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Sample records for parasitic diseases diagnosed

  1. Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... You can get them from contaminated food or water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites range in size from tiny, ... Contaminated water supplies can lead to Giardia infections. Cats can ...

  2. Parasitic Diseases: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... make it easier to diagnose certain infections/diseases. Protozoa: Single-celled, microscopic organisms that can perform all necessary functions of metabolism and reproduction. Some protozoa are free-living, while others parasitize other organisms ...

  3. Analysis of parasitic diseases diagnosed by tissue biopsy specimens at KyungHee Medical Center (1984-2005) in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Hyung; Chu, Jong-Phil; Jiang, Meihua; Lee, Yun-Sik; Kim, Bum-Shik; Kim, Deog-Gon; Park, Yong-Koo

    2010-03-01

    We analyzed parasitic diseases diagnosed by tissue biopsy specimens at KyungHee Medical Center (KMC) from 1984 to 2005. The total number of parasite infection cases was 150 (0.07%) out of the total 211,859 biopsy specimens submitted for histopathological examinations. They consisted of 62 cysticercosis, 23 sparganosis, 16 paragonimiasis, 15 amebiasis, 11 anisakiasis, 11 clonorchiasis, 3 ascariasis, 2 scabies, 2 enterobiasis, 2 trichuriasis, 1 leishmaniasis, 1 taeniasis, and 1 thelaziasis. Out of 62 cysticercosis cases, 55 were detected in subcutaneous tissues or the central nerve system. Eighteen out of 23 sparganosis cases were involved in muscular and subcutaneous tissues. In most anisakiasis cases, the involved organ was the stomach. The lung and the pleura were the most common site of paragonimiasis. The incidence of parasitic diseases during the first 5 years (1984-1988) was the highest of all observed periods. After 1989, similar incidences were shown throughout the period. Whereas cysticercosis was diagnosed in 34 cases during 1984-1988, no case has been diagnosed since 2000. In the case of sparganosis, the chronological incidence was almost uniform throughout the period 1984-2005. Paragonimiasis showed a similar tendency to cysticercosis. In gender and age distribution of parasitic diseases, men showed higher incidence rates than females, and the age groups of the 40s or older indicated higher infection frequencies than other age groups. Therefore, these results are a significant report to appear the tendency of human parasitic disease diagnosed by tissue biopsy in association with parasitosis at KMC in Seoul.

  4. How Is Kawasaki Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Kawasaki Disease Diagnosed? Kawasaki disease is diagnosed based on your child's signs and ... are the first to suspect a child has Kawasaki disease. Pediatricians are doctors who specialize in treating children. ...

  5. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases.

  6. Parasitism and calfhood diseases.

    PubMed

    Herlich, H; Douvres, F W

    1977-02-01

    That animals can and do acquire an effective immunity against helminth parasites has been demonstrated extensively experimentally, and the fact that domestic animals such as cattle, sheep, and horses become adults while maintaining good health in spite of constant exposure to reinfection long has suggested that immunity must be important to such survival. Although our attempts to date to vaccinate calves against helminth parasites have either failed or been unsatisfactory because of the pathosis induced by the experimental vaccines, the results are not surprising or discouraging. In contrast to the long history of immunization research on bacterial and viral diseases, only within a relatively short time have serious efforts been directed at exploiting hostal immunity for prevention and control of helminthic diseases. Unlike the comparatively simple structures of viruses and bacteria, helminths are complex multicellular animals with vast arrays of antigens and complicated physiological and immunological interactions with their hosts. Much more fundamental information on helminth-bovine interactions, on helminth antigens, and on cattle antibody systems must be developed before progress on control of cattle helminths by vaccination can be meaningful.

  7. Unexpected hosts: imaging parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Carnero, Pablo; Hernández Mateo, Paula; Martín-Garre, Susana; García Pérez, Ángela; Del Campo, Lourdes

    2017-02-01

    Radiologists seldom encounter parasitic diseases in their daily practice in most of Europe, although the incidence of these diseases is increasing due to migration and tourism from/to endemic areas. Moreover, some parasitic diseases are still endemic in certain European regions, and immunocompromised individuals also pose a higher risk of developing these conditions. This article reviews and summarises the imaging findings of some of the most important and frequent human parasitic diseases, including information about the parasite's life cycle, pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment. We include malaria, amoebiasis, toxoplasmosis, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, echinococcosis, cysticercosis, clonorchiasis, schistosomiasis, fascioliasis, ascariasis, anisakiasis, dracunculiasis, and strongyloidiasis. The aim of this review is to help radiologists when dealing with these diseases or in cases where they are suspected. Teaching Points • Incidence of parasitic diseases is increasing due to migratory movements and travelling. • Some parasitic diseases are still endemic in certain regions in Europe. • Parasitic diseases can have complex life cycles often involving different hosts. • Prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential for patient management in parasitic diseases. • Radiologists should be able to recognise and suspect the most relevant parasitic diseases.

  8. Immune Responses in Parasitic Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    RESPONSES IN PARASITIC DISEASES Final Scientific Report Daniel J. Stechschulte, M.D. Herbert B. Lindsley, M.D. September 1982 (July 1974 - December 1979...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED IMMUNE RESPONSES IN PARASITIC DISEASES Final Report July 1977 - Dec. 1979 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER S 4 7. AUTNIOR(a) 6...DAMD 17-74-C-4136 AD_______________ IMMUNE RESPONSES IN PARASITIC DISEASES Final Scientific Report Daniel J. Stechschulte, M.D. Herbert B. Lindsley

  9. Women and Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travelers Women Health Professionals Public Health Departments Laboratory Science ... Infection with Toxoplasma gondii , a parasite found in undercooked meat, cat feces, soil, and untreated water can lead to severe brain ...

  10. Tropical parasitic diseases and women.

    PubMed

    Okwa, O O

    2007-12-01

    Tropical parasitic diseases constitute the greatest threat to the health and socio-economic status of women as a gender and social group. There are some gender specific ways in which parasitic diseases affect women in contrast to men due to differences in exposure, occupational risk, sociocultural behavior, gender roles and practices. These parasitic diseases confer some social stigma, which affects the health seeking behavior of women. Women are therefore important in the control of these parasitic diseases and they are key agents of change, if they are included in community control programs. Women need more attention in endemic areas as a group that had been neglected. This deprived and excluded group have got vital role to play, as discussed in this review.

  11. [Water and intestinal parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, N A; Belova, E G; Baburina, L V; Novosil'tsev, G I; Chernyshenko, A I

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents data on the rates of Lamblia cyst dissemination of surface water sources in foreign countries, the Russian Federation, Moscow, and the Moscow Region. It shows a role of drinking water in the spread of intestinal parasitic diseases. In accordance with parasitological parameters, specific data on improvement of methodological control of water quality are presented. The dosages of ultraviolet radiation are given in relation to water decontamination of parasitic disease germs.

  12. Extracellular vesicles in parasitic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marcilla, Antonio; Martin-Jaular, Lorena; Trelis, Maria; de Menezes-Neto, Armando; Osuna, Antonio; Bernal, Dolores; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Almeida, Igor C.; del Portillo, Hernando A.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic diseases affect billions of people and are considered a major public health issue. Close to 400 species are estimated to parasitize humans, of which around 90 are responsible for great clinical burden and mortality rates. Unfortunately, they are largely neglected as they are mainly endemic to poor regions. Of relevance to this review, there is accumulating evidence of the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in parasitic diseases, acting both in parasite–parasite inter-communication as well as in parasite–host interactions. EVs participate in the dissemination of the pathogen and play a role in the regulation of the host immune systems. Production of EVs from parasites or parasitized cells has been described for a number of parasitic infections. In this review, we provide the most relevant findings of the involvement of EVs in intercellular communication, modulation of immune responses, involvement in pathology, and their potential as new diagnostic tools and therapeutic agents in some of the major human parasitic pathogens. PMID:25536932

  13. Molecular diagnostics and parasitic disease.

    PubMed

    Vasoo, Shawn; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2013-09-01

    Molecular parasitology represents an emerging field in microbiology diagnostics. Although most assays use nonstandardized, laboratory-developed methods, a few commercial systems have recently become available and are slowly being introduced into larger laboratories. In addition, a few methodologies show promise for use in field settings in which parasitic infections are endemic. This article reviews the available techniques and their applications to major parasitic diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, and trichomoniasis.

  14. Parasites

    MedlinePlus

    ... Where to Find Further Information on Parasitic Diseases Public Health Image Library Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Explore Parasites A-Z Index Parasites Glossary Education and Training Healthy Water Travelers Health Laboratory ... Science Parasites About Parasites Animals ...

  15. Pregnancy, nutrition and parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Steketee, Richard W

    2003-05-01

    In the developing world, young women, pregnant women, and their infants and children frequently experience a cycle where undernutrition (macronutrient and micronutrient) and repeated infection, including parasitic infections, lead to adverse consequences that can continue from one generation to the next. Among parasitic infections, malaria and intestinal helminths coexist widely with micronutrient deficiencies and contribute importantly to anemia and this cycle of retarded growth and development. In somewhat more limited or focal geographic settings, other parasitic diseases (e.g., schistosomiasis, filariasis) contribute similarly to this cycle. It is undoubtedly much better to enter a pregnancy free of infection and nutritionally replete than the various alternatives. Existing intervention strategies for micronutrient support and for the control of common parasitic infections before or during pregnancy, particularly malaria and intestinal helminths, should be followed. However, further research to identify barriers and priority approaches to achieving this goal remain very important in resource-poor settings where targeted public health efforts are required.

