Science.gov

Sample records for parapsoriasis

  1. Ichthyosiform large plaque parapsoriasis: report of a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Nag, Falguni; Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Biswas, Projna; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Biswas, Saugato

    2013-09-01

    Large plaque parapsoriasis (LPP) is an idiopathic, chronic scaly dermatosis classified within parapsoriasis group of diseases, occurring commonly in middle aged patients of all races and geographic regions. LPP and its variants are closely related to the patch stage of mycosis fungoides. The two types of LPP mostly described are the poikilodermatous and retiform parapsoriasis. We are reporting an ichthyosiform LPP for its rarity.

  2. Retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Francesco; Blasi, Sara; Sgueglia, Monica; Polichetti, Paolo; Tromba, Luciana; Berni, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Background Extremely rare cases of paraneoplastic syndromes or ectopic production of proteins associated with liposarcoma are reported in literature. Production of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor, alpha-fetoprotein, paraneoplastic pemphigus and leucocytosis, Acrokeratosis paraneoplastica (Bazex's syndrome) are reported. The present report describes a case of retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis. Our search in the English literature of such a kind of association did not reveal any case reported. Case presentation A 74 year male patient was admitted to our hospital because of the presence of an abdominal mass in right iliac fossa. He also complained of a two-year history of psoriasiform eruptions. The CT scan showed a retroperitoneal pelvic mass. Therefore surgical resection of the tumor was performed. After surgery, the skin eruptions disappeared completely in seven days and so a diagnosis of parapsoriasis syndrome was done. Conclusion Parallel disappearing of skin eruptions after surgery, typical clinical picture and not specific histology of the cutaneous lesions suggest the diagnosis of small plaque parapsoriasis. Therefore we propose to add Small Plaque Parapsoriasis to the list of paraneoplastic syndromes associated to liposarcoma. PMID:17620118

  3. [Radiation therapy of psoriasis and parapsoriasis].

    PubMed

    Wiskemann, A

    1982-09-15

    Selective UV-Phototherapy with lambda 300-320 nm (SUP) as well as oral photochemotherapy with 8-methoxy-psoralene plus UVA-radiation (PUVA intern) are very effective in clearing the lesions of th generalized psoriasis and those of the chronic forms of parapsoriasis. Being treated with 4 suberythemal doses per week psoriasis patients are free or nearly free of symptoms after averaging 6.3 weeks of SUP-therapy or after 5.3 weeks of PUVA orally. The PUVA-therapy is mainly indicated in pustular, inverse and erythrodermic psoriasis as well as in parapsoriasis in plaques and variegata. In all other forms of psoriasis and in pityriasis lichenoides chronica, we prefer the SUP-therapy because of less acute or chronic side effects, and because of its better practicability. X-rays are indicated in psoriasis of nails, grenz-rays in superficial psoriatic lesions of the face, the armpits, the genitals and the anal region.

  4. Trichophyton Schoenleinii-induced widespread tinea corporis mimicking parapsoriasis.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, P; Farshi, S; Khosravi, A R; Naraghi, Z S; Chalangari, R

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of extensive tinea corporis in an 80-year-old woman on her forearms, thighs, legs, buttocks and trunk, mimicking parapsoriasis due to Trichophyton schoenleinii, without scalp involvement. Diagnosis of Trichophyton schoenleinii was confirmed by microscopy and mycological culture specimens.

  5. Papulosquamous diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Fox, B J; Odom, R B

    1985-04-01

    Papulosquamous diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders whose etiology primarily is unknown. The nosology of these disorders is based on a descriptive morphology of clinical lesions characterized by scaly papules and plaques. The major entities in this group include psoriasis, parapsoriasis (including pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta), lichen planus, lichen nitidus, lichen striatus, pityriasis rosea, pityriasis rubra pilaris, seborrheic dermatitis, and the Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. Many other conditions may become papulosquamous and should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  6. Sacroiliac joints in chronic dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Sváb, V; Jirásek, L; Machácková, J

    1981-01-01

    In 34 patients with different chronic skin diseases (including eczemas, lichen ruber, erythrodermia, pyodermia, pemphigus erythematosus, vasculitis, parapsoriasis varioliformis, scleroderma adultorum Buschke, prophyria cutanea tarda, rosacea, dermatomyositis, erythematodes chronicus discoides and indurative tuberculosis), X-ray studies revealed sacroiliac-changes consistent with a low-grade inflammation. This oteoarthritis slightly differs from the patterns disclosed earlier by the same authors in psoriatic patients, lacking any clinical bone or joint symptoms. So far, it has not been possible to explain their nature, cause or development.

