surgeries were 95%, 96%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusions: Fractionated proton radiotherapy for grade 1 cavernous sinus meningiomas achieves excellent control rates with minimal toxicities, regardless of surgical intervention or use of histologic diagnosis. Disease control for large lesions can be achieved by primary fractionated proton therapy.

  13. Sagittal sinus thrombosis due to L-asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Nisar A.; Kosar, Tasleem; Pala, Nazir A.; Qureshi, Umar A.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis (CSVT) is a serious complication of L-asparaginase chemotherapy for leukemia in children. Clinical features of headache, altered consciousness, focal neurological deficit, and seizures developing during or immediately after treatment with L-asparaginase should alert the treating physician to the possibility of CSVT. Immediate imaging of the brain should be done using CT and MRI and the veins should be visualized noninvasively by CT and MR venography. We report two children on induction therapy for acute leukemia who presented with seizures, headache, and altered consciousness. Venous infarcts with and without hemorrhage were seen on CT in one patient and the empty delta sign was seen after contrast injection; however, the early changes were missed by CT. MRI detected dural sinus thrombosis relatively earlier in another patient, while the CT findings were equivocal; in this patient, contrast-enhanced MRI showed the empty delta sign and MR venography confirmed absent flow in the superior sagittal sinus, which was diagnostic of sinus thrombosis. Rapid anticoagulation was started with heparin and maintained with warfarin. The child with a unilateral small nonhemorrhagic infarct made a complete recovery while the other, with bilateral hemorrhagic infarcts, did not survive. We stress the importance of early diagnosis of CSVT using CT and MRI in children with leukemia being treated with L-asparaginase; this will permit timely treatment. PMID:21042505

  14. Lateral sinus thrombosis associated with zoster sine herpete.

    PubMed

    Chan, James; Bergstrom, Richard T; Lanza, Donald C; Oas, John G

    2004-01-01

    Herpes zoster results from reactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV). Zoster sine herpete (ZSH) is an uncommon manifestation of VZV infection and presents with similar symptoms but without the vesicular rash. We describe an unusual case of lateral sinus thrombosis (LST) that developed during the clinical course of ZSH in the C2 distribution. A 55-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of left temporal and postauricular pain, nausea, vomiting, and mild photophobia. She denied otalgia, otorrhea, and hearing loss. Examination revealed hyperesthesia in the left C2 nerve root distribution without evidence of herpetic rash. A computed tomography scan showed minimal fluid in the left mastoid cavity (not mastoiditis) and thrombus within the left lateral and sigmoid dural sinus. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiogram confirmed these findings. Laboratory studies revealed elevated neurotrophic immunoglobulin G levels to VZV. Hypercoagulable studies were normal. She was subsequently treated with Neurontin, acyclovir, and anticoagulation. Her symptoms improved, and she was discharged 3 days later. LST is generally a complication of middle ear infection. Nonseptic LST, however, may result from dehydration, oral contraceptive use, coagulopathy, or thyroid disease. This unusual case raises the suspicion that thrombosis resulted from VZV associated thrombophlebitis in the ipsilateral cerebral venous sinuses along the second cervical nerve root distribution. A high index of suspicion is necessary in such cases so that a different treatment course can be identified and antiviral medication initiated promptly.

  15. Stenting Procedure for Sinus Stenosis with Transverse-Sigmoid Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, S.; Ueda, T.; Igase, K.; Ohue, S.; Kumon, Y.; Ohnishi, T.

    2006-01-01

    Summary We reported the dural AVF case with sinus stenosis, that was entirely treated through the stenting procedure. 61-year-old male had been realizing the attack which causes bilateral visual problem. He would have suffered from the intracranial hypertension caused by dural AVF in the right transverse sinus and left transverse sinus stenosis. We performed TVE and sinus stenting, then used the antiplatelet and the anticoagulant. However, six months later, he suffered from SAH due to recurrence of dural AVF. We performed TVE again, denser packing than usual. Two years later, he have no symptom, angiographically, there was no recurrence of dural AVF and patency of stented sinus. We think denser embolizations should have performed in case of dural AVF with sinus stenting. PMID:20569627

  16. Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis during Everest Expedition: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, P.; Shrestha, A. M.; Bhattarai, S.; Sapkota, D.; Sharma, N.; Devkota, U. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare but serious disorder that is associated with a poor clinical outcome. We report a 35-year-old man who had a severe headache and diplopia while climbing Mount Everest. His MR venography showed right transverse and right sigmoid sinus thrombosis. He improved on anticoagulant and symptomatic measures. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis at high altitude is discussed. PMID:27872776

  17. Virtual endoscopy in odontogenic sinus disease. Study technique and main pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Fanucci, Ezio; Leporace, Mario; Di Costanzo, Giuseppe; Mannino, Michela; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2004-09-01

    The use of CT scans in dental pathology is an established technique. The potential applications of Dentascan are further enhanced by the use of virtual navigation software, resulting in endoscopy-like imaging of the maxillary sinus, thus optimising both the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to sinus pathology of dental origin. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the technical-methodological aspects of maxillary sinus virtual endoscopy with Dentascan software and to document the most important and frequent diseases.

  18. Sick sinus syndrome associated with hypopituitarism: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongsheng; Zhang, Qing; Lu, Jingping; Zhang, Gang; Lu, Huihe; Huang, Jianfei; Shan, Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Though an association between autoimmune diseases and sick sinus syndrome has been reported, there has been no report on the association of hypopituitarism and sick sinus syndrome. Herein, we provide the first case report of hypopituitarism accompanying sick sinus syndrome in a 51-year-old woman presented to our hospital with syncope due to cardiac arrest. The patient was successfully managed by pacemaker installation and hormone replacement therapy. PMID:25332716

  19. Sigmoid Sinus Wall Reconstruction for Pulsatile Tinnitus Caused by Sigmoid Sinus Wall Dehiscence: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao-Hui; Liang, Xi-Hong; Zhao, Peng-Fei; Wang, Zhen-Chang; Gong, Shu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical characteristics and present surgical outcomes of PT caused by sigmoid sinus wall dehiscence (SSWD) Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 34 patients with PT who were diagnosed with SSWD in our institution between December 2008 and July 2013. Among them, 27 patients underwent sigmoid sinus wall reconstruction (surgery group) and 7 patients refused surgery (non-surgery group). Preoperative data were obtained from the patients’ medical records. All patients were followed up regularly for at least 25 months. Preoperative and postoperative computed tomography angiography (CTA) images were compared. Student’s t-tests were used to compare age, body mass index (BMI) and preoperative Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) scores between the surgery and the non-surgery groups and to compare pre- and follow-up THI scores. Results There was no significant difference in age, body mass index, or preoperative THI scores between groups. Following surgery, 14 patients had complete resolution, 5 had partial resolution, 7 experienced no change and PT was aggravated in 1 patient. The difference between preoperative and postoperative THI scores was significant. No severe complications were found postoperatively. Comparison of the preoperative and postoperative CTA images revealed that remnant unrepaired dehiscences were the cause of unsatisfactory outcomes following surgery. In the non-surgery group, PT remained largely unchanged. Conclusions Sigmoid sinus wall reconstruction is an effective and safe treatment for PT caused by SSWD. It is imperative that all regions of the dehiscence are sufficiently exposed and resurfaced during surgery. PMID:27736970

  20. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Two kinds of lymphocytes can attack and kill cancer cells: T-cells and B-cells. Immunotherapy aims to boost the ability of the T-cell and B-cell lymphocytes to kill cancer. This kind of therapy can also be used ...