  16. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed? Your primary care doctor may detect a heart murmur or other signs of heart valve disease. However, a cardiologist usually will diagnose the condition. ...

  17. Parasitic diseases of the pleura.

    PubMed

    Lal, Chitra; Huggins, John Terrill; Sahn, Steven A

    2013-05-01

    Parasitic infections are prevalent in certain parts of the world and may cause pleural involvement, which often goes unrecognized. Common parasites involving the pleura include Entamoeba histolytica, Echinococcus granulosus and Paragonimus westermani. Amebiasis can cause empyema with "anchovy sauce" pus, reactive pleural effusions and bronchopleural fistula with hydropneumothorax. Echinococcosis may result in pleural thickening, pneumothorax, secondary pleural hydatidosis and pleural effusions. Paragonimiasis may cause chylous and cholesterol pleural effusions, pleural thickening and pneumothorax. Less commonly, pulmonary eosinophilia, or Loeffler's syndrome, caused by Ascaris lumbricoides, Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus and tropical pulmonary eosinophilia caused by Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi may involve the pleura. This article provides a comprehensive review of parasitic infections involving the pleura. A high index of suspicion in the appropriate clinical setting is required to facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment of these diseases.

  18. Parasitic Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Parasitic Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Parasitic Diseases - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  19. Cardiac manifestations of parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Guimarães Júnior, Milton Henriques; Diamantino, Adriana Costa; Gelape, Claudio Leo; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu

    2017-03-11

    The heart may be affected directly or indirectly by a variety of protozoa and helminths. This involvement may manifest in different ways, but the syndromes resulting from impairment of the myocardium and pericardium are the most frequent. The myocardium may be invaded by parasites that trigger local inflammatory response with subsequent myocarditis or cardiomyopathy, as occurs in Chagas disease, African trypanosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, trichinellosis and infection with free-living amoebae. In amoebiasis and echinococcosis, the pericardium is the structure most frequently involved with consequent pericardial effusion, acute pericarditis, cardiac tamponade or constrictive pericarditis. Chronic hypereosinophilia due to helminth infections, especially filarial infections, has been associated with the development of tropical endomyocardial fibrosis, a severe form of restrictive cardiomyopathy. Schistosomiasis-associated lung vasculature involvement may cause pulmonary hypertension (PH) and cor pulmonale Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, which is characterised by progressive interstitial fibrosis and restrictive lung disease, may lead to PH and its consequences may occur in the course of filarial infections. Intracardiac rupture of an Echinococcus cyst can cause membrane or secondary cysts embolisation to the lungs or organs supplied by the systemic circulation. Although unusual causes of cardiac disease outside the endemic areas, heart involvement by parasites should be considered in the differential diagnosis especially of myocardial and/or pericardial diseases of unknown aetiology in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. In this review, we updated and summarised the current knowledge on the major heart diseases caused by protozoan and metazoan parasites, which either involve the heart directly or otherwise influence the heart adversely.

  20. [Parasitic diseases in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Nawa, Yukifumi

    2005-11-01

    Along with the drastic decrease of soil-transmitted intestinal helminthiases, parasitic diseases in general are ignored, or considered as the disease of the past, in Japan. However, due to the Japanese food culture of eating raw materials, food-borne parasitic diseases are still present in Japan. The majority of food-borne parasitic diseases are zoonotic, and caused by ectopic migration of parasite larvae. They accidentally migrate into CNS to cause deleterious conditions. Clinicians should always remind about the possibility of parasitic diseases when they make differential diagnosis for CNS diseases.

  1. Emerging parasitic diseases of sheep.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M A

    2012-09-30

    There have been changes in the emergence and inability to control of a number of sheep parasitic infections over the last decade. This review focuses on the more globally important sheep parasites, whose reported changes in epidemiology, occurrence or failure to control are becoming increasingly evident. One of the main perceived driving forces is climate change, which can have profound effects on parasite epidemiology, especially for those parasitic diseases where weather has a direct effect on the development of free-living stages. The emergence of anthelmintic-resistant strains of parasitic nematodes and the increasing reliance placed on anthelmintics for their control, can exert profound changes on the epidemiology of those nematodes causing parasitic gastroenteritis. As a consequence, the effectiveness of existing control strategies presents a major threat to sheep production in many areas around the world. The incidence of the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, is inextricably linked to high rainfall and is particularly prevalent in high rainfall years. Over the last few decades, there have also been increasing reports of other fluke associated diseases, such as dicroceliosis and paramphistomosis, in a number of western European countries, possibly introduced through animal movements, and able to establish with changing climates. External parasite infections, such as myiasis, can cause significant economic loss and presents as a major welfare problem. The range of elevated temperatures predicted by current climate change scenarios, result in an elongated blowfly season with earlier spring emergence and a higher cumulative incidence of fly strike. Additionally, legislative decisions leading to enforced changes in pesticide usage and choices have resulted in increased reports and spread of ectoparasitic infections, particularly mite, lice and tick infestations in sheep. Factors, such as dip disposal and associated environmental concerns, and, perhaps more

  2. Trypanosomatid parasites causing neglected diseases.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, K; Honek, J; Cadmus, C M C v C; Efferth, T

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic diseases such as Kala azar (visceral leishmaniasis), Chagas disease human (American trypanosomiasis) and African sleeping sickness (African trypanosomiasis) are affecting more than 27 million people worldwide. They are categorized amongst the most important neglected diseases causing approximately 150,000 deaths annually. As no vaccination is available, treatment is solely dependent on chemotherapeutic drugs. This review provides a comprehensive insight into the treatment of Kala azar, Chagas disease and African sleeping sickness. In addition to established drugs, novel small molecule- based therapeutic approaches are discussed. Drugs currently used for the treatment of Kala azar include pentavalent antimonials, Amphotericin B, Miltefosine, and Paromomycin. Liposomal formulations such as AmBisome provide promising alternatives. Furthermore, antiproliferative compounds might open new avenues in Kala azar treatment. Regarding Chagas disease, chemotherapy is based on two drugs, Nifurtimox and Benznidazole. However, sequencing of T. cruzi genome in the year 2005 raises a hope for new drug targets. Proteases, sterols and sialic acids are potential promising drug targets. Suramin, Pentamidine, Melarsporol and Eflornithine are well-established drugs to treat African sleeping sickness. New treatment options include combination therapy of Eflornithine and Nifurtimox, a Chagas disease therapeutic.. However, all approved chemotherapeutic compounds for trypanosomatid diseases suffer from high toxicity. Further, increasing resistance limits their efficacy and compliance.

  3. How Is Sickle Cell Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sickle Cell Disease Diagnosed? Screening Tests People who do not ... NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sickle Cell Disease (Nicholas) 09/02/2011 In this video— ...

  4. Molecular Paleoparasitological Hybridization Approach as Effective Tool for Diagnosing Human Intestinal Parasites from Scarce Archaeological Remains

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Lauren Hubert; Iñiguez, Alena Mayo

    2014-01-01

    Paleoparasitology is the science that uses parasitological techniques for diagnosing parasitic diseases in the past. Advances in molecular biology brought new insights into this field allowing the study of archaeological material. However, due to technical limitations a proper diagnosis and confirmation of the presence of parasites is not always possible, especially in scarce and degraded archaeological remains. In this study, we developed a Molecular Paleoparasitological Hybridization (MPH) approach using ancient DNA (aDNA) hybridization to confirm and complement paleoparasitological diagnosis. Eight molecular targets from four helminth parasites were included: Ascaris sp., Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, and Strongyloides stercoralis. The MPH analysis using 18th century human remains from Praça XV cemetery (CPXV), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, revealed for the first time the presence E. vermicularis aDNA (50%) in archaeological sites of Brazil. Besides, the results confirmed T. trichiura and Ascaris sp. infections. The prevalence of infection by Ascaris sp. and E. vermicularis increased considerably when MPH was applied. However, a lower aDNA detection of T. trichiura (40%) was observed when compared to the diagnosis by paleoparasitological analysis (70%). Therefore, based on these data, we suggest a combination of Paleoparasitological and MPH approaches to verify the real panorama of intestinal parasite infection in human archeological samples. PMID:25162694

  5. Infectious diseases and parasites of ratites.

    PubMed

    Shane, S M

    1998-11-01

    This article discusses infectious and parasitic disease conditions in the three ratite species. Diseases and parasitic conditions are reviewed in relation to etiology, transmission, pathology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. To ensure optimum reproduction and growth of birds on large production units, a veterinarian must understand management in relation to biosecurity and disease problems.