  7. Home ultraviolet phototherapy of early mycosis fungoides: preliminary observations.

    PubMed

    Milstein, H J; Vonderheid, E C; Van Scott, E J; Johnson, W C

    1982-03-01

    Thirty-one patients with early mycosis fungoides (MF) and three patients with parapsoriasis en plaques were treated with ultraviolet phototherapy (280 to 350 nm) at home using a commercially available light source containing four Westinghouse FS40 lamps. A complete clinical and histologic remission of disease, lasting for a median duration in excess of 18 months, was achieved in nineteen patients (61%) with MF. Although higher complete response rates generally are achieved with other therapeutic modalities, ultraviolet phototherapy with its minimal adverse effects may be indicated for selected patients. Controlled studies are encouraged to evaluate the full potential of conventional phototherapy in the management of MF.

  8. Consistency and distribution of reflectance confocal microscopy features for diagnosis of cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne; Babilli, Jasmin; Beyer, Marc; Ríus-Diaz, Francisca; González, Salvador; Stockfleth, Eggert; Ulrich, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) represents a noninvasive imaging technique that has previously been used for characterization of mycosis fungoides (MF) in a pilot study. We aimed to test the applicability of RCM for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of MF in a clinical study. A total of 39 test sites of 15 patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of either MF, parapsoriasis, Sézary syndrome, or lymphomatoid papulosis were analyzed for presence and absence of RCM features of MF. Cochran and Chi2 analysis were applied to test the concordance between investigators and the distribution of RCM features, respectively. For selected parameters, the Cochran analysis showed good concordance between investigators. Inter-observer reproducibility was highest for junctional atypical lymphocytes, architectural disarray, and spongiosis. Similarly, Chi2 analysis demonstrated that selected features were present at particularly high frequency in individual skin diseases, with values ranging from 73% to 100% of all examined cases.

  9. Lymphomatoid contact dermatitis associated with textile dye at an unusual location.

    PubMed

    Uzunçakmak, Tuğba Kevser; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Özkanlı, Şeyma; Türkoğlu, Zafer; Zemheri, Ebru Itır; Ka Radağ, Ayşe Serap

    2015-12-01

    Lymphomatoid contact dermatitis (LCD) is a rare variant of noneczematous allergic contact dermatitis, which can mimick parapsoriasis or early-stage mycosis fungoides with its atypical clinical and histopathological manifestation. Many different haptens have been reported to be associated with this reaction. Histopathological examination, immunhistochemistry, clonality tests, and patch tests are mandatory for diagnosis and differential diagnosis. We present a 48-year-old male with a four years history of a relapsing erythematous plaque on the glans penis. Topical corticosteroids had been prescribed but he complained of relapse upon withdrawal. Histopathological examination was consistent with LCD. Thin layer rapid use epicutaneous patch test result was (++) for disperse blue and nickel sulfate. We present this case because of its rarity and unusual localization. This kind of allergic contact dermatitis should be remembered in differential diagnosis of nonspesific pruritic plaques over the genital region.

  10. Lymphomatoid contact dermatitis associated with textile dye at an unusual location

    PubMed Central

    Uzunçakmak, Tuğba Kevser; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Özkanlı, Şeyma; Türkoğlu, Zafer; Zemheri, Ebru Itır; Ka Radağ, Ayşe Serap

    2015-01-01

    Lymphomatoid contact dermatitis (LCD) is a rare variant of noneczematous allergic contact dermatitis, which can mimick parapsoriasis or early-stage mycosis fungoides with its atypical clinical and histopathological manifestation. Many different haptens have been reported to be associated with this reaction. Histopathological examination, immunhistochemistry, clonality tests, and patch tests are mandatory for diagnosis and differential diagnosis. We present a 48-year-old male with a four years history of a relapsing erythematous plaque on the glans penis. Topical corticosteroids had been prescribed but he complained of relapse upon withdrawal. Histopathological examination was consistent with LCD. Thin layer rapid use epicutaneous patch test result was (++) for disperse blue and nickel sulfate. We present this case because of its rarity and unusual localization. This kind of allergic contact dermatitis should be remembered in differential diagnosis of nonspesific pruritic plaques over the genital region. PMID:26904444

  11. Present status of eyelid phototherapy. Clinical efficacy and transmittance of ultraviolet and visible radiation through human eyelids.

    PubMed

    Prystowsky, J H; Keen, M S; Rabinowitz, A D; Stevens, A W; DeLeo, V A

    1992-04-01

    Phototherapy for the eyelid has not previously been recognized as a safe and effective treatment of photoresponsive dermatoses of the eyelid, such as atopic dermatitis, vitiligo, psoriasis, lymphomatoid papulosis, and parapsoriasis. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of this treatment. Two cases are presented to demonstrate clinical efficacy. In addition, a retrospective eye evaluation of seven patients receiving a combined total of greater than 1300 eyelid phototherapy treatments was performed. To determine whether potentially harmful UV radiation is significantly transmitted through eyelid skin, an in vitro study was conducted to measure the percentage transmittance of ultraviolet-visible radiation through five excised eyelids. In the two cases presented, remarkable improvement occurred without adverse side effects, suggesting that it is possible to deliver incremental UV dosages to eyelid skin to achieve clearing of skin disease. Retrospective analysis of patients' records revealed no ocular disease from the phototherapy. In vitro eyelid examination produced data that indicated negligible quantities of UV radiation were transmitted through eyelid skin compared with the visible spectrum, in which up to 77% of the radiation was transmitted through the tissue. The combined clinical experience and transmittance data suggest that eyelid phototherapy is a safe and effective treatment in selected patients.

