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Sample records for paraplegia

  1. Hysterical paraplegia.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J H; Silver, J R

    1987-01-01

    Between 1944 and 1984 20 patients were admitted to a spinal injuries centre with a diagnosis of traumatic paraplegia. They subsequently walked out and the diagnosis was revised to hysterical paraplegia. A further 23 patients with incomplete traumatic injuries, who also walked from the centre, have been compared with them as controls. The features that enabled a diagnosis of hysterical paraplegia to be arrived at were: They were predominantly paraplegic, There was a high incidence of previous psychiatric illness and employment in the Health Service or allied professions, Many were actively seeking compensation. The physical findings were a disproportionate motor paralysis, non anatomical sensory loss, the presence of downgoing plantar responses, normal tone and reflexes. They made a rapid total recovery. In contrast, the control traumatic cases showed an incomplete recovery and a persistent residual neurological deficit. Investigations apart from plain radiographs of the spinal column were not warranted, and the diagnosis should be possible on clinical grounds alone. PMID:3585346

  2. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 8

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hereditary spastic paraplegias are divided into two types: pure and complex. The pure types involve only the nerves and muscles controlling ... the body. Spastic paraplegia type 8 is a pure hereditary spastic paraplegia. Like all hereditary spastic paraplegias, ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions spastic paraplegia type 2 spastic paraplegia type 2 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Spastic paraplegia type 2 is part of a group of genetic disorders ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions spastic paraplegia type 4 spastic paraplegia type 4 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spastic paraplegia type 4 is part of a group of ...

  5. Living with Paraplegia: Tensions and Contradictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Deborah L.; Young, Jenny M.; Saul, Megan Johnston

    2004-01-01

    Although it is well established that paraplegia results in dramatic lifestyle changes, little is understood about living in the community with paraplegia, especially from the perspective of the person with paraplegia. To develop insight into this experience, in-depth, personal interviews were conducted with seven individuals with paraplegia who…

  6. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 31

    MedlinePlus

    ... dominant MalaCards: spastic paraplegia 31 National Health Service (UK) Orphanet: Autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia type 31 Orphanet: ... and Advocacy Resources (5 links) Contact a Family (UK) National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Hereditary Spastic ...

  7. Pott's spine and paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Gautam, M P; Karki, P; Rijal, S; Singh, R

    2005-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis is usually secondary to lung or abdominal involvement and may also be the first manifestation of tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis (often called Pott's disease) is by definition, an advanced disease, requiring meticulous assessment and aggressive systemic therapy. Physicians should keep the diagnosis in mind, especially in a patient from a group with a high rate of tuberculosis infection. This review aims on updating the knowledge on spinal tuberculosis and its management. Skeletal involvement has been reported to occur in approximately 10% of all patents with extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and half of these patients develop infection within the spinal column. Symptoms of spinal tuberculosis are back pain, weakness, weight loss, fever, fatigue, and malaise. It is much more prone to develop neurological manifestation, paraplegia of varying degree. The palpation of spinous process in routine clinical examination is the most rewarding clinical method and is an invaluable measure for early recognition. Diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis is made on the basis of typical clinical presentation along with systemic constitutional manifestation and the evidence of past exposure to tuberculosis or concomitant visceral tuberculosis. Magnetic resonance imaging can define the extent of abscess formation and spinal cord compression. The diagnosis is confirmed through percutaneous or open biopsy of the spinal lesion. Surgery is necessary as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy if the vertebral infection produces an abscess, vertebral collapse, or neurologic compression. Some patents need aggressive supportive care owing to tuberculous meningitis or encephalopathy. Moreover, the importance of immediate commencement of appropriate treatment and its continuation for adequate duration along with the proper counseling of the patient and family members should not be underestimated for successful and desired outcome.

  8. Problems and perspectives in paraplegia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nashold, B.

    1974-01-01

    Improved clinical treatment of the paraplegic, developed during World War II, has reduced the overall mortality rate from close to 100 percent to 30 percent. Despite major clinical improvements, mainly in treatment of the acute phase of paraplegia, and despite greater rehabilitation efforts, the spinal injured person is never rehabilitated in the sense that he reaches an optimum and stays there. He is always exposed to the constant threat of deterioration of his physiological, sociological, and psychological state.

  9. Fluorosis... causing paraplegia... mutilating life...

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Tasnim; Jabeen, Rakhshanda; Hashim, Saba; Bano, Zeenat; Ghafoor, Subheen

    2016-02-01

    Fluorosis is thought to be rare in Pakistan but endemic in various parts of the world, especially in India and China. In Pakistan only a few cases have been reported from Thar, Sibbi and Manga Mandi, with probability of fluorosis on MRI findings, supported by high drinking waterfluoride content. Neurological manifestations of skeletal fluorosis may vary from radiculo-myelopathy to neuropathy. A case of 26 years old female from Thul, Sindh, who presented with paraplegia, is reported here. Her MRI showed extensive classical degenerative changes throughout the spine, consistent with fluorosis, leading to cord compression at multiple levels. No such case with confirmed fluorosis has been previously reported from Pakistan.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 11

    MedlinePlus

    ... the peripheral nervous system, which consists of nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and ... with this type of spastic paraplegia, the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain ( ...

  11. Painless aortic dissection presenting as paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Colak, Necmettin; Nazli, Yunus; Alpay, Mehmet Fatih; Akkaya, Ismail Olgun; Cakir, Omer

    2012-01-01

    Acute dissection of the aorta can be life-threatening. As a presenting manifestation of aortic dissection, neurologic complications such as paraplegia are rare. Herein, we report the case of a 51-year-old man who presented with sudden-onset paraplegia and ischemia of the legs, with no chest or back pain. His medical history included coronary artery bypass grafting. Physical examination revealed pulseless lower extremities, and computed tomography showed aortic dissection from the ascending aorta to the common iliac arteries bilaterally. A lumbar catheter was inserted for cerebrospinal fluid drainage, and axillary arterial cannulation was established. With the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, the aortic dissection was corrected, and the previous coronary artery grafts were reattached. The surgery restored spinal and lower-extremity perfusion, and the patient walked unaided from the hospital upon his discharge 5 days later. Although acute aortic dissection presenting as paraplegia is rare, it should be considered in patients who have pulseless femoral arteries bilaterally and sudden-onset paraplegia, despite no pain in the chest or back. Prompt diagnosis and intervention can prevent morbidity and death.

  12. Leptospirosis presenting as a flaccid paraplegia.

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, C.; Dudley, N.; Terry, H.

    1990-01-01

    A fatal case of leptospirosis in a 64 year old farm worker is described. The dramatic neurological presentation with a rapidly evolving flaccid paraplegia associated with biochemical evidence of renal and hepatic dysfunction is discussed. Attention is drawn to the wide range of neurological symptoms reported in leptospirosis, and to the possibility that this infectious disease may present neurologically. PMID:2362889

  13. Complete paraplegia resulting from surfer's myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Tomokazu; Yokoyama, Osamu; Sakuma, Fujiko; Itoh, Ryousuke; Romero, Ray R

    2013-09-01

    Three patients with diagnoses of surfer's myelopathy (24-31 yrs old; two men, one woman) were admitted to our rehabilitation hospital. All three patients were novice surfers and had a typical clinical course of onset: rapid progression of paraplegia after back pain while taking surfing lessons. Despite months of rehabilitation at our hospital, in all three patients, complete paraplegia (T9-T12) and bladder-bowel dysfunction remained. Our case profiles suggest that the neurologic outcome of surfer's myelopathy is potentially catastrophic, as has been suggested in previous reports. Surfer's myelopathy has been estimated to be an ischemic thoracic myelopathy. From our case profiles and review of the literature, not only the prolonged prone hyperextended posture of paddling but also the repetitive mechanical stress caused by flexion-extension of the spinal column may be related to its pathogenesis. To prevent surfer's myelopathy and to avoid progressive deterioration of neurologic function, increased education and awareness are essential.

  14. Paraplegia After Thoracic Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Vivek; Kaveeshvar, Hirsh; Dwivedi, Samvid

    2016-09-01

    Epidural steroid injections are a common procedure performed by pain physicians. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia along with several other groups recently provided guidelines for performing epidural injections in the setting of anticoagulants. We present a case of a patient who developed an epidural hematoma and subsequent paraplegia despite strict adherence to these guidelines. Although new guidelines serve to direct practice, risks of devastating neurologic complications remain as evidenced by our case.

  15. Walking dreams in congenital and acquired paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Saurat, Marie-Thérèse; Agbakou, Maité; Attigui, Patricia; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2011-12-01

    To test if dreams contain remote or never-experienced motor skills, we collected during 6 weeks dream reports from 15 paraplegics and 15 healthy subjects. In 9/10 subjects with spinal cord injury and in 5/5 with congenital paraplegia, voluntary leg movements were reported during dream, including feelings of walking (46%), running (8.6%), dancing (8%), standing up (6.3%), bicycling (6.3%), and practicing sports (skiing, playing basketball, swimming). Paraplegia patients experienced walking dreams (38.2%) just as often as controls (28.7%). There was no correlation between the frequency of walking dreams and the duration of paraplegia. In contrast, patients were rarely paraplegic in dreams. Subjects who had never walked or stopped walking 4-64 years prior to this study still experience walking in their dreams, suggesting that a cerebral walking program, either genetic or more probably developed via mirror neurons (activated when observing others performing an action) is reactivated during sleep.

  16. [Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC)].

    PubMed

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-10-01

    Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC), a nationwide clinical and genetic survey of patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), was started in 2006 as a project of the Research Committee for Ataxic Diseases of the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare, Japan. To date (April 4, 2014), 448 indexed patients with HSP have been registered from 46 prefectures in Japan. We are now performing molecular testing of the HSP patients using Sanger sequencing (SPG4, SPG11, SPG31, and ARSACS), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, 39, 42, ABCD1, alsin, and ARSACS), and resequencing microarray (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, and ABCD1). In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). In 88 patients with autosomal recessive HSP, although SPG11 was the most common form, accounting for 6%, most showed significant genetic heterogeneity. The results of molecular testing will be applicable to patients in terms of improved positive diagnosis, follow-up, and genetic counseling. JASPAC will contribute to elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying HSP, and will facilitate the development of better treatments for HSP.

  17. Acute Paraplegia as a Presentation of Aortic Saddle Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Guishard, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute onset paraplegia has a myriad of causes most often of a nonvascular origin. Vascular etiologies are infrequent causes and most often associated with postsurgical complications. Objective. To describe the occurrence and possible mechanism for aortic saddle embolism as a rare cause of acute paraplegia. Case Report. Described is a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with the sudden onset of nontraumatic low back pain with rapidly progressive paraplegia which was subsequently determined to be of vascular origin. PMID:27822396

  18. Spinal Arteriovenous Fistula with Progressive Paraplegia after Spinal Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Argyrakis, Nikolaos; Matis, Georgios K.; Mpata-Tshibemba, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    A case of an iatrogenic spinal arteriovenous fistula with progressive paraplegia in a young woman is reported. The fistula was eventually created after repetitive lumbar punctures performed in the process of spinal anaesthesia. Her symptoms were progressed to paraplegia over a period of 2 years. The digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a single-hole fistula, involving the anterior spinal artery and vein. The lesion was occluded by embolization with immediate improvement. The potential mechanism is discussed. PMID:24653807

  19. [Hereditary spastic paraplegia: up to date].

    PubMed

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that are clinically characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. HSP genetic loci are designated SPG1-72 in order of their discovery. In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). We have identified novel mutations in the C12orf65 gene and the LYST gene in several Japanese families with autosomal recessive HSP. JASPAC will facilitate gene discovery and mechanistic understanding of HSP. The future challenge will be the establishment of treatment of HSP.

  20. Paraplegia Due to Spinal Cord Infarction After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sevuk, Utkan; Kaya, Sedat; Ayaz, Firat; Aktas, Ulas

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegia is an extremely rare complication after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We report a patient who developed paraplegia after CABG and review the literature on spinal cord ischemia following CABG surgery.

  1. Paraplegia caused by cerebral contusions in the bilateral precentral gyri

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Hideaki; Fujimori, Hiroyuki; Sato, Naoaki; Matsumura, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Background: Paraplegia is mainly caused by spinal cord disease and rarely occurs due to head trauma. In this report, we describe a case of paraplegia caused by cerebral contusions in the bilateral precentral gyri. Case Description: A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with mildly impaired consciousness and severe pure motor paralysis in both legs. He was healthy until the morning of the day, but his wife found him injured in front of his house upon returning home. He had a subcutaneous hematoma in his occipital region, and seemed to have slipped by accident. Computed tomography of the brain and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of his spinal cord revealed no apparent cause of the paraplegia, although an MRI of his brain clearly revealed cerebral contusions in the bilateral precentral gyri. The cerebral contusion was diagnosed as the cause of pure motor paralysis of lower extremities. He received rehabilitation, and manual muscle testing of his legs revealed improvements. In the subacute phase, the precentral gyrus lesion disappeared on MRI. Conclusion: We must emphasize that cerebral contusion can be a differential diagnosis for paraplegia. In the acute phase, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI coronal and sagittal images are useful for identifying precentral gyri contusions. Paraplegia caused by a cerebral contusion may be misdiagnosed as a spinal concussion due to the disappearance of the precentral gyrus lesion on FLAIR MRI in the subacute phase. PMID:27904755

  2. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Eleanna; Tucci, Arianna; Manzoni, Claudia; Lynch, David S.; Elpidorou, Marilena; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Hamed, Sherifa A.; Haridy, Nourelhoda A.; Federoff, Monica; Preza, Elisavet; Hughes, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Wiethoff, Sarah; Schottlaender, Lucia; Proukakis, Christos; Morris, Huw; Warner, Tom; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Korlipara, L.V. Prasad; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W.; Lewis, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias are a heterogeneous group of degenerative disorders that are clinically classified as either pure with predominant lower limb spasticity, or complex where spastic paraplegia is complicated with additional neurological features, and are inherited in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked patterns. Genetic defects have been identified in over 40 different genes, with more than 70 loci in total. Complex recessive spastic paraplegias have in the past been frequently associated with mutations in SPG11 (spatacsin), ZFYVE26/SPG15, SPG7 (paraplegin) and a handful of other rare genes, but many cases remain genetically undefined. The overlap with other neurodegenerative disorders has been implied in a small number of reports, but not in larger disease series. This deficiency has been largely due to the lack of suitable high throughput techniques to investigate the genetic basis of disease, but the recent availability of next generation sequencing can facilitate the identification of disease-causing mutations even in extremely heterogeneous disorders. We investigated a series of 97 index cases with complex spastic paraplegia referred to a tertiary referral neurology centre in London for diagnosis or management. The mean age of onset was 16 years (range 3 to 39). The SPG11 gene was first analysed, revealing homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in 30/97 (30.9%) of probands, the largest SPG11 series reported to date, and by far the most common cause of complex spastic paraplegia in the UK, with severe and progressive clinical features and other neurological manifestations, linked with magnetic resonance imaging defects. Given the high frequency of SPG11 mutations, we studied the autophagic response to starvation in eight affected SPG11 cases and control fibroblast cell lines, but in our restricted study we did not observe correlations between disease status and autophagic or lysosomal markers. In the remaining cases, next

  3. Spinal cord ischemia resulting in paraplegia following extrapleural pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Ural, Kelly; Jakob, Kyle; Lato, Scott; Gilly, George; Landreneau, Rodney

    2014-08-01

    A patient undergoing radical extrapleural pneumonectomy for epithelioid malignant mesothelioma developed acute paraplegia postoperatively related to long-segment spinal cord ischemia. The usual area of concern for this complication is the T9 to T12 area where the artery of Adamkiewicz is most likely to originate. In this patient, there was ligation of only upper thoracic, ipsilateral segmental arteries from the T3 to T6 level, yet he still developed paraplegia. Our hypothesis is variant mid-thoracic vascular anatomy. Previously unreported, to our knowledge, this should be understood as a rare complication of this surgery.

  4. Paraplegia after aortic and superior mesenteric artery stenting for occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Hans, Sachinder S; Ngo, William; McAllister, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Paraplegia after endovascular therapy for aortic and visceral artery occlusive disease is an extremely uncommon occurrence. Two cases of paraplegia after placement of an aortic covered stent for infrarenal aortic stenosis and a superior mesenteric artery stent for chronic visceral ischemia are presented. In both patients, embolization of the arterial supply to the spinal cord was the presumed cause. One patient had a slight recovery after intense physical therapy and rehabilitation. The second patient did not have any recovery from her paraplegia.

  5. [Anesthetic management of a patient with hereditary spastic paraplegia].

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, Takayuki; Takahata, Osamu; Takayama, Koji; Sengoku, Kazufumi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    We experienced the anesthetic management of a 39 year-old-male with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) associated with pain due to pes cavus. He underwent orthomorphia ostectomy and tenodesis. Preoperative neurological examination revealed that he had slight dementia, symptoms of the pyramidal tract, lower limb bathyhypesthesia, and neurogenic bladder in addition to spastic paraplegia, and he was diagnosed as having combined type of HSP. Spinocerebellar degeneration is often accompanied with this type of HSP. To avoid the use of muscle relaxants and narcotics, we tried to induce anesthesia with inhalation of nitrous oxide (N2O), oxygen and sevoflurane (sevo). A laryngeal mask (LM) was inserted at the expiratory concentration of sevo 3.5%. Anesthesia was maintained by N2O, oxygen and sevo (2-3%) under spontaneous respiration. The patient recovered from anesthesia after the end of surgery, and the LM was removed smoothly. The patient's respiratory condition was stable, and no problems were found in the postoperative period.

  6. Aortoiliac occlusive disease presenting as sudden onset paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chien-Hung; Wang, Cheng-Hsien; Wu, Shih-Yun; Shih, Hong-Mo

    2014-07-01

    Thromboembolism and atherosclerotic stenosis both can cause arterial occlusion. Aortoiliac occlusive disease involving bifurcation of the aortoiliac artery induces symptoms of ischemia such as claudication and pain of buttocks and thighs, decreased bilateral femoral pulses, and impotence. Here, we describe a 58-year-old woman with a past history of atrial fibrillation and lacuna stroke with minimal right side weakness. She presented to our emergency department with sudden onset bilateral pain in the legs and paraplegia. A comprehensive examination revealed paresthesia and decreasing bilateral distal pulses. Computed tomographic imaging showed filling defects over the low abdominal aorta just above the bifurcation of the common iliac artery and bilateral femoral arteries. Acute aortic embolic occlusion was suspected. Her symptoms were resolved after emergent thrombectomy for acute limb ischemia. Physicians need to be aware of aortoiliac embolic occlusive disease which may present as acute paraplegia.

  7. Hybrid Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Thrombosis Presenting with Paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Azzarone, Matteo; De Troia, Alessandro; Iazzolino, Luigi; Nabulsi, Bilal; Tecchio, Tiziano

    2016-05-01

    Acute thrombotic or embolic occlusion of the abdominal aorta is a rare vascular emergency associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Classically, the clinical presentation is a severe peripheral ischemia with bilateral leg pain as the predominant feature. Aortic occlusion presenting as an isolated acute onset of paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia is very rare and requires improved awareness to prevent adverse outcomes associated with delayed diagnosis. We report the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with sudden paraplegia due to the thrombotic occlusion of the infrarenal aorta involving the first segment of the common iliac arteries on both sides; emergent transperitoneal aorto iliac thrombectomy combined with the endovascular iliac kissing-stent technique were performed achieving perioperative complete regression of the symptoms.

  8. [Paraplegia due to adhesive arachnoiditis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Luna, José Guadalupe; Sandoval Sánchez, Víctor; Benavides Rodríguez, David; Olivares Camacho, Jorge L; Taboada, Jesús B

    2009-01-01

    Various conditions of the spinal column occur at the lumbar level and new therapeutic surgical techniques have been applied to reduce the length of hospital stay, contribute to a quick return of patients to their activities of daily living, and reduce the postoperative limitations. However, a silent complication, adhesive arachnoiditis, has been reported with a frequency of 6-16% in cases undergoing lumbar surgery or with a history of revision surgery, and thus a second complication may occur, paraplegia, since the common symptom of arachnoiditis is persistent low back pain. The case of a 40-year-old patient is presented herein, who underwent lumbar spine surgery for herniated discs, and developed adhesive arachnoiditis involving the cauda equina, which was diagnosed with MRI. He had irreversible paraplegia with diffuse involvement of the cauda equina despite the mechanical lavage and surgical debridement performed due to the persistence of serous fluid discharge from the wound. The interbody implant placed during the first surgery was removed and the treatment was completed with posterior stabilization reinstrumentation; the patient had persistent neurologic impairment. There are few reports in the world literature of paraplegia due to non-infectious adhesive arachnoiditis. The remaining reports of paraplegia have been in patients with spinal infection, such as HIV-TB, mycosis, brucellosis or meningeal hemorrhage. It is not easy for patients to understand the very likely irreversible neurologic lesion of his complication. However, it is important for the spine surgeon to bear in mind the occurrence and frequency of adhesive arachnoiditis which could lead to irreversible neurologic deficit in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery.

  9. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H.; Henriksen, Sandra P.; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%) and variants of uncertain significance in ten probands (10%). Together these accounted for 30 probands (29%) and involved 18 different genes. Among several interesting findings, dominantly inherited KIF1A variants, p.(Val8Met) and p.(Ile27Thr) segregated in two independent families, both presenting with a pure spastic paraplegia phenotype. Two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly4230Ser) and p.(Leu4221Val) were found in SACS in one consanguineous family, presenting with spastic ataxia and isolated cerebellar atrophy. The average disease duration in probands with pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants was 31 years, ranging from 4 to 51 years. In conclusion, this study confirmed and expanded the clinical phenotypes associated with known disease genes. The results demonstrate that gene panel sequencing and similar sequencing approaches can serve as efficient diagnostic tools for different heterogeneous disorders. Early use of such strategies may help to reduce both costs and time of the diagnostic process. PMID:28362824

  10. Late neurological recovery of paraplegia after endovascular repair of an infected thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mees, Barend M E; Bastos Gonçalves, Frederico; Koudstaal, Peter J; Verhagen, Hence J M

    2013-02-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a potentially devastating complication after thoracic endovascular aorta repair (TEVAR). Patients with spinal cord ischemia after TEVAR often develop paraplegia, which is considered irreversible, and have significant increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. We report the case of a patient with unusual late complete neurologic recovery of acute-onset paraplegia after TEVAR for an infected thoracic aortic aneurysm.

  11. Spontaneous acute hemorrhage of intraspinal canal cellular schwannoma with paraplegia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng-Zhu; Li, Yuping; Han, Yang; Wang, Xiaodong; She, Lei; Yan, Zhengcun; Dong, Lun

    2015-06-01

    Cellular schwannoma, an unusual histological subtype of schwannoma, is a benign hypercellular variant of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. We report a 48-year-old woman with sudden onset of paraplegia. The complete surgical resection was achieved. This is the first report about intraspinal canal cellular schwannoma following spontaneous acute hemorrhage and paraplegia.

  12. [Urinary infection in patients with the condition of paraplegia].

    PubMed

    Ramić, Ibrahim

    2004-01-01

    The data were retrospectivelly analyzed conserning the frequency of uroinnfect in person with the paraplegia condition at the institute for physiatry and rehabilitation--the Center for paraplegia of the Clinical center of University in Sarajevo. The analysis was involved 71 (10%) of the patients chosen by the method of the casual choice. Males 57 (80.28%), females 14 (19.71%) of the examimnees. Urolitiazation was found in 22 (30.98%), without urolitization was 49 (69.01%) of patients. The sterile urinoculture were found in only 4 (5.63%) of the patients. The greatest number of the patients 34 (47.88%) he had three and more bacteria in urinoculture. Per two bacterias had 18 (25.35%), with the a one bacteria was 15 (21.12%) of patients. That the degree of the education and enabling of the activities of every day life (AEL) has no essential influence on the seizures of uroinfect shows the result of the research of Barther index where we found 59 (83.09%) of the examinees independent in movement. What are social consequences of this condition when the complications by uroinfect and urocaliculosys can be seen by the hospitalization number at the Institute for the rehabilitation where 29 (40.84%) of the examinees was hospitalized more than three times, 12 (16.90%) three times, 16 (22.90%) and only 14 (19.71%) once. It is considered that the persons with the paraplegia condition if they have no the acute becoming works should perform at least the essential control examinations every six months.

  13. Simulated paraplegia: an occasional problem for the neurosurgeon.

    PubMed Central

    Maurice-Williams, R S; Marsh, H

    1985-01-01

    Fourteen cases of simulated paraplegia and tetraplegia encountered amongst 4,800 neurosurgical admissions are described. The classification of such cases is difficult. Use of the term "hysteria" depends on whether the behaviour is judged to be conscious or not, but this can rarely be decided. In most of the patients the paralysis was of relatively short duration and recovered rapidly with simple methods of treatment which permitted this to occur without loss of face, but such cases presenting as acute neurological emergencies represent only one relatively simple form of pretended or "hysterical" illness. Many of these patients are probably never seen by psychiatrists. PMID:4031935

  14. Rehabilitation for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyong; Hong, Yi

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] To study the characteristics and treatment strategy for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation. [Subjects] Six cases were selected from among the patients admitted to the China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1991 to 2014. The criteria for the six cases were spinal cord injury with amputation immediately or in a short time (1 week) after the trauma. [Methods] General information, clinical diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and other data were analyzed. [Results] All the six cases were injured by high energy or complex energy accidents: two cases by falls after high voltage electric shock, one by an oil pipeline explosion, one by the impact of a falling tower crane and received high energy traffic accident injuries (one was hit by a train, and the other was hit by a truck at high speed). All the six cases had thoracic and lumbar vertebral injuries and complete paraplegia. Amputation stump infection occurred in four cases. After comprehensive rehabilitation treatment, patients' functional independence measure (FIM) scores improved significantly, but American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores and ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) grades showed no significant improvement. [Conclusion] When formulating the clinical treatment and rehabilitation for spinal cord injury with amputation patients, simultaneous consideration of the characteristics of the spinal cord injury and amputation is needed to develop an individualized strategy. For spinal cord injury with limb amputation patients, prostheses should allow the improvement of patients' self-care ability.

  15. Rehabilitation for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangyong; Hong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To study the characteristics and treatment strategy for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation. [Subjects] Six cases were selected from among the patients admitted to the China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1991 to 2014. The criteria for the six cases were spinal cord injury with amputation immediately or in a short time (1 week) after the trauma. [Methods] General information, clinical diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and other data were analyzed. [Results] All the six cases were injured by high energy or complex energy accidents: two cases by falls after high voltage electric shock, one by an oil pipeline explosion, one by the impact of a falling tower crane and received high energy traffic accident injuries (one was hit by a train, and the other was hit by a truck at high speed). All the six cases had thoracic and lumbar vertebral injuries and complete paraplegia. Amputation stump infection occurred in four cases. After comprehensive rehabilitation treatment, patients’ functional independence measure (FIM) scores improved significantly, but American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores and ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) grades showed no significant improvement. [Conclusion] When formulating the clinical treatment and rehabilitation for spinal cord injury with amputation patients, simultaneous consideration of the characteristics of the spinal cord injury and amputation is needed to develop an individualized strategy. For spinal cord injury with limb amputation patients, prostheses should allow the improvement of patients’ self-care ability. PMID:26644641

  16. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  17. Dominant transmission of de novo KIF1A motor domain variant underlying pure spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Ylikallio, Emil; Kim, Doyoun; Isohanni, Pirjo; Auranen, Mari; Kim, Eunjoon; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2015-10-01

    Variants in family 1 kinesin (KIF1A), which encodes a kinesin axonal motor protein, have been described to cause variable neurological manifestations. Recessive missense variants have led to spastic paraplegia, and recessive truncations to sensory and autonomic neuropathy. De novo missense variants cause developmental delay or intellectual disability, cerebellar atrophy and variable spasticity. We describe a family with father-to-son transmission of de novo variant in the KIF1A motor domain, in a phenotype of pure spastic paraplegia. Structural modeling of the predicted p.(Ser69Leu) amino acid change suggested that it impairs the stable binding of ATP to the KIF1A protein. Our study reports the first dominantly inherited KIF1A variant and expands the spectrum of phenotypes caused by heterozygous KIF1A motor domain variants to include pure spastic paraplegia. We conclude that KIF1A should be considered a candidate gene for hereditary paraplegias regardless of inheritance pattern.

  18. Unusual presentation of aortic dissection: post-coital acute paraplegia with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Galabada, Dinith P; Nazar, Abdul L M

    2014-09-01

    We report the case of a 45-year-old chronic smoker who presented with acute paraplegia occurring during coitus and subsequently developed acute renal failure (ARF) requiring dialysis. He had absent peripheral pulses in the lower limbs with evidence of acute ischemia. Doppler study showed dissecting aneurysm of thoracic aorta, thrombotic occlusion of the distal aorta from L1 level up to bifurcation and occlusion of the right renal artery by a thrombus that was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. He was not subjected to any vascular intervention as his lower limbs were not salvageable due to delay in the diagnosis. Post-coital aortic dissection and aortic dissection presenting with acute paraplegia and ARF are very rare. This is probably the first case report with post-coital acute aortic dissection presenting with paraplegia and ARF. This case emphasizes the importance of a careful examination of peripheral pulses in patients presenting with ARF and paraplegia.

  19. Successful staged operation for acute type A aortic dissection with paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takashi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Tokuichiro; Makuuchi, Haruo

    2013-06-01

    A 75-year-old man presented with both paraplegia and acute occlusion of the abdominal aorta at onset. Extraanatomical bypass was performed following spinal drainage. After 3 days, the ascending aorta replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass using the extraanatomical bypass graft for arterial cannulation. The abdominal aorta was replaced after 6 months. A staged operation is one of the options for acute aortic dissection with paraplegia and acute occlusion of the abdominal aorta.

  20. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma presenting as paraplegia after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kin, Hajime; Mukaida, Masayuki; Koizumi, Junichi; Kamada, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Yoshino; Iwase, Tomoyuki; Ikai, Akio; Okabayashi, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    An 86-year-old woman was scheduled to undergo aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass graft. On postoperative day 3, she developed sudden-onset neck pain followed by weakness in the right arm. Her symptoms worsened with time, and she developed paraplegia. At 60 h after the first complaint, spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) from C2 to C6 with spinal cord compression was diagnosed from a magnetic resonance image of the cervical region. We decided on conservative therapy because operative recovery was impossible. Delayed diagnosis led to grievous results in the present case. When neurological abnormalities follow neck or back pain after open heart surgery, SSEH must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Further, if it is suspected, early cervical computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and surgery should be considered.

  1. Paraplegia by acute cervical disc protrusion after lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Huan; Hui, Yu-Ling; Yu, Chong-Ming; Niu, Chi-Chien; Lui, Ping-Wing

    2005-04-01

    Non-traumatic paraplegia caused by herniation of the cervical intervertebral disc is an uncommon postoperative complication. A patient with claudication and radiculopathy was scheduled for lumbar laminectomy due to spinal stenosis. Postoperatively, numbness below T6 was found in his both legs of the patient. MRI showed a protruded intervertebral disc between C6 and C7. Despite urgent disectomy, the patient's lower extremities remained paralyzed without significant improvement for 3 months. Loss of muscle support during general anesthesia, excessive neck extension during endotracheal intubation and positioning, as well as bucking and agitation are believed as triggering factors for the protrusion of the cervical disc. We suggest that a complete history taking and physical examination be accomplished in patients scheduled for lumbar spine surgery in order to exclude coexisting cervical spine disorders. In addition, skillful endotracheal intubation and careful neck positioning are mandatory for patients receiving surgery in the prone position.

  2. Evaluation of activity monitors in manual wheelchair users with paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V.; Ding, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of SenseWear® (SW) and RT3 activity monitors (AMs) in estimating energy expenditure (EE) in manual wheelchair users (MWUs) with paraplegia for a variety of physical activities. Methods Twenty-four subjects completed four activities including resting, wheelchair propulsion, arm-ergometry exercise, and deskwork. The criterion EE was measured by a K4b2 portable metabolic cart. The EE estimated by the SW and RT3 were compared with the criterion EE by the absolute differences and absolute percentage errors. Intraclass correlations and the Bland and Altman plots were also used to assess the agreements between the two AMs and the metabolic cart. Correlations between the criterion EE and the estimated EE and sensors data from the AMs were evaluated. Results The EE estimation errors for the AMs varied from 24.4 to 125.8% for the SW and from 22.0 to 52.8% for the RT3. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the criterion EE and the EE estimated by the two AMs for each activity and all activities as a whole were considered poor with all the ICCs smaller than 0.75. Except for deskwork, the EE from the SW was more correlated to the criterion EE than the EE from the RT3. Conclusion The results indicate that neither of the AMs is an appropriate tool for quantifying physical activity in MWUs with paraplegia. However, the accuracy of EE estimation could be potentially improved by building new regression models based on wheelchair-related activities. PMID:21528634

  3. Clinical and genetic study of hereditary spastic paraplegia in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Chrestian, Nicolas; Dupré, Nicolas; Gan-Or, Ziv; Szuto, Anna; Chen, Shiyi; Venkitachalam, Anil; Brisson, Jean-Denis; Warman-Chardon, Jodi; Ahmed, Sohnee; Ashtiani, Setareh; MacDonald, Heather; Mohsin, Noreen; Mourabit-Amari, Karim; Provencher, Pierre; Boycott, Kym M.; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J.; Dion, Patrick A.; Ray, Peter N.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical, genetic, and epidemiologic features of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) in Canada and to determine which clinical, radiologic, and genetic factors determine functional outcomes for patients with HSP. Methods: We conducted a multicenter observational study of patients who met clinical criteria for the diagnosis of HSP in the provinces of Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec from 2012 to 2015. Characteristics of the participants were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The main outcome measure for a subset of the cohort (n = 48) was the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale. We also used the SPATAX-EUROSPA disability stage (disability score) to assess disability (n = 65). Results: A total of 526 patients were identified with HSP across the country, and 150 patients had a confirmed genetic diagnosis. Mutations were identified in 15 different genes; the most common were SPAST (SPG4, 48%), ATL1 (SPG3A, 16%), SPG11 (8%), SPG7 (7%), and KIAA0196 (SPG8, 5%). The diagnosis of SPG4 was associated with older age at symptom onset (p = 0.0017). SPG4 and SPG3A were less associated with learning disabilities compared to other subtypes of HSP, and SPG11 was strongly associated with progressive cognitive deficits (odds ratio 87.75, 95% confidence interval 14.04–548.24, p < 0.0001). SPG3A was associated with better functional outcomes compared to other HSP subtypes (p = 0.04) on multivariate analysis. The strongest predictor of significant disability was abnormal brain MRI (p = 0.014). Conclusions: The most important predictors of disability in our HSP cohort were SPG11 mutations and abnormal brain MRI. Accurate molecular characterization of well-phenotyped cohorts and international collaboration are essential to establish the natural history of these rare neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27957547

  4. Double incontinence as a first symptom of saddle embolism of the aorta leads to sudden paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-11-01

    An aortic saddle embolus causing cauda equine syndrome followed by paraplegia is an exceedingly rare phenomenon in post-operative period in coronary artery bypass grafting. In non-CABG cases, reported documentation of neurological recovery from this event is even rarer. A 57-year-old male 8 days after uneventful OPCAP presented with severe lower extremity pain and sudden fecal and urinary incontinence, followed by the absence of pulsations in the lower limbs and paraplegia, during 20-minute period. He underwent immediate bilateral transfemoral embolectomy. The postoperative period was uneventful. The paraplegia recovered immediately after embolectomy and recovery from anesthesia. An angiography has been made to verify that a high origin of the great radicular artery above T12 level may be responsible for better recovery of paraplegia when its ostium obstructed by a saddle embolus relieved using embolectomy. Early surgical intervention in restoring the blood flow into the great radicular artery may prevent severe histological changes hitherto responsible for non-recovery from paraplegia in the earlier reports. Three unique characteristics of this article are as follows: 1) Occurrence of this complication in the post-operative period in off-pump CABG surgery; 2) Commencing of emboli with bizarre symptoms of double incontinence; 3) Combination of cauda equine syndrome and complete paralysis.

  5. Complete Immediate Paraplegia Reversal after Performing Aorto-Lumbar Bypass on the Patient who Underwent Aortoiliac Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Banzic, Igor; Sladojevic, Milos; Ilic, Nikola; Koncar, Igor; Davidovic, Lazar; Brankovic, Milos

    2016-08-01

    Although both internal iliac arteries were saved during operation, the patient developed paraplegia immediately after aortoiliac reconstruction due to the spinal cord ischemia. We report a successfully treated immediate postoperative paraplegia by performing second operation and creating bypass from the bifurcated Dacron graft to the previously detected nonpaired huge lumbar artery.

  6. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  7. Management of acute spontaneous thoracic spinal epidural hematoma causing paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Alić, Fahrudin; Bečulić, Hakija; Jusić, Aldin; Skomorac, Rasim; Moranjkić, Mirza; Hrvat, Lejla; Tandir, Lejla

    2017-02-01

    Aim To emphasize the importance of early recognition, diagnostic processing and emergent surgical treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). Methods A 39-year-old female presented with sudden onset of severe pain between the shoulder blades followed by paraparesis and alerted sensibility in the lower extremities. An hour later she developed paraplegia with sensory deficits below ThIV level, absence of patellar reflex, ankle jerk reflex and sphincter dysfunction. Results Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated acute extensive epidural mass of thoracic spinal segments (ThI-ThIII). The patient underwent emergent decompressive laminectomy ThI-ThIII with epidural hematoma evacuation within 24 hours of symptoms onset. After the surgical treatment, because of suspicion on spinal arteriovenous malformation, complete diagnostic evaluation with spinal angiography was done and no form of vascular malformation was found. Idiopathic SSEH was diagnosed. Two months later the patient reached complete neurological improvement. Conclusion The SSEH is a rare condition that should be kept in mind in patients presenting with neurological deficit and a sudden onset of back pain like it was in our case. For early diagnosis, immediate MRI is essential. Prompt surgical decompression such as laminectomy is an absolute surgical indication widely accepted for patients with progressive neurological deficit. The SSEH should be considered as one of the important differential diagnoses in patients who have developed acute myelopathy.

  8. Strumpellin and Spartin, Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Proteins, are Binding Partners

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiali; Hedera, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is one of the most heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases with more than 50 identified genes causing a relatively stereotypical phenotypic presentation. Recent studies of HSP pathogenesis have suggested the existence of shared biochemical pathways that are crucial for axonal maintenance and degeneration. We explored possible interactions of several proteins associated with this condition. Here we report interactions of endogenous and overexpressed strumpellin with another HSP-associated protein, spartin. This biochemical interaction does not appear to be a part of the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein and Scar homologue (WASH) complex because spartin is not co-immunoprecipitated with WASH1 protein. The spartin–strumpellin association does not require the presence of the microtubule interacting and trafficking domain of spartin. Over-expression of mutant forms of strumpellin with the introduced HSP-causing mutations does not alter the colocalization of these two proteins. Knockdown of strumpellin in cultured cortical rat neurons interferes with development of neuronal branching and results in reduced expression of endogenous spartin. Proteosomal inhibition stabilized the levels of spartin and WASH1 proteins, supporting increased spartin degradation in the absence of strumpellin. PMID:25987849

  9. A stimulation-driven exoskeleton for walking after paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sarah R; Nandor, Mark J; Lu Li; Foglyano, Kevin M; Schnellenberger, John R; Kobetic, Rudi; Quinn, Roger D; Triolo, Ronald J

    2016-08-01

    An untethered version of a stimulation-driven exoskeleton was evaluated for its ability to restore walking after paralysis from spinal cord injury. The hybrid neuroprosthesis (HNP) combined a passive variable-constraint exoskeleton for stability and support with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to contract the paralyzed muscles to drive limb movement. This self-contained HNP was operated by an onboard controller that sampled sensor signals, generated appropriate commands to both the exoskeletal constraints and integrated stimulator, and transmitted data wirelessly via Bluetooth to an off-board computer for real-time monitoring and recording for offline analysis. The subject selected the desired function (i.e. standing up, stepping, or sitting down) by means of a wireless finger switch that communicated with the onboard controller. Within the stepping function, a gait event detector supervisory controller transitioned between the different phases of gait such as double stance, swing, and weight acceptance based on signals from sensors incorporated into the exoskeleton. The different states of the control system governed the locking and unlocking of the exoskeletal hip and knee joints as well as the stimulation patterns activating hip and knee flexor or extensor muscles at the appropriate times and intensities to enable stepping. This study was one of our first successful implementations of the self-contained "muscle-first" HNP and successfully restored gait to an individual with motor complete mid-thoracic paraplegia.

  10. [Thoraco-abdominal aortic replacement in chronic phase in a patient with temporary paraplegia after Stanford B acute dissection].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Goro; Hata, Masaki; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2013-07-01

    A 42-year-old man underwent was performed with thoraco-abdominal aneurysm replacement accompaniedy with reconstruction of abdominal branches and intercostal arteries. Eighteen months before, he had suffered from Stanford already been cured with paraplegia on being type B acute aortic dissection combined with paraplegia. When paraplegia had been occurred, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was had been performed promptly, and 4 days later, neurologic deficit was disappeared in 1 day. During the thoraco-abdominal aortic operation, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was performed done again. After the operation, paraplegia did was not occurred and he did not feel somewhat wrong with his legs. He was discharged from hospital on foot by himself. This case showed the efficacy of cerebral spinal fluid drainage for not only both with the prevention but also and treatment of paraplegia.

  11. Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma: Long-term Outcome in 87 Patients Who Presented With Paraplegia in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Hesseling, P B; Mbah, G; Kouya, F; Kimbi, C; Nfor, P; Kaah, J; Kuruvilla, R; Best, A; Wharin, P

    2015-01-01

    The reported long-term outcome of endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) patients who present with paraplegia is largely unknown. Records of BL patients treated with comparable short-interval cyclophosphamide chemotherapy schedules between 2004 and 2014 at three Baptist mission hospitals in Cameroon were reviewed. Survivors were followed up and examined at home or in hospital. Eighty-seven of 948 (9.2%) patients had paraplegia at diagnosis. The survival rate in eBL patients with paraplegia at diagnosis was 33% (n = 29) after follow-up of between 2 and 96 (median 40) months. Seven patients (24%) had neurological sequelae and needed rehabilitation. There was no relationship between the duration of symptoms (<2, 2-4, >4 weeks) and the survival rate or the risk to have neurological sequelae. The survival rate and risk for sequelae were similar in patients with confirmed St. Jude stage III and IV diseases.

  12. Cholesterol crystal embolism and delayed-onset paraplegia after thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Bahaa; Schneider, Fabrice; Marques da Fonseca, Pedro; Gouny, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Postoperative paraplegia caused by ischemic injury of the spinal cord is the most disabling complication of thoracoabdominal surgery. We described the case of a 75-year-old patient who underwent a thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair (type IV aneurysm according to Crawford classification). The aorta clamping was done at the T11 level without specific medullary protection. The first postoperative week was uneventful. On the postoperative day 8, renal failure and livedo of the left lower limb occurred together with complete hypotonic paraplegia and severe sepsis. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a gangrenous cholecystitis, and skin biopsies showed cholesterol crystals embolisms in the hypodermis small arteries. The patient died on the postoperative day 28 from a multiorgan failure. In this case, paraplegia was due to cholesterol crystal embolism, which migrated secondarily after aortic clamping.

  13. Coagulopathy associated with sac reperfusion for reversing paraplegia after endovascular repair of type II thoracoabdominal aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lioupis, Christos; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Clough, Rachel; Matharu, Nick; Modarai, Bijan; Carrell, Tom; Taylor, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Sac perfusion may be helpful in preventing or reversing spinal cord injury after endovascular repair of thoracoabdominal aneurysms and it has been used as an adjunct to the standard physiologic measures of sustained hypertension and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Coagulopathy as a result of endoleak after endovascular aneurysm repair has been reported, and very rare cases of treatment after repair of these endoleaks have been described. We report a 73-year-old man who had endovascular repair of a type II thoracoabdominal aneurysm with a branched stent graft. Sac reperfusion was initiated to manage postoperative paraplegia. The paraplegia partially resolved but severe hemorrhagic complications developed that were attributed to sac perfusion-related hyperfibrinolysis. Discontinuation of sac perfusion resolved the coagulopathy but resulted in paraplegia.

  14. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with recessive trait caused by mutation in KLC4 gene.

    PubMed

    Bayrakli, Fatih; Poyrazoglu, Hatice Gamze; Yuksel, Sirin; Yakicier, Cengiz; Erguner, Bekir; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Yuceturk, Betul; Ozer, Bugra; Doganay, Selim; Tanrikulu, Bahattin; Seker, Askin; Akbulut, Fatih; Ozen, Ali; Per, Huseyin; Kumandas, Sefer; Altuner Torun, Yasemin; Bayri, Yasar; Sakar, Mustafa; Dagcinar, Adnan; Ziyal, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    We report an association between a new causative gene and spastic paraplegia, which is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. Clinical phenotyping of one consanguineous family followed by combined homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing analysis. Three patients from the same family shared common features of progressive complicated spastic paraplegia. They shared a single homozygous stretch area on chromosome 6. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation (c.853_871del19) in the gene coding the kinesin light chain 4 protein (KLC4). Meanwhile, the unaffected parents and two siblings were heterozygous and one sibling was homozygous wild type. The 19 bp deletion in exon 6 generates a stop codon and thus a truncated messenger RNA and protein. The association of a KLC4 mutation with spastic paraplegia identifies a new locus for the disease.

  15. Novel medical bathing with traditional Chinese herb formula alleviates paraplegia spasticity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Meng, Qingxi; Yu, Dapeng; Zhao, Xiwu; Zhao, Tingbao

    2014-06-01

    Paraplegia spasm is a kind of chronic disease which lacks effective treatment; the patients have to endure long-term pain, which is a tough problem for nursing practice. Lots of potential candidate medicines are under investigation, and a new Chinese herb formula is introduced in the current study. In the present study, we chose six different well-known Chinese herbs to form a formula, and boiled them into the water with an optimized ratio to make bath water; 80 paraplegic patients received this medicinal bath, and 80 patients received perfume water bath as placebo group. Compared with placebo control patients, the herb-treated patients have significant reduction in paraplegia spasm, visual analogue scale score, clinician global impression and sleep disorder. This novel six-combined formula traditional medicine could be beneficial for alleviating paraplegia spasm, but the underlying action mechanism deserves further study.

  16. Acute Paraplegia After Lumbar Steroid Injection in Patients With Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas: Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistulas (SDAVFs) are the most common type of spinal vascular malformations. However, SDAVFs are still underdiagnosed entities because their clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, as they include low back pain or radiating pain to the limb. There have been several reports of acute paraplegia after lumbar epidural steroid injections in patients with SDAVFs. We present 4 patients with SDAVFs who received lumbar steroid injection. Among the 4 cases, acute paraplegia developed in 2 cases that received a larger volume of injectate than the other cases. Thus, we are suggesting that the volume of injectate may be a contributing factor for acute paraplegia after lumbar steroid injection in patients with SDAVFs. PMID:27847727

  17. The mouse rumpshaker mutation of the proteolipid protein in human X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.; Hoffman, E.P.; Matise, T.C.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by slowly progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower extremities. We have recently genetically analyzed the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family reported by Johnston and McKusick in 1962. We employed a fluorescent multiplex CA repeat strategy using a 22 locus, 10 cM framework map of the human X chromosome and localized the gene within a 36 cM region of Xq2l.3-q24 which includes the PLP locus. Saugier-Veber et al. recently reported a point mutation (His139Tyr) in exon 3B of the PLP gene in an X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family (SPG2). This family shows no optic atrophy, in contrast to the family we have studied. This data showed that SPG2 and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease were allelic disorders. We investigated the PLP gene as a candidate gene for the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family using SSCP and direct sequencing methods. We found a point mutation (T to C) in exon 4 of affected males which alters the amino-acid (Ile to Thr) at residue 186. This change was absent in the unaffected males of the family and in 40 unrelated control females (80 X chromosomes). Surprisingly, this mutation is identical to the mutation previously identified in the rumpshaker mouse model. The complete homology between both the mouse and human PLP sequence, and the mouse rumpshaker mutation and human spastic paraplegia mutation in our family, permit direct parallels to be drawn with regards to pathophysiology. Our data indicates that the well-documented and striking clinical differences between Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is due to the specific effect of different mutations of the human PLP gene on oligodendrocyte differentiation and development and on later myelin production and maintenance.

  18. Paraplegia after contrast media application: a transient or devastating rare complication? Case report.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Dorothee; Kallenberg, Kai; Hartmann, Marius; Rohde, Veit

    2016-05-01

    The authors report the case of a 76-year-old man with a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula. The patient suffered from sudden repeated reversible paraplegia after spinal digital subtraction angiography as well as CT angiography. Neurotoxicity of contrast media (CM) is the most probable cause for this repeated short-lasting paraplegia. Intolerance to toxicity of CM to the vulnerable spinal cord is rare, and probably depends on the individual patient. This phenomenon is transient and can occur after both intraarterial and intravenous CM application.

  19. Mutation in the AP4B1 gene cause hereditary spastic paraplegia type 47 (SPG47) .

    PubMed

    Bauer, Peter; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Blumkin, Lubov; Schlipf, Nina; Schröder, Christopher; Schicks, Julia; Lev, Dorit; Riess, Olaf; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Schöls, Ludger

    2012-02-01

    We recently identified a new locus for spastic paraplegia type 47 (SPG47) in a consanguineous Arabic family with two affected siblings with progressive spastic paraparesis,intellectual disability, seizures, periventricular white matter changes and thin corpus callosum. Using exome sequencing, we now identified a novel AP4B1 frameshift mutation (c.664delC) in this family. This mutation was homozygous in both affected siblings and heterozygous in both parents. The mutant allele was absent in 316 Caucasian and 200 ethnically matched control chromosomes. We propose that AP4B1 mutations cause SPG47 and should be considered in early onset spastic paraplegia with intellectual disability.

  20. REEP1 Mutation Spectrum and Genotype/Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type 31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beetz, Christian; Schule, Rebecca; Deconinck, Tine; Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Zhu, Hui; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A. G.; Byrne, Paula; Otto, Susanne; Nygren, Anders O. H.; Baets, Jonathan; Smets, Katrien; Ceulemans, Berten; Dan, Bernard; Nagan, Narasimhan; Kassubek, Jan; Klimpe, Sven; Klopstock, Thomas; Stolze, Henning; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance T. R. M.; Hutchinson, Michael; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Braastad, Corey; Deufel, Thomas; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Schols, Ludger; de Jonghe, Peter; Zuchner, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1) have recently been reported to cause autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) type SPG31. In a large collaborative effort, we screened a sample of 535 unrelated HSP patients for "REEP1" mutations and copy number variations. We identified 13 novel and 2 known "REEP1"…

  1. Prevalence of Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Syndrome in Adults with Paraplegia and Tetraplegia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To investigate the extent of oxidative stress and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in people with spinal cord injuries (SCI) and to identify the major factors associated with oxidative stress and MetS in this population. Methods: 24 subjects with paraplegia (PARA), 26 subjects with tetraplegia ...

  2. Alteration of ornithine metabolism leads to dominant and recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Coutelier, Marie; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Habarou, Florence; Morais, Sara; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Tao, Feifei; Konop, Juliette; Stoll, Marion; Charles, Perrine; Jacoupy, Maxime; Matusiak, Raphaël; Alonso, Isabel; Tallaksen, Chantal; Mairey, Mathilde; Kennerson, Marina; Gaussen, Marion; Schule, Rebecca; Janin, Maxime; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Durand, Christelle M.; Depienne, Christel; Calvas, Patrick; Coutinho, Paula; Saudubray, Jean-Marie; Rouleau, Guy; Brice, Alexis; Nicholson, Garth; Darios, Frédéric; Loureiro, José L.; Zuchner, Stephan; Ottolenghi, Chris; Mochel, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias are heterogeneous neurological disorders characterized by a pyramidal syndrome with symptoms predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Some limited pyramidal involvement also occurs in patients with an autosomal recessive neurocutaneous syndrome due to ALDH18A1 mutations. ALDH18A1 encodes delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), an enzyme that catalyses the first and common step of proline and ornithine biosynthesis from glutamate. Through exome sequencing and candidate gene screening, we report two families with autosomal recessive transmission of ALDH18A1 mutations, and predominant complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with marked cognitive impairment, without any cutaneous abnormality. More interestingly, we also identified monoallelic ALDH18A1 mutations segregating in three independent families with autosomal dominant pure or complex hereditary spastic paraplegia, as well as in two sporadic patients. Low levels of plasma ornithine, citrulline, arginine and proline in four individuals from two families suggested P5CS deficiency. Glutamine loading tests in two fibroblast cultures from two related affected subjects confirmed a metabolic block at the level of P5CS in vivo. Besides expanding the clinical spectrum of ALDH18A1-related pathology, we describe mutations segregating in an autosomal dominant pattern. The latter are associated with a potential trait biomarker; we therefore suggest including amino acid chromatography in the clinico-genetic work-up of hereditary spastic paraplegia, particularly in dominant cases, as the associated phenotype is not distinct from other causative genes. PMID:26026163

  3. X-linked recessive type of pure spastic paraplegia in a large pedigree: absence of detectable linkage with Xg.

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, M; Penha-Serrano, C; Otto, P A

    1976-01-01

    A family with 24 males affected by an X-linked type of spastic paraplegia is reported. Twelve affected members were personally examined showing the pure form of the disease. Half of the affected males had many descendants, all normal. Linkage studies strongly suggest that this X-linked form of spastic paraplegia and Xg loci are not at a measurable distance on the X chromosome. PMID:1084423

  4. Confirmation of locus heterogeneity in the pure form of familial spastic paraplegia

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Gaskell, P.C.; Robinson, L.C.

    1995-08-14

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP), characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities, is in its {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} form generally of autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Hazen et al. reported tight linkage of a large FSP family to the highly polymorphic microsatellite marker D14S269 with z ({sub {theta}}) = 8.49 at {sub {theta}} = 0.00. They further demonstrated evidence for locus heterogeneity when they showed that 2 FSP families were unlinked to this region. We have subsequently studied 4 FSP families (3 American, one British) and excluded the disease locus in these families for approximately 30 cM on either side of D14S269, thereby confirming evidence for locus heterogeneity within the spastic paraplegia diagnostic classification. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Paraplegia caused by giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk after combined spinal-epidural anesthesia in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Toshiyuki; Nakahira, Junko; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    Total paraplegia after epidural or spinal anesthesia is extremely rare. We herein report a case of total paraplegia caused by a giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk at the L3-L4 level after total hip arthroplasty for coxarthrosis. The patient had no preoperative neurologic abnormalities. Intraoperative anesthetic management involved combined spinal-epidural anesthesia at the L3-L4 level with continuous intravenous propofol administration. Postoperatively, the patient complained of numbness and total paraplegia of the lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a giant herniation of a lumbar disk compressing the spinal cord at the L3-L4 level. The intradural herniation was surgically treated, and the patient's symptoms completely resolved.

  6. Riluzole improves outcome following ischemia-reperfusion injury to the spinal cord by preventing delayed paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Satkunendrarajah, K; Fehlings, M G

    2014-04-18

    The spinal cord is vulnerable to ischemic injury due to trauma, vascular malformations and correction of thoracic aortic lesions. Riluzole, a sodium channel blocker and anti-glutamate drug has been shown to be neuroprotective in a model of ischemic spinal cord injury, although the effects in clinically relevant ischemia/reperfusion models are unknown. Here, we examine the effect of riluzole following ischemia-reperfusion injury to the spinal cord. Female rats underwent high thoracic aortic balloon occlusion to produce an ischemia/reperfusion injury. Tolerance to ischemia was evaluated by varying the duration of occlusion. Riluzole (8mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 4h after injury. Locomotor function (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scale) was assessed at 4h, 1day, and 5days post-ischemia. Spinal cords were extracted and evaluated for neuronal loss using immunohistology (choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and neuronal nuclei (NeuN)), inflammation (CD11b), astrogliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein - GFAP) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Ischemic injury lasting between 5.5 and 6.75min resulted in delayed paraplegia, whereas longer ischemia induced immediate paraplegia. When riluzole was administered to rats that underwent 6min of occlusion, delayed paraplegia was prevented. The BBB score of riluzole-treated rats was 11.14±4.85 compared with 1.86±1.07 in control animals. Riluzole also reduced neuronal loss, infiltration of microglia/macrophages and astrogliosis in the ventral horn and intermediate zone of the gray matter. In addition, riluzole reduced apoptosis of neurons in the dorsal horn of the gray matter. Riluzole has a neuroprotective effect in a rat model of spinal cord injury/reperfusion when administered up to 4h post-injury, a clinically relevant therapeutic time window.

  7. [Incomplete paraplegia after delayed diagnostics of motor function deficits. Severe malpractice?].

    PubMed

    Regauer, M; Neu, J

    2013-03-01

    A 72-year-old female patient was transferred to a rehabilitation centre after surgical stabilization of a subtrochanteric femoral fracture. However, adequate mobilization was not possible there and 5 days after transfer deficits in the motor function of both lower extremities were documented for the first time and an initial paraplegia was diagnosed the following day by a neurologist. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the suspicion of an unstable fracture of the seventh thoracic vertebral body 8 days after the initial symptoms, which was confirmed by computed tomography after another 3 days. Surgical decompression and stabilization were performed at a department for neurosurgery 4 days later but incomplete paraplegia persisted permanently. The patient complained about insufficient diagnostic measures at the rehabilitation centre. The expert opinion concluded that it would have been mandatory to investigate the matter of the newly occurring neurological symptoms immediately but this had only been performed after undue delay, which had to be interpreted as a case of medical malpractice. The expert pointed out that it was not possible to provide clear evidence that emergent diagnosis and surgery would have enabled a significantly better outcome.The arbitration board ascertained a lack of examination and argued that prompt and adequate diagnostic measures would have revealed the relevant pathological finding and thus surgery would have been performed immediately. According to the reversal of evidence in favor of the patient it could be assumed that no permanent neurological damage existed when the first neurological symptoms occurred and that emergent surgery at least had the potential to prevent permanent paraplegia. This opinion of the arbitration board is supported by numerous references in the literature.

  8. Successful reversal of immediate paraplegia associated with repair of acute Type A aortic dissection using cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Shinichiro; Cho, Yasunori; Aki, Akira; Ueda, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of a 49-year old man who suffered from immediate paraplegia upon awakening from anaesthesia after surgery for acute aortic dissection Type A. A catheter was promptly inserted into the spinal canal for cerebrospinal fluid drainage, and the cerebrospinal fluid pressure was maintained <10 cmH2O. Although magnetic resonance imaging showed extensive spinal cord ischaemia, the patient gradually recovered from the paraplegia and was able to walk by himself after rehabilitation. In some cases, cerebrospinal fluid drainage can be effective for the treatment of immediate postoperative spinal cord damage.

  9. Spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy, microcephaly with normal intelligence, and XY sex reversal: a new autosomal recessive syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Teebi, A S; Miller, S; Ostrer, H; Eydoux, P; Colomb-Brockmann, C; Oudjhane, K; Watters, G

    1998-01-01

    Two female sibs of first cousin Iranian parents were found to have the syndrome of spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy with poor vision, microcephaly, and normal cognitive development. Karyotype analysis showed a normal female constitution in one and a male constitution (46,XY) in the other. The XY female showed normal female external genitalia, normal uterus and tubes, and streak gonads. SRY gene sequencing was normal. We conclude that the present family probably represents a new autosomal recessive trait of pleiotropic effects including XY sex reversal and adds further evidence for the heterogeneity of spastic paraplegia syndromes as well as sex reversal syndromes. Images PMID:9733035

  10. Relationship Between Hand Contact Angle and Shoulder Loading During Manual Wheelchair Propulsion by Individuals with Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Mulroy, Sara J.; Ruparel, Puja; Hatchett, Patricia E.; Haubert, Lisa Lighthall; Eberly, Valerie J.; Gronley, JoAnne K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shoulder loading during manual wheelchair propulsion (WCP) contributes to the development of shoulder pain in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective: To use regression analysis to investigate the relationships between the hand contact angle (location of the hand on the pushrim at initial contact and release during the push phase of the WCP cycle) with propulsion characteristics, pushrim forces, and shoulder kinetics during WCP in individuals with paraplegia. Methods: Biomechanical data were collected from 222 individuals (198 men and 24 women) with paraplegia from SCI during WCP on a stationary ergometer at a self-selected speed. The average age of participants was 34.7 years (±9.3), mean time since SCI was 9.3 years (±6.1), and average body weight was 74.4 kg (±15.9). The majority (n = 127; 56%) of participants had lower level paraplegia (T8 to L5) and 95 (42%) had high paraplegia (T2 to T7). Results: Increased push arc (mean = 75.3°) was associated with greater velocity (R = 0.384, P < .001) and cycle distance (R = 0.658, P < .001) and reduced cadence (R = -0.419, P < .001). Initial contact angle and hand release angles were equally associated with cycle distance and cadence, whereas a more anterior release angle was associated with greater velocity (R = 0.372, P < .001). When controlling for body weight, a more posterior initial contact angle was associated with greater posterior shoulder net joint force (R = 0.229, P = .001) and greater flexor net joint moment (R = 0.204, P = .002), whereas a more anterior hand release angle was significantly associated with increased vertical (R = 0.270, P < .001) and greater lateral (R = .293, P < .001) pushrim forces; greater shoulder net joint forces in all 3 planes — posterior (R = 0.164, P = .015), superior (R = 0.176, P = .009), and medial (R = 0.284, P < .001); and greater external rotator (R = 0.176, P = .009) and adductor (R = 0.259, P = .001) net joint moments. Conclusions: Current

  11. Mutations in the Novel Mitochondrial Protein REEP1 Cause Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type 31

    PubMed Central

    Züchner, Stephan; Wang, Gaofeng; Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Nance, Martha A.; Gaskell, Perry C.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Ashley-Koch, Allison E.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) comprises a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that affect the upper motor neurons and their axonal projections. For the novel SPG31 locus on chromosome 2p12, we identified six different mutations in the receptor expression–enhancing protein 1 gene (REEP1). REEP1 mutations occurred in 6.5% of the patients with HSP in our sample, making it the third-most common HSP gene. We show that REEP1 is widely expressed and localizes to mitochondria, which underlines the importance of mitochondrial function in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:16826527

  12. REEPing the benefits of an animal model of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Ariel Y; Hedera, Peter; Colbran, Roger J

    2013-10-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are characterized by spasticity of the leg muscles due to axonal degeneration of corticospinal neurons. Beetz et al. report that the core motor phenotype and axonal pathology of HSPs are recapitulated in mice lacking the HSP-associated gene Reep1. REEP1 is shown to regulate ER structure in motor cortex neurons. The Reep1 knockout mouse should be a very useful model in which to study the mechanisms of progressive axon loss in HSPs and other disorders.

  13. REEPing the benefits of an animal model of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Deutch, Ariel Y.; Hedera, Peter; Colbran, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are characterized by spasticity of the leg muscles due to axonal degeneration of corticospinal neurons. Beetz et al. report that the core motor phenotype and axonal pathology of HSPs are recapitulated in mice lacking the HSP-associated gene Reep1. REEP1 is shown to regulate ER structure in motor cortex neurons. The Reep1 knockout mouse should be a very useful model in which to study the mechanisms of progressive axon loss in HSPs and other disorders. PMID:24051371

  14. Paraplegia and quadriplegia: special considerations during pregnancy and labor and delivery.

    PubMed

    Greenspoon, J S; Paul, R H

    1986-10-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury resulting in paraplegia or quadriplegia increasingly desire to bear children. Management by a health care team attentive to the special problems that may complicate pregnancy offers the best chance for a successful pregnancy outcome. Life-threatening autonomic hyperreflexia may occur in patients with lesions above the T5-6 level. Precautions should be taken to avoid an unsupervised delivery. Vaginal delivery is appropriate unless there is an obstetric indication for cesarean section. Surveillance for urinary tract infection, anemia, and skin ulcers is advisable.

  15. Hemorrhagic thoracic schwannoma presenting with intradural hematoma and acute paraplegia after spinal manipulation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Sciubba, Daniel; Bydon, Ali; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy; Gokaslan, Ziya L.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic conversion of spinal schwannomas represents a rare occurrence; also rare is the development of a spinal intradural hematoma after spinal manipulation therapy. We report a unique presentation of paraplegia in a patient who underwent spinal manipulation therapy and was found to have a hemorrhagic thoracic schwannoma at time of surgery in the setting of anti-platelet therapy use. In patients with spinal schwannomas, tumor hemorrhage is a rare occasion, which can be considered in the setting of additive effects of spinal manipulation therapy and antiplatelet therapy. PMID:28377856

  16. TFG associated hereditary spastic paraplegia: an addition to the phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Huma; Naz, Sadaf

    2017-01-25

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) constitute movement disorders with extreme lower limb spasticity caused by axonopathies of the upper motor neurons. We describe two siblings affected with a recessive form of movement disorder. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous missense mutation c.64 C>T (p.Arg22Trp) in TFG as cause of the disorder. Comparison of the phenotype of the patients of this study, with that reported previously, revealed differences in the severity of the disorder as well as new clinical findings. These include presence of clonus, undeveloped speech, and sleep disturbances. Our findings extend the phenotypic spectrum associated with the TFG mutations in HSP.

  17. A spastic paraplegia mouse model reveals REEP1-dependent ER shaping

    PubMed Central

    Beetz, Christian; Koch, Nicole; Khundadze, Mukhran; Zimmer, Geraldine; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hertel, Nicole; Huebner, Antje-Kathrin; Mumtaz, Rizwan; Schweizer, Michaela; Dirren, Elisabeth; Karle, Kathrin N.; Irintchev, Andrey; Alvarez, Victoria; Redies, Christoph; Westermann, Martin; Kurth, Ingo; Deufel, Thomas; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta; Hübner, Christian A.