  6. Parasitic diseases in the abdomen: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Parasitic diseases of the liver and biliary tract include echinococcosis, schistosomiasis, toxocariasis, clonorchiasis, and opisthorchiasis, affecting millions people in some endemic areas. Amebiasis and ascariasis are believed to be the most common bowel lumen indwelling parasitic diseases, affecting billions people worldwide, but sometimes these parasites migrate inadvertently to the liver and biliary tract, resulting in liver abscess or obstructive jaundice. Imaging findings of these parasitic diseases are fairly characteristic and easy to recognize if radiologists are aware of the findings, especially in endemic areas. Because of increased immigration and frequent travelling, some patients with "exotic" parasitic diseases may be encountered in non-endemic areas, and the diagnosis may be delayed or difficult, and it is often made only after operation. This feature section was designed to provide the detailed imaging features of common parasitic diseases affecting the abdominal organs and peritoneal cavity, based on pathology-image correlation.

  7. How Is Wilson Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connect with Wilson Disease Association Send Email Physician Contacts List of Physicians and Institutions in Your Area View Contacts Support Contacts Individuals who can offer Support and Information View ...

  8. How Is Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... structures inside your chest, such as your heart, lungs, and blood vessels. A chest x ray can reveal signs ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  9. Water-Related Parasitic Diseases in China

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Shan; Tian, Li-Guang; Liu, Qin; Qian, Men-Bao; Fu, Qing; Steinmann, Peter; Chen, Jia-Xu; Yang, Guo-Jing; Yang, Kun; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2013-01-01

    Water-related parasitic diseases are directly dependent on water bodies for their spread or as a habitat for indispensable intermediate or final hosts. Along with socioeconomic development and improvement of sanitation, overall prevalence is declining in the China. However, the heterogeneity in economic development and the inequity of access to public services result in considerable burden due to parasitic diseases in certain areas and populations across the country. In this review, we demonstrated three aspects of ten major water-related parasitic diseases, i.e., the biology and pathogenicity, epidemiology and recent advances in research in China. General measures for diseases control and special control strategies are summarized. PMID:23685826

  10. Update on pathology of ocular parasitic disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dipankar; Ramachandra, Varsha; Islam, Saidul; Bhattacharjee, Harsha; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Koul, Akanksha; Deka, Panna; Deka, Apurba

    2016-01-01

    Parasites are a group of eukaryotic organisms that may be free-living or form a symbiotic or parasitic relationship with the hosts. Consisting of over 800,000 recognized species, parasites may be unicellular (Protozoa) or multicellular (helminths and arthropods). The association of parasites with human population started long before the emergence of civilization. Parasitic zoonotic diseases are prevalent worldwide including India. Appropriate epidemiological data are lacking on existing zoonotic parasitic diseases, and newer diseases are emerging in our scenario. Systemic diseases such as cysticercosis, paragonimiasis, hydatidosis, and toxoplasmosis are fairly common. Acquired Toxoplasma infections are rising in immune-deficient individuals. Amongst the ocular parasitic diseases, various protozoas such as Cystoidea, trematodes, tissue flagellates, sporozoas etc. affect humans in general and eyes in particular, in different parts of the world. These zoonoses seem to be a real health related problem globally. Recent intensification of research throughout the world has led to specialization in biological fields, creating a conducive situation for researchers interested in this subject. The basics of parasitology lie in morphology, pathology, and with recent updates in molecular parasitology, the scope has extended further. The current review is to address the recent update in ophthalmic parasites with special reference to pathology and give a glimpse of further research in this field. PMID:27958200

  11. [Treatment of parasitic liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Lecuna, V

    1989-01-01

    Most of primary and secondary parasitic liver diseases, at present can be property treated with drugs. Venezuelan pharmaceutic market has some peculiarities that have determined the disappearance from the market of many drugs such as emetine, thiabendazole, quinacrine and niclosamide. Diloxanide never appeared. Venezuela has no commercial international treatises that protect international patents in the pharmaceutical area. In addition, government regulation of cost of drugs is very strict. This is particularly true with old drugs (such as emetine or quinacrine) which had such a low price that is non-commercial for the maker of the drug, usually a large transnational, and is withdrawn from the market. Flexibility of prices is quite easy for new antibiotics which are very expensive. Frequently small national companies import the drug from Italy and Japan which sell the drug independently from international treats. Such companies frequently produce the drug for the government social system, but are unreliable and also frequently they withdraw the drug a variable period of time. The government, through the Ministry of Public Health administer free treatment with drugs for malaria, tuberculosis and leprosy. The severe economic crisis of the country has severely impaired the preventive programs and there is an increase of malaria due to gold mining in the south of the country and falciparum chloroquine resistance and an increase of schistosomiasis in a previous free area. Also administration of drugs for malaria has been severely impaired, mainly for economic reasons. The establishment of a National Government Laboratory is an old (as far as 1946) political goal, but has remained in the political intention.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Drug repurposing and human parasitic protozoan diseases

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Katherine T.; Fisher, Gillian; Skinner-Adams, Tina S.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic diseases have an enormous health, social and economic impact and are a particular problem in tropical regions of the world. Diseases caused by protozoa and helminths, such as malaria and schistosomiasis, are the cause of most parasite related morbidity and mortality, with an estimated 1.1 million combined deaths annually. The global burden of these diseases is exacerbated by the lack of licensed vaccines, making safe and effective drugs vital to their prevention and treatment. Unfortunately, where drugs are available, their usefulness is being increasingly threatened by parasite drug resistance. The need for new drugs drives antiparasitic drug discovery research globally and requires a range of innovative strategies to ensure a sustainable pipeline of lead compounds. In this review we discuss one of these approaches, drug repurposing or repositioning, with a focus on major human parasitic protozoan diseases such as malaria, trypanosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis and leishmaniasis. PMID:25057459

  13. Travel/Travelers and Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can Be Acquired During Travel* Contaminated Food and Water More Common giardiasis cryptosporidiosis cyclosporiasis Less Common amebiasis ... Page last updated: July 28, 2016 Content source: Global Health - Division of Parasitic Diseases Email Recommend Tweet ...

  14. Left ventricular noncompaction diagnosed following Graves' disease

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Habib; Hawatmeh, Amer; Rampal, Upamanyu; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Isolated left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a rare genetic cardiomyopathy. Clinical manifestations are variable; patients may present with heart failure symptoms, arrhythmias, and systemic thromboembolism. However, it can also be asymptomatic. When asymptomatic, LVNC can manifest later in life after the onset of another unrelated condition. We report a case of LVNC which was diagnosed following a hyperthyroid state secondary to Graves' disease. The association of LVNC with other noncardiac abnormalities including neurological, hematological, and endocrine abnormalities including hypothyroidism has been described in isolated case reports before. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of LVNC diagnosed following exacerbation in contractile dysfunction triggered by Graves' disease. PMID:27843800

  15. Parasitic diseases in humans transmitted by vectors.

    PubMed

    Cholewiński, Marcin; Derda, Monika; Hadaś, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Despite the considerable progress of medicine, parasitic diseases still pose a great threat to human health and life. Among parasitic diseases, those transmitted by vectors, mainly arthropods, play a particular role. These diseases occur most frequently in the poorest countries and affect a vast part of the human population. They include malaria, babesiosis, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis and filariasis. This study presents those vector-transmitted diseases that are responsible for the greatest incidence and mortality of people on a global scale. Attention is focused primarily on diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, flies, Hemiptera and ticks.

  16. [Laboratory tests for parasitic diseases in Israel].

    PubMed

    Marva, Esther; Grossman, Tamar

    2010-09-01

    Microscopic examination is still considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. In many clinical laboratories in hospitals and in health maintenance organizations ("Kupot Holim"), an excellent microscopic identification of parasites is performed. Microscopic examinations using wet mount preparations are performed for the detection of protozoan trophozoites and helmintic ova or larvae. Specific concentration techniques, including flotation and sedimentation procedures are further performed for the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. However, microscopic examinations are time-consuming, non-sensitive and not always reliable. Furthermore, the diagnosis of certain infections is not always possible by searching for the parasites in host tissues or excreta since risky invasive techniques might be necessary to locate the parasites. Detection of antibodies can be very useful as an indication for infection with a specific parasite, especially in individuals with no exposure to the parasite prior to recent travel in a disease-endemic area. In addition to serology, there are other tests of high sensitivity which can be integrated with microscopy, such as antigen detection in stool and blood samples as well as the use of other molecular diagnosis methods. There are two main laboratories in Israel where parasitic diagnosis is available by integration of microscopy, serology, antigen detection and molecular methods: The Reference Laboratory for Parasitology in Jerusalem at the Central Laboratories of the Ministry of Health (MOH) and the Laboratory of Parasitology at Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheva (SOR). There are also two special diagnostic units, one responsible for the identification of toxopLasma: Reference Laboratory for Toxoplasmosis, Public Health Laboratory, Ministry of Health, Tel Aviv (Tox), and the other for the identification of Leishmaniasis: Kuvin Center, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Kuv). This article

  17. Alphabetical Index of Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Entamoeba histolytica Infection) American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas Disease) Ancylostomiasis (Hookworm) Angiostrongyliasis ( Angiostrongylus Infection) Anisakiasis ( Anisakis Infection, Pseudoterranova Infection) ...

  18. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in HIV-infected patients in Uzbekistan].

    PubMed

    Nurtaev, Kh S; Badalova, N S; Zalialieva, M V; Osipova, S O

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic diseases were diagnosed in 100 HIV-infected patients at different stages of disease (its asymptomatic form, persistent generalized lymphoadenopathy, pre-AIDS, and AIDS) (Group 1), 100 Tashkent residents (Group 2), and 349 patients with gastrointestinal diseases, allergic dermatoses, and skin depigmentation foci (Group 3). The HIV-infected patients were found to have virtually all parasites, such as Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, Chilomastix mesnili, Entamoeba coli, Iodamoeba butschlii, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Endolimax nana, Blastocystis hominis, Enlerobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides, Hymenolepis nana, detectable in the population of Tashkent. The highest infestation with intestinal protozoa, including nonpathogenic amoebas and helmninths, was found in Groups 1 and 3. However, in all the forms of HIV infection, the infestation with E. histolytical/dispar was 10 times greater than that in Groups 2 and 3 (1% and 0.8%, respectively). G. lamblia was detected in 16, 21, and 45.2% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In all the HIV-infected patients, the content of CD8 lymphocytes was increased, but that of CD20 lymphocytes was normal. Parasites were detectable with different levels of CD4 lymphocytes, but C. parvum was found only if its count was > 200/ml. In the HIV-infected patients, the hyperproduction of IgE was caused mainly by helminths rather than protozoa. In these patients, the increased level of IgE was also noted in the absence of parasites.

  19. Major trends in human parasitic diseases in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; He, Shenyi; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Guanghui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2010-05-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in the control and prevention of human parasitic diseases in mainland China in the past 30 years because of China's Reform and Opening to the Outside Policies initiated in 1978. However, parasitic diseases remain a major human health problem, with significant morbidity and mortality as well as adverse socioeconomic consequences. Although soil-transmitted parasitic diseases are in the process of being gradually controlled, food-borne parasitic diseases and emerging parasitic diseases are becoming the focus of new campaigns for control and prevention. This article reviews major trends in human parasitic diseases in mainland China, with perspectives for control.

  20. Optical coherence tomography for diagnosing periodontal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Everett, Matthew J.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Otis, Linda L.; Nathel, Howard

    1997-05-01

    We have, in this preliminary study, investigated the use of optical coherence tomography for diagnosis of periodontal disease. We took in vitro OCT images of the dental and periodontal tissues from a young pig and compared them to histological sections. These images distinguish tooth and soft tissue relationships that are important in diagnosing and assessing periodontal disease. We have imaged the attachment of gingiva to the tooth surface and located the cemento-enamel junction. This junction is an important reference point for defining attachment level in the diagnosis of periodontal disease. the boundary between enamel and dentin is also visible for most of the length of the anatomical crown, allowing quantitation of enamel thickness and character.

  1. [Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, E

    2010-02-01

    Central nervous system infections and infestations by protozoa and helminths constitute a problem of increasing importance throughout all of central European and northern/western countries. This is partially due to the globalisation of our society, tourists and business people being more frequently exposed to parasitic infection/infestation in tropical countries than in moderate climate countries. On top of that, migrants may import chronic infestations and infections with parasitic pathogens, eventually also--sometimes exclusively--involving the nervous system. Knowledge of epidemiology, initial clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures as well as specific chemotherapeutic therapies and adjunctive therapeutic strategies is of utmost important in all of these infections and infestations of the nervous systems, be it by protozoa or helminths. This review lists, mainly in the form of tables, all possible infections and infestations of the nervous systems by protozoa and by helminths. Besides differentiating parasitic diseases of the nervous system seen in migrants, tourists etc., it is very important to have in mind that disease-related (e.g. HIV) or iatrogenic immunosuppression has led to the increased occurrence of a wide variety of parasitic infections and infestations of the nervous system (e. g. babesiosis, Chagas disease, Strongyloides stercoralis infestation, toxoplasmosis, etc.).

  2. Parasitic diarrheal disease: drug development and targets

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Amir; Peerzada, Mudasir N.; Ahmad, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is the manifestation of gastrointestinal infection and is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity specifically among the children of less than 5 years age worldwide. Moreover, in recent years there has been a rise in the number of reports of intestinal infections continuously in the industrialized world. These are largely related to waterborne and food borne outbreaks. These occur by the pathogenesis of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms like bacteria and parasites. The parasitic intestinal infection has remained mostly unexplored and under assessed in terms of therapeutic development. The lack of new drugs and the risk of resistance have led us to carry out this review on drug development for parasitic diarrheal diseases. The major focus has been depicted on commercially available drugs, currently synthesized active heterocyclic compounds and unique drug targets, that are vital for the existence and growth of the parasites and can be further exploited for the search of therapeutically active anti-parasitic agents. PMID:26617574

  3. Diagnosing Parkinson's Diseases Using Fuzzy Neural System

    PubMed Central

    Abiyev, Rahib H.; Abizade, Sanan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the design of the recognition system that will discriminate between healthy people and people with Parkinson's disease. A diagnosing of Parkinson's diseases is performed using fusion of the fuzzy system and neural networks. The structure and learning algorithms of the proposed fuzzy neural system (FNS) are presented. The approach described in this paper allows enhancing the capability of the designed system and efficiently distinguishing healthy individuals. It was proved through simulation of the system that has been performed using data obtained from UCI machine learning repository. A comparative study was carried out and the simulation results demonstrated that the proposed fuzzy neural system improves the recognition rate of the designed system. PMID:26881009

  4. Bacterial and parasitic diseases of selected invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Klaphake, Eric

    2009-09-01

    Invertebrate medicine is a rapidly advancing aspect of veterinary medicine, although frustrating in its lack of answers and its limitations compared with vertebrate medicine. Because invertebrates make up 98% of animal life, it should be impossible to contain information on their known bacterial and parasitic diseases within a single article. When the focus is placed on those species commonly kept and treated by non-marine veterinarians, the amount of information becomes manageable. Many exotic species had their known diseases and treatments start this way and then advanced to a higher level of understanding. This article stands as an introduction to the parasitic and bacterial diseases of these fascinating creatures for the veterinary practitioner.

  5. [Discussion on the usage of terminology of some parasites and parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-quan; Cui, Jing

    2006-04-30

    According to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature and the Standardized Nomenclature of Animal Parasitic Diseases (SNOAPAD), and considering the new advances in parasitology, the usage of the terminology of some parasites and parasitic diseases (such as Trichinella and trichinellosis, filariae and filariasis, Echinococcus and echinococcosis, etc.) was discussed.

  6. Automated diagnostic kiosk for diagnosing diseases

    DOEpatents

    Regan, John Frederick; Birch, James Michael

    2014-02-11

    An automated and autonomous diagnostic apparatus that is capable of dispensing collection vials and collections kits to users interesting in collecting a biological sample and submitting their collected sample contained within a collection vial into the apparatus for automated diagnostic services. The user communicates with the apparatus through a touch-screen monitor. A user is able to enter personnel information into the apparatus including medical history, insurance information, co-payment, and answer a series of questions regarding their illness, which is used to determine the assay most likely to yield a positive result. Remotely-located physicians can communicate with users of the apparatus using video tele-medicine and request specific assays to be performed. The apparatus archives submitted samples for additional testing. Users may receive their assay results electronically. Users may allow the uploading of their diagnoses into a central databank for disease surveillance purposes.

  7. [Views for research development of control of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin-Ping; Dong, Hui-Fen; Jiang, Ming-Sen

    2013-12-01

    With the social and technological development, new understandings have been emerged for the research development of the control of parasitic diseases. The present review argues that: the traditional point of view for the control of parasitic diseases, eliminating parasites/media, should be updated. For the long-term interests of science and human perspective, biological diversity, including the parasite biodiversity, and ecological environment should be paid much more attention during the control of parasitic diseases. The leading role of society, economy and culture should be fully developed in the control of parasitic diseases with the progress of scientific and technology, to find a final way of sustainable development in the control of parasitic diseases.

  8. [Intestinal and hepatic parasitic diseases: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Gétaz, L; Chappuis, F; Loutan, L

    2007-05-16

    Intestinal parasites represent an important burden of disease mainly in developing countries. Physicians practicing in Europe can be exposed to these diseases, mainly seen in immigrants or travellers returning from tropical countries. Several parasitic diseases remain ubiquitous and can be contracted in developed countries. Most often, parasitic infections cause no or only few symptoms, but some can lead to serious disease in immuno-compromised patients. Diagnostic procedures and treatments available are discussed.

  9. The study of parasite sharing for surveillance of zoonotic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Maxwell J.; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Davies, T. Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    Determining the factors that influence the transmission of parasites among hosts is important for directing surveillance of animal parasites before they successfully emerge in humans, and increasing the efficacy of programs for the control and management of zoonotic diseases. Here we present a review of recent advances in the study of parasite sharing, wildlife ecology, and epidemiology that could be extended and incorporated into proactive surveillance frameworks for multi-host infectious diseases. These methods reflect emerging interdisciplinary techniques with significant promise for the identification of future zoonotic parasites and unknown reservoirs of current zoonoses, strategies for the reduction of parasite prevalence and transmission among hosts, and decreasing the burden of infectious diseases.

  10. Some diseases and parasites of captive woodcocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, L.N.; Stickel, W.H.; Geis, S.A.

    1965-01-01

    Observations were made concerning the diseases and parasites of a group of woodcocks (Philohela minor) caught in Massachusetts in the summer of 1960 and kept in captivity in Maryland, and of another group caught and kept in Louisiana in the winter of 1960-61. Bumblefoot, a granulomatous swelling of the foot caused by Micrococcus sp., is reported for woodcocks for the first time. Six of 31 woodcocks were infected with a renal coccidium of an undetermined species. Tetrameres sp. was found in 4 of 31 birds examined. Sarcocystis was found in one bird. Aerosaculitis was found in several.

  11. Parasites, emerging disease and wildlife conservation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R C A; Lymbery, A J; Smith, A

    2010-08-15

    In this review some emerging issues of parasite infections in wildlife, particularly in Australia, are considered. We discuss the importance of understanding parasite biodiversity in wildlife in terms of conservation, the role of wildlife as reservoirs of parasite infection, and the role of parasites within the broader context of the ecosystem. Using a number of parasite species, the value of undertaking longitudinal surveillance in natural systems using non-invasive sampling and molecular tools to characterise infectious agents is illustrated in terms of wildlife health, parasite biodiversity and ecology.

  12. Exploiting structural biology in the fight against parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Modis, Yorgo

    2012-04-01

    Despite spectacular advances in structural biology over the past half-century, only approximately 2% of the structures in the Protein Data Bank are from eukaryotic parasites and less than 0.5% are from multicellular parasites. Even when only major human pathogens are considered, 3D structures of parasites are vastly underrepresented. Yet approximately one-third of the global burden of human disease comes from parasites. It is time to divert greater effort and resources in structural biology to benefit the fight against parasitic diseases. Using as leverage recent technological and methodological advances, a concerted effort to determine macromolecular structures from parasite pathogens would provide invaluable mechanistic insights on vital processes of the parasites and would suggest novel strategies for inhibiting infection.

  13. [Parasitic diseases in the Kyrgyz Republic: epidemiological aspects].

    PubMed

    Usubalieva, Zh M; Toĭgombaeva, V C; Nogoĭbaeva, K A; Mergenov, A E

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyzes the epidemiological situation associated with intestinal helminthic and protozoan diseases in the Kyrgyz Republic in the past 17 years (1991-2007). The analysis suggests that parasitic diseases are of wide spread in the republic. In the structure of infectious diseases, parasitic diseases account for 45%. Children less than 14 years of age are a risk group, whose proportion is 80%. Enteric nosological entities are prevalent in the structure of parasitic diseases. There has been a long-term trend for a rise in the incidence of echinococcosis and ascariasis and for a decrease in that of enterobiasis and hymenolepiasis.

  14. Applying New Methods to Diagnose Coral Diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Zawada, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Coral disease, one of the major causes of reef degradation and coral death, has been increasing worldwide since the 1970s, particularly in the Caribbean. Despite increased scientific study, simple questions about the extent of disease outbreaks and the causative agents remain unanswered. A component of the U.S. Geological Survey Coral Reef Ecosystem STudies (USGS CREST) project is focused on developing and using new methods to approach the complex problem of coral disease.

  15. [Clinical microbiology laboratory and imported parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Martínez-Ruiz, Rocío; Cuadros, Juan; Cañavate, Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Imported parasitosis represents an increasingly frequent diagnostic challenge for microbiology laboratories. A surge in immigration and international travel has led to a rise in the number of imported cases of parasitosis, and this trend is expected to continue in the future. The present article addresses this challenge by reviewing recommended diagnostic approaches and tests. Currently, microscopy is always recommended when analysing blood samples for parasites. If malaria is suspected, rapid antigen testing (including at least HRP2 antigen) should also be performed. The work-up for suspected leishmaniasis should include serology, culture, and in selected cases detection of antigen in urine. In suspected Chagas disease, two different serological tests should be performed. PCR for blood protozoa is highly sensitive, although it cannot be used to rule out Chagas disease, since this condition may be present without parasitemia. Accurate diagnosis of intestinal amebiasis usually requires PCR or antigen detection tests. In helminthiasis, traditional microscopy may need to be complemented with other tests, such as agar plate culture for strongyloidiasis, Og4C3 antigen detection for bancroftian filariasis, and antibody detection test for filariasis and schistosomiasis.

  16. How Is Paget's Disease of Bone Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... than-usual level of a chemical substance called serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP), it is a sign that the disease may be present. SAP is a type of ... than twice the usual level strongly suggests Paget’s disease, especially if the person’s serum calcium level, phosphorus level, and kidney function are ...

  17. [Extrinsic allergic alveolitis--rarely diagnosed disease].

    PubMed

    Lauková, D; Marget, I; Plutinský, J

    2009-05-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA), known as hypersensitive pneumonitis, causes interstitial lung involvement by inhaled antigen. The clinical presentation of the disease has been defined as acute, subacute and chronic. The most often symptoms of the acute form of the disease are flu-like symptoms, dyspnoe and cough. The progressive dyspnoe in particullary is characterized for the chronic form of EAA. Dyspnoe is worsed, if the disease is combinied with usual respiratory infection or reexposition of inhaled antigen. It seems the diagnostic definition of EAA should be easy and prevalence of EAA relative high. The disease belongs to the group of interstitial lung diseases and it is underestimated as a matter of fact. The clinic, radiographic, laboratory and histologic abnormalities are results of inhaled antigen contact and support the diagnosis of EAA. Specific IgG antibodies against the offending antigen along with them are consedered to be detected (established) of EAA.

  18. How Is Peripheral Arterial Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Smoking and Your Heart Stroke Send a link ...

  19. How Is Coronary Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... structures inside your chest, such as your heart, lungs, and blood vessels. A chest x ray can reveal signs ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  20. Role of parasitic vaccines in integrated control of parasitic diseases in livestock

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neelu; Singh, Veer; Shyma, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic infections adversely affect animal’s health and threaten profitable animal production, thus affecting the economy of our country. These infections also play a major role in the spread of zoonotic diseases. Parasitic infections cause severe morbidity and mortality in animals especially those affecting the gastrointestinal system and thus affect the economy of livestock owner by decreasing the ability of the farmer to produce economically useful animal products. Due to all these reasons proper control of parasitic infection is critically important for sustained animal production. The most common and regularly used method to control parasitic infection is chemotherapy, which is very effective but has several disadvantages like drug resistance and drug residues. Integrated approaches to control parasitic infections should be formulated including grazing management, biological control, genetic resistance of hosts, and parasitic vaccines. India ranks first in cattle and buffalo population, but the majority of livestock owners have fewer herds, so other measures like grazing management, biological control, genetic resistance of hosts are not much practical to use. The most sustainable and economical approach to control parasitic infection in our country is to vaccinate animals, although vaccines increase the initial cost, but the immunity offered by the vaccine are long lived. Thus, vaccination of animals for various clinical, chronic, subclinical parasitic infections will be a cheaper and effective alternative to control parasitic infection for long time and improve animal production. PMID:27047140

  1. Fascioliasis: a worldwide parasitic disease of importance in travel medicine.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Keyhan; Bargues, M Dolores; O'Neill, Sandra; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Fascioliasis is a foodborne zoonotic disease caused by the two parasite species Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. This trematodiasis has never been claimed special relevance for travellers and migrants. However, the situation has drastically changed in the last two decades, in a way that fascioliasis should today be included in the list of diseases to be enhanced in Travel Medicine. Different kind of travellers have been involved in human infection reports: business travellers, tourists, migrants, expatriated workers, military personnel, religious missionaries, and refugees. Europe is the continent where more imported cases have been reported in many countries. More cases would have been probably reported in Europe if fascioliasis would be a reportable disease. In the Americas, most of the reports concern cases diagnosed in USA. Relative few patients have been diagnosed in studies on travellers performed in Asia. In Africa, most cases were reported in Maghreb countries. Blood eosinophilia and the ingestion of watercress or any other suggestive freshwater plant in anamnesis are extremely useful in guiding towards a fascioliasis diagnosis in a developed country, although may not be so in human endemic areas of developing countries. Several suggestive clinical presentation aspects may be useful, although the clinical polymorphism may be misleading in many cases. Non-invasive techniques are helpful for the diagnosis, although images may lead to confusion. Laparoscopic visualization should assist and facilitate procurement of an accurately guided biopsy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first choice in patients in the chronic phase. ERCP and sphincterotomy are used to extract parasites from the biliary tree. Fluke egg finding continues to be the gold standard and enables for burden quantification and establishing of the drug dose. Many serological and stool antigen detection tests have been developed. Immunological techniques present

  2. Questions of diagnosing and treating Meniere's disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khechinashvili, S. N.

    1980-01-01

    The possibilities of diagnosis and treatment of Meniere's disease are considered. Attention is given to the use of dehydration tests which are based on glycerol administration or intravenous injection of furosemide. The risks of bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment in prolonged conservative treatment is emphasized. The data of auditory function study before and following endolymphatic sac surgery are presented.

  3. Parasitic diseases in travelers: a focus on therapy.

    PubMed

    Showler, Adrienne J; Wilson, Mary E; Kain, Kevin C; Boggild, Andrea K

    2014-04-01

    Parasitic infections are an important cause of illness among returned travelers, and can lead to considerable morbidity and, in some cases, mortality. The complexity of parasitic life cycles and geographic specificities can present diagnostic challenges, particularly in non-endemic settings to which most travelers return for care. Clinical manifestations reflect the diverse taxonomy and pathogenesis of parasites, and appropriate diagnosis and management therefore necessitate a high index of suspicion of parasitic illnesses. Much of our knowledge surrounding management of parasitic infections in travelers is extrapolated from evidence derived in endemic populations, or is based on expert opinion and case series. We herein provide an overview of parasitic diseases of short-term travelers, and summarize current therapeutic strategies for each illness.

  4. Clues in diagnosing congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    A number of practical office and bedside clues to cardiac disease in infants and children have been passed on through the years. They relate to the history, to the inspection and palpation components of the physical examination, and to knowledge of the specific cardiac defects that are likely to be associated with certain clinical syndromes. With the possible exception of coarctation of the aorta, the clues are not diagnostically specific. In many instances, however, they serve to narrow a broad array of diagnostic possibilities to 2 or 3 and, with the aid of other clues and auscultation, they can often be distinguished from one another. When a primary care physician is confronted with a child who has an incidental murmur that is "probably" innocent but could be organic, useful clues favoring an organic murmur are a history of congenital heart disease in a first-degree relative; a history of maternal rubella syndrome, alcohol use, or teratogenic drug use during pregnancy; a history of inappropriate sweating; a history of syncope, chest pain, or squatting; maternal diabetes mellitus; premature birth; birth at a high altitude; cyanosis; abnormal pulsations; recurrent bronchiolitis or pneumonia; chronic unexplained hoarseness; asymmetric facies with crying; and a physical appearance suggestive of a clinical syndrome. PMID:1574882

  5. [Hygienic issues related with prevention of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, N A

    2003-01-01

    Data on a wide spread of parasitic diseases among Russia's population are presented in the article. The contamination of soil, water-reserves' surfaces, drinking water, foodstuffs and of household goods with helminth ovum and with cysts of intestinal pathogenic protozoa was shown to play the key role in the discussed process. Therefore, hygienic measures targeted at preservation, environmental sanitation and protection of the environment from causative agents of parasites that would reduce or expel the risk of new contaminations should be regarded as the key trend in preventing the parasitic diseases.

  6. Diagnosing cardiac disease during pregnancy: imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Ntusi, Ntobeko A; Samuels, Petronella; Moosa, Sulaiman; Mocumbi, Ana O

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women with known or suspected cardiovascular disease (CVD) often require cardiovascular imaging during pregnancy. The accepted maximum limit of ionising radiation exposure to the foetus during pregnancy is a cumulative dose of 5 rad. Concerns related to imaging modalities that involve ionising radiation include teratogenesis, mutagenesis and childhood malignancy. Importantly, no single imaging study approaches this cautionary dose of 5 rad (50 mSv or 50 mGy). Diagnostic imaging procedures that may be used in pregnancy include chest radiography, fluoroscopy, echocardiography, invasive angiography, cardiovascular computed tomography, computed tomographic pulmonary angiography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear techniques. Echocardiography and CMR appear to be completely safe in pregnancy and are not associated with any adverse foetal effects, provided there are no general contra-indications to MR imaging. Concerns related to safety of imaging tests must be balanced against the importance of accurate diagnosis and thorough assessment of the pathological condition. Decisions about imaging in pregnancy are premised on understanding the physiology of pregnancy, understanding basic concepts of ionising radiation, the clinical manifestations of existent CVD in pregnancy and features of new CVD. The cardiologist/physician must understand the indications for and limitations of, and the potential harmful effects of each test during pregnancy. Current evidence suggests that a single cardiovascular radiological study during pregnancy is safe and should be undertaken at all times when clinically justified. In this article, the different imaging modalities are reviewed in terms of how they work, how safe they are and what their clinical utility in pregnancy is. Furthermore, the safety of contrast agents in pregnancy is also reviewed.

  7. The impact of genomics on population genetics of parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hupalo, Daniel N; Bradic, Martina; Carlton, Jane M

    2015-02-01

    Parasites, defined as eukaryotic microbes and parasitic worms that cause global diseases of human and veterinary importance, span many lineages in the eukaryotic Tree of Life. Historically challenging to study due to their complicated life-cycles and association with impoverished settings, their inherent complexities are now being elucidated by genome sequencing. Over the course of the last decade, projects in large sequencing centers, and increasingly frequently in individual research labs, have sequenced dozens of parasite reference genomes and field isolates from patient populations. This 'tsunami' of genomic data is answering questions about parasite genetic diversity, signatures of evolution orchestrated through anti-parasitic drug and host immune pressure, and the characteristics of populations. This brief review focuses on the state of the art of parasitic protist genomics, how the peculiar genomes of parasites are driving creative methods for their sequencing, and the impact that next-generation sequencing is having on our understanding of parasite population genomics and control of the diseases they cause.

  8. The global burden of foodborne parasitic diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Paul R; de Silva, Nilanthi R; Fèvre, Eric M; Kasuga, Fumiko; Rokni, Mohammad B; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Sripa, Banchob; Gargouri, Neyla; Willingham, Arve Lee; Stein, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne diseases (FBDs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the human population. Accurate information on the burden of FBDs is needed to inform policy makers and allocate appropriate resources for food safety control and intervention. Consequently, in 2006 the WHO launched an initiative to estimate the global burden of FBDs in terms of Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). This review gives an update of the progress on evaluating the burden of foodborne parasitic diseases that has been generated by this study. Results to date indicate that parasitic diseases that can be transmitted through food make a substantial contribution to the global burden of disease.

  9. Chagas disease: role of parasite genetic variation in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Andra M; Oliveira, Riva P; Pena, Srgio D J

    2002-03-05

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is characterised by a variable clinical course, from symptomless cases to severe chronic disease with cardiac and/or gastrointestinal involvement. This variability has been attributed both to differences in the host response and to genomic heterogeneity of the parasite. This article reviews the evidence in favour of an important role of the genetic constitution of T. cruzi in determining the clinical characteristics of Chagas disease and discusses the basis of the 'Clonal-Histotropic Model' for the pathogenesis of this disease.

  10. DNA vaccines: a rational design against parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Joana A; Rodgers, Jean; Atouguia, Jorge; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2010-02-01

    Parasitic diseases are one of the most devastating causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although immunization against these infections would be an ideal solution, the development of effective vaccines has been hampered by specific challenges posed by parasitic pathogens. Plasmid-based DNA vaccines may prove to be promising immunization tools in this area because vectors can be designed to integrate several antigens from different stages of the parasite life cycle or different subspecies; vaccines, formulations and immunization protocols can be tuned to match the immune response that offers protective immunity; and DNA vaccination is an affordable platform for developing countries. Partial and full protective immunity have been reported following DNA vaccination against the most significant parasitic diseases in the world.

  11. Control of human parasitic diseases: Context and overview.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, David H

    2006-01-01

    The control of parasitic diseases of humans has been undertaken since the aetiology and natural history of the infections was recognized and the deleterious effects on human health and well-being appreciated by policy makers, medical practitioners and public health specialists. However, while some parasitic infections such as malaria have proved difficult to control, as defined by a sustained reduction in incidence, others, particularly helminth infections can be effectively controlled. The different approaches to control from diagnosis, to treatment and cure of the clinically sick patient, to control the transmission within the community by preventative chemotherapy and vector control are outlined. The concepts of eradication, elimination and control are defined and examples of success summarized. Overviews of the health policy and financing environment in which programmes to control or eliminate parasitic diseases are positioned and the development of public-private partnerships as vehicles for product development or access to drugs for parasite disease control are discussed. Failure to sustain control of parasites may be due to development of drug resistance or the failure to implement proven strategies as a result of decreased resources within the health system, decentralization of health management through health-sector reform and the lack of financial and human resources in settings where per capita government expenditure on health may be less than $US 5 per year. However, success has been achieved in several large-scale programmes through sustained national government investment and/or committed donor support. It is also widely accepted that the level of investment in drug development for the parasitic diseases of poor populations is an unattractive option for pharmaceutical companies. The development of partnerships to specifically address this need provides some hope that the intractable problems of the treatment regimens for the trypanosomiases and

  12. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a case report and differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Gotaro; Tatsuno, Brent K; Inaba, Michiko; Velligas, Stephanie; Masaki, Kamal; Liow, Kore K

    2013-04-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology that causes rapidly progressive dementia. This disease is uniformly fatal and most patients die within 12 months. Clinical findings include myoclonus, visual disturbances, and cerebellar and pyramidal/extrapyramidal signs in addition to rapidly progressive cognitive and functional impairment. These findings are all non-specific and it is often difficult and challenging to diagnose premortem because of low awareness and clinical suspicion. We present a 66-year-old woman with a 5-month history of rapidly progressive dementia. After a series of extensive diagnostic examinations and continuous follow-up, she was diagnosed with probable sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria, with key findings of rapidly progressive dementia, blurry vision, extrapyramidal signs (cogwheel rigidity), and abnormal hyperintensity signals on diffusion-weighted MRI. Her symptoms progressively worsened and she died 7 months after the onset. The postmortem brain autopsy demonstrated the presence of abnormal protease-resistant prion protein by Western Blot analysis. A literature review was performed on differential diagnoses that present with rapidly progressive dementia and thereby mimic sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. These include Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy Bodies, frontotemporal dementia, meningoencephalitis, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, CADASIL, and paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis.

  13. Diagnose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Wolfgang

    Die Zunahme der Elektronik im Kraftfahrzeug, die Nutzung von Software zur Steuerung des Fahrzeugs und die erhöhte Komplexität moderner Einspritzsysteme stellen hohe Anforderungen an das Diagnosekonzept, die Überwachung im Fahrbetrieb (On-Board-Diagnose) und die Werkstattdiagnose (Bild 1). Basis der Werkstattdiagnose ist die geführte Fehlersuche, die verschiedene Möglichkeiten von Onboard- und Offboard-Prüfmethoden und Prüfgeräten verknüpft. Im Zuge der Verschärfung der Abgasgesetzgebung und der Forderung nach laufender Überwachung hat auch der Gesetzgeber die On-Board-Diagnose als Hilfsmittel zur Abgasüberwachung erkannt und eine herstellerunabhängige Standardisierung geschaffen. Dieses zusätzlich installierte System wird OBD-System (On Board Diagnostic System) genannt.

  14. [Screening of parasitic diseases in the asymptomatic immigrant population].

    PubMed

    Goterris, Lidia; Bocanegra, Cristina; Serre-Delcor, Núria; Moure, Zaira; Treviño, Begoña; Zarzuela, Francesc; Espasa, Mateu; Sulleiro, Elena

    2016-07-01

    Parasitic diseases suppose an important health problem in people from high endemic areas, so these must be discarded properly. Usually, these infections develop asymptomatically but, in propitious situations, are likely to reactivate themselves and can cause clinical symptoms and/or complications in the receiving country. Moreover, in some cases it is possible local transmission. Early diagnosis of these parasitic diseases made by appropriate parasitological techniques and its specific treatment will benefit both, the individual and the community. These techniques must be selected according to geoepidemiological criteria, patient's origin, migration route or time spent outside the endemic area; but other factors must also be considered as its sensitivity and specificity, implementation experience and availability. Given the high prevalence of intestinal parasites on asymptomatic immigrants, it is recommended to conduct a study by coproparasitological techniques. Because of its potential severity, the screening of asymptomatic malaria with sensitive techniques such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction) is also advisable. Serological screening for Chagas disease should be performed on all Latin American immigrants, except for people from the Caribbean islands. Other important parasites, which should be excluded, are filariasis and urinary schistosomiasis, by using microscopic examination. The aim of this paper is to review the different techniques for the screening of parasitic diseases and its advices within the care protocols for asymptomatic immigrants.

  15. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic tropical parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Neil F; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2009-01-01

    Tropical diseases continue to cause significant health problems in developing nations. An overview of illnesses with notable cutaneous findings caused by protozoans and helminthes is provided. The role of the health care provider in disease management is described.

  16. Parasitic kidney disease: milestones in the evolution of our knowledge.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, Rashad S

    2013-03-01

    Of the 342 parasites that infect humans, 20 are associated with kidney disease, yet of these, only schistosomes, plasmodia, filariae, and leishmanias are held responsible for significant clinical or epidemiologic impact. Reviewing the evolution of human knowledge for these parasites discloses a lot of similarities regarding their discovery, patterns of kidney injury, and pathogenic mechanisms. From a historical perspective, our relevant information may be classified into 4 phases: (1) disease documentation in ancient and medieval scripts as far back as 2000-3000 bce; (2) discovery of the parasites, their life cycles, and clinical correlates by European clinicians working in African and Asian colonies during the second half of the 19th century; (3) discovery and characterization of the renal manifestations of monoparasitic infections during the second half of the 20th century; and (4) recognition of the confounding effects of coinfection with bacteria, viruses, or other parasites. The spectrum of respective kidney diseases extends all the way from acute kidney injury to glomerulonephritis, amyloidosis, urologic disorders, and malignancy. Discovery of the common immunopathogenetic host response to parasitic infections has provided a knowledge core that explains the similarities, diversities, and interactions with regard to kidney injury.

  17. One world health: socioeconomic burden and parasitic disease control priorities.

    PubMed

    Torgerson, Paul R

    2013-08-01

    Parasitic diseases present a considerable socio-economic impact to society. Zoonotic parasites can result in a considerable burden of disease in people and substantive economic losses to livestock populations. Ameliorating the effects of these diseases may consist of attempts at eradicating specific diseases at a global level, eliminating them at a national or local level or controlling them to minimise incidence. Alternatively with some parasitic zoonoses it may only be possible to treat human and animal cases as they arise. The choice of approach will be determined by the potential effectiveness of a disease control programme, its cost and the cost effectiveness or cost benefit of undertaking the intervention. Furthermore human disease burden is being increasingly measured by egalitarian non-financial measures which are difficult to apply to livestock. This adds additional challenges to the assessment of socio-economic burdens of zoonotic diseases. Using examples from the group of neglected zoonotic diseases, information regarding the socio-economic effects is reviewed together with how this information is used in decision making with regard to disease control and treatment.

  18. [Intestinal parasitic diseases as a global health problem].

    PubMed

    Chacín-Bonilla, Leonor

    2013-03-01

    In today's world, parasitic disease agents are not restricted by geography or economy, and have become a significant global threat. The increasing globalization of the fresh produce market and greater international trade and travels, have contributed to the spread of these organisms in the industrialized world. Parasitic protozoa cause waterborne and foodborne outbreaks of diarrhea. The unprecedented flow of people introduces cultural and behavior patterns around the world; the increasing tendency to eat raw or undercooked meat and seafood, favors the dissemination of several parasitic pathogens. Climate changes are predicted to cause a global increase in soil-transmitted helminthiases. The multidisciplinary study of these agents, and the interaction among scientists, global health organizations and governments are imperative to reduce the burden of these diseases and improve the life of a large segment of the world population.

  19. [Case of Behcet's disease diagnosed by bilateral epididymitis].

    PubMed

    Horii, Sayaka; Takada, Shingo; Kinjo, Takanori; Nonomura, Daichi; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Yoneda, Suguru; Nomura, Hironori; Tei, Norihide; Matsumiya, Kiyomi; Shiroyama, Yoshimi

    2014-11-01

    A 24-year-old man visited our emergency room with testicular pain and left shoulder pain, and was admitted to our hospital for diagnosis of bilateral epididymitis. Antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medication were started, but the symptoms did not improve. During hospitalization, ulcerous lesions, erythema nodosum, folliculitis-like exanthema and multiple oral aphtha appeared. Then, we consulted the department of dermatology. As he had a combination of arthritis and epididymitis, he was diagnosed with the abortive form of Behcet's disease. After diagnosis, we began administering colchicine. Then, all symptoms improved in a few days, and he has remained free of the disease after the discontinuation of colchicine.

  20. Epidemiology and history of human parasitic diseases in Romania.

    PubMed

    Neghina, Raul; Neghina, Adriana M; Marincu, Iosif; Iacobiciu, Ioan

    2011-06-01

    Intestinal parasitic diseases such as enterobiasis, giardiasis, and ascariasis are detected most frequently in Romania, but their importance is definitely surpassed by trichinellosis, cystic echinococcosis, and toxoplasmosis. Malaria was common until its eradication in 1963, and only imported cases are reported nowadays. The aim of this review was to bring together essential data on the epidemiology and history of human parasitoses in Romania. Information on 43 parasitic diseases was collected from numerous sources, most of them unavailable abroad or inaccessible to the international scientific community. Over time, Romanian people of all ages have paid a significant tribute to the pathogenic influences exerted by the parasites. Sanitary and socio-economical consequences of the parasites diseases have great negative impact on the quality of life of affected individuals and the overall well-being of the population. Implementation of efficient public health measures and informative campaigns for the masses as well as changing the inadequate habits that are deeply rooted in the population are mandatory for cutting successfully this Gordian knot.

  1. Eosinophilia and thrombosis in parasitic diseases: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ames, Paul R J; Aloj, Giuseppina; Gentile, Fabrizio

    2011-02-01

    It is known that peripheral blood eosinophilia (PBE) is a normal hematopoietic response to several parasitic diseases, but it is less known that PBE promotes a hypercoagulable state that may favor thrombosis. Scope of this article is to explore which parasitic infestations are most likely to be complicated by thrombosis and to highlight the pathogenetic contribution of PBE to vascular occlusions in this setting. A review of the world literature revealed 18 cases in which PBE was associated with vascular occlusion though no specific surveys were dedicated to this topic. The eosinophil exerts its thrombogenic potential by inhibition of the natural anticoagulant pathways and release of tissue factor with enhanced coagulation activation leading to vascular occlusion. It is hoped that this review contributes to the awareness of the link between PBE and thrombosis in parasitic disorders to foster research in this area.

  2. Natural Products as a Source for Treating Neglected Parasitic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ndjonka, Dieudonné; Rapado, Ludmila Nakamura; Silber, Ariel M.; Liebau, Eva; Wrenger, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases caused by parasites are a major threat for the entire mankind, especially in the tropics. More than 1 billion people world-wide are directly exposed to tropical parasites such as the causative agents of trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, which represent a major health problem, particularly in impecunious areas. Unlike most antibiotics, there is no “general” antiparasitic drug available. Here, the selection of antiparasitic drugs varies between different organisms. Some of the currently available drugs are chemically de novo synthesized, however, the majority of drugs are derived from natural sources such as plants which have subsequently been chemically modified to warrant higher potency against these human pathogens. In this review article we will provide an overview of the current status of plant derived pharmaceuticals and their chemical modifications to target parasite-specific peculiarities in order to interfere with their proliferation in the human host. PMID:23389040

  3. [Diagnosing and expertizing asbestos-induced occupational diseases].

    PubMed

    Baur, X; Schneider, J; Woitowitz, H-J

    2011-11-01

    Due to latency periods that can last for decades, asbestos-related diseases show 18 years after the enforcement of the prohibition of asbestos application in Germany their highest numbers. In the centre of attention are asbestos-induced pleural fibroses, mesotheliomas, asbestoses, lung and laryngeal cancer. Diagnosing and expertizing these diseases causes difficulties, is hitherto non-uniform and does frequently not correspond to the current medico-scientific expertise. This induced the German Respiratory Society as well as the German Society of Occupational and Environmental Medicine in cooperation with the German Society of Pathology, the German Radiology Society and the German Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Cervical Surgery, to develop the above mentioned guideline during seven meetings moderated by AWMF. The required thorough diagnosis is based on the detailed recording of a qualified occupational history. Since the sole radiological and pathological-anatomical findings cannot sufficiently contribute to the causal relationship the occupational history recorded by a general physician and a specialist is of decisive importance. These physicians have to report suspected occupational diseases and to advise patients on social and medical questions. Frequently, problems occur if the recognition of an occupational disease is neglected due to a supposedly too low exposure or too few ferruginous bodies or low fibre concentrations in lung tissue. The new S2k directive summarizing the current medico-scientific knowledge is for this reason, for diagnoses and expert opinions as well as for the determination of a reduced capacity for work a very important source of information.

  4. 25 CFR 700.723 - Control of livestock disease and parasites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RELOCATION PROCEDURES New Lands Grazing § 700.723 Control of livestock disease and parasites. Whenever livestock within the New Lands become infected with contagious or infectious disease or parasites or have... responsible permittee in accordance with applicable laws....

  5. Criticality of Parasitic Disease Transmission in a Diffusive Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min-Hua; Zhang, Duan-Ming; Pan, Gui-Jun; Yin, Yan-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Yuan

    2008-12-01

    Through using the methods of finite-size effect and short time dynamic scaling, we study the critical behavior of parasitic disease spreading process in a diffusive population mediated by a static vector environment. Through comprehensive analysis of parasitic disease spreading we find that this model presents a dynamical phase transition from disease-free state to endemic state with a finite population density. We determine the critical population density, above which the system reaches an epidemic spreading stationary state. We also perform a scaling analysis to determine the order parameter and critical relaxation exponents. The results show that the model does not belong to the usual directed percolation universality class and is compatible with the class of directed percolation with diffusive and conserved fields.

  6. McArdle's disease diagnosed following statin-induced myositis.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Callum; Al Riyami, Said; Wilkins, Peter; Ferns, Gordon A A

    2004-07-01

    We describe the case of a 69-year-old man with a history of muscular symptoms dating back to his childhood; McArdle's disease (glycogen-storage disease V) was diagnosed following an episode of myositis in which a statin and physical exertion appear to have been precipitating factors. This case demonstrates that the ischaemic lactate-ammonia test still has a place in screening patients with symptoms suggestive of McArdle's disease and emphasizes the importance of carrying out glycogen phosphorylase histochemistry on the skeletal muscle biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. In patients who develop a raised plasma creatine kinase level or muscular symptoms during lipid-lowering therapy, the clinician should be alert to the possibility of an underlying myopathy.

  7. Parasitic diseases of remote Indigenous communities in Australia.

    PubMed

    Holt, Deborah C; McCarthy, James S; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2010-08-15

    Indigenous Australians suffer significant disadvantage in health outcomes and have a life expectancy well below that of non-Indigenous Australians. Mortality rates of Indigenous Australians are higher than that of Indigenous populations in developed countries elsewhere in the world. A number of parasitic diseases which are uncommon in the rest of the Australian population contribute to the high burden of disease in many remote Indigenous communities. High rates of infection with enteric parasites such as Strongyloides stercoralis, hookworm and Trichuris have been recorded and infection of the skin with the ecto-parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei is also a substantial problem. Secondary infection of scabies lesions, including with Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptococcus, can produce serious sequelae such as rheumatic fever and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Transmission of many parasites in many remote communities is facilitated by overcrowded living conditions and infrastructure problems which result in poor sanitation and hygiene. Improvements in environmental health conditions must accompany medical initiatives to achieve sustainable improvement in the health of Indigenous Australians.

  8. 25 CFR 700.723 - Control of livestock disease and parasites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Control of livestock disease and parasites. 700.723... RELOCATION PROCEDURES New Lands Grazing § 700.723 Control of livestock disease and parasites. Whenever livestock within the New Lands become infected with contagious or infectious disease or parasites or...

  9. 25 CFR 700.723 - Control of livestock disease and parasites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Control of livestock disease and parasites. 700.723... RELOCATION PROCEDURES New Lands Grazing § 700.723 Control of livestock disease and parasites. Whenever livestock within the New Lands become infected with contagious or infectious disease or parasites or...

  10. 25 CFR 700.723 - Control of livestock disease and parasites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Control of livestock disease and parasites. 700.723... RELOCATION PROCEDURES New Lands Grazing § 700.723 Control of livestock disease and parasites. Whenever livestock within the New Lands become infected with contagious or infectious disease or parasites or...

  11. 25 CFR 700.723 - Control of livestock disease and parasites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Control of livestock disease and parasites. 700.723... RELOCATION PROCEDURES New Lands Grazing § 700.723 Control of livestock disease and parasites. Whenever livestock within the New Lands become infected with contagious or infectious disease or parasites or...

  12. Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases: Old and New Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ndao, Momar

    2009-01-01

    Methods for the diagnosis of infectious diseases have stagnated in the last 20–30 years. Few major advances in clinical diagnostic testing have been made since the introduction of PCR, although new technologies are being investigated. Many tests that form the backbone of the “modern” microbiology laboratory are based on very old and labour-intensive technologies such as microscopy for malaria. Pressing needs include more rapid tests without sacrificing sensitivity, value-added tests, and point-of-care tests for both high- and low-resource settings. In recent years, research has been focused on alternative methods to improve the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. These include immunoassays, molecular-based approaches, and proteomics using mass spectrometry platforms technology. This review summarizes the progress in new approaches in parasite diagnosis and discusses some of the merits and disadvantages of these tests. PMID:20069111

  13. Gastrointestinal parasites: potential therapy for refractory inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Moreels, Tom G; Pelckmans, Paul A

    2005-02-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Different pharmacological agents are currently used in several combinations to control the inflammatory process. Recently, antibodies against the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha appeared to be very effective in treating patients with Crohn's disease. However, due to the fact that the pathogen causing IBD is still unknown, no causative treatment is currently available that is able to make the disease disappear. Recently, the hygiene hypothesis of the development of immunological diseases was proposed, stating that raising children in extremely hygienic environments with less exposure to parasite infections may negatively affect the development of the immune system, predisposing them to immunologic diseases such as IBD. This hypothesis is supported by experimental data showing that helminthic parasites protect against T helper (TH) type 1 cell-mediated gastrointestinal inflammations like Crohn's disease. Both TH-2 cells and regulatory T cells may be involved in this immunomodulatory mechanism. Here, we review the experimental and clinical studies in favor of the hygiene hypothesis, opening perspectives on new therapies for IBD.

  14. Parasite control practices and public perception of parasitic diseases: A survey of dog and cat owners.

    PubMed

    Matos, Mariana; Alho, Ana Margarida; Owen, Sinclair Patrick; Nunes, Telmo; Madeira de Carvalho, Luís

    2015-11-01

    Drugs used in the control of internal and external parasites in companion animals play a crucial role in Animal and Public Health. To ensure continuing protection, these drugs should be administered regularly and in intervals, as suggested by the manufacturers. To assess parasite control practices and other related factors, including the degree of public awareness on the topic, 312 dog and cat owners were surveyed while attending the Small Animal Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Lisbon University. Results showed that 89.7% of the dogs were currently being treated with endoparasitic drugs. Of these, 74.3% were dewormed every four months or longer and merely 11.8% with the recommended treatment regimen (