  12. Fixed drug eruption: the dark side of activation of intraepidermal CD8+ T cells uniquely specialized to mediate protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Shiohara, Tetsuo; Mizukawa, Yoshiko

    2012-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is generally regarded as representing the mild end of drug-induced dermatitis, but the clinical importance of recognizing this disease as an abortive, localized variant of toxic epidermal necrolysis has received increasing attention in recent years. FDE often presents with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations indistinguishable from those of other skin diseases, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome /toxic epidermal necrolysis, cellulitis, paronychia, lichen planus, and parapsoriasis en plaques. These unusual forms of FDE are likely to be overlooked unless the possibility of a drug etiology is routinely considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient with these diseases. Clinical awareness and recognition of these unique forms are essential for avoiding a misdiagnosis. Intraepidermal CD8+ T cells resident in the FDE lesions that have the capacity to rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-γ are likely to have a key role in mediating localized epidermal injury, while they may represent a T cell subset uniquely specialized to mediate protective immunity against various pathogens. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. [The excimer laser in dermatology and esthetic medicine].

    PubMed

    Grema, H; Raulin, C

    2004-01-01

    First reports about the use of the excimer laser in dermatology date back to 1997. It is seen as an improvement on conventional phototherapy and photochemotherapy because of the lower cumulative UV-dose involved, the shorter time frame required for treatment and the option of targeting individual lesions without affecting the surrounding healthy skin. In addition to the indications of psoriasis vulgaris, vitiligo and atopic eczema (for which there is now FDA approval in the US), the spectrum of possible uses for the excimer laser is growing rapidly, especially in the field of light-sensitive dermatoses. Case studies so far have ranged from post-operative hypopigmentation to acne vulgaris and from alopecia areata to parapsoriasis en plaque. The foremost priorities in the future will be to evaluate reproducible therapeutic regimens with realistic prospects of success in large-scale studies; assess potential iatrogenic risks in treatment; develop pathogenetic models for the mechanism of action; and define therapeutic approaches to new indications. This paper summarizes the publications to date and discusses our observations and experiences.

  14. Atrophying tinea versicolor: a clinical and histological study of 12 patients.

    PubMed

    Crowson, A N; Magro, C M

    2003-12-01

    We describe 12 patients with an atrophying dermatitis in whom the biopsy findings were compatible with tinea versicolor. We encountered 12 skin biopsies from 12 patients in whom a clinically atrophying dermatosis was associated with light microscopic (LM) evidence of atrophy and epidermal colonization by Pityrosporum sp. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were cut at 5 microns and stained with H&E, alcian blue-PAS and PAS-diastase preparations. Five men and seven women aged 17-73 years in whom lesions characterized as atrophic plaques, patches or macules prompted clinical differential diagnoses including parapsoriasis or mycosis fungoides (MF), anetoderma, lupus erythematosus, and steroid atrophy. A LM examination showed epidermal colonization with pityrosporum hyphae and spores accompanied by variable epidermal and dermal atrophy characterized by rete-ridge effacement, subepidermal fibroplasia, pigment incontinence and elastolysis. Atrophying cutaneous lesions comprise part of the clinical spectrum of tinea versicolor for which we propose the term 'atrophying tinea versicolor'. The pathogenetic basis is unclear but could be the sequela of delayed type hypersensitivity and the release by T-helper lymphocytes of leukotrienes which perturb collagen metabolism and/or keratinocyte growth. Lesions may be mistaken clinically for MF or other atrophying dermatoses.

  15. Pityriasis lichenoides: a clonal T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Magro, Cynthia; Crowson, A Neil; Kovatich, Al; Burns, Frank

    2002-08-01

    Pityriasis lichenoides (PL) is a papulosquamous disorder often considered a form of reactive dermatosis and classified with small plaque parapsoriasis (digitate dermatosis). However, some patients with PL have developed large plaque parapsoriasis (LPP) and mycosis fungoides (MF), and lymphoid atypia and T-cell clonality have been reported in lesions of PL. We set out to explore the possibility that PL is a form of T-cell dyscrasia. Cases were selected by natural language search from an outpatient dermatopathology database; 35 cases were reviewed and clinicians and patients were contacted. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were examined and immunophenotyping was carried out on paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed tissue using antibodies to CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8, CD20, CD30, and CD56. In paraffin-embedded tissue, T-cell receptor (TCR)-gamma chain rearrangement was sought through polymerase chain reaction single stranded conformational polymorphism analysis. There were 14 males and 21 females with a mean age of 40 years held clinically to have PL chronica (PLC) (28 cases) and/or PL et varioliformis acuta (PLEVA) (7 cases). Five patients developed large atrophic poikilodermatous and/or annular plaques compatible with MF and/or LPP in a background of typical PLC. All biopsies showed tropism of lymphocytes to an epidermis manifesting psoriasiform hyperplasia, dyskeratosis, parakeratosis, and intraepithelial collections of Langerhans' cells and lymphocytes mimicking Pautrier's microabascesses. Epidermal atrophy, dermal fibroplasia, poikilodermatous alterations, and a dominance of intraepidermal cerebriform cells were seen only in patients with chronic persistent disease (i.e., PLC) and in some cases corresponded with clinical progression to MF. All cases had a T cell-dominant infiltrate, with a CD7 deletion in 21 of 32 biopsies examined; the CD7-negative cells were typically the largest and most atypical forms, often in a cohesive array within the upper layers of

  16. TOX expression and role in CTCL

    PubMed Central

    McGirt, LY; Degesys, CA; Johnson, VE; Zic, JA; Zwerner, JP; Eischen, CM

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are skin malignancies including mycosis fungoides (MF) and CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD). In early disease, CTCL can be difficult to diagnose, especially in MF for which there is no reliable diagnostic marker. MF/CTCL have increased expression of thymocyte selection-associated HMG box protein (TOX). Although TOX has been proposed to be a diagnostic marker for MF, further validation studies are needed. Moreover, it is unclear what drives TOX expression or its role in MF/CTCL. We hypothesize evaluation of TOX levels across a spectrum of CTCL, including MF precursor (large plaque parapsoriasis, LPP), will help elucidate the implications of altered TOX expression. TOX staining was performed in MF, CD30+ LPD, LPP as well as benign inflammatory dermatoses (BID) and normal skin (NS). Positive TOX expression was identified in 73.6% of MF cases and in 31.6% of BID/NS. TOX had a positive predictive value (PPV) for MF of 86.7% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 48.1%. TOX expression in MF was detected more commonly in Black patients (p=0.015) and less commonly in transformed MF (p=0.045). LPP had positive TOX staining in 70.0%. In CTCL cells, GATA3 knockdown decreased TOX mRNA and protein expression. TOX expression also decreased in the presence of CTCL therapeutics. Our data indicate that TOX is useful as a diagnostic marker in MF. Moreover, TOX expression was evident in LPP, indicating it may have a previously unappreciated role in the development of MF. Finally, our data suggest that GATA3 regulates TOX, revealing insight into TOX regulation. PMID:27345620

  17. Benefits of controlled ultraviolet radiation in the treatment of dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Bulat, Vedrana; Majcen, Kristina; Dzapo, Antea; Jezovita, Josip

    2014-12-01

    Phototherapy is a second-line treatment modality for the most common dermatoses that is safe and effective. Most phototherapy regimens denote the use of ultraviolet (UV) radiation of different wavelengths in the management of several dermatoses. Currently, irradiations with broadband UVB (290-320 nm), narrowband UVB (311-313 nm), 308 nm excimer laser, UVA 1 (340-400 nm), UVA with psoralen (PUVA), and extracorporeal photochemotherapy (photopheresis) are being used. Beneficial effects of UV radiation are far from being completely understood. Dermatoses that may benefit from such approach are numerous, with psoriasis, parapsoriasis, atopic dermatitis, cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, morphea, and vitiligo vulgaris as main indications. UVB radiation primarily acts on cells at the epidermis and the epidermodermal junction, while UVA radiation affects epidermal and dermal components, especially blood vessels. UVradiation has im- mediate and delayed effects. Immediate effects are the formation of DNA photoproducts and DNA damage leading to apoptosis of heratinocytes, Langerhans cells, activated T-lymphocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, NK cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and mast-cells, cell membrane damage by lipid peroxidation, and isomerization of chromophores such as urocanic acid. Delayed effects include synthesis of prostaglandins and cytokines that play important roles in immune suppression. Systemic and local immune suppression, alteration in cytokine expression (induction of interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist, decrease in IL-2, increase in IL-IO, IL-15), and cell cycle arrest may all contribute to the suppression of disease activity. PUVA is a form of controlled and repeated induction of phototoxic reactions which uses UVA light to activate chemicals known as psoralens. The conjunction of psoralens with epidermal DNA inhibits DNA synthesis and causes cell apoptosis. PUVA also causes an alteration in the expression of cytokines and cytokine receptors