    2013-01-01

    Axonopathies are a group of clinically diverse disorders characterized by the progressive degeneration of the axons of specific neurons. In hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), the axons of cortical motor neurons degenerate and cause a spastic movement disorder. HSP is linked to mutations in several loci known collectively as the spastic paraplegia genes (SPGs). We identified a heterozygous receptor accessory protein 1 (REEP1) exon 2 deletion in a patient suffering from the autosomal dominantly inherited HSP variant SPG31. We generated the corresponding mouse model to study the underlying cellular pathology. Mice with heterozygous deletion of exon 2 in Reep1 displayed a gait disorder closely resembling SPG31 in humans. Homozygous exon 2 deletion resulted in the complete loss of REEP1 and a more severe phenotype with earlier onset. At the molecular level, we demonstrated that REEP1 is a neuron-specific, membrane-binding, and membrane curvature–inducing protein that resides in the ER. We further show that Reep1 expression was prominent in cortical motor neurons. In REEP1-deficient mice, these neurons showed reduced complexity of the peripheral ER upon ultrastructural analysis. Our study connects proper neuronal ER architecture to long-term axon survival. PMID:24051375

  18. Powered Lower-Limb Exoskeletons to Restore Gait for Individuals with Paraplegia – a Review

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sarah R.; Kobetic, Rudi; Audu, Musa L.; Quinn, Roger D.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with paraplegia due to spinal cord injury rank restoration of walking high on the list of priorities to improving their quality of life. Powered lower-limb exoskeleton technology provides the ability to restore standing up, sitting down, and walking movements for individuals with paraplegia. The robotic exoskeletons generally have electrical motors located at the hip and knee joint centers, which move the wearers' lower limbs through the appropriate range of motion for gait according to control systems using either trajectory control or impedance control. Users of exoskeletons are able to walk at average gait speeds of 0.26 m/s and distances ranging between 121-171 m. However, the achieved gait speeds and distances fall short of those required for full community ambulation (0.8 m/s and at least 230 m), restricting use of the devices to limited community use with stand-by assist or supervised rehabilitation settings. Improvement in the gait speed and distance may be achievable by combining a specially designed powered exoskeleton with neuromuscular stimulation technologies resulting in a hybrid system that fully engages the user and achieves the necessary requirements to ambulate in the community environment with benefits of muscle contraction. PMID:28004009

  19. Powered Lower-Limb Exoskeletons to Restore Gait for Individuals with Paraplegia - a Review.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sarah R; Kobetic, Rudi; Audu, Musa L; Quinn, Roger D; Triolo, Ronald J

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with paraplegia due to spinal cord injury rank restoration of walking high on the list of priorities to improving their quality of life. Powered lower-limb exoskeleton technology provides the ability to restore standing up, sitting down, and walking movements for individuals with paraplegia. The robotic exoskeletons generally have electrical motors located at the hip and knee joint centers, which move the wearers' lower limbs through the appropriate range of motion for gait according to control systems using either trajectory control or impedance control. Users of exoskeletons are able to walk at average gait speeds of 0.26 m/s and distances ranging between 121-171 m. However, the achieved gait speeds and distances fall short of those required for full community ambulation (0.8 m/s and at least 230 m), restricting use of the devices to limited community use with stand-by assist or supervised rehabilitation settings. Improvement in the gait speed and distance may be achievable by combining a specially designed powered exoskeleton with neuromuscular stimulation technologies resulting in a hybrid system that fully engages the user and achieves the necessary requirements to ambulate in the community environment with benefits of muscle contraction.

  20. Progressive Paraplegia from Spinal Cord Stimulator Lead Fibrotic Encapsulation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Benfield, Jon; Maknojia, Asif; Epstein, Franklin

    2016-03-01

    Ten years after placement of a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) and resolution of pain, this patient presented with progressive paraplegia, worsening thoracic radicular pain at the same dermatome level of the electrodes, and bowel and bladder incontinence. Computed tomographic myelogram confirmed thoracic spinal cord central canal stenosis at the level of electrodes. After removal of the fibrotic tissue and electrodes, the patient had resolution of his thoracic radicular pain and a return of his pre-SCS pain and minimal neurologic and functional return. To the authors' knowledge, no studies have been identified with thoracic SCS lead fibrosis in the United States causing permanent paraplegia. Only one other case has been reported in Madrid, Spain. Patients with SCS presenting with loss of pain relief, new-onset radicular or neuropathic pain in same dermatome(s) as SCS electrodes, worsening neuromuscular examination, or new bladder or bowel incontinence need to be evaluated for complications regarding SCS implantation causing spinal stenosis and subsequent cord compression to avoid permanent neurologic deficits.

  1. Clinical indicators of paraplegia underplay universal spinal cord neuronal injury from transient aortic occlusion.

    PubMed

    Bell, Marshall T; Puskas, Ferenc; Bennett, Daine T; Cleveland, Joseph C; Herson, Paco S; Mares, Joshua M; Meng, Xainzhong; Weyant, Michael J; Fullerton, David A; Brett Reece, T

    2015-08-27

    Paraplegia following complex aortic intervention relies on crude evaluation of lower extremity strength such as whether the patient can lift their legs or flex the ankle. Little attention has been given to the possible long-term neurologic sequelae following these procedures in patients appearing functionally normal. We hypothesize that mice subjected to minimal ischemic time will have functional and histological changes despite the gross appearance of normal function. Male mice underwent 3 min of aortic occlusion (n=14) or sham surgery (n=4) via a median sternotomy. Neurologic function was graded by Basso Motor Score (BMS) preoperatively and at 24h intervals after reperfusion. Mice appearing functionally normal and sham mice were placed on a walking beam and recorded on high-definition, for single-frame motion analysis. After 96 hrs, spinal cords were removed for histological analysis. Following 3 min of ischemia, functional outcomes were split evenly with either mice displaying almost normal function n=7 or near complete paraplegia n=7. Additionally, single-frame motion analysis revealed significant changes in gait. Histologically, there was a significant stepwise reduction of neuronal viability, with even the normal function ischemic group demonstrating significant loss of neurons. Despite the appearance of normal function, temporary ischemia induced marked cyto-architectural changes and neuronal degeneration. Furthermore high-definition gait analysis revealed significant changes in gait and activity following thoracic aortic occlusion. These data suggest that all patients undergoing procedures, even with short ischemic times, may have spinal cord injury that is not evident clinically.

  2. Bladder and rectal incontinence without paraplegia or paraparesis after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Naritomo; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Maruyama, Ryushi; Ujihira, Kosuke; Iba, Yutaka; Hatta, Eiichiro; Yamada, Akira; Nakanishi, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a well-known potential complication of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), and it is usually manifested by paraplegia or paraparesis. We describe a case in which spinal cord ischemia after EVAR presented by isolated bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological deficits. A 63-year-old woman presented with intermittent claudication secondary to an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and a left common iliac artery obstruction, for which she underwent EVAR using an aorto-uniiliac (AUI) device and ilio-femoral artery bypass. On postoperative day 3, she developed urinary and fecal incontinence without signs of paraplegia or paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a hyper-intense signal in the spinal cord. She received hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy and was discharged after 18 days when her urinary and fecal incontinence were almost resolved. This report suggests that spinal cord ischemia after EVAR for aortoiliac occlusive disease might present as bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological manifestations.

  3. A spastic paraplegia mouse model reveals REEP1-dependent ER shaping.

    PubMed

    Beetz, Christian; Koch, Nicole; Khundadze, Mukhran; Zimmer, Geraldine; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hertel, Nicole; Huebner, Antje-Kathrin; Mumtaz, Rizwan; Schweizer, Michaela; Dirren, Elisabeth; Karle, Kathrin N; Irintchev, Andrey; Alvarez, Victoria; Redies, Christoph; Westermann, Martin; Kurth, Ingo; Deufel, Thomas; Kessels, Michael M; Qualmann, Britta; Hübner, Christian A

    2013-10-01

    Axonopathies are a group of clinically diverse disorders characterized by the progressive degeneration of the axons of specific neurons. In hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), the axons of cortical motor neurons degenerate and cause a spastic movement disorder. HSP is linked to mutations in several loci known collectively as the spastic paraplegia genes (SPGs). We identified a heterozygous receptor accessory protein 1 (REEP1) exon 2 deletion in a patient suffering from the autosomal dominantly inherited HSP variant SPG31. We generated the corresponding mouse model to study the underlying cellular pathology. Mice with heterozygous deletion of exon 2 in Reep1 displayed a gait disorder closely resembling SPG31 in humans. Homozygous exon 2 deletion resulted in the complete loss of REEP1 and a more severe phenotype with earlier onset. At the molecular level, we demonstrated that REEP1 is a neuron-specific, membrane-binding, and membrane curvature-inducing protein that resides in the ER. We further show that Reep1 expression was prominent in cortical motor neurons. In REEP1-deficient mice, these neurons showed reduced complexity of the peripheral ER upon ultrastructural analysis. Our study connects proper neuronal ER architecture to long-term axon survival.

  4. Effect of increased load on scapular kinematics during manual wheelchair propulsion in individuals with paraplegia and tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Raina, Shashank; McNitt-Gray, Jill L; Mulroy, Sara; Requejo, Philip S

    2012-04-01

    Repetitive loading of the upper extremity musculature during activities like wheelchair propulsion can lead to fatigue of surrounding musculature causing irregular segment kinematics. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of increase in load on the kinematics of the scapula in users with paraplegia and tetraplegia. Data were collected on 18 participants (11 with paraplegia and 7 with tetraplegia) using an electromagnetic motion tracking system (100Hz) and force sensing pushrim (200Hz). The participants propelled under no load and loaded conditions at their customary propulsion velocity. On average a 60N increase in force was elicited with the experimental protocol. Users with tetraplegia showed significant increases (p<.05) in the rate of change of scapular angles in the upward/downward rotation and the retraction/protraction direction under the loaded conditions, whereas users with paraplegia only showed difference in the retraction/protraction rotation direction. Overall both user populations moved towards position of increased downward rotation, anterior tilt and protraction with increase in load hence increasing the risk of impingement. This experiment adds depth to our understanding of dynamic scapular kinematics during wheelchair propulsion under different loading conditions and differences in scapular control between users with paraplegia and tetraplegia.

  5. Full Body Gait Analysis May Improve Diagnostic Discrimination Between Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia and Spastic Diplegia: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnefoy-Mazure, A.; Turcot, K.; Kaelin, A.; De Coulon, G.; Armand, S.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) and spastic diplegia (SD) patients share a strong clinical resemblance. Thus, HSP patients are frequently misdiagnosed with a mild form of SD. Clinical gait analysis (CGA) has been highlighted as a possible tool to support the differential diagnosis of HSP and SD. Previous analysis has focused on the lower-body…

  6. A Pilot Study To Assess the Relationships among Coping, Self-Efficacy and Functional Improvement in Men with Paraplegia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lou, M. F.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A study of four men with paraplegia admitted to a rehabilitation ward investigated the relationship between levels of coping, self-efficacy, and improvement in rehabilitation performance. The subjects using more coping strategies had more rehabilitation improvement after the first month and those using problem-oriented coping strategies showed…

  7. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.B.; Jones, S.M.; Lesicki, A.; Reinglass, T.; Sharp, G.B.; Lange, B.M.; Varvil, T.; Otterud, B.; Leppert, M.

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant, uncomplicated familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by insidiously progressive lower-extremity spasticity. Recently, a locus on chromosome 14q was shown to be tightly linked with the disorder in one of three families. We performed linkage analysis in a kindred with autosomal dominant uncomplicated FSP. After excluding the chromosome 14q locus, we observed tight linkage of the disorder to a group of markers on chromosome 15q (maximum two-point lod score 9.70; {theta} = .05). Our results clearly establish the existence of a locus for autosomal dominant FSP in the centromeric region of chromosome 15q. Comparing clinical and genetic features in FSP families linked to chromosome 14q with those linked to chromosome 15q may provide insight into the pathophysiology of this disorder. 34 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Mobile spinal enterogenous cyst resulting in intermittent paraplegia in a child: case report.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Satoko; Yoshimura, Junichi; Takao, Tetsuro; Tamura, Tetsuro; Nishiyama, Kenichi; Maruyama, Shigeru; Suda, Masashi; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2016-10-01

    The authors report the case of a mobile spinal enterogenous cyst in a 2-year-old boy, who was admitted to the hospital several times for intermittent paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT revealed an isolated cyst in the lumbar spinal canal. The symptoms were caused by transient myelopathy of the conus medullaris and radiculopathy of the cauda equina due to the changing size and location of the cyst. The cyst was surgically extirpated, after which the symptoms resolved. The histopathological diagnosis was enterogenous cyst. The clinical history of intraspinal enterogenous cyst is usually progressive. Mobility and changes in size are rare pathophysiological findings. The authors speculate that the cyst wall did not adhere to the surrounding structures and had ruptured and quickly reformed. Enterogenous cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal intradural cysts in children with radiculomyelopathy.

  9. Disseminated mycobacteriosis manifesting as paraplegia in two Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) naturally exposed to Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Robveille, Cynthia; Albaric, Olivier; Gaide, Nicolas; Abadie, Jérome

    2015-11-01

    Two captive female Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) died after a history of flaccid paraplegia. On postmortem examination, granulomatous and suppurative osteomyelitis involving the left ischium and the lumbosacral region, with meningeal extension at the cauda equina, and caseonecrotic mastitis were the most significant changes. Multiple small nodules in the liver and spleen, and an enlargement of some lymph nodes with central caseous necrosis were also observed. Microscopically, a disseminated granulomatous inflammation with numerous multinucleate giant cells was seen. Numerous acid-fast bacilli were detected in macrophages, in multinucleated giant cells, and free in the central necrosis and suppurative exudate. After culture, polymerase chain reaction assays were carried out to detect the 65-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp65) and insertion sequences (IS)1245 and IS900. The causative agent was identified as Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium.

  10. A recurrent mutation in KCNA2 as a novel cause of hereditary spastic paraplegia and ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Katherine L.; Hedrich, Ulrike B.S.; Shinde, Deepali N.; Krey, Ilona; Teichmann, Anne‐Christin; Hentschel, Julia; Schubert, Julian; Chamberlin, Adam C.; Huether, Robert; Lu, Hsiao‐Mei; Alcaraz, Wendy A.; Tang, Sha; Jungbluth, Chelsy; Dugan, Sarah L.; Vainionpää, Leena; Karle, Kathrin N.; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Schüle, Rebecca; Lehesjoki, Anna‐Elina; Helbig, Ingo; Lerche, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders with over 50 known causative genes. We identified a recurrent mutation in KCNA2 (c.881G>A, p.R294H), encoding the voltage‐gated K+‐channel, KV1.2, in two unrelated families with HSP, intellectual disability (ID), and ataxia. Follow‐up analysis of > 2,000 patients with various neurological phenotypes identified a de novo p.R294H mutation in a proband with ataxia and ID. Two‐electrode voltage‐clamp recordings of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing mutant KV1.2 channels showed loss of function with a dominant‐negative effect. Our findings highlight the phenotypic spectrum of a recurrent KCNA2 mutation, implicating ion channel dysfunction as a novel HSP disease mechanism. Ann Neurol 2016 PMID:27543892

  11. Mapping of a complicated familial spastic paraplegia to locus SPG4 on chromosome 2p.

    PubMed Central

    Heinzlef, O; Paternotte, C; Mahieux, F; Prud'homme, J F; Dien, J; Madigand, M; Pouget, J; Weissenbach, J; Roullet, E; Hazan, J

    1998-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia (AD-FSP) is a degenerative disorder of the central motor system characterised by progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. AD-FSP has been divided into pure and complicated forms. Pure AD-FSP is genetically heterogeneous; three loci have been mapped to chromosomes 14q (SPG3), 2p (SPG4), and 15q (SPG6), whereas no loci responsible for complicated forms have been identified to date. Here we report linkage to the SPG4 locus in a three generation family with AD-FSP complicated by dementia and epilepsy. Assuming that both forms of AD-FSP are caused by mutations involving the same FSP gene, analysis of recombination events in this family positions the SPG4 gene within a 0 cM interval flanked by loci D2S2255 and D2S2347. PMID:9507385

  12. Novel De Novo Mutations in KIF1A as a Cause of Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia With Progressive Central Nervous System Involvement.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Leslie; Donkervoort, Sandra; Leach, Meganne E; Mohassel, Payam; Bharucha-Goebel, Diana X; Bradley, Nathaniel; Nguyen, David; Hu, Ying; Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by lower extremity spasticity and weakness. Recently, the first de novo mutations in KIF1A were identified in patients with an early-onset severe form of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia. We report two additional patients with novel de novo mutations in KIF1A, hereby expanding the genetic spectrum of KIF1A-related hereditary spastic paraplegia. Both children presented with spastic paraplegia and additional findings of optic nerve atrophy, structural brain abnormalities, peripheral neuropathy, cognitive/language impairment, and never achieved ambulation. In particular, we highlight the progressive nature of cerebellar involvement as captured on sequential magnetic resonance images (MRIs), thus linking the neurodegenerative and spastic paraplegia phenotypes. Exome sequencing in patient 1 and patient 2 identified novel heterozygous missense mutations in KIF1A at c.902G>A (p.R307Q) and c.595G>A (p.G199 R), respectively. Therefore, our report contributes to expanding the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by mutations in KIF1A.

  13. Spastic Paraplegia Type 7 Is Associated with Multiple Mitochondrial DNA Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Wedding, Iselin Marie; Koht, Jeanette; Tran, Gia Tuong; Misceo, Doriana; Selmer, Kaja Kristine; Holmgren, Asbjørn; Frengen, Eirik; Bindoff, Laurence; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Tzoulis, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    Spastic paraplegia 7 is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding paraplegin, a protein located at the inner mitochondrial membrane and involved in the processing of other mitochondrial proteins. The mechanism whereby paraplegin mutations cause disease is unknown. We studied two female and two male adult patients from two Norwegian families with a combination of progressive external ophthalmoplegia and spastic paraplegia. Sequencing of SPG7 revealed a novel missense mutation, c.2102A>C, p.H 701P, which was homozygous in one family and compound heterozygous in trans with a known pathogenic mutation c.1454_1462del in the other. Muscle was examined from an additional, unrelated adult female patient with a similar phenotype caused by a homozygous c.1047insC mutation in SPG7. Immunohistochemical studies in skeletal muscle showed mosaic deficiency predominantly affecting respiratory complex I, but also complexes III and IV. Molecular studies in single, microdissected fibres showed multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions segregating at high levels (38–97%) in respiratory deficient fibres. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that paraplegin mutations cause accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage and multiple respiratory chain deficiencies. While paraplegin is not known to be directly associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid, it is known to process other mitochondrial proteins and it is possible therefore that paraplegin mutations lead to mitochondrial DNA deletions by impairing proteins involved in the homeostasis of the mitochondrial genome. These studies increase our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of SPG7 mutations and suggest that SPG7 testing should be included in the diagnostic workup of autosomal recessive, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, especially if spasticity is present. PMID:24466038

  14. Mutations in CAPN1 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Gan-Or, Ziv; Bouslam, Naima; Birouk, Nazha; Lissouba, Alexandra; Chambers, Daniel B.; Vérièpe, Julie; Androschuck, Alaura; Laurent, Sandra B.; Rochefort, Daniel; Spiegelman, Dan; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Szuto, Anna; Liao, Meijiang; Figlewicz, Denise A.; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Benomar, Ali; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Ouazzani, Reda; Yoon, Grace; Dupré, Nicolas; Suchowersky, Oksana; Bolduc, Francois V.; Parker, J. Alex; Dion, Patrick A.; Drapeau, Pierre; Rouleau, Guy A.; Bencheikh, Bouchra Ouled Amar

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs with or without additional neurological symptoms. Although more than 70 genes and genetic loci have been implicated in HSP, many families remain genetically undiagnosed, suggesting that other genetic causes of HSP are still to be identified. HSP can be inherited in an autosomal-dominant, autosomal-recessive, or X-linked manner. In the current study, we performed whole-exome sequencing to analyze a total of nine affected individuals in three families with autosomal-recessive HSP. Rare homozygous and compound-heterozygous nonsense, missense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations in CAPN1 were identified in all affected individuals, and sequencing in additional family members confirmed the segregation of these mutations with the disease (spastic paraplegia 76 [SPG76]). CAPN1 encodes calpain 1, a protease that is widely present in the CNS. Calpain 1 is involved in synaptic plasticity, synaptic restructuring, and axon maturation and maintenance. Three models of calpain 1 deficiency were further studied. In Caenorhabditis elegans, loss of calpain 1 function resulted in neuronal and axonal dysfunction and degeneration. Similarly, loss-of-function of the Drosophila melanogaster ortholog calpain B caused locomotor defects and axonal anomalies. Knockdown of calpain 1a, a CAPN1 ortholog in Danio rerio, resulted in abnormal branchiomotor neuron migration and disorganized acetylated-tubulin axonal networks in the brain. The identification of mutations in CAPN1 in HSP expands our understanding of the disease causes and potential mechanisms. PMID:27153400

  15. The Extended Posterior Circumferential Decompression Technique in the Management of Tubercular Spondylitis with and without Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Rathinavelu, Barani; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Amritanand, Rohit; Sundararaj, Gabriel David

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective clinical series. Purpose To study the clinical, functional and radiological results of patients with tuberculous spondylitis with and without paraplegia, treated surgically using the "Extended Posterior Circumferential Decompression (EPCD)" technique. Overview of Literature With the increasing possibility of addressing all three columns by a single approach, posterior and posterolateral approaches are gaining acceptance. A single exposure for cases with neurological deficit and kyphotic deformity requiring circumferential decompression, anterior column reconstruction and posterior instrumentation is helpful. Methods Forty-one patients with dorsal/dorsolumbar/lumbar tubercular spondylitis who were operated using the EPCD approach between 2006 to 2009 were included. Postoperatively, patients were started on nine-month anti-tuberculous treatment. They were serially followed up to thirty-six months and both clinical measures (including pain, neurological status and ambulatory status) and radiological measures (including kyphotic angle correction, loss of correction and healing status) were used for assessment. Results Disease-healing with bony fusion (interbody fusion) was seen in 97.5% of cases. Average deformity (kyphosis) correction was 54.6% in dorsal spine and 207.3% in lumbar spine. Corresponding loss of correction was 3.6 degrees in dorsal spine and 1.9 degrees in the lumbar spine. Neurological recovery in Frankel B and C paraplegia was 85.7% and 62.5%, respectively. Conclusions The EPCD approach permits all the advantages of a single or dual session anterior and posterior surgery, with significant benefits in terms of decreased operative time, reduced hospital stay and better kyphotic angle correction. PMID:25558312

  16. Protrudin regulates endoplasmic reticulum morphology and function associated with the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yutaka; Shirane, Michiko; Matsuzaki, Fumiko; Saita, Shotaro; Ohnishi, Takafumi; Nakayama, Keiichi I

    2014-05-09

    Protrudin is a membrane protein that regulates polarized vesicular trafficking in neurons. The protrudin gene (ZFYVE27) is mutated in a subset of individuals with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), and protrudin is therefore also referred to as spastic paraplegia (SPG) 33. We have now generated mice that express a transgene for dual epitope-tagged protrudin under control of a neuron-specific promoter, and we have subjected highly purified protrudin-containing complexes isolated from the brain of these mice to proteomics analysis to identify proteins that associate with protrudin. Protrudin was found to interact with other HSP-related proteins including myelin proteolipid protein 1 (SPG2), atlastin-1 (SPG3A), REEP1 (SPG31), REEP5 (similar to REEP1), Kif5A (SPG10), Kif5B, Kif5C, and reticulon 1, 3, and 4 (similar to reticulon 2, SPG12). Membrane topology analysis indicated that one of three hydrophobic segments of protrudin forms a hydrophobic hairpin domain similar to those of other SPG proteins. Protrudin was found to localize predominantly to the tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and forced expression of protrudin promoted the formation and stabilization of the tubular ER network. The protrudin(G191V) mutant, which has been identified in a subset of HSP patients, manifested an increased intracellular stability, and cells expressing this mutant showed an increased susceptibility to ER stress. Our results thus suggest that protrudin contributes to the regulation of ER morphology and function, and that its deregulation by mutation is a causative defect in HSP.

  17. Car Transfer and Wheelchair Loading Techniques in Independent Drivers with Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Haubert, Lisa Lighthall; Mulroy, Sara J.; Hatchett, Patricia E.; Eberly, Valerie J.; Maneekobkunwong, Somboon; Gronley, Joanne K.; Requejo, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Car transfers and wheelchair (WC) loading are crucial for independent community participation in persons with complete paraplegia from spinal cord injury, but are complex, physically demanding, and known to provoke shoulder pain. This study aimed to describe techniques and factors influencing car transfer and WC loading for individuals with paraplegia driving their own vehicles and using their personal WCs. Sedans were the most common vehicle driven (59%). Just over half (52%) of drivers place their right leg only into the vehicle prior to transfer. Overall, the leading hand was most frequently placed on the driver’s seat (66%) prior to transfer and the trailing hand was most often place on the WC seat (48%). Vehicle height influenced leading hand placement but not leg placement such that drivers of higher profile vehicles were more likely to place their hand on the driver’s seat than those who drove sedans. Body lift time was negatively correlated with level of injury and age and positively correlated with vehicle height and shoulder abduction strength. Drivers who transferred with their leading hand on the steering wheel had significantly higher levels of shoulder pain than those who placed their hand on the driver’s seat or overhead. The majority of participants used both hands (62%) to load their WC frame, and overall, most loaded their frame into the back (62%) vs. the front seat. Sedan drivers were more likely to load their frame into the front seat than drivers of higher profile vehicles (53 vs. 17%). Average time to load the WC frame (10.7 s) was 20% of the total WC loading time and was not related to shoulder strength, frame weight, or demographic characteristics. Those who loaded their WC frame into the back seat had significantly weaker right shoulder internal rotators. Understanding car transfers and WC loading in independent drivers is crucial to prevent shoulder pain and injury and preserve community participation. PMID:26442253

  18. Clinical and Paraclinical Indicators of Motor System Impairment in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Martinuzzi, Andrea; Montanaro, Domenico; Vavla, Marinela; Paparella, Gabriella; Bonanni, Paolo; Musumeci, Olimpia; Brighina, Erika; Hlavata, Hana; Rossi, Giuseppe; Aghakhanyan, Gayane; Martino, Nicola; Baratto, Alessandra; D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Peruch, Francesca; Fantin, Marianna; Arnoldi, Alessia; Citterio, Andrea; Vantaggiato, Chiara; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Toscano, Antonio; Bresolin, Nereo; Bassi, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSP) are a composite and genetically heterogeneous group of conditions mainly expressed by the impairment of the central motor system (“pure” forms). The involvement of other components of the central nervous system or of other systems is described in the “complicate” forms. The definition of an investigation protocol capable, by assembling clinical and paraclinical indicators to fully represent the extent of the motor system impairment, would help both the clinical handling of these conditions and contribute to our understanding of their pathogenesis. Methods We applied a clinical and paraclinical protocol which included tools exploring motor and non motor functioning, neurophysiology and MRI to a composite cohort of 70 molecularly defined HSP patients aged 3 to 65, to define for each indicator its significance in detailing the presence and the severity of the pathology. Results Clinically increased deep tendon reflexes and lower limb (LL) weakness are constant findings in all patients. The “complicated” forms are characterized by peripheral motor impairment, cognitive and cerebellar involvement. The Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale efficiently reflects the severity of functional problems and correlates with disease duration. Neurophysiology consistently documents the impairment of the central motor pathway to the LLs. Nevertheless, the upper extremities and sensory system involvement is a frequent finding. MRI diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) highlighted a significant alteration of FA and MD. Combining the sampling of the various portion of the cortico-spinal tract (CST) DTI consistently discriminated patients from controls. Conclusion We propose a graded clinical and paraclinical protocol for HSP phenotype definition, indicating for each tool the discriminative and descriptive capacity. Our protocol applied to 9 different forms of HSP showed that the functional impairment often extends beyond the CST. The novel

  19. A novel frameshift mutation of DDHD1 in a Japanese patient with autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shiroh; Morikawa, Takuya; Fujioka, Ryuta; Kosaka, Kengo; Yamada, Kohei; Hattori, Gohsuke; Motomura, Manabu; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    Spastic paraplegia (SPG) type 28 is an autosomal recessive SPG caused by mutations in the DDHD1 gene. We examined a Japanese 54-years-old male patient with autosomal recessive SPG. His parents were consanguineous. He needed a wheelchair for transfer due to spastic paraplegia. There was a history of operations for bilateral hallux valgus, thoracic ossification of the yellow ligament, bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, bilateral ankle contracture, and lumbar spinal canal stenosis. He noticed gait disturbance at age 14. He used a cane for walking in his 40s. On neurological examination, he showed hyperreflexia, spasticity, and weakness in the lower extremities and bilateral Babinski reflexes. Urinary dysfunctions and impaired vibration sense in the lower limbs were observed. By exome sequencing analysis using Agilent SureSelect and Illumina MiSeq, we identified 17,248 homozygous nucleotide variants in the patient. Through the examination of 48 candidate genes known to be responsible for autosomal recessive SPG, we identified a novel homozygous 4-bp deletion, c.914_917delGTAA, p.Ser305Ilefs*2 in exon2 of the DDHD1 gene encoding phosphatidic acid-preferring phospholipase A1 (PA-PLA1). The mutation is expected to cause a frameshift generating a premature stop codon 3-bp downstream from the deletion. In consequence, the DDHD domain that is known to be critical for PLA1 activity is completely depleted in the mutated DDHD1 protein, predicted to be a functionally null mutation of the DDHD1 gene. By Sanger sequencing, we confirmed that both parents are heterozygous for the mutation. This variation was not detected in 474 Japanese control subjects as well as the data of the 1,000G Project. We conclude that the novel mutation in DDHD1 is the causative variant for the SPG28 patient that is the first record of the disease in Japanese population.

  20. Progressive paraplegia caused by recurrence of mantle-cell lymphoma with atypical spinal magnetic resonance imaging features.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Hiromichi; Ochi, Nobuaki; Yamagishi, Tomoko; Takigawa, Nagio; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of paraplegia, which had progressed rapidly in a 60-year-old Japanese man with mantle-cell lymphoma. (MCL). He admitted to our hospital due to lumbago and progressive muscle weakness of bilateral lower thighs lasting for 1. month, while he had the history of the systemic chemotherapy for MCL since 10 months. Magnetic resonance imaging. (MRI) revealed a wide-spreading intradural tumor situated in the spinal canal from L1 to L5 with an intervertebral slipped disk as the only site of recurrence. Laminectomy followed by salvage chemotherapy led disappearance of lumbago and paraplegia of the bilateral lower extremities. Although wide-spreading tumor formation in spinal canal without other involvement sites is very rare in MCL, physicians should be aware of such patterns of central nervous system. (CNS) relapse for the early diagnosis and adequate selection of treatment modality.

  1. Disturbed Mental Imagery of Affected Body-Parts in Patients with Hysterical Conversion Paraplegia Correlates with Pathological Limbic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Saj, Arnaud; Raz, Noa; Levin, Netta; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Arzy, Shahar

    2014-01-01

    Patients with conversion disorder generally suffer from a severe neurological deficit which cannot be attributed to a structural neurological damage. In two patients with acute conversion paraplegia, investigation with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) showed that the insular cortex, a limbic-related cortex involved in body-representation and subjective emotional experience, was activated not only during attempt to move the paralytic body-parts, but also during mental imagery of their movements. In addition, mental rotation of affected body-parts was found to be disturbed, as compared to unaffected body parts or external objects. fMRI during mental rotation of the paralytic body-part showed an activation of another limbic related region, the anterior cingulate cortex. These data suggest that conversion paraplegia is associated with pathological activity in limbic structures involved in body representation and a deficit in mental processing of the affected body-parts. PMID:24961768

  2. Spastic paraplegia gene 7 in patients with spasticity and/or optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Klebe, Stephan; Depienne, Christel; Gerber, Sylvie; Challe, Georges; Anheim, Mathieu; Charles, Perrine; Fedirko, Estelle; Lejeune, Elodie; Cottineau, Julien; Brusco, Alfredo; Dollfus, Hélène; Chinnery, Patrick F; Mancini, Cecilia; Ferrer, Xavier; Sole, Guilhem; Destée, Alain; Mayer, Jean-Michel; Fontaine, Bertrand; de Seze, Jérôme; Clanet, Michel; Ollagnon, Elisabeth; Busson, Philippe; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Stevanin, Giovanni; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Brice, Alexis; Durr, Alexandra

    2012-10-01

    Mutations in the spastic paraplegia 7 (SPG7) gene encoding paraplegin are responsible for autosomal recessive hereditary spasticity. We screened 135 unrelated index cases, selected in five different settings: SPG7-positive patients detected during SPG31 analysis using SPG31/SPG7 multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (n = 7); previously reported ambiguous SPG7 cases (n = 5); patients carefully selected on the basis of their phenotype (spasticity of the lower limbs with cerebellar signs and/or cerebellar atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging/computer tomography scan and/or optic neuropathy and without other signs) (n = 24); patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis referred consecutively from attending neurologists and the national reference centre in a diagnostic setting (n = 98); and the index case of a four-generation family with autosomal dominant optic neuropathy but no spasticity linked to the SPG7 locus. We identified two SPG7 mutations in 23/134 spastic patients, 21% of the patients selected according to phenotype but only 8% of those referred directly. Our results confirm the pathogenicity of Ala510Val, which was the most frequent mutation in our series (65%) and segregated at the homozygous state with spastic paraparesis in a large family with autosomal recessive inheritance. All SPG7-positive patients tested had optic neuropathy or abnormalities revealed by optical coherence tomography, indicating that abnormalities in optical coherence tomography could be a clinical biomarker for SPG7 testing. In addition, the presence of late-onset very slowly progressive spastic gait (median age 39 years, range 18-52 years) associated with cerebellar ataxia (39%) or cerebellar atrophy (47%) constitute, with abnormal optical coherence tomography, key features pointing towards SPG7-testing. Interestingly, three relatives of patients with heterozygote SPG7 mutations had cerebellar signs and atrophy, or peripheral neuropathy, but no spasticity of the lower

  3. A hereditary spastic paraplegia mutation in kinesin-1A/KIF5A disrupts neurofilament transport

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hereditary spastic paraplegias are a group of neurological disorders characterized by progressive distal degeneration of the longest ascending and descending axons in the spinal cord, leading to lower limb spasticity and weakness. One of the dominantly inherited forms of this disease (spastic gait type 10, or SPG10) is caused by point mutations in kinesin-1A (also known as KIF5A), which is thought to be an anterograde motor for neurofilaments. Results We investigated the effect of an SPG10 mutation in kinesin-1A (N256S-kinesin-1A) on neurofilament transport in cultured mouse cortical neurons using live-cell fluorescent imaging. N256S-kinesin-1A decreased both anterograde and retrograde neurofilament transport flux by decreasing the frequency of anterograde and retrograde movements. Anterograde velocity was not affected, whereas retrograde velocity actually increased. Conclusions These data reveal subtle complexities to the functional interdependence of the anterograde and retrograde neurofilament motors and they also raise the possibility that anterograde and retrograde neurofilament transport may be disrupted in patients with SPG10. PMID:21087519

  4. Severe adhesive arachnoiditis resulting in progressive paraplegia following obstetric spinal anaesthesia: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Killeen, T; Kamat, A; Walsh, D; Parker, A; Aliashkevich, A

    2012-12-01

    A 27-year-old woman developed severe adhesive arachnoiditis after an obstetric spinal anaesthetic with bupivacaine and fentanyl, complicated by back pain and headache. No other precipitating cause could be identified. She presented one week postpartum with communicating hydrocephalus and syringomyelia and underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting and foramen magnum decompression. Two months later, she developed rapid, progressive paraplegia and sphincter dysfunction. Attempted treatments included exploratory laminectomy, external drainage of the syrinx and intravenous steroids, but these were unsuccessful and the patient remains significantly disabled 21 months later. We discuss the pathophysiology of adhesive arachnoiditis following central neuraxial anaesthesia and possible causative factors, including contamination of the injectate, intrathecal blood and local anaesthetic neurotoxicity, with reference to other published cases. In the absence of more conclusive data, practitioners of central neuraxial anaesthesia can only continue to ensure meticulous, aseptic, atraumatic technique and avoid all potential sources of contamination. It seems appropriate to discuss with patients the possibility of delayed, permanent neurological deficit while taking informed consent.

  5. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: LOD-score considerations for confirmation of linkage in a heterogeneous trait

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, M.P.; Kibar, Z.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a degenerative disorder of the motor system, defined by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs. HSP may be inherited as an autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive, or an X-linked trait. AD HSP is genetically heterogeneous, and three loci have been identified so far: SPG3 maps to chromosome 14q, SPG4 to 2p, and SPG4a to 15q. We have undertaken linkage analysis with 21 uncomplicated AD families to the three AD HSP loci. We report significant linkage for three of our families to the SPG4 locus and exclude several families by multipoint linkage. We used linkage information from several different research teams to evaluate the statistical probability of linkage to the SPG4 locus for uncomplicated AD HSP families and established the critical LOD-score value necessary for confirmation of linkage to the SPG4 locus from Bayesian statistics. In addition, we calculated the empirical P-values for the LOD scores obtained with all families with computer simulation methods. Power to detect significant linkage, as well as type I error probabilities, were evaluated. This combined analytical approach permitted conclusive linkage analyses on small to medium-size families, under the restrictions of genetic heterogeneity. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia; Linkage analysis and evidence for linkage to chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Figlewicz, D.A.; Dube, M.P.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a degenerative disorder of the motor system characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs. Little is known about the pathophysiology of this disorder. FSP can be inherited as an autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive, or X-linked trait. We have undertaken linkage analysis for a group of 36 AD FSP families from which we have collected blood samples from 427 individuals, including 148 affected individuals. Typing of polymorphic markers has allowed us to exclude more than 50% of the genome. Recently, linkage for AD FSP to a locus on chromosome 14q was reported. Our AD FSP kindreds were tested for linkage to markers spanning the 20 cM region between D14S69 and D14S66; however, we were not able to establish linkage for any of our families to chromosome 14. Lod scores suggestive of linkage for some AD FSP kindreds have been obtained for markers on chromosome 2p. We have tested seven polymorphic markers spanning the region between D2S405 and D2S177. Our highest aggregate lod score, including all families tested, was obtained at the locus D2S352: 2.4 at 20 cM. Results from HOMOG analysis for linkage heterogeneity will be reported.

  7. Optimal control of FES-assisted standing up in paraplegia using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Davoodi, R; Andrews, B J

    1999-11-01

    A practical system for Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) assisted standing up in paraplegia should involve only a minimum of manual set up and tuning. An improved tuning method, using a genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed and demonstrated using computer simulation. Specifically, the GA adjusts the parameters of fuzzy logic (FL) and gain-scheduling proportional integral derivative (GS-PID) controllers that electrically stimulate the hip and knee musculature during the sit-stand maneuver. These new GA designed controllers were found to be effective in coordinating volitional and FES control according to formulated criteria. The latter was based on the deviations from a desired trajectory of the knee and hip joints and the magnitude of the voluntary upper body forces. The magnitude of the average arm forces were slightly higher when compared with the open-loop maximal stimulation of the hip and knee musculature; however, the terminal knee velocities were significantly reduced to less than 10 degrees /s. For practical implementation, the number of trials required to optimize the FL and GS-PID controllers can be reduced by a proposed pre-training procedure using a computer model scaled to the individual. The GA designed controllers remain near optimal provided the model-subject mismatch is small.

  8. A preliminary assessment of legged mobility provided by a lower limb exoskeleton for persons with paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Farris, Ryan J; Quintero, Hugo A; Murray, Spencer A; Ha, Kevin H; Hartigan, Clare; Goldfarb, Michael

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents an assessment of a lower limb exoskeleton for providing legged mobility to people with paraplegia. In particular, the paper presents a single-subject case study comparing legged locomotion using the exoskeleton to locomotion using knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFOs) on a subject with a T10 motor and sensory complete injury. The assessment utilizes three assessment instruments to characterize legged mobility, which are the timed up-and-go test, the Ten-Meter Walk Test (10 MWT), and the Six-Minute Walk Test (6 MWT), which collectively assess the subject's ability to stand, walk, turn, and sit. The exertion associated with each assessment instrument was assessed using the Physiological Cost Index. Results indicate that the subject was able to perform the respective assessment instruments 25%, 70%, and 80% faster with the exoskeleton relative to the KAFOs for the timed up-and-go test, the 10 MWT, and the 6 MWT, respectively. Measurements of exertion indicate that the exoskeleton requires 1.6, 5.2, and 3.2 times less exertion than the KAFOs for each respective assessment instrument. The results indicate that the enhancement in speed and reduction in exertion are more significant during walking than during gait transitions.

  9. PMCA4 (ATP2B4) Mutation in Familial Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Zero Ho-Man; Kung, Michelle Hiu-Wai; Sham, Pak-Chung; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2014-01-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized primarily by progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness. More than 50 disease loci have been described with different modes of inheritance. In this study, we identified a novel missense mutation (c.803G>A, p.R268Q) in the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA4, or ATP2B4) gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant FSP using whole-exome sequencing and confirmed with Sanger sequencing. This mutation co-segregated with the phenotype in the six family members studied and is predicted to be pathogenic when multiple deleteriousness predictions were combined. This novel R268Q mutation was not present in over 7,000 subjects in public databases, and over 1,000 Han Chinese in our database. Prediction of potential functional consequence of R268Q mutation on PMCA4 by computational modeling revealed that this mutation is located in protein aggregation-prone segment susceptible to protein misfolding. Analysis for thermodynamic protein stability indicated that this mutation destabilizes the PMCA4 protein structure with higher folding free energy. As PMCA4 functions to maintain neuronal calcium homeostasis, our result showed that calcium dysregulation may be associated with the pathogenesis of FSP. PMID:25119969

  10. PMCA4 (ATP2B4) mutation in familial spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Li, Miaoxin; Ho, Philip Wing-Lok; Pang, Shirley Yin-Yu; Tse, Zero Ho-Man; Kung, Michelle Hiu-Wai; Sham, Pak-Chung; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2014-01-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized primarily by progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness. More than 50 disease loci have been described with different modes of inheritance. In this study, we identified a novel missense mutation (c.803G>A, p.R268Q) in the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA4, or ATP2B4) gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant FSP using whole-exome sequencing and confirmed with Sanger sequencing. This mutation co-segregated with the phenotype in the six family members studied and is predicted to be pathogenic when multiple deleteriousness predictions were combined. This novel R268Q mutation was not present in over 7,000 subjects in public databases, and over 1,000 Han Chinese in our database. Prediction of potential functional consequence of R268Q mutation on PMCA4 by computational modeling revealed that this mutation is located in protein aggregation-prone segment susceptible to protein misfolding. Analysis for thermodynamic protein stability indicated that this mutation destabilizes the PMCA4 protein structure with higher folding free energy. As PMCA4 functions to maintain neuronal calcium homeostasis, our result showed that calcium dysregulation may be associated with the pathogenesis of FSP.

  11. Revisiting genotype-phenotype overlap in neurogenetics: triplet-repeat expansions mimicking spastic paraplegias.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Quintáns, Beatriz; Ros, Raquel; Ampuero, Israel; Yáñez, Zuleima; Pascual, Samuel Ignacio; de Yébenes, Justo García; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2012-09-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) constitute a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders, characterized primarily by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. HSPs are caused by mutations in multiple genes (at least 48 loci and 28 causative genes). The clinical spectrum of HSPs is wide and important differences have been reported between patients with distinct mutations in the same gene, or even between different family members bearing the same mutation. Many patients with HSP present clinical deficits related to the involvement of neuronal systems other than corticospinal tracts, namely, peripheral nerves, sensory, or cerebellar pathways. These cases may be difficult to differentiate from other neurological diseases (e.g., hereditary ataxias), also genetically and clinically heterogeneous. As an illustration of how overlapping this genotype-phenotype relationship is, and the difficulties that it brings upon the development of neurogenetic algorithms and databases, we review the main clinical and genetic features of HSPs, and summarize reports on cases of triplet-repeat spinocerebellar ataxias that can mimic HSP phenotypes. This complex scenario makes the necessity of high-quality, curated mutation databases even more urgent, in order to develop adequate diagnostic guidelines, correct interpretation of genetic testing, and appropriate genetic counseling.

  12. Acute spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma presenting as paraplegia and complete recovery with non-operative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Al, Behçet; Yildirim, Cuma; Zengin, Suat; Genc, Sinan; Erkutlu, Ibrahim; Mete, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma (SSDH) with no underlying pathology is a very rare condition. Only 20 cases have been previously reported. It can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasia, or trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. It occurs most commonly in the thoracic spine and presents with sudden back pain radiating to the arms, legs or trunk, and varying degrees of motor, sensory, and autonomic disturbances. Although the main approach to management is surgical decompression, conservative management is used as well. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with sudden severe low back pain followed by rapid onset of complete paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an anterior subdural haematoma from T9 to L1 with cord compression. Corticosteroid treatment was administered. The patient showed substantial clinical improvement after 7 days of bed rest and an intense rehabilitation programme. An MRI scan and a computed tomography angiogram did not reveal any underlying pathology to account for the subdural haematoma. PMID:22065983

  13. Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia in Greece: Characterisation of a previously unexplored population using next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, David S; Koutsis, Georgios; Tucci, Arianna; Panas, Marios; Baklou, Markella; Breza, Marianthi; Karadima, Georgia; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) is a syndrome characterised by lower limb spasticity, occurring alone or in association with other neurological manifestations, such as cognitive impairment, seizures, ataxia or neuropathy. HSP occurs worldwide, with different populations having different frequencies of causative genes. The Greek population has not yet been characterised. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and molecular epidemiology of the largest cohort of HSP in Greece, comprising 54 patients from 40 families. We used a targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) approach to genetically assess a proband from each family. We made a genetic diagnosis in more than 50 % of cases and identified 11 novel variants. Variants in SPAST and KIF5A were the most common causes of autosomal dominant HSP, while SPG11 and CYP7B1 were the most common cause of autosomal recessive HSP. We identified a novel variant in SPG11 which led to disease with later onset and may be unique to the Greek population and report the first nonsense mutation in KIF5A. Interestingly, the frequency of HSP mutations in the Greek population, which is relatively isolated, was very similar to other European populations. We confirm that NGS approaches are an efficient diagnostic tool and should be employed early in the assessment of HSP patients. PMID:26374131

  14. Towards Parameters and Protocols to Recommend FES-Cycling in Cases of Paraplegia: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Juliana Araujo; da Fonseca, Lucas Oliveira; dos Santos-Couto-Paz, Clarissa Cardoso; Bó, Antônio Padilha Lanari; Fattal, Charles; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Fachin-Martins, Emerson

    2016-01-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation assisted cycling (FES-Cycling) is increasingly becoming an alternative option recommended to people with spinal cord injury struggling with paraplegia and interested in practicing sports. In order to propose preconditions to guide FES-Cycling recommendation, we aimed to investigate some features and their potential relationships with responsiveness to Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES). Fourteen volunteers attended a public recruitment forum to be assessed about their responsiveness through the 16-sessions of NMES. Volunteers were separated in two groups (responsive and non-responsive to NMES) which were investigated in the light of some personal, clinical, structural and functional features. Fifty seven percent of the initial sample responded to electrical stimulation with a visual contraction. This responsive group was predominantly composed by subjects presenting traumatic spinal cord injuries above T12 vertebral level. Only two subjects became responsive at the 3rd and 16th sessions. Among the observed features, the etiology and level of injuries seems to be more associated to responsiveness. Our observations seem to indicate that subjects with traumatic spinal cord injury above T12 level were the best potential candidates for FES-cycling. PMID:27990239

  15. Complicated spastic paraplegia in patients with AP5Z1 mutations (SPG48)

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Jennifer; Madeo, Marianna; Smets, Katrien; Edgar, James R.; Schols, Ludger; Li, Jun; Yarrow, Anna; Deconinck, Tine; Baets, Jonathan; Van Aken, Elisabeth; De Bleecker, Jan; Datiles, Manuel B.; Roda, Ricardo H.; Liepert, Joachim; Züchner, Stephan; Mariotti, Caterina; De Jonghe, Peter; Blackstone, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Biallelic mutations in the AP5Z1 gene encoding the AP-5 ζ subunit have been described in a small number of patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) (SPG48); we sought to define genotype–phenotype correlations in patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous sequence variants predicted to be deleterious. Methods: We performed clinical, radiologic, and pathologic studies in 6 patients with biallelic mutations in AP5Z1. Results: In 4 of the 6 patients, there was complete loss of AP-5 ζ protein. Clinical features encompassed not only prominent spastic paraparesis but also sensory and motor neuropathy, ataxia, dystonia, myoclonus, and parkinsonism. Skin fibroblasts from affected patients tested positive for periodic acid Schiff and autofluorescent storage material, while electron microscopic analysis demonstrated lamellar storage material consistent with abnormal storage of lysosomal material. Conclusions: Our findings expand the spectrum of AP5Z1-associated neurodegenerative disorders and point to clinical and pathophysiologic overlap between autosomal recessive forms of HSP and lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:27606357

  16. Coexistence of Factor VII Deficiency and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia in Two Siblings

    PubMed Central

    De la Corte-Rodriguez, Hortensia; Alvarez-Roman, M. Teresa; Hernandez-Moreno, Ana L.

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of two patients aged 12 years and 7 years who were referred to our hospital for factor VII deficiency inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, who had suffered from previous multiple joint haemarthroses. They presented with fine motor symptoms and difficulty in walking. During physical examination we observed neurological symptoms (general hypotonia, muscular hypotrophy, exaggerated tendon reflexes, pes cavus, and spastic gait). Given that the symptoms were not justified by the deficiency of coagulation factor VII and on suspicion of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), tests were carried out. Findings from the tests confirmed the diagnosis of HSP (axonal degeneration of the central motor pathway and pyramidal tracts), further complicated by mixed neuropathy. This disease was also inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern with no direct genetic association with factor VII deficiency. Neurological symptoms had gone unnoticed due to a history of multiple joint haemarthrosis; musculoskeletal examination led to a satisfactory differential diagnosis. Haematological prophylaxis was commenced with rFVIIa at 30 mcg/kg, three days per week. A rehabilitation programme was prescribed so that the patient could remain independent for as long as possible, based on orthosis, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy. Response to treatment is currently satisfactory and no new bleeding has presented. As far as we are aware, the coexistence of these two diseases (factor VII deficiency and HSP) has not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:28018685

  17. Conserved pharmacological rescue of hereditary spastic paraplegia-related phenotypes across model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Carl; Lissouba, Alexandra; Madabattula, Surya; Fardghassemi, Yasmin; Rosenfelt, Cory; Androschuk, Alaura; Strautman, Joel; Wong, Clement; Bysice, Andrew; O'sullivan, Julia; Rouleau, Guy A.; Drapeau, Pierre; Parker, J. Alex; Bolduc, François V.

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases causing progressive gait dysfunction. Over 50 genes have now been associated with HSP. Despite the recent explosion in genetic knowledge, HSP remains without pharmacological treatment. Loss-of-function mutation of the SPAST gene, also known as SPG4, is the most common cause of HSP in patients. SPAST is conserved across animal species and regulates microtubule dynamics. Recent studies have shown that it also modulates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Here, utilizing null SPAST homologues in C. elegans, Drosophila and zebrafish, we tested FDA-approved compounds known to modulate ER stress in order to ameliorate locomotor phenotypes associated with HSP. We found that locomotor defects found in all of our spastin models could be partially rescued by phenazine, methylene blue, N-acetyl-cysteine, guanabenz and salubrinal. In addition, we show that established biomarkers of ER stress levels correlated with improved locomotor activity upon treatment across model organisms. Our results provide insights into biomarkers and novel therapeutic avenues for HSP. PMID:26744324

  18. Total knee arthroplasty in patient with paraplegia after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zietek, P; Dobiecki, K

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of paraplegic patients is more complex than in able-bodied subjects. Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects younger, active people more often than the elderly during high-energy fall or traffic accidents. In order to return to work after suffering an SCI, patients need to regain their functional independence, especially their ability to drive. The literature lacks strong evidence addressing the surgical solutions in severe knee arthrosis in paralyzed patients after SCI. We present a favourable outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) of a stiff knee in extension in a man with T12 grade C paraplegia after SCI. We describe an effective rehabilitation protocol after knee arthroplasty in patient with damage to the spinal cord. Several factors should be taken into account before performing surgery: 1. ability of regaining some of spinal cord locomotor function through intensive gait rehabilitation in SCI patients, 2. presence of muscle imbalance and knee contractures combined with a risk of bone fracture resulting from intensive postoperative rehabilitation, 3. the impaired microvasculature of the skin and subcutaneous tissues and increased risk of occlusion occurrence of the capillaries and small vessels of the leg, 4. higher prevalence of secondary infections via urinary entry sites in patients after SCI, 5. patient's strong determination and willingness to undergo the arthroplasty procedure. TKA might be considered in selected paralyzed patients after SCI, especially in those with severe arthrosis as well as significant knee contractures. Our study reveals the advantage of performing TKA in improving functional state in patients with cord injury.

  19. Alteration of Fatty-Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Affects Mitochondrial Form and Function in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Christelle; Nawara, Magdalena; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Zaki, Maha S.; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Schule, Rebecca; Mignot, Cyril; Obre, Emilie; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Durand, Christelle M.; Oteyza, Andrés Caballero; El-Hachimi, Khalid H.; Al Drees, Abdulmajeed; Bouslam, Naima; Lamari, Foudil; Elmalik, Salah A.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Esteves, Typhaine; Gaussen, Marion; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Gyapay, Gabor; Lechner, Doris; Gonzalez, Michael; Depienne, Christel; Mochel, Fanny; Lavie, Julie; Schols, Ludger; Lacombe, Didier; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Zuchner, Stephan; Yamashita, Atsushi; Benomar, Ali; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Darios, Frederic; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is considered one of the most heterogeneous groups of neurological disorders, both clinically and genetically. The disease comprises pure and complex forms that clinically include slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting from degeneration of the corticospinal tract. At least 48 loci accounting for these diseases have been mapped to date, and mutations have been identified in 22 genes, most of which play a role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we identified mutations in two functionally related genes (DDHD1 and CYP2U1) in individuals with autosomal-recessive forms of HSP by using either the classical positional cloning or a combination of whole-genome linkage mapping and next-generation sequencing. Interestingly, three subjects with CYP2U1 mutations presented with a thin corpus callosum, white-matter abnormalities, and/or calcification of the basal ganglia. These genes code for two enzymes involved in fatty-acid metabolism, and we have demonstrated in human cells that the HSP pathophysiology includes alteration of mitochondrial architecture and bioenergetics with increased oxidative stress. Our combined results focus attention on lipid metabolism as a critical HSP pathway with a deleterious impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic function. PMID:23176821

  20. Intramuscular viral delivery of paraplegin rescues peripheral axonopathy in a model of hereditary spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Pirozzi, Marinella; Quattrini, Angelo; Andolfi, Gennaro; Dina, Giorgia; Malaguti, Maria Chiara; Auricchio, Alberto; Rugarli, Elena I.

    2006-01-01

    Degeneration of peripheral motor axons is a common feature of several debilitating diseases including complicated forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia. One such form is caused by loss of the mitochondrial energy-dependent protease paraplegin. Paraplegin-deficient mice display a progressive degeneration in several axonal tracts, characterized by the accumulation of morphological abnormal mitochondria. We show that adenoassociated virus–mediated (AAV-mediated) intramuscular delivery of paraplegin halted the progression of neuropathological changes and rescued mitochondrial morphology in the peripheral nerves of paraplegin-deficient mice. One single injection before onset of symptoms improved the motor performance of paraplegin-deficient mice for up to 10 months, indicating that the peripheral neuropathy contributes to the clinical phenotype. This study provides a proof of principle that gene transfer may be an effective therapeutic option for patients with paraplegin deficiency and demonstrates that AAV vectors can be successfully employed for retrograde delivery of an intracellular protein to spinal motor neurons, opening new perspectives for several hereditary axonal neuropathies of the peripheral nerves. PMID:16357941

  1. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    PubMed

    Varga, Rita-Eva; Khundadze, Mukhran; Damme, Markus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hoffmann, Birgit; Stauber, Tobias; Koch, Nicole; Hennings, J Christopher; Franzka, Patricia; Huebner, Antje K; Kessels, Michael M; Biskup, Christoph; Jentsch, Thomas J; Qualmann, Britta; Braulke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A

    2015-08-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs). Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  2. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Rita-Eva; Khundadze, Mukhran; Damme, Markus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hoffmann, Birgit; Stauber, Tobias; Koch, Nicole; Hennings, J. Christopher; Franzka, Patricia; Huebner, Antje K.; Kessels, Michael M.; Biskup, Christoph; Jentsch, Thomas J.; Qualmann, Britta; Braulke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs). Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice. PMID:26284655

  3. Successful surgical treatment of descending aorta interruption in a 29-year-old woman with acute paraplegia and subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shutang; Wang, Zhiheng; Zhang, Liang; Fu, Hongdu; Zhuang, Huanwei; Cao, Xianjun; Liang, Liming; Yang, Yanqi

    2015-06-06

    Interruption of the descending aorta is an extremely rare great vessel malformation. In this report, we describe a very unusual case of a 29-year-old female with a 13-year history of hypertension who was found to have an interruption of the descending aorta when she was hospitalized with a subarachnoid hemorrhage and symptoms of acute paraplegia. We successfully surgically corrected the defect using a Gore-Tex® graft to bypass the aortic interruption. The patient's blood pressure postoperatively returned to normal, and the patient recovered completely from her paraplegia by the time of her 5-month follow-up visit.

  4. Posterior-only vertebral column resection for revision surgery in post-laminectomy rotokyphoscoliosis associated with late-onset paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Youping; Wu, Jigong; Ma, Huasong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Severe post-laminectomy spinal deformity associated with late-onset paraplegia is a complex and rare disorder. Little is known about revision surgery in post-laminectomy rotokyphoscoliosis associated with late-onset paraplegia treated by the single stage posterior-only vertebral column resection (VCR) procedure. Patient concerns and diagnoses: The patient was a 14-year-old male diagnosed as post-laminectomy rotokyphoscoliosis associated with late-onset paraplegia. He underwent posterior total laminectomy through the thoracic spine for intramedullary spinal cord tumors at the age of 3 years in another hospital. He then developed kyphosis deformity 1 year after laminectomy, and underwent posterior spinal fusion without instrumentation at 9 years of age. However, the deformity gradually progressed over the years. Seven months before admission to our hospital, he developed a significant progression of neurological deficits, including weakness of strength and sensation in lower extremities bilaterally, with no bladder or bowel dysfunction. There was no improvement of spinal cord function with conservative measures, and he required a wheelchair for movement. Interventions: The patient underwent posterior-only VCR by single stage with the purposes of spinal cord decompression and spinal deformity correction. Outcomes: Postoperatively, he was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) and required positive pressure ventilation support to improve his respiratory condition. The child experienced cerebrospinal fluid leak (CSF) which resulted in an unplanned return to the operating room. The neurological function improved from preoperative Frankel C to Frankel D within 12 months of surgery, and recovered completely to Frankel E by 18 months. At the 24 month follow-up, the good neurological function was maintained; pulmonary function tests (PFTs) revealed improved forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume for 1 second (FEV1). The patient

  5. A pregnant woman with metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma and paraplegia: Multiple considerations involved in the management.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Kand, Purushottam

    2011-01-01

    undertaken 48h after the administration of (131)I scan dose. Both the diagnostic and post (131)I treatment scan demonstrated multiple foci of (131)I uptake in the skeleton, lungs and liver. Following discharge from the isolation ward, adequate separation from the infant was ensured and the childcare was undertaken by relatives. The patient had a remarkable improvement clinically. During the next 3-½ years she was treated 2 more times with (131)I with cumulative doses of about 25.9GBq. The last post-treatment scan is depicted in. She has been presently ambulatory with complete resolution of paraplegia and a significantly better quality of life without any requirement of support, despite the presence of extensive skeletal disease. A recent review entitled "Approach to the pregnant patient with thyroid cancer", addresses this topic as a separate category. Similar emphasis has also been given by other authors while dealing with these patients. In our experience, patients with PTC metastatic lesions in the vertebrae show better response compared to those with large flat bone metastases likely related to the small size of the former. In conclusion, a teamwork of surgeons, obstetricians, nuclear medicine physicians as well as the strong support by the relatives, was necessary to favorably treat this patient with metastatic PTC, paraplegia and pregnancy.

  6. Linkage of the late onset autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia (DFSPII) to chromosome 2p markers

    SciTech Connect

    Hentati, A.; Wasserman, B.; Siddique, T.

    1994-09-01

    Pure familial spastic paraplegias (FSP) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by spasticity of lower limbs. FSP in inherited as an autosomal dominant (DFSP) or an autosomal recessive (RFSP) trait. DFSP has been classified into early onset (DFSPI) and late onset (DFSPII) based on the mean age of onset in families. A locus for RFSP has been mapped to chromosome 8, while a locus for DFSPI has been mapped to chromosome 14q. Genetic locus heterogeneity was observed in both of these forms. The location of DFSPII locus (or loci) is unknown. We collected DNA samples from 81 individuals including 26 affecteds from three DFSPII families (9998, 840, 581). The mean age of onset of systems was 26.5, 42.5, and 35.2 years, respectively. We first tested 156 DNA markers distributed throughout the human 22 autosomes with family 9998 and positive lod scores were obtained with chromosome 2p markers D2S174 (Z({theta})=2.93 at {theta}=0.00), D2S146 (Z({theta})=1.03 at {theta}=0.00) and D2S177 (Z({theta})=1.04 at {theta}=0.00). Analysis of the 2 additional families confirmed the linkage with a peak lod score of Z({theta})=4.62 at {theta}=0.105 with D2S174. The multipoint linkage analysis using the map D2S175-10cM-D2S174-14cM-D2DS177 suggested that the DFSPII locus most likely maps between D2S174 and D2S177 with Z({theta})=6.11. There was no evidence in our data supporting genetic locus heterogeneity for the DFSPII.

  7. Loss of Association of REEP2 with Membranes Leads to Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Typhaine; Durr, Alexandra; Mundwiller, Emeline; Loureiro, José L.; Boutry, Maxime; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Gauthier, Julie; El-Hachimi, Khalid H.; Depienne, Christel; Muriel, Marie-Paule; Acosta Lebrigio, Rafael F.; Gaussen, Marion; Noreau, Anne; Speziani, Fiorella; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Deleuze, Jean-François; Dion, Patrick; Coutinho, Paula; Rouleau, Guy A.; Zuchner, Stephan; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Darios, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurological conditions. Their main pathogenic mechanisms are thought to involve alterations in endomembrane trafficking, mitochondrial function, and lipid metabolism. With a combination of whole-genome mapping and exome sequencing, we identified three mutations in REEP2 in two families with HSP: a missense variant (c.107T>A [p.Val36Glu]) that segregated in the heterozygous state in a family with autosomal-dominant inheritance and a missense change (c.215T>A [p.Phe72Tyr]) that segregated in trans with a splice site mutation (c.105+3G>T) in a family with autosomal-recessive transmission. REEP2 belongs to a family of proteins that shape the endoplasmic reticulum, an organelle that was altered in fibroblasts from an affected subject. In vitro, the p.Val36Glu variant in the autosomal-dominant family had a dominant-negative effect; it inhibited the normal binding of wild-type REEP2 to membranes. The missense substitution p.Phe72Tyr, in the recessive family, decreased the affinity of the mutant protein for membranes that, together with the splice site mutation, is expected to cause complete loss of REEP2 function. Our findings illustrate how dominant and recessive inheritance can be explained by the effects and nature of mutations in the same gene. They have also important implications for genetic diagnosis and counseling in clinical practice because of the association of various modes of inheritance to this new clinico-genetic entity. PMID:24388663

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging in SPG11- and SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Garaci, Francesco; Toschi, Nicola; Lanzafame, Simona; Meschini, Alessandro; Bertini, Enrico; Simonetti, Giovanni; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Guerrisi, Maria; Floris, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential diagnostic markers of Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP). We investigated the white matter features of spastic gait (SPG)11- and SPG4-linked HSP, using diffusion tensor imaging performed with a 3-Tesla (3T) scanner. We examined four patients with SPG11 mutations, three with SPG4 mutations, and 26 healthy controls. We obtained maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), which we analyzed through both region of interest -based approach and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Compared with healthy controls, SPG11 patients presented increased MD and decreased FA in the semioval centers, frontal and peritrigonal white matter, posterior limb of the internal capsule, and throughout the corpus callosum. Similar alterations were seen in the SPG4 patients at the levels of the semioval centers, the posterior limb of the internal capsule, the left cerebral pedicle, the genu and trunk of the corpus callosum, and the peritrigonal white matter on the left. No MD or FA alterations were observed in the cerebellar white matter. In a direct comparison, white matter alterations were more pronounced and widespread in HSP-SPG11 than in HSP-SPG4 patients. Joint TBSS analysis of all three groups confirmed significant widespread alterations of FA and MD values in the supratentorial white matter. This noninvasive study documented the presence of altered diffusivity in white matter in both forms of HSP, which could represent an important diagnostic marker of HSP. The association of reduced FA and increased MD in this patient population supports the interpretation of HPG as a neurodegenerative disorder.

  9. Identification and Expression Analysis of Spastin Gene Mutations in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Svenson, Ingrid K.; Ashley-Koch, Allison E.; Gaskell, P. Craig; Riney, Travis J.; Cumming, W. J. Ken; Kingston, Helen M.; Hogan, Edward L.; Boustany, Rose-Mary N.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Nance, Martha A.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Marchuk, Douglas A.

    2001-01-01

    Pure hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG) type 4 is the most common form of autosomal dominant hereditary SPG, a neurodegenerative disease characterized primarily by hyperreflexia and progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding spastin, a member of the AAA family of ATPases. We have screened the spastin gene for mutations in 15 families consistent with linkage to the spastin gene locus, SPG4, and have identified 11 mutations, 10 of which are novel. Five of the mutations identified are in noninvariant splice-junction sequences. Reverse transcription–PCR analysis of mRNA from patients shows that each of these five mutations results in aberrant splicing. One mutation was found to be “leaky,” or partially penetrant; that is, the mutant allele produced both mutant (skipped exon) and wild-type (full-length) transcripts. This phenomenon was reproduced in in vitro splicing experiments, with a minigene splicing-vector construct only in the context of the endogenous splice junctions flanking the splice junctions of the skipped exon. In the absence of endogenous splice junctions, only mutant transcript was detected. The existence of at least one leaky mutation suggests that relatively small differences in the level of wild-type spastin expression can have significant functional consequences. This may account, at least in part, for the wide ranges in age at onset, symptom severity, and rate of symptom progression that have been reported to occur both among and within families with SPG linked to SPG4. In addition, these results suggest caution in the interpretation of data solely obtained with minigene constructs to study the effects of sequence variation on splicing. The lack of full genomic sequence context in these constructs can mask important functional consequences of the mutation. PMID:11309678

  10. Hereditary spastic paraplegia due to a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Sébastien; Lavie, Julie; Banneau, Guillaume; Voirand, Nathalie; Lavandier, Karine; Debouverie, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a heterogeneous group of diseases little known in clinical practice due to its low prevalence, slow progression, and difficult diagnosis. This results in an underestimation of HSP leading to belated diagnosis and management. In depth diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and identification of genomic mutations. We describe the clinical presentation and pathogeny of HSP through a report of a case due to a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene (SPG31). Patient concerns: A 64-year-old woman presented gait disturbances due to spasticity of the lower limbs progressing since her third decade. Previous investigations failed to find any cause. Interventions: DNA analysis was performed to search for HSP causing mutations. Diagnoses: A novel heterozygote mutation (c.595 + 1G>A) of the REEP1 gene, within the splice site of intron 6, was discovered. This nucleotide change causes exon 6 skipping leading to frame shift and a truncated transcript identified by complementary DNA sequencing of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction products. Outcomes: REEP1 is a known protein predominantly located in the upper motor neurons. Mutation of REEP1 primary affects the longest axons explaining predominance of pyramidal syndrome on lower limbs. Lessons: Slow progressive pyramidal syndrome of the lower limbs should elicit a diagnosis of HSP. We describe a novel mutation of the REEP1 gene causing HSP. Pathogeny is based on resulting abnormal REEP1 protein which is involved in the development of longest axons constituting the corticospinal tracts. PMID:28099355

  11. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Tight linkage to chromosome 15q

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Wu, C.T.B.; Jones, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) (MIM No.18260) constitutes a clinically and genetically diverse group of disorders that share the primary feature of progressive, severe, lower extremity spasticity. FSP is classified according to the mode of inheritance and whether progressive spasticity occurs in isolation ({open_quotes}uncomplicated FSP{close_quotes}) or with other neurologic abnormalities ({open_quotes}complicated FSP{close_quotes}), including optic neuropathy, retinopathy, extrapyramidal disturbance, dementia, ataxia, ichthyosis, mental retardation, or deafness. Recently, autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP was shown to be genetically heterogeneous and tightly linked to a group of microsatellite markers on chromosome 14q in one large kindred. We examined 126 members of a non-consanguineous North American kindred of Irish descent. FSP was diagnosed in 31 living subjects who developed insidiously progressive gait disturbance between ages 12 and 35 years. Using genetic linkage analysis to microsatellite DNA polymorphisms, we showed that the FSP locus on chromosome 14q was exluded from linkage with the disorder in our family. Subsequently, we searched for genetic linkage between the disorder and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms spanning approximately 50% of the genome. We observed significantly positive, two-point maximum lod scores (Z) for markers on chromosome 15q: D15S128 (Z=9.70, {theta}=0.05), D15S165 (Z=3.30, {theta}=0.10), and UT511 (Z=3.86, {theta}=0.10). Our data clearly establishes that one locus for autosomal dominant, uncomplicated FSP is mapped to the pericentric region of chromosome 15q. Identifying genes responsible for chromosome 15q-linked and chromosome 14q-linked FSP will greatly advance our understanding of this condition and hopefully other inherited and degenerative brain and spinal cord disorders that are also characterized by axonal degeneration.

  12. Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia-Linked REEP1 Modulates ER-Mitochondria Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Youngshin; Cho, Il-Taeg; Schoel, Leah J.; Cho, Ginam; Golden, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mutations in receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1) are associated with hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs). Although axonal degeneration is thought to be a predominant feature in HSP, the role of REEP1 mutations in degeneration is largely unknown. Previous studies have implicated a role for REEP1 in the ER, whereas others localized REEP1 with mitochondria. We sought to resolve the cellular localization of REEP1 and to further elucidate the pathobiology underlying REEP1 mutations in patients. Methods A combination of cellular imaging and biochemical approaches was used to refine the cellular localization of REEP1. Next, Reep1 mutations associated with HSP were functionally tested in neuritic growth and degeneration assays using mouse cortical culture. Finally, a novel assay was developed and used with wild type and mutant Reep1s to measure the interactions between the ER and mitochondria. Results We found that REEP1 is present at the ER-mitochondria interface, and it contains subdomains for mitochondrial as well as ER localization. Knockdown of Reep1 and the expression of pathological Reep1 mutations resulted in neuritic growth defects and degeneration. Finally, using our novel split-RLuc8 assay, we show REEP1 facilitates ER-mitochondria interactions, a function diminished by disease-associated mutations. Interpretation Our data potentially reconcile the current conflicting reports regarding REEP1 being either an ER or a mitochondrial protein. Furthermore, our results connect, for the first time, the disrupted ER-mitochondria interactions to a failure in maintaining health of long axons in HSPs. Finally, the split-RLuc8 assay offers a new tool to identify potential drugs for multiple neurodegenerative diseases with ER-mitochondria interaction defects. PMID:26201691

  13. The influence of shoulder pain on functional limitation, perceived health, and depressive mood in patients with traumatic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Chi; Chan, Rai-Chi; Tsai, Yun-An; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich; Wu, Han-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether functional activity, perceived health, and depressive symptoms differ between individuals with traumatic paraplegia with and without shoulder pain. Design Cross sectional and comparative investigation using the unified questionnaire. Setting Neural Regeneration and Repair Division unit of Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan. Participants Seventy-six patients with paraplegia (23 with and 53 without shoulder pain) who had experienced spinal cord injury at American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale T2 to T12 neurologic level (at least 6 months previously). Outcome measures Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM), a single item from the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) depression scale. Results Shoulder pain was prevalent in 30% patients. Patients with shoulder pain had significantly worse perceived health and greater depressive symptoms than those without. No significant difference was found in functional ability between groups. Greater shoulder pain intensity was related to higher depressive scores (r = 0.278, P = 0.017) and lower self-perceived health scores (r = −0.433, P < 0.001) but not SCIM scores (P = 0.342). Conclusion Although shoulder pain was unrelated to functional limitation, it was associated with lower perceived health and higher depressive mood levels. PMID:25296991

  14. [A Case of Postoperative Paraplegia Caused by Idiopathic Spinal Cord Infarction following Hepatectomy under Both General and Epidural Anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Koga, Yukari; Hiraki, Teruyuki; Ushijima, Kazuo

    2015-04-01

    A 73-year-old woman (height : 155 cm, weight : 55 kg) was scheduled to undergo a laparotomic hepatectomy and radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Her medical history did not include any relevant conditions such as cardiovascular or neurological disorders. A thoracic epidural catheter was introduced at T8-9 before the induction of anesthesia with intravenous propofol. General anesthesia was maintained with the inhalation of oxygen, air, and desflurane, and the continuous infusion of remifentanil. Several intraoperative episodes of mild hypotension occurred, each of which was successfully treated with intravenous ephedrine, but otherwise her anesthetic course was uneventful, and she recovered from the anesthesia smoothly. Her postoperative pain was well controlled with continuous epidural infusion of levobupivacaine and fentanyl, and she could walk by herself on postoperative day (POD) 1. However, she suffered weakness in her lower extremities on POD2 and subsequently fell into complete paraplegia with sensory loss below the T4 level on POD3. A magnetic resonance imaging scan taken on POD4 showed an idiopathic spinal cord infarction (SCI) involving levels T1 through T4, although no epidural abnormalities, e.g., hematomas, were detected. Immediate treatment with methylprednisolone, ozagrel, and edaravone failed to resolve her symptoms. We suggest that it is of great importance to consider SCI as a differential diagnosis as soon as possible in cases of unanticipated postoperative paraplegia.

  15. Late-onset spastic paraplegia: Aberrant SPG11 transcripts generated by a novel splice site donor mutation.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Toshitaka; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Mori, Atsuko; Oki, Ryosuke; Tsukamoto-Miyashiro, Ai; Matsui, Naoko; Miyazaki, Yoshimichi; Orlacchio, Antonio; Izumi, Yuishin; Nishida, Yoshihiko; Kaji, Ryuji

    2015-12-15

    We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site donor (SSD) of intron 30 (c.5866+1G>A) in consanguineous Japanese SPG11 siblings showing late-onset spastic paraplegia using the whole-exome sequencing. Phenotypic variability was observed, including age-at-onset, dysarthria and pes cavus. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that the mutation affected the recognition of the constitutive SSD of intron 30, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSD in exon 30. The use of constitutive splice sites of intron 29 was confirmed by sequencing. The mutant transcripts are mostly subject to degradation by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay system. SPG11 transcripts, escaping from the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, would generate a truncated protein (p.Tyr1900Phefs5X) containing the first 1899 amino acids and followed by 4 aberrant amino acids. This study showed a successful clinical application of whole-exome sequencing in spastic paraplegia and demonstrated a further evidence of allelic heterogeneity in SPG11. The confirmation of aberrant transcript by splice site mutation is a prerequisite for a more precise molecular diagnosis.

  16. Genetic analysis of SPG4 and SPG3A genes in a cohort of Chinese patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xingjiao; Cen, Zhidong; Xie, Fei; Ouyang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Baorong; Zhao, Guohua; Luo, Wei

    2014-12-15

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP or SPG) is a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders. At least 52 different gene loci have been identified so far, involving autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked (XL), and maternal inheritance. Mutations in the SPAST (SPG4) and ATL1 (SPG3A) genes are responsible for about 50% of pure AD-HSP patients. In this study, SPAST and ATL1 mutations were screened in 36 unrelated HSP patients (17 probands with AD family history and 19 sporadic HSP patients) by direct sequencing and multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA). We identified 3 micro-mutations and 2 exon deletions in SPAST gene and 2 micro-mutations in ATL1 gene. Four of five micro-mutations were novel and del. ex. 13-15 in SPAST was not reported previously. In this cohort of Chinese patients with spastic paraplegia, SPAST and ATL1 mutations were found in 5 of 17 HSP probands with AD family history and in 2 of 19 sporadic HSP patients. Four novel micro-mutations and one novel exon deletion were identified, which broadened the mutational spectrum of the genes.

  17. Characterization of Alu and recombination-associated motifs mediating a large homozygous SPG7 gene rearrangement causing hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    López, Eva; Casasnovas, Carlos; Giménez, Javier; Matilla-Dueñas, Antoni; Sánchez, Ivelisse; Volpini, Víctor

    2015-04-01

    Spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7) is one of the most common forms of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia (AR-HSP). Although over 77 different mutations have been identified in SPG7 patients, only 9 gross deletions have been reported with only a few of them being fully characterized. Here, we present a detailed description of a large homozygous intragenic SPG7 gene rearrangement involving a 5144-base pair (bp) genomic loss (c. 1450-446_1779 + 746 delinsAAAGTGCT) encompassing exons 11 to 13, identified in a Spanish AR-HSP family. Analysis of the deletion junction sequences revealed that the 5' breakpoint of this SPG7 gene deletion was located within highly homologous Alu sequences where the 3' breakpoint appears to be flanked by the core crossover hotspot instigator (chi)-like sequence (GCTGG). Furthermore, an 8-bp (AAAGTTGCT) conserved sequence at the breakpoint junction was identified, suggesting that the most likely mechanism for the occurrence of this rearrangement is by Alu microhomology and chi-like recombination-associated motif-mediated multiple exon deletion. Our results are consistent with non-allelic homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining in deletion mutagenesis for the generation of rearrangements. This study provides more evidence associating repeated elements as a genetic mechanism underlying neurodegenerative disorders, highlighting their importance in human diseases.

  18. Comparison of Blood Lactate Elimination in Individuals With Paraplegia and Able-Bodied Individuals During Active Recovery From Exhaustive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Leicht, Christof; Perret, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare blood lactate elimination between individuals with paraplegia (P) and able-bodied (AB) individuals after strenuous arm exercise. Methods: Eight P and 8 AB men (matched for age, height, and weight) participated in this study. Average weekly arm-training volume for P participants (eg, hand bike, wheelchair basketball) and AB participants (eg, swimming, rowing, cross-country skiing) was 4.1 ± 1.6 vs 2.8 ± 0.8 h. A maximal-arm-cranking intensity-graded exercise test to volitional exhaustion was performed by all test participants. Immediately after the exercise test, the participants performed arm cranking for another 30 minutes at a workload of one third of the maximally achieved power output. During this active recovery, mixed-capillary blood samples were taken for lactate analysis. Results: The lactate accumulation constant was significantly higher for P individuals, whereas the lactate elimination constant showed no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions: Individuals with paraplegia seem to have no disadvantages in lactate elimination after exhaustive arm exercise compared with able-bodied individuals. PMID:18533413

  19. Paraplegia increased cardiac NGF content, sympathetic tonus, and the susceptibility to ischemia-induced ventricular tachycardia in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Lujan, Heidi L.; Chen, Ying; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    Midthoracic spinal cord injury is associated with ventricular arrhythmias that are mediated, in part, by enhanced cardiac sympathetic activity. Furthermore, it is well known that sympathetic neurons have a lifelong requirement for nerve growth factor (NGF). NGF is a neurotrophin that supports the survival and differentiation of sympathetic neurons and enhances target innervation. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that paraplegia is associated with an increased cardiac NGF content, sympathetic tonus, and susceptibility to ischemia-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Intact and paraplegic (6–9 wk posttransection, T5 spinal cord transection) rats were instrumented with a radiotelemetry device for recording arterial pressure, temperature, and ECG, and a snare was placed around the left main coronary artery. Following recovery, the susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias (coronary artery occlusion) was determined in intact and paraplegic rats. In additional groups of matched intact and paraplegic rats, cardiac nerve growth factor content (ELISA) and cardiac sympathetic tonus were determined. Paraplegia, compared with intact, increased cardiac nerve growth factor content (2,146 ± 286 vs. 180 ± 36 pg/ml, P < 0.05) and cardiac sympathetic tonus (154 ± 4 vs. 68 ± 4 beats/min, P < 0.05) and decreased the ventricular arrhythmia threshold (3.6 ± 0.2 vs. 4.9 ± 0.2 min, P < 0.05). Thus altered autonomic behavior increases the susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias in paraplegic rats. PMID:19286942

  20. Identification of two novel KIF5A mutations in hereditary spastic paraplegia associated with mild peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    López, Eva; Casasnovas, Carlos; Giménez, Javier; Santamaría, Raúl; Terrazas, Jesús M; Volpini, Víctor

    2015-11-15

    Spastic paraplegia type 10 (SPG10) is a rare form of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) due to mutations in KIF5A, a gene encoding the neuronal kinesin heavy-chain involved in axonal transport. KIF5A mutations have been associated with a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from pure HSP to isolated peripheral nerve involvement or complicated HSP phenotypes. Most KIF5A mutations are clustered in the motor domain of the protein that is necessary for microtubule interaction. Here we describe two Spanish families with an adult onset complicated AD-HSP in which neurological studies revealed a mild sensory neuropathy. Intention tremor was also present in both families. Molecular genetic analysis identified two novel mutations c.773 C>T and c.833 C>T in the KIF5A gene resulting in the P258L and P278L substitutions respectively. Both were located in the highly conserved kinesin motor domain of the protein which has previously been identified as a hot spot for KIF5A mutations. This study adds to the evidence associating the known occurrence of mild peripheral neuropathy in the adult onset SPG10 type of AD-HSP.

  1. Non-traumatic acute paraplegia associated with a CT-guided needle biopsy in a silicotic nodule: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XU, LIYING; DING, XUN; LIAO, MEIYAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the case of an adult patient with non-traumatic acute paraplegia following a computed tomography (CT)-guided automated cutting needle biopsy (ACNB). Multiple nodules and masses were revealed on performing chest radiography and CT on a 45-year-old man. In order to make a pathological diagnosis, a CT-guided biopsy using an automatic cutting needle was performed. However, 10 min after the biopsy, a weakness of the lower extremities occurred, and the patient collapsed to the ground, albeit with clear consciousness. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed subsequently revealed no abnormal findings in the spinal cord. An MRI performed 24 h later, however, revealed swelling of the thoracic spinal cord and a high-signal-intensity lesion in T2-weighted images at the level of T7, T8 and T9. The patient subsequently received hyperbaric oxygen therapy for a few days, and rehabilitative treatment over the course of a few weeks. At 6 months following the biopsy, the patient was unable to walk, although the patient could stand for 10 min and defecate independently. Currently, the patient remains active in daily life, in spite of confinement to a wheelchair. The present case study was reported to raise the awareness of the possibility of spinal cord ischemia and acute paraplegia following a CT-guided ACNB of the lungs. The mechanism underlying spinal cord ischemia remains to be fully elucidated, although is thought to be multifactorial, involving air embolism. PMID:26998303

  2. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: clinico-pathologic features and emerging molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fink, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a syndrome designation describing inherited disorders in which lower extremity weakness and spasticity are the predominant symptoms. There are more than 50 genetic types of HSP. HSP affects individuals diverse ethnic groups with prevalence estimates ranging from 1.2 to 9.6 per 100,000 [39, 70, 77, 154, 185]. Symptoms may begin at any age. Gait impairment that begins after childhood usually worsens very slowly over many years. Gait impairment that begins in infancy and early childhood may not worsen significantly. Post mortem studies consistently identify degeneration of corticospinal tract axons (maximal in the thoracic spinal cord) and degeneration of fasciculus gracilis fibers (maximal in the cervico-medullary region). HSP syndromes thus appear to involve motor-sensory axon degeneration affecting predominantly (but not exclusively) the distal ends of long central nervous system (CNS) axons. In general, proteins encoded by HSP genes have diverse functions including axon transport (e.g. SPG30/KIF1A, SPG10/KIF5A and possibly SPG4/Spastin); endoplasmic reticulum morphology (e.g. SPG3A/Atlastin, SPG4/Spastin, SPG12/reticulon 2, and SPG31/REEP1, all of which interact); mitochondrial function (e.g. SPG13/chaperonin 60/heat shock protein 60, SPG7/paraplegin; and mitochondrial ATP6; 4) myelin formation (e.g. SPG2/Proteolipid protein and SPG42/Connexin 47); 5) protein folding and ER-stress response (SPG6/NIPA1, SPG8/K1AA0196 (Strumpellin), SGP17/BSCL2 (Seipin) [113-115], “mutilating sensory neuropathy with spastic paraplegia” due to CcT5 mutation and presumably SPG18/ERLIN2); 6) corticospinal tract and other neurodevelopment (e.g. SPG1/L1 cell adhesion molecule and SPG22/thyroid transporter MCT8); 7) fatty acid and phospholipid metabolism (e.g. SPG28/DDHD1, SPG35/FA2H, SPG39/NTE, SPG54/DDHD2, and SPG56/CYP2U1); and 8) endosome membrane trafficking and vesicle formation (e.g. SPG47/AP4B1, SPG48/KIAA0415, SPG50/AP4M1, SPG51/AP4E

  3. Hereditary spastic paraplegias with autosomal dominant, recessive, X-linked, or maternal trait of inheritance.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Löscher, Wolfgang; Quasthoff, Stefan; Wanschitz, Julia; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-07-15

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that are clinically characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower-limbs (pure SPG) and, majoritorian, additional more extensive neurological or non-neurological manifestations (complex or complicated SPG). Pure SPG is characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower-limbs, and occasionally sensory disturbances or bladder dysfunction. Complex SPGs additionally include cognitive impairment, dementia, epilepsy, extrapyramidal disturbances, cerebellar involvement, retinopathy, optic atrophy, deafness, polyneuropathy, or skin lesions in the absence of coexisting disorders. Nineteen SPGs follow an autosomal-dominant (AD-SPG), 27 an autosomal-recessive (AR-SPG), 5 X-linked (XL-SPG), and one a maternal trait of inheritance. SPGs are due to mutations in genes encoding for proteins involved in the maintenance of corticospinal tract neurons. Among the AD-SPGs, 40-45% of patients carry mutations in the SPAST-gene (SPG4) and 10% in the ATL1-gene (SPG3), while the other 9 genes are more rarely involved (NIPA1 (SPG6), KIAA0196 (SPG8), KIF5A (SPG10), RNT2 (SPG12), SPGD1 (SPG13), BSCL2 (SPG17), REEP1 (SPG31), ZFYVE27 (SPG33, debated), and SLC33A1 (SPG42, debated)). Among the AR-SPGs, ~20% of the patients carry mutations in the KIAA1840 (SPG11) gene whereas the 15 other genes are rarely mutated and account for SPGs in single families yet (CYP7B1 (SPG5), SPG7 (SPG7), ZFYVE26 (SPG15), ERLIN2 (SPG18), SPG20 (SPG20), ACP33 (SPG21), KIF1A (SPG30), FA2H (SPG35), NTE (SPG39), GJA12/GJC2 (SPG44), KIAA0415 (SPG48) and 4 genes encoding for the AP4-complex (SPG47)). Among the XL-SPGs, 3 causative genes have been identified (L1CAM (SPG1), PLP1 (SPG2), and SLC16A2 (SPG22)). The diagnosis of SPGs is based on clinical, instrumental and genetic investigations. Treatment is exclusively symptomatic.

  4. Feasibility for developing cardiovascular exercise recommendations for persons with motor-complete paraplegia based on manual wheelchair propulsion; A protocol and preliminary data

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Meaghan; Liem, Brian; Jacobs, Geneva; Hwang, Peter; Hornby, Thomas George; Rydberg, Leslie; Roth, Elliot

    2016-01-01

    Background The Center for Disease Control, American Heart Association, and American College of Sports Medicine recommendations for duration and intensity of exercise are based on the amount of energy expenditure required to maintain cardiovascular health in able body individuals; 1000 Kilocalories (Kcals) per week of energy expenditure has been demonstrated to achieve this effect. Manual wheelchair propulsion (MWP) represents a practical and accessible form of exercise for individuals with paraplegia. Objective To describe a method to determine the duration of MWP required to expend 1000 Kcals, when performed by individuals with paraplegia due to motor-complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Study Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Rehabilitation Research Laboratory. Participants Sixteen adults with motor complete T3-T12 paraplegia (body mass index < 35, duration of paraplegia > 3 months). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Indirect calorimetry during MWP was measured in order to calculate caloric expenditure per minute. These data were used to calculate the number of minutes of MWP required to expend 1000 Kcal in one week. Results During MWP, participants expended 3.3 ± 1.0 Kcal/minute. Based on this figure, 1000 Kcal of energy expenditure in one week would require 303 minutes of MWP per week, or 43.3 minutes per day, 7 days per week. Conclusions Our data suggest that it is feasible to create a practical and accessible exercise recommendation based on manual wheelchair propulsion for individuals with paraplegia due to motor-complete SCI. Larger studies are needed in order to develop accurate exercise recommendations for persons with SCI. PMID:25582138

  5. Shoulder Strength and Physical Activity Predictors of Shoulder Pain in People With Paraplegia From Spinal Injury: Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hatchett, Patricia; Eberly, Valerie J.; Lighthall Haubert, Lisa; Conners, Sandy; Requejo, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Shoulder joint pain is a frequent secondary complaint for people following spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective The purpose of this study was to determine predictors of shoulder joint pain in people with paraplegia. Methods/Design A 3-year longitudinal study was conducted. Participants were people with paraplegia who used a manual wheelchair for at least 50% of their mobility and were asymptomatic for shoulder pain at study entry. Participants were classified as having developed shoulder pain if they experienced an increase of ≥10 points on the Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index in the 3-year follow-up period. Measurements of maximal isometric shoulder torques were collected at study entry (baseline), 18 months, and 3 years. Daily activity was measured using a wheelchair odometer, and self-reported daily transfer and raise frequency data were collected by telephone every 6 weeks. Results Two hundred twenty-three participants were enrolled in the study; 39.8% developed shoulder pain over the 3-year follow-up period. Demographic variables and higher activity levels were not associated with shoulder pain onset. Baseline maximal isometric torque (normalized by body weight) in all shoulder muscle groups was 10% to 15% lower in participants who developed shoulder pain compared with those who remained pain-free. Lower shoulder adduction torque was a significant predictor of shoulder pain development (log-likelihood test=11.38), but the model explained only 7.5% of shoulder pain onset and consequently is of limited clinical utility. Limitations Time since SCI varied widely among participants, and transfer and raise activity was measured by participant recall. Conclusions Participants who developed shoulder pain had decreased muscle strength, particularly in the shoulder adductors, and lower levels of physical activity prior to the onset of shoulder pain. Neither factor was a strong predictor of shoulder pain onset. PMID:25721123

  6. A Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Mouse Model Supports a Role of ZFYVE26/SPASTIZIN for the Endolysosomal System

    PubMed Central

    Khundadze, Mukhran; Kollmann, Katrin; Koch, Nicole; Biskup, Christoph; Nietzsche, Sandor; Zimmer, Geraldine; Hennings, J. Christopher; Huebner, Antje K.; Symmank, Judit; Jahic, Amir; Ilina, Elena I.; Karle, Kathrin; Schöls, Ludger; Kessels, Michael; Braulke, Thomas; Qualmann, Britta; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs because of the degeneration of cortical motoneuron axons. SPG15 is a recessively inherited HSP variant caused by mutations in the ZFYVE26 gene and is additionally characterized by cerebellar ataxia, mental decline, and progressive thinning of the corpus callosum. ZFYVE26 encodes the FYVE domain-containing protein ZFYVE26/SPASTIZIN, which has been suggested to be associated with the newly discovered adaptor protein 5 (AP5) complex. We show that Zfyve26 is broadly expressed in neurons, associates with intracellular vesicles immunopositive for the early endosomal marker EEA1, and co-fractionates with a component of the AP5 complex. As the function of ZFYVE26 in neurons was largely unknown, we disrupted Zfyve26 in mice. Zfyve26 knockout mice do not show developmental defects but develop late-onset spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia confirming that SPG15 is caused by ZFYVE26 deficiency. The morphological analysis reveals axon degeneration and progressive loss of both cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. Importantly, neuron loss is preceded by accumulation of large intraneuronal deposits of membrane-surrounded material, which co-stains with the lysosomal marker Lamp1. A density gradient analysis of brain lysates shows an increase of Lamp1-positive membrane compartments with higher densities in Zfyve26 knockout mice. Increased levels of lysosomal enzymes in brains of aged knockout mice further support an alteration of the lysosomal compartment upon disruption of Zfyve26. We propose that SPG15 is caused by an endolysosomal membrane trafficking defect, which results in endolysosomal dysfunction. This appears to be particularly relevant in neurons with highly specialized neurites such as cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells. PMID:24367272

  7. A hereditary spastic paraplegia mouse model supports a role of ZFYVE26/SPASTIZIN for the endolysosomal system.

    PubMed

    Khundadze, Mukhran; Kollmann, Katrin; Koch, Nicole; Biskup, Christoph; Nietzsche, Sandor; Zimmer, Geraldine; Hennings, J Christopher; Huebner, Antje K; Symmank, Judit; Jahic, Amir; Ilina, Elena I; Karle, Kathrin; Schöls, Ludger; Kessels, Michael; Braulke, Thomas; Qualmann, Britta; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs because of the degeneration of cortical motoneuron axons. SPG15 is a recessively inherited HSP variant caused by mutations in the ZFYVE26 gene and is additionally characterized by cerebellar ataxia, mental decline, and progressive thinning of the corpus callosum. ZFYVE26 encodes the FYVE domain-containing protein ZFYVE26/SPASTIZIN, which has been suggested to be associated with the newly discovered adaptor protein 5 (AP5) complex. We show that Zfyve26 is broadly expressed in neurons, associates with intracellular vesicles immunopositive for the early endosomal marker EEA1, and co-fractionates with a component of the AP5 complex. As the function of ZFYVE26 in neurons was largely unknown, we disrupted Zfyve26 in mice. Zfyve26 knockout mice do not show developmental defects but develop late-onset spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia confirming that SPG15 is caused by ZFYVE26 deficiency. The morphological analysis reveals axon degeneration and progressive loss of both cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. Importantly, neuron loss is preceded by accumulation of large intraneuronal deposits of membrane-surrounded material, which co-stains with the lysosomal marker Lamp1. A density gradient analysis of brain lysates shows an increase of Lamp1-positive membrane compartments with higher densities in Zfyve26 knockout mice. Increased levels of lysosomal enzymes in brains of aged knockout mice further support an alteration of the lysosomal compartment upon disruption of Zfyve26. We propose that SPG15 is caused by an endolysosomal membrane trafficking defect, which results in endolysosomal dysfunction. This appears to be particularly relevant in neurons with highly specialized neurites such as cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells.

  8. Behcet's disease presenting with sudden-onset paraplegia due to anterior spinal artery involvement: 1-year follow-up of rehabilitation in conjunction with medication.

    PubMed

    Duman, Iltekin; Guzelkucuk, Umut; Tezel, Kutay; Aydemir, Koray; Yılmaz, Bilge

    2013-06-01

    A 26-year-old male patient with sudden-onset paraplegia was presented. Clinical and imaging evaluation revealed isolated spinal cord lesions at thoracal levels and anterior spinal arterial involvement. Diagnosis of Behcet's disease was established with associating clinical findings with medical history. Vigorous medication and rehabilitation program were performed. Through the 1-year rehabilitation period in conjunction with medication, strength and functions improved gradually. A satisfactory functional gain as a rehabilitative goal in independence in activities of daily living and long-distance ambulation achieved around 4 months. The patient reached full independence after 1-year. As conclusion, Behcet's disease can present with sudden-onset paraplegia. In case of no evident etiology for paraplegia in young male, neuro-Behcet's disease also should be kept in mind. Contrary to assumption, early aggressive treatment and continuous rehabilitation in conjunction with medication might provide good prognosis with excellent clinical outcome in spinal cord involvement. Satisfactory functional recovery should be expected only after 3-4 months, and complete independence can be achieved after 1 year.

  9. Spectrum of X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS), MASA syndrome, and complicated spastic paraplegia (SPG1): Clincal review with six additional families

    SciTech Connect

    Schrander-Stumpel, C.; Hoeweler, C.; Jones, M.

    1995-05-22

    X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS) (MIM{sup *}307000), MASA syndrome (MIM {sup *}303350), and complicated spastic paraplegia (SPG1) (MIM {sup *}3129000) are closely related. Soon after delineation, SPG1 was incorporated into the spectrum of MASA syndrome. HSAS and MASA syndrome show great clinical overlap; DNA linkage analysis places the loci at Xq28. In an increasing number of families with MASA syndrome or HSAS, mutations in L1CAM, a gene located at Xq28, have been reported. In order to further delineate the clinical spectrum, we studied 6 families with male patients presenting with MASA syndrome, HSAS, or a mixed phenotype. We summarized data from previous reports and compared them with our data. Clinical variability appears to be great, even within families. Problems in genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis, the possible overlap with X-linked corpus callosum agenesis and FG syndrome, and the different forms of X-linked complicated spastic paraplegia are discussed. Since adducted thumbs and spastic paraplegia are found in 90% of the patients, the condition may be present in males with nonspecific mental retardation. We propose to abandon the designation MASA syndrome and use the term HSAS/MASA spectrum, incorporating SPG1. 79 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Effects of prandial challenge on triglyceridemia, glycemia, and pro-inflammatory activity in persons with chronic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbroek, Dennis; Kressler, Jochen; Cowan, Rachel E.; Burns, Patricia A.; Mendez, Armando J.; Nash, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Context/Objective Exaggerated postprandial lipemia has been reported after spinal cord injury (SCI). We examined metabolite and accompanying pro-inflammatory biomarker responses to repeat feeding of typical high-fat meals in individuals with chronic paraplegia. Design Descriptive trial. Methods Metabolites (triglycerides, glucose, and insulin) and inflammatory biomarkers (interleukin-6 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP)) were measured under fasting conditions in 11 recreationally active individuals with chronic (>1 year) paraplegia. Subjects received high-fat meals at time point 0 and again at minute 240. Antecubital venous blood was obtained at time points −30 (fasting), 0 (first meal), 30, 60, 90, 120, 240 (second meal), 360, and 480 minutes. Correlations were examined among the study variables. Exploratory subgroup analysis was performed for subjects with levels of postprandial glucose greater than >200 mg/dl. Results Triglycerides showed a significant rise 4 hours after eating. Basal inflammatory markers were elevated, and did not undergo additional change during the testing. Additionally, subjects with excessive postprandial glucose responses showed higher hsCRP levels than those having typical glucose responses both for fasting (11.8 ± 6.5 vs. 2.9 ± 2.7 mg/l, P = 0.064) and postprandial (11.1 ± 4.9 vs. 3.7 ± 3.8 mg/l, P = 0.018) values. Conclusions Despite elevations in metabolic response markers, inflammatory markers did not change significantly after consumption of population-representative (i.e. hypercaloric) mixed-nutrient meals. Levels of fasting CRP in the high-risk range are consistent with other reports in persons with SCI and continue to pose concern for their cardiovascular disease risk. The possible association between postprandial metabolic responses and inflammatory states warrants further investigation to identify individual component risks for this secondary health hazard. PMID:24617559

  11. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, the gene most frequently mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Henson, Brian J; Zhu, Wan; Hardaway, Kelsey; Wetzel, Jaime L; Stefan, Mihaela; Albers, Kathryn M; Nicholls, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) comprise a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities, due to axonal degeneration in the corticospinal motor tracts. HSPs are genetically heterogeneous and show autosomal dominant inheritance in ∼70-80% of cases, with additional cases being recessive or X-linked. The most common type of HSP is SPG4 with mutations in the SPAST gene, encoding spastin, which occurs in 40% of dominantly inherited cases and in ∼10% of sporadic cases. Both loss-of-function and dominant-negative mutation mechanisms have been described for SPG4, suggesting that precise or stoichiometric levels of spastin are necessary for biological function. Therefore, we hypothesized that regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of SPAST are important determinants of spastin biology, and if altered, could contribute to the development and progression of the disease. To examine the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, we used molecular phylogenetic methods to identify conserved sequences for putative transcription factor binding sites and miRNA targeting motifs in the SPAST promoter and 3'-UTR, respectively. By a variety of molecular methods, we demonstrate that SPAST transcription is positively regulated by NRF1 and SOX11. Furthermore, we show that miR-96 and miR-182 negatively regulate SPAST by effects on mRNA stability and protein level. These transcriptional and miRNA regulatory mechanisms provide new functional targets for mutation screening and therapeutic targeting in HSP.

  12. Endogenous spar tin, mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia, has a complex subcellular localization suggesting diverse roles in neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Robay, Dimitri; Patel, Heema; Simpson, Michael A.; Brown, Nigel A.; Crosby, Andrew H. . E-mail: acrosby@sgul.ac.uk

    2006-09-10

    Mutation of spartin (SPG20) underlies a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia, a disorder principally defined by the degeneration of upper motor neurons. Using a polyclonal antibody against spartin to gain insight into the function of the endogenous molecule, we show that the endogenous molecule is present in two main isoforms of 85 kDa and 100 kDa, and 75 kDa and 85 kDa in human and murine, respectively, with restricted subcellular localization. Immunohistochemical studies on human and mouse embryo sections and in vitro cell studies indicate that spartin is likely to possess both nuclear and cytoplasmic functions. The nuclear expression of spartin closely mirrors that of the snRNP (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein) marker {alpha}-Sm, a component of the spliceosome. Spartin is also enriched at the centrosome within mitotic structures. Notably we show that spartin protein undergoes dynamic positional changes in differentiating human SH-SY5Y cells. In undifferentiated non-neuronal cells, spartin displays a nuclear and diffuse cytosolic profile, whereas spartin transiently accumulates in the trans-Golgi network and subsequently decorates discrete puncta along neurites in terminally differentiated neuroblastic cells. Investigation of these spartin-positive vesicles reveals that a large proportion colocalizes with the synaptic vesicle marker synaptotagmin. Spartin is also enriched in synaptic-like structures and in synaptic vesicle-enriched fraction.

  13. An Approach for the Cooperative Control of FES With a Powered Exoskeleton During Level Walking for Persons With Paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kevin H; Murray, Spencer A; Goldfarb, Michael

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a hybrid system that combines a powered lower limb exoskeleton with functional electrical stimulation (FES) for gait restoration in persons with paraplegia. The general control structure consists of two control loops: a motor control loop, which utilizes joint angle feedback control to control the output of the joint motor to track the desired joint trajectories, and a muscle control loop, which utilizes joint torque profiles from previous steps to shape the muscle stimulation profile for the subsequent step in order to minimize the motor torque contribution required for joint angle trajectory tracking. The implementation described here incorporates stimulation of the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles, such that the hip joints are actuated by the combination of hip motors and the hamstrings, and the knee joints are actuated by the combination of knee motors and the quadriceps. In order to demonstrate efficacy, the control approach was implemented on three paraplegic subjects with motor complete spinal cord injuries ranging from levels T6 to T10. Experimental data indicates that the cooperative control system provided consistent and repeatable gait motions and reduced the torque and power output required from the hip and knee motors of the exoskeleton compared to walking without FES.

  14. PMCA4 (ATP2B4) mutation in familial spastic paraplegia causes delay in intracellular calcium extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Philip Wing-Lok; Pang, Shirley Yin-Yu; Li, Miaoxin; Tse, Zero Ho-Man; Kung, Michelle Hiu-Wai; Sham, Pak-Chung; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2015-01-01

    Background Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized primarily by progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness. More than 50 disease loci have been described with different modes of inheritance. Recently, we described a novel missense mutation (c.803G>A, p.R268Q) in the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA4, or ATP2B4) gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant FSP. Further to this finding, here we describe the functional effect of this mutation. Methods As PMCA4 removes cytosolic calcium, we measured transient changes and the time-dependent decay of cytosolic calcium level as visualized by using fura-2 fluorescent dye with confocal microscopy in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells overexpressing either wild-type or R268Q mutant PMCA4. Results Overexpressing both wild-type and R268Q PMCA4 significantly reduced maximum calcium surge after KCl-induced depolarization as compared with vector control cells. However, cells overexpressing mutant PMCA4 protein demonstrated significantly higher level of calcium surge when compared with wild-type. Furthermore, the steady-state cytosolic calcium concentration in these mutant cells remained markedly higher than the wild-type after SERCA inhibition by thapsigargin. Conclusion Our result showed that p.R268Q mutation in PMCA4 resulted in functional changes in calcium homeostasis in human neuronal cells. This suggests that calcium dysregulation may be associated with the pathogenesis of FSP. PMID:25798335

  15. Late-onset spastic paraplegia type 10 (SPG10) family presenting with bulbar symptoms and fasciculations mimicking amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Seiji; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Nodera, Hiroyuki; Pedace, Lucia; Orlacchio, Antonio; Izumi, Yuishin; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kaji, Ryuji

    2016-05-15

    Pathogenic mutations in the KIF5A-SPG10 gene, encoding the kinesin HC5A, can be associated with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (ADHSP). It accounts for about 10% of the complicated forms of ADHSP. Peripheral neuropathy, distal upper limb amyotrophy, and cognitive decline are the most common additional clinical features. We examined a 66-year-old Japanese woman manifesting gait disturbance and spastic dysarthria for 6years with positive family history. She showed evidence of upper and lower motor neuron involvement and fasciculations, thus mimicking amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous variant in KIF5A (c.484C>T, p.Arg162Trp) in 2 symptomatic members. The mutation was also identified in 4 asymptomatic members, including 2 elderly members aged over 78years. Electromyography in the 2 symptomatic members revealed evidence of lower motor neuron involvement and fasciculation potentials in distal muscles. This report describes the first known Asian family with a KIF5A mutation and broadens the clinical and electrophysiological spectrum associated with KIF5A-SPG10 mutations. Given that our cases showed pseudobulbar palsy, fasciculation and altered penetrance, KIF5A-SPG10 might well be considered as a differential diagnosis of sporadic ALS.

  16. A Genome-Scale DNA Repair RNAi Screen Identifies SPG48 as a Novel Gene Associated with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Słabicki, Mikołaj; Theis, Mirko; Krastev, Dragomir B.; Samsonov, Sergey; Mundwiller, Emeline; Junqueira, Magno; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Teyra, Joan; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Poser, Ina; Prieur, Fabienne; Truchetto, Jérémy; Confavreux, Christian; Marelli, Cécilia; Durr, Alexandra; Camdessanche, Jean Philippe; Brice, Alexis; Shevchenko, Andrej; Pisabarro, M. Teresa; Stevanin, Giovanni; Buchholz, Frank

    2010-01-01

    DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity, and genes with roles in DNA repair are frequently mutated in a variety of human diseases. Repair via homologous recombination typically restores the original DNA sequence without introducing mutations, and a number of genes that are required for homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR) have been identified. However, a systematic analysis of this important DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells has not been reported. Here, we describe a genome-scale endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNA (esiRNA) screen for genes involved in DNA double strand break repair. We report 61 genes that influenced the frequency of HR-DSBR and characterize in detail one of the genes that decreased the frequency of HR-DSBR. We show that the gene KIAA0415 encodes a putative helicase that interacts with SPG11 and SPG15, two proteins mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We identify mutations in HSP patients, discovering KIAA0415/SPG48 as a novel HSP-associated gene, and show that a KIAA0415/SPG48 mutant cell line is more sensitive to DNA damaging drugs. We present the first genome-scale survey of HR-DSBR in mammalian cells providing a dataset that should accelerate the discovery of novel genes with roles in DNA repair and associated medical conditions. The discovery that proteins forming a novel protein complex are required for efficient HR-DSBR and are mutated in patients suffering from HSP suggests a link between HSP and DNA repair. PMID:20613862

  17. Clinical exome sequencing for cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia uncovers novel gene–disease associations and unanticipated rare disorders

    PubMed Central

    van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Schouten, Meyke I; de Bot, Susanne T; Vermeer, Sascha; Meijer, Rowdy; Pennings, Maartje; Gilissen, Christian; Willemsen, Michèl AAP; Scheffer, Hans; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia (CA) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are two of the most prevalent motor disorders with extensive locus and allelic heterogeneity. We implemented clinical exome sequencing, followed by filtering data for a ‘movement disorders' gene panel, as a generic test to increase variant detection in 76 patients with these disorders. Segregation analysis or phenotypic re-evaluation was utilized to substantiate findings. Disease-causing variants were identified in 9 of 28 CA patients, and 8 of 48 HSP patients. In addition, possibly disease-causing variants were identified in 1 and 8 of the remaining CA and HSP patients, respectively. In 10 patients with CA, the total disease-causing or possibly disease-causing variants were detected in 8 different genes, whereas 16 HSP patients had such variants in 12 different genes. In the majority of cases, the identified variants were compatible with the patient phenotype. Interestingly, in some patients variants were identified in genes hitherto related to other movement disorders, such as TH variants in two siblings with HSP. In addition, rare disorders were uncovered, for example, a second case of HSP caused by a VCP variant. For some patients, exome sequencing results had implications for treatment, exemplified by the favorable L-DOPA treatment in a patient with HSP due to ATP13A2 variants (Parkinson type 9). Thus, clinical exome sequencing in this cohort of CA and HSP patients suggests broadening of disease spectra, revealed novel gene–disease associations, and uncovered unanticipated rare disorders. In addition, clinical exome sequencing results have shown their value in guiding practical patient management. PMID:27165006

  18. Cold temperature improves mobility and survival in Drosophila models of autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP).

    PubMed

    Baxter, Sally L; Allard, Denise E; Crowl, Christopher; Sherwood, Nina Tang

    2014-08-01

    Autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) is a crippling neurodegenerative disease for which effective treatment or cure remains unknown. Victims experience progressive mobility loss due to degeneration of the longest axons in the spinal cord. Over half of AD-HSP cases arise from loss-of-function mutations in spastin, which encodes a microtubule-severing AAA ATPase. In Drosophila models of AD-HSP, larvae lacking Spastin exhibit abnormal motor neuron morphology and function, and most die as pupae. Adult survivors display impaired mobility, reminiscent of the human disease. Here, we show that rearing pupae or adults at reduced temperature (18°C), compared with the standard temperature of 24°C, improves the survival and mobility of adult spastin mutants but leaves wild-type flies unaffected. Flies expressing human spastin with pathogenic mutations are similarly rescued. Additionally, larval cooling partially rescues the larval synaptic phenotype. Cooling thus alleviates known spastin phenotypes for each developmental stage at which it is administered and, notably, is effective even in mature adults. We find further that cold treatment rescues larval synaptic defects in flies with mutations in Flower (a protein with no known relation to Spastin) and mobility defects in flies lacking Kat60-L1, another microtubule-severing protein enriched in the CNS. Together, these data support the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of cold extend beyond specific alleviation of Spastin dysfunction, to at least a subset of cellular and behavioral neuronal defects. Mild hypothermia, a common neuroprotective technique in clinical treatment of acute anoxia, might thus hold additional promise as a therapeutic approach for AD-HSP and, potentially, for other neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Adaptor protein complex 4 deficiency causes severe autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, progressive spastic paraplegia, shy character, and short stature.

    PubMed

    Abou Jamra, Rami; Philippe, Orianne; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Eck, Sebastian H; Graf, Elisabeth; Buchert, Rebecca; Borck, Guntram; Ekici, Arif; Brockschmidt, Felix F; Nöthen, Markus M; Munnich, Arnold; Strom, Tim M; Reis, Andre; Colleaux, Laurence

    2011-06-10

    Intellectual disability inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion represents an important fraction of severe cognitive-dysfunction disorders. Yet, the extreme heterogeneity of these conditions markedly hampers gene identification. Here, we report on eight affected individuals who were from three consanguineous families and presented with severe intellectual disability, absent speech, shy character, stereotypic laughter, muscular hypotonia that progressed to spastic paraplegia, microcephaly, foot deformity, decreased muscle mass of the lower limbs, inability to walk, and growth retardation. Using a combination of autozygosity mapping and either Sanger sequencing of candidate genes or next-generation exome sequencing, we identified one mutation in each of three genes encoding adaptor protein complex 4 (AP4) subunits: a nonsense mutation in AP4S1 (NM_007077.3: c.124C>T, p.Arg42(∗)), a frameshift mutation in AP4B1 (NM_006594.2: c.487_488insTAT, p.Glu163_Ser739delinsVal), and a splice mutation in AP4E1 (NM_007347.3: c.542+1_542+4delGTAA, r.421_542del, p.Glu181Glyfs(∗)20). Adaptor protein complexes (AP1-4) are ubiquitously expressed, evolutionarily conserved heterotetrameric complexes that mediate different types of vesicle formation and the selection of cargo molecules for inclusion into these vesicles. Interestingly, two mutations affecting AP4M1 and AP4E1 have recently been found to cause cerebral palsy associated with severe intellectual disability. Combined with previous observations, these results support the hypothesis that AP4-complex-mediated trafficking plays a crucial role in brain development and functioning and demonstrate the existence of a clinically recognizable syndrome due to deficiency of the AP4 complex.

  20. Tetraplegia or paraplegia with brachial diparesis? What is the most appropriate designation for the motor deficit in patients with lower cervical spinal cord injury?

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Nicandro; Figueiredo, Iara Eberhard; Resnick, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    The authors seek to clarify the nomenclature used to describe cervical spinal cord injuries, particularly the use of the terms "tetraplegia", "quadriplegia", "quadriparesis", "tetraparesis", "incomplete quadriplegia" or "incomplete tetraplegia" when applied to patients with lower cervical cord injuries. A review of the origin of the terms and nomenclature used currently to describe the neurological status of patients with SCI in the literature was performed. The terms "tetraplegia", "quadriplegia", "quadriparesis", "tetraparesis", "incomplete quadriplegia" or "incomplete tetraplegia" have been used very often to describe patients with complete lower cervical SCI despite the fact that the clinical scenario is all the same for most of these patients. Most of these patients have total loss of the motor voluntary movements of their lower trunk and inferior limbs, and partial impairment of movement of their superior limbs, preserving many motor functions of the proximal muscles of their arms (superior limbs). A potentially better descriptive term may be "paraplegia with brachial diparesis". In using the most appropriate terminology, the patients with lower cervical SCI currently referred as presenting with "tetraplegia", "quadriplegia", "quadriparesis", "tetraparesis", "incomplete quadriplegia" or "incomplete tetraplegia", might be better described as having "paraplegia with brachial diparesis".

  1. Whole-genome sequencing of two probands with hereditary spastic paraplegia reveals novel splice-donor region variant and known pathogenic variant in SPG11

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anne Yin-Yan; Au, Wing Chi; Shen, Yun; Chan, Ting Fung

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a group of heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders, which are often presented with overlapping phenotypes such as progressive paraparesis and spasticity. To assist the diagnosis of HSP subtypes, next-generation sequencing is often used to provide supporting evidence. In this study, we report the case of two probands from the same family with HSP symptoms, including bilateral lower limb weakness, unsteady gait, cognitive decline, dysarthria, and slurring of speech since the age of 14. Subsequent whole-genome sequencing revealed that the patients are compound heterozygous for variants in the SPG11 gene, including the paternally inherited c.6856C>T (p.Arg2286*) variant and the novel maternally inherited c.2316+5G>A splice-donor region variant. Variants in SPG11 are the common cause of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia type 11. According to the ClinVar database, there are already 101 reported pathogenic variants in SPG11 that are associated with HSPs. To our knowledge, this is the first report of SPG11 variants in our local population. The novel splice variant identified in this study enriches the catalog of SPG11 variants, potentially leading to better genetic diagnosis of HSPs. PMID:27900367

  2. Mutational spectrum of the SPG4 (SPAST) and SPG3A (ATL1) genes in Spanish patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias (HSP) are characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. At least 45 loci have been identified in families with autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive (AR), or X-linked hereditary patterns. Mutations in the SPAST (SPG4) and ATL1 (SPG3A) genes would account for about 50% of the ADHSP cases. Methods We defined the SPAST and ATL1 mutational spectrum in a total of 370 unrelated HSP index cases from Spain (83% with a pure phenotype). Results We found 50 SPAST mutations (including two large deletions) in 54 patients and 7 ATL1 mutations in 11 patients. A total of 33 of the SPAST and 3 of the ATL1 were new mutations. A total of 141 (31%) were familial cases, and we found a higher frequency of mutation carriers among these compared to apparently sporadic cases (38% vs. 5%). Five of the SPAST mutations were predicted to affect the pre-mRNA splicing, and in 4 of them we demonstrated this effect at the cDNA level. In addition to large deletions, splicing, frameshifting, and missense mutations, we also found a nucleotide change in the stop codon that would result in a larger ORF. Conclusions In a large cohort of Spanish patients with spastic paraplegia, SPAST and ATL1 mutations were found in 15% of the cases. These mutations were more frequent in familial cases (compared to sporadic), and were associated with heterogeneous clinical manifestations. PMID:20932283

  3. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia: Reduction of the FSPI candidate region on chromosome 14q to 7 cM and locus heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Gispert, S.; Santos, N.; Auburger, G.; Damen, R.; Voit, T.; Schulz, J.; Klockgether, T.; Orozco, G.; Kreuz, F.; Weissenbach, J.

    1995-01-01

    Three large pedigrees of Germany descent with autosomal dominant {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) were characterized clinically and genetically. Haplotype and linkage analyses, with microsatellites covering the FSP region on chromosome 14q (locus FSP1), were performed. In pedigree W, we found a haplotype that cosegregates with the disease and observed three crossing-over events, reducing the FSP1 candidate region to 7 cM; in addition, the observation of apparent anticipation in this family suggests a trinucleotide repeat expansion as the mutation. In pedigree D and S, the gene locus could be excluded from the whole FSP1 region, confirming the locus heterogeneity of autosomal dominant FSP. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells in post-traumatic paraplegia offers a viable therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Umang G.; Vanikar, Aruna V.; Trivedi, Hargovind L.; Shah, Veena R.; Dave, Shruti D.; Dixit, Satyajit B.; Tiwari, Bharat B.; Shah, Harda H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord injury (SCI) is not likely to recover by current therapeutic modalities. Stem cell (SC) therapy (SCT) has promising results in regenerative medicine. We present our experience of co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived mesenchymal SC differentiated neuronal cells (N-Ad-MSC) and hematopoietic SCs (HSCs) in a set of patients with posttraumatic paraplegia. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with posttraumatic paraplegia of mean age 3.42 years were volunteered for SCT. Their mean age was 28 years, and they had variable associated complications. They were subjected to adipose tissue resection for in vitro generation of N-Ad-MSC and bone marrow aspiration for generation of HSC. Generated SCs were infused into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) below injury site in all patients. Results: Total mean quantum of SC infused was 4.04 ml with a mean nucleated cell count of 4.5 × 104/μL and mean CD34+ of 0.35%, CD45−/90+ and CD45−/73+ of 41.4%, and 10.04%, respectively. All of them expressed transcription factors beta-3 tubulin and glial fibrillary acid protein. No untoward effect of SCT was noted. Variable and sustained improvement in Hauser's index and American Spinal Injury Association score was noted in all patients over a mean follow-up of 2.95 years. Mean injury duration was 3.42 years against the period of approximately 1-year required for natural recovery, suggesting a positive role of SCs. Conclusion: Co-infusion of N-Ad-MSC and HSC in CSF is safe and viable therapeutic approach for SCIs. PMID:27110548

  5. Hypokalemic Paraplegia in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    TV, Srividya; Gopal, N

    2014-01-01

    Hypokalemic myopathy may range from numbness/weakness to complete paralysis. The aetiology may be congenital or acquired. It is characterized by acute muscular weakness with low levels of potassium (<3.5 meq/L). We present a case of 26-year-old multigravida at 36 weeks of gestation with gestational hypertension on treatment, who came with acute onset of pain, numbness and weakness of both legs which worsened following betamethasone injection. She was diagnosed to have Hypokalemic paralysis with potassium levels of 2.1 meq/L. The medical profile remitted promptly on intravenous potassium replacement. Pregnancy was continued till 37 weeks with oral potassium supplements, antihypertensives and regular monitoring of serum potassium levels. The pregnancy was terminated after 37 weeks in view of gestational hypertension. Postpartum period was uneventful, patient was discharged after two weeks when potassium levels and BP returned to normal. PMID:25121034

  6. Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    MedlinePlus

    ... by other symptoms. These additional symptoms include impaired vision due to cataracts and problems with the optic nerve and retina of the eye, ataxia (lack of muscle coordination), epilepsy, cognitive impairment, peripheral neuropathy, and deafness. The diagnosis of HSP ...

  7. Identification of a Heterozygous SPG11 Mutation by Clinical Exome Sequencing in a Patient With Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing, such as whole-genome sequencing, whole-exome sequencing, and targeted panel sequencing have been applied for diagnosis of many genetic diseases, and are in the process of replacing the traditional methods of genetic analysis. Clinical exome sequencing (CES), which provides not only sequence variation data but also clinical interpretation, aids in reaching a final conclusion with regards to genetic diagnosis. Sequencing of genes with clinical relevance rather than whole exome sequencing might be more suitable for the diagnosis of known hereditary disease with genetic heterogeneity. Here, we present the clinical usefulness of CES for the diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We report a case of patient who was strongly suspected of having HSP based on her clinical manifestations. HSP is one of the diseases with high genetic heterogeneity, the 72 different loci and 59 discovered genes identified so far. Therefore, traditional approach for diagnosis of HSP with genetic analysis is very challenging and time-consuming. CES with TruSight One Sequencing Panel, which enriches about 4,800 genes with clinical relevance, revealed compound heterozygous mutations in SPG11. One workflow and one procedure can provide the results of genetic analysis, and CES with enrichment of clinically relevant genes is a cost-effective and time-saving diagnostic tool for diseases with genetic heterogeneity, including HSP. PMID:28119845

  8. A complex form of hereditary spastic paraplegia in three siblings due to somatic mosaicism for a novel SPAST mutation in the mother.

    PubMed

    Aulitzky, Anna; Friedrich, Katrin; Gläser, Dieter; Gastl, Regina; Kubisch, Christian; Ludolph, Albert C; Volk, Alexander E

    2014-12-15

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) represent a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases. Major symptoms comprise progressive bilateral leg stiffness, spasticity at rest and diffuse muscle weakness. Complex forms are characterized by additional symptoms like dementia, cerebellar dysfunction or seizures. Autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked recessive and possibly mitochondrial inheritance have been described in familial HSP. The most frequently mutated gene in familial cases of uncomplicated autosomal dominant HSP is SPAST, however de novo mutations in SPAST are rarely found. Here, we report on the clinical and genetic findings in a family with three children afflicted by complex HSP and their unaffected parents. Although autosomal dominant inheritance seemed unlikely in this family, genetic testing revealed a novel SPAST mutation, c.1837G>C (p.Asp613His), in a heterozygous state in all affected individuals and somatic mosaicism of this mutation in the unaffected mother. Our study thus expands the knowledge on SPAST-associated HSP and emphasizes that de novo mutations and somatic mosaicism should be taken into consideration in HSP families presenting with a family history not suggestive for an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern.

  9. Decreased expression of the mitochondrial matrix proteases Lon and ClpP in cells from a patient with hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG13).

    PubMed

    Hansen, J; Corydon, T J; Palmfeldt, J; Dürr, A; Fontaine, B; Nielsen, M N; Christensen, J H; Gregersen, N; Bross, P

    2008-05-02

    The mitochondrial chaperonin heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) assists the folding of a subset of proteins localized in mitochondria and is an essential component of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. Mutations in the HSPD1 gene that encodes Hsp60 have been identified in patients with an autosomal dominant form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG13), a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive paraparesis of the lower limbs. The disease-associated Hsp60-(p.Val98Ile) protein, encoded by the c.292G>A HSPD1 allele, has reduced chaperonin activity, but how its expression affects mitochondrial functions has not been investigated. We have studied mitochondrial function and expression of genes encoding mitochondrial chaperones and proteases in a human lymphoblastoid cell line and fibroblast cells from a patient who is heterozygous for the c.292G>A HSPD1 allele. We found that both the c.292G>A RNA transcript and the corresponding Hsp60-(p.Val98Ile) protein were present at comparable levels to their wild-type counterparts in SPG13 patient cells. Compared with control cells, we found no significant cellular or mitochondrial dysfunctions in SPG13 patient cells by assessing the mitochondrial membrane potential, cell viability, and sensitivity toward oxidative stress. However, a decreased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control proteases Lon and ClpP, both at the RNA and protein level, was demonstrated in SPG13 patient cells. We propose that decreased levels of mitochondrial proteases Lon and ClpP may allow Hsp60 substrate proteins to go through more folding attempts instead of being prematurely degraded, thereby supporting productive folding in cells with reduced Hsp60 chaperonin activity. In conclusion, our studies with SPG13 patient cells expressing the functionally impaired mutant Hsp60 chaperonin suggest that reduction of the degradative activity of the protein quality control system may represent a previously

  10. Inactivation of the hereditary spastic paraplegia-associated Hspd1 gene encoding the Hsp60 chaperone results in early embryonic lethality in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Marit N.; Hansen, Jakob; Füchtbauer, Annette; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; West, Mark; Corydon, Thomas J.; Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The mitochondrial Hsp60 chaperonin plays an important role in sustaining cellular viability. Its dysfunction is related to inherited forms of the human diseases spastic paraplegia and hypomyelinating leukodystrophy. However, it is unknown whether the requirement for Hsp60 is neuron specific or whether a complete loss of the protein will impair mammalian development and postnatal survival. In this study, we describe the generation and characterization of a mutant mouse line bearing an inactivating gene-trap insertion in the Hspd1 gene encoding Hsp60. We found that heterozygous mice were born at the expected ratio compared to wild-type mice and displayed no obvious phenotype deficits. Using quantitative reverse transcription PCR, we found significantly decreased levels of the Hspd1 transcript in all of the tissues examined, demonstrating that the inactivation of the Hspd1 gene is efficient. By Western blot analysis, we found that the amount of Hsp60 protein, compared to either cytosolic tubulin or mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1/porin, was decreased as well. The expression of the nearby Hspe1 gene, which encodes the Hsp10 co-chaperonin, was concomitantly down regulated in the liver, and the protein levels in all tissues except the brain were reduced. Homozygous Hspd1 mutant embryos, however, died shortly after implantation (day 6.5 to 7.5 of gestation, Theiler stages 9–10). Our results demonstrate that Hspd1 is an essential gene for early embryonic development in mice, while reducing the amount of Hsp60 by inactivation of one allele of the gene is compatible with survival to term as well as postnatal life. PMID:20393889

  11. Recessive loss-of-function mutations in AP4S1 cause mild fever-sensitive seizures, developmental delay and spastic paraplegia through loss of AP-4 complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hardies, Katia; May, Patrick; Djémié, Tania; Tarta-Arsene, Oana; Deconinck, Tine; Craiu, Dana; Helbig, Ingo; Suls, Arvid; Balling, Rudy; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Hirst, Jennifer; Afawi, Zaid; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Depienne, Christel; De Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Dimova, Petia; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Guerrini, Renzo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jahn, Johanna; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes; Lerche, Holger; Marini, Carla; Muhle, Hiltrud; Rosenow, Felix; Serratosa, Jose M.; Møller, Rikke S.; Stephani, Ulrich; Striano, Pasquale; Talvik, Tiina; Von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne; Zara, Federico

    2015-01-01

    We report two siblings with infantile onset seizures, severe developmental delay and spastic paraplegia, in whom whole-genome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous mutations in the AP4S1 gene, encoding the σ subunit of the adaptor protein complex 4 (AP-4). The effect of the predicted loss-of-function variants (p.Gln46Profs*9 and p.Arg97*) was further investigated in a patient's fibroblast cell line. We show that the premature stop mutations in AP4S1 result in a reduction of all AP-4 subunits and loss of AP-4 complex assembly. Recruitment of the AP-4 accessory protein tepsin, to the membrane was also abolished. In retrospect, the clinical phenotype in the family is consistent with previous reports of the AP-4 deficiency syndrome. Our study reports the second family with mutations in AP4S1 and describes the first two patients with loss of AP4S1 and seizures. We further discuss seizure phenotypes in reported patients, highlighting that seizures are part of the clinical manifestation of the AP-4 deficiency syndrome. We also hypothesize that endosomal trafficking is a common theme between heritable spastic paraplegia and some inherited epilepsies. PMID:25552650

  12. A new locus (SPG47) maps to 1p13.2-1p12 in an Arabic family with complicated autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia and thin corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Blumkin, Lubov; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Lev, Dorit; Yosovich, Keren; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2011-06-15

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSP) are a heterogeneous group of genetic neurodegenerative disorders in which the main feature is progressive spasticity of the lower limbs due to pyramidal tract dysfunction. Clinically HSP are divided into two forms: a pure form that presents with progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness, sensory signs and bladder dysfunction, and a complicated form, associated with more extensive neurological and extra neurological signs as well as pathological findings on brain imaging. The clinical variability observed in HSP is supported by the large underlying genetic heterogeneity. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum (HSP-TCC) is a frequent subtype of complicated HSP clinically characterized by a slowly progressive spastic paraparesis with cognitive impairment and thin corpus callosum (TCC). SPG11, the most frequent gene associated with HSP-TCC, encodes spatacsin, a protein of unknown function. We describe two siblings from an Arabic consanguineous family with slowly progressive spastic paraparesis, mental retardation, seizures, thin corpus callosum and periventricular white matter abnormalities. Homozygosity mapping identified a novel single candidate region of 7.3 Mb on chromosome 1p13.2-1p12. The finding of a new locus for AR-HSP-TCC further demonstrates the extensive genetic heterogeneity of this condition.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 7

    MedlinePlus

    ... proteins that form a complex called the m-AAA protease. The m-AAA protease is responsible for assembling ribosomes (cellular structures ... there is a mutation in paraplegin, the m-AAA protease cannot function correctly. Nonfunctional m-AAA proteases ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 15

    MedlinePlus

    ... the peripheral nervous system, which consists of nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and ... disability. In almost all affected individuals, the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain ( ...

  15. [Value of functional electrostimulation in patients with paraplegia].

    PubMed

    Hesse, S; Malezic, M; Lücke, D; Mauritz, K H

    1998-04-01

    This 1-year follow-up study included 17 patients with spinal cord injuries who participated in a functional electrical stimulation (FES) program for restoration of the ability to stand and walk. Four tetraplegic patients reached a mean FES-assisted standing duration of 6.8 min after 6 weeks. After 1 year three patients had stopped FES-assisted standing due to orthostatic problems and only used the system for cyclic stimulation of quadriceps muscles while lying down. Ten paraplegic patients had a mean standing duration of 22.6 min. The gait velocity (gait distance) of seven patients ranged from 2.9 to 24.2 m/min (from 4 to 335 m) in seven patients. Due to flexor spasm in two and unrealistic expectations in seven cases, four patients stopped the program and five only practiced FES-assisted standing. One patient continued FES walking after 1 year. Three patients with an incomplete cervical lesion who had been able to walk a short distance before treatment achieved constant improvement their gait ability. Their gait velocity/walking distance without FES improved for a mean of +33.3%/+163.8%, after 6 weeks. Assuming that FES is used according to the level of impairment, the results favor broader application of the method in the rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries.

  16. Acute spinal cord injury: tetraplegia and paraplegia in small animals.

    PubMed

    Granger, Nicolas; Carwardine, Darren

    2014-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a common problem in animals for which definitive treatment is lacking, and information gained from its study has benefit for both companion animals and humans in developing new therapeutic approaches. This review provides an overview of the main concepts that are useful for clinicians in assessing companion animals with severe acute SCI. Current available advanced ancillary tests and those in development are reviewed. In addition, the current standard of care for companion animals following SCI and recent advances in the development of new therapies are presented, and new predictors of recovery discussed.

  17. [Hypokalemia-induced paraplegia secondary to acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Ortuño Andériz, F; Cabello Clotet, N; de Diego Gamarra, R; Salaverría Garzón, I; Vázquez Rizaldos, S

    2002-02-01

    Hypokalemia can give a variety of syntomatology but more often courses without it or with inespecific clinical manifestations. In our enviroment the etiology of hypokalemia is wide but one of the most common causes in third world countries are diarrheas. We describe a case of severe hypokalemia due to acute diarrhea which was manifested with severe neurologic symtoms but improves with conventional treatment.

  18. Abnormal thermal hyperaemia in the skin in paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Barbenel, J C; Cui, Z F

    1993-08-01

    Surface insulation, together with laser Doppler flowmetry, was used to assess the skin microcirculation of paraplegic patients. Two control groups of five male and five female subjects were used to establish the response of normals with which to compare the results obtained from six paraplegic subjects. No significant sex related difference was revealed from this study. It was found that in normal subjects, surface insulation resulted in a significant increase in both skin temperature and skin blood flow. In paraplegic patients, the temperature increase was significantly less than in the normal subjects and there was no significant thermally induced hyperaemia after surface insulation.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: spastic paraplegia type 3A

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord (central nervous system), particularly in nerve cells ( neurons ) that extend down the spinal cord (corticospinal tracts). These neurons send electrical signals that lead to voluntary muscle ...

  20. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonali; Naidoo, Khimara; Thomas, Peter

    2014-06-25

    Spinal cord infarction is rare and represents a diagnostic challenge for many physicians. There are few reported cases worldwide with a prevalence of 1.2% of all strokes. Circulation to the spinal cord is supplied by a rich anastomosis. The anterior spinal artery supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord and infarction to this area is marked by paralysis, spinothalamic sensory deficit and loss of sphincter control depending on where the lesion is. Treatment of spinal cord infarction focuses on rehabilitation with diverse outcomes. This report presents a case of acute spinal cord infarction with acquisition of MRI to aid diagnosis.

  1. ERRATUM: Original electronic design to perform epimysial and neural stimulation in paraplegia Original electronic design to perform epimysial and neural stimulation in paraplegia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiraud, David; Stieglitz, Thomas; Taroni, Gérard; Divoux, Jean-Louis

    2008-03-01

    Equation (3) in this paper contains an error. The correct equation is given below: x = (\\alpha - 0.5) \\pi \\\\ \\vspace*{-0.5cm} \\begin{eqnarray*} E(x) = 10 \\log \\left( {\\frac{{\\sum_{n = 1}^5 \\sin^2 ((2n + 1) x) \\big/ (2n + 1)^2 }}{{\\sin^2 (x)}}} \\right) \\end{eqnarray*}

  2. A new case of cervical intramedullary sinus histiocytosis causing paraplegia and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Maguey, Jesús; Felix-Torrontegui, José-Angel; Cabrera-López, Myriam; Gutiérrez-Castro, Macrina; Montante-Montes de Oca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rosai–Dorfman disease (RDD) is an uncommon, benign histiocytic proliferative disorder of unknown origin. It predominantly affects the lymph nodes, but can also be found extranodal in different organs. Nervous system involvement is rare, and the most cases are intracranial. Surgical treatment is indicated when the central nervous system (CNS) in compromised. Case Description: We herein describe the management of a 27-year-old woman who presented progressive spinal cord symptoms, secondary to an isolated intramedullary lesion, which had a histological confirmation of RDD. To our knowledge, this is the 6th case reported in English written manuscripts. We review these cases and analyze some of the literature concerning the disease. Conclusions: RDD shows some variability in the involvement of the entire neuraxis, and because its ability to mimic meningeal and primary brain tumors, it is essential to be aware of this entity and consider RDD in the differential diagnosis of various lesions of the CNS. The conclusive diagnosis must be obtained by histological methods, so surgical approaches have to be discussed. Although it is not considered as a malignancy, options for postoperative medical treatment are variable and include radiation, chemotherapy or maybe monoclonal antibodies for refractory or recurrent cases. PMID:26862448

  3. Secondary Myelitis in Dermal Sinus Causing Paraplegia in a Child with Previously Normal Neurological Function

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Sakina; Kinabo, Grace; Kellogg, Marissa; Howlett, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Neural tube defects result from failure of neural tube fusion during early embryogenesis, the fourth week after conception. The spectrum of severity is not uniform across the various forms of this congenital anomaly as certain presentations are not compatible with extrauterine life (anencephaly) while, on the other hand, other defects may remain undiagnosed as they are entirely asymptomatic (occult spina bifida). We report a child with previously normal neurological development, a devastating clinical course following superinfection of a subtle spina bifida defect which resulted in a flaccid paralysis below the level of the lesion and permanent neurological deficits following resolution of the acute infection and a back closure surgery. PMID:28050293

  4. Physical Activity and Quality of Life among Adults with Paraplegia in Odisha, India

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Shankar; Mishra, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The complete rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) comprises both physical and psychosocial factors. This study therefore aimed to assess physical activity and quality of life (QOL) among paraplegic patients with SCI in Odisha, India. Methods: This cross-sectional prospective study was conducted between March 2010 and December 2013. All paraplegic patients treated at the Swami Vivekanand National Institute of Rehabilitation Training & Research in Odisha, India, during the study period who met the inclusion criteria were invited to participate in the study (n = 364). Structured face-to-face interviews were held with participants and QOL and physical activity were assessed using the abbreviated World Health Organization QOL instrument and the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities, respectively. Results: A total of 84 people participated in the study (response rate: 23.1%). The mean age was 32.54 ± 10.75 years and 90.5% of the participants were male. Participants had a low mean metabolic equivalent score (18.18 ± 10.68 hours/day). Additionally, low mean scores were noted for the physical health, psychological well-being, social relationships and environment QOL domains (49.76 ± 18.74, 48.57 ± 17.04, 57.88 ± 17.04 and 49.85 ± 17.77, respectively). There was a strong positive association between levels of physical activity and all QOL domains (P <0.050). Physical activity and employment status were significant predictors of all QOL domains (P <0.001). Conclusion: Low physical activity levels and QOL were noted among the paraplegic subjects. Interventions promoting physical activity and employment may help to improve QOL among this patient group. PMID:26909214

  5. Quantitative and Functional Analyses of Spastin in the Nervous System: Implications for Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-27

    abnormalities when cultured, and some zebrafish neurons display abnormal- ities in axonal growth when spastin levels are diminished using morpholinos (Wood et...Spastin is essential for axon outgrowth in the zebrafish embryo. Hum Mol Genet 15:2763–2771. Yu W, Ahmad FJ, Baas PW (1994) Microtubule fragmentation and...Microtubule-severing in the axon: impli- cations for development, disease, and regeneration after injury. J Environ Biomed 1:1–7. Zhao X, Alvarado D, Rainier

  6. Sensor-based hip control with hybrid neuroprosthesis for walking in paraplegia.

    PubMed

    To, Curtis S; Kobetic, Rudi; Bulea, Thomas C; Audu, Musa L; Schnellenberger, John R; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test whether a hybrid neuroprosthesis (HNP) with an exoskeletal variable-constraint hip mechanism (VCHM) combined with a functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) controller can maintain upright posture with less upper-limb support and improve gait speed as compared with walking with either an isocentric reciprocating gait orthosis (IRGO) or FNS only. The results show that walking with the HNP significantly reduced forward lean in FNS-only walking and the maximum upper-limb forces by 42% and 19% as compared with the IRGO and FNS-only gait, respectively. Walking speed increased significantly with VCHM as compared with 1:1 reciprocal coupling and by 15% when using the sensor-based FNS controller as compared with HNP with fixed baseline stimulation without the controller active.

  7. ERRATUM: Original electronic design to perform epimysial and neural stimulation in paraplegia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-03-01

    Equation (3) in this paper contains an error. The correct equation is given below: x = (\\alpha - 0.5) \\pi \\\\ \\vspace*{-0.5cm} \\begin{eqnarray*} E(x) = 10 \\log \\left( {\\frac{{\\sum_{n = 1}^5 \\sin((2n + 1) x) \\big/ (2n + 1)^2 }}{{\\sin (x)^2}}} \\right) \\end{eqnarray*}

  8. An implantable neuroprosthesis for standing and walking in paraplegia: 5-year patient follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiraud, David; Stieglitz, Thomas; Koch, Klaus Peter; Divoux, Jean-Louis; Rabischong, Pierre

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of a 5-year patient follow-up after implantation of an original neuroprosthesis. The system is able to stimulate both epimysial and neural electrodes in such a way that the complete flexor-extensor chain of the lower limb can be activated without using the withdrawal reflex. We demonstrate that standing and assisted walking are possible, and the results have remained stable for 5 years. Nevertheless, some problems were noted, particularly regarding the muscle response on the epimysial channels. Analysis of the electrical behaviour and thresholds indicated that the surgical phase is crucial because of the sensitivity of the functional responses to electrode placement. Neural stimulation proved to be more efficient and more stable over time. This mode requires less energy and provides more selective stimulation. This FES system can be improved to enable balanced standing and less fatiguing gait, but this will require feedback on event detection to trigger transitions between stimulation sequences, as well as feedback to the patient about the state of his lower limbs.

  9. Original electronic design to perform epimysial and neural stimulation in paraplegia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiraud, David; Stieglitz, Thomas; Taroni, Gérard; Divoux, Jean-Louis

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents an original electronic architecture to manage epimysial and neural stimulation using the same implantable device. All the muscles needed to achieve lower limb movements such as standing and walking can thus be activated. Mainly for surgical reasons, some muscles need to be stimulated through different inputs: epimysium or motor nerve. We developed an electronic solution, including the design of an application-specific integrated circuit, to meet the requirements of both types of stimulation. Five years after the successful implantation of the system, we were able to evaluate the system's performance. The patient is still using the system at home and no failure occurred during this 5-year period. We conclude that the electronic design not only provides a unique investigative tool for research, but that it can also be used to restore the motor function of the lower limb. This technology has an advantage over external stimulation because the patient can safely use the system at home. However, improvements such as lower power consumption, and thus greater autonomy, are needed. We further conclude that the modelling of the electrical behaviour of the electrodes is reliable and the estimated parameter values are homogeneous and consistent for the same type of electrode. Thus, the three parameters of the first-order model can be identified from an acute animal experiment and provide a means to optimize the design of the output stage of implanted stimulators.

  10. Acute paraplegia in a patient with spinal tophi: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, L C; Hung, Y C; Lee, E J; Chen, H H

    2001-03-01

    A 28-year-old man with a 5-year history of gouty arthritis suffered from an acute episode of lower back pain. He visited a rehabilitative clinic and received physical therapy following his examination. Weakness and numbness of both lower legs developed rapidly after physical therapy. He was sent to our hospital with complete paralysis of both lower limbs and complete sensory loss below the umbilicus 3 hours after the physical therapy. No peripheral tophi were found. Myelography showed an extrinsic compression of the dura sac at T10. Emergency decompressive laminectomy of T9 to T11 was performed. During the surgery, caseous material was found deposited in the ligamentum flavum and the left T9 to T10 facet joint, with indentation of the dura sac. The pathologic diagnosis was spinal tophi. After surgery, the patient's neurologic function recovered rapidly. It was suspected that inappropriate physical therapy might have aggravated acute inflammation of spinal gout and resulted in a rapid deterioration of neurologic function. Though gout is a chronic medical disease, an acute attack of spinal gout may be disastrous and requires emergency neurosurgical intervention.

  11. Thoracic vertebral hemangioma causing paraplegia in Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Okutan, Ozerk; Yildirim, Timur; Isik, Serdar; Gokce, Berna; Saygili, Barıs; Konakli, Ethem Bes

    2013-01-01

    Vertebral hemangiomas are the most common tumours of the vertebral column. Generally, these tumours are asymptomatic but some patients complain of back pain and develop neurologic symptoms due to extraosseous extension. Vertebral hemangiomas can extend extradurally causing neurological impairment as a result of compression of the spinal cord and nerve roots. Vertebral hemangiomas may be multiple and detectable as a component of the Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome. Although this syndrome consists of deep venous thrombosis, lymphatic anomalies, cutaneous capillary malformations, and hypertrophy of soft tissue and bone on extremities, its clinical presentation may be very variable. We present a unique case of vertebral hemangioma causing spinal cord compression due to the extradural extension that also had deep venous thrombosis, hematuria, hypophyseal cyst and ventricle asymmetry, diagnosed as the Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome.

  12. Levodopa in Treatment of Decompression Sickness and of Air Embolism Induced Paraplegia in Rats.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-28

    of cardiogenic shock . Levodopa induces mesenteric, renal and cerebral vasodilation. In this work we studied the effect of hypothermia on pressor...anesthesia (Bevan et al., 1973; Popovic at al., 1977). Beneficial effects of levodopa and dopamine have been demonstrated in cardiogenic (Goldberg et al., 1977...Stephens et al., 1978) and noncardiogenic shock (Samii et al., 1978). The major benefit obtained with dopamine treatment seems to be an im

  13. Cognitive Impairment Involving Social Cognition in SPG4 Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Chamard, Ludivine; Ferreira, Sabrina; Pijoff, Alexa; Silvestre, Manon; Berger, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To describe cognitive assessment including social cognition in SPG4 patients. Methods. We reported a series of nine patients with SPG4 mutation with an extensive neuropsychological examination including social cognition assessment. Results. None of our patients presented with mental retardation or dementia. All presented with mild cognitive impairment with a high frequency of attention deficit (100%), executive disorders (89%), and social cognition impairment (78%). An asymptomatic patient for motor skills presented with the same cognitive profile. No correlation was found in this small sample between cognitive impairment and motor impairment, age at disease onset, or disease duration. Conclusions. SPG4 phenotypes share some cognitive features of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cognitive disorders including executive disorders and social cognition impairment are frequent in SPG4 patients and might sometimes occur before motor disorders. Therefore, cognitive functions including social cognition should be systematically assessed in order to improve the clinical management of this population. PMID:27688599

  14. “I Can’t Walk!” Acute Thrombosis of Descending Aorta Causing Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Matthew L.; Yucebey, Elif; Weaver, Mitchell R.; Jaehne, A. Kathrin; Rivers, Emanuel P.

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED) with acute, bilateral lower extremity weakness and loss of sensation, as well as absent pulses bilaterally. Computed tomography angiography showed complete occlusion of the aorta below the inferior mesenteric artery, extending to the iliac bifurcations. Echocardiographic findings showed severe systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction of 15%) and cryptic cardiogenic shock in spite of stable vital signs. Prior to early operative intervention, an early goal-oriented hemodynamic strategy of shock management resulted in the resolution of motor and sensory deficits.After definitive surgical intervention, the patient was discharged neurologically intact. Acute aortic occlusion is frequently accompanied by myocardial dysfunction, which can be from mild to severe. The most severe form can even occur with normal vital signs or occult cardiogenic shock. Early detection and goal-directed preoperative hemodynamic optimization, along with surgical intervention in the ED, is required to optimize outcomes. PMID:24106532

  15. [Bariatrica paraplegia patient and morbid obesity. New challenge in bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Gros Herguido, Noelia; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; Barranco Moreno, Antonio; Socas Macias, Maria; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Garcia-Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2014-06-01

    The loss of mobility due to spinal cord injury is a risk factor for weight gain. Despite the well-documented outcomes of bariatric surgery in outpatients, little information is available about the surgery in paraplegic patients. We present two cases of patients with morbid obesity and spinal cord injury. After several attempts to lose weight conservatively, were assessed by the multidisciplinary team of our hospital and finally intervened by laparoscopic gastric bypass. After surgery have been no post-surgical complications. The patient in case 1, after two years of follow-up, a weight of 84 kg (BMI 25.08 kg/m2). Case 2, after a month of surgery has reduced weight and stopped taking antihypertensive therapy. It 's available to bariatric surgery as an important option to consider if all non-surgical interventions fail is highlighted.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Silver syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... group of genetic disorders known as hereditary spastic paraplegias. These disorders are characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) and, frequently, development of paralysis of the lower limbs (paraplegia). Hereditary spastic paraplegias ...

  17. Experiencing Functional Electrical Stimulation Roots on Education, and Clinical Developments in Paraplegia and Tetraplegia With Technological Innovation.

    PubMed

    Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Cybernetics-based concepts can allow for complete independence for paralyzed individuals, including sensory motor recovery. Spinal cord injuries are responsible for a huge stress on health and a financial burden to society. This article focuses on novel procedures such as functional diagnosis for paraplegics and tetraplegics, cybertherapies toward lessening comorbidities such as cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, etc., and the production of new technology for upper and lower limb control. Functional electrical stimulation reflects a unique opportunity for bipedal gait to be achieved by paraplegics and tetraplegics. Education and training of undergraduates and postgraduates in engineering and life sciences have also been a major aim of this work.

  18. Interference of Different Types of Seats on Postural Control System during a Forward-Reaching Task in Individuals with Paraplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Abreu, Daniela Cristina Carvalho; Takara, Kelly; Metring, Nathalia Lopes; Reis, Julia Guimaraes; Cliquet, Alberto, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the influence of different types of wheelchair seats on paraplegic individuals' postural control using a maximum anterior reaching test. Balance evaluations during 50, 75, and 90% of each individual's maximum reach in the forward direction using two different cushions on seat (one foam and one gel) and a no-cushion condition…

  19. The "open branch" technique: A new way to prevent paraplegia after total endovascular repair of thoracoabdominal aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Krajcer, Zvonimir; Echeverria, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord ischemia (SCI) has been one of the most concerning complications after surgical and endovascular thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair "Open Branch" is an innovative technique to reduce the incidence of SCI Further studies in a larger number of patients with varying pathologies are needed to confirm the advantages of this technique.

  20. It's About Time Physical Disabilities Came Out in the Open: Part I. Amputation, Monoplegia, Hemiplegia, Triplegia, Quadruplegia, Paraplegia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kay

    After a definition of the term, mobility impairments, and a discussion of the causes and problems associated with amputation, this document covers, under the major section, Paralysis, six handicapping conditions in terms of how each may affect a student's ability to be successful in both a vocational program and a job. Topics under this section…

  1. Physical Therapy in the Management of Pelvic Floor Muscles Hypertonia in a Woman with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Aline Moreira; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge; Cristine Lemes Mateus-Vasconcelos, Elaine; Moroni, Rafael Mendes; Brito, Luciane Maria Oliveira; Brito, Luiz Gustavo Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pelvic floor (PF) hypertonic disorders are a group of conditions that present with muscular hypertonia or spasticity, resulting in a diminished capacity to isolate, contract, and relax the PF. Their presentation includes voiding and sexual dysfunctions, pelvic pain, and constipation. Various factors are associated, such as complicated vaginal birth, muscular injury, scar tissue formation, and neuropathies. Study Design. The case of a single patient will be presented, together with the management strategies employed. Case Description. A woman with hereditary spastic paraparesis and a history of muscle spasticity and urinary and fecal complaints since childhood. She presented to this institution seeking treatment for pelvic pain, pain during intercourse, constipation, and micturition problems. A physical therapy protocol was developed, with the trial of several treatment modalities. Outcome. After some failed attempts, perineal and pelvic floor stretching proved to be very efficacious therapies for this patient's complaint, leading to improved pain during intercourse, constipation, pelvic pain, and urinary stream. Discussion. PF spasticity can lead to severe disability and interfere with daily basic functions, such as micturition and evacuation. Physical therapy plays an essential role in the management of these patients and can lead to significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:25478261

  2. Interference of different types of seats on postural control system during a forward-reaching task in individuals with paraplegia.

    PubMed

    de Abreu, Daniela Cristina Carvalho; Takara, Kelly; Metring, Nathália Lopes; Reis, Júlia Guimarães; Cliquet, Alberto

    2012-09-01

    We aimed to evaluate the influence of different types of wheelchair seats on paraplegic individuals' postural control using a maximum anterior reaching test. Balance evaluations during 50, 75, and 90% of each individual's maximum reach in the forward direction using two different cushions on seat (one foam and one gel) and a no-cushion condition were carried out on 11 individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) and six individuals without SCI. Trunk anterior displacement and the time spent to perform the test were assessed. No differences were found for the three types of seats in terms of trunk anterior displacement and the time spent to perform the test when intragroup comparisons were made in both groups (P>0.05). The intergroup comparison showed that body displacement was less prominent and the time spent to perform the test was more prolonged for individuals with SCI (P<0.05), which suggests a postural control deficit. The seat type did not affect the ability of the postural control system to maintain balance during the forward-reaching task.

  3. Coupling between "hand" primary sensorimotor cortex and lower limb muscles after ulnar nerve surgical transfer in paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, C; Vecchio, F; Babiloni, F; Brunelli, G A; Carducci, F; Cincotti, F; Pizzella, V; Romani, G L; Tecchio, F T; Rossini, P M

    2004-02-01

    Previous neuroimaging evidence revealed an "invasion" of "hand" over "lower limb" primary sensorimotor cortex in paraplegic subjects, with the exception of a rare patient who received a surgical motor reinnervation of hip-thigh muscles by the ulnar nerve. Here, the authors show that a functional reorganization of cortico-muscular and cortico-cortical oscillatory coupling was related to the recovery of the rare patient, as a paradigmatic case of long-term plasticity in human sensorimotor cortex after motor reinnervation of paraplegic muscles. This conclusion was based on electroencephalographic and electromyographic data collected while the patient and normal control subjects performed isometric muscle contraction of the left hand or lower limb. Cortico-muscular and cortico-cortical coupling was estimated by electroencephalographic-electromyographic coherence and directed transfer function of a multivariate autoregressive model.

  4. The Presynaptic Microtubule Cytoskeleton in Physiological and Pathological Conditions: Lessons from Drosophila Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias

    PubMed Central

    Bodaleo, Felipe J.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs) transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS) where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs) and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models. PMID:27504085

  5. Effective Structured Query Formulation for Session Search

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    with top frequency are “type of paralysi”, “quadriplegia paraplegia ”, “ paraplegia ”, “spinal cord injury”, and “quadriplegic tetraplegic”, so the final...quadriplegia paraplegia ) 0.004819 paraplegia 0.004819 #combine(spinal cord injury) 0.00241 #combine(quadriplegic tetraplegic) )”, where the

  6. [X-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia due to mutation in the L1CAM gene: three cases reports of CRASH syndrome].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Abián; Cabrera-López, José C; Santana-Rodríguez, Alfredo; Toledo-Bravo de Laguna, Laura; Santana-Artiles, Alexandre; Sebastián-García, Irma

    2016-03-01

    Introduccion. La paraplejia espastica hereditaria (PEH) representa un conjunto de cuadros clinicos neurodegenerativos que se caracteriza por perdida progresiva de fuerza en los miembros inferiores con espasticidad. Esto se debe a una lesion axonal en los haces corticoespinales. La de tipo 1, conocida como SPG1, es la forma mas comun de PEH ligada al cromosoma X. Esta se produce por una mutacion en el gen de la molecula de adhesion celular L1 (L1CAM). La SPG1 se manifiesta con el sindrome CRASH (corpus callosum hypoplasia, retardation, adducted thumbs, spasticity and hydrocephalus). Casos clinicos. Tres varones, dos hermanos y un primo (materno), con un cuadro clinico de discapacidad intelectual, paraparesia espastica, piramidalismo, dismorfias faciales y pulgares en aduccion. La neuroimagen mostro agenesia del cuerpo calloso y ventriculomegalia en los tres. Los estudios neurofisiologico y metabolico fueron normales. El estudio genetico evidencio en todos ellos una mutacion concreta en el gen L1CAM (Xq28). Conclusion. Se describen los hallazgos clinicorradiologicos de tres varones afectos de sindrome CRASH por mutacion c.516G>A en el exon 5 del gen L1CAM. Estos parecen ser los primeros casos descritos en España segun la bibliografia actual. Recomendamos sospechar este sindrome cuando se asocian paraparesia espastica, discapacidad intelectual y pulgares aductos.

  7. Effect of Epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord on voluntary movement, standing, and assisted stepping after motor complete paraplegia: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Harkema, Susan; Gerasimenko, Yury; Hodes, Jonathan; Burdick, Joel; Angeli, Claudia; Chen, Yangsheng; Ferreira, Christie; Willhite, Andrea; Rejc, Enrico; Grossman, Robert G.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Repeated periods of stimulation of the spinal cord and training seems to have amplified the ability to consciously control movement. Methods An individual three years post C7-T1 subluxation presented with a complete loss of clinically detectable voluntary motor function and partial preservation of sensation below the T1 cord segment. Following 170 locomotor training sessions, a 16-electrode array was surgically placed on the dura (L1-S1 cord segments) to allow for chronic electrical stimulation. After implantation and throughout stand retraining with epidural stimulation, 29 experiments were performed. Extensive stimulation combinations and parameters were tested to achieve standing and stepping. Findings Epidural stimulation enabled the human lumbosacral spinal circuitry to dynamically elicit full weight-bearing standing with assistance provided only for balance for 4·25 minutes in a subject with a clinically motor complete SCI. This occurred when using stimulation at parameters optimized for standing while providing bilateral load-bearing proprioceptive input. Locomotor-like patterns were also observed when stimulation parameters were optimized for stepping. In addition, seven months after implantation, the subject recovered supraspinal control of certain leg movements, but only during epidural stimulation. Interpretation Even after a severe low cervical spinal injury, the neural networks remaining within the lumbosacral segments can be reactivated into functional states so that it can recognize specific details of ensembles of sensory input to the extent that it can serve as the source of neural control. In addition, newly formed supraspinal input to this same lumbosacral segments can re-emerge as another source of control. Task specific training with epidural stimulation may have reactivated previously silent spared neural circuits or promoted plasticity. This suggests that these interventions could be a viable clinical approach for functional recovery after severe paralysis. Funding National Institutes of Health and Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation. PMID:21601270

  8. 16 CFR 1207.1 - Scope, purpose, and findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) quadriplegia and paraplegia resulting from users (primarily adults using the swimming pool slide for the first... address the risk of quadriplegia and paraplegia (except insofar as the standard specifies a low angle...

  9. Autonomic Dysreflexia-Like Syndrome in a T12 Paraplegic During Thoracic Spine Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    or lumbar spinal cord lesions and paraplegia have been reported to exhibit catecholamine-induced hypertension and autonomic dys- function of central...cord origin. Roche et al.17 reported a series of 5 African American male patients with low thoracic or lumbar traumatic paraplegia exhibiting severe...Am Paraplegia Soc 1992;15:171–86 4. Amzallag M. Autonomic hyperreflexia. Int Anesthesiol Clin 1993;31:87–102 5. Karlsson AK. Autonomic dysreflexia

  10. Can Surgery Improve Neurological Function in Penetrating Spinal Injury? A Review of the Military and Civilian Literature and Treatment Recommendations for Military Neurosurgeons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    was hit in the left shoulder, experienced immediate paraplegia , and died of his injury shortly thereafter. Other notable fatalities from spinal GSWs...acute spinal cord inju- ries in a war zone. J Neurosurg 34:164–167, 1971 19. Jacobson SA, Bors E: Spinal cord injury in Vietnamese com- bat. Paraplegia 7

  11. Safer Ski Jumps: Design of Landing Surfaces and Clothoidal In-Run Transitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Yamashita, ―Traumatic Paraplegia in Snowboarders,‖ Spine, vol. 26, no. 11, 2001, pp. 1294—1297 [Online]. Available: http://www.biomedsearch.com/nih...Traumatic- paraplegia - in-snowboarders/11389402.html [Accessed: April 7, 2010]. [15] ―Newton’s Second Law,‖ April 16, 2010 [Online]. Available

  12. Genetics Home Reference: infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and paraplegia result from degeneration (atrophy) of motor neurons , which are specialized nerve cells in the brain ... highest amounts in the brain, particularly in motor neurons. Alsin turns on (activates) multiple proteins called GTPases ...

  13. Psychosocial outcomes among youth with spinal cord injury by neurological impairment

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Anne; Kelly, Erin H.; Klaas, Sara J.; Vogel, Lawrence C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Examine psychosocial outcomes of youth with spinal cord injury (SCI) as a function of neurological level (paraplegia/tetraplegia) and severity (American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS)). Design Survey research. Setting Three pediatric SCI specialty centers in the USA. Participants Youth with SCI ages 5–18 with neurological impairment classifications of: tetraplegia AIS ABC (tetraplegia ABC), paraplegia AIS ABC (paraplegia ABC), or AIS D. Outcome Measures Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale, and Children's Depression Inventory. Results Three hundred and forty youth participated; 57% were male; 60% were Caucasian, 21% Hispanic, 7% African-American, 2% Native American, and 3% reported “other”. Their mean age was 8.15 years (standard deviation (SD) = 5.84) at injury and 13.18 years (SD = 3.87) at interview. Ninety-six youth (28%) had tetraplegia ABC injuries, 191 (56%) paraplegia ABC injuries, and 53 (16%) AIS D injuries. Neurological impairment was significantly related to participation and quality of life (QOL). Specifically, youth with paraplegia ABC and AIS D injuries participated in more activities than youth with tetraplegia ABC (P = 0.002; P = 0.018, respectively) and youth with paraplegia ABC participated more often than youth with tetraplegia ABC (P = 0.006). Youth with paraplegia ABC reported higher social QOL than youth with tetraplegia ABC (P = 0.001) and AIS D injuries (P = 0.002). Groups did not differ regarding mental health. Conclusion Interventions should target youth with tetraplegia ABC, as they may need support in terms of participation, and both youth with tetraplegia ABC and AIS D injuries in terms of social integration. PMID:24621027

  14. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-09-15

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

  15. Drosophila spichthyin inhibits BMP signaling and regulates synaptic growth and axonal microtubules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinnan; Shaw, W Robert; Tsang, Hilda T H; Reid, Evan; O'Kane, Cahir J

    2007-02-01

    To understand the functions of NIPA1, mutated in the neurodegenerative disease hereditary spastic paraplegia, and of ichthyin, mutated in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, we have studied their Drosophila melanogaster ortholog, spichthyin (Spict). Spict is found on early endosomes. Loss of Spict leads to upregulation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling and expansion of the neuromuscular junction. BMP signaling is also necessary for a normal microtubule cytoskeleton and axonal transport; analysis of loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes indicate that Spict may antagonize this function of BMP signaling. Spict interacts with BMP receptors and promotes their internalization from the plasma membrane, implying that it inhibits BMP signaling by regulating BMP receptor traffic. This is the first demonstration of a role for a hereditary spastic paraplegia protein or ichthyin family member in a specific signaling pathway, and implies disease mechanisms for hereditary spastic paraplegia that involve dependence of the microtubule cytoskeleton on BMP signaling.

  16. Electrical treatment of spinal cord injuries in the 18th and 19th centuries.

    PubMed

    Silver, John R; Weiner, M-F

    2013-05-01

    Two centuries ago, electricity was being used for the treatment of paraplegia and trials were taking place in France. This study aims to identify cases of traumatic paraplegia treated with electricity in the 19th century in order to assess the therapeutic benefit. Only four such cases were identified, none with a complete transection of the spinal cord since these patients would have died from pressure sores and urinary tract infections. The personalities involved, William Gull, William Erb, Guillaume Duchenne and Cyril Henry Golding Bird are portrayed and contemporaneous views on electrotherapy analysed. While the four patients apparently benefited from the treatment, the lack of follow-up and the incomplete data prevented a definitive conclusion on the therapeutic value of electrical treatment in traumatic paraplegia.

  17. Comparison of neck and upper-limb muscle activities between able-bodied and paraplegic individuals during wheelchair propulsion on the ground.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Jin; Park, So Hyun; Lee, Chang-Ryeol

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the muscle activities of the neck and upper-limb muscles between able-bodied individuals and persons with paraplegia during wheelchair propulsion on the ground. [Subjects and Methods] The muscle activities of the neck and upper-limb muscles of 8 normal individuals and 8 individuals with paraplegia were analyzed during wheelchair propulsion. The activities of the latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major, anterior/posterior deltoids, triceps brachii, extensor carpi radialis, and sternocleidomastoid muscles were assessed. [Results] The paraplegic group showed significantly higher sternocleidomastoid activity than the normal group. Latissimus dorsi activity was also higher in the paraplegia group than in the normal group, but the difference was not significant. There were no significant differences in the other muscle activities between groups. [Conclusion] Paraplegic patients tend to use the sternocleidomastoid and latissimus dorsi muscles with greater degrees of activity. Therefore, physiotherapists should not overlook the treatment of these muscles for paraplegic patients who are long-term wheelchair users.

  18. Subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM): two cases of SPAM following surgical treatment of thoracolumbar fractures.

    PubMed

    Farooque, Kamran; Kandwal, Pankaj; Gupta, Ankit

    2014-01-01

    To report two cases of traumatic paraplegia who developed Sub-acute Post-Traumatic Ascending Myelopathy (SPAM) following surgical decompression.We hereby report two cases (both 35yr old male) with traumatic paraplegia that developed ascending weakness at 3rd and 5th Post-Op day respectively following surgical decompression. Both the patients experienced remarkable improvement in Neurology after treatment with steroids. The authors conclude by emphasizing on minimum cord handling during surgical decompression of the spinal cord to avoid this potentially life threatening complication.

  19. Unusual cause of lower extremity wounds: Cobb syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Saffaei, Ali; Pourazizi, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Cobb syndrome (Cutaneomeningospinal Angiomatosis) is a rare segmental neurocutaneous syndrome associated with metameric cutaneous and spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In this syndrome, capillary malformation or angiokeratoma-like lesions are formed in a dermatomal distribution, with an AVM in the corresponding segment of the spinal cord. The spinal cord lesions can cause neurological disorder and paraplegia, which typically develop during young adulthood. We report a 32-year-old male with the Cobb syndrome associated with lower extremity painful wounds and acute-onset paraplegia due to metameric vascular malformations.

  20. Swimming for the Handicapped Child and Adult: Occasional Papers No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neishloss, Lou

    Outlined are physiological and psychological values of swimming for the handicapped, basic principles and teaching procedures for instructing physically handicapped persons, and specific suggestions for teaching swimming to persons with the following conditions; amputations, polio, paraplegia, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, Legg-Perthes Disease,…

  1. Spinal cord ischemia and left atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Hirose, G; Kosoegawa, H; Takado, M; Shimazaki, K; Murakami, E

    1979-07-01

    A 62-year-old man had an acute, transient, flaccid paraplegia. Examination showed a primary cardiac tumor with emboli to major branches of the aorta. A myxoma was removed from the left atrium, and normal function returned. Left atrial myxoma should be suspected as a cause for embolism to the CNS.

  2. Spinal Cord Injury: Facts and Figures at a Glance

    MedlinePlus

    ... old 50 years old High Tetraplegia (C1-C4) AIS ABC $1,023,924 $177,808 $4,543,182 $2,496,856 Low Tetraplegia (C5-C8) AIS ABC $739,874 $109,077 $3,319,533 $2,041,809 Paraplegia AIS ABC $499,023 $66,106 $2,221,596 $ ...

  3. Safety Belt Education Using Visual Crash Images and Low-Cost Incentives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bross, Michael H.; Spellicy, Martin J.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a community-based safety belt promotional program held at 10 public high schools. Safety belt assemblies, which created vivid crash images, were conducted using police officers, ambulance personnel, people with paraplegia, and athletes. Incentives were awarded to buckled students over 10 weeks. The program resulted in increased safety…

  4. Comparison of Heart Rate Response to Tennis Activity between Persons with and without Spinal Cord Injuries: Implications for a Training Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barfield, J. P.; Malone, Laurie A.; Coleman, Tristica A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to reach a training threshold during on-court sport activity. Monitors collected heart rate (HR) data every 5 s for 11 wheelchair tennis players (WCT) with low paraplegia and 11 able-bodied controls matched on experience and skill level (ABT).…

  5. Unusual course of an epidural rhabdomyosarcoma of the upper thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Tsitsopoulos, P D; Tsonidis, C A; Nanasis, K A; Tsoleka, K D; Tavridis, G N

    1995-01-01

    This report deals with a case of rhabdomyosarcoma in the upper thoracic spine. It is of particular interest, not only for the rarity of type and location of this tumour, but for its clinical course, which presented fluctuations of neurological status, included an acute demonstration of complete paraplegia followed by full recovery after conservative treatment, and gradual relapsing of neurological deficit, one year later.

  6. 34 CFR 350.5 - What definitions apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... capacities (such as mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; (ii) Whose vocational rehabilitation can be... epilepsy), paraplegia, quadriplegia, other spinal cord impairments, sickle cell anemia, specific...

  7. Press release. "Stem Cell Implants to Treat Spinal Cord Injury: No Scientific Evidence, Beware of Hope Thieves".

    PubMed

    Carannante, Giuseppe

    2010-04-01

    A new alarm launched by Prof. Giuseppe Carannante, distinguished Turin surgeon and spokesman for SOMIPAR, the Italian medical association for paraplegia, during the association's XIV national congress underway in Palermo, Sicily since Thursday 18(th) March until Saturday 20(th) March.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: L1 syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... area? Other Names for This Condition CRASH syndrome MASA syndrome spastic paraplegia 1 SPG1 X-linked complicated ... links) Disease InfoSearch: X-linked hydrocephalus syndrome MalaCards: masa syndrome Merck Manual Home Edition for Patients and ...

  9. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells pave the road for a better understanding of motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Winner, Beate; Marchetto, Maria C; Winkler, Jürgen; Gage, Fred H

    2014-09-15

    While motor neuron diseases are currently incurable, induced pluripotent stem cell research has uncovered some disease-relevant phenotypes. We will discuss strategies to model different aspects of motor neuron disease and the specific neurons involved in the disease. We will then describe recent progress to investigate common forms of motor neuron disease: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, hereditary spastic paraplegia and spinal muscular atrophy.

  10. Drosophila spichthyin inhibits BMP signaling and regulates synaptic growth and axonal microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinnan; Shaw, W. Robert; Tsang, Hilda T. H.; Reid, Evan; O'Kane, Cahir J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary To understand the functions of SPG6, mutated in the neurodegenerative disease hereditary spastic paraplegia, and of ichthyin, mutated in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, we have studied their Drosophila ortholog, spichthyin (Spict). Spict is found on early endosomes. Loss of Spict leads to upregulation of BMP signaling and expansion of the neuromuscular junction. BMP signaling is also necessary for a normal microtubule cytoskeleton and axonal transport; analysis of loss and gain-of-function phenotypes suggests that Spict antagonizes this function of BMP signaling. Spict interacts with BMP receptors and promotes their internalization from the plasma membrane, suggesting that it inhibits BMP signaling by regulating BMP receptor traffic. This is the first demonstration of a role for an SPG protein or ichthyin family member in a specific signaling pathway, and suggests disease mechanisms for hereditary spastic paraplegia that involve dependence of the microtubule cytoskeleton on BMP signaling. PMID:17220882

  11. Prosthetic ambulation in a paraplegic patient with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Shin, J C; Park, C; Kim, D Y; Choi, Y S; Kim, Y K; Seong, Y J

    2000-08-01

    Great importance and caution should be placed on prosthetic fitting for a paraplegic patient with an anesthetic residual limb if functional ambulation is to be achieved. The combination of paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy is a complex injury that makes the rehabilitation process difficult. This article describes a case of L2 paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy on the right side. Following the rehabilitation course, the patient independently walked using a walker at indoor level with a transfemoral prosthesis with ischial containment socket, polycentric knee assembly, endoskeletal shank and multiaxis foot assembly and a knee ankle foot orthosis on the sound side. The difficulties of fitting a functional prosthesis to an insensate limb and the rehabilitation stages leading to functional ambulation are reviewed.

  12. Spinal cord infarction in giant cell arteritis associated with scalp necrosis.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Khader N; Hadidy, Azmy; Joudeh, Anwar; Obeidat, Fatima Nouri; Abdulfattah, Khalid W

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord infarction is extremely rare in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA). There are only four case reports in the literature. We describe a 65-year-old man who presented with sudden paraplegia and back pain of 4-days duration with sensory loss below the umbilicus and bilateral scalp necrosis. Magnetic resonance imaging finding was consistent with dorsal spinal cord infarction. Biopsy of the temporal artery confirmed the diagnosis of GCA. The patient was treated with high dose of corticosteroids, which resulted in healing of the scalp ulcerations in 3 weeks, but the paraplegia was irreversible. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spinal cord infarction and simultaneous occurrence of bilateral scalp necrosis in a histopathologically proven GCA. Although literature about spinal cord involvement in GCA is very limited, cord infarction is associated with high mortality and therapeutic challenges since little is understood regarding the pathogenesis that leads to infarction.

  13. Is the spinal cord the generator of 16-Hz orthostatic tremor?

    PubMed

    Norton, Jonathan A; Wood, Duncan E; Day, Brian L

    2004-02-24

    Primary orthostatic tremor is characterized by 16-Hz motor activity that is coherent between muscles. It has been suggested that this tremor originates in the brain. This view is questioned by findings from a patient with complete paraplegia who experiences intermittent leg spasms at rest. The EMG activity within the spasms showed a 16-Hz component that was coherent between muscles unilaterally and bilaterally. This raises the possibility that the spinal cord could be the source of orthostatic tremor.

  14. An autopsy case of classical Pelizaeus-Merzbacher's disease.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Y; Kamoshita, S

    1975-01-01

    A girl aged 8 years and 10 months at death had shown signs of a slowly progressive neurological disease with onset in early infancy. The main clinical features were nystagmus, spastic paraplegia, amd mental deterioration. Pathological examination of the brain showed severe demyelination with perivascular preservation of mylein islands, presenting a tigroid pattern. The patient is the second case of classical Pelizaeus-Merzbacher's disease in Japan proven by autopsy.

  15. Motor evoked potentials in thoracoabdominal aortic surgery: CON.

    PubMed

    Coselli, Joseph S; Tsai, Peter I

    2010-05-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAAs) have a dismal natural history that frequently necessitates surgical repair, but such repairs sometimes result in paraplegia and paraparesis. To reduce the risk of these complications, intraoperative monitoring of spinal cord motor evoked potentials (MEPs) can be used to guide TAAA repair procedures and may potentially minimize spinal cord ischemia. However, the use of MEP monitoring techniques requires important changes to anesthetic management, entails certain risks, and has important contraindications.

  16. Complex phenotype in an Italian family with a novel mutation in SPG3A.

    PubMed

    de Leva, Maria Fulvia; Filla, Alessandro; Criscuolo, Chiara; Tessa, Alessandra; Pappatà, Sabina; Quarantelli, Mario; Bilo, Leonilda; Peluso, Silvio; Antenora, Antonella; Longo, Dario; Santorelli, Filippo M; De Michele, Giuseppe

    2010-03-01

    Mutations in the SPG3A gene represent a significant cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia with early onset and pure phenotype. We describe an Italian family manifesting a complex phenotype, characterized by cerebellar involvement in the proband and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like syndrome in her father, in association with a new mutation in SPG3A. Our findings further widen the notion of clinical heterogeneity in SPG3A mutations.

  17. Whole thoracal spinal cord involvement in case of neuro-Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kabukçu, Tiginçe; Edemci, Safi; Uçan, Halil; Celik, Canan; Gunes, Hafize N; Yoldas, Tahir

    2009-04-01

    Behçet's disease is a chronic inflammatory, multisystem vasculitis. Neurological involvement is one of the most serious manifestations of Behçet's disease. Although brain stem and diencephelon are the most affected areas in neuro-Behçet's disease, spinal cord involvement are rarely seen. We report a case of paraplegia caused by completely thoracic cord involvement of Behçet's disease in a 20-year-old woman.

  18. [A renal function survey in paraplegic patients of the Tangshan earthquake].

    PubMed

    Zhou, T J

    1989-08-01

    The writers had investigated 307 patients with paraplegia caused by Tangshan earthquake on July 28, 1976 and analysed their renograms. The results showed that the incidence of the abnormal renogram was 22.8% and significantly higher in the males and the patients with urinary incontinence than in the females and patients with urinary regularly. The renography was compared with the ultrasonography and their coincidence ratio was 93.5%. The relation among the abnormal renogram, urinary incontinence and sex is discussed.

  19. Spinal Cord Infarction in the Course of a Septic Shock: About One Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Molderez, A.; Trine, H.

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a patient admitted to our intensive care unit in the course of a septic shock, secondary to cholangitis. After rapid hemodynamic stabilization, antibiotherapy, and endoscopic extraction of bile ducts stones, she appeared to have developed flaccid paraplegia. The suspected diagnosis of medullar ischemia was confirmed by typical MRI findings. This case stresses the potential pathogenic role of hypotension in medullar ischemia and the place of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a reliable diagnostic tool. PMID:28316845

  20. Intervertebral disc extrusion and spinal decompression in a binturong (Arctictis binturong).

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Maria; Arble, Jason; Myers, Gwen

    2007-03-01

    A 10-yr-old binturong (Arctictis binturong) developed an acute onset of hind limb paralysis. Neurological examination revealed sensorimotor paraplegia. Myelography and computed tomography demonstrated a ventrolateral extradural compression of the spinal cord centered over the L3-L4 intervertebral disc space. Spinal decompression was performed via hemilaminectomy and excision of degenerate nucleus pulposus, confirmed by histopathologic examination. The binturong regained slight motor function by day 8 postoperatively but succumbed to pancreatitis 19 days postoperatively.

  1. The surgical management and treatment of metastatic lesions in the proximal femur

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Helin; Wang, Jin; Xu, Jianfa; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Review current treatments of metastatic lesions in the proximal femur. We reviewed published literature related to diagnosis and surgical treatments and summarized current treatment options. Surgical management mainly consist of internal fixation, hip replacement, and percutaneous femoroplasty (PFP) which has been newly applied in clinical practice. An appropriate series of treatments is necessary for patients to avoid the occurrence of paraplegia and prolong survival time. PMID:27428183

  2. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  3. Mobility Outcomes Following Five Training Sessions with a Powered Exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Dalley, Skyler; Clausen, Mike; Wilson, Edgar; Morrison, Scott; Etheridge, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Background: Loss of legged mobility due to spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with multiple physiological and psychological impacts. Powered exoskeletons offer the possibility of regained mobility and reversal or prevention of the secondary effects associated with immobility. Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate mobility outcomes for individuals with SCI after 5 gait-training sessions with a powered exoskeleton, with a primary goal of characterizing the ease of learning and usability of the system. Methods: Sixteen subjects with SCI were enrolled in a pilot clinical trial at Shepherd Center, Atlanta, Georgia, with injury levels ranging from C5 complete to L1 incomplete. An investigational Indego exoskeleton research kit was evaluated for ease of use and efficacy in providing legged mobility. Outcome measures of the study included the 10-meter walk test (10MWT) and the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) as well as measures of independence including donning and doffing times and the ability to walk on various surfaces. Results: At the end of 5 sessions (1.5 hours per session), average walking speed was 0.22 m/s for persons with C5-6 motor complete tetraplegia, 0.26 m/s for T1-8 motor complete paraplegia, and 0.45 m/s for T9-L1 paraplegia. Distances covered in 6 minutes averaged 64 meters for those with C5-6, 74 meters for T1-8, and 121 meters for T9-L1. Additionally, all participants were able to walk on both indoor and outdoor surfaces. Conclusions: Results after only 5 sessions suggest that persons with tetraplegia and paraplegia learn to use the Indego exoskeleton quickly and can manage a variety of surfaces. Walking speeds and distances achieved also indicate that some individuals with paraplegia can quickly become limited community ambulators using this system. PMID:26364278

  4. An atypical case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    De Fino, Chiara; Nociti, Viviana; Modoni, Anna; Bizzarro, Alessandra; Mirabella, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a young man admitted to our hospital for persistent headache associated with fever, retrorbitary pain and vomiting, who rapidly developed encephalopathy with drowsiness, paraplegia, hypoesthesia with a D6 sensory level and urinary retention. Brain and spinal cord MRI revealed findings compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and microbiological tests documented a cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. CMV infection is extraordinarily associated with ADEM, but must be included in microbiological tests, because early diagnosis and treatment ameliorate the neurological outcome.

  5. [Lameness of the hindlimbs of the cat].

    PubMed

    Grevel, V

    1989-08-01

    About six to seven per cent of cats presented at the clinic show neurological signs. The largest group consists of traumatized cats. A complete neurological examination is essential for localizing the lesion and establishing a prognosis. Differential diagnosis for paraparesis/paraplegia of pelvic limbs in cats are discussed. Cats are demonstrated which had spinal cord trauma, disc protrusion, aortic thromboembolism and lumbosacral stenosis and the importance of the evaluation of x-rays, cerebrospinal fluid examination and myelography is stressed.

  6. [Motor evoked potentials in thoracoabdominal aortic surgery].

    PubMed

    Magro, Cátia; Nora, David; Marques, Miguel; Alves, Angela Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic disease (aneurysm or dissection) has increased in recent decades. Surgery is the curative treatment but is associated to high perioperative morbidity and mortality risks. Paraplegia is one of the most severe complications, whose incidence has decreased significantly with the implementation of spinal cord protection strategies. No single method or combination of methods has proven to be fully effective in preventing paraplegia. This review is intended to analyse the scientific evidence available on the role of intraoperative monitoring with motor evoked potentials in the neurological outcome of patients undergoing thoracoabdominal aortic surgery. An online search (PubMed) was conducted. Relevant references were selected and reviewed. Intraoperative monitoring with motor evoked potentials (MEP) allows early detection of ischemic events and a targeted intervention to prevent the development of spinal cord injury, significantly reducing the incidence of postoperative paraplegia. MEP monitoring may undergo several intraoperative interferences which may compromise their interpretation. Neuromuscular blockade is the main limiting factor of anesthetic origin. It is essential to strike a balance between monitoring conditions and surgical and anesthetic needs as well as to evaluate the risks and benefits of the technique for each patient. MEP monitoring improves neurological outcome when integrated in a multidisciplinary strategy which must include multiple protective mechanisms that should be tailored to each hospital reality.

  7. S113R mutation in SLC33A1 leads to neurodegeneration and augmented BMP signaling in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pingting; Jiang, Baichun; Ma, Jian; Lin, Pengfei; Zhang, Yinshuai; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The S113R mutation (c.339T>G) (MIM #603690.0001) in SLC33A1 (MIM #603690), an ER membrane acetyl-CoA transporter, has been previously identified in individuals with hereditary spastic paraplegia type 42 (SPG42; MIM #612539). SLC33A1 has also been shown to inhibit the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway in zebrafish. To better understand the function of SLC33A1, we generated and characterized Slc33a1S113R knock-in mice. Homozygous Slc33a1S113R mutant mice were embryonic lethal, whereas heterozygous Slc33a1 mutant mice (Slc33a1wt/mut) exhibited behavioral abnormalities and central neurodegeneration, which is consistent with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) phenotypes. Importantly, we found an upregulation of BMP signaling in the nervous system and mouse embryonic fibroblasts of Slc33a1wt/mut mice. Using a sciatic nerve crush injury model in vivo and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) culture in vitro we showed that injury-induced axonal regeneration in Slc33a1wt/mut mice was accelerated and mediated by upregulated BMP signaling. Exogenous addition of BMP signaling antagonist, noggin, could efficiently alleviate the accelerated injury-induced axonal regrowth. These results indicate that SLC33A1 can negatively regulate BMP signaling in mice, further supporting the notion that upregulation of BMP signaling is a common mechanism of a subset of hereditary spastic paraplegias. PMID:27935820

  8. Alsin Related Disorders: Literature Review and Case Study with Novel Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Sampaio, Mafalda; Nahavandi, Nahid; Fernandes, Susana; Leão, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the ALS2 gene cause three distinct disorders: infantile ascending hereditary spastic paraplegia, juvenile primary lateral sclerosis, and autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We present a review of the literature and the case of a 16-year-old boy who is, to the best of our knowledge, the first Portuguese case with infantile ascending hereditary spastic paraplegia. Clinical investigations included sequencing analysis of the ALS2 gene, which revealed a heterozygous mutation in exon 5 (c.1425_1428del p.G477Afs*19) and a heterozygous and previously unreported variant in exon 3 (c.145G>A p.G49R). We also examined 42 reported cases on the clinical characteristics and neurophysiological and imaging studies of patients with known ALS2 gene mutations sourced from PubMed. This showed that an overlap of phenotypic manifestations can exist in patients with infantile ascending hereditary spastic paraplegia, juvenile primary lateral sclerosis, and juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:25302125

  9. Complex Blunt Aortic Injury or Repair: Beneficial Effects of Cardiopulmonary Bypass Use

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Preston R.; Kortesis, Bill G.; McLaughlin, Charles A.; Chen, Michael Y. M.; Chang, Michael C.; Kon, Neal D.; Meredith, J. Wayne

    2003-01-01

    Objective To compare the outcomes and associated morbidity in patients with blunt aortic injury (BAI) repaired using cardiopulmonary bypass versus no bypass. Special consideration is given to the influence of bypass in the outcome of complex injuries or repair circumstances. Summary Background Data There are conflicting data concerning the utility of bypass techniques in the operative management of BAI, and controversy over the subject persists. During the last decade, surgeons at the authors’ institution have undergone a change in philosophy concerning management of these injuries and began almost exclusively using cardiopulmonary bypass for the repair in 1996. This project explores the effects of this change in the management of BAI. Methods The records of all patients with BAI admitted to a level 1 trauma center over a period of 12 years were reviewed for demographics, injury characteristics, operative technique, and outcome. The bypass group was compared to the no bypass group with respect to morbidity and mortality. Those with a complex injury or repair (CI/R) were examined as a subgroup. CI/R was defined as the presence of an injury with extension proximal to the subclavian artery, involvement of branch vessels, or requirement of maneuvers interfering with anastomosis construction, such as cardiac massage. Results From January 1, 1990, to December 31, 2001, 91 patients were admitted to Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center with BAI. Sixty-five of these underwent operative repair. Sixty (32 no bypass, 28 bypass) survived to the immediate postoperative period. Injury Severity Score was similar (33 no bypass, 31 bypass, P = .48), as was admission base deficit (−9.2 m Eq/L no bypass vs. −7.0 mEq/L B, P = .13). Paraplegia occurred in four (12%) of the no bypass group as opposed to 0 of the bypass group (P = .05). No patient in the bypass group experienced complications related to heparinization, and two (7%) experienced bypass-related complications

  10. Aculaser therapy: a comprehensive approach for the treatment of cerebral palsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik Muhammed; Nadeem Khan, Malik Mohammad; Munir Qazi, Faiza; Ahmed, Imtiaz; Awan, Abid Hareef

    2006-10-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah's First C.P. & Paralysis Clinic and Research Center in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (CP) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, quadriplegia, paraplegia, monoplegia, sensory-neural deafness and speech disorders. In all 100 childern were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 18 months from December 2003 till June 2005. This article shows results of the treatment with ACULASER THERAPY in CP childern who were treated for minimum 6 weeks and more or had minimum of 10 treatment sessions and more. This paper also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 4-12 weeks did not show any reversal of the symptoms. These children were classified according to the associated Neurological Disorders. Analysis of the data showed that out of 81 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 69 showed marked improvement showing 85% improvement rate, out of 54 children with Epileptic fits there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 34 children showing 63% success rate, out of 18 children with Cortical Blindness 13 children showed improvement accounting for 72% efficacy rate, out of 45 children with Hearing Difficulties, 31 showed marked improvement accounting for 69% improvement rate, out of 100 children with Speech Disorders 67 showed improvement reflecting 67 % improvement rate, out of 46 children with Hemiplegia 32 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 69% improvement rate, out of 36 children with Quadriplegia 25 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 18 children with Paraplegia of lower limbs 12 showed improvement in weight bearing

  11. Shoulder Muscular Demand During Lever-Activated Vs Pushrim Wheelchair Propulsion in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Requejo, Philip Santos; Lee, Sharon E; Mulroy, Sara J; Haubert, Lisa Lighthall; Bontrager, Ernest L; Gronley, JoAnne K; Perry, Jacquelin

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: The high demand on the upper limbs during manual wheelchair (WC) use contributes to a high prevalence of shoulder pathology in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Lever-activated (LEVER) WCs have been presented as a less demanding alternative mode of manual WC propulsion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the shoulder muscle electromyographic activity and propulsion characteristics in manual WC users with SCI propelling a standard pushrim (ST) and LEVER WC design. Methods: Twenty men with complete injuries (ASIA A or B) and tetraplegia (C6, n = 5; C7, n = 7) or paraplegia (n = 8) secondary to SCI propelled ST and LEVER WCs at 3 propulsion conditions on a stationary ergometer: self-selected free, self-selected fast, and simulated graded resistance. Average velocity, cycle distance, and cadence; median and peak electromyographic intensity; and duration of electromyography of anterior deltoid, pectoralis major, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus muscles were compared between LEVER and ST WC propulsion. Results: Significant decreases in pectoralis major and supraspinatus activity were recorded during LEVER compared with ST WC propulsion. However, anterior deltoid and infraspinatus intensities tended to increase during LEVER WC propulsion. Participants with tetraplegia had similar or greater anterior deltoid, pectoralis major, and infraspinatus activity for both ST and LEVER WC propulsion compared with the men with paraplegia. Conclusions: Use of the LEVER WC reduced and shifted the shoulder muscular demands in individuals with paraplegia and tetraplegia. Further studies are needed to determine the impact of LEVER WC propulsion on long-term shoulder function. PMID:19086715

  12. Correlation of diffusion tensor imaging parameters with neural status in Pott’s spine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nikhil; Saini, Namita Singh; Kumar, Sudhir; Rajagopalan, Mukunth; Chakraborti, Kanti Lal; Jain, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used in cervical trauma and spondylotic myelopathy, and it has been found to correlate with neural deficit and prognosticate neural recovery. Such a correlation has not been studied in Pott’s spine with paraplegia. Hence, this prospective study has been used to find correlation of DTI parameters with neural deficit in these patients. Methods: Thirty-four patients of spinal TB were enrolled and DTI was performed before the start of treatment and after six months. Fractional anisotropy (FA), Mean diffusivity (MD), and Tractography were studied. Neurological deficit was graded by the Jain and Sinha scoring. Changes in FA and MD at and below the site of lesion (SOL) were compared to above the SOL (control) using the unpaired t-test. Pre-treatment and post-treatment values were also compared using the paired t-test. Correlation of DTI parameters with neurological score was done by Pearson’s correlation. Subjective assessment of Tractography images was done. Results: Mean average FA was not significantly decreased at the SOL in patients with paraplegia as compared to control. After six months of treatment, a significant decrease (p = 0.02) in mean average FA at the SOL compared to pre-treatment was seen. Moderate positive correlation (r = 0.49) between mean average FA and neural score after six months of treatment was found. Tractography images were not consistent with severity of paraplegia. Conclusion: Unlike spondylotic myelopathy and trauma, epidural collection and its organized inflammatory tissue in Pott’s spine precludes accurate assessment of diffusion characteristics of the compressed cord. PMID:27163110

  13. Intradural Intramedullary Mixed Type Hemangioma: Optimizing the Surgical Management through Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rahyussalim, Ahmad Jabir; Situmeang, Adrian; Safri, Ahmad Yanuar; Fadhly, Zulfa Indah K.

    2015-01-01

    Intradural intramedullary mixed type hemangioma is a rare histotype of primary spinal cord tumors, though it can carry a severe clinical burden leading to limb dysfunction or motor and sensory disturbances. Timely intervention with radical resection is the hallmark of treatment but achieving it is not an easy task even for experienced neurosurgeons. We herein present an exemplificative case presenting with sudden paraplegia in which total resection was achieved under intraoperative neurophysiology monitoring. A thorough discussion on the operative technique and the role of neuromonitoring in allowing a safe surgical management of primary spinal cord tumors is presented. PMID:26839729

  14. Studies on Axonal Transport in an Animal Model for Gulf War Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    during development (Fink and Rainier , 2004). One possibility is that longer axons are more at risk than shorter axons, but this does not explain why...Suppl 1]:S106 –S110. Fink JK (2006) Hereditary spastic paraplegia. Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep 6:65–76. Fink JK, Rainier S (2004) Hereditary spastic...Biomed 1:1–7. Zhao X, Alvarado D, Rainier S, Lemons R, Hedera P, Weber CH, Tukel T, Apak M, Heiman-Patterson T, Ming L, Bui M, Fink JK (2001) Muta

  15. SLC33A1 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    From NCBI Gene: The protein encoded by this gene is required for the formation of O-acetylated (Ac) gangliosides. The encoded protein is predicted to contain 6 to 10 transmembrane domains, and a leucine zipper motif in transmembrane domain III. Defects in this gene have been reported to cause spastic paraplegia autosomal dominant type 42 (SPG42) in one Chinese family, but not in similar patients of European descent. Two transcript variants encoding the same protein have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2010

  16. Treatment of metastatic para-aortic paraganglioma by surgery, radiotherapy and I-131 mIBG.

    PubMed

    Ball, A B; Tait, D M; Fisher, C; Sinnett, H D; Harmer, C L

    1991-10-01

    A patient with a malignant, functioning, aortico-sympathetic paraganglioma and a solitary bone metastasis causing paraplegia was treated by spinal decompression, irradiation of the metastasis, surgical excision of the primary tumour and systemic I-131 meta-iodobenzyl-guanidine (mIBG). Sixteen months after treatment there was no clinical, radiological or biochemical evidence of residual disease and neurological function was restored. The case supports the use of combined treatment incorporating mIBG in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours which demonstrate mIBG uptake.

  17. Training strategies for a lower limb rehabilitation robot based on impedance control.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jin; Hou, Zengguang; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Yixiong; Li, Pengfeng

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes three training strategies based on impedance control, including passive training, damping-active training and spring-active training, for a 3-DOF lower limb rehabilitation robot designed for patients with paraplegia or hemiplegia. Controllers with similar structure are developed for these training strategies, consisting of dual closed loops, the outer impedance control loop and the inner position/velocity control loop, known as position-based impedance control method. Simulation results verify that position-based impedance control approach is feasible to accomplish the training strategies.

  18. Intradural Extramedullary Tuberculoma Mimicking En Plaque Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Dae Moo; Kim, Tae Kyun; Chae, Soo Uk

    2010-01-01

    A 24-year-old man with tuberculosis meningitis developed acute paraplegia and sensory disturbances 5 weeks after receiving conventional antituberculous therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural extramedullary long segmental mass mimicking en plaque meningioma at the T2-T6 vertebrae levels. Prompt surgical decompression was performed. A histology examination of the mass revealed a tuberculoma. After surgery, the patient showed improved motor power and a normal bladder function. Intradural extramedullary tuberculoma of the spinal cord is rare complication of tuberculosis meningitis, which can occur as a response to conventional antituberculous therapy. PMID:21119945

  19. Engineering evaluation of the energy-storing orthosis FES gait system.

    PubMed

    Kangude, Abhijit; Burgstahler, Brett; Durfee, William

    2010-01-01

    A system to restore walking in the vicinity of a wheelchair for people with paraplegia resulting from spinal cord injury is under development. The approach combines single channel surface electrical stimulation with an orthosis. The orthosis is spring loaded and contains a pneumatic system that stores energy during knee extension caused by quadriceps stimulation and transfers it to hip joint for hip extension. A laboratory version of the prototype of the gait system has been fabricated and engineering bench tests were performed. The paper presents the design of the wearable prototype and results of bench testing.

  20. [Transverse myelopathy in an adult with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: case report].

    PubMed

    Brito, J C; da Nóbrega, P V; Guedes Filho, G E; Santos, F J; Souto, M G

    2001-06-01

    We report a case of transverse myelopathy in a 31 year old white man with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, subtype L3 (ALL-L3). This is a severe form of leukemia that affects children more often than adults. Less than 1% of leukemic patients develop neurologic complication in the spinal cord. The symptomatology in the present case started with back pain, flaccid paraplegia, and loss of sensibility and vegetative functions below the lesion. The etiologic diagnostic was obtained through peripheral blood study, bone marrow cytology, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and magnetic resonance image of the dorsal cord. The antileukemic treatment with specific drugs had no influence on the fatal outcome of the disease.

  1. Spinal cord metastasis in small cell carcinoma of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Holoye, P.; Libnoch, J.; Cox, J.; Kun, L.; Byhardt, R.; Almagro, U.; McCelland, S.; Chintapali, K.

    1984-03-01

    Among 50 patients with small cell bronchogenic carcinoma who were placed on a protocol of combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy, seven patients developed recurrence in the spinal cord. Five cases terminated in paraplegia and death. One patient with pontine recurrence recovered with local radiation therapy. One patient, diagnosed early, responded to local radiation therapy and is ambulatory. Methods of diagnosis were myelogram, computerized axial tomography, cerebro spinal fluid, chemistry and cytologies. The poor prognosis and the difficulty of diagnosis suggest that prophylactic therapy of the entire cranio-spinal axis should be evaluated.

  2. Novalis radiosurgery for metastatic spine tumors.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jack P; Ryu, Samuel; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2004-10-01

    It is logical to anticipate that the field of spinal radiosurgery will evolve in a fashion similar to that seen for intracranial radiosurgery. Given the frequency of various pathologic entities that affect the spine, including those that have proven to be largely intractable to surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy (eg, sarcomas), and the serious clinical, economic and quality-of-life consequences of paraplegia, radiosurgery offers new hope as an adjuvant or primary therapy. The meticulous application of well-designed investigations of relevant clinical outcomes will be critical to the appropriate and effective use of this technology.

  3. From new genetics to everyday knowledge: Ideas about how genetic diseases are transmitted in two large Brazilian families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Silvana; Bizzo, Nelio

    2005-07-01

    This study focuses on everyday or lay understandings of inheritance. In the northeastern Brazil, 100 individuals were interviewed in order to describe how they explain the origin of genetic disorders affecting their relatives for several generations. There were involved 60 individuals from a large consanguineous family with many members affected with a neurodegenerative disorder, SPOAN syndrome (spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy and neuropathy), and 40 individuals of another family living with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The results indicate that families here studied have built narratives to explain the origin of genetic diseases, saying that an ancestor infected with syphilis gave rise to disorders and birthmarks transmitted to descendents.

  4. [Postoperative spinal cord ischemia in thoracoabdominal aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Latorre, J; Rosendo, A; Vidal, J; Sarrias, M

    1991-01-01

    At the present article, 12 cases of paraplegia secondary to the surgical treatment of thoracoabdominal aneurysms are presented. Study includes patients admitted between 1973-1987 for treatment and rehabilitation of its medular injury. Factors of risk, surgical technics practiced, peroperative complications and type of medular injury are analyzed. The most common medular injury was an anterior medular syndrome (rather than 60%). In the same way, preventive methods are analyzed and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP), both in developing phase at the present moment, are recommended as the most viable method for detecting changes during the surgical procedure.

  5. Detection and genetic characterization of a novel parvovirus distantly related to human bufavirus in domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Hargitai, Renáta; Pankovics, Péter; Kertész, Attila Mihály; Bíró, Hunor; Boros, Ákos; Phan, Tung Gia; Delwart, Eric; Reuter, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a novel parvovirus (strain swine/Zsana3/2013/HUN, KT965075) was detected in domestic pigs and genetically characterized by viral metagenomics and PCR methods. The novel parvovirus was distantly related to the human bufaviruses and was detected in 19 (90.5 %) of the 21 and five (33.3 %) of the 15 faecal samples collected from animals with and without cases of posterior paraplegia of unknown etiology from five affected farms and one control farm in Hungary, respectively. Swine/Zsana3/2013/HUN is highly prevalent in domestic pigs and potentially represents a novel parvovirus species in the subfamily Parvovirinae.

  6. Invasive histiocytic sarcoma of the lumbar spine in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Warschau, M; Hoffmann, M; Dziallas, P; Hansmann, F; Baumgärtner, W; Mischke, R; Cichowski, S; Fehr, M

    2017-02-01

    This report describes the history, clinical examination and histopathology of a histiocytic sarcoma in a domestic ferret. Clinical signs were acute paraplegia and dysuria. Physical examination revealed a firm, smooth, touch-sensitive mass in and around the lumbar vertebral column. Neurologic examination was consistent with a lesion between spinal cord segments T3 and L3. Magnetic resonance images revealed bone lesions of L2 and L3 combined with compression of the spinal cord due to a homogenous, isointense mass that was diagnosed as a malignant round cell tumour and the ferret was euthanased. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of an infiltrative histiocytic sarcoma.

  7. Aggressive hemangioma of the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Schrock, Wesley B; Wetzel, Raun J; Tanner, Stephanie C; Khan, Majid A

    2011-01-01

    Vertebral hemangiomas are common lesions and usually considered benign. A rare subset of them, however, are characterized by extra-osseous extension, bone expansion, disturbance of blood flow, and occasionally compression fractures and thereby referred to as aggressive hemangiomas. We present a case of a 67-year-old woman with progressive paraplegia and an infiltrative mass of T4 vertebra causing mass effect on the spinal cord. Multiple conventional imaging modalities were utilized to suggest the diagnosis of aggressive hemangioma. Final pathologic diagnosis after decompressive surgery confirmed the diagnosis of an osseous hemangioma.

  8. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Song, Geun Sung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS.

  9. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS. PMID:27800000

  10. The effect of magnesium oral therapy on spasticity in a patient with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rossier, P; van Erven, S; Wade, D T

    2000-11-01

    The effects of magnesium glycerophosphate oral therapy on spasticity was studied in a 35-year-old woman with severe spastic paraplegia resulting from multiple sclerosis (MS). We found a significant improvement in the spasticity after only 1 week from the onset of the treatment on the modified Ashworth scale, an improvement in the range of motion and in the measures of angles at resting position in lower limbs. No side-effects were reported and there was no weakness in the arms during the treatment.

  11. The changing pattern of spinal arachnoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, M D; Russell, J A; Grossart, K W

    1978-01-01

    Spinal arachnoiditis is a rare condition. Eighty cases, diagnosed during a period when 7600 spinal contrast investigations were undertaken, have been reviewed. The majority had suffered a previous spinal condition, the most common being lumbar disc disease. There has been a change in the distribution of arahnoiditis with the lumbar region now most frequently involved. This accounts for the persistence of radicular symptoms and the relatively low incidence of paraplegia when compared with earlier series. Surgery does not appear to have any role in the treatment. Images PMID:632824

  12. Occlusion of the artery of Adamkiewicz after hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mutch, Jennifer A J; Johansson, Joyce E

    2011-04-01

    The artery of Adamkiewicz is the most significant tributary of the anterior spinal artery in the midthoracic region; the occlusion of this artery results in a well-described phenomenon consisting of paraplegia with loss of the sensation of pain, temperature, and touch as well as loss of sphincter control. Proprioception and vibration sense are typically preserved. Although this phenomenon has been associated with several surgeries as well as preexisting aortic abnormalities, the literature thus far has not reported this as a complication of hip or knee arthroplasty. Two case histories are presented.

  13. A novel mutation in VCP causes Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 2 disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Michael A.; Feely, Shawna M.; Speziani, Fiorella; Strickland, Alleene V.; Danzi, Matt; Bacon, Chelsea; Lee, Youjin; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Blanton, Susan H.; Weihl, Conrad C.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in VCP have been reported to account for a spectrum of phenotypes that include inclusion body myopathy with Paget’s disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and 1–2% of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We identified a novel VCP mutation (p.Glu185Lys) segregating in an autosomal dominant Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 2 family. Functional studies showed that the Glu185Lys variant impaired autophagic function leading to the accumulation of immature autophagosomes. VCP mutations should thus be considered for genetically undefined Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 2. PMID:25125609

  14. Pyogenic spinal osteomyelitis: a review of 61 cases.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K G; Gillespie, W J

    1986-02-12

    The presentation and outcome of 61 cases of nontuberculous spinal osteomyelitis were reviewed. Although the commonest presentation was subacute, with back pain predominating, 10% had septicaemia and 7% paraperesis or paraplegia. Most infections were caudal to the fourth thoracic vertebra. One third were associated with preceding urinary, respiratory, dental or abdominal sepsis. Staphylococcus aureus was the infecting organism in 85% of isolates. Delay in diagnosis was frequent. There were four deaths, and seven individuals remained severely disabled: outcome was otherwise satisfactory. An algorithm for the investigation and management of this uncommon but serious condition is proposed.

  15. A new clinical variant of the post-malaria neurological syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pace, Adrian A; Edwards, Simon; Weatherby, Stuart

    2013-11-15

    Post-malaria neurological syndrome (PMNS) is an uncommon, monophasic illness that occurs within two months following recovery from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria. Clinical manifestations of PMNS are variable, but published cases uniformly feature neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms without long tract signs. We describe a case of severe brainstem and spinal cord inflammation with paraplegia and sphincter involvement in a 48 year old woman following recovery from a Pf malarial illness. We propose that this case represents a previously unreported form of PMNS, which has features that distinguish it from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and that the recognised clinical spectrum of PMNS should be extended to include brainstem and spinal cord inflammation.

  16. [Anatomical and clinical correlations in the cerebellar eredodegeneration].

    PubMed

    Pea, Umberto; de Luca, Francesco; Nicola, Massimiliano; Galli, Luigi

    2003-06-01

    Spinocerebellar hereditary degeneration makes up a heterogeneous group of diseases headed by Strumpell-Lorrain syndrome and Friedreich's disease. They are a heterogeneous group characterized by spasticity and paraplegia and related to demyelinization of the pyramidal tract and of the posterior cordons. During a 4-year period, we studied 14 patients (42-61 years old) suffering cerebellar eredodegeneration (hereditary ataxia). The aim of our work was to correlate anatomopathological findings with clinical signs. The important role played by the cerebellum in vesicosphincterial coordination was shown; in particular severe alteration of the ponto-cerebellar bundles could be cause of the abnormal behaviour of the detrusor.

  17. Body composition modifications in people with chronic spinal cord injury after supervised physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Frederico Ribeiro; Lopes, Guilherme Henrique

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantification of body composition variables is important for planning of better activities in relation to individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Objectives (1) To evaluate changes in body composition in patients with SCI after a supervised physical activity process; (2) To correlate total body fat with time since injury. Design Pre-post intervention. Setting Sarah Rehabilitation Hospital Network, Brazil. Participants Fifty-three men with SCI aged 18–52 years with duration of injury >3 years. Interventions The subjects were divided into three groups: tetraplegia (TT) (C5–C8), high paraplegia (HP) (T1–T6), and low paraplegia (LP) (T7–L2). Body composition was estimated in the first and last weeks of hospitalization. Outcome measures Body weight (kg), skinfolds sum (mm), absolute (kg), and relative (%) fat and lean body mass. Results Body weight increased in TT and decreased in HP (0.8 kg, 95%CI 0.1–1.5; and −1.0 kg, 95%CI −2.0 to 0.0, respectively; P < 0.05). Skinfolds sum decreased only in HP (−13.1 mm, 95%CI −20.7 to −5.5; P < 0.05). Absolute and relative body fat decreased significantly in the paraplegia groups. Lean body mass (LBM) percentage increased significantly in the paraplegia groups. Absolute LBM increased in TT and LP (0.8 kg, 95%CI 0.3–1.3; and 1.3 kg, 95%CI 0.8 to 1.8, respectively; P < 0.05). There was no correlation between time since injury and skinfolds sum for the three groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion TT, HP, and LP demonstrated favorable changes in body composition after 29 days of supervised physical activity. However, these changes were different in direction and magnitude. PMID:22330114

  18. The clinical spectrum of mutations in L1, a neuronal cell adhesion molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Fransen, E.; Vits, L.; Van Camp, G.; Willems, P.J.

    1996-07-12

    Mutations in the gene encoding the neuronal cell adhesion molecule L1 are responsible for several syndromes with clinical overlap, including X-linked hydrocephalus (XLH, HSAS), MASA (mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, adducted thumbs) syndrome, complicated X-linked spastic paraplegia (SP 1), X-linked mental retardation-clasped thumb (MR-CT) syndrome, and some forms of X-linked agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). We review 34 L1 mutations in patients with these phenotypes. 22 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Bilateral Upper Extremity Hyperesthesia and Absence of Neck Tenderness in Four Adolescent Athletes With Cervical Spine Injuries.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jay Douglas; Thorpe, Elizabeth Lewis

    2017-01-24

    Cervical spine injury in the pediatric athlete is an uncommon but potentially devastating condition that can require a heightened index of suspicion to correctly diagnose. Although some cervical spine injuries present overtly with paraplegia due to cord transection, others can present more subtly with symptoms suggestive of bilateral peripheral neuropathy. Patients with traumatic brachial neuropraxia or "stinger" physiology can present similarly, but symptoms are exclusively unilateral. We present 4 patients with bilateral upper extremity hyperesthesias and absence of tenderness over the cervical vertebral landmarks who were subsequently diagnosed with cervical spine injuries.

  20. Spartin regulates synaptic growth and neuronal survival by inhibiting BMP-mediated microtubule stabilization.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Minyeop; Lee, Min-Jung; Parkinson, William; Lee, Mihye; Kim, Haeran; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Kim, Sungdae; Cho, Yi Sul; Min, Byung-Moo; Bae, Yong Chul; Broadie, Kendal; Lee, Seungbok

    2013-02-20

    Troyer syndrome is a hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by human spartin (SPG20) gene mutations. We have generated a Drosophila disease model showing that Spartin functions presynaptically with endocytic adaptor Eps15 to regulate synaptic growth and function. Spartin inhibits bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling by promoting endocytic degradation of BMP receptor wishful thinking (Wit). Drosophila fragile X mental retardation protein (dFMRP) and Futsch/MAP1B are downstream effectors of Spartin and BMP signaling in regulating microtubule stability and synaptic growth. Loss of Spartin or elevation of BMP signaling induces age-dependent progressive defects resembling hereditary spastic paraplegias, including motor dysfunction and brain neurodegeneration. Null spartin phenotypes are prevented by administration of the microtubule-destabilizing drug vinblastine. Together, these results demonstrate that Spartin regulates both synaptic development and neuronal survival by controlling microtubule stability via the BMP-dFMRP-Futsch pathway, suggesting that impaired regulation of microtubule stability is a core pathogenic component in Troyer syndrome.

  1. A mutation of EPT1 (SELENOI) underlies a new disorder of Kennedy pathway phospholipid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mustafa Y.; Al-Khayat, Aisha; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Al-Futaisi, Amna; Chioza, Barry A.; Pedro Fernandez-Murray, J.; Self, Jay E.; Salter, Claire G.; Harlalka, Gaurav V.; Rawlins, Lettie E.; Al-Zuhaibi, Sana; Al-Azri, Faisal; Al-Rashdi, Fatma; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Wenk, Markus R.; Al-Salmi, Fatema; Patton, Michael A.; Silver, David L.; McMaster, Christopher R.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in genes involved in lipid metabolism have increasingly been associated with various subtypes of hereditary spastic paraplegia, a highly heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative motor neuron disorders characterized by spastic paraparesis. Here, we report an unusual autosomal recessive neurodegenerative condition, best classified as a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia, associated with mutation in the ethanolaminephosphotransferase 1 (EPT1) gene (now known as SELENOI), responsible for the final step in Kennedy pathway forming phosphatidylethanolamine from CDP-ethanolamine. Phosphatidylethanolamine is a glycerophospholipid that, together with phosphatidylcholine, constitutes more than half of the total phospholipids in eukaryotic cell membranes. We determined that the mutation defined dramatically reduces the enzymatic activity of EPT1, thereby hindering the final step in phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis. Additionally, due to central nervous system inaccessibility we undertook quantification of phosphatidylethanolamine levels and species in patient and control blood samples as an indication of liver phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis. Although this revealed alteration to levels of specific phosphatidylethanolamine fatty acyl species in patients, overall phosphatidylethanolamine levels were broadly unaffected indicating that in blood EPT1 inactivity may be compensated for, in part, via alternate biochemical pathways. These studies define the first human disorder arising due to defective CDP-ethanolamine biosynthesis and provide new insight into the role of Kennedy pathway components in human neurological function. PMID:28052917

  2. An AP4B1 frameshift mutation in siblings with intellectual disability and spastic tetraplegia further delineates the AP-4 deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdollahpour, Hengameh; Alawi, Malik; Kortüm, Fanny; Beckstette, Michael; Seemanova, Eva; Komárek, Vladimír; Rosenberger, Georg; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-02-01

    The recently proposed adaptor protein 4 (AP-4) deficiency syndrome comprises a group of congenital neurological disorders characterized by severe intellectual disability (ID), delayed or absent speech, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and growth retardation. AP-4 is a heterotetrameric protein complex with important functions in vesicle trafficking. Mutations in genes affecting different subunits of AP-4, including AP4B1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4M1, have been reported in patients with the AP-4 deficiency phenotype. We describe two siblings from a non-consanguineous couple who presented with severe ID, absent speech, microcephaly, growth retardation, and progressive spastic tetraplegia. Whole-exome sequencing in the two patients identified the novel homozygous 2-bp deletion c.1160_1161delCA (p.(Thr387Argfs*30)) in AP4B1. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the siblings and revealed it in the heterozygous state in both parents. The AP4B1-associated phenotype has previously been assigned to spastic paraplegia-47. Identification of a novel AP4B1 alteration in two patients with clinical manifestations highly similar to other individuals with mutations affecting one of the four AP-4 subunits further supports the observation that loss of AP-4 assembly or functionality underlies the common clinical features in these patients and underscores the existence of the clinically recognizable AP-4 deficiency syndrome.

  3. Tropical myelopathies.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    A large number of causal agents produce spinal cord lesions in the tropics. Most etiologies found in temperate regions also occur in the tropics including trauma, herniated discs, tumors, epidural abscess, and congenital malformations. However, infectious and nutritional disorders occur with higher prevalence in tropical regions. Among the most common infectious etiologies are tuberculous Pott's disease, brucellosis, and neuroborreliosis. Parasitic diseases such as schistosomiasis, neurocysticercosis, and eosinophilic meningitis are frequent causes of nontraumatic paraplegia. The retrovirus HTLV-1 is a cause of tropical spastic paraparesis. Nutritional causes of paraparesis include deficiencies of vitamin B12 and folate; endemic clusters of konzo and tropical ataxic myeloneuropathy are associated in Africa with malnutrition and excessive consumption of cyanide-containing bitter cassava. Other toxic etiologies of tropical paraplegia include lathyrism and fluorosis. Nutritional forms of myelopathy are associated often with optic and sensory neuropathy, hence the name tropical myeloneuropathies. Acute transverse myelopathy is seen in association with vaccination, infections, and fibrocartilaginous embolism of the nucleus pulposus. Multiple sclerosis and optic myelopathy occur in the tropics but with lesser prevalence than in temperate regions. The advent of modern imaging in the tropics, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, has allowed better diagnosis and treatment of these conditions that are a frequent cause of death and disability.

  4. Spastin subcellular localization is regulated through usage of different translation start sites and active export from the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Claudiani, Pamela; Riano, Elena; Errico, Alessia; Andolfi, Gennaro; Rugarli, Elena I. . E-mail: rugarli@tigem.it

    2005-10-01

    Most cases of autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia are linked to mutations in SPG4 encoding spastin, a protein involved in microtubule dynamics and membrane trafficking. In pyramidal neurons of the motor cortex and in immortalized motor neurons, spastin is localized to the synaptic terminals and growth cones. However, in other neurons and in proliferating cells spastin is prevalently nuclear. The mechanisms that determine targeting of spastin to the nucleus or the cytoplasm are unknown. We show here that the SPG4 mRNA is able to direct synthesis of two spastin isoforms, 68 and 60 kDa, respectively, through usage of two different translational start sites. Both isoforms are imported into the nucleus, but the 68-kDa isoform contains two nuclear export signals that efficiently drive export to the cytoplasm. Nuclear export is leptomycin-B sensitive. The cytoplasmic 68-kDa spastin isoform is more abundant in the brain and the spinal cord than in other tissues. Our data indicate that spastin function is modulated through usage of alternative translational start sites and active nuclear import and export, and open new perspectives for the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

  5. Oxygen costs using a reciprocating gait orthosis in a paraplegic (T9) patient with a bilateral below-knee amputation: case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, W E; Clark, P F; MacArthur, D; Allatt, R D; Hayes, K C; Cunningham, D A

    1997-02-01

    The Reciprocating Gait Orthosis (RGO) is a useful aid to ambulation for patients with paraplegia. Its use has been described previously though not in conjunction with limb prostheses. We report here the energy costs of ambulation of a patient, disabled by paraplegia at T9 and bilateral below-knee amputations, walking at her preferred rate using an RGO while gas exchange was measured by the Douglas bag method. Oxygen uptake (VO2) rose from 0.198 1 min-1 at rest to 0.582 1 min-1 in the last minute of exercise, representing a VO2 of 14.3 ml kg-1 min-1. During the fourth minute of ambulation, energy consumption was 30.44 J kg-1 s-1 with an energy cost of 4.17 J kg-1 m-1 at a velocity of 0.13 m s-1, Ambulation with this combination of disability is possible with the aid of limb prostheses and an RGO though it is slow and the energy expenditure as consumption per second and cost per metre are high.

  6. Spartin Regulates Synaptic Growth and Neuronal Survival by Inhibiting BMP-Mediated Microtubule Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Minyeop; Lee, Min-Jung; Parkinson, William; Lee, Mihye; Kim, Haeran; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Kim, Sungdae; Cho, Yi Sul; Min, Byung-Moo; Bae, Yong Chul; Broadie, Kendal; Lee, Seungbok

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Troyer syndrome is a hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by human spartin (SPG20) gene mutations. We have generated a Drosophila disease model showing that Spartin functions presynaptically with endocytic adaptor Eps15 to regulate synaptic growth and function. Spartin inhibits bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling by promoting endocytic degradation of BMP receptor wishful thinking (Wit). Drosophila fragile X mental retardation protein (dFMRP) and Futsch/MAP1B are downstream effectors of Spartin and BMP signaling in regulating microtubule stability and synaptic growth. Loss of Spartin or elevation of BMP signaling induces age-dependent progressive defects resembling hereditary spastic paraplegias, including motor dysfunction and brain neurodegeneration. Null spartin phenotypes are prevented by administration of the microtubule-destabilizing drug vinblastine. Together, these results demonstrate that Spartin regulates both synaptic development and neuronal survival by controlling microtubule stability via the BMP-dFMRP-Futsch pathway, suggesting that impaired regulation of microtubule stability is a core pathogenic component in Troyer syndrome. PMID:23439121

  7. Subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy after T12 burst fracture in a 32-year-old male: case report and surgical result of cervical durotomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Huili; Liu, Haiying; Wang, Guangshun

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to a rare neurological deterioration after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to discuss evidence supporting an increase in cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), we present an extremely rare case of subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM) in which the patient sustained a T12 fracture initially resulting in paraplegia and after undergoing posterior fixation and anterior decompression. The patient was a 32-year-old healthy man who sustained a T12 burst fracture with complete paraplegia after a fall injury. The patient underwent a posterior reduction and short-segment fixation 8 h after the injury and an anterior thoracoscopic-assisted decompression on post-traumatic day 8. On post-traumatic day 21, he had a progressive neurological deterioration with dyspnoea and decreased muscle strength of both upper extremities that could not be relieved by conservative intervention. After undergoing a cervical posterior laminectomy and durotomy, the patient exhibited the clinical manifestation of brain herniation. There was no recovery of autonomous respiration, and the patient entered a coma. The patient died on post-traumatic day 25 because of cardiac and respiratory arrest. SPAM is a rare, potentially fatal neurological deterioration after SCI; however, a prompt diagnosis can be made by magnetic resonance imaging. Our observations suggest that an increase in CSFP may be the main cause of SPAM. The paraplegic level should be recorded daily so that neurological deterioration can be recognised as soon as possible.

  8. [Central nervous system leukemia mimicking rapidly progressive HTLV-1 associated myelopathy].

    PubMed

    Haruki, Hiroyo; Tanaka, Shinichiro; Koga, Michiaki; Kawai, Motoharu; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2009-03-01

    A 79-year-old woman was suffered from rapidly progressive paresthesia of lower limbs and gait disturbance. After one month, she showed flaccid paraplegia and hyperreflexia in the lower limbs with positive Babinski signs. Anti-HTLV-1 antibody titer was elevated in the serum, but negative in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF examination showed mild pleocytosis, elevated protein, and normal glucose content. Adult T cell lymphoma (ATL)-like cells were seen in the CSF. MRI showed no abnormal intensity in the spinal cord and brain. Two months later, she showed rapid worsening of the paraplegia and she became unable to stand. A tentative diagnosis of rapidly progressive HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (HAM) was given, but intravenous methylprednisolone was ineffective. Six months later, she developed pneumonia, and abundant ATL cells were seen in the peripheral blood, suggesting a diagnosis of ATL. Direct infiltration of ATL cells to central nervous system was therefore suggested to have caused neurological abnormalities in this case. One may consider central nervous system leukemia when rapidly progressive HAM-like symptoms and signs are recognized, especially without positive anti-HTLV-1 antibody in the CSF.

  9. The Troyer syndrome (SPG20) protein spartin interacts with Eps15

    SciTech Connect

    Bakowska, Joanna C.; Jenkins, Russell; Pendleton, James; Blackstone, Craig . E-mail: blackstc@ninds.nih.gov

    2005-09-09

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias comprise a group of inherited neurological disorders in which the primary manifestation is spastic weakness of the lower extremities. Troyer syndrome is an autosomal recessive form of spastic paraplegia caused by a frameshift mutation in the spartin (SPG20) gene. Currently, neither the localization nor the functions of the spartin protein are known. In this study, we generated anti-spartin antibodies and found that spartin is both cytosolic and membrane-associated. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach, we screened an adult human brain library for binding partners of spartin. We identified Eps15, a protein known to be involved in endocytosis and the control of cell proliferation. This interaction was confirmed by fusion protein 'pull-down' experiments as well as a cellular redistribution assay. Our results suggest that spartin might be involved in endocytosis, vesicle trafficking, or mitogenic activity, and that impairment in one of these processes may underlie the long axonopathy in patients with Troyer syndrome.

  10. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot-based analysis of the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat in different motor neuron diseases.

    PubMed

    Hübers, Annemarie; Marroquin, Nicolai; Schmoll, Birgit; Vielhaber, Stefan; Just, Marlies; Mayer, Benjamin; Högel, Josef; Dorst, Johannes; Mertens, Thomas; Just, Walter; Aulitzky, Anna; Wais, Verena; Ludolph, Albert C; Kubisch, Christian; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Volk, Alexander E

    2014-05-01

    The GGGGCC-hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72 is the most common genetic cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This study determined the frequency of C9orf72 repeat expansions in different motor neuron diseases (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), motor neuron diseases affecting primarily the first or the second motor neuron and hereditary spastic paraplegia). Whereas most studies on C9orf72 repeat expansions published so far rely on a polymerase chain reaction-based screening, we applied both polymerase chain reaction-based techniques and Southern blotting. Furthermore, we determined the sensitivity and specificity of Southern blotting of the C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat in DNA derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines. C9orf72 repeat expansions were found in 27.1% out of 166 familial ALS patients, only once in 68 sporadic ALS patients, and not in 61 hereditary spastic paraplegia patients or 52 patients with motor neuron diseases affecting clinically primarily either the first or the second motor neuron. We found hints for a correlation between C9orf72 repeat length and the age of onset. Somatic instability of the C9orf72 repeat was observed in lymphoblastoid cell lines compared with DNA derived from whole blood from the same patient and therefore caution is warranted for repeat length determination in immortalized cell lines.

  11. Selective occlusion of lumbar arteries as a spinal cord ischemia model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tomoyuki; Mori, Koichi; Shiraishi, Yoshimitsu; Tatebayashi, Kyoko; Kawai, Yasuaki

    2003-02-01

    Paraplegia is a devastating complication of operations requiring transient occlusion of the descending thoracic aorta. Many animal models of spinal cord ischemia have been utilized to examine the efficacy of various neuroprotective methods. In this study, we establish a rabbit model of spinal cord ischemia by selective temporary occlusion of lumbar arteries and examine the protective effects of systemic mild hypothermia in this model. Animals were divided into the following four groups: sham group (group A, n = 6); 10 min ischemia, normothermia (39 degrees C) (group B, n = 6); 20 min ischemia, normothermia (group C, n = 6); and 30 min ischemia, mild hypothermia (35 degrees C) (group D, n = 6). After 7 d of reperfusion, three rabbits in group B and five rabbits in group C developed paraplegia (Tarlov's score = 0). In contrast, all rabbits preserved hindlimb motor function (Tarlov's score = 4) in groups A and D. Histological findings indicated that the number of motor neurons in the anterior horns in group C were significantly fewer than in group A. A large number of motor neurons were preserved in group D. Hypothermia is known to be an effective and reliable method of neuroprotection, but the risk of complications rises at deep hypothermia. Our current results confirm that systemic, mild hypothermia is a safe and effective neuroprotective method during ischemia-reperfusion injury of the spinal cord.

  12. Late-onset spastic ataxia phenotype in a patient with a homozygous DDHD2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hiroshi; Ushiyama, Masao; Baba, Takashi; Tani, Katsuko; Shiina, Masaaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Miyatake, Satoko; Fukuda-Yuzawa, Yoko; Tsuji, Shoji; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Yoshida, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias and autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegias (ARHSPs) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurological disorders. Herein we describe Japanese siblings with a midlife-onset, slowly progressive type of cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, without intellectual disability. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense mutation in DDHD2, whose mutations were recently identified as the cause of early-onset ARHSP with intellectual disability. Brain MRI of the patient showed a thin corpus callosum. Cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed an abnormal lipid peak in the basal ganglia, which has been reported as the hallmark of DDHD2-related ARHSP (SPG 54). The mutation caused a marked reduction of phospholipase A1 activity, supporting that this mutation is the cause of SPG54. Our cases indicate that the possibility of SPG54 should also be considered when patients show a combination of adult-onset spastic ataxia and a thin corpus callosum. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be helpful in the differential diagnosis of patients with spastic ataxia phenotype. PMID:25417924

  13. Thoracic Infectious Spondylitis After Surgical Treatments of Herniated Lumbar Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Hyun; Kang, Jung-Il; Kim, Min Jeong; Lee, Jongmin; Lee, In-Sik; Jung, Heeyoune

    2013-01-01

    The postoperative infectious spondylitis has been reported to occur among every 1% to 12%. It is difficult to early diagnose in some cases. If the diagnosis is delayed, it can be a life-threatening condition. We report a 32-year-old male patient with postoperative infectious spondylitis. He had surgical treatments for traumatic intervertebral disc herniations in L3-4 and L4-5. Three weeks after surgery, he complained for fever and paraplegia. Cervicothoracic magnetic resonance imaging showed the collapsed T2 and T3 vertebral body with changes of bone marrow signal intensity. Moreover, it showed anterior and posterior epidural masses causing spinal cord compressions which suggested infectious spondylitis. After the use of antibiotics and surgical decompressions T2-T3, his general conditions were improved and muscle power of lower extremities began to be gradually restored. However, we could not identify the exact organisms that may be the cause of infectious spondylitis. It could be important that the infectious spondylitis, which is presented away from the primary operative level, should be observed in patients with fevers of unknown origin and paraplegia. PMID:24236263

  14. Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS) in two consecutive generations caused by a missense MCT8 gene mutation. Phenotypic variability with the presence of normal serum T3 levels.

    PubMed

    Boccone, Loredana; Dessì, Valentina; Meloni, Antonella; Loudianos, Georgios

    2013-04-01

    Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS), an X linked condition, is characterized by severe intellectual disability, dysarthria, athetoid movements, muscle hypoplasia and spastic paraplegia in combination with altered TH levels, in particular, high serum T3 levels. Mutations in the MCT8 gene coding for the monocarboxylate thyroid hormone transporter 8 have been associated with AHDS. Here we describe a family with the presence of a MCT8 gene mutation, p.A224T, in three consecutive generations. In two generations its presence was detected in the hemizygous state in two males with neurological abnormalities including mental retardation, axial hypotonia, hypertonia of arms and legs and athetoid movements. One of them presented normal thyroid hormone levels. Mutation was also detected, although in the heterozygous state, in three females showing thyroid hormone levels in the normal range. Our results show the difficulty of distinguishing AHDS from patients with X-linked intellectual disability solely on the basis of clinical features and biochemical tests, and we advise screening for MCT8 mutations in either young or older patients with severe intellectual disability, axial hypotonia/dystonia, poor head control, spastic paraplegia, and athetoid movements even when they have normal thyroid hormone profiles.

  15. [Surgery of the descending thoracic and thoraco-abdominal arteries. Report of 105 cases].

    PubMed

    Zanetti, P P; Rosa, G; Sorisio, V; Cavanenghi, D; Amerio, G M; Stillo, R; Zappa, A; Cardellino, S; Franco, M; Muncinelli, M

    1997-07-01

    The Authors show their casistic of about 105 cases of thoracic descending and thoraco-abdominal aorta pathologies between 1.1.1993 and 30.12.1995. After a short introduction about the improvements in anesthesia and reanimation of these pathologies as well as the good reliability of diagnostic and currently available instruments, mortality and mobility parameters are taken into account, the last one referring to paraplegia and ARF. The casistic is evaluated splitting the cases into 2 groups, urgent surgery and election surgery, and differentiating the aneurysm type from the dissection type. Besides, the mortality and mobility are reported for any pathology, with a discussion of the parameters which drove the choice of the most suitable methodology to be adopted (ECC femoro-subclavian shunt, simple clamping). The results achieved show a mortality of 40% in urgency, between 5 and 15% in election, with a rate of paraplegia around 8-10% and a ARF between 5 and 15%. These data match the literature statistics and support the quality of the adopted methodologies.

  16. The use of long leg calipers for paraplegic patients: a follow-up study of patients discharged 1973-82.

    PubMed

    Hawran, S; Biering-Sørensen, F

    1996-11-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 45 paraplegic patients discharged with long leg calipers, during the 10 year period 1973-82, from the Rehabilitation Hospital in Hornbaek, Denmark. A follow-up interview was carried out during 1993-94 for all 40 patients who were still alive. Thirty had complete paraplegia (seven women) and 10 had incomplete paraplegia (two women). At the follow-up interview only three were still using their calipers. The main reasons for giving up the use of calipers was, in 38%, that it was too time consuming to put them on and take them off. For 22% the main reason was a fear of falling, while 19% reported that the calipers were impractical, as their hands had to be occupied in keeping balance and therefore could not be used for other purposes, including carrying items. The three paraplegic patients who did not totally give up the use of long leg calipers used them very little, at a maximum once a week. In contrast all 10 paraplegic patients who had been provided with a standing frame made use of this at least once a month. The majority of the remaining subjects were interested in having a standing frame. We therefore believe that a standing frame could be a good alternative to long leg calipers to facilitate standing for spinal cord injured patients.

  17. Thoracoabdominal aortic replacement for Crawford extent II aneurysm after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haiou; Zheng, Tie; Zhu, Junming; Liu, Yongmin; Qi, Ruidong

    2017-01-01

    Background The surgical treatment of Crawford extent II aneurysms after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) remains challenging, because of the need to remove the failed endograft and the complexity of the aortic reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with surgical management of Crawford extent II aneurysms after TEVAR using thoracoabdominal aortic replacement (TAAR). Methods Eleven patients (10 males, 1 female) with Crawford extent II aneurysm after TEVAR were treated with TAAR between August 2012 and May 2015. The indications included: diameter >5.0 cm; persistent pain; size increase >0.5 cm/year; and no suitable landing zone for re-TEVAR. Five patients underwent surgery under deep hypothermic cardiac arrest, two under mild hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and four under direct aortic cross-clamping under normothermia. Two patients had Marfan syndrome. Results There were no in-hospital deaths. Continuous renal replacement therapy was required in three patients. One patient needed re-intubation, and two patients had prolonged intubation (>72 h). One patient sustained paraplegia after surgery but recovered during follow-up. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage were used in four patients (3 immediately in the operation room, and 1 in the intensive care unit when the patient suffered paraplegia). One patient died during follow-up. Conclusions TAAR represents a feasible option for the treatment of Crawford extent II aneurysms after TEVAR, with acceptable surgical risks and favorable results. PMID:28203407

  18. Motor Evoked Potentials in 43 High Risk Spine Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Biscevic, Mirza; Biscevic, Sejla; Ljuca, Farid; Smrke, Barbara UR; Ozturk, Cagatay; Tiric-Campara, Merita

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Correction of pediatric spine deformities is challenging surgical procedures. This fragile group of patients has many risk factors, therefore prevention of most fearing complication-paraplegia is extremely important. Monitoring of transmission of neurophysiological impulses through motor and sensor pathways of spinal cord gives us an insight into cord's function, and predicts postoperative neurological status. Goal: Aim of this work is to present our experiences in monitoring of spinal cord motor function - MEP during surgical corrections of the hardest pediatric spine deformities, pointing on the most dangerous aspects. Material and methods: We analyzed incidence of MEP changes and postoperative neurological status in patients who had major spine correcting surgery in period April ‘11- April ‘14 on our Spine department. Results: Two of 43 patients or 4.6% in our group experienced significant MEP changes during their major spine reconstructive surgeries. We promptly reduced distractive forces, and MEP normalized, and there were no neurological deficit. Neuromonitoring is reliable method which allows us to “catch” early signs of neurological deficits, when they are still in reversible phase. Although IONM cannot provide complete protection of neurological deficit (it reduces risk of paraplegia about 75%), it at least afford a comfort to the surgeon being fear free that his patient is neurologically intact during long lasting procedures. PMID:25568569

  19. Centrifugal pump support for distal aortic perfusion during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Walls, Joseph T; Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Schmaltz, Richard A

    2002-11-01

    Paraplegia from ischemic injury of the spinal cord and renal failure from inadequate perfusion of the kidneys may occur from aortic cross-clamping during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries. After Institutional Review Board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 26 patients surgically treated for traumatic transection of the descending thoracic aorta during a 14 year period (1987-2001), using centrifugal pump (Sarns) support for distal aortic perfusion. The study group comprised 19 males and 7 females, whose ages ranged from 15 to 69 years. For all but 1 patient, who fell from a flagpole, the injuries were incurred in motor vehicle accidents. Aortic cross-clamp time lasted between 5 to 78 min (median = 40 min). Mean arterial pressure ranged from 50 to 80 mm Hg (median = 70 mm Hg). All patients survived operation without developing paraplegia or renal failure. Distal centrifugal pump perfusion during repair of traumatic injury of the descending thoracic aorta is a valuable adjunct during surgical treatment and aids in preservation of spinal cord and renal function.

  20. Myelopathy in adult aortic coarctation: Causes and caveats of an atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mourya, Chandan; Verma, Ashish; Bansal, Anand; Shukla, Ram C; Srivastava, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old female presenting with acute-onset paraplegia was referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cervico-dorsal spine. On MRI, multiple tortuous dilated vessels were noted in the epidural space with long segment cord compression and imaging features of compressive myelopathy. Associated small acute cervico-dorsal epidural hematoma was also noted in the same region. Computed tomography (CT) angiography was performed subsequently which revealed post-ductal coarctation of aorta with multiple arterial collaterals in the chest wall and spinal canal. An extensive review of English language literature pertaining to the clinical presentations of adult aortic coarctation revealed only few reports of acute compressive myelopathy due to spinal epidural collateral vessels. Further, presentation at such a late age has not been reported before. In the present case, apart from a hypertrophied anterior spinal artery and perispinal collaterals, an anterior epidural hematoma was an additional important factor in the causation of myelopathy. PMID:28104936

  1. [A case of sporadic and transient bradyarrhythmias in a patient with a glioma in the medulla oblongata].

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, S; Ishii, M; Kon, S; Yoshida, Y

    1993-08-01

    In a 20-year-old female patient with a brain stem glioma in the medulla oblongata in association with paraplegia and respiratory paralysis, bradyarrhythmias such as sinus bradycardia and sinus arrest repeated sporadically and transiently, but soon subsided as radiotherapy was being delivered to the glioma in the medulla oblongata. The bradyarrhythmias were differentiated from sick sinus syndrome in their sporadic and transient character. The patient responded normally to atropine, isoproterenol, and phenylephrine. Parasympathetic nerve reflexes induced by Aschner's, Czermak's, and Valsalva's maneuvers and sympathetic nerve reflex induced by change of body position were within normal limits. Although EKG abnormalities associated with diseases of the central nervous system are frequently due to intracranial hypertension and/or irritation of the hypothalamus, the bradyarrhythmias in this patient were possibly due to vagus stimulation caused by the glioma in the medulla.

  2. Nontraumatic Myelopathy Associated With Surfing

    PubMed Central

    Avilés-Hernández, Israel; García-Zozaya, Inigo; DeVillasante, Jorge M

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Ischemic nontraumatic spinal cord injury associated with surfing is a novel diagnosis believed to be related to prolonged spine hyperextension while lying prone on the surfboard. Only 9 cases have been documented. This report features possible risk factors, etiology, diagnostic imaging, and outcomes of surfer's myelopathy. Design: Case report. Results: A 37-year-old man developed T11 American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) A paraplegia shortly after surfing. The clinical history and magnetic resonance imaging findings were compatible with an ischemic insult to the distal thoracic spinal cord. Our patient did not have any of the proposed risk factors associated with this condition, and, contrary to most reports, he sustained a complete spinal cord lesion without neurological recovery by 8 weeks post injury. Conclusions: Surfer's myelopathy, because of its proposed mechanism of injury, is amenable to medical intervention. Increased awareness of this condition may lead to early recognition and treatment, which should contribute to improved neurological outcomes. PMID:17684897

  3. Spinal Tuberculosis and Cold Abscess without Known Primary Disease: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gannamani, Vedavyas; Shay, Emily; Alcid, David

    2016-01-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is uncommon but not rare. Bone and joint involvement constitute about 10% of extrapulmonary TB cases, with the spine being the most frequently affected site. Spinal TB patients typically present with back pain but other constitutional or pulmonary symptoms may be absent, rendering the diagnosis difficult. This case explores challenges in the diagnosis of spinal TB. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman presenting with vague back swelling for many years. Imaging revealed osteomyelitis of the spine but initial studies and cultures were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The diagnosis was confirmed weeks later when cultures demonstrated Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Considering the severe complications of untreated spinal TB including paraplegia and need for surgical intervention, high suspicion is critical in early diagnosis. PMID:28070429

  4. Bacterial β-Glucosidase Reveals the Structural and Functional Basis of Genetic Defects in Human Glucocerebrosidase 2 (GBA2)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Human glucosylcerebrosidase 2 (GBA2) of the CAZy family GH116 is responsible for the breakdown of glycosphingolipids on the cytoplasmic face of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Genetic defects in GBA2 result in spastic paraplegia and cerebellar ataxia, while cross-talk between GBA2 and GBA1 glucosylceramidases may affect Gaucher disease. Here, we report the first three-dimensional structure for any GH116 enzyme, Thermoanaerobacterium xylanolyticum TxGH116 β-glucosidase, alone and in complex with diverse ligands. These structures allow identification of the glucoside binding and active site residues, which are shown to be conserved with GBA2. Mutagenic analysis of TxGH116 and structural modeling of GBA2 provide a detailed structural and functional rationale for pathogenic missense mutations of GBA2. PMID:27115290

  5. A novel R275X mutation of the SLC25A15 gene in a Japanese patient with the HHH syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Kira, Ryutaro; Kanazawa, Naomi; Takemoto, Megumi; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Sakai, Yasunari; Tsujino, Seiichi; Hara, Toshiro

    2006-06-01

    The hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome (MIM 238970) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by a deficiency of the mitochondrial ornithine transporter, one of the urea cycle components. Mutations in the SLC25A15 gene have been coupled to the HHH syndrome. We describe a Japanese female patient with the HHH syndrome due to a novel homozygous R275X SLC25A15 mutation and male sibling who presumably carried the same mutation. He exhibited slowly progressive deterioration with seizures, a gait disturbance due to polyneuropathy, episodic confusion, and died of acute encephalopathy at 34 years of age while the proband exhibited moderate mental retardation, seizures, mild spastic paraplegia, and deafness without neurological deterioration for more than 20 years. The clinical features of previously documented patients with the homozygous SLC25A15 mutation demonstrated that genotype did not simply correlate with clinical severity. The phenotypic variability might depend on other factors, such as dietary and other genetic ones.

  6. The First Report of Fetal Alcohol Effect in a 12 Year-Old Child in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dong Hyun; Lee, Young Jin; An, Ho Young; Ahn, Joon Ho

    2009-01-01

    We present the first report of fetal alcohol effect in a 12 year-old child in Korea. The mother had consumed 162 g of alcohol per week continuously during pregnancy. His first febrile seizure occurred before he was 1 year old, and became more frequent 2 years later. He started showing signs of right paraplegia when he was 3.5 years old and brain MRI revealed periventricular leucomalacia near the left ventricle. He was microcephalic and his growth was retarded. He was irritable, impatient, impulsive, and inattentive, and showed disinterest in school activities and aggressive and dangerous behavior. After the diagnosis of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder was made, psychopharmacological treatment and family support was initiated. After 10 months, he still had intermittent ideas of reference, although the aggressive behavior, inattentiveness, and impulsivity had improved. Using this case study, we stress the importance of maternal alcohol history in patients with these characteristics. PMID:20046374

  7. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Stephen J.; Kissel, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Incidence The incidence of SMA is 1:11,000 live births [1]. Prevalence The prevalence of the carrier state is approximately 1 in 54 [1]. Severity The clinical severity of SMA correlates inversely with SMN2 gene copy number and varies from an extreme weakness and paraplegia of infancy to a mild proximal weakness of adulthood. Natural History The natural history of SMA is complex and variable. For this reason, clinical subgroups have been defined based upon best motor function attainment during development. Type 1 SMA infants never sit independently. Type 2 SMA children sit at some point during their childhood, but never walk independently. And Type 3 SMA children and adults are able to walk independently at some point in their childhood. PMID:26515624

  8. Intradural Extramedullary Tuberculoma of the Spinal Cord Following Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Deok-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Intradural extramedullary tuberculoma of the spinal cord (IETSC) is an uncommon disease which can occurs secondary to tuberculous meningitis. A 31-year-old woman was diagnosed as tuberculous meningitis after mental disorientation. Her mentality was recovered after antituberculous therapy. After 7 months of antituberculous therapy, paraplegia has developed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass lesion between the T1 and T12 spinal levels with arachnoid thickening which results in the development of tuberculoma. She received surgical resection of IETSC followed by antituberculous therapy and neurological function has been improved. The two years after surgical treatment, spinal MRI showed syringomyelia between T1 to L1. But, her neurological outcome was not aggravated. PMID:26217394

  9. [Central nervous pain in patients with spinal cord injury. Medical and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Grønning, M; Ertzgaard, P; Myrseth, E

    1997-05-20

    About 50% of patients with spinal cord injury suffer from persistent central neurogenic pain. The authors review the case of a patient with traumatic paraplegia who developed persistent central neurogenic pain. The pain was described as burning in the buttock area, icing in the rectum area and as lancinating pain to the lower extremities. The combination of amitryptilin and morphine had a slight, short-term effect, but the pain did not respond to treatment with simple analgetica, dextropropoxyphen or ketobemidone, neither administered alone nor in combination with tricyclic antidepressants, carbamazepine or baclophen. Transcutanous nerve stimulation and acupuncture had no effect. The patient was operated on by means of the computer-assisted dorsal root entry zone (DREZ)-microcoagulation technique 2.5 years after the trauma. This technique is described in brief. The prevalence and classification of neurogenic pain, and possible medical and surgical treatment, are also discussed.

  10. In utero Repair of Myelomeningocele: Rationale, Initial Clinical Experience and a Randomized Controlled Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Enrico; Flake, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    Myelomeningocele (MMC), one of the most common congenital malformations, can result in severe lifelong disabilities, including paraplegia, hydrocephalus, Arnold-Chiari II malformation, incontinence, sexual dysfunction, skeletal deformations, and mental impairment. MMC was the first nonlethal anomaly to be treated by fetal surgery. Studies in animals provide compelling evidence that the primary cause of the neurological deficit associated with MMC is not simply incomplete neurulation but rather chronic mechanical injury and amniotic-fluid-induced chemical trauma that progressively damage the exposed neural tissue during gestation. Initial results suggest that the surgical repair of MMC before 25 weeks of gestation may preserve neurological function, reverse the hindbrain herniation of the Arnold-Chiari II malformation, and obviate the need for postnatal placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. As it is currently unknown whether fetal surgery for MMC is truly beneficial compared to standard postnatal care, a randomized, controlled clinical trial has been initiated within the United States. PMID:22479081

  11. Is Modulation of Oxidative Stress an Answer? The State of the Art of Redox Therapeutic Actions in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chiurchiù, Valerio; Orlacchio, Antonio; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system is particularly sensitive to oxidative stress due to many reasons, including its high oxygen consumption even under basal conditions, high production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species from specific neurochemical reactions, and the increased deposition of metal ions in the brain with aging. For this reason, along with inflammation, oxidative stress seems to be one of the main inducers of neurodegeneration, causing excitotoxicity, neuronal loss, and axonal damage, ultimately being now considered a key element in the onset and progression of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and hereditary spastic paraplegia. Thus, the present paper reviews the role of oxidative stress and of its mechanistic insights underlying the pathogenesis of these neurodegenerative diseases, with particular focus on current studies on its modulation as a potential and promising therapeutic strategy.

  12. Acupuncture for back pain, knee pain and insomnia in transverse myelitis - a case report.

    PubMed

    Vaghela, Sonia A; Donnellan, Clare P

    2008-09-01

    This case report describes the use of acupuncture for back pain, knee pain and insomnia in a 49 year old woman with a recent diagnosis of transverse myelitis with paraplegia, sensory disturbance, and bladder and bowel dysfunction. She was receiving intensive in-patient multi-disciplinary rehabilitation but was struggling to participate fully due to pain and poor sleep quality. She received a course of acupuncture in addition to standard care and reported substantial benefits including reduction in pain, improved sleep and mood, and reduction in daytime fatigue. Effective symptom control allowed this patient to participate more fully in her rehabilitation programme. Reduction of knee pain and sleep disturbance was maintained until discharge, 15 weeks after the last acupuncture treatment. This case report suggests that acupuncture may be an option to consider for other patients with pain or sleep disturbance that is interfering with their rehabilitation programme.

  13. Mutations in PNPLA6 are linked to photoreceptor degeneration and various forms of childhood blindness

    PubMed Central

    Kmoch, S.; Majewski, J.; Ramamurthy, V.; Cao, S.; Fahiminiya, S.; Ren, H.; MacDonald, I.M.; Lopez, I.; Sun, V.; Keser, V.; Khan, A.; Stránecký, V.; Hartmannová, H.; Přistoupilová, A.; Hodaňová, K.; Piherová, L.; Kuchař, L.; Baxová, A.; Chen, R.; Barsottini, O.G.P.; Pyle, A.; Griffin, H.; Splitt, M.; Sallum, J.; Tolmie, J.L.; Sampson, J.R.; Chinnery, P.; Canada, Care4Rare; Banin, E.; Sharon, D.; Dutta, S.; Grebler, R.; Helfrich-Foerster, C.; Pedroso, J.L.; Kretzschmar, D.; Cayouette, M.; Koenekoop, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Blindness due to retinal degeneration affects millions of people worldwide, but many disease-causing mutations remain unknown. PNPLA6 encodes the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing protein 6, also known as neuropathy target esterase (NTE), which is the target of toxic organophosphates that induce human paralysis due to severe axonopathy of large neurons. Mutations in PNPLA6 also cause human spastic paraplegia characterized by motor neuron degeneration. Here we identify PNPLA6 mutations in childhood blindness in seven families with retinal degeneration, including Leber congenital amaurosis and Oliver McFarlane syndrome. PNPLA6 localizes mostly at the inner segment plasma membrane in photo-receptors and mutations in Drosophila PNPLA6 lead to photoreceptor cell death. We also report that lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid levels are elevated in mutant Drosophila. These findings show a role for PNPLA6 in photoreceptor survival and identify phospholipid metabolism as a potential therapeutic target for some forms of blindness. PMID:25574898

  14. Subcutaneous pellet testosterone replacement therapy: the "first steps" in treating men with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kendra M; Derosa, Angela

    2013-12-01

    The authors describe the case of a 36-year-old man who presented with hormone level concerns 6 months after a rock climbing accident that resulted in paraplegia. Hypogonadism was diagnosed, and the patient received subcutaneous pellet testosterone replacement therapy. Within 6 months, the patient had substantial improvement in muscle function and was able to take several steps with the assistance of crutches or a walker. This case highlights the potential improvement in quality of life and overall prognosis resulting from the subcutaneous pellet form of testosterone when used as part of the overall treatment plan in such patients. Considering the overwhelming preponderance of hypogonadism in men with spinal cord injuries, the standard of care for such patients should include screening, laboratory hormone evaluation, and prompt treatment for testosterone deficiency.

  15. The BMP signaling pathway at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction and its links to neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bayat, Vafa; Jaiswal, Manish; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) has recently provided new insights into the roles of various proteins in neurodegenerative diseases including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP), and Huntington’s Disease (HD). Several developmental signaling pathways including WNT, MAPK and BMP/TGF-β signaling play important roles in the formation and growth of the Drosophila NMJ. Studies of the fly homologues of genes that cause neurodegenerative disease at the NMJ have resulted in a better understanding of the roles of these proteins in vivo. These studies may shed light on the pathological mechanisms of these diseases, with implications for reduced BMP/TGF-β signaling in ALS, SMA and HD and increased signaling in HSP and MS. PMID:20832291

  16. Cervical spine fracture in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis causing a C2-T9 spinal epidural hematoma- Treatment resulted in a rapid and complete recovery from tetraplegia: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Albert Sii Hieng; Yu, Denis Hee Youg

    2015-01-01

    Full recovery from tetraplegia is uncommon in cervical spine injury. This has not being reported for cervical spine fracture in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis causing spinal epidural hematoma. We report on a case of cervical spine fracture in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis who came with tetraplegia. He underwent a two stage fixation and fusion. He had a complete recovery. Two hours after the operation he regained full strength in all the limbs while in the Intensive Care Unit. He went back to full employment. There are only two other reports in the literature where patients with ankylosing spondylitis and extradural hematoma who underwent treatment within 12 h and recovered completely from tetraparesis and paraplegia respectively. Patient with ankylosing spondylitis has a higher incidence of spinal fracture and extradural hematoma. Good outcome can be achieved by early diagnosis and treatment. This can ensure not only a stable spine, but also a rapid and complete recovery in a tetraplegic patient.

  17. A 7-month-old male with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome and the power of T3.

    PubMed

    Langley, Katherine G; Trau, Steven; Bean, Lora J H; Narravula, Alekhya; Schrier Vergano, Samantha A

    2015-05-01

    Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS, MIM 300523) is an X-linked neurodegenerative disorder characterized by intellectual disability, severe hypotonia, diminished muscle mass, and progressive spastic paraplegia. All affected males have pathognomonic thyroid profiles with an elevated T3 , low-normal free T4 , and normal TSH. Mutations in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) gene, SLC16A2, have been found to be causative. Here, we describe a proband whose extensive evaluation and ultimate diagnosis of AHDS unmasked three previously undiagnosed generations of affected individuals in one family. This case illustrates the need for clinicians to consider obtaining full thyroid studies on individuals with the non-specific findings of severe hypotonia, failure to thrive, and gross motor delay.

  18. Inversion duplication of the short arm of chromosome 8: Clinical data on seven patients and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Engelen, J.J.M.; Schrander-Stumpel, C.T.R.M.

    1995-11-20

    We report on clinical and cytogenetic data on 5 children and 2 adults with a de novo inverted duplication of the short arm of chromosome 8, and we give a review of 26 patients from the literature. The clinical picture in young children is characterized by minor facial anomalies, hypotonia, and severe developmental delay. In older patients the facial traits are less characteristic, spastic paraplegia develops, and severe orthopedic problems are frequent. Psychomotor retardation is always severe-to-profound. Duplication of 8p21-p22 results in a clinically recognizable multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation (MCA/MR) syndrome. It is shown that in all patients examined, the duplication was accompanied by a deletion of the most terminal part of 8p. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A Design Method for FES Bone Health Therapy in SCI

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Brian; Shippen, James; Armengol, Monica; Gibbons, Robin; Holderbaum, William; Harwin, William

    2016-01-01

    FES assisted activities such as standing, walking, cycling and rowing induce forces within the leg bones and have been proposed to reduce osteoporosis in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, details of the applied mechanical stimulus for osteogenesis is often not reported. Typically, comparisons of bone density results are made after costly and time consuming clinical trials. These studies have produced inconsistent results and are subject to sample size variations. Here we propose a design process that may be used to predict the clinical outcome based on biomechanical simulation and mechano-biology. This method may allow candidate therapies to be optimized and quantitatively compared. To illustrate the approach we have used data obtained from a rower with complete paraplegia using the RowStim (III) system. PMID:28078075

  20. Low-Energy Laser Irradiation And The Nervous System: Method And Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochkind, S.; Lubart, R.; Nissan, M.; Barr-Nea, L.

    1988-06-01

    The present study introduces a novel method for assessing the efficacy of so-called soft tissue lasers on the peripheral and central nervous systems. In any readily available method relying on low energy laser irradiation, one of the most critical factors is obviously the wavelength of the laser, for this will determine how much of the energy applied to the skin or muscle actually reaches the target nerve. The present findings reaffirm our conclusion that low energy laser irradiation is bene-ficial in the treatment of injured peripheral or central nervous system, the beneficial effect diminishing with decreasing wavelength from 632nm down to 465nm. Our results pave the way for a new approach to the treatment of traumatic paraplegia and argue in favor of a combination of laser irradiation and PNS or CNS transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  1. The eponymous legacy of Sir William Richard Gowers (1845-1915): A revealing letter.

    PubMed

    Toodayan, Nadeem; Boes, Christopher J

    2016-08-11

    The eponymous legacy of Sir William Richard Gowers (1845-1915) was the subject of a comprehensive appraisal first written for this journal late last year. Since the completion of that work, a revealing February 1903 letter has come to light recording, amongst other things, Gowers' firsthand and somewhat private opinions concerning some of his own eponymous contributions to medicine. This addendum to the primary author's original article will review and contextualize this very interesting find as it relates to Gowers' eponymous legacy. Gowers' "ataxic paraplegia" (referred to as "Gowers' disease" in the letter) and "syringal hemorrhage" are specially considered, and his broader neological contributions are also briefly addressed. For completion, a number of other previously unnoticed eponyms are added to the already impressive list of medical entities named in Gowers' honor, and a more complete collection of eponyms found in Gowers' Manual are tabulated for consideration.

  2. Intrathecal application of cyproheptadine impairs locomotion in intact rats.

    PubMed

    Majczyński, Henryk; Cabaj, Anna; Górska, Teresa

    In intact adult rats, cyproheptadine, a 5-HT2 antagonist, administered intrathecally at the midlumbar segments was found to impair hindlimb locomotor movements during overground locomotion. These effects were dose-dependent; they varied from transient complete hindlimb paraplegia seen at doses of 300 microg/20 microl, to short-lasting trunk instability at doses of 100 microg/20 microl. After the return of overground locomotion, transient abduction of one of the hindlimbs was observed in some animals. These findings demonstrate that the blockade of 5-HT2 receptors affects locomotion in intact rats. Our results provide support for the hypothesis of serotonergic involvement in rat locomotion, which, so far, has been based mainly on the effects of 5-HT2 agonists on the recovery of locomotion in spinal rats.

  3. [Traumatic section of the thoracic aorta: its repair by direct aortic clamping].

    PubMed

    Cairols, M A; Sieyro, F; Miralles, M; Blanes, I; Lozano, P

    1991-01-01

    Traumatic section of descendent aorta, severe complication of a thoracic traumatism, requires an early recognition and restoration because its high mortality rate. Between 1988 and 1990, three patients underwent surgical approach, by direct aortic clamping [correction of clamplaje], at our Service. In two cases, a heart stoppage appeared during the clamping/unclamping [correction of clampaje/desclampaje] maneuvers. One of them had previously electrocardiographic abnormalities, suggestive of heart contusion. Two patients died, one of them during surgical procedure because an irreversible heart stoppage, and the second patient died after 7 days because of a brain hemorrhage. One case presented postoperative paraplegia. Respective rates and literature about the main factors implicated in the diagnosis and treatment of such pathology are reviewed.

  4. The Role of Stent-Grafts in the Management of Aortic Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Herve Elaassar, Omar; Marcheix, Bertrand; Cron, Christophe; Chabbert, Valerie; Combelles, Sophie; Dambrin, Camille; Leobon, Bertrand; Moreno, Ramiro; Otal, Philippe; Auriol, Julien

    2012-02-15

    Stent graft has resulted in major advances in the treatment of trauma patients with blunt traumatic aortic injury (TAI) and has become the preferred method of treatment at many trauma centers. In this review, we provide an overview of the place of stent grafts for the management of this disease. As a whole, TEVAR repair of TAIs offers a survival advantage and reduction in major morbidity, including paraplegia, compared with open surgery. However, endovascular procedures in trauma require a sophisticated multidisciplinary and experienced team approach. More research and development of TAI-specific endograft devices is needed and large, multicenter studies will help to clarify the role of TEVAR compared with open repair of TAI.

  5. Exome Sequencing Links Corticospinal Motor Neuron Disease to Common Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hofree, Matan; Silhavy, Jennifer L.; Heiberg, Andrew D.; Abdellateef, Mostafa; Rosti, Basak; Scott, Eric; Mansour, Lobna; Masri, Amira; Kayserili, Hulya; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M. H.; Karminejad, Ariana; Kara, Majdi; Kara, Bulent; Bozorgmehri, Bita; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Mojahedi, Faezeh; El Din Mahmoud, Iman Gamal; Bouslam, Naima; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Benomar, Ali; Hanein, Sylvain; Raymond, Laure; Forlani, Sylvie; Mascaro, Massimo; Selim, Laila; Shehata, Nabil; Al-Allawi, Nasir; Bindu, P.S.; Azam, Matloob; Gunel, Murat; Caglayan, Ahmet; Bilguvar, Kaya; Tolun, Aslihan; Issa, Mahmoud Y.; Schroth, Jana; Spencer, Emily G.; Rosti, Rasim O.; Akizu, Naiara; Vaux, Keith K.; Johansen, Anide; Koh, Alice A.; Megahed, Hisham; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Gabriel, Stacy B.; Ideker, Trey; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are neurodegenerative motor neuron diseases characterized by progressive age-dependent loss of corticospinal motor tract function. Although the genetic basis is partly understood, only a fraction of cases can receive a genetic diagnosis, and a global view of HSP is lacking. By using whole-exome sequencing in combination with network analysis, we identified 18 previously unknown putative HSP genes and validated nearly all of these genes functionally or genetically. The pathways highlighted by these mutations link HSP to cellular transport, nucleotide metabolism, and synapse and axon development. Network analysis revealed a host of further candidate genes, of which three were mutated in our cohort. Our analysis links HSP to other neurodegenerative disorders and can facilitate gene discovery and mechanistic understanding of disease. PMID:24482476

  6. Epidemiologic Change of Patients With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Yu, Su Jin; Yang, Hea Eun; Yoon, Seo Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the epidemiologic change of patients with spinal cord injury who were admitted to a Rehabilitation Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, during 1987-1996 and 2004-2008. Methods Medical records of 629 patients with spinal cord injury admitted to the Rehabilitation Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, from 2004 to 2008 were collected and reviewed retrospectively. Results The male-to-female ratio decreased to 2.86:1, the mean age at injury increased, nontraumatic etiology increased, traffic accident remained to be the most common in traumatic spinal cord injury, and falling increased significantly. Tumor was the most common etiology in nontraumatic spinal cord injury, tetraplegia and incomplete injuries occurred more than paraplegia and complete injuries, indwelling catheter was the most common voiding method, and the duration of hospitalization decreased. Conclusion Many trends changed in epidemiology of spinal cord injury. PMID:23525183

  7. Citrobocter kasori spinal epidural abscess: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Jain, Pramod; Singh, Pritish; Divthane, Rupam; Badole, C M

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic spinal epidural abscess Is an uncommon Infectious occurrence. Clinical prospects of pyogenic spinal epidural abscess are graver if not promptly diagnosed and treated appropriately. A case of spinal epidural abscess has been presented with sinus tract formation at L4-L5 level, of pyogenic aetiology that progressed to paraplegia over the course of the disease. MRI pointed towards an epidural abscess extending from T12 vertebral level to S1 vertebral level. Surgical decompression in the form of laminectomy and evacuation of pus was done and antibiotics were given according to culture and sensitivity. Histopathological analysis revealed the acute suppurative nature of the abscess. Citrobacter kasori was isolated on pus culture. Pyogenic epidural abscess with causative organism being Citrobacter kasori has least been documented.

  8. Motion of the body centre of gravity as a summary indicator of the mechanics of human pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Detrembleur, C; van den Hecke, A; Dierick, F

    2000-12-01

    Abnormal movements of the body segments due to lowest level gait disorders such as musculoskeletal disorders, peripheral neuropathies and radiculopathies or middle-level disorders such as hemiplegia, paraplegia and dystonia influence the motion of the centre of gravity (CG) during walking. The translation of the CG can be studied by the work done by muscles (WExt) with respect to the ground. The efficacy of gait's mechanism can be quantified by the energy transferred between gravitational potential and kinetic energies (recovery). WExt and recovery were investigated in lowest and middle-level gait disorders during level walking. No statistical significant difference was observed between patients with lowest-level gait disorders and normal subjects. However, WExt was increased for the patients with middle-level gait disorders and recovery decreased up to 20%. The measurement of changes in mechanical energy of the CG might be a summary indicator for the mechanics of pathological gait.

  9. Acute onset of postoperative syringohydromyelia

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. Santosh Mohan; Balasubramaniam, Chidambaram; Subramaniam, K.

    2015-01-01

    Syringohydromyelia is a frequent finding in cases of tethered cord syndrome. The classical teaching is that the development and progression of a syrinx is a chronic process. We present a case report of an acute onset syringomyelia in an infant, who underwent an excision of a lumbosacral transitional lipoma and detethering of the cord. Immediately after recovery, the infant was found to have flaccid paraplegia. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large acute onset syringomyelia for which he underwent an emergency midline myelotomy and release of fluid from the syrinx. Though the eventual recovery was good, this made us re-visit our understanding of the concept of syringohydromyelia. The case details and a plausible hypothesis for the rapid development of the syrinx are presented. PMID:26557165

  10. Severe aortic and arterial aneurysms associated with a TGFBR2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    LeMaire, Scott A; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Carter, Stacey A; Coselli, Joseph S; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2008-01-01

    Background A 24-year-old man presented with previously diagnosed Marfan’s syndrome. Since the age of 9 years, he had undergone eight cardiovascular procedures to treat rapidly progressive aneurysms, dissection and tortuous vascular disease involving the aortic root and arch, the thoracoabdominal aorta, and brachiocephalic, vertebral, internal thoracic and superior mesenteric arteries. Throughout this extensive series of cardiovascular surgical repairs, he recovered without stroke, paraplegia or renal impairment. Investigations CT scans, arteriogram, genetic mutation screening of transforming growth factor β receptors 1 and 2. Diagnosis Diffuse and rapidly progressing vascular disease in a patient who met the diagnostic criteria for Marfan’s syndrome, but was later rediagnosed with Loeys–Dietz syndrome. Genetic testing also revealed a de novo mutation in transforming growth factor β receptor 2. Management Regular cardiovascular surveillance for aneurysms and dissections, and aggressive surgical treatment of vascular disease. PMID:17330129

  11. A novel microwave sensor to detect specific biomarkers in human cerebrospinal fluid and their relationship to cellular ischemia during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Fok, M; Bashir, M; Fraser, H; Strouther, N; Mason, A

    2015-04-01

    Thoraco-abdominal aneurysms (TAAA) represents a particularly lethal vascular disease that without surgical repair carries a dismal prognosis. However, there is an inherent risk from surgical repair of spinal cord ischaemia that can result in paraplegia. One method of reducing this risk is cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. We believe that the CSF contains clinically significant biomarkers that can indicate impending spinal cord ischaemia. This work therefore presents a novel measurement method for proteins, namely albumin, as a precursor to further work in this area. The work uses an interdigitated electrode (IDE) sensor and shows that it is capable of detecting various concentrations of albumin (from 0 to 100 g/L) with a high degree of repeatability at 200 MHz (R(2) = 0.991) and 4 GHz (R(2) = 0.975).

  12. Is Modulation of Oxidative Stress an Answer? The State of the Art of Redox Therapeutic Actions in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chiurchiù, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system is particularly sensitive to oxidative stress due to many reasons, including its high oxygen consumption even under basal conditions, high production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species from specific neurochemical reactions, and the increased deposition of metal ions in the brain with aging. For this reason, along with inflammation, oxidative stress seems to be one of the main inducers of neurodegeneration, causing excitotoxicity, neuronal loss, and axonal damage, ultimately being now considered a key element in the onset and progression of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and hereditary spastic paraplegia. Thus, the present paper reviews the role of oxidative stress and of its mechanistic insights underlying the pathogenesis of these neurodegenerative diseases, with particular focus on current studies on its modulation as a potential and promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26881039

  13. Posterior Trans-Dural Repair of Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Herniation after Resection of Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic spinal cord herniation is a rare complication following spinal surgery. We introduce a posterior trans-dural repair technique used in a case of thoracic spinal cord herniation through a ventral dural defect following resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the cervicothoracic spine. A 51-year-old female was suffering from paraplegia after laminectomy alone for cervicothoracic OPLL. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a severely compressed spinal cord with pseudomeningocele identified postoperatively. Cerebrospinal fluid leak and iatrogenic spinal cord herniation persisted despite several operations with duroplasty and sealing agent. Finally, the problems were treated by repair of the ventral dural defect with posterior trans-dural duroplasty. Several months after surgery, the patient could walk independently. This surgical technique can be applied to treat ventral dural defect and spinal cord herniation. PMID:27114779

  14. [Mental activity hand orthosis control using the EEG: a case study].

    PubMed

    Pfurtscheller, G; Müller, G; Korisek, G

    2002-02-01

    A report is given on the realization of a steering mechanism of a hand orthosis for a patient with paraplegia. An EEG-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) was used here for the first time, transferring purely mental activity to a control signal. This means that the patient has the capability to open or close the hand orthosis only by imagination of a movement. At this time, after a training period of about four months, the patient is able to move the hand orthosis with a certainty of almost hundred percent. The restored grasp function was verified by a grasp function test. Results are compared to those obtained using a conventional EMG-controlled orthosis.

  15. Aplastic articular facets in a dog with intervertebral disk rupture of the 12th to 13th thoracic vertebral space.

    PubMed

    Werner, Thorsten; McNicholas, W Thomas; Kim, Jongmin; Baird, Debra K; Breur, Gert J

    2004-01-01

    A 6-year-old, female spayed Pomeranian was presented with acute hind-limb paraplegia with the presence of deep pain perception and urinary incontinence. Myelography showed a Hansen type I herniation of the12th to 13th thoracic intervertebral space (T(12-13)). Articular facets of the T(12-13) and T(13) to first lumbar vertebra (L(1)) were absent. The spinal cord was decompressed using a bilateral T(12-13) modified lateral hemilaminectomy (pediculectomy). The aplastic sites were associated with minimal instability of the vertebral column, and stabilization of the vertebral column was not required. Familiarity with this condition is important, because articular facet aplasia may cause vertebral instability and may require an adjusted surgical approach or vertebral reduction and fusion following decompression.

  16. Epidural hematoma associated with spinal fracture in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Ryoji; Imagama, Shiro; Satake, Kotaro; Iwase, Toshiki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical findings, radiographic appearance and surgical treatment of a spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) associated with spinal fracture in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). An 81-year-old male patient injured after falling from a 2.5 m tree presented with severe back pain. On plain radiographs and CT images, DISH with anterolateral osteophytes and fused thoracolumbar vertebrae was found along with a T12 fracture. Patient was initially treated with bed rest followed by placement into a body cast. Three weeks later, he presented with incomplete paraplegia of his lower limbs. CT images did not reveal any fracture displacement, but MRI images showed an epidural hematoma compressing the dura mater. The patient was successfully treated by posterior fixation surgery using pedicle screws and rod with vertebroplasty. We aimed to report a unique case of a SEH complicating a spinal fracture in DISH.

  17. Aggressive hemangioma of the spine in a pregnant female: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Demirkale, İsmail; De Iure, Federico; Terzi, Silvia; Gasbarrini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Type and timing of treatment for symptomatic hemangiomas in pregnant females are challenging due to fetus survival and conflicts in neurological recovery. In this article, we report a 40-year-old female patient at pregnancy week 23 with a complicated hemangioma at T1 level. Physical examination revealed an incomplete spastic paraplegia. Patient did not accept any surgery due to child's death risk. Patient was started corticoid treatment and no more weight bearing was allowed. At the 28th week of pregnancy, the patient underwent cesarean section immediately followed by selective arterial embolization, decompression, fixation, and radiotherapy. At two-year follow-up, the patient was pain free, without any signs of local recurrence and with complete neurological recovery. A multidisciplinary approach is mandatory to save the life of the fetus without damaging the spinal cord functions of the mother.

  18. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  19. The Crossroads of Synaptic Growth Signaling, Membrane Traffic and Neurological Disease: Insights from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Mugdha; Rodal, Avital A

    2016-02-01

    Neurons require target-derived autocrine and paracrine growth factors to maintain proper identity, innervation, homeostasis and survival. Neuronal growth factor signaling is highly dependent on membrane traffic, both for the packaging and release of the growth factors themselves, and for regulation of intracellular signaling by their transmembrane receptors. Here, we review recent findings from the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) that illustrate how specific steps of intracellular traffic and inter-organelle interactions impinge on signaling, particularly in the bone morphogenic protein, Wingless and c-Jun-activated kinase pathways, regulating elaboration and stability of NMJ arbors, construction of synapses and synaptic transmission and homeostasis. These membrane trafficking and signaling pathways have been implicated in human motor neuron diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and hereditary spastic paraplegia, highlighting their importance for neuronal health and survival.

  20. Tuberculosis of spine

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vinod; Patgaonkar, P. R.; Nagariya, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine is one of the most common spine pathology in India. Over last 4 decades a lot has changed in the diagnosis, medical treatment and surgical procedures to treat this disorder. Further developments in diagnosis using molecular genetic techniques, more effective antibiotics and more aggressive surgical protocols have become essential with emergence of multidrug resistant TB. Surgical procedures such as single stage anterior and posterior stabilization, extrapleral dorsal spine anterior stabilization and endoscopic thoracoscopic surgeries have reduced the mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedures. is rapidly progressing. It is a challenge to treat MDR-TB Spine with late onset paraplegia and progressive deformity. Physicians must treat tuberculosis of spine on the basis of Culture and sensitivity. PMID:21572628

  1. Thoracic disc herniation: An unusual complication after prone positioning in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Mohammed Zahier; Vlok, Adriaan J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurological complications of the prone position have been well documented. Post-operative paraplegia and neurological deterioration unrelated to the site of surgery after proning in spinal surgery is a rare but potentially devastating complication. We describe the case of a 47 year old female who underwent an L4/5 discectomy and posterior instrumented fusion. A few hours after surgery she developed bilateral lower limb weakness with a T11 sensory level. Post-operative MRI revealed an acute disc herniation at the T11/12 level with associated spinal cord compression. This was not present on the pre-operative imaging. A subsequent T11/12 discectomy and instrumented fusion was performed and the patient's motor and sensory function returned to normal.

  2. [A case of dural arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction, which spinal MRI findings reveals increased intensity signal in Th3-medullary cone].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Masamichi; Ueda, Miki; Takeuchi, Yuko; Ochiai, Jun; Mabuchi, Chiyuki; Hattori, Shinnosuke

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman had transient weakness of the legs and urinary retention for six weeks. She presented with a gait disorder and was admitted to the hospital. She showed symptoms of paraplegia, tingling in the lower extremities, dysuria. She underwent an MRI, and T2-weighted images showed an enlargement of the thoracolumbar spinal cord and high intensity signal from Th3 to the medullary cone, and a contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image showed abnormal vessels anterior to the spine cord. Cervical and spinal angiography documented a dural arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction that was fed by the right vertebral artery and the right ascending pharyngeal arteries and drained into the perimedullary veins. Surgical therapy improved her symptoms and MRI images. Craniocervical junction DAVF with thoracic-medullary cones lesion is rare.

  3. [Robot-aided training in rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Hachisuka, Kenji

    2010-02-01

    Recently, new training techniques that involve the use of robots have been used in the rehabilitation of patients with hemiplegia and paraplegia. Robots used for training the arm include the MIT-MANUS, Arm Trainer, mirror-image motion enabler (MIME) robot, and the assisted rehabilitation and measurement (ARM) Guide. Robots that are used for lower-limb training are the Rehabot, Gait Trainer, Lokomat, LOPES Exoskeleton Robot, and Gait Assist Robot. Robot-aided therapy has enabled the functional training of the arm and the lower limbs in an effective, easy, and comfortable manner. Therefore, with this type of therapy, the patients can repeatedly undergo sufficient and accurate training for a prolonged period. However, evidence of the benefits of robot-aided training has not yet been established.

  4. Anaesthesia for vascular emergencies.

    PubMed

    Ellard, L; Djaiani, G

    2013-01-01

    Patients presenting with vascular emergencies including acute aortic syndrome, ruptured thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms, thoracic aortic trauma and acute lower limb ischaemia have a high risk of peri-operative morbidity and mortality. Although anatomical suitability is not universal, endovascular surgery may improve mortality and the results of ongoing randomised controlled trials are awaited. Permissive hypotension pre-operatively should be the standard of care with the systolic blood pressure kept to 50-100 mmHg as long as consciousness is maintained. The benefit of local anaesthesia over general anaesthesia is not definitive and this decision should be tailored for a given patient and circumstance. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage for prevention of paraplegia is often impractical in the emergency setting and is not backed by strong evidence; however, it should be considered postoperatively if symptoms develop. We discuss the pertinent anaesthetic issues when a patient presents with a vascular emergency and the impact that endovascular repair has on anaesthetic management.

  5. Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints: An unsolvable problem

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sailendra

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints beyond 90° is a difficult condition to treat for any orthopedic surgeon. There is no fixed protocol of treatment described, by and large it is individualized. A 20 year old female presented with paraplegia for last 15 years due to irrecoverable spinal cord disease with complete sensory and motor loss of both lower extremities and was admitted with acute flexion contracture of both hip joints with trunk resting on thighs. She underwent bilateral proximal femoral resection. Both hip joints were straight immediately after surgery and patient could lie on her back. In a course of time, she started sitting on her buttocks, led a comfortable wheelchair life with a sitting balance. Proximal femoral resection is an effective method to treat long standing irrecoverable paraplegic acute flexion deformity of the hip joint. PMID:27904226

  6. [Double spinal cord compression by dorsal meningioma and Paget's disease of a vertebra. A propos of 2 cases treated surgically].

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, P; Lerais, J M; Scherpereel, B; Bernard, M H; Pluot, M

    1982-01-01

    A spinal cord compression due to intradural meningioma appeared in two patients with vertebral X-Rays lesions of foreknown Paget's disease. These lesions were located at the same level that the meningioma in the second case and three vertebra below the meningioma in the first case. In both cases, it took one year between the first clinical symptoms and the surgical decision. We truly think the Paget's disease and its X-Rays vertebral lesions to be responsible for the waist of time in myelography and surgical schedule. No other case of meningioma associated with Paget's disease has been found through literature. Because the treatment of Paget's disease paraplegia is now mostly medical, we thought important to report our experience in order to avoid other delays in this unusual diagnosis.

  7. Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour in a dog.

    PubMed

    Junginger, J; Röthlisberger, A; Lehmbecker, A; Stein, V M; Ludwig, D C; Baumgärtner, W; Seehusen, F

    2013-11-01

    A 1-year-old German shepherd dog was presented with paraparesis quickly progressing to paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large mass beneath the thoracolumbar vertebral column infiltrating the spinal canal and resulting in severe extradural compression of the spinal cord. Microscopically, this comprised a cell-rich unencapsulated tumour supported by fine bands of a fibrovascular stroma and occasionally forming primitive rosettes. Immunohistochemistry showed the tumour cells to express synaptophysin and neuron-specific enolase. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells had low to moderate numbers of intracytoplasmic neurosecretory granules. A peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour was diagnosed. This is a rare embryonal tumour of neural origin that may have arisen from adrenal medulla, autonomic ganglia or peripheral nerves.

  8. Survey of Use of the Insufflator-Exsufflator in Patients With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, James K; Stiens, Steven; Trincher, Rose; Lam, Mylam; Sarkarati, Mehdii; Linder, Steven; Ho, Chester H

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: The insufflator-exsufflator has been shown to be effective in assisting cough in individuals with spinal cord injury. However, many institutions do not use this device. The study was performed to assess use of the device and attitudes among health care providers. Methods: We developed a questionnaire with 4 categories of questions: knowledge of the device, type of facility, clinical practice with the device, and patient and provider satisfaction. The questionnaire was mailed to members of the American Paraplegia Society. Results: Eighty-six questionnaires (16%) were returned. The device was being used in 49% of the institutions. The device was most commonly used with a tracheostomy; use did not correlate with size or type of facility. Patient and provider satisfaction with the insufflator-exsufflator was high. Conclusions: The insufflator-exsufflator is used as a means of removal of secretions in approximately one half of institutions polled. Satisfaction with the device is high. PMID:17591224

  9. Spinal Epidural Hematoma After Thrombolysis for Deep Vein Thrombosis with Subsequent Pulmonary Thromboembolism: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Young-Min Kwak, Ho-Sung; Jin, Gong-Young; Chung, Gyung-Ho; Song, Kyung-Jin

    2006-06-15

    A 38-year-old male was initially admitted for left leg swelling. He was diagnosed as having deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the left leg and a pulmonary thromboembolism by contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) with delayed lower extremity CT. The DVT was treated by thrombolysis and a venous stent. Four hours later, he complained of severe back pain and a sensation of separation of his body and lower extremities; he experienced paraplegia early in the morning of the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a spinal epidural hematoma between T11 and L2, which decompressed following surgery. We, therefore, report a case of a spinal epidural hematoma after thrombolysis in a case of DVT with a pulmonary thromboembolism.

  10. Continuous lumbar hemilaminectomy for intervertebral disc disease in an Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Flegel, Thomas; Böttcher, Peter; Alef, Michaele; Kiefer, Ingmar; Ludewig, Eberhard; Thielebein, Jens; Grevel, Vera

    2008-09-01

    A 13-yr-old Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was presented for an acute onset of paraplegia. Spinal imaging that included plain radiographs, myelography, and computed tomography performed under general anesthesia revealed lateralized spinal cord compression at the intervertebral disc space L4-5 caused by intervertebral disc extrusion. This extrusion was accompanied by an extensive epidural hemorrhage from L3 to L6. Therefore, a continuous hemilaminectomy from L3 to L6 was performed, resulting in complete decompression of the spinal cord. The tiger was ambulatory again 10 days after the surgery. This case suggests that the potential benefit of complete spinal cord decompression may outweigh the risk of causing clinically significant spinal instability after extensive decompression.

  11. Radial Basis Function Neural Network-based PID model for functional electrical stimulation system control.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Longlong; Zhang, Guangju; Wan, Baikun; Hao, Linlin; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong

    2009-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has been widely used in the area of neural engineering. It utilizes electrical current to activate nerves innervating extremities affected by paralysis. An effective combination of a traditional PID controller and a neural network, being capable of nonlinear expression and adaptive learning property, supply a more reliable approach to construct FES controller that help the paraplegia complete the action they want. A FES system tuned by Radial Basis Function (RBF) Neural Network-based Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) model was designed to control the knee joint according to the desired trajectory through stimulation of lower limbs muscles in this paper. Experiment result shows that the FES system with RBF Neural Network-based PID model get a better performance when tracking the preset trajectory of knee angle comparing with the system adjusted by Ziegler- Nichols tuning PID model.

  12. Guillain-Barre syndrome: A possibility in a spinal cord injured patient.

    PubMed

    Jagatsinh, Yogendrasinh

    2007-07-01

    A 28-year-old male had paraplegia as a result of fracture dislocation of T12/L1 six years ago. He was functioning independently until four weeks ago, when he started complaining of trunkal paraesthesia which later progressed to include the upper extremities. The initial diagnosis was that of posttraumatic syringomyelia (PTS). While awaiting the MRI scan he developed weakness of upper limbs. The weakness restricted his self-care activities including transfers. The MRI did not show any evidence of syringomyelia. Neurological consultation and assessment yielded provisional diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). The patient was treated with immunoglobulins and regained 90% of his previous neurological status. This case is reported to raise awareness among clinicians to include the possibility of the GBS in the differential diagnosis of progressive neurological loss on top of existing neurological deficiency in spinal cord injured patients.

  13. Galactorrhea: a complication of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yarkony, G M; Novick, A K; Roth, E J; Kirschner, K L; Rayner, S; Betts, H B

    1992-09-01

    Galactorrhea, a secretion of milk or milk-like products from the breast in the absence of parturition, has been reported to occur in women with spinal cord injuries in association with amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. Four cases of galactorrhea in association with spinal cord injury are reported. Galactorrhea developed in four spinal cord injured women who had thoracic paraplegia. The onset of galactorrhea was from one month to five months after injury. Although the onset of galactorrhea may have been related to prescribed medications in all four cases, insufficient data exist to draw conclusions. The three women whose galactorrhea persisted declined treatment and galactorrhea continuing for more than two years in one instance. We conclude that galactorrhea with or without amenorrhea may develop after a spinal cord injury and that spinal cord injured women may have an enhanced sensitivity to medication-induced galactorrhea.

  14. Clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder of patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Alex Pereira; Terrabuio Junior, Alberto Antonio; Pimenta, Ciro Jabur; Medina, Giovanna Ignácio Subirá; Rimkus, Carolina de Medeiros; Cliquet Júnior, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the shoulder of this group of patients using magnetic resonance imaging to detect clinical and subclinical disorders and establish a rehabilitation program. Methods Nine patients with spinal cord injury followed in the Laboratory of Biomechanics and Rehabilitation of the Locomotive System at HC/UNICAMP were divided into two groups according to the presence of paraplegia and tetraplegia and were clinically assessed for correlation with the imaging exams. Results Normal results were found in 41% of the shoulders. Most common injuries were tendinopathy of the supraspinatus and acromioclavicular joint degeneration. Eighty percent of injured shoulders had combined lesions. Conclusion A great variety of causes of shoulder pain was identified in paraplegic and tetraplegic subjects. Routine clinical assessment and imaging studies of the shoulder may contribute to the evolution of rehabilitation and reduction of pain and musculoskeletal disorders. Level of Evidence II, Development of Diagnostic Criteria on Consecutive Patients, With Universally Applied Reference "Gold" Standard. PMID:24453620

  15. Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints: An unsolvable problem.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sailendra

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints beyond 90° is a difficult condition to treat for any orthopedic surgeon. There is no fixed protocol of treatment described, by and large it is individualized. A 20 year old female presented with paraplegia for last 15 years due to irrecoverable spinal cord disease with complete sensory and motor loss of both lower extremities and was admitted with acute flexion contracture of both hip joints with trunk resting on thighs. She underwent bilateral proximal femoral resection. Both hip joints were straight immediately after surgery and patient could lie on her back. In a course of time, she started sitting on her buttocks, led a comfortable wheelchair life with a sitting balance. Proximal femoral resection is an effective method to treat long standing irrecoverable paraplegic acute flexion deformity of the hip joint.

  16. New domains of neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 implicated in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Jouet, M.; Kenwick, S.; Moncla, A.

    1995-06-01

    The neural cell-adhesion molecule L1 is involved in intercellular recognition and neuronal migration in the CNS. Recently, we have shown that mutations in the gene encoding L1 are responsible for three related disorders; X-linked hydrocephalus, MASA (mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs) syndrome, and spastic paraplegia type I (SPG1). These three disorders represent a clinical spectrum that varies not only between families but sometimes also within families. To date, 14 independent L1 mutations have been reported and shown to be disease causing. Here we report nine novel L1 mutations in X-linked hydrocephalus and MASA-syndrome families, including the first examples of mutations affecting the fibronectin type III domains of the molecule. They are discussed in relation both to phenotypes and to the insights that they provide into L1 function. 39 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Successful Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap Reconstruction for a Recurrent Ischial Pressure Ulcer: A Case With Multiple Recurrences Over a 7-year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Yu; Shih, Yu-Jen; Chou, Chang-Yi; Chen, Tim-Mo; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Ischial pressure ulcers are difficult ulcers to treat and have a low treatment success rate compared to sacral and trochanteric ulcers; regional flap failure further complicates the treatment. Reported here is a case of a 65-year-old man who experienced a spinal injury with paraplegia due to trauma 20 years ago. The patient experienced a recurrent ischial ulcer since 2007, and underwent several types of flap reconstruction with poor outcomes over a 7-year period. Therefore, the chosen intervention was a pedicled anterolateral thigh (pALT) fasciocutaneous flap reconstruction for the ischial ulcer via a subcutaneous route. Over the 10-month follow-up, the recurrent ischial ulcer healed without wound dehiscence. Island pALT reconstruction appears to be an alternative technique for treating recurrent ischial pressure ulcers. Though reconstruction of ischial ulcers via the pALT technique has been described previously, this may be the first case report to describe pALT flap in a patient with recurrent ischial ulcers after failed reconstructions using a gluteus maximus flap, V-Y advancement flap, and hatchet flap.Ischial pressure ulcers are difficult to treat and have a low treatment success rate1 compared to sacral and trochanteric ulcers. In addition, there are many different techniques that can be used to treat ischial pressure ulcers, including primary wound closure, gluteus maximus flaps, V-Y advancement flaps, or inferior gluteal artery perforator flaps. However, several experts have recently described using the pedicled anterolateral thigh (pALT) flap for reconstruction of recurrent ischial pressure ulcers.1,2 In the presented case, the authors followed a single patient with paraplegia with a recurrent ischial ulcer who had undergone several types of wound treatment over a 7-year period. The indurated ulcer was ultimately resolved by pALT reconstruction.

  18. Is Level of Injury a Determinant of Quality of Life Among Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury? 
A Tertiary Rehabilitation Center Report

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Seyed Amir Hossein; Kavian, Mohammad; Bakhsh, Samira Chai; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Hamedan, Maryam Shabany; Ghazwin, Manijeh Yazdanshenas; Latifi, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The role of injury-related variables in determining health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among Iranian persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) has not yet been fully described. In this study, we compared HRQOL between individuals with injury at cervical level and those with injury at thoracolumbar sections and evaluated the discriminating value of injury level as a determinant of HRQOL among Iranian people with SCI. Methods Individuals with SCI, who were referred to Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, were invited to participate in this investigation. HRQOL was assessed using the Short Form (SF-36) questionnaire to determine the quality of life (QOL) in eight domains: physical functioning (PF), role limitation due to physical problems (RP), bodily pain (BP), general health (GH), vitality (VT), social functioning (SF), role limitation due to emotional problems (RE), and mental health (MH). Results Ninety patients with paraplegia and 94 quadriplegic patients participated in this investigation. The mean score of PF domain was significantly lower in patients with injury at cervical level (p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in other domains of SF-36 between subjects with paraplegia and quadriplegia (p = 0.670, 0.700, 0.910, 0.710, 0.730, 0.290 and 0.850 for RP, RE, VT, MH, SF, BP and GH, respectively). Similarly, the mean physical component summary (PCS) score was significantly higher among individuals with injury at thoracolumbar sections (p < 0.0001). The mean mental component summary (MCS) score did not differ between the two groups (p = 0.720). Conclusions Patients with SCI at the cervical level have similar mental health compared to those with injury at thoracolumbar sections, which shows proper mental adaptability in quadriplegic individuals. Injury level can be used as a major determinant of the physical component of QOL among people with SCI. PMID:27168921

  19. The often overlooked digital tuft: clues to diagnosis and pathophysiology of neuropathic disease and spondyloarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, B; Behnam, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess diagnostic implications of abnormalities of the pedal digital tufts and to identify features to facilitate distinguishing of spondyloarthropathy and leprosy. Background: Better criteria for distinguishing between these disorders are necessary if their character, natural history, and evolution are to be understood. Methods: Pedal x rays of 91 consecutive patients with diabetes, 21 alcoholic patients, 100 with spondyloarthropathy, 8 with scleroderma, and 137 with leprosy, and 188 defleshed skeletons of individuals with alcoholism, syphilis, cerebrovascular disease, and paraplegia from the Terry and Hamman-Todd collections were examined for evidence of osseous and articular pathologies. Digital tuft abnormalities were divided into irregularity, divot, flattening, resorption, whittling, and fragmentation. Results: Tuft divots were more common in alcoholics than in diabetic, and were more common in both than in the other groups studied. Tuft flattening was limited to alcoholic and neurosyphilis groups. Tuft whittling was especially prominent among individuals with spondyloarthropathy, contrasted with leprosy and diabetes. Aligned fractures were more common in diabetics than individuals with leprosy. Misaligned fractures were limited to individuals with leprosy and neurosyphilis. Leprosy and spondyloarthropathy were complicated by phalangeal and metatarsal whittling more commonly than other diseases studied. Background pedal abnormalities, derived from individuals with cardiovascular syphilis, cerebrovascular accidents, and paraplegia, was limited to abnormal divots only. Conclusions: Pedal digital tufts undergo a variety of pathological alterations useful in the recognition of disorders traditionally considered neuropathic in aetiology and in distinguishing differential considerations. Tuft flattening appears specific for alcoholism and neurosyphilis, and misaligned fractures seem specific for neurosyphilis and leprosy, providing differential

  20. Improved Gait Speed After Robot-Assisted Gait Training in Patients With Motor Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical features that could serve as predictive factors for improvement in gait speed after robotic treatment. Methods A total of 29 patients with motor incomplete spinal cord injury received 4-week robot-assisted gait training (RAGT) on the Lokomat (Hocoma AG, Volketswil, Switzerland) for 30 minutes, once a day, 5 times a week, for a total of 20 sessions. All subjects were evaluated for general characteristics, the 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT), the Lower Extremity Motor Score (LEMS), the Functional Ambulatory Category (FAC), the Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury version II (WISCI-II), the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and the Spinal Cord Independence Measure version III (SCIM-III) every 0, and 4 weeks. After all the interventions, subjects were stratified using the 10MWT score at 4 weeks into improved group and non-improved group for statistical analysis. Results The improved group had younger age and shorter disease duration than the non-improved group. All subjects with the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale level C (AIS-C) tetraplegia belonged to the non-improved group, while most subjects with AIS-C paraplegia, AIS-D tetraplegia, and AIS-D paraplegia belonged to the improved group. The improved group showed greater baseline lower extremity strength, balance, and daily living function than the non-improved group. Conclusion Assessment of SCIM-III, BBS, and trunk control, in addition to LEMS, have potential for predicting the effects of robotic treatment in patients with motor incomplete spinal cord injury. PMID:28289633

  1. Atlastin GTPases are required for Golgi apparatus and ER morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rismanchi, Neggy; Soderblom, Cynthia; Stadler, Julia; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Blackstone, Craig

    2008-06-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (SPG1-33) comprise a cluster of inherited neurological disorders characterized principally by lower extremity spasticity and weakness due to a length-dependent, retrograde axonopathy of corticospinal motor neurons. Mutations in the gene encoding the large oligomeric GTPase atlastin-1 are responsible for SPG3A, a common autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia. Here we describe a family of human GTPases, atlastin-2 and -3 that are closely related to atlastin-1. Interestingly, while atlastin-1 is predominantly localized to vesicular tubular complexes and cis-Golgi cisternae, mostly in brain, atlastin-2 and -3 are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are most enriched in other tissues. Knockdown of atlastin-2 and -3 levels in HeLa cells using siRNA (small interfering RNA) causes disruption of Golgi morphology, and these Golgi structures remain sensitive to brefeldin A treatment. Interestingly, expression of SPG3A mutant or dominant-negative atlastin proteins lacking GTPase activity causes prominent inhibition of ER reticularization, suggesting a role for atlastin GTPases in the formation of three-way junctions in the ER. However, secretory pathway trafficking as assessed using vesicular stomatitis virus G protein fused to green fluorescent protein (VSVG-GFP) as a reporter was essentially normal in both knockdown and dominant-negative overexpression conditions for all atlastins. Thus, the atlastin family of GTPases functions prominently in both ER and Golgi morphogenesis, but they do not appear to be required generally for anterograde ER-to-Golgi trafficking. Abnormal morphogenesis of the ER and Golgi resulting from mutations in atlastin-1 may ultimately underlie SPG3A by interfering with proper membrane distribution or polarity of the long corticospinal motor neurons.

  2. Aculaser therapy for the treatment of cerebral palsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Ammad, Haseeb U.

    2012-03-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensoryneural deafness and speech disorders. In all 500 children were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 4 years from December 2006 till December 2010. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for a minimum of 08 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 342 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 294 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 252 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 182 children showing 72% success rate, out of 96 children with Cortical Blindness 60 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 210 children with Hearing Difficulties, 126 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 380 children with Speech Disorders 244 showed improvement reflecting 64 % improvement rate, out of 192 children with Hemiplegia 142 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 152 children with Quadriplegia 104 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 116 children with

  3. Treating cerebral palsy with aculaser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Dar, Irfan

    2008-03-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensory-neural deafness and speech disorders. In all 250 childern were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 3 years from December 2003 till December 2006. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for minimum 6 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 171 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 147 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 126 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 91 children showing 72% success rate, out of 48 children with Cortical Blindness 30 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 105 children with Hearing Difficulties, 63 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 190 children with Speech Disorders 122 showed improvement reflecting 64% improvement rate, out of 96 children with Hemiplegia 71 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 76 children with Quadriplegia 52 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 58 children with Paraplegia of

  4. LMNB1‐related autosomal‐dominant leukodystrophy: Clinical and radiological course

    PubMed Central

    Sundblom, Jimmy; Dahl, Niklas; Melberg, Atle; Raininko, Raili

    2015-01-01

    Objective Duplication of the LMNB1 gene encoding lamin B1 causes adult‐onset autosomal‐dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) starting with autonomic symptoms, which are followed by pyramidal signs and ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain reveals characteristic findings. This is the first longitudinal study on this disease. Our objective is to describe the natural clinical and radiological course of LMNB1‐related ADLD. Methods Twenty‐three subjects in two families with LMNB1 duplications were studied over two decades with clinical assessment and MRI of the brain and spinal cord. They were 29 to 70 years old at their first MRI. Repeated MRIs were performed in 14 subjects over a time period of up to 17 years. Results Pathological MRI findings were found in the brain and spinal cord in all examinations (i.e., even preceding clinical symptoms). MRI changes and clinical symptoms progressed in a definite order. Autonomic dysfunction appeared in the fifth to sixth decade, preceding or together with gait and coordination difficulties. Motor signs developed ascending from spastic paraplegia to tetraplegia and pseudobulbar palsy in the seventh decade. There were clinical, radiological, and neurophysiological signs of myelopathy. Survival lasted more than two decades after clinical onset. Interpretation LMNB1‐related ADLD is a slowly progressive neurological disease. MRI abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord can precede clinical symptoms by more than a decade and are extensive in all symptomatic patients. Spinal cord involvement is a likely contributing factor to early autonomic symptoms and spastic paraplegia. Ann Neurol 2015;78:412–425 PMID:26053668

  5. Anterolateral Radical Debridement and Interbody Bone Grafting Combined With Transpedicle Fixation in the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhaohui; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Qixin; Wu, Yongchao; Guo, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting with transpedicle fixation for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis operation aims to remove the lesions and necrotic tissues, remove spinal cord compression, and reconstruct spinal stability. However, traditional operation methods cannot effectively correct cyrtosis or stabilize the spine. In addition, the patient needs to stay in bed for a long time and may have many complications. So far, the best surgical method and fixation method for spinal tuberculosis remain controversial. There were a total of 43 patients, 16 involving spinal cord injury, from January 2004 to January 2011. The patients were surgically treated for radical anterolateral debridement via posterolateral incision and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation. All the patients were followed up to determine the stages of intervertebral bone fusion and the corrections of spinal kyphosis with the restoration of neurological deficit. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of these patients decreased to normal levels for a mean of 2.8 months. The function of feeling, motion, and sphincter in 16 paraplegia cases gradually recovered after 1 week to 3 months postoperatively, and the American Spinal Injury Association scores significantly increased at the final follow-up. Intervertebral bone fusions were all achieved postoperatively. No internal fixation devices were loose, extracted, or broken. There was no correction degree loss during the follow-up. The method of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation was effective for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis, correcting kyphotic deformity, and reconstructing

  6. The Impact Of Sports Activities On Quality Of Life Of Persons With A Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Eminović, Fadilj; Dopsaj, Milivoj; Pavlović, Dragan; Arsić, Sladjana; Otašević, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Studying the quality of life of people with a spinal cord injury is of great importance as it allows the monitoring of both functioning and adaptation to disability. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between persons with a spinal cord injury involved in sports activities and those not involved in sports activities in relation to their quality of life and the presence of secondary health conditions (pressure ulcers, urinary infections, muscle spasms, osteoporosis, pain, kidney problems-infections, calculosis and poor circulation). Methods The study included a total of 44 participants with spinal cord injury-paraplegia of both genders; 26 of them were athletes and 18 were not athletes. The athletes were training actively for the last two years, minimally 2-3 times per week. A specially designed questionnaire, medical documentation and the Spinal Cord Injury Quality of Life Questionnaire (SCI QL-23) were used for research purposes. Chi-square test was used to analyze the differences between the groups, while multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to determine the differences between the sets of variables. Results Among the participants, the athletes perceived higher quality of life than the non-athletes (male gender p<0.001 and female gender p<0.05). Regarding secondary health conditions, the athletes reported the presence of less pain (p=0.034) and a subjective feeling of better circulation (p=0.023). Conclusion The implementation of sports activities significantly improves quality of life in the population of people with spinal cord injury-paraplegia. However, sports activities only partially affect secondary health conditions. PMID:27284378

  7. Loss of AP-5 results in accumulation of aberrant endolysosomes: defining a new type of lysosomal storage disease.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Jennifer; Edgar, James R; Esteves, Typhaine; Darios, Frédéric; Madeo, Marianna; Chang, Jaerak; Roda, Ricardo H; Dürr, Alexandra; Anheim, Mathieu; Gellera, Cinzia; Li, Jun; Züchner, Stephan; Mariotti, Caterina; Stevanin, Giovanni; Blackstone, Craig; Kruer, Michael C; Robinson, Margaret S

    2015-09-01

    Adaptor proteins (AP 1-5) are heterotetrameric complexes that facilitate specialized cargo sorting in vesicular-mediated trafficking. Mutations in AP5Z1, encoding a subunit of the AP-5 complex, have been reported to cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), although their impact at the cellular level has not been assessed. Here we characterize three independent fibroblast lines derived from skin biopsies of patients harbouring nonsense mutations in AP5Z1 and presenting with spastic paraplegia accompanied by neuropathy, parkinsonism and/or cognitive impairment. In all three patient-derived lines, we show that there is complete loss of AP-5 ζ protein and a reduction in the associated AP-5 µ5 protein. Using ultrastructural analysis, we show that these patient-derived lines consistently exhibit abundant multilamellar structures that are positive for markers of endolysosomes and are filled with aberrant storage material organized as exaggerated multilamellar whorls, striated belts and 'fingerprint bodies'. This phenotype can be replicated in a HeLa cell culture model by siRNA knockdown of AP-5 ζ. The cellular phenotype bears striking resemblance to features described in a number of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Collectively, these findings reveal an emerging picture of the role of AP-5 in endosomal and lysosomal homeostasis, illuminates a potential pathomechanism that is relevant to the role of AP-5 in neurons and expands the understanding of recessive HSPs. Moreover, the resulting accumulation of storage material in endolysosomes leads us to propose that AP-5 deficiency represents a new type of LSDs.

  8. Physiological Responses to Exergaming After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Patricia; Kressler, Jochen; Nash, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether exergaming satisfies guideline-based intensity standards for exercise conditioning (40%/50% oxygen uptake reserve [VO2R] or heart rate reserve (HRR), or 64%/70% of peak heart rate [HRpeak]) in persons with paraplegia. Methods: Nine men and women (18-65 years old) with chronic paraplegia (T1-L1, AIS A-C) underwent intensity-graded arm cycle exercise (AE) to evaluate VO2peak and HRpeak. On 2 randomized nonconsecutive days, participants underwent graded exercise using a custom arm cycle ergometer that controls the video display of a Nintendo Gamecube (GameCycle; Three Rivers Holdings LLC, Mesa, AZ) or 15 minutes of incrementally wrist-weighted tennis gameplay against a televised opponent (XaviX Tennis System; SSD Co Ltd, Kusatsu, Japan). Results: GameCycle exergaming (GCE) resistance settings ≥0.88 Nm evoked on average ≥50% VO2R. During XaviX Tennis System exergaming (XTSE) with wrist weights ≥2 lbs, average VO2 reached a plateau of ~40% VO2R. Measurements of HR were highly variable and reached average values ≥50% HRR during GCE at resistance settings ≥0.88 Nm. During XTSE, average HR did not reach threshold levels based on HRR for any wrist weight (20%-35% HRR). Conclusions: On average, intensity responses to GCE at resistance setting ≥0.88 Nm were sufficient to elicit exercise intensities needed to promote cardiorespiratory fitness in individuals with SCI. The ability of XTSE to elicit cardiorespiratory fitness benefits is most likely limited to individuals with very low fitness levels and may become subminimal with time if used as a conditioning stimulus. PMID:23459619

  9. Non-Traumatic Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma in a Patient with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation During Treatment with Rivaroxaban

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Jessica M.; Afanador, Hayley F.; Manjarrez, Efren; Morales, Ximena A.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma Symptoms: Paraplegia Medication: Rivaroxaban Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: General Internal Medicine • Hospital Medicine • Cardiology • Hematology • Neurology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) is a rare but disabling condition, accounting for only 4.1% of all intraspinal hematomas. Risk factors include arteriovenous malformations, coagulopathy, therapeutic anticoagulation, underlying neoplasms, or following spinal puncture. Vitamin K antagonists, antiplatelet agents, and heparinoids have been associated with SSDHs in prior reports. To the best of our knowledge, no cases have reported this association with the factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, and SSDHs. Case Report: We report the case of a 69-year-old Honduran man with a 5-year history of symptomatic palpitations due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation. He was initially refractory to pharmacologic therapy. He underwent cardioversion in February 2014. After cardioversion, he remained asymptomatic on flecainide. He was anticoagulated on rivaroxaban 20 mg daily without incident since early 2013 until presentation in August 2014. He presented with sudden onset of excruciating upper and lower back pain after minimal movement. This was immediately followed by bilateral lower extremity paresis rapidly progressing to paraplegia with bowel and bladder dysfunction over 15 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an acute spinal subdural hematoma extending from T3 inferiorly to the conus medullaris. Six months after undergoing cervical and lumbar drainage procedures, he has not recovered bowel, bladder, or lower extremity neurologic function. Conclusions: Non-traumatic spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma is a rare neurological emergency that may occur during the use of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Physicians should suspect SSDH in

  10. GSK3ß‐dependent dysregulation of neurodevelopment in SPG11‐patient induced pluripotent stem cell model

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Himanshu K.; Prots, Iryna; Havlicek, Steven; Kohl, Zacharias; Perez‐Branguli, Francesc; Boerstler, Tom; Anneser, Lukas; Minakaki, Georgia; Wend, Holger; Hampl, Martin; Leone, Marina; Brückner, Martina; Klucken, Jochen; Reis, Andre; Boyer, Leah; Schuierer, Gerhard; Behrens, Jürgen; Lampert, Angelika; Engel, Felix B.; Gage, Fred H.; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mutations in the spastic paraplegia gene 11 (SPG11), encoding spatacsin, cause the most frequent form of autosomal‐recessive complex hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) and juvenile‐onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS5). When SPG11 is mutated, patients frequently present with spastic paraparesis, a thin corpus callosum, and cognitive impairment. We previously delineated a neurodegenerative phenotype in neurons of these patients. In the current study, we recapitulated early developmental phenotypes of SPG11 and outlined their cellular and molecular mechanisms in patient‐specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)‐derived cortical neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Methods We generated and characterized iPSC‐derived NPCs and neurons from 3 SPG11 patients and 2 age‐matched controls. Results Gene expression profiling of SPG11‐NPCs revealed widespread transcriptional alterations in neurodevelopmental pathways. These include changes in cell‐cycle, neurogenesis, cortical development pathways, in addition to autophagic deficits. More important, the GSK3ß‐signaling pathway was found to be dysregulated in SPG11‐NPCs. Impaired proliferation of SPG11‐NPCs resulted in a significant diminution in the number of neural cells. The decrease in mitotically active SPG11‐NPCs was rescued by GSK3 modulation. Interpretation This iPSC‐derived NPC model provides the first evidence for an early neurodevelopmental phenotype in SPG11, with GSK3ß as a potential novel target to reverse the disease phenotype. Ann Neurol 2016;79:826–840 PMID:26971897

  11. The history of multiple sclerosis: the changing frame of the disease over the centuries.

    PubMed

    Murray, T Jock

    2009-02-01

    For centuries, it was recognised that there was a condition characterised by episodic and progressive neurological deterioration, classified as 'paraplegia'. Some early cases of 'paraplegia' have been described in sufficient detail to recognise a condition resembling what we now call multiple sclerosis and these cast an interesting light on the approach to therapy before the disease had a name. Multiple sclerosis was differentiated and 'framed' as a separate identifiable entity by von Frerichs, Vulpian, Charcot and others in the mid-nineteenth century. Once framed by its pathology, clinical picture, course and prognosis, cases were diagnosed by others around the world. As knowledge of the disease increased, theories of cause and approaches to treatment increased so that a review in 1935 covered 158 treatments used in MS. There were subsequent waves of therapies including anticoagulants, antibiotics, histamine desensitisation, various diets, vaccines and anti-cancer agents, as well as numerous claims of 'cures'. After the 1960s the methodology for carrying out randomised clinical trials became better defined, aided by improved disease classification and disability scales. As data accumulated, theories were tested to account for observations of genetic influences, environmental factors, geographical variations, infections and immunological changes. The development of multiple sclerosis societies advanced research and public education and changed attitudes towards the disease. At the same time, attitudes of physicians towards management of people with multiple sclerosis changed. In the last fifty years, the major advances have been in basic research to elucidate the mechanisms and processes underlying the disease, the development of imaging techniques (MRI) and the development of immunomodulatory drugs which, for the first time, are altering the outcome of the disease. We have now entered the therapeutic era of multiple sclerosis, with continual major advances

  12. Myelin-associated glycoprotein gene mutation causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like disorder

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Nimrod; Lerer, Israela; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Fellig, Yakov; Glick, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Bat-El; Azulay, Haim; Dotan, Shlomo; Goldberg, Sharon; Gomori, John M.; Ponger, Penina; Newman, J. P.; Marreed, Hodaifah; Steck, Andreas J.; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Mor, Nofar; Harel, Michal; Geiger, Tamar; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Peles, Elior

    2015-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease is an X-linked hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by mutations or rearrangements in PLP1. It presents in infancy with nystagmus, jerky head movements, hypotonia and developmental delay evolving into spastic tetraplegia with optic atrophy and variable movement disorders. A clinically similar phenotype caused by recessive mutations in GJC2 is known as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. Both genes encode proteins associated with myelin. We describe three siblings of a consanguineous family manifesting the typical infantile-onset Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like phenotype slowly evolving into a form of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with mental retardation, dysarthria, optic atrophy and peripheral neuropathy in adulthood. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy were consistent with a demyelinating leukodystrophy. Using genetic linkage and exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense c.399C>G; p.S133R mutation in MAG. This gene, previously associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia, encodes myelin-associated glycoprotein, which is involved in myelin maintenance and glia-axon interaction. This mutation is predicted to destabilize the protein and affect its tertiary structure. Examination of the sural nerve biopsy sample obtained in childhood in the oldest sibling revealed complete absence of myelin-associated glycoprotein accompanied by ill-formed onion-bulb structures and a relatively thin myelin sheath of the affected axons. Immunofluorescence, cell surface labelling, biochemical analysis and mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies in a variety of cell types demonstrated a devastating effect of the mutation on post-translational processing, steady state expression and subcellular localization of myelin-associated glycoprotein. In contrast to the wild-type protein, the p.S133R mutant was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and was subjected to endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation by the

  13. [Acute spinal subdural hematoma after attempted spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Likar, R; Mathiaschitz, K; Spendel, M; Krumpholz, R; Martin, E

    1996-01-01

    This is a report of a case of a subdural haematoma with resulting paraplegia after attempted spinal anaesthesia. Epidural and subdural haematomas are rare complications after central neural blockade. The complication described here was the result of an unsuccessful attempt to puncture the spinal channel. The patient was a 72-year-old woman with a fracture of the left femoral neck, which it was intended to stabilize operatively. Findings that made lumbar spinal puncture difficult were severe overweight, and lordosis and scoliosis of the lumbar spine resulting from degenerative changes. Spinal anaesthesia was suggested because the patient had eaten shortly before and because she suffered from asthma. From the aspect of haemostasis no contraindications were present, and the anaesthesist was experienced in spinal anaesthesia even under difficult anatomical conditions. Several unsuccessful attempts were made to puncture the lumbar spinal channel while the patient was lying on her right side. It was also impossible to reach the spinal channel from a median or left paramedian approach. We used atraumatic pencil-point needles (Sprotte gauge 24, 90 mm). No blood was aspirated during any of the attempts. The surgical intervention was finally performed under a general anaesthetic in view of the urgency. No significant complications occurred during the operation, and no neurological abnormalities were observed immediately after or in the next 8 h after the operation. At 12 h after the operation a paraparesis was found caudal to L3. After this had been verified by radiological and neurological tests, neurosurgical decompression was carried out as quickly as possible. During the operation a distinct subdural haematoma without any detectable source of bleeding was discovered. Even after surgical revision and evacuation of the remaining haematoma it was not possible to reverse the paraplegia, in spite of rehabilitation measures. Despite a certain fragility of the vessel and

  14. Atraumatic Spinal Cord Injury in the Novice Surfer: A Comprehensive Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Flick, David; Cheng, Moses

    2017-01-01

    Novice surfers are at risk for a rare but potentially devastating form of atraumatic myelopathy. There are 16 published studies on this condition, including 66 cases. The most common suggested mechanism of injury is static hyperextension. However, active mechanisms, in contrast to static, have also been proposed and may be contributory. First time surfers, defined as those who have never been on a surfboard prior to the day of injury, are at particular risk. These individuals make up 89.5%–100% of the reported novice surfers found in the various reports. Multiple neurologic deficits occur and often include paraparesis, paraplegia, urinary retention, and hyperesthesia. While these deficits resolve in some cases, there are reports of multiple instances of permanent injury. Increased awareness of this condition is arguably the most effective preventative measure, as it may lead to avoidance of the predisposing postures. It may also lead to earlier diagnosis in the acute setting, which will become relevant as treatment modalities continue to be refined. PMID:28210528

  15. Characterization of maspardin, responsible for human Mast syndrome, in an insect species and analysis of its evolution in metazoans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertemps, Thomas; Montagné, Nicolas; Bozzolan, Françoise; Maria, Annick; Durand, Nicolas; Maïbèche-Coisne, Martine

    2012-07-01

    Mast syndrome is a complicated form of human hereditary spastic paraplegias, caused by a mutation in the gene acid cluster protein 33, which encodes a protein designated as "maspardin." Maspardin presents similarity to the α/β-hydrolase superfamily, but might lack enzymatic activity and rather be involved in protein-protein interactions. Association with the vesicles of the endosomal network also suggested that maspardin may be involved in the sorting and/or trafficking of molecules in the endosomal pathway, a crucial process for maintenance of neuron health. Despite a high conservation in living organisms, studies of maspardin in other animal species than mammals were lacking. In the cotton armyworm Spodoptera littoralis, an insect pest model, analysis of an expressed sequence tag collection from antenna, the olfactory organ, has allowed identifying a maspardin homolog ( SlMasp). We have investigated SlMasp tissue distribution and temporal expression by PCR and in situ hybridization techniques. Noteworthy, we found that maspardin was highly expressed in antennae and associated with the structures specialized in odorant detection. We have, in addition, identified maspardin sequences in numerous "nonmammalian" species and described here their phylogenetic analysis in the context of metazoan diversity. We observed a strong conservation of maspardin in metazoans, with surprisingly two independent losses of this gene in two relatively distant ecdysozoan taxa that include major model organisms, i.e., dipterans and nematodes.

  16. Cortical activation during visual illusory walking in persons with spinal cord injury: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Eick, John; Richardson, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the location of cortical activation during a visual illusion walking paradigm, a recently proposed treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI)-related neuropathic pain, in persons with SCI compared to able-bodied controls. Design Pilot experimental fMRI trial. Setting Outpatient rehabilitation clinic. Participants Three persons with paraplegia and five able bodied participants were included in this study. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Cortical activation as measured by blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) method of fMRI. Results During visually illusory walking, there was significant activation in the somatosensory cortex among those with SCI. In contrast, able-bodied participants showed little to no significant activation in this area, but rather, in the frontal and pre-motor areas. Conclusions Treatment modalities for SCI-related neuropathic pain that are based on sensory input paradigms such as virtual or visual illusory walking may work by targeting somatosensory cortex, an area that has been previously found to functionally reorganize following SCI. PMID:25461820

  17. Novel endovascular procedures and new developments in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S W K

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair has evolved to become a viable mainstream treatment for aortic pathology in both acute and elective settings. As technology advanced, traditional anatomical barriers were progressively tackled using new devices and novel procedures, and there are now multiple options available to the vascular surgeon. In the abdominal aorta, advances in endovascular aneurysm repair have been in the treatment of hostile aortic necks using new sealing concepts and ancillary procedures, and in branch preservation using fenestrations and snorkels. Access challenges have been met with a percutaneous approach and low-profile devices, and standard protocols have improved mortality for ruptured aneurysms. In the thoracic aorta, more invasive hybrid procedures have given way gradually to branched endografts. Particular challenges to the anaesthetist include blood pressure control and the prevention of stroke and paraplegia. Current focus in the thoracic aorta is in treating aortic arch pathology and in optimal management of acute and chronic dissections. This review describes the latest trends in the endovascular treatment of aortic diseases and examines the current evidence for different modalities of management.

  18. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells applied on the pressure ulcers had produced a surprising outcome in a severe case of neuromyelitis optica

    PubMed Central

    Dulamea, Adriana Octaviana; Sirbu-Boeti, Mirela-Patricia; Bleotu, Coralia; Dragu, Denisa; Moldovan, Lucia; Lupescu, Ioana; Comi, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies provided evidence that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative potential in cutaneous repair and profound immunomodulatory properties making them a candidate for therapy of neuroimmunologic diseases. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune, demyelinating central nervous system disorder characterized by a longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesion. A 46-year-old male diagnosed with NMO had relapses with paraplegia despite treatment and developed two stage IV pressure ulcers (PUs) on his legs. The patient consented for local application of autologous MSCs on PUs. MSCs isolated from the patient's bone marrow aspirate were multiplied in vitro during three passages and embedded in a tridimensional collagen-rich matrix which was applied on the PUs. Eight days after MSCs application the patient showed a progressive healing of PUs and improvement of disability. Two months later the patient was able to walk 20 m with bilateral assistance and one year later he started to walk without assistance. For 76 months the patient had no relapse and no adverse event was reported. The original method of local application of autologous BM-MSCs contributed to healing of PUs. For 6 years the patient was free of relapses and showed an improvement of disability. The association of cutaneous repair, sustained remission of NMO and improvement of disability might be explained by a promotion/optimization of recovery mechanisms in the central nervous system even if alternative hypothesis should be considered. Further studies are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells in NMO treatment. PMID:26807122

  19. Long-Term Training with a Brain-Machine Interface-Based Gait Protocol Induces Partial Neurological Recovery in Paraplegic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Ana R. C.; Shokur, Solaiman; Morya, Edgard; Campos, Debora S. F.; Moioli, Renan C.; Gitti, Claudia M.; Augusto, Patricia B.; Tripodi, Sandra; Pires, Cristhiane G.; Pereira, Gislaine A.; Brasil, Fabricio L.; Gallo, Simone; Lin, Anthony A.; Takigami, Angelo K.; Aratanha, Maria A.; Joshi, Sanjay; Bleuler, Hannes; Cheng, Gordon; Rudolph, Alan; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) provide a new assistive strategy aimed at restoring mobility in severely paralyzed patients. Yet, no study in animals or in human subjects has indicated that long-term BMI training could induce any type of clinical recovery. Eight chronic (3–13 years) spinal cord injury (SCI) paraplegics were subjected to long-term training (12 months) with a multi-stage BMI-based gait neurorehabilitation paradigm aimed at restoring locomotion. This paradigm combined intense immersive virtual reality training, enriched visual-tactile feedback, and walking with two EEG-controlled robotic actuators, including a custom-designed lower limb exoskeleton capable of delivering tactile feedback to subjects. Following 12 months of training with this paradigm, all eight patients experienced neurological improvements in somatic sensation (pain localization, fine/crude touch, and proprioceptive sensing) in multiple dermatomes. Patients also regained voluntary motor control in key muscles below the SCI level, as measured by EMGs, resulting in marked improvement in their walking index. As a result, 50% of these patients were upgraded to an incomplete paraplegia classification. Neurological recovery was paralleled by the reemergence of lower limb motor imagery at cortical level. We hypothesize that this unprecedented neurological recovery results from both cortical and spinal cord plasticity triggered by long-term BMI usage. PMID:27513629

  20. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease.

  1. Arachnoiditis ossificans and syringomyelia: A unique presentation

    PubMed Central

    Opalak, Charles F.; Opalak, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) is a rare disorder that was differentiated from leptomeningeal calcification by Kaufman and Dunsmore in 1971. It generally presents with progressive lower extremity myelopathy. Though the underlying etiology has yet to be fully described, it has been associated with various predisposing factors including vascular malformations, previous intradural surgery, myelograms, and adhesive arachnoiditis. Associated conditions include syringomyelia and arachnoid cyst. The preferred diagnostic method is noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Surgical intervention is still controversial and can include decompression and duroplasty or durotomy. Case Description: The authors report the case of a 62-year-old male with a history of paraplegia who presented with a urinary tract infection and dysautonomia. His past surgical history was notable for a C4–C6 anterior fusion and an intrathecal phenol injection for spasticity. A magnetic resonance image (MR) also demonstrated a T6-conus syringx. At surgery, there was significant ossification of the arachnoid/dura, which was removed. After a drain was placed in the syrinx, there was a significant neurologic improvement. Conclusion: This case demonstrates a unique presentation of AO and highlights the need for CT imaging when a noncommunicating syringx is identified. In addition, surgical decompression can achieve good results when AO is associated with concurrent compressive lesions. PMID:26693389

  2. The effects of exercise on human articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, F; Hudelmaier, M; Putz, R

    2006-01-01

    The effects of exercise on articular hyaline articular cartilage have traditionally been examined in animal models, but until recently little information has been available on human cartilage. Magnetic resonance imaging now permits cartilage morphology and composition to be analysed quantitatively in vivo. This review briefly describes the methodological background of quantitative cartilage imaging and summarizes work on short-term (deformational behaviour) and long-term (functional adaptation) effects of exercise on human articular cartilage. Current findings suggest that human cartilage deforms very little in vivo during physiological activities and recovers from deformation within 90 min after loading. Whereas cartilage deformation appears to become less with increasing age, sex and physical training status do not seem to affect in vivo deformational behaviour. There is now good evidence that cartilage undergoes some type of atrophy (thinning) under reduced loading conditions, such as with postoperative immobilization and paraplegia. However, increased loading (as encountered by elite athletes) does not appear to be associated with increased average cartilage thickness. Findings in twins, however, suggest a strong genetic contribution to cartilage morphology. Potential reasons for the inability of cartilage to adapt to mechanical stimuli include a lack of evolutionary pressure and a decoupling of mechanical competence and tissue mass. PMID:16637874

  3. Spinal cord injuries in ice hockey in Finland and Sweden from 1980 to 1996.

    PubMed

    Mölsä, J J; Tegner, Y; Alaranta, H; Myllynen, P; Kujala, U M

    1999-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) in the cervical or thoracic region is one of the most catastrophic types of sport injuries. This study was designed to determine incidence and mechanisms of major SCI in ice hockey in Finland and Sweden from 1980 to 1996 in order to find possibilities for prevention. Retrospective analysis of injury occurrence were carried out. Medical case records were reviewed and injured players were interviewed to complete the data. From 1980 to 1996, there were 16 accidents involving spinal cord injury with permanent disability. All players were male. The mean age was 21.1 years (range = 14 to 33 yr). In 50% of the cases the mechanism was body checking from behind and a blow to the head from the boards. In 69% of the cases the vertebral injury was fracture or/and luxation between C5 and C7. The neurological endstate was tetraplegia/paresis in 10 cases and paraplegia/paresis of the lower extremities in 6 cases. Ice hockey is one of the most popular sports in Europe, and the number of participants is still increasing. The typical mechanism in SCI is body checking from behind, falling down and a head-first blow from the boards. These serious injuries may be prevented by changing the rules (banning body checking near the boards) with strict refereeing and education of trainers and players.

  4. Can MRI Findings Help to Predict Neurological Recovery in Paraplegics With Thoracolumbar Fracture?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joonchul; Koh, Seong-Eun; Jung, Heeyoune; Lee, Hye Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usefulness of various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the prognosis of neurological recovery in paraplegics with thoracolumbar fracture using association analysis with clinical outcomes and electrodiagnostic features. Methods This retrospective study involved 30 patients treated for paraplegia following thoracolumbar fracture. On axial and sagittal T2-weighted MRI scans, nerve root sedimentation sign, root aggregation sign, and signal intensity changes in the conus medullaris were independently assessed by two raters. A positive sedimentation sign was defined as the absence of nerve root sedimentation. The root aggregation sign was defined as the presence of root aggregation in at least one axial MRI scan. Clinical outcomes including the American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale, ambulatory capacity, and electrodiagnostic features were used for association analysis. Results Inter-rater reliability of the nerve root sedimentation sign and the root aggregation sign were κ=0.67 (p=0.001) and κ=0.78 (p<0.001), respectively. A positive sedimentation sign was significantly associated with recovery of ambulatory capacity after a rehabilitation program (χ2=4.854, p=0.028). The presence of the root aggregation sign was associated with reduced compound muscle action potential amplitude of common peroneal and tibial nerves in nerve conduction studies (χ2=5.026, p=0.025). Conclusion A positive sedimentation sign was significantly associated with recovery of ambulatory capacity and not indicative of persistent paralysis. The root aggregation sign suggested the existence of significant cauda equina injuries. PMID:26798606

  5. Fibromyalgia and arachnoiditis presented as an acute spinal disorder

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Ghazali, Faizul H.; Abdullah, Jafri M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adhesive arachnoiditis is a chronic, insidious condition that causes debilitating intractable pain and a range of other neurological problems. Its pathophysiology is not well understood. This manuscript discusses its presentations, which can mimic an acute spinal disorder, its hypothetical pathophysiology, treatment, and its relationship with fibromyalgia. Case Description: The authors present a case of a 47-year-old female who presented with clinical features mimicking an acute spinal disorder but later found to have an adhesive arachnoiditis. She was admitted following a trauma with complaints of back pain and paraplegia. On examination, there was marked tenderness over thoracolumbar spine with lower limbs upper motor neuron weakness. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine revealed multiple lesions at her thoracic and lumbar spinal canals, which did not compress the spinal cord. Therefore, conservative management was initiated. Despite on regular therapies, her back and body pain worsened and little improvement in her limbs power was noted. Laminectomy was pursued and found to have spinal cord arachnoiditis. Subsequently, she was operated by other team members for multiple pelvic masses, which later proved to be benign. After gathering all the clinical information obtained at surgery and after taking detailed history inclusive of cognitive functions, diagnosis of an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome was made. Currently, she is managed by neuropsychologist and pain specialist. Conclusion: This case report highlights the importance of knowing an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome – a rarely discussed pathology by the neurosurgeon, which discloses a significant relationship between immune and nervous systems. PMID:25396073

  6. Results of Isotope Cisternography in 175 Patients with a Suspected Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Mi; Shim, Jae-Joon; Yoon, Seok-Mann; Bae, Hack-Gun; Doh, Jae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is a syndrome characterized by gait disturbance, memory impairment and urinary incontinence. The isotope cisternography (ICG) became less useful because of low accuracy and complications. We tried to evaluate the safety and value of the ICG. Methods We retrospectively collected data on ICG of 175 consecutive patients with a suspected hydrocephalus. We classified the ICG into four types by the ventricular reflux and circulation time. The ventricular size was measured by Evans index and the width of the third ventricle. Results There were three complications including one case of paraplegia. Type 4 was the most common type, observed in 53%. Type 3 (33%), type 2 (7%), and type 1 (7%) were observed less often. Type 4 was more common in patients with large ventricles. Types of the ICG were not related to the causes of hydrocephalus, gender, or age of the patients. Shunting was more frequently performed in type 4 (71%), compared to type 1 (17%), type 2 (33%), and type 3 (46%). Surgery was more common when the cause was vascular. After the shunt surgery, 33.0% were graded as the improved. Although there were some improvements even in the not-improved patients, they still needed many helps. The improvement was related to the preoperative state. Conclusion ICG may bring a serious complication, however the incidence is very low. Although the predictability of response rate on the shunting is doubtful, ICG is a cheap and useful tool to select surgical candidates in NPH. PMID:27169059

  7. Screening of ARHSP-TCC patients expands the spectrum of SPG11 mutations and includes a large scale gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Denora, Paola S; Schlesinger, David; Casali, Carlo; Kok, Fernando; Tessa, Alessandra; Boukhris, Amir; Azzedine, Hamid; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Bruno, Claudio; Truchetto, Jeremy; Biancheri, Roberta; Fedirko, Estelle; Di Rocco, Maja; Bueno, Clarissa; Malandrini, Alessandro; Battini, Roberta; Sickl, Elisabeth; de Leva, Maria Fulvia; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Silvestri, Gabriella; Simonati, Alessandro; Said, Edith; Ferbert, Andreas; Criscuolo, Chiara; Heinimann, Karl; Modoni, Anna; Weber, Peter; Palmeri, Silvia; Plasilova, Martina; Pauri, Flavia; Cassandrini, Denise; Battisti, Carla; Pini, Antonella; Tosetti, Michela; Hauser, Erwin; Masciullo, Marcella; Di Fabio, Roberto; Piccolo, Francesca; Denis, Elodie; Cioni, Giovanni; Massa, Roberto; Della Giustina, Elvio; Calabrese, Olga; Melone, Marina A B; De Michele, Giuseppe; Federico, Antonio; Bertini, Enrico; Durr, Alexandra; Brockmann, Knut; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Zatz, Mayana; Filla, Alessandro; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2009-03-01

    Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia with thinning of corpus callosum (ARHSP-TCC) is a complex form of HSP initially described in Japan but subsequently reported to have a worldwide distribution with a particular high frequency in multiple families from the Mediterranean basin. We recently showed that ARHSP-TCC is commonly associated with mutations in SPG11/KIAA1840 on chromosome 15q. We have now screened a collection of new patients mainly originating from Italy and Brazil, in order to further ascertain the spectrum of mutations in SPG11, enlarge the ethnic origin of SPG11 patients, determine the relative frequency at the level of single Countries (i.e., Italy), and establish whether there is one or more common mutation. In 25 index cases we identified 32 mutations; 22 are novel, including 9 nonsense, 3 small deletions, 4 insertions, 1 in/del, 1 small duplication, 1 missense, 2 splice-site, and for the first time a large genomic rearrangement. This brings the total number of SPG11 mutated patients in the SPATAX collection to 111 cases in 44 families and in 17 isolated cases, from 16 Countries, all assessed using homogeneous clinical criteria. While expanding the spectrum of mutations in SPG11, this larger series also corroborated the notion that even within apparently homogeneous population a molecular diagnosis cannot be achieved without full gene sequencing.

  8. The Seatbelt Syndrome-Do We Have a Chance?: A Report of 3 Cases With Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Christiane S; Zand, Tristan; Ceroni, Dimitri; Wildhaber, Barbara E; La Scala, Giorgio

    2016-05-01

    The seatbelt syndrome represents an injury pattern seen after motor vehicle accidents. It is secondary to either the misplacement of seatbelts over the abdomen or the misuse of the restraint systems. This syndrome is infrequent in the pediatric population and occurs mostly in school-aged children because recommended lap-shoulder belts and booster seats are often not used in this age group, so that the seatbelt lies over the abdomen. Sudden deceleration bends the child around the lap belt causing injuries to the viscera, head, and spine (Chance fracture), often associated with paraplegia. Because not all patients have an abdominal seatbelt sign, this syndrome can easily not be recognized with potentially life-threatening consequences.We report on 3 patients with the seatbelt syndrome and review the literature regarding prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of the different injuries and discuss the diagnostic challenges of intestinal lesions and their management.Following this accident pattern, in hemodynamically stable patients with a normal abdominal computed tomography scan, close surveillance is warranted to rule out intestinal lesions manifesting with progressive peritoneal irritation. In hemodynamically unstable patients, or if there is evidence of free air on the computed tomography scan, emergency abdominal exploration is required.

  9. The effects of neck and trunk stabilization exercises on upper limb and visuoperceptual function in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji-Won; Song, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to investigate the effects of neck and trunk stabilization exercises on upper limb and visuoperceptual function in children with cerebral palsy. The Jebson-Taylor hand function test and the Korean Developmental Test of Visual Perception-2 (K-DTVP-2) test were utilised. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 11 schoolchildren who had paraplegia caused by premature birth, and who had been diagnosed with periventricular leukomalacia. Kinesitherapy was implemented in individual children for eight weeks, twice a week, for 45 minutes at a time. After a preliminary evaluation, kinesitherapy, including neck and trunk stabilization exercises common to all the children, was implemented for eight weeks according to the functioning and level of each child. A post evaluation was performed after the eight weeks of kinesitherapy. [Results] The intervention showed a significant effect in five subcategories of the Jebson-Taylor hand function test, as well as according to the K-DTVP-2 test. [Conclusion] Because neck and trunk stabilization exercises requiring positive participation by the children included fundamental elements of daily living motion, the exercises might have had a positive effect on upper limb and visuoperceptual function. PMID:27942155

  10. Design of Optimal Treatments for Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders using Patient-Specific Multibody Dynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Disorders of the human neuromusculoskeletal system such as osteoarthritis, stroke, cerebral palsy, and paraplegia significantly affect mobility and result in a decreased quality of life. Surgical and rehabilitation treatment planning for these disorders is based primarily on static anatomic measurements and dynamic functional measurements filtered through clinical experience. While this subjective treatment planning approach works well in many cases, it does not predict accurate functional outcome in many others. This paper presents a vision for how patient-specific multibody dynamic models can serve as the foundation for an objective treatment planning approach that identifies optimal treatments and treatment parameters on an individual patient basis. First, a computational paradigm is presented for constructing patient-specific multibody dynamic models. This paradigm involves a combination of patient-specific skeletal models, muscle-tendon models, neural control models, and articular contact models, with the complexity of the complete model being dictated by the requirements of the clinical problem being addressed. Next, three clinical applications are presented to illustrate how such models could be used in the treatment design process. One application involves the design of patient-specific gait modification strategies for knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation, a second involves the selection of optimal patient-specific surgical parameters for a particular knee osteoarthritis surgery, and the third involves the design of patient-specific muscle stimulation patterns for stroke rehabilitation. The paper concludes by discussing important challenges that need to be overcome to turn this vision into reality. PMID:21785529

  11. The thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, T R; Dineen, R; White, B; Jaspan, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study included a series of middle-aged male and female patients who presented with chronic anterior hemicord dysfunction progressing to paraplegia. Imaging of anterior thoracic cord displacement by either a dural adhesion or a dural defect with associated cord herniation is presented. Methods This is a retrospective review of cases referred to a tertiary neuroscience centre over a 19-year period. Imaging series were classified by two experienced neuroradiologists against several criteria and correlated with clinical examination and/or findings at surgery. Results 16 cases were available for full review. Nine were considered to represent adhesions (four confirmed surgically) and four to represent true herniation (three confirmed surgically). In the three remaining cases the diagnosis was radiologically uncertain. Conclusion The authors propose “thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome” as a novel term to describe this patient cohort and suggest appropriate clinicoradiological features for diagnosis. Several possible aetiologies are also suggested, with disc rupture and inflammation followed by disc resorption and dural pocket formation being a possible mechanism predisposing to herniation at the extreme end of a clinicopathological spectrum. PMID:22665931

  12. Piriformis syndrome in an incomplete paraplegic patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Misirlioglu, TO; Palamar, D; Akgun, K

    2015-01-01

    Study design: Single case report. Objectives: We present an incomplete paraplegic patient with lower back and hip pain, diagnosed and treated as the piriformis syndrome (PS). Setting: University hospital, Turkey. Case: A 62-year-old woman with T3 paraplegia of American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade D presented with lower back and right hip pain accompanied by pain and numbness radiating to her right leg. After detailed anamnesis and physical examination, she was pre-diagnosed as having PS. The marked relief of pain following the ultrasound-guided piriformis muscle injection of 4 cc of lidocaine 2%+1 cc of betametazone confirmed the diagnosis. Conclusion: Although the compressive neuropathies and musculoskeletal injuries of the upper limb leading to neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) are well described in literature, there is limited information regarding those of lower limbs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of PS in a patient with SCI. PS should be kept in mind as a pain generator, especially in active and ambulatory SCI patients. PMID:28053713

  13. Systemic interleukin 12 displays anti-tumour activity in the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Kishima, H.; Shimizu, K.; Miyao, Y.; Mabuchi, E.; Tamura, K.; Tamura, M.; Sasaki, M.; Hakakawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    In various systemic cancers, interleukin 12 (IL-12) induces anti-tumour immunity mediated by T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. To determine whether IL-12 has anti-tumour activity against malignant gliomas in the central nervous system (CNS), which is considered to be an immunologically privileged site, we treated mice with meningeal gliomatosis by intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) administration of recombinant murine IL-12. Although untreated mice revealed symptoms, such as body weight loss or paraplegia as a result of the meningeal gliomatosis within 8 days after tumour inoculation, 80% of the mice treated with IL-12 at 0.5 microg i.p. were cured. Many lymphocytes, mostly CD4+ and CD8+ cells, infiltrated to the tumours of IL-12-treated mice. The numbers of these cells increased in the cervical lymph nodes, into which the cerebrospinal fluid drains, and there they secreted a considerable amount of interferon-gamma. Mice cured by IL-12 rejected subcutaneous or i.t. rechallenge with their original glioma cells, but the same mice were not able to reject other syngeneic tumour cells. These results indicate that the immune system recognizes malignant glioma cells in the subarachnoid space of the CNS and that systemic IL-12 may produce effective anti-tumour activity and long-lasting tumour-specific immunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9716025

  14. Periodically Relieving Ischial Sitting Load to Decrease the Risk of Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Makhsous, Mohsen; Rowles, Diane M.; Rymer, William Z.; Bankard, James; Nam, Ellis K.; Chen, David; Lin, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relieving effect on interface pressure of an alternate sitting protocol involving a sitting posture that reduces ischial support. Design Repeated measures in 2 protocols on 3 groups of subjects. Setting Laboratory. Participants Twenty able-bodied persons, 20 persons with paraplegia, and 20 persons with tetraplegia. Interventions Two 1-hour protocols were used: alternate and normal plus pushup. In the alternate protocol, sitting posture was alternated every 10 minutes between normal (sitting upright with ischial support) and with partially removed ischial support (WO-BPS) postures; in the normal plus pushup protocol, sitting was in normal posture with pushups (lifting the subject off the seat) performed every 20 minutes. Main Outcome Measure Interface pressure on seat and backrest. Results In WO-BPS posture, the concentrated interface pressure observed around the ischia in normal posture was significantly repositioned to the thighs. By cyclically repositioning the interface pressure, the alternate protocol was superior to the normal plus pushup protocol in terms of a significantly lower average interface pressure over the buttocks. Conclusions A sitting protocol periodically reducing the ischial support helps lower the sitting load on the buttocks, especially the area close to ischial tuberosities. PMID:17601466

  15. Microsurgical procedures in the peripheral nerves and the dorsal root entry zone for the treatment of spasticity.

    PubMed

    Sindou, M; Keravel, Y

    1988-01-01

    When spasticity becomes severe and harmful, in spite of physical and medical therapy, neurosurgery can give functional improvement. This paper deals with the long term results of Selective Peripheral Neurotomies of the Tibial Nerve and Selective Posterior Rhizotomies in the Dorsal Root Entry Zone, in 123 patients with spastic disorders localized to the limbs. The micro-techniques and intra-operative electro-stimulation for identification of the nervous structures responsible for the spastic components, can give a substantial reduction of the harmful spasticity, without suppressing the useful muscle tone and impairing the residual motor and sensory functions. The results were effective, with a 1 to 13 year follow-up (5 on average), in 89% of 47 Selective Peripheral Neurotomies of the tibial nerve for spastic foot, in 92% of 53 Selective Posterior Rhizotomies for paraplegia and in 87% of 23 Selective Posterior Rhizotomies for hemiplegia. In the most severe situations ("comfort" indications), correction of the abnormal postures and relief of pain facilitated nursing and physiotherapy. Sometimes there was reappearance of some useful voluntary movements. In the less affected patients ("functional" indications), the suppression of the harmful spastic components made the persistant capacities more effective.

  16. Small bowel entrapment and ureteropelvic junction disruption associated with L3 Chance fracture-dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Pesenti, Sebastien; Blondel, Benjamin; Faure, Alice; Peltier, Emilie; Launay, Franck; Jouve, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Chance fracture are rare lesions but often associated with abdominal injuries. We herein present the case of a seven years old patient who sustained an entrapment of small bowel and an ureteropelvic disruption associated with a Chance fracture and spine dislocation following a traffic accident. Initial X-rays and computed tomographic (CT) scan showed a Chance fracture with dislocation of L3 vertebra, with an incarceration of a small bowel loop in the spinal canal and a complete section of the left lumbar ureter. Paraplegia was noticed on the initial neurological examination. A posterior L2-L4 osteosynthesis was performed firstly. In a second time she underwent a sus umbilical laparotomy to release the incarcerated jejunum loop in the spinal canal. An end-to-end anastomosis was performed on a JJ probe to suture the left injured ureter. One month after the traumatism, she started to complain of severe headaches related to a leakage of cerebrospinalis fluid. Three months after the traumatism there was a clear regression of the leakage. One year after the trauma, an anterior intervertebral fusion was done. At final follow-up, no neurologic recovery was noticed. In case of Chance fracture, all physicians should think about abdominal injuries even if the patient is asymptomatic. Initial abdominal CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging provide in such case crucial info for management of the spine and the associated lesions. PMID:27672641

  17. Phase 1 Trial of Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Kakabadze, Zurab; Kipshidze, Nickolas; Mardaleishvili, Konstantine; Chutkerashvili, Gocha; Chelishvili, Irakli; Harders, Albrecht; Loladze, George; Shatirishvili, Gocha; Kipshidze, Nodar; Chakhunashvili, David; Chutkerashvili, Konstantine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. A total of 18 patients, with complete motor deficits and paraplegia caused by thoracic and lumbar spine trauma without muscle atrophy or psychiatric problems, were included into this study. Materials and Methods. The bone marrow was aspirated from the anterior iliac crest under local anesthesia and the mononuclear fraction was isolated by density gradient method. At least 750 million mononuclear-enriched cells, suspended in 2 mL of saline, were infused intrathecally. Results and Discussion. The study reports demonstrated improvement of motor and sensory functions of various degrees observed in 9 of the 18 (50%) cases after bone marrow stem cell transplantation. Measured by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale, 7 (78%) out of the 9 patients observed an improvement by one grade, while two cases (22%) saw an improvement by two grades. However, there were no cases in which the condition was improved by three grades. Conclusions. Analysis of subsequent treatment results indicated that the transplantation of mononuclear-enriched autologous BMSCs is a feasible and safe technique. However, successful application of the BMSCs in the clinical practice is associated with the necessity of executing more detailed examinations to evaluate the effect of BMSCs on the patients with spinal cord injury.

  18. Neurodegeneration and microtubule dynamics: death by a thousand cuts

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Jyoti; Ratnakaran, Neena; Koushika, Sandhya P.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules form important cytoskeletal structures that play a role in establishing and maintaining neuronal polarity, regulating neuronal morphology, transporting cargo, and scaffolding signaling molecules to form signaling hubs. Within a neuronal cell, microtubules are found to have variable lengths and can be both stable and dynamic. Microtubule associated proteins, post-translational modifications of tubulin subunits, microtubule severing enzymes, and signaling molecules are all known to influence both stable and dynamic pools of microtubules. Microtubule dynamics, the process of interconversion between stable and dynamic pools, and the proportions of these two pools have the potential to influence a wide variety of cellular processes. Reduced microtubule stability has been observed in several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), and tauopathies like Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Hyperstable microtubules, as seen in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP), also lead to neurodegeneration. Therefore, the ratio of stable and dynamic microtubules is likely to be important for neuronal function and perturbation in microtubule dynamics might contribute to disease progression. PMID:26441521

  19. Phenotypic evolution of UNC80 loss of function.

    PubMed

    Valkanas, Elise; Schaffer, Katherine; Dunham, Christopher; Maduro, Valerie; du Souich, Christèle; Rupps, Rosemarie; Adams, David R; Baradaran-Heravi, Alireza; Flynn, Elise; Malicdan, May C; Gahl, William A; Toro, Camilo; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2016-12-01

    Failure to thrive arises as a complication of a heterogeneous group of disorders. We describe two female siblings with spastic paraplegia and global developmental delay but also, atypically for the HSPs, poor weight gain classified as failure to thrive. After extensive clinical and biochemical investigations failed to identify the etiology, we used exome sequencing to identify biallelic UNC80 mutations (NM_032504.1:c.[3983-3_3994delinsA];[2431C>T]. The paternally inherited NM_032504.1:c.3983-3_3994delinsA is predicted to encode p.Ser1328Argfs*19 and the maternally inherited NM_032504.1:c.2431C>T is predicted to encode p.Arg811*. No UNC80 mRNA was detectable in patient cultured skin fibroblasts, suggesting UNC80 loss of function by nonsense mediated mRNA decay. Further supporting the UNC80 mutations as causative of these siblings' disorder, biallelic mutations in UNC80 have recently been described among individuals with an overlapping phenotype. This report expands the disease spectrum associated with UNC80 mutations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Neurology and diving.

    PubMed

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent.

  1. Spinal cord blood flow measured by /sup 14/C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography during and after graded spinal cord compression in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, A.; Nystroem, B.G.; Gerdin, B.

    1989-05-01

    The relations between degree of thoracic spinal cord compression causing myelographic block, reversible paraparesis, and extinction of the sensory evoked potential on one hand, and spinal cord blood flow on the other, were investigated. This was done in rats using the blocking weight-technique and /sup 14/C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. A load of 9 g caused myelographic block. Five minutes of compression with that load caused a reduction of spinal cord blood flow to about 25%, but 5 and 60 minutes after the compression spinal cord blood flow was restored to 60% of the pretrauma value. A load of 35 g for 5 minutes caused transient paraparesis. Recovery to about 30% was observed 5 and 60 minutes thereafter. During compression at a load of 55 g, which caused almost total extinction of sensory evoked potential and irreversible paraplegia, spinal cord blood flow under the load ceased. The results indicate that myelographic block occurs at a load which does not cause irreversible paraparesis and that a load which permits sensory evoked potential to be elicited results in potentially salvageable damage.

  2. Further genotype-phenotype correlation emerging from two families with PLP1 exon 4 skipping.

    PubMed

    Biancheri, Roberta; Grossi, Serena; Regis, Stefano; Rossi, Andrea; Corsolini, Fabio; Rossi, Daniela Paola; Cavalli, Pietro; Severino, Mariasavina; Filocamo, Mirella

    2014-03-01

    Proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1) gene-related disorders due to mutations in the PLP1 include a wide spectrum of X-linked disorders ranging from severe connatal Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) to spastic paraplegia 2 (SPG2). Duplications, deletions or point mutations in coding and noncoding regions of the PLP1 gene may occur. We report the clinical, neuroradiologic and molecular findings in six patients from two unrelated families. The affected males showed severe mental retardation, spastic tetraparesis, inability of walking and pes cavus at onset in early infancy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hypomyelination and brain atrophy. Nystagmus was never observed. The affected females showed adult-onset progressive spastic paraparesis leading to wheel-chair dependency and subtle white matter changes on brain MRI. Molecular studies in the two families identified two different intronic mutations, the novel c.622+2T>C and the known c.622+1G>A, leading to the skipping of PLP1-exon 4. The clinical presentation of the affected males did not consistently fit in any of the PLP1-related disorder subtypes (i.e., connatal or classic PMD, SPG2 and 'PLP1 null syndrome'), and in addition, the carrier females were symptomatic despite the severe clinical picture of their respective probands. This study provides new insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of patients with PLP1 splice-site mutations.

  3. Treatment of Chronic Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation in a Paraplegic Patient with the Weaver-Dunn Procedure and a Hook-Plate.

    PubMed

    Godry, Holger; Citak, Mustafa; Königshausen, Matthias; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Seybold, Dominik

    2016-06-27

    In case of patients with spinal cord injury and concomitant acromioclavicular (AC) joint-dislocation the treatment is challenging, as in this special patient group the function of the shoulder joint is critical because patients depend on the upper limb for mobilization and wheelchair-locomotion. Therefore the goal of this study was to examine, if the treatment of chronic AC-joint dislocation using the Weaver-Dunn procedure augmented with a hook-plate in patients with a spinal cord injury makes early postoperative wheelchair mobilization and the wheelchair transfer with full weight-bearing possible. In this case the Weaver-Dunn procedure with an additive hook-plate was performed in a 34-year-old male patient with a complete paraplegia and a posttraumatic chronic AC-joint dislocation. The patient was allowed to perform his wheelchair transfers with full weight bearing on the first post-operative day. The removal of the hook-plate was performed four months after implantation. At the time of follow-up the patient could use his operated shoulder with full range of motion without restrictions in his activities of daily living or his wheel-chair transfers.

  4. Chapter 3: neurology in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    York, George K; Steinberg, David A

    2010-01-01

    Neurology, in the modern sense, did not exist in ancient Egypt, where medicine was a compound of natural, magical and religious elements, with different practitioners for each form of healing. Nevertheless, Egyptian doctors made careful observations of illness and injury, some of which involved the nervous system. Modern scholars have three sources of information about Egyptian medicine: papyri, inscriptions, and mummified remains. These tell us that the Egyptians had words for the skull, brain, vertebrae, spinal fluid and meninges, though they do not say if they assigned any function to them. They described unconsciousness, quadriparesis, hemiparesis and dementia. We can recognize neurological injuries, such as traumatic hemiparesis and cervical dislocation with paraplegia, in the well known Edwin Smith surgical papyrus. Similarly recognizable in the Ebers papyrus is a description of migraine. An inscription from the tomb of the vizier Weshptah, dated c. 2455 BCE, seems to describe stroke, and Herodotus describes epilepsy in Hellenistic Egypt. We have very little understanding of how Egyptian physicians organized these observations, but we may learn something of Egyptian culture by examining them. At the same time, modern physicians feel some connection to Egyptian physicians and can plausibly claim to be filling a similar societal role.

  5. [Recommendations for the administration of conventional and new antithrombotic agents from the perspective of anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Gogarten, W; Hoffmann, K; Van Aken, H

    2010-11-01

    Neuraxial blockade confers benefits to surgical patients not only due to the high analgesic quality but also through a reduction in postoperative complications, such as respiratory insufficiency and a shortening of postoperative paralytic ileus. In orthopedic surgery peripheral and neuraxial blockades are extensively used to enhance postoperative mobilization. The most serious complication of neuraxial blockade is spinal epidural hematoma, which may lead to permanent paraplegia if left untreated. The risk is enhanced in patients receiving thromboembolism prophylaxis. Most national societies have issued guidelines with specific time intervals between application of antithrombotic drugs and subsequent neuraxial blockade to minimize this risk. From the viewpoint of an anesthesiologist it is preferable to start with chemical thromboembolism prophylaxis postoperatively as opposed to preoperatively, to administer all drugs in the evening and to limit the number of available drugs at each site. The safety of neuraxial blockade in the presence of the new oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban is currently unknown due to limited experience and dabigatran is considered contraindicated with indwelling epidural catheters according to the manufacturer.

  6. Increased spasticity from a fracture in the baclofen catheter caused by Charcot spine: case report.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Ray, Wilson Z; Sayama, Christina M; Dailey, Andrew T

    2015-04-01

    In patients with Charcot spine, a loss of normal feedback response from the insensate spine results in spinal neuropathy. Increasing deformity, which can manifest as sitting imbalance, crepitus, or increased back pain, can result. We present the case of a patient with a high-thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) who subsequently developed a Charcot joint at the T10-11 level that resulted in a dramatic increase in previously controlled spasticity after fracture of an existing baclofen catheter. The 68-year-old man with T4 paraplegia presented with increasing baclofen requirements and radiographic evidence of fracture of the intrathecal baclofen catheter with an associated Charcot joint with extensive bony destruction. The neuropathic spinal arthropathy caused mechanical baclofen catheter malfunction and resulting increased spasticity. The patient was found to have transected both his spinal cord and the baclofen catheter. Treatment consisted of removal of the catheter and stabilization with long-segment instrumentation and fusion from T6 to L2. Follow-up radiographs obtained a year and a half after surgery showed no evidence of hardware failure or significant malalignment. The patient has experienced resolution of symptoms and does not require oral or intrathecal baclofen. This is the only reported case of a Charcot spine causing intrathecal catheter fracture, leading to increased spasticity. This noteworthy case suggests that late spinal instability should be considered in the setting of SCI and increased spasticity.

  7. Perinatal and Neonatal Outcomes of Patients Who Were Diagnosed with Neural Tube Defect in Midtrimester Fetal Ultrasound Scan and Refused Request for Termination of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Eraslan, Sevil; Celik, Ebru; Simsek, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the perinatal and neonatal outcomes of patients who were diagnosed with neural tube defect (NTD) in the midtrimester fetal ultrasound scan and refused the request for termination of pregnancy. Material and Methods. The records of 69 patients, for whom NTD was detected in the midtrimester fetal ultrasound scan and who preferred the continuation of the pregnancy after comprehensive counselling about the possible prognosis and treatment options during the period between January 2011 and February 2016, were reviewed retrospectively. Results. Of these patients, 66.7% were 25–35 years old; 95.7% were multiparous; and 1.4% had a history of a fetus having NTD in previous pregnancies. There were 7 (10.1%) neonatal deaths in these patients. Meningomyelocele closure procedure was the most performed surgery in the postnatal period (92%). Of these patients, 30.7% had paraplegia; 51.6% had neurogenic bladder; and 6.4% had infections due to surgery. Conclusion. The results of this study demonstrated perinatal and neonatal outcomes of fetuses with NTD who were not terminated by the preference of the family in midtrimester. The experience of our centre would be beneficial as a tool for nondirective counselling of these patients when considering the antenatal/postnatal care options and postnatal prognosis. PMID:27999804

  8. Perinatal and Neonatal Outcomes of Patients Who Were Diagnosed with Neural Tube Defect in Midtrimester Fetal Ultrasound Scan and Refused Request for Termination of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Melekoglu, Rauf; Eraslan, Sevil; Celik, Ebru; Simsek, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the perinatal and neonatal outcomes of patients who were diagnosed with neural tube defect (NTD) in the midtrimester fetal ultrasound scan and refused the request for termination of pregnancy. Material and Methods. The records of 69 patients, for whom NTD was detected in the midtrimester fetal ultrasound scan and who preferred the continuation of the pregnancy after comprehensive counselling about the possible prognosis and treatment options during the period between January 2011 and February 2016, were reviewed retrospectively. Results. Of these patients, 66.7% were 25-35 years old; 95.7% were multiparous; and 1.4% had a history of a fetus having NTD in previous pregnancies. There were 7 (10.1%) neonatal deaths in these patients. Meningomyelocele closure procedure was the most performed surgery in the postnatal period (92%). Of these patients, 30.7% had paraplegia; 51.6% had neurogenic bladder; and 6.4% had infections due to surgery. Conclusion. The results of this study demonstrated perinatal and neonatal outcomes of fetuses with NTD who were not terminated by the preference of the family in midtrimester. The experience of our centre would be beneficial as a tool for nondirective counselling of these patients when considering the antenatal/postnatal care options and postnatal prognosis.

  9. [Analysis of the quality of life in patients with spinal lesions in the Canton of Sarajevo].

    PubMed

    Vavra-Hadziahmetović, Narcisa

    2004-01-01

    The author present in the retrospective analysis 10 patients (52 females, 48 males) with the condition of paraplegy in Canton Sarajevo in the period 01.01.-31.12.2002. year. In all the patients were followed the total life and working activities as are proclaim by UN 1994. The standard rules for the equal possibilities of the persons with unableness what predicts the insurance of their rights from the medical care and additional services. The results of the examination show that there does not exist one program for the professional direction and that only 8 (16%) males and 2 (4%) females employed while the rest unemployed, prematurely retired people or it is about the children it schooling. Although the persons with paraplegia get qualified as the persons with unableness of the adaptation and the life--housing adaptation only portionally performed (entrance in the flat--house 30%, bathroom/WC 26%, the thresholds 60%). They are identical the situations and with use of the utilities: wheel chair--stand--beds (92%:2%:29%). The particular caution is by the parents, marital partner 32% and 27% by brother, sister or another family member. The results which concern life of the examinees in the community show that 16% of examinees live along. The identical is the situation when ace in question also the members in the association and attending of the tuition at schools or faculties.

  10. Neuromuscular scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Allam, Anand M; Schwabe, Aloysia L

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this focused review is to provide an overview of neuromuscular scoliosis from the perspective of the rehabilitation physician. Scoliosis is a common consequence of neuromuscular diseases, including central nervous system disorders such as cerebral palsy and spinal cord injury; motor neuron disorders, for example, spinal muscular atrophy; muscle fiber disorders, for example, Duchenne muscular dystrophy; multifactorial disorders, for example, spina bifida; and many other neuropathic and myopathic conditions. Unlike adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, which is the most common form of spinal deformity, neuromuscular scoliosis is more severe and more progressive, and is associated with more morbidity. Factors that contribute to this spinal deformity include asymmetric paraplegia, imbalance of mechanical forces, intraspinal and congenital anomalies of the spine, altered sensory feedback, and abnormal posture via central pathways. Spinal deformity combined with limitations due to an underlying neuromuscular condition lead to significant physiologic impairments that affect limb movement, cardiopulmonary function, gait, standing, sitting, balance, trunk stability, bimanual activities, activities of daily living, and pain, as well as concerns with self-image and social interactions. Evaluation and management of this population requires understanding of disease progression, pulmonary status, functional limitations, indications for conservative and surgical interventions, and social considerations.

  11. Flexible organic field effect transistors for biomedical microimplants using polyimide and parylene C as substrate and insulator layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feili, Dara; Schuettler, Martin; Doerge, Thomas; Kammer, Sascha; Hoffmann, Klaus Peter; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Biomedical micro implants are used as neural prostheses to restore body functions after paraplegia by means of functional electrical stimulation (FES). Polymer electronic technology offers the potential to integrate flexible electronic circuits on microelectrodes in order to overcome the limit of traditional FES systems. This paper describes an approach of flexible organic transistors in order to develop a flexible biomedical micro implant for FES use. Polyimide shows excellent biocompatibility and biostability properties for flexible multi-channel microelectrodes in neural prosthetics application (Stieglitz et al 1997 Sensors Actuators A 60 240-3). Therefore, it was used as a flexible substrate on which polymer transistors have to be integrated. Gold or platinum was sputtered as the gate, drain and source. In this paper polyimide has been investigated as a gate isolator because of its high flexibility and biocompatibility. Polyimide was spin coated and imidized at different temperatures and times. Pentacene (C14H22) was evaporated at UHV and 75 °C substrate temperature as an active layer in an organic field effect transistor (OFET). Plasma activation and self-assembled monolayer surface modification were used to advance the electrical properties of organic transistors. The whole transistor was encapsulated in parylene C that was evaporated at room temperature using a standard Gorham system (Gorham 1966 J. Polym. Sci. A-1 4 3027-39). Investigation of the electrical properties of the OFET using polyimide as the isolator led to promising results.

  12. Atlastin regulates store-operated calcium entry for nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Yan, Bing; Si, Hongjiang; Peng, Xu; Zhang, Shenyuan L.; Hu, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    Homotypic membrane fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by a class of dynamin-like GTPases known as atlastin (ATL). Depletion of or mutations in ATL cause an unbranched ER morphology and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a neurodegenerative disease characterized by axon shortening in corticospinal motor neurons and progressive spasticity of the lower limbs. How ER shaping is linked to neuronal defects is poorly understood. Here, we show that dominant-negative mutants of ATL1 in PC-12 cells inhibit nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth. Overexpression of wild-type or mutant ATL1 or depletion of ATLs alters ER morphology and affects store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) by decreasing STIM1 puncta formation near the plasma membrane upon calcium depletion of the ER. In addition, blockage of the STIM1-Orai pathway effectively abolishes neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells stimulated by NGF. These results suggest that SOCE plays an important role in neuronal regeneration, and mutations in ATL1 may cause HSP, partly by undermining SOCE. PMID:28240257

  13. Monitoring standing wheelchair use after spinal cord injury: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Richard K.; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna

    2011-01-01

    Purpose An important issue in spinal cord injury (SCI) research is whether standing can yield positive health benefits. However, quantifying dose of standing and establishing subject compliance with a standing protocol is difficult. This case report describes a method to monitor dose of standing outside the laboratory, describes the standing patterns of one subject, and describes this subject’s satisfaction with the standing protocol. Method A man with T-10 complete paraplegia agreed to have his commercially available standing wheelchair instrumented with a custom-designed logging device for a 2-year period. The micro-controller-based logger, under custom software control, was mounted to the standing wheelchair. The logger recorded date, duration, angle of standing, and start/stop times. Results The client exceeded a suggested minimum dosage of standing per month (130.4% of goal), choosing to stand for short bouts (mean = 11.57 min) at an average angle of 61 °, on an average 3.86 days per calendar week. He was generally very satisfied with the standing device and provided subjective reports of improved spasticity and bowel motility. Conclusions This case report describes a standing and surveillance system that allows quantification of standing dose. Future controlled studies are needed to evaluate whether standing can beneficially affect secondary complications after SCI. PMID:15823996

  14. The Mitochondrial m-AAA Protease Prevents Demyelination and Hair Greying

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemyn, Julie; Barth, Esther; Langer, Thomas; Niessen, Carien M.; Rugarli, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    The m-AAA protease preserves proteostasis of the inner mitochondrial membrane. It ensures a functional respiratory chain, by controlling the turnover of respiratory complex subunits and allowing mitochondrial translation, but other functions in mitochondria are conceivable. Mutations in genes encoding subunits of the m-AAA protease have been linked to various neurodegenerative diseases in humans, such as hereditary spastic paraplegia and spinocerebellar ataxia. While essential functions of the m-AAA protease for neuronal survival have been established, its role in adult glial cells remains enigmatic. Here, we show that deletion of the highly expressed subunit AFG3L2 in mature mouse oligodendrocytes provokes early-on mitochondrial fragmentation and swelling, as previously shown in neurons, but causes only late-onset motor defects and myelin abnormalities. In contrast, total ablation of the m-AAA protease, by deleting both Afg3l2 and its paralogue Afg3l1, triggers progressive motor dysfunction and demyelination, owing to rapid oligodendrocyte cell death. Surprisingly, the mice showed premature hair greying, caused by progressive loss of melanoblasts that share a common developmental origin with Schwann cells and are targeted in our experiments. Thus, while both neurons and glial cells are dependant on the m-AAA protease for survival in vivo, complete ablation of the complex is necessary to trigger death of oligodendrocytes, hinting to cell-autonomous thresholds of vulnerability to m-AAA protease deficiency. PMID:27911893

  15. Mutations in mitochondrial enzyme GPT2 cause metabolic dysfunction and neurological disease with developmental and progressive features

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Qing; Nakayama, Tojo; Baytas, Ozan; Davidson, Shawn M.; Yang, Chendong; Schmidt, Michael; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Mishra, Sasmita; EI-Quessny, Malak; Niaz, Saima; Gul Butt, Mirrat; Imran Murtaza, Syed; Javed, Afzal; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Vaughan, Dylan J.; Hill, R. Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Yoo, Seung-Yun; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Nasir, Ramzi; Al-Saffar, Muna; Barkovich, A. James; Schwede, Matthew; Nagpal, Shailender; Rajab, Anna; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Housman, David E.; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Morrow, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that cause neurological phenotypes are highly informative with regard to mechanisms governing human brain function and disease. We report autosomal recessive mutations in the enzyme glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in large kindreds initially ascertained for intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). GPT2 [also known as alanine transaminase 2 (ALT2)] is one of two related transaminases that catalyze the reversible addition of an amino group from glutamate to pyruvate, yielding alanine and α-ketoglutarate. In addition to IDD, all affected individuals show postnatal microcephaly and ∼80% of those followed over time show progressive motor symptoms, a spastic paraplegia. Homozygous nonsense p.Arg404* and missense p.Pro272Leu mutations are shown biochemically to be loss of function. The GPT2 gene demonstrates increasing expression in brain in the early postnatal period, and GPT2 protein localizes to mitochondria. Akin to the human phenotype, Gpt2-null mice exhibit reduced brain growth. Through metabolomics and direct isotope tracing experiments, we find a number of metabolic abnormalities associated with loss of Gpt2. These include defects in amino acid metabolism such as low alanine levels and elevated essential amino acids. Also, we find defects in anaplerosis, the metabolic process involved in replenishing TCA cycle intermediates. Finally, mutant brains demonstrate misregulated metabolites in pathways implicated in neuroprotective mechanisms previously associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, our data reveal an important role for the GPT2 enzyme in mitochondrial metabolism with relevance to developmental as well as potentially to neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:27601654

  16. Field hospital treatment of blast wounds of the musculoskeletal system during the Yugoslav civil war.

    PubMed

    Covey, D C; Lurate, R B; Hatton, C T

    2000-05-01

    The spectrum of wounding and treatment of forty-one patients with musculoskeletal blast injuries at a U.S. military field hospital in the former Yugoslavia was reviewed. Patients underwent wound exploration, irrigation, debridement, broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, early fracture stabilization, and appropriate reconstructive surgery. Four patients developed wound infections. Two patients died as a result of their injuries (overall mortality 5 percent). There were three below-knee amputations and five other amputations (above-knee, ankle, midtarsal, partial forefoot, and finger). Three patients sustained lumbar burst fractures from mines that exploded under their vehicles, resulting in paraplegia in one case. Our patients underwent 112 surgical procedures, an average of 2.1 per patient. Twenty-two patients (54 percent) had other injuries or conditions in addition to their orthopaedic wounds. There were wide variations in the bone and soft tissue injuries caused by detonating ordnance, and the tissue damage was qualitatively different from that caused by gunshot wounds. Early debridement, leaving wounds open, and treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics were important factors in wound healing to allow subsequent successful reconstructive surgery in an austere field setting.

  17. Cochlear Implantation in Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Savaş, Özden; Aslan, Filiz; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurobrucellosis is a disease consisting of a wide spectrum of complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cranial nerve involvement, ataxia, meningeal irritation, paraplegia, seizures, coma, and even death. The vestibulocochlear nerve seems to be the most commonly affected cranial nerve (10%). We present a patient with neurobrucellosis whose auditory perception and speech intelligibility skill performances improved after cochlear implantation. Case Report: A 35 year-old woman was admitted to another hospital 2 years ago with the symptoms of headache, nausea, and altered consciousness, who was finally diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. She developed bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss during the following 6 months. There was no benefit of using hearing aids. After successful treatment of her illness, she was found to be suitable for cochlear implantation. After the operation, her auditory perception skills improved significantly with a Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score of 5. According to clinical observations and her family members’ statements, her Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) score was 3. Her speech intelligibility skills are still improving. Conclusion: Our case report represents the second case of hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation after neurobrucellosis. Cochlear implantation is a cost-effective and time-proven successful intervention in post-lingual adult patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Early timing of the surgery after appropriate treatment of meningitis helps the patient to achieve better postoperative results. PMID:26966626

  18. Comparison of heart rate response to tennis activity between persons with and without spinal cord injuries: implications for a training threshold.

    PubMed

    Barfield, J P; Malone, Laurie A; Coleman, Tristica A

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to reach a training threshold during on-court sport activity. Monitors collected heart rate (HR) data every 5 s for 11 wheelchair tennis players (WCT) with low paraplegia and 11 able-bodied controls matched on experience and skill level (ABT). Average HR was determined for time spent in practice (e.g, drills) and game (i.e., a competitive set), and the ability to surpass 50% peak HR (HRpeak) and 64% HRpeak in each condition was evaluated. Average exercise intensity (%HRpeak) was not significantly different between the groups during practice (M WCT = 68.18, SD = 7.53%, M ABT = 68.78, SD = 5.44%; t = .22, p = .83) or game (M WCT = 68.17, SD = .17%, M ABT = 71.55, SD = 4.75%; t = 1.12, p =.28). Allparticipants averaged an intensity > or = 50% HR-peak during practice and game, and the difference between group participants averaging an intensity > or = 64% HRpeak was not significant during practice (chi2 = .92, p = .34) or game (chi2 = 3.85, p = .05). In terms of reaching a health and fitness training threshold during tennis, individuals with low-level SCI are similar to matched controls.

  19. Clinical, imaging, and pathologic characteristics of Gurltia paralysans myelopathy in domestic cats from Chile.

    PubMed

    Mieres, Marcelo; Gómez, Marcelo A; Lillo, Carla; Rojas, Marcela A; Moroni, Manuel; Muñoz, Pamela; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Wiegand, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Gurltia paralysans is a rare metastrongylid nematode of domestic cats that is found mainly in the veins of the spinal cord subarachnoid space and parenchyma. Endemic regions for G. paralysans mainly include Chile and Argentina. The ante mortem diagnosis of gurltiosis is difficult and based primarily on neurological signs, epidemiological factors, and the exclusion of other causes of feline myelopathies. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to describe clinical, imaging, and pathologic characteristics in nine domestic cats naturally infected with G. paralysans. Imaging tests included radiography, myelography, computed tomographic myelography (myelo-CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Neurological signs included paraparesis, paraplegia, pelvic limb ataxia and proprioceptive deficits, pelvic limb tremors, lumbosacral hyperesthesia, and tail trembling or atony. Complete blood count findings included a decrease in the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration value in eight cats. Eosinophilia in peripheral blood was observed in three cats, and thrombocytopenia was observed in three cats. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed mononuclear pleocytosis in five cases. Myelo-CT showed diffuse enlargement of the spinal cord at the midthoracic, lumbar, and sacral regions in all cats. Magnetic resonance image findings in the thoracic and lumbar region demonstrated multiple small nodular areas of T2 hyperintensity in the periphery of the spinal cord parenchyma. Localized intraparenchymal areas of increased T2 intensity were also observed in the thoracolumbar spinal cord and lumbosacral conus medullaris. In conclusion, G. paralysans should be considered as a differential diagnosis for domestic cats in endemic regions that have this combination of clinical and imaging characteristics.

  20. Sexual Functioning in Men Living with a Spinal Cord Injury–A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sunilkumar, MM; Boston, Patricia; Rajagopal, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a major concern for Indian men living with a spinal cord injury Objectives: To examine the literature related to sexuality traumatic cord injury and its impact on sexual functioning. Materials and Methods: Databases using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) 2000–2012, Medline 1989–2012, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA) 1989–2012 and Google Scholar were the search engines used used for literature review. Results: The search yielded a total of 457 articles and only 75 of them were found relevant. The minimum number of articles required to meet the inclusion criteria for this review was 25–30 articles. Out of the 75 articles, 33 were considered relevant or related to the topic of sexual functioning, spinal cord injury, and paraplegia. Six areas were identified: Sexual stigmatization, physiological barriers to sexual satisfaction, clinical aspects of sexual functioning, biomedical approaches to sexual dysfunction, partner satisfaction, and lack of accessibility to sexual education. Conclusion: Spinal cord injury and sexual functioning affects a large segment of the male Indian population, yet most current research focuses on quantitative measurement with the emphasis on ejaculatory dysfunction, orgasm impairment, incontinence, and other physiological dysfunction. Further research is needed to address the subjective accounts of patients themselves with respect to the emotional and social impact of sexual disability. This would help to identify the best possible outcomes for both treatment and rehabilitation. PMID:26600694

  1. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on recovery of function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tazoe, Toshiki; Perez, Monica A

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of rehabilitation strategies after spinal cord injury (SCI) is to enhance the recovery of function. One possible avenue to achieve this goal is to strengthen the efficacy of the residual neuronal pathways. Noninvasive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used in patients with motor disorders as a tool to modulate activity of corticospinal, cortical, and subcortical pathways to promote functional recovery. This article reviews a series of studies published during the last decade that used rTMS in the acute and chronic stages of paraplegia and tetraplegia in humans with complete and incomplete SCI. In the studies, rTMS has been applied over the arm and leg representations of the primary motor cortex to target 3 main consequences of SCI: sensory and motor function impairments, spasticity, and neuropathic pain. Although some studies demonstrated that consecutive sessions of rTMS improve aspects of particular functions, other studies did not show similar effects. We discuss how rTMS parameters and postinjury reorganization in the corticospinal tract, motor cortical, and spinal cord circuits might be critical factors in understanding the advantages and disadvantages of using rTMS in patients with SCI. The available data highlight the limited information on the use of rTMS after SCI and the need to further understand the pathophysiology of neuronal structures affected by rTMS to maximize the potential beneficial effects of this technique in humans with SCI.

  2. [A case of neuro-Behçet's disease with repeating isolated thoracic spinal cord lesion].

    PubMed

    Shiote, Mito; Kido, Yukiko; Hayashi, Takeshi; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Kashihara, Ken-ichi; Nagano, Isao; Shoji, Mikio; Abe, Koji

    2003-06-01

    We reported a 45-year-old man who had repeated isolated thoracic spinal cord lesion on MRI in the clinical course of seven years. He had transient bilateral plantar numbness and urinary retention on December, 1994. Then, spastic paraplegia, total anesthesia of feet, and severe sphincter disturbance struck him on May, 1995. He was diagnosed as incomplete Behçet's disease and neuro-Behçet's disease on June, 1995 because of recurrent oral aphta, genital ulceration, and foliculitis. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed high intensity enhanced with Gd-DTPA in thoracic spinal cord from Th 5 to 8 level. Any other abnormal lesion on brain or spinal MRI was not observed. He was treated with corticosteroids and recovered incompletely. Another two big attacks occurred to him. No new lesion but thoracic spinal cord lesion was observed. We conclude that this case is the first reported example of neuro-Behçet's disease with repeating isolated thoracic spinal cord lesion.

  3. An Automated Image Analysis System to Quantify Endosomal Tubulation

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Recycling of cargos from early endosomes requires regulation of endosomal tubule formation and fission. This regulation is disrupted in cells depleted of the microtubule severing enzyme spastin, causing elongation of endosomal tubules and mis-trafficking of recycling endosomal cargos such as the transferrin receptor. Spastin is encoded by SPAST, mutations in which are the most frequent cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia, a condition characterised by a progressive loss of lower limb function resulting from upper motor neuron axonopathy. Investigation of molecular factors involved in endosomal tubule regulation is hindered by the need for manual counting of endosomal tubules. We report here the development of an open source automated system for the quantification of endosomal tubules, using ImageJ and R. We validate the method in cells depleted of spastin and its binding partner IST1. The additional speed and reproducibility of this system compared with manual counting makes feasible screens of candidates to further understand the mechanisms of endosomal tubule formation and fission. PMID:28006827

  4. The efficiency of orthotic interventions on energy consumption in paraplegic patients: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Arazpour, M; Samadian, M; Bahramizadeh, M; Joghtaei, M; Maleki, M; Ahmadi Bani, M; Hutchins, S W

    2015-01-20

    Study design:This is a systematic literature review.Objectives:Different types of orthoses have been developed to enable and facilitate ambulation in individuals with paraplegia. However, their effect on energy consumption while ambulating is not clear. The objective of this review was to compare the energy expenditure required to walk with these devices.Methods:Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) method, and based on selected keywords and their composition according to the Population Intervention Comparison Outcome (PICO) method, a search was performed in Science Direct, Google Scholar, Scopus, Web of Knowledge and PubMed databases. The searches were restricted to papers published in the English language and were conducted during February 2014; the last access to the database was on 25 February 2014. A total of 24 articles were chosen for final evaluation.Results:Hybrid orthoses reduce energy consumption compared with mechanical orthoses when used for walking by paraplegic patients. The isocentric reciprocating gait orthosis has been shown to be more effective than other reciprocating orthoses in reducing energy consumption. Energy consumption when walking with powered orthoses (PO) and hybrid orthoses was also reduced compared with when walking with conventional orthoses.Conclusions:The hybrid orthoses and PO could be effective alternatives in rehabilitation for spinal cord injury patients to help improve the energy consumption.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 20 January 2015; doi:10.1038/sc.2014.227.

  5. Delayed GM-CSF treatment stimulates axonal regeneration and functional recovery in paraplegic rats via an increased BDNF expression by endogenous macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bouhy, Delphine; Malgrange, Brigitte; Multon, Sylvie; Poirrier, Anne-Lise; Scholtes, Félix; Schoenen, Jean; Franzen, Rachelle

    2006-06-01

    Macrophages (monocytes/microglia) could play a critical role in central nervous system repair. We have previously found a synchronism between the regression of spontaneous axonal regeneration and the deactivation of macrophages 3-4 wk after a compression-injury of rat spinal cord. To explore whether reactivation of endogenous macrophages might be beneficial for spinal cord repair, we have studied the effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the same paraplegia model and in cell cultures. There was a significant, though transient, improvement of locomotor recovery after a single delayed intraperitoneal injection of 2 microg GM-CSF, which also increased significantly the expression of Cr3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) by macrophages at the lesion site. At longer survival delays, axonal regeneration was significantly enhanced in GM-CSF-treated rats. In vitro, BV2 microglial cells expressed higher levels of BDNF in the presence of GM-CSF and neurons cocultured with microglial cells activated by GM-CSF generated more neurites, an effect blocked by a BDNF antibody. These experiments suggest that GM-CSF could be an interesting treatment option for spinal cord injury and that its beneficial effects might be mediated by BDNF.

  6. Sexual issues of women with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Charlifue, S W; Gerhart, K A; Menter, R R; Whiteneck, G G; Manley, M S

    1992-03-01

    The need for research addressing problems unique to women with spinal cord injuries is well documented. Consequently, 231 such women, ages 18 to 45, were surveyed. Demographic characteristics and data relating to physician usage, female hygiene, pregnancy, contraception and sexuality were collected. Analysis revealed that 60% of the respondents had post injury amenorrhea; the average time until menses resumption was 5 months. The group's post injury pregnancy rate was one-third its pre injury rate, but women with incomplete paraplegia had significantly more pregnancies than those with complete quadriplegia. Of 47 women who did carry babies to delivery, one-half had vaginal deliveries; 49% used no anesthesia. Problems during pregnancy included autonomic hyperreflexia, decubitus ulcers, urinary tract infections, water retention, bladder and bowel problems, anemia, spotting, fatigue, cardiac irregularity and toxemia. Many of these problems plagued the women during labor and delivery and in the post partum period as well. Sixty-nine percent of the women were satisfied with their post injury sexual experiences, although self confidence, spasticity, and lack of spontaneity were issues. Although satisfied with care received from physicians, many women were not content with the information provided during rehabilitation, and felt a need for more literature, counselling, and peer support.

  7. A conserved amphipathic helix is required for membrane tubule formation by Yop1p

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Jacob P.; Claridge, Jolyon K.; Smith, Peter G.; Schnell, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    The integral membrane proteins of the DP1 (deleted in polyposis) and reticulon families are responsible for maintaining the high membrane curvature required for both smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules and the edges of ER sheets, and mutations in these proteins lead to motor neuron diseases, such as hereditary spastic paraplegia. Reticulon/DP1 proteins contain reticulon homology domains (RHDs) that have unusually long hydrophobic segments and are proposed to adopt intramembrane helical hairpins that stabilize membrane curvature. We have characterized the secondary structure and dynamics of the DP1 family protein produced from the YOP1 gene (Yop1p) and identified a C-terminal conserved amphipathic helix (APH) that, on its own, interacts strongly with negatively charged membranes and is necessary for membrane tubule formation. Analyses of DP1 and reticulon family members indicate that most, if not all, contain C-terminal sequences capable of forming APHs. Together, these results indicate that APHs play a previously unrecognized role in RHD membrane curvature stabilization. PMID:25646439

  8. The retromer complex - endosomal protein recycling and beyond.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Matthew N J

    2012-10-15

    The retromer complex is a vital element of the endosomal protein sorting machinery that is conserved across all eukaryotes. Retromer is most closely associated with the endosome-to-Golgi retrieval pathway and is necessary to maintain an active pool of hydrolase receptors in the trans-Golgi network. Recent progress in studies of retromer have identified new retromer-interacting proteins, including the WASH complex and cargo such as the Wntless/MIG-14 protein, which now extends the role of retromer beyond the endosome-to-Golgi pathway and has revealed that retromer is required for aspects of endosome-to-plasma membrane sorting and regulation of signalling events. The interactions between the retromer complex and other macromolecular protein complexes now show how endosomal protein sorting is coordinated with actin assembly and movement along microtubules, and place retromer squarely at the centre of a complex set of protein machinery that governs endosomal protein sorting. Dysregulation of retromer-mediated endosomal protein sorting leads to various pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease and spastic paraplegia and the mechanisms underlying these pathologies are starting to be understood. In this Commentary, I will highlight recent advances in the understanding of retromer-mediated endosomal protein sorting and discuss how retromer contributes to a diverse set of physiological processes.

  9. A veterinary and behavioral analysis of dolphin killing methods currently used in the "drive hunt" in Taiji, Japan.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Andrew; Brakes, Philippa; Vail, Courtney S; Reiss, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Annually in Japanese waters, small cetaceans are killed in "drive hunts" with quotas set by the government of Japan. The Taiji Fishing Cooperative in Japan has published the details of a new killing method that involves cutting (transecting) the spinal cord and purports to reduce time to death. The method involves the repeated insertion of a metal rod followed by the plugging of the wound to prevent blood loss into the water. To date, a paucity of data exists regarding these methods utilized in the drive hunts. Our veterinary and behavioral analysis of video documentation of this method indicates that it does not immediately lead to death and that the time to death data provided in the description of the method, based on termination of breathing and movement, is not supported by the available video data. The method employed causes damage to the vertebral blood vessels and the vascular rete from insertion of the rod that will lead to significant hemorrhage, but this alone would not produce a rapid death in a large mammal of this type. The method induces paraplegia (paralysis of the body) and death through trauma and gradual blood loss. This killing method does not conform to the recognized requirement for "immediate insensibility" and would not be tolerated or permitted in any regulated slaughterhouse process in the developed world.

  10. Protective effect of Crocus sativus L. (Saffron) extract on spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Farjah, Gholam Hossein; Salehi, Shadi; Ansari, Mohammad Hasan; Pourheidar, Bagher

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury of spinal cord is leading to the paraplegia observed. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of the saffron extract on spinal cord I/R injury. Materials and Methods: Thirty five male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups: intact, sham surgery, normal saline (NS), low dose saffron aqua extract, high dose saffron aqua extract. Results: The mean motor deficit index (MDI) scores were significantly lower in the saffron extract groups than in the NS group at 48 hr after spinal cord ischemia (P<0.001). Saffron extract groups significantly decreased plasma level of malondialdehyde than in the NS Group (P<0.05). The number of motor normal neurons was significantly greater in the high saffron extract group than in the NS and low saffron group (P<0.05). Conclusion: These data suggest that a saffron extract may protect spinal cord neurons from I/R injury. PMID:28392907

  11. Dopa-responsive dystonia--clinical and genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wijemanne, Subhashie; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) encompasses a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders that typically manifest as limb-onset, diurnally fluctuating dystonia and exhibit a robust and sustained response to levodopa treatment. Autosomal dominant GTP cyclohydrolase 1 deficiency, also known as Segawa disease, is the most common and best-characterized condition that manifests as DRD, but a similar presentation can be seen with genetic abnormalities that lead to deficiencies in tyrosine hydroxylase, sepiapterin reductase or other enzymes that are involved in the biosynthesis of dopamine. In rare cases, DRD can result from conditions that do not affect the biosynthesis of dopamine; single case reports have shown that DRD can be a manifestation of hereditary spastic paraplegia type 11, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 and ataxia telangiectasia. This heterogeneity of conditions that underlie DRD frequently leads to misdiagnosis, which delays the appropriate treatment with levodopa. Correct diagnosis at an early stage requires use of the appropriate diagnostic tests, which include a levodopa trial, genetic testing (including whole-exome sequencing), cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitter analysis, the phenylalanine loading test, and enzyme activity measurements. The selection of tests for use depends on the clinical presentation and level of complexity. This Review presents the common and rarer causes of DRD and their clinical features, and considers the most appropriate approaches to ensure early diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Novel Homozygous Missense Mutation in SPG20 Gene Results in Troyer Syndrome Associated with Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Ronen; Soiferman, Devorah; Shaag, Avraham; Shalev, Stavit; Elpeleg, Orly; Saada, Ann

    2016-08-19

    Troyer syndrome is an autosomal recessive form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) caused by deleterious mutations in the SPG20 gene. Although the disease is associated with a loss of function mechanism of spartin, the protein encoded by SPG20, the precise pathogenesis is yet to be elucidated. Recent data indicated an important role for spartin in both mitochondrial maintenance and function. Here we report a child presenting with progressive spastic paraparesis, generalized muscle weakness, dysarthria, impaired growth, and severe isolated decrease in muscle cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity. Whole exome sequencing identified the homozygous c.988A>G variant in SPG20 gene (p.Met330Val) resulting in almost complete loss of spartin in skeletal muscle. Further analyses demonstrated significant tissue specific reduction of COX 4, a nuclear encoded subunit of COX, in muscle suggesting a role for spartin in proper mitochondrial respiratory chain function mediated by COX activity. Our findings need to be verified in other Troyer syndrome patients in order to classify it as a form of HSP caused by mitochondrial dysfunction.

  13. Clinical variability and female penetrance in X-linked familial FTD/ALS caused by a P506S mutation in UBQLN2.

    PubMed

    Vengoechea, Jaime; David, Marjorie P; Yaghi, Shadi R; Carpenter, Lori; Rudnicki, Stacy A

    2013-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative motor neuron disease leading to progressive paralysis that is generally fatal. Only 10% of cases are familial, a subset of which overlaps with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Up to half of ALS patients have cognitive impairment, with 15% meeting the criteria for FTD. Clinical sequencing of UBQLN2 in a family with X-linked FTD/ALS with suspected incomplete penetrance, manifesting in both genders, revealed a P506S mutation in. Affected individuals were diagnosed with various conditions including hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), bulbar palsy and multiple sclerosis. The mutation in UBQLN2 was first identified in a 35-year-old female who presented with one year of progressive dysarthria, dyspnea, dysphagia, and cognitive decline. EMG suggested early motor neuron disease with prominent bulbar involvement. Her cognition declined rapidly and she developed extremity weakness. Her brother, initially diagnosed with HSP, and her second cousin, with primary lateral sclerosis, also have a P506S mutation in UBQLN2. In conclusion, the P506S mutation in UBQLN2 can affect both males and females and displays great phenotypic variability within the same family. Females can potentially have a more severe and rapidly progressive presentation than their male relatives. Additionally, the P506S mutation can also cause an FTD phenotype.

  14. A Muscle Synergy-Inspired Adaptive Control Scheme for a Hybrid Walking Neuroprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Alibeji, Naji A; Kirsch, Nicholas Andrew; Sharma, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid neuroprosthesis that uses an electric motor-based wearable exoskeleton and functional electrical stimulation (FES) has a promising potential to restore walking in persons with paraplegia. A hybrid actuation structure introduces effector redundancy, making its automatic control a challenging task because multiple muscles and additional electric motor need to be coordinated. Inspired by the muscle synergy principle, we designed a low dimensional controller to control multiple effectors: FES of multiple muscles and electric motors. The resulting control system may be less complex and easier to control. To obtain the muscle synergy-inspired low dimensional control, a subject-specific gait model was optimized to compute optimal control signals for the multiple effectors. The optimal control signals were then dimensionally reduced by using principal component analysis to extract synergies. Then, an adaptive feedforward controller with an update law for the synergy activation was designed. In addition, feedback control was used to provide stability and robustness to the control design. The adaptive-feedforward and feedback control structure makes the low dimensional controller more robust to disturbances and variations in the model parameters and may help to compensate for other time-varying phenomena (e.g., muscle fatigue). This is proven by using a Lyapunov stability analysis, which yielded semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded tracking. Computer simulations were performed to test the new controller on a 4-degree of freedom gait model.

  15. Unique Function of Kinesin Kif5A in Localization of Mitochondria in Axons

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Philip D.; Shen, Kimberle; Sapio, Matthew R.; Glenn, Thomas D.; Talbot, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Kinesin proteins (Kifs) are linked to various neurological diseases, but the specific and redundant functions of the vertebrate Kifs are incompletely understood. For example, Kif5A, but not other Kinesin-1 heavy-chain family members, is implicated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP), but the mechanism of its involvement in the progressive axonal degeneration characteristic of these diseases is not well understood. We report that zebrafish kif5Aa mutants exhibit hyperexcitability, peripheral polyneuropathy, and axonal degeneration reminiscent of CMT and HSP. Strikingly, although kif5 genes are thought to act largely redundantly in other contexts, and zebrafish peripheral neurons express five kif5 genes, kif5Aa mutant peripheral sensory axons lack mitochondria and degenerate. We show that this Kif5Aa-specific function is cell autonomous and is mediated by its C-terminal tail, as only Kif5Aa and chimeric motors containing the Kif5Aa C-tail can rescue deficits. Finally, concurrent loss of the kinesin-3, kif1b, or its adaptor kbp, exacerbates axonal degeneration via a nonmitochondrial cargo common to Kif5Aa. Our results shed light on Kinesin complexity and reveal determinants of specific Kif5A functions in mitochondrial transport, adaptor binding, and axonal maintenance. PMID:25355224

  16. Sliding and Lower Limb Mechanics during Sit-Stand-Sit Transitions with a Standing Wheelchair

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei-Chien; Chang, Jyh-Jong; Kuo, Chang-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This study aimed to investigate the shear displacement between the body and backrest/seat, range of motion (ROM), and force acting on the lower limb joints during sit-stand-sit transitions by operating an electric-powered standing wheelchair. Methods and Materials. The amounts of sliding along the backrest and the seat plane, ROM of lower limb joints, and force acting on the knee/foot were measured in twenty-four people with paraplegia. Results. Without an antishear mechanism, the shear displacement was approximately 9 cm between the user's body and the backrest/seat surfaces. During standing up, the user's back slid down and the thigh was displaced rearward, but they moved in opposite directions when wheelchair sat back down. A minimum of 60 degrees of ROM at the hip and knee was needed during sit-stand-sit transitions. The maximal resultant forces acting on the knee restraints could reach 23.5% of body weight. Conclusion. Sliding between the body and backrest/seat occurred while transitioning from sitting to standing and vice versa. A certain amount of ROM at lower limb joints and force acting on the knee was necessitated during sit-stand-sit transitions. Careful consideration needs to be given to who the user of the electric powered standing wheelchair is. PMID:25105120

  17. Simulating Ideal Assistive Devices to Reduce the Metabolic Cost of Running

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Thomas K.; Seth, Ajay; Pouya, Soha; Dembia, Christopher L.; Hicks, Jennifer L.; Delp, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    Tools have been used for millions of years to augment the capabilities of the human body, allowing us to accomplish tasks that would otherwise be difficult or impossible. Powered exoskeletons and other assistive devices are sophisticated modern tools that have restored bipedal locomotion in individuals with paraplegia and have endowed unimpaired individuals with superhuman strength. Despite these successes, designing assistive devices that reduce energy consumption during running remains a substantial challenge, in part because these devices disrupt the dynamics of a complex, finely tuned biological system. Furthermore, designers have hitherto relied primarily on experiments, which cannot report muscle-level energy consumption and are fraught with practical challenges. In this study, we use OpenSim to generate muscle-driven simulations of 10 human subjects running at 2 and 5 m/s. We then add ideal, massless assistive devices to our simulations and examine the predicted changes in muscle recruitment patterns and metabolic power consumption. Our simulations suggest that an assistive device should not necessarily apply the net joint moment generated by muscles during unassisted running, and an assistive device can reduce the activity of muscles that do not cross the assisted joint. Our results corroborate and suggest biomechanical explanations for similar effects observed by experimentalists, and can be used to form hypotheses for future experimental studies. The models, simulations, and software used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and can provide insight into assistive device design that complements experimental approaches. PMID:27656901

  18. A new autosomal recessive spastic ataxia associated with frequent white matter changes maps to 2q33-34.

    PubMed

    Thiffault, I; Rioux, M F; Tetreault, M; Jarry, J; Loiselle, L; Poirier, J; Gros-Louis, F; Mathieu, J; Vanasse, M; Rouleau, G A; Bouchard, J P; Lesage, J; Brais, B

    2006-09-01

    Recessive ataxias are a heterogeneous group of diseases. We identified a group of 23 French-Canadian cases belonging to 17 families affected by an autosomal recessive spastic ataxia associated with frequent white matter changes. The fact that 59% of these families have a genealogical relationship to the Portneuf County of Quebec suggests that this is a new form of ataxia with a regional founder effect. All cases present with cerebellar ataxia and spasticity. There is great intrafamilial and interfamilial variability, as illustrated by the spectrum of age of diagnosis (range: 2-59 years, mean: 15.0) and the presence of white matter changes on MRI in 52.4% of cases. The more severe cases have spasticity from birth, scoliosis, dystonia and cognitive impairment and were considered cases of cerebral palsy. Brain MRI constantly shows cerebellar atrophy, which in some cases may be associated with cortical atrophy, leucoencephalopathy and corpus callosum thinning. A genome wide scan uncovered linkage of three families to marker D2S2321 localized on chromosome 2q33-34. Linkage analysis confirmed that all families are linked to the same region [multipoint log of the odds (LOD) score of 5.95]. Haplotype analysis and allele sharing suggest that one common mutation may account for 97% of carrier chromosomes in Quebec. The uncovering of the mutated gene may point to a common pathway for pyramidal and cerebellar degeneration as both are often observed in recessive ataxias and complicated paraplegias.

  19. Primary Lateral Sclerosis and Early Upper Motor Neuron Disease: Characteristics of a Cross-Sectional Population

    PubMed Central

    Loci, Lorena; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kisanuki, Yasushi; Simmons, Zachary; Maragakis, Nicholas J; McVey, April L; Al-Lahham, Tawfiq; Heiman-Patterson, Terry D; Andrews, Jinsy; McDonnell, Erin; Cudkowicz, Merit; Atassi, Nazem

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The goals of this study were to characterize clinical and electrophysiologic findings of subjects with upper motor neuron disease and to explore feasibility of clinical trials in this population. Methods Twenty northeast ALS consortium (NEALS) sites performed chart reviews to identify active clinical pure upper motor neuron disease patients. Patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) or meeting revised El Escorial electrodiagnostic criteria for ALS were excluded. Patients were classified into two groups according to the presence or absence of minor electromyography (EMG) abnormalities. Results 233 subjects with upper motor neuron disease were identified; 217 had available EMG data. Normal EMGs were seen in 140 subjects, and 77 had minor denervation. Mean disease duration was 84 (±80) months for the entire cohort with no difference seen between the two groups. No difference was seen in clinical symptoms, disability, or outcome measures between the two groups after correcting for multiple comparisons. Conclusions Minor EMG abnormalities were not associated with phenotypic differences in a clinical upper motor neuron disease population. These findings suggest that subtle EMG abnormalities can not necessarily be used as a prognostic tool in patients with clinical upper motor neuron disease. This study also demonstrates the availability of a large number of patients with upper motor neuron diseases within the NEALS network and suggests feasibility for conducting clinical trials in this population. PMID:26905909

  20. Progressive Lower Extremity Weakness and Axonal Sensorimotor Polyneuropathy from a Mutation in KIF5A (c.611G>A;p.Arg204Gln)

    PubMed Central

    Jerath, Nivedita U.; Grider, Tiffany; Shy, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) is a rare hereditary disorder that primarily involves progressive spasticity of the legs (hamstrings, quadriceps, and calves). Methods. A 27-year-old gentleman was a fast runner and able to play soccer until age 9 when he developed slowly progressive weakness. He was wheelchair-bound by age 25. He was evaluated by laboratory testing, imaging, electrodiagnostics, and molecular genetics. Results. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed an axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Genetic testing for HSP in 2003 was negative; repeat testing in 2013 revealed a mutation in KIF5A (c.611G>A;p.Arg204Gln). Conclusions. A recent advance in neurogenetics has allowed for more genes and mutations to be identified; over 76 different genetic loci for HSP and 59 gene products are currently known. Even though our patient had a sensorimotor polyneuropathy on electrodiagnostic testing and a 2003 HSP genetic panel that was negative, a repeat HSP genetic panel was performed in 2013 due to the advancement in neurogenetics. This revealed a mutation in KIF5A. PMID:26543653

  1. Fluoro-Jade B evidence of induced ischemic tolerance in the rat spinal cord ischemia: physiological, neurological and histopathological consequences.

    PubMed

    Orendácová, J; Ondrejcák, T; Kuchárová, K; Cízková, D; Jergová, S; Mitrusková, B; Raceková, E; Vanický, I; Marsala, J

    2005-03-01

    Fluoro-Jade B, a marker of degenerating neurons, was used to label histopathological changes in the rat spinal cord after transient ischemia and ischemic preconditioning (IPC). To characterize postischemic neurodegenerations and consequent neurological changes, a particular attention was paid to the standardization of ischemic conditions in animals of both groups. 1. The control ischemic rats were submitted to a reversible occlusion of descending aorta by insertion and subsequent inflation of a 2F Fogarty catheter for 12 min. 2. In the IPC rats, an episode of short 3 min occlusion and 30 min reperfusion preceded the 12 min ischemia. Postischemic motor function testing (ambulation and stepping) was provided repeatedly for evaluation of neurological status 2 h and 24 h after surgery and at the end of postischemic survival, i.e. after 48 h. Fluoro-Jade B staining was used to demonstrate degenerated neurons. In the control rats, neurological consequences of histopathological changes in lumbosacral spinal cord, manifested as paraplegia, were present after 12 min ischemia. Thus, numbers of degenerated Fluoro-Jade B positive cells were visible in gray matter of the most injured L(4)-S(2) spinal cord segments. Slight motor function impairment, consequential from significant decreasing in Fluoro-Jade B-positivity in the L(4)-S(2) spinal cord segments of the IPC rats, was considered the pathomorpfological evidence that IPC induces spinal cord tolerance to ischemia. Our results are consistent with the previously published silver impregnation method for histopathological demonstration of ischemic degeneration.

  2. Hippocrates: the forefather of neurology.

    PubMed

    Breitenfeld, T; Jurasic, M J; Breitenfeld, D

    2014-09-01

    Hippocrates is one of the most influential medical doctors of all times. He started observing and experimenting in times of mysticism and magic. He carried a holistic and humanitarian approach to the patient with examination as the principal approach-inspection, palpation and auscultation are still the most important tools in diagnosing algorithms of today. He had immense experience with the human body most likely due to numerous wound treatments he had performed; some even believe he performed autopsies despite the negative trend at the time. Hippocrates identified the brain as the analyst of the outside world, the interpreter of consciousness and the center of intelligence and willpower. Interestingly, Hippocrates was aware of many valid concepts in neurology; his treatise On the Sacred Disease was the most important for understanding neurology and epilepsy. His other ideas pioneered modern day neurology mentioning neurological diseases like apoplexy, spondylitis, hemiplegia, and paraplegia. Today, 10 % of neurological Pubmed and 7 % of neuroscience Scopus reviews mention Corpus Hippocraticum as one of the sources. Therefore, Hippocrates may be considered as the forefather of neurology.

  3. Recurrent de novo BICD2 mutation associated with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita and bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Di Donato, Nataliya; Hahn, Gabriele; Davis, Mark R; Craven, Paul D; Poke, Gemma; Neas, Katherine R; Neuhann, Teresa M; Dobyns, William B; Laing, Nigel G

    2016-11-01

    Autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of BICD2 are associated with congenital-onset spinal muscular atrophy characterised by lower limb predominance. A few cases have also showed upper motor neuron pathology, including presenting with features resembling hereditary spastic paraplegia. The age-of-onset for the published families is usually at birth but also included cases with childhood- and adult-onset disease. In this report we described two isolated probands that presented in utero with features associated with reduced fetal movements. Both cases were diagnosed at birth with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) and hypotonia. Other variable features included congenital fractures, hip dislocation, micrognathia, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly and bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria. Patient 1 is 4 years of age and stable, but shows significant motor developmental delay and delayed speech. Patient 2 passed away at 7 weeks of age. Through next generation sequencing we identified the same missense substitution in BICD2 (p.Arg694Cys) in both probands. Sanger sequencing showed that in both cases the mutation arose de novo. The in utero onset in both cases suggests that the p.Arg694Cys substitution may have a more deleterious effect on BICD2 function than previously described mutations. Our results broaden the phenotypes associated with BICD2 mutations to include AMC and cortical malformations and therefore to a similar phenotypic spectrum to that associated with its binding partner DYNC1H1.

  4. An obscure case of hepatic subcapsular hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ndzengue, Albert; Hammoudeh, Fadi; Brutus, Pierre; Ajah, Ofem; Purcell, Roland; Leadon, Joseph; Rafal, Richard B; Balmir, Simon; Enriquez, Danilo A; Posner, Gerald L; Jaffe, Eric A; Chandra, Pradeep

    2011-04-13

    Spontaneous liver bleeding is often reported in preeclampsia. It is otherwise rare and has been linked to gross anatomical lesions and coagulopathy. We report a case of subcapsular hematoma of the liver without any apparent lesion and in the absence of coagulopathy. A 41-year-old male, paraplegic for 16 years, presented to the emergency department 3 days after sudden onset of right upper quadrant and shoulder pain. He had been on vitamins and 5,000 units subcutaneous heparin 12-hourly at the nursing home for the last month. He was in no distress, afebrile, with stable vitals. Physical examination showed a diverting colostomy, tender hepatomegaly and sacral decubiti. A fecal occult blood test was negative. There was spastic paraplegia below the level of T12. Two days after admission, the patient was afebrile and hemodynamically stable. PTT, PT, liver profile, BUN and creatinine were all normal, however his hemoglobin had dropped from 11.3 to 7.6 g/dl. An abdominal CT scan revealed an isolated 9.0 × 1.8 cm subcapsular hematoma. The patient received blood transfusion in the intensive care unit and was discharged 7 days later. In conclusion, spontaneous liver hemorrhage occurs in the nonobstetrical population in the setting of gross anatomical lesions or coagulopathy. This is the first report of an isolated subcapsular liver hematoma.

  5. Clinical treatment of malignant hyperthermia in three cases

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tao; Ji, Wenli; Nie, Mengqi; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a rare life threatening inherited disorder that is triggered by drugs used for general anesthesia in susceptible persons. The symptoms include rapid increase of body temperature and severe muscle contractions. The present study includes 3 cases of MH and highlights the timely identification of symptoms for rescuing the patient. In case I, a 7-year-old male child underwent surgery with ketamine at a dose of 250 mg. After 4 h of operation, the child went through convulsions, high fever and succumbed within a few hours. High fever was not detected in a timely manner, which is one of the main symptoms of MH. In case II, a 12-year-old male child had convulsions and high fever after simple surgery caused by MH. Once confirmed, immediate measures were taken to lower the body temperature and the child was rescued. In case III, a male 57-year-old was admitted to hospital due to paraplegia. The patient underwent more critical conditions once symptoms of MH appeared. Additionally, antidote dantrolene was unavailable in the first and third case; thus, the progression of disease was not alleviated although active symptomatic and supportive treatment were employed. PMID:27882090

  6. Early Experiences with the Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Sung; Oh, Se Jin; Sung, Yong Won; Moon, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jung Sang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to report our early experiences with the endovascular repair of ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (rDTAAs), which are a rare and life-threatening condition. Methods Among 42 patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) between October 2010 and September 2015, five patients (11.9%) suffered an rDTAA. Results The mean age was 72.4±5.1 years, and all patients were male. Hemoptysis and hemothorax were present in three (60%) and two (40%) patients, respectively. Hypovolemic shock was noted in three patients who underwent emergency operations. A hybrid operation was performed in three patients. The mean operative time was 269.8±72.3 minutes. The mean total length of aortic coverage was 186.0±49.2 mm. No 30-day mortality occurred. Stroke, delirium, and atrial fibrillation were observed in one patient each. Paraplegia did not occur. Endoleak was found in two patients (40%), one of whom underwent an early and successful reintervention. During the mean follow-up period of 16.8±14.8 months, two patients died; one cause of death was a persistent type 1 endoleak and the other cause was unknown. Conclusion TEVAR for rDTAA was associated with favorable early mortality and morbidity outcomes. However, early reintervention should be considered if persistent endoleak occurs. PMID:27064672

  7. A silent mutation, C924T (G308G), in the L1CAM gene results in X linked hydrocephalus (HSAS).

    PubMed Central

    Du, Y Z; Dickerson, C; Aylsworth, A S; Schwartz, C E

    1998-01-01

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is a neuronal gene involved in the development of the nervous system. Mutations in L1CAM are known to cause several clinically overlapping X linked mental retardation conditions: X linked hydrocephalus (HSAS), MASA syndrome (mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, adducted thumbs), spastic paraplegia type I (SPG1), and X linked agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). In an analysis of a family with HSAS, we identified a C-->T transition (C924T) in exon 8 that was initially thought to have no effect on the protein sequence as the alteration affected the third base of a codon (G308G). Extensive analysis of the other 27 exons showed no other alteration. A review of the sequence surrounding position 924 indicated that the C-->T transition created a potential 5' splice site consensus sequence, which would result in an in frame deletion of 69 bp from exon 8 and 23 amino acids of the L1CAM protein. RT-PCR of the RNA from an affected male fetus and subsequent sequence analysis confirmed the use of the new splice site. This is the first report of a silent nucleotide substitution in L1CAM giving rise to an alteration at the protein level. Furthermore, it shows that as mutation analysis plays an ever more important role in human genetics, the identification of a synonymous base change should not be routinely discounted as a neutral polymorphism. Images PMID:9643285

  8. Retrograde labeling, transduction, and genetic targeting allow cellular analysis of corticospinal motor neurons: implications in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Jara, Javier H; Genç, Barış; Klessner, Jodi L; Ozdinler, P Hande

    2014-01-01

    Corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN) have a unique ability to receive, integrate, translate, and transmit the cerebral cortex's input toward spinal cord targets and therefore act as a "spokesperson" for the initiation and modulation of voluntary movements that require cortical input. CSMN degeneration has an immense impact on motor neuron circuitry and is one of the underlying causes of numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In addition, CSMN death results in long-term paralysis in spinal cord injury patients. Detailed cellular analyses are crucial to gain a better understanding of the pathologies underlying CSMN degeneration. However, visualizing and identifying these vulnerable neuron populations in the complex and heterogeneous environment of the cerebral cortex have proved challenging. Here, we will review recent developments and current applications of novel strategies that reveal the cellular and molecular basis of CSMN health and vulnerability. Such studies hold promise for building long-term effective treatment solutions in the near future.

  9. [Surgical treatment of chemodectomas of the neck (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Benhamou, A C; Kieffer, E; Tricot, J F; Maraval, M; Bussome, M; Natali, J

    1979-09-01

    About 16 cases of chemodectomas of the neck, with surgical management during the five past years, the authors present an actualisation about surgery of these tumors of the paraganglionnary system at the level of the neck. After recording the different means of the diagnosis, particulary carotid arteriography, they insist about the necessity of a complete excision of these tumors because of local risks due to the neurovascular compression and infiltration, and because of general risks due to malignant metastasis. Three major risks run with surgery in these cases: hemorrhagic, neurologic, and vascular risks (because of the possible extension to the carotidian axis). 14 total excisions and 1 incomplete excision were performed; 1 no-operated tumor was noted because of the death of the patient before surgery due to a metastatis paraplegia. 4 resections of the carotidian axis with 1 repair by end to end anastomosis and 3 by a vein graft were necessary. No mortality after surgery in these patients was encountered. No recurence, no metastatic phenomen in our patients after the total excision of the primary chemodectoma of the neck even for one histologically maligant tumor, three years ago.

  10. Traumatic lumbar artery rupture after lumbar spinal fracture dislocation causing hypovolemic shock: An endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jong-Pil; Oh, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we observed a case of lumbar artery injury after trauma, which was treated by endovascular embolization. A 67-year-old woman who was injured in a traffic accident was brought to the emergency room. She was conscious and her hemodynamic condition was stable, but she had paraplegia below L1 dermatome. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of abdomen and pelvis revealed fracture dislocation of L3/4 along with retroperitoneal hematomas. However, there was no evidence of traumatic injury in both thoracic and abdominal cavity. At that time, her blood pressure suddenly decreased to 60/40 mmHg and her mental status deteriorated. Also, her hemoglobin level was 5.4 g/dl. While her hemodynamic condition stabilized with massive fluid resuscitation including blood transfusion, an angiography was immediately performed to look for and embolize site of retroperitoneal hemorrhage. On the angiographic images, there was an active extravasation from ruptured left 3rd lumbar artery, and we performed complete embolization with GELFOAM and coil. Lumbar artery injury after trauma is rare and endovascular treatment is useful in case of hemodynamic instability.

  11. Novel mutational mechanism in man: Expansion of trinucleotide repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Ilarioshkin, S.N.; Ivanova-Smolenskaya, I.A.; Markova, E.D.

    1995-11-01

    An analysis of a novel, recently discovered class of mutations in man - an expansion, i.e., an increase of the copy number of intragenic unstable trinucleotide repeats - is presented. The expansion of trinucleotide X chromosome syndrome (two separate variants of the disease - FRAXA and FRAXE), myotonic dystrophy, spinal and bulbar Kennedy`s amyotrophy, Huntington`s chorea, type 1 spinocerebellar ataxia, and dentatorubral-pallidolyusian atrophy. The discovery of triplet expansion allows a satisfactory explanation on the molecular level of a series of unusual clinical genetic phenomena, such as anticipation, the {open_quotes}paternal transmission{close_quotes} effect, the {open_quotes}Sherman paradox,{close_quotes} and others. The common properties and the distinctions of unstable trinucleotide mutations in the nosologic forms mentioned above are analyzed comprehensively. These features include the mechanism by which these mutations cause disease, the time of their appearance in ontogenesis, and various clinical genetic correlations. The evolutionary origin of this class of mutations and, in particular, the role of alleles with an {open_quotes}intermediate{close_quotes} triplet number, which are the persistent reservoir of mutations arising de novo in a population, are also discussed. The possible implication of unstable trinucleotide repeats for a series of other hereditary diseases, such as type 2, spinocerebellar ataxia, Machado-Joseph disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia, essential tremor, schizophrenia, and others, is also suggested. 108 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Inbreeding levels in Northeast Brazil: Strategies for the prospecting of new genetic disorders

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A new autosomal recessive genetic condition, the SPOAN syndrome (an acronym for spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy and neuropathy syndrome), was recently discovered in an isolated region of the State of Rio Grande do Norte in Northeast Brazil, in a population that was identified by the IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics) as belonging to the Brazilian communities with the highest rates of “deficiencies” (Neri, 2003), a term used to describe diseases, malformations, and handicaps in general. This prompted us to conduct a study of consanguinity levels in five of its municipal districts by directly interviewing their inhabitants. Information on 7,639 couples (corresponding to about 40% of the whole population of the studied districts) was obtained. The research disclosed the existence of very high frequencies of consanguineous marriages, which varied from about 9% to 32%, suggesting the presence of a direct association between genetic diseases such as the SPOAN syndrome, genetic drift and inbreeding levels. This fact calls for the introduction of educational programs for the local populations, as well as for further studies aiming to identify and characterize other genetic conditions. Epidemiological strategies developed to collect inbreeding data, with the collaboration of health systems available in the region, might be very successful in the prospecting of genetic disorders. PMID:21637472

  13. Inbreeding levels in Northeast Brazil: Strategies for the prospecting of new genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Santos, Silvana; Kok, Fernando; Weller, Mathias; de Paiva, Francisco Rennan Lopes; Otto, Paulo A

    2010-04-01

    A new autosomal recessive genetic condition, the SPOAN syndrome (an acronym for spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy and neuropathy syndrome), was recently discovered in an isolated region of the State of Rio Grande do Norte in Northeast Brazil, in a population that was identified by the IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics) as belonging to the Brazilian communities with the highest rates of "deficiencies" (Neri, 2003), a term used to describe diseases, malformations, and handicaps in general. This prompted us to conduct a study of consanguinity levels in five of its municipal districts by directly interviewing their inhabitants. Information on 7,639 couples (corresponding to about 40% of the whole population of the studied districts) was obtained. The research disclosed the existence of very high frequencies of consanguineous marriages, which varied from about 9% to 32%, suggesting the presence of a direct association between genetic diseases such as the SPOAN syndrome, genetic drift and inbreeding levels. This fact calls for the introduction of educational programs for the local populations, as well as for further studies aiming to identify and characterize other genetic conditions. Epidemiological strategies developed to collect inbreeding data, with the collaboration of health systems available in the region, might be very successful in the prospecting of genetic disorders.

  14. Rehabilitation and long-term course of nontraumatic myelopathy associated with surfing.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masahiro; Moriizumi, Shigehiro; Toki, Megumi; Murakami, Takanori; Ishiai, Sumio

    2013-09-01

    A nontraumatic spinal cord injury related to surfing is called surfer's myelopathy. The case of a 26-yr-old man who became paraplegic after surfing without apparent traumatic events is described. Physical examination revealed a spinal cord injury at T12 according to the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A. The initial magnetic resonance image revealed a fusiform swelling of the spinal cord from T7-8 to the conus, which was hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 6 mos of rehabilitation, the patient was followed for more than 1 yr after onset. He became able to walk with knee-ankle-foot-orthoses without assistance. A magnetic resonance image obtained 1 yr after the onset of paraplegia showed an atrophic spinal cord from T7-8 to the conus. The course of the neurologic findings and the imaging studies suggest that the pathogenesis of surfer's myelopathy may be ischemia of the anterior spinal artery territory induced by the abnormal trunk posture while surfing.

  15. An Investigation of Bilateral Symmetry During Manual Wheelchair Propulsion.

    PubMed

    Soltau, Shelby L; Slowik, Jonathan S; Requejo, Philip S; Mulroy, Sara J; Neptune, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    Studies of manual wheelchair propulsion often assume bilateral symmetry to simplify data collection, processing, and analysis. However, the validity of this assumption is unclear. Most investigations of wheelchair propulsion symmetry have been limited by a relatively small sample size and a focus on a single propulsion condition (e.g., level propulsion at self-selected speed). The purpose of this study was to evaluate bilateral symmetry during manual wheelchair propulsion in a large group of subjects across different propulsion conditions. Three-dimensional kinematics and handrim kinetics along with spatiotemporal variables were collected and processed from 80 subjects with paraplegia while propelling their wheelchairs on a stationary ergometer during three different conditions: level propulsion at their self-selected speed (free), level propulsion at their fastest comfortable speed (fast), and propulsion on an 8% grade at their level, self-selected speed (graded). All kinematic variables had significant side-to-side differences, primarily in the graded condition. Push angle was the only spatiotemporal variable with a significant side-to-side difference, and only during the graded condition. No kinetic variables had significant side-to-side differences. The magnitudes of the kinematic differences were low, with only one difference exceeding 5°. With differences of such small magnitude, the bilateral symmetry assumption appears to be reasonable during manual wheelchair propulsion in subjects without significant upper-extremity pain or impairment. However, larger asymmetries may exist in individuals with secondary injuries and pain in their upper extremity and different etiologies of their neurological impairment.

  16. Function Over Form: Modeling Groups of Inherited Neurological Conditions in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kozol, Robert A.; Abrams, Alexander J.; James, David M.; Buglo, Elena; Yan, Qing; Dallman, Julia E.

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are a unique cell to behavior model for studying the basic biology of human inherited neurological conditions. Conserved vertebrate genetics and optical transparency provide in vivo access to the developing nervous system as well as high-throughput approaches for drug screens. Here we review zebrafish modeling for two broad groups of inherited conditions that each share genetic and molecular pathways and overlap phenotypically: neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID) and Schizophrenia (SCZ), and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Cerebellar Ataxia (CATX), Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease (CMT). We also conduct a small meta-analysis of zebrafish orthologs of high confidence neurodevelopmental disorder and neurodegenerative disease genes by looking at duplication rates and relative protein sizes. In the past zebrafish genetic models of these neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases have provided insight into cellular, circuit and behavioral level mechanisms contributing to these conditions. Moving forward, advances in genetic manipulation, live imaging of neuronal activity and automated high-throughput molecular screening promise to help delineate the mechanistic relationships between different types of neurological conditions and accelerate discovery of therapeutic strategies. PMID:27458342

  17. Familial Case of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disorder Detected by Oligoarray Comparative Genomic Hybridization: Genotype-to-Phenotype Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kariminejad, Roxana; Hosseini, Kaveh; Moshtagh, Azadeh; Abbassi, Gole Maryam; Sadatian, Neda; Bazrgar, Masood; Kariminejad, Ariana; Kariminejad, Mohamad Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked recessive hypomyelinating leukodystrophy characterized by nystagmus, spastic quadriplegia, ataxia, and developmental delay. It is caused by mutation in the PLP1 gene. Case Description. We report a 9-year-old boy referred for oligoarray comparative genomic hybridization (OA-CGH) because of intellectual delay, seizures, microcephaly, nystagmus, and spastic paraplegia. Similar clinical findings were reported in his older brother and maternal uncle. Both parents had normal phenotypes. OA-CGH was performed and a 436 Kb duplication was detected and the diagnosis of PMD was made. The mother was carrier of this 436 Kb duplication. Conclusion. Clinical presentation has been accepted as being the mainstay of diagnosis for most conditions. However, recent developments in genetic diagnosis have shown that, in many congenital and sporadic disorders lacking specific phenotypic manifestations, a genotype-to-phenotype approach can be conclusive. In this case, a diagnosis was reached by universal genomic testing, namely, whole genomic array. PMID:28133555

  18. Influence of spinal cord injury on cerebral sensorimotor systems: a PET study.

    PubMed Central

    Roelcke, U; Curt, A; Otte, A; Missimer, J; Maguire, R P; Dietz, V; Leenders, K L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of a transverse spinal cord lesion on cerebral energy metabolism in view of sensorimotor reorganisation. METHODS: PET and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose were used to study resting cerebral glucose metabolism in 11 patients with complete paraplegia or tetraplegia after spinal cord injury and 12 healthy subjects. Regions of interest analysis was performed to determine global glucose metabolism (CMRGlu). Statistical parametric mapping was applied to compare both groups on a pixel by pixel basis (significance level P = 0.001). RESULTS: Global absolute CMRGlu was lower in spinal cord injury (33.6 (6.6) mumol/100 ml/min (mean (SD)) than in controls (45.6 (6.2), Mann-Whitney P = 0.0026). Statistical parametric mapping analysis disclosed relatively increased glucose metabolism particularly in the supplementary motor area, anterior cingulate, and putamen. Relatively reduced glucose metabolism in patients with spinal cord injury was found in the midbrain, cerebellar hemispheres, and temporal cortex. CONCLUSIONS: It is assumed that cerebral deafferentiation due to reduction or loss of sensorimotor function results in the low level of absolute global CMRGlu found in patients with spinal cord injury. Relatively increased glucose metabolism in brain regions involved in attention and initiation of movement may be related to secondary disinhibition of these regions. PMID:9010401

  19. Physical activity is related to lower levels of pain, fatigue, and depression in individuals with spinal cord injury: A correlational study

    PubMed Central

    Tawashy, A; Eng, JJ; Lin, KH; Tang, PF; Hung, C

    2011-01-01

    Study Design This was a prospective cross-sectional study for people with chronic SCI. Objectives To (1) evaluate the intensity level and nature of physical activity in community-dwelling individuals living with SCI, and (2) explore the relation between descriptive individual variables (e.g. lesion level), secondary complications, and participation in physical activity. Setting Urban community setting Methods Forty-nine subjects with SCI who used a manual wheelchair for primary mode of mobility (mean years since injury, 11.8; mean age, 43.7 years; 67% paraplegia) completed the physical activity recall assessment for people with spinal cord injury (PARA-SCI). Results Approximately 50% of reported physical activity among individuals with SCI is due to activities of daily living. The amount of physical activity was not related to lesion level, age, BMI, or waistline size. Greater heavy intensity activity was related to lower levels of pain and fatigue and higher levels of self efficacy while higher amounts of mild intensity activity and total activity were related to less depressive symptoms. Conclusions Activities of daily living are a large component for physical activity among individuals with SCI. It appears that greater physical activity is associated with less secondary complications (pain, fatigue and depression) in individuals with SCI. PMID:18936771

  20. The health and life priorities of individuals with spinal cord injury: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Lisa A.; Eng, Janice J.; Hsieh, Jane T.C.; Wolfe, Dalton L.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the priorities of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) can assist in aligning research priorities which ultimately improve these individuals’ quality of life. This systematic review examined studies that directly surveyed people with SCI to ascertain their health priorities and life domains of importance. Twenty-four studies (combined sample of 5262) that met the inclusion criteria were identified using electronic databases (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO). The questionnaire methods and domains of importance were reviewed and described. While the questionnaires varied across the studies, a consistent set of priorities emerged. Functional recovery priorities were identified for the following areas: motor function (including arm/hand function for individuals with tetraplegia and mobility for individuals with paraplegia), bowel, bladder and sexual function. In addition, health, as well as relationships emerged as important life domains. The information from this study, which identified the priorities and domains of importance by individuals with SCI, may be useful for informing healthcare and research agenda-setting activities. PMID:22320160

  1. Glycosphingolipids are modulators of disease pathogenesis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dodge, James C.; Treleaven, Christopher M.; Pacheco, Joshua; Cooper, Samantha; Bao, Channa; Abraham, Marissa; Cromwell, Mandy; Sardi, S. Pablo; Chuang, Wei-Lien; Sidman, Richard L.; Cheng, Seng H.; Shihabuddin, Lamya S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genetic evidence suggests that aberrant glycosphingolipid metabolism plays an important role in several neuromuscular diseases including hereditary spastic paraplegia, hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1, and non-5q spinal muscular atrophy. Here, we investigated whether altered glycosphingolipid metabolism is a modulator of disease course in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Levels of ceramide, glucosylceramide, galactocerebroside, lactosylceramide, globotriaosylceramide, and the gangliosides GM3 and GM1 were significantly elevated in spinal cords of ALS patients. Moreover, enzyme activities (glucocerebrosidase-1, glucocerebrosidase-2, hexosaminidase, galactosylceramidase, α-galactosidase, and β-galactosidase) mediating glycosphingolipid hydrolysis were also elevated up to threefold. Increased ceramide, glucosylceramide, GM3, and hexosaminidase activity were also found in SOD1G93A mice, a familial model of ALS. Inhibition of glucosylceramide synthesis accelerated disease course in SOD1G93A mice, whereas infusion of exogenous GM3 significantly slowed the onset of paralysis and increased survival. Our results suggest that glycosphingolipids are likely important participants in pathogenesis of ALS and merit further analysis as potential drug targets. PMID:26056266

  2. Methylation changes of SIRT1, KLF4, DAPK1 and SPG20 in B-lymphocytes derived from follicular and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Frazzi, Raffaele; Zanetti, Eleonora; Pistoni, Mariaelena; Tamagnini, Ione; Valli, Riccardo; Braglia, Luca; Merli, Francesco

    2017-03-09

    Diffuse large-B cell lymphomas (DLBCL) and follicular lymphomas (FL) are the most represented subtypes among mature B-cell neoplasms and originate from malignant B lymphocytes. Methylation represents one of the major epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is a class III lysine-deacetylase playing several functions and considered to be a context-dependent tumor promoter. We present the quantitative methylation, gene expression and tissue distribution of SIRT1 and some key mediators related to lymphoma pathogenesis in B lymphocytes purified from biopsies of follicular hyperplasias, FL and DLBCL. SIRT1 mRNA levels are higher in FL than follicular hyperplasias and DLBCL. B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) positively correlates with SIRT1. SIRT1 promoter shows a methylation decrease in the order: follicular hyperplasia - FL - DLBCL. Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), Death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) and Spastic Paraplegia 20 (SPG20) methylation increase significantly in FL and DLBCL compared to follicular hyperplasias. Gene expression of DAPK1 and SPG20 inversely correlates with their degree of methylation. Our findings evidence a positive correlation between SIRT1 and BCL6 expression increase in FL. SIRT1 methylation decreases in FL and DLBCL accordingly and this parallels the increase of KLF4, DAPK1 and SPG20 methylation.

  3. Inverted Pendulum Standing Apparatus for Investigating Closed-Loop Control of Ankle Joint Muscle Contractions during Functional Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, John F; Masani, Kei; Vette, Albert H; Zariffa, José; Robinson, Mark; Lynch, Cheryl; Popovic, Milos R

    2014-01-01

    The restoration of arm-free standing in individuals with paraplegia can be facilitated via functional electrical stimulation (FES). In developing adequate control strategies for FES systems, it remains challenging to test the performance of a particular control scheme on human subjects. In this study, we propose a testing platform for developing effective control strategies for a closed-loop FES system for standing. The Inverted Pendulum Standing Apparatus (IPSA) is a mechanical inverted pendulum, whose angular position is determined by the subject's ankle joint angle as controlled by the FES system while having the subject's body fixed in a standing frame. This approach provides a setup that is safe, prevents falling, and enables a research and design team to rigorously test various closed-loop controlled FES systems applied to the ankle joints. To demonstrate the feasibility of using the IPSA, we conducted a case series that employed the device for studying FES closed-loop controllers for regulating ankle joint kinematics during standing. The utilized FES system stimulated, in able-bodied volunteers, the plantarflexors as they prevent toppling during standing. Four different conditions were compared, and we were able to show unique performance of each condition using the IPSA. We concluded that the IPSA is a useful tool for developing and testing closed-loop controlled FES systems for regulating ankle joint position during standing.

  4. Increased expression of AT-1/SLC33A1 causes an autistic-like phenotype in mice by affecting dendritic branching and spine formation

    PubMed Central

    Hullinger, Rikki; Li, Mi; Wang, Jingxin; Peng, Yajing; Dowell, James A.; Bomba-Warczak, Ewa; Mitchell, Heather A.; Burger, Corinna; Chapman, Edwin R.; Denu, John M.; Li, Lingjun

    2016-01-01

    The import of acetyl-CoA into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by AT-1/SLC33A1 regulates Nε-lysine acetylation of ER-resident and -transiting proteins. Specifically, lysine acetylation within the ER appears to influence the efficiency of the secretory pathway by affecting ER-mediated quality control. Mutations or duplications in AT-1/SLC33A1 have been linked to diseases such as familial spastic paraplegia, developmental delay with premature death, and autism spectrum disorder with intellectual disability. In this study, we generated an AT-1 Tg mouse model that selectively overexpresses human AT-1 in neurons. These animals demonstrate cognitive deficits, autistic-like social behavior, aberrations in synaptic plasticity, an increased number of dendritic spines and branches, and widespread proteomic changes. We also found that AT-1 activity regulates acetyl-CoA flux, causing epigenetic modulation of the histone epitope H3K27 and mitochondrial adaptation. In conclusion, our results indicate that increased expression of AT-1 can cause an autistic-like phenotype by affecting key neuronal metabolic pathways. PMID:27242167

  5. Kinematic comparison of Hybrid II test dummy to wheelchair user.

    PubMed

    Dvorznak, M J; Cooper, R A; O'Connor, T J; Boninger, M L; Fitzgerald, S G

    2001-05-01

    Hybrid test dummies provide a safe alternative to human subjects when investigating mechanisms of wheelchair tips and falls. The data that researchers acquire from these test dummies are more useful if the test dummy represents the population being studied. The goal of this study was to measure the validity of a 50th percentile Hybrid II test dummy (HTD) as an accurate representation of a wheelchair user. A test pilot with T8 paraplegia due to traumatic spinal cord injury served as a basis for validation. Simple modifications were made to the HTD to approximate the trunk stability characteristics of a person with a spinal cord injury. An HTD, a modified HTD, and a human test pilot were seated in an electric-powered wheelchair and several braking tests performed. The standard HTD underestimated the kinematics when compared to the test pilot. The modified HTD had less trunk stability than the standard HTD during all braking methods. The modified HTD and wheelchair test pilot had similar trunk stability characteristics during kill switch and joystick full-reverse braking conditions. The modified HTD is a satisfactory representation of a wheelchair user with a spinal cord injury; however, the modified test dummy underestimates the trunk dynamics during the less extreme joystick release braking. Work should continue on the development of a low-speed, low-impact test dummy that emulates the wheelchair user population.

  6. Clinical mitochondrial genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P.; Howell, N.; Andrews, R.; Turnbull, D.

    1999-01-01

    The last decade has been an age of enlightenment as far as mitochondrial pathology is concerned. Well established nuclear genetic diseases, such as Friedreich's ataxia,12 Wilson disease,3 and autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia,4 have been shown to have a mitochondrial basis, and we are just starting to unravel the complex nuclear genetic disorders which directly cause mitochondrial dysfunction (table 1). However, in addition to the 3 billion base pair nuclear genome, each human cell typically contains thousands of copies of a small, 16.5 kb circular molecule of double stranded DNA (fig 1). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) accounts for only 1% of the total cellular nucleic acid content. It encodes for 13 polypeptides which are essential for aerobic metabolism and defects of the mitochondrial genome are an important cause of human disease.9293 Since the characterisation of the first pathogenic mtDNA defects in 1988,513 over 50 point mutations and well over 100 rearrangements of the mitochondrial genome have been associated with human disease9495 (http://www.gen.emory.edu/mitomap.html). These disorders form the focus of this article.


Keywords: mitochondrial DNA; mitochondrial disease; heteroplasmy; genetic counselling PMID:10874629

  7. Lipoxin A4 ameliorates ischemia/reperfusion induced spinal cord injury in rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Wang, Jian; Xia, Li-Jian; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced spinal cord injury is an important pathologic mechanism leading to the paraplegia observed after surgery to repairaortic aneurysms. This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Lipoxin A4 and its potential mechanism in a rabbit model with I/R spinal cord injury. Forty-five rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: sham group, I/R group and Lipoxin A4 group. Rabbits were subject to 30 min aortic occlusion to induce transient spinal cord ischemia. All animals were sacrificed after neurological evaluation with modified Tarlov criteria at the 48th hour after reperfusion, and the spinal cord segments (L4-6) were harvested for histopathological examination, as well as local malondialdehyde (MDA) and total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity analysis. All animals in the I/R group became paraplegic. While after 48-hour treatment, compared with I/R group, Lipoxin A4 significantly improved neurological function, reduced cell apoptosis and MDA levels as well as increased SOD activity (P < 0.05). These results suggest that Lipoxin A4 can ameliorate I/R induced spinal cord injury in Rabbit through its antiapoptosis and antioxidant activity. PMID:26550197

  8. Musculoskeletal Deterioration and Hemicorporectomy After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The long-term management following an hemicorporectomy (HCP) is not well documented in the scientific literature. The purpose of this case report is to describe the 25-year history of a man with a spinal cord injury who experienced severe musculoskeletal deterioration and hemicorporectomy. Case Description The client sustained T10 complete paraplegia at age 18 years, developed severe decubitus ulcers, and required an HCP as a lifesaving measure 13 years later. The authors describe the chronology of several rehabilitation and prosthetic strategies and speculate on factors that may have contributed to their successes and failures. Outcomes The client survived 12 years after the HCP and returned to independent mobility, self-care, and schooling despite complications with continued skin breakdown. Over the 12 years following discharge from the hospital after the spinal cord injury, he spent 749 days in the hospital. During the 12 years he lived after discharge from the hospital following the HCP, he was hospitalized 190 days. Discussion The authors discuss factors contributing to the client’s musculoskeletal deterioration including chronic wounds, postural deviations, and incomplete adherence to pressure-relief recommendations and raise considerations for physical therapists who treat patients after HCP. PMID:12620090

  9. The ergonomics of different tyres and tyre pressure during wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Sawatzky, Bonita J; Kim, Won O; Denison, Ian

    2004-11-01

    It is believed that the newer solid tyres on wheelchairs perform as well as pneumatic tyres along with less cost and time for maintenance. The questions are: (1) do solid tyres perform as well as pneumatic tyres and (2) what is the critical level of pneumatic tyre pressure before wheeling efficiency decreases? Part one measured the rolling resistance differences of five commonly used wheelchair tyres (three pneumatic and two solid) under four different tyre pressures (100, 75, 50 and 25 of inflation). Part two measured the oxygen consumption in 15 participants with paraplegia, during wheelchair propulsion, comparing the same four levels of tyre inflation. The solid tyres performed worse than all three pneumatic tyres even when tyres were under-inflated to 25% of tyre pressure. Two of the pneumatic tyres showed significant decreases in rolling between 100 and 50%, but there were no significant differences in rolling distance between 100 and 75% pressure. The physiological study showed that energy expenditure increased significantly at 50% of tyre-inflation. Health care facilities are finding ways to decrease cost by using solid tyres on all wheelchairs. This study shows that benefits to clients and staff using pneumatic tyres far outweigh the minimal cost in time to maintain adequate tyre inflation.

  10. Towards tract-specific fractional anisotropy (TSFA) at crossing-fiber regions with clinical diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Virendra; Guo, Xiaohu; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Huang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose White matter fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure implying microstructure, is significantly underestimated with single diffusion tensor model at crossing-fiber regions (CFR). We propose a tract-specific FA (TSFA), corrected for the effects of crossing-fiber geometry and free water at CFR, and adapted for tract analysis with diffusion MRI (dMRI) in clinical research. Methods At CFR voxels, the proposed technique estimates free water fraction (fiso) as a linear function of mean apparent diffusion coefficient (mADC), fits the dual tensors and estimates TSFA. Digital phantoms were designed for testing the accuracy of fiso and fitted dual-anisotropies at CFR. The technique was applied to clinical dMRI of normal subjects and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) patients to test the effectiveness of TSFA. Results Phantom simulation showed unbiased estimates of dual-tensor anisotropies at CFR and high accuracy of fiso as a linear function of mADC. TSFA at CFR was highly consistent to the single tensor FA at non-CFR within the same tract with normal human dMRI. Additional HSP imaging biomarkers with significant correlation to clinical motor function scores could be identified with TSFA. Conclusion Results suggest the potential of the proposed technique in estimating unbiased TSFA at CFR and conducting tract analysis in clinical research. PMID:25447208

  11. Souffle/Spastizin controls secretory vesicle maturation during zebrafish oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kanagaraj, Palsamy; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Riedel, Dietmar; Schomburg, Christoph; Cerdà, Joan; Vollack, Nadine; Dosch, Roland

    2014-06-01

    During oogenesis, the egg prepares for fertilization and early embryogenesis. As a consequence, vesicle transport is very active during vitellogenesis, and oocytes are an outstanding system to study regulators of membrane trafficking. Here, we combine zebrafish genetics and the oocyte model to identify the molecular lesion underlying the zebrafish souffle (suf) mutation. We demonstrate that suf encodes the homolog of the Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) gene SPASTIZIN (SPG15). We show that in zebrafish oocytes suf mutants accumulate Rab11b-positive vesicles, but trafficking of recycling endosomes is not affected. Instead, we detect Suf/Spastizin on cortical granules, which undergo regulated secretion. We demonstrate genetically that Suf is essential for granule maturation into secretion competent dense-core vesicles describing a novel role for Suf in vesicle maturation. Interestingly, in suf mutants immature, secretory precursors accumulate, because they fail to pinch-off Clathrin-coated buds. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of the abscission regulator Dynamin leads to an accumulation of immature secretory granules and mimics the suf phenotype. Our results identify a novel regulator of secretory vesicle formation in the zebrafish oocyte. In addition, we describe an uncharacterized cellular mechanism for Suf/Spastizin activity during secretion, which raises the possibility of novel therapeutic avenues for HSP research.

  12. Souffle/Spastizin Controls Secretory Vesicle Maturation during Zebrafish Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Dietmar; Schomburg, Christoph; Cerdà, Joan; Vollack, Nadine; Dosch, Roland

    2014-01-01

    During oogenesis, the egg prepares for fertilization and early embryogenesis. As a consequence, vesicle transport is very active during vitellogenesis, and oocytes are an outstanding system to study regulators of membrane trafficking. Here, we combine zebrafish genetics and the oocyte model to identify the molecular lesion underlying the zebrafish souffle (suf) mutation. We demonstrate that suf encodes the homolog of the Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) gene SPASTIZIN (SPG15). We show that in zebrafish oocytes suf mutants accumulate Rab11b-positive vesicles, but trafficking of recycling endosomes is not affected. Instead, we detect Suf/Spastizin on cortical granules, which undergo regulated secretion. We demonstrate genetically that Suf is essential for granule maturation into secretion competent dense-core vesicles describing a novel role for Suf in vesicle maturation. Interestingly, in suf mutants immature, secretory precursors accumulate, because they fail to pinch-off Clathrin-coated buds. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of the abscission regulator Dynamin leads to an accumulation of immature secretory granules and mimics the suf phenotype. Our results identify a novel regulator of secretory vesicle formation in the zebrafish oocyte. In addition, we describe an uncharacterized cellular mechanism for Suf/Spastizin activity during secretion, which raises the possibility of novel therapeutic avenues for HSP research. PMID:24967841

  13. Axonal degeneration in paraplegin-deficient mice is associated with abnormal mitochondria and impairment of axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Ferreirinha, Fatima; Quattrini, Angelo; Pirozzi, Marinella; Valsecchi, Valentina; Dina, Giorgia; Broccoli, Vania; Auricchio, Alberto; Piemonte, Fiorella; Tozzi, Giulia; Gaeta, Laura; Casari, Giorgio; Ballabio, Andrea; Rugarli, Elena I.

    2004-01-01

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, axonal degeneration occurs before neuronal death and contributes significantly to patients’ disability. Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by selective degeneration of axons of the corticospinal tracts and fasciculus gracilis. HSP may therefore be considered an exemplary disease to study the local programs mediating axonal degeneration. We have developed a mouse model for autosomal recessive HSP due to mutations in the SPG7 gene encoding the mitochondrial ATPase paraplegin. Paraplegin-deficient mice are affected by a distal axonopathy of spinal and peripheral axons, characterized by axonal swelling and degeneration. We found that mitochondrial morphological abnormalities occurred in synaptic terminals and in distal regions of axons long before the first signs of swelling and degeneration and correlated with onset of motor impairment during a rotarod test. Axonal swellings occur through massive accumulation of organelles and neurofilaments, suggesting impairment of anterograde axonal transport. Retrograde axonal transport is delayed in symptomatic mice. We speculate that local failure of mitochondrial function may affect axonal transport and cause axonal degeneration. Our data suggest that a timely therapeutic intervention may prevent the loss of axons. PMID:14722615

  14. The clinical maze of mitochondrial neurology

    PubMed Central

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Schon, Eric A.; Carelli, Valerio; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases involve the respiratory chain, which is under the dual control of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The complexity of mitochondrial genetics provides one explanation for the clinical heterogeneity of mitochondrial diseases, but our understanding of disease pathogenesis remains limited. Classification of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathies has been laborious, but whole-exome sequencing studies have revealed unexpected molecular aetiologies for both typical and atypical mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Mendelian mitochondrial defects can affect five components of mitochondrial biology: subunits of respiratory chain complexes (direct hits); mitochondrial assembly proteins; mtDNA translation; phospholipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membrane; or mitochondrial dynamics. A sixth category—defects of mtDNA maintenance—combines features of Mendelian and mitochondrial genetics. Genetic defects in mitochondrial dynamics are especially important in neurology as they cause optic atrophy, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. Therapy is inadequate and mostly palliative, but promising new avenues are being identified. Here, we review current knowledge on the genetics and pathogenesis of the six categories of mitochondrial disorders outlined above, focusing on their salient clinical manifestations and highlighting novel clinical entities. An outline of diagnostic clues for the various forms of mitochondrial disease, as well as potential therapeutic strategies, is also discussed. PMID:23835535

  15. An extremely rare case: osteosclerotic metaphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kasapkara, C S; Küçükçongar, A; Boyunağa, O; Bedir, T; Oncü, F; Hasanoğlu, A; Tümer, L

    2013-01-01

    OMD (osteosclerotic metaphyseal dysplasia) is a very rare sclerosing bone disorder, first described by G. Nishimura in two Japanese siblings in 1993 (6). We report the case of a 12-month-old male with hypotonia, developmental delay and sclerosis of the metaphyses and epiphyses of specific bones. This 36-week gestation boy was born to a 26 year old gravida 5 para 1 Turkish mother and a 27 year old nonconsanguineous father. Radiographic findings obtained during the hospital stay included bilateral symmetrical osteosclerosis of the metaphyseal portions of the long bones in the upper and lower extremities with osteopenic shafts. Narrow bands of metaphyseal osteosclerosis were detected in the short tubular bones of the hands and feet. Growing parts of bilateral scapula, iliac, pubic and ischial bones show sclerotic bands. In addition superior and inferior plates of vertebras, transverse processes of sacral vertebras, all visible epiphyses, carpal and tarsal bones also show sclerotic changes. The scalp was unaffected. Based on the clinical, radiographic, and laboratory findings, a diagnosis of OMD was made. We do not know any of the osteosclerotic bone disorder with changes including hypotonia, mental and motor developmental delay and metaphyseal sclerosis of the bones with a unique distribution except OMD. The syndrome is characterized by developmental delay of a progressive nature, hypotonia, elevated alkaline phosphatase, and late-onset spastic paraplegia 18 years ago. Our patient is the 4th case of OMD described in the literature share some clinical and radiological similarities with other three reported cases of osteosclerotic metaphyseal dysplasias.

  16. The N-terminal domain plays a crucial role in the structure of a full-length human mitochondrial Lon protease

    PubMed Central

    Kereïche, Sami; Kováčik, Lubomír; Bednár, Jan; Pevala, Vladimír; Kunová, Nina; Ondrovičová, Gabriela; Bauer, Jacob; Ambro, Ľuboš; Bellová, Jana; Kutejová, Eva; Raška, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Lon is an essential, multitasking AAA+ protease regulating many cellular processes in species across all kingdoms of life. Altered expression levels of the human mitochondrial Lon protease (hLon) are linked to serious diseases including myopathies, paraplegia, and cancer. Here, we present the first 3D structure of full-length hLon using cryo-electron microscopy. hLon has a unique three-dimensional structure, in which the proteolytic and ATP-binding domains (AP-domain) form a hexameric chamber, while the N-terminal domain is arranged as a trimer of dimers. These two domains are linked by a narrow trimeric channel composed likely of coiled-coil helices. In the presence of AMP-PNP, the AP-domain has a closed-ring conformation and its N-terminal entry gate appears closed, but in ADP binding, it switches to a lock-washer conformation and its N-terminal gate opens, which is accompanied by a rearrangement of the N-terminal domain. We have also found that both the enzymatic activities and the 3D structure of a hLon mutant lacking the first 156 amino acids are severely disturbed, showing that hLon’s N-terminal domains are crucial for the overall structure of the hLon, maintaining a conformation allowing its proper functioning. PMID:27632940

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms with the EndoFit Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Saratzis, N.; Saratzis, Athanasios Melas, N.; Ginis, G.; Lioupis, A.; Lykopoulos, D.; Lazaridis, J.; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2007-04-15

    Objective. To evaluate the mid-term feasibility, efficacy, and durability of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) exclusion using the EndoFit device (LeMaitre Vascular). Methods. Twenty-three (23) men (mean age 66 years) with a DTAA were admitted to our department for endovascular repair (21 were ASA III+ and 2 refused open repair) from January 2003 to July 2005. Results. Complete aneurysm exclusion was feasible in all subjects (100% technical success). The median follow-up was 18 months (range 8-40 months). A single stent-graft was used in 6 cases. The deployment of a second stent-graft was required in the remaining 17 patients. All endografts were attached proximally, beyond the left subclavian artery, leaving the aortic arch branches intact. No procedure-related deaths have occurred. A distal type I endoleak was detected in 2 cases on the 1 month follow-up CT scan, and was repaired with reintervention and deployment of an extension graft. A nonfatal acute myocardial infarction occurred in 1 patient in the sixth postoperative month. Graft migration, graft infection, paraplegia, cerebral or distal embolization, renal impairment or any other major complications were not observed. Conclusion. The treatment of DTAAs using the EndoFit stent-graft is technically feasible. Mid-term results in this series are promising.

  18. Endovascular Exclusion of Mycotic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Takach, Thomas J.; Kane, Peter N.; Madjarov, Jeko M.; Holleman, Jeremiah H.; Robicsek, Francis; Roush, Timothy S.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of prohibitive risk may preclude usual surgical management. Such was the case for a critically ill, 60-year-old woman who presented with concomitant, life-threatening conditions. The patient presented with acute central cord syndrome and lower-extremity paraplegia after completing a 6-week course of intravenous antibiotics for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine. Radiologic examination revealed bony destruction of thoracic vertebrae T4 through T6, impingement on the spinal cord and canal by an inflammatory mass, and a separate 2.5-cm mycotic aneurysm of the infrarenal aorta. The clinical and radiologic findings warranted immediate decompression and stabilization of the spinal cord, aneurysmectomy, and vascular reconstruction. However, the severely debilitated patient could not tolerate 2 simultaneous open procedures. She underwent emergent endovascular exclusion of the mycotic aneurysm with a stent-graft, followed immediately by laminectomy and stabilization of the thoracic spine. Intraoperative microbiology specimens showed no growth. The patient was maintained on prophylactic antibiotic therapy for 6 months. Fourteen months postoperatively, her neurologic function was near full recovery, and neither surveillance blood cultures nor radiologic examinations showed a recurrence of infection or aneurysm. Although the long-term outcome of endovascular stent-grafts in the treatment of culture-negative mycotic aneurysms is unknown, the use of these grafts in severely debilitated patients can reduce operative risk and enable recovery in the short term. PMID:18172531

  19. Long-term evaluation of direct repair of traumatic isthmic aortic transection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, G; Fontan, F; Deville, C; Madonna, F; Thibaud, D

    1989-01-01

    Direct repair of traumatic aortic isthmic transection eliminates the late complications of prosthetic graft repair. This study evaluates the long-term fate of direct aortic repair to which little attention has been paid. Among 32 patients operated upon from 1965 to 1987, 27 (84%) underwent direct repair. The tear was circumferential in 15 patients and partial in 12. Multiple traumatic lesions were present in 26 patients, including intracranial injury in 19. Partial cardiopulmonary bypass was used in 15 patients and simple aortic cross-clamping in 12. No paraplegia was observed. There were 4 deaths from associated lesions among the 14 patients operated upon for acute traumatic isthmic transection and no deaths in the others. Among the 23 survivors, 4 were lost to follow-up; the other 19 patients have excellent clinical results. Intravenous digital aortic angiography performed in 14 patients at a mean delay of 5 years 3 months showed excellent aortic reconstruction in all cases. Technically more demanding and faster than a graft interposition, direct repair is recommended as the procedure of choice in the surgical treatment of traumatic isthmic transection, particularly in young patients, the group most at risk from this lesion.

  20. Clinical Guideline for Treatment of Symptomatic Thoracic Spinal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-qiang; Sun, Chui-guo

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic spinal stenosis is a relatively common disorder causing paraplegia in the population of China. Until nowadays, the clinical management of thoracic spinal stenosis is still demanding and challenging with lots of questions remaining to be answered. A clinical guideline for the treatment of symptomatic thoracic spinal stenosis has been created by reaching the consensus of Chinese specialists using the best available evidence as a tool to aid practitioners involved with the care of this disease. In this guideline, many fundamental questions about thoracic spinal stenosis which were controversial have been explained clearly, including the definition of thoracic spinal stenosis, the standard procedure for diagnosing symptomatic thoracic spinal stenosis, indications for surgery, and so on. According to the consensus on the definition of thoracic spinal stenosis, the soft herniation of thoracic discs has been excluded from the pathological factors causing thoracic spinal stenosis. The procedure for diagnosing thoracic spinal stenosis has been quite mature, while the principles for selecting operative procedures remain to be improved. This guideline will be updated on a timely schedule and adhering to its recommendations should not be mandatory because it does not have the force of law.

  1. The articles of Babinski on his sign and the paper of 1898.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Estañol; Horacio, Sentíes-Madrid; Yolanda, Elías; Guillermo, García Ramos

    2007-01-01

    In 1896 Joseph François Felix Babinski described for the first time the phenomenon of the toes; nevertheless in this first paper he simply described extension of all toes with pricking of the sole of the foot. It was not until the second paper of 1898 that he specifically described the extension of the hallux with strong tactile stimulation (stroking) of the lateral border of the sole. Babinski probably discovered his sign by a combination of chance observation and careful re-observation and replication. He also had in mind practical applications of the sign, particularly in the differential diagnosis with hysteria and in medico-legal areas. Several of the observations and physiopathological mechanisms proposed by Babinski are still valid today, e.g, he realized since 1896 that the reflex was part of the flexor reflex synergy and observed that several patients during the first hours of an acute cerebral or spinal insult had absent extensor responses. He also found that most patients with the abnormal reflex had weakness of dorsiflexion of the toes and ankles and observed a lack of correlation between hyperactive myotatic reflexes and the presence of an upgoing hallux. He discovered that not all patients with hemiplegia or paraplegia had the sign but thought erroneously that some normal subjects could have an upgoing toe. Between 1896 and 1903 Babinski continued to think on the sign that bears his name and enrich its semiological and physiopathological value.

  2. Real-Time Strap Pressure Sensor System for Powered Exoskeletons

    PubMed Central

    Tamez-Duque, Jesús; Cobian-Ugalde, Rebeca; Kilicarslan, Atilla; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Soto, Rogelio; Contreras-Vidal, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Assistive and rehabilitative powered exoskeletons for spinal cord injury (SCI) and stroke subjects have recently reached the clinic. Proper tension and joint alignment are critical to ensuring safety. Challenges still exist in adjustment and fitting, with most current systems depending on personnel experience for appropriate individual fastening. Paraplegia and tetraplegia patients using these devices have impaired sensation and cannot signal if straps are uncomfortable or painful. Excessive pressure and blood-flow restriction can lead to skin ulcers, necrotic tissue and infections. Tension must be just enough to prevent slipping and maintain posture. Research in pressure dynamics is extensive for wheelchairs and mattresses, but little research has been done on exoskeleton straps. We present a system to monitor pressure exerted by physical human-machine interfaces and provide data about levels of skin/body pressure in fastening straps. The system consists of sensing arrays, signal processing hardware with wireless transmission, and an interactive GUI. For validation, a lower-body powered exoskeleton carrying the full weight of users was used. Experimental trials were conducted with one SCI and one able-bodied subject. The system can help prevent skin injuries related to excessive pressure in mobility-impaired patients using powered exoskeletons, supporting functionality, independence and better overall quality of life. PMID:25690551

  3. Role of calf muscle stimulation in the prevention of DVT in Indian patients undergoing surgeries for fractures around the hip

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Aman; Arora, Sumit; Batra, Sumit; Sharma, Rohit; Mittal, Mahesh Kumar; Sharma, Vinod K

    2012-01-01

    Background: The venous stasis of soleal vein during surgery may be an important factor in the development of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The stimulation of calf muscle during surgery may help in preventing DVT. The present study is conducted to evaluate the role of peroperative calf muscle electrostimulation in prevention of DVT in patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint. Materials and Methods: The study comprised 200 patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint. The patients having risk factors (such as previous myocardial infarction, malignancies, paraplegia or lower limb monoplegia, previous history of DVT or varicose veins, etc.) for the development of DVT were excluded. They were randomized into two groups: 100 cases were given peroperative calf muscle electrostimulation for DVT prophylaxis (Group A) and the remaining 100 patients were taken as controls without any prophylaxis (Group B). The color Doppler ultrasound was performed to exclude pre-existing DVT and on 7th day postoperative to find out the incidence of DVT in both the groups. Results: Two patients among Group A and six patients among Group B demonstrated DVT on ultrasonography, but the difference was not found to be statistically significant (P=0.279). None of the patients had any clinical evidence of DVT. Conclusion: The role of peroperative calf muscle electrostimulation for DVT prophylaxis remains controversial. The risk of developing DVT in patients undergoing surgeries around the hip joint is very less in patients analysed in our series. PMID:23162147

  4. Expanding roles for lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Welte, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid droplets are the intracellular sites for neutral lipid storage. They are critical for lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis, and their dysfunction has been linked to many diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that the roles lipid droplets play in biology are significantly broader than previously anticipated. Lipid droplets are the source of molecules important in the nucleus: they can sequester transcription factors and chromatin components and generate the lipid ligands for certain nuclear receptors. Lipid droplets have also emerged as important nodes for fatty acid trafficking, both inside the cell and between cells. In immunity, new roles for droplets, not directly linked to lipid metabolism, have been uncovered, as assembly platforms for specific viruses and as reservoirs for proteins that fight intracellular pathogens. Until recently, knowledge about droplets in the nervous system has been minimal, but now there are multiple links between lipid droplets and neurodegeneration: Many candidate genes for Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia also have central roles in lipid-droplet formation and maintenance, and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurons can lead to transient accumulating of lipid droplets in neighboring glial cells, an event that may, in turn, contribute to neuronal damage. As the cell biology and biochemistry of lipid droplets are increasingly well understood, the next few years should yield many new mechanistic insights into these novel functions of lipid droplets. PMID:26035793

  5. Bone mineral status in paraplegic patients who do or do not perform standing.

    PubMed

    Goemaere, S; Van Laere, M; De Neve, P; Kaufman, J M

    1994-05-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by dual-photon X-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine (L3, L4), the proximal femur and the femoral shaft, and by single-photon absorptiometry at the forearm in 53 patients with complete traumatic paraplegia of at least 1 year's duration and in age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The patients did (n = 38) or did not (n = 15) regularly perform passive weightbearing standing with the aid of a standing device. Compared with the controls, the BMD of paraplegic patients was preserved in the lumbar spine and was markedly decreased in the proximal femur (33%) and the femoral shaft (25%). When considering all patients performing standing, they had a better-preserved BMD at the femoral shaft (p = 0.009), but not at the proximal femur, than patients not performing standing. BMD at the lumbar spine (L3, L4) was marginally higher in the standing group (significant only for L3; p = 0.040). A subgroup of patients performing standing with use of long leg braces had a significantly higher BMD at the proximal femur than patients using a standing frame or a standing wheelchair (p = 0.030). The present results suggest that passive mechanical loading can have a beneficial effect on the preservation of bone mass in osteoporosis found in paraplegics.

  6. Sialylation regulates brain structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung-Wan; Motari, Mary G.; Susuki, Keiichiro; Prendergast, Jillian; Mountney, Andrea; Hurtado, Andres; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Every cell expresses a molecularly diverse surface glycan coat (glycocalyx) comprising its interface with its cellular environment. In vertebrates, the terminal sugars of the glycocalyx are often sialic acids, 9-carbon backbone anionic sugars implicated in intermolecular and intercellular interactions. The vertebrate brain is particularly enriched in sialic acid-containing glycolipids termed gangliosides. Human congenital disorders of ganglioside biosynthesis result in paraplegia, epilepsy, and intellectual disability. To better understand sialoglycan functions in the nervous system, we studied brain anatomy, histology, biochemistry, and behavior in mice with engineered mutations in St3gal2 and St3gal3, sialyltransferase genes responsible for terminal sialylation of gangliosides and some glycoproteins. St3gal2/3 double-null mice displayed dysmyelination marked by a 40% reduction in major myelin proteins, 30% fewer myelinated axons, a 33% decrease in myelin thickness, and molecular disruptions at nodes of Ranvier. In part, these changes may be due to dysregulation of ganglioside-mediated oligodendroglial precursor cell proliferation. Neuronal markers were also reduced up to 40%, and hippocampal neurons had smaller dendritic arbors. Young adult St3gal2/3 double-null mice displayed impaired motor coordination, disturbed gait, and profound cognitive disability. Comparisons among sialyltransferase mutant mice provide insights into the functional roles of brain gangliosides and sialoglycoproteins consistent with related human congenital disorders.—Yoo, S.-W., Motari, M. G., Susuki, K., Prendergast, J., Mountney, A., Hurtado, A., Schnaar, R. L. Sialylation regulates brain structure and function. PMID:25846372

  7. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone treatment improves locomotor activity, urinary function and neurofilament protein expression after spinal cord injury in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Vallejo, Denisse; Quintanar, J Luis

    2012-05-02

    It was reported that the hypothalamic decapeptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) produces neurotrophic effects and that the spinal cord possesses GnRH receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether administration of GnRH improves locomotor activity, urinary function and neurofilament (NFs) protein expression after spinal cord injury (SCI) in ovariectomized rats. SCI was induced by balloon inflation model resulting in paraplegia. Locomotion was evaluated according to the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan Scale. Rats were subjected to bladder compression, twice daily until bladder reflex was established. NFs of 68, 160 and 200 kDa from spinal cords were analyzed by electrophoresis. GnRH (60 μg/kg) or physiologic NaCl solution was administered at 1 day after SCI and then daily for 15 days and the functional evaluation was realized for 5 weeks. Our results indicate that locomotor activity, restoration of urinary dysfunction and NFs expression of 160 and 200 kDa were improved in SCI animals given GnRH compared to those without treatment. These findings suggest that GnRH acts as a neurotrophic factor and may be used as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of SCI.

  8. Evaluation of Neurologic Deficit Without Apparent Cause: The Importance of a Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Harvey E; Rynning, Ralph E; Okafor, Chukwuka; Zaslavsky, James; Tracy, Joseph I; Ratliff, John; Harrop, James; Albert, Todd; Hilibrand, Alan; Anderson, Gregory; Sharan, Ashwini; Brown, Zoe; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: A patient presenting with an acute neurologic deficit with no apparent etiology presents a diagnostic dilemma. A broad differential diagnosis must be entertained, considering both organic and psychiatric causes. Methods: A case report and thorough literature review of acute paraplegia after a low-energy trauma without a discernible organic etiology. Results: Diagnostic imaging excluded any bony malalignment or fracture and any abnormality on magnetic resonance imaging. When no organic etiology was identified, a multidisciplinary approach using neurology, psychiatry, and physical medicine and rehabilitation services was applied. Neurophysiologic testing confirmed the absence of an organic disorder, and at this juncture, diagnostic efforts focused on identifying any psychiatric disorder to facilitate appropriate treatment for this individual. The final diagnosis was malingering. Conclusions: The full psychiatric differential diagnosis should be considered in the evaluation of any patient with an atypical presentation of paralysis. A thorough clinical examination in combination with the appropriate diagnostic studies can confidently exclude an organic disorder. When considering a psychiatric disorder, the differential diagnosis should include conversion disorder and malingering, although each must remain a diagnosis of exclusion. Maintaining a broad differential diagnosis and involving multiple disciplines (neurology, psychiatry, social work, medical specialists) early in the evaluation of atypical paralysis may facilitate earlier diagnosis and initiation of treatment for the underlying etiology. PMID:18092568

  9. Factors That Influence Employment After Spinal Cord Injury in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eun-Na; Shin, Hyung-Ik

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate employment status after spinal cord injury (SCI) and identify personal, family, and injury characteristics those affect their employment in South Korea. Methods Participants were 334 community-dwelling persons 20-64 years of age who had sustained SCI for more than one year. Investigators visited each participant's home to carry out the survey. Bivariate and binary logistic regression analyses were performed to identify personal, family, and injury characteristics that influenced employment after SCI. Results Employment rate decreased significantly from 82.5% to 27.5% after SCI. Logistic regression showed that the probability of employment was higher in men than women, and in individuals older than 45 years at the time of injury than those aged 31-45 years of age. Moreover, employment was higher in individuals injured for longer than 20 years than those injured for 1-5 years and in individuals with incomplete tetraplegia than those with complete paraplegia. Employment was lower in individuals with SCI caused by industrial accidents than those injured in non-industrial accidents. Conclusion Injury characteristics are the most important predictors of employment in persons with SCI. For persons with lower employment rate, individualized vocational rehabilitation and employment-support systems are required. PMID:24639924

  10. Postocclusive reactive hyperemia and thermal response in the skin microcirculation of subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schubert, V; Fagrell, B

    1991-01-01

    The response of skin blood cell flux (SBF) to locally applied pressure was evaluated by laser Doppler fluxmetry over the sacrum and the gluteus maximus muscle in twenty patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI)-ten with tetraplegia, ten with paraplegia-and ten healthy subjects. The SCI patients were further divided into two subgroups, one with sensation and the other without sensation over the sacrum area. The SBF over the sacrum, without applied pressure, showed somewhat higher values among the patients. The ten paraplegic patients (p less than 0.05) and the subgroup of patients without sensation over the sacrum (p less than 0.05) showed the highest values. Occlusion of the SBF was reached at a lower external skin pressure over the sacrum than over the gluteus maximus muscle in the group with spinal cord injuries (p less than 0.01). During the postocclusive reactive hyperemia we found a much shorter time to peak SBF over the gluteus muscle for the patients compared to the healthy subjects (p less than 0.01). In the subgroup of patients without sensation over the sacrum a prolonged time to peak SBF was found (p less than 0.01) over the sacrum compared to patients with sensation and to healthy subjects. The increase of the SBF during postocclusive hyperemia response was lower over both the sacrum and the gluteus maximus muscle areas in the patients with spinal cord injuries (p less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Function Over Form: Modeling Groups of Inherited Neurological Conditions in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kozol, Robert A; Abrams, Alexander J; James, David M; Buglo, Elena; Yan, Qing; Dallman, Julia E

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish are a unique cell to behavior model for studying the basic biology of human inherited neurological conditions. Conserved vertebrate genetics and optical transparency provide in vivo access to the developing nervous system as well as high-throughput approaches for drug screens. Here we review zebrafish modeling for two broad groups of inherited conditions that each share genetic and molecular pathways and overlap phenotypically: neurodevelopmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID) and Schizophrenia (SCZ), and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Cerebellar Ataxia (CATX), Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease (CMT). We also conduct a small meta-analysis of zebrafish orthologs of high confidence neurodevelopmental disorder and neurodegenerative disease genes by looking at duplication rates and relative protein sizes. In the past zebrafish genetic models of these neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases have provided insight into cellular, circuit and behavioral level mechanisms contributing to these conditions. Moving forward, advances in genetic manipulation, live imaging of neuronal activity and automated high-throughput molecular screening promise to help delineate the mechanistic relationships between different types of neurological conditions and accelerate discovery of therapeutic strategies.

  12. Effects of Krankcycle Training on Performance and Body Composition in Wheelchair Users

    PubMed Central

    Čichoň, Rostislav; Maszczyk, Adam; Stastny, Petr; Uhlíř, Petr; Petr, Miroslav; Doubrava, Ondřej; Mostowik, Aleksandra; Gołaś, Artur; Cieszczyk, Paweł; Żmijewski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Innovation in training equipment is important for increasing training effectiveness, performance and changes in body composition, especially in wheelchair users with paraplegia. The main objective of a workout session is to induce an adaptation stimulus, which requires overload of involved muscles by voluntary effort, yet this overload may be highly influenced by the size of the spinal cord lesion. Krancykl construction is designed to allow exercise on any wheelchair and with adjustable height or width of crank handles, where even the grip handle may be altered. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in body composition, performance and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) in paraplegics with a different level of paralyses after a 12 week training programme of a unilateral regime on Krankcycle equipment (a crank machine). The study sample included four men and one women at a different spine lesion level. The 12 weeks programme was successfully completed by four participants, while one subject got injured during the intervention process. Three participants were paraplegics and one was quadriplegic with innervation of the biceps humeri, triceps humeri and deltoideus. The Krankcycle 30 min programme was followed by four other exercises, which were performed after themselves rather than in a circuit training manner as the latter would result in much longer rest periods between exercises, because paraplegics have to be fixed by straps during exercise on hydraulic machines. The RPE after the workout decreased following the twelve week adaptation period. PMID:26834875

  13. Constructs of human neuropathy target esterase catalytic domain containing mutations related to motor neuron disease have altered enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Hein, Nichole D; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Rainier, Shirley R; Fink, John K; Richardson, Rudy J

    2010-07-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) is a phospholipase/lysophospholipase associated with organophosphorus (OP) compound-induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN). Distal degeneration of motor axons occurs in both OPIDN and the hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs). Recently, mutations within the esterase domain of NTE were identified in patients with a novel type of HSP (SPG39) designated NTE-related motor neuron disease (NTE-MND). Two of these mutations, arginine 890 to histidine (R890H) and methionine 1012 to valine (M1012V), were created in human recombinant NTE catalytic domain (NEST) to measure possible changes in catalytic properties. These mutated enzymes had decreased specific activities for hydrolysis of the artificial substrate, phenyl valerate. In addition, the M1012V mutant exhibited a reduced bimolecular rate constant of inhibition (k(i)) for all three inhibitors tested: mipafox, diisopropylphosphorofluoridate, and chlorpyrifos oxon. Finally, while both mutated enzymes inhibited by OP compounds exhibited altered time-dependent loss of their ability to be reactivated by nucleophiles (aging), more pronounced effects were seen with the M1012V mutant. Taken together, the results from specific activity, inhibition, and aging experiments suggest that the mutations found in association with NTE-MND have functional correlates in altered enzymological properties of NTE.

  14. Selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic diplegia secondary to stroke in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Eppinger, Melissa Ann; Berman, Casey Melissa; Mazzola, Catherine Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is often recommended for children with spastic paraparesis and cerebral palsy. SDR reduces spasticity in the lower extremities for these children with spastic paraplegia. However, SDR is infrequently recommended for adults with spasticity. Spastic diplegia in adult patients can be due to stroke, brain or spinal cord injury from trauma, infection, toxic-metabolic disorders, and other causes. Although rarely considered, SDR is an option for adult patients with spastic diplegia as well. Case Description: The authors describe a patient who underwent a SDR with a successful postoperative outcome. This man suffered a hypertensive and hemorrhagic stroke secondary to intravenous drug abuse at age 46. A SDR was performed after two failed intrathecal baclofen pump placements due to recurrent infections, likely resulting from his immunocompromised status. The patient underwent lumbar laminectomies and dorsal rhizotomies at levels L1-S1 bilaterally. Postoperatively, the patient's spasticity was significantly reduced. His Ashworth spasticity score decreased from 4/5 to 1/5, and the reduction in tone has been durable over 3 years. Conclusion: SDR in older patients with spastic paraparesis may be considered as a treatment option. PMID:26167363

  15. The effect of crank position and backrest inclination on shoulder load and mechanical efficiency during handcycling.

    PubMed

    Arnet, U; van Drongelen, S; Schlüssel, M; Lay, V; van der Woude, L H V; Veeger, H E J

    2014-04-01

    Handbikes come in different models and setups, but only limited knowledge is available on the handbike-user interface. The aim of this study was to identify optimal handbike setups, assuming that in such a setup mechanical efficiency is high, while shoulder load is low. Thirteen subjects with a spinal cord injury (paraplegia) performed handcycling with different handbike setups at constant power output: four crank positions (two distances, two heights) and four backrest inclinations. The O2-consumption, kinetics, and kinematics were measured to calculate mechanical efficiency and shoulder load (glenohumeral contact force, net shoulder moments, and rotator cuff force). The analysis showed that more upright backrest positions resulted in lower shoulder load compared with the most reclined position [glenohumeral contact force (260 vs 335 N), supraspinatus (14.4% vs 18.2%), and infraspinatus force (5.4% vs 9.8%)], while there was no difference in efficiency. Except for a reduction in subscapularis force at the distant position, no differences in shoulder load or efficiency were found between crank positions. Recreational handbike users, who want to improve their physical capacity in a shoulder-friendly way, should set up their handbike with a more upright backrest position and a distant crank placement.

  16. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin on spinal cord in rabbit model with ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xing, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury of the spinal cord is a serious complication that can result from thoracoabdominal aortic surgery. Objective To investigate the neuroprotective effect of curcumin against I/R injury in a rabbit model. Methods A total of 36 rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: sham, I/R, and curcumin-treated group. Rabbits were subject to 30-min aortic occlusion to induce transient spinal cord ischemia. Neurological function was observed after reperfusion and spinal cord segment (L3–L5) was collected for histopathological evaluation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were also assayed. Results Rabbits in I/R group were induced to paraplegia. While after 48-hour treatment, compared with I/R group, curcumin significantly improved neurological function, reduced cell apoptosis and MDA levels as well as increased SOD activity (P < 0.05). Conclusions The results suggest that curcumin, at least in an animal model, can attenuate transient spinal cord ischemic injury potentially via reducing oxidative damage, which may provide a novel approach in the treatment of spinal cord ischemic injury. PMID:23809530

  17. Spinal cord lesions shrink peripersonal space around the feet, passive mobilization of paraplegic limbs restores it.

    PubMed

    Scandola, Michele; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria; Bonente, Claudio; Avesani, Renato; Moro, Valentina

    2016-04-06

    Peripersonal space (PPS) is the space surrounding us within which we interact with objects. PPS may be modulated by actions (e.g. when using tools) or sense of ownership (e.g. over a rubber hand). Indeed, intense and/or prolonged use of a tool may induce a sense of ownership over it. Conversely, inducing ownership over a rubber hand may activate brain regions involved in motor control. However, the extent to which PPS is modulated by action-dependent or ownership-dependent mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we explored the PPS around the feet and the sense of ownership over lower limbs in people with Paraplegia following Complete spinal cord Lesions (PCL) and in healthy subjects. PCL people can move their upper body but have lost all sensory-motor functions in their lower body (e.g. lower limbs). We tested whether PPS alterations reflect the topographical representations of various body parts. We found that the PPS around the feet was impaired in PCL who however had a normal representation of the PPS around the hands. Significantly, passive mobilization of paraplegic limbs restored the PPS around the feet suggesting that activating action representations in PCL brings about short-term changes of PPS that may thus be more plastic than previously believed.

  18. Prevalence of anxiety disorder in patients with type 2 diabetes: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hung-Pin; Lin, Ching-Hua; Hsieh, Hui-Min; Jiang, He-Jiun; Wang, Peng-Wei; Huang, Chun-Jen

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates the prevalence of anxiety disorder (AD) in Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Study participants were identified based on at least one service claim for ambulatory or inpatient care with a principal diagnosis of AD and at least 2 service claims for ambulatory care or one service claim for inpatient care with a principal diagnosis of T2D, as listed in the National Health Insurance database of Taiwan. The prevalence of AD decreased from 13.75 to 11.00 % in patients with T2D, whereas it increased from 4.17 to 6.09 % in the general population during the 2000-2010 period. A high prevalence of AD in patients with T2D was associated with age >30 years, the female sex, living in the northern region, comorbidities of congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and depression disorder, and a Charlson participant comorbidity index of ≥1. A low prevalence of AD in patients with T2D was associated with residency in urban areas, the comorbidity of hemiplegia or paraplegia, the usage of metformin and sulfonylureas, and rapid-acting insulin injection therapy. The prevalence of AD was higher in patients with T2D than in the general population. Therefore, more public health emphasis is required for preventing and treating AD in patients with T2D, specifically those with the mentioned risk factors.

  19. Endovascular Management of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fattori, Rossella Russo, Vincenzo; Lovato, Luigi; Buttazzi, Katia; Rinaldi, Giovanni

    2011-12-15

    The overall survival of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) has improved significantly in the past few years. Endovascular treatment, proposed as an alternative to surgery, has been considered a therapeutic innovation because of its low degree of invasiveness, which allows the treatment of even high-surgical risk patients with limited complications and mortality. A major limitation is the lack of adequate evidence regarding long-term benefit and durability because follow-up has been limited to just a few years even in the largest series. The combination of endovascular exclusion with visceral branch revascularization for the treatment of thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms involving the visceral aorta has also been attempted. As an alternative, endografts with branches represent a technological evolution that allows treatment of complex anatomy. Even if only small numbers of patients and short follow-up are available, this technical approach, which has with limited mortality (<10%) and paraplegia rates, to expand endovascular treatment to TAA seems feasible. With improved capability to recognize proper anatomy and select clinical candidates, the choice of endovascular stent-graft placement may offer a strategy to optimize management and improve prognosis.

  20. Mid-Term Results After Endovascular Stent-Grafting of Descending Aortic Aneurysms in High-Risk Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Michael Walluscheck, Knut P.; Jahnke, Thomas; Attmann, Tim; Heller, Martin; Cremer, Jochen; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. To analyze our experience with endovascular stent-grafting of descending aortic aneurysms in high-risk patients. Methods. Nineteen patients underwent endovascular stent-graft repair of descending aortic aneurysms using the Talent Stent Graft System (Medtronic). All patients were considered high-risk for open surgical repair due to their age, requirement for emergency surgery, and comorbidities. Computed tomography and/or MR tomography were performed at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively and thereafter every 12 months. Results. Secondary technical success was 100%. Thirty-day mortality was 5%. Incidence of postoperative stroke and paraplegia were 5% each. One patient required a second stent-graft due to a type I endoleak during the same hospital stay (primary technical success 95%). All patients have been followed for a median of 20 months. No migration, wire fractures or endoleak appeared during follow-up. Conclusion. Endovascular stent-grafting had a low 30-day mortality and morbidity in high-risk patients. One patient developed an aortoesophageal fistula 40 days after stent implantation. Stent-graft repair is a valuable supplement to surgical therapy in high-risk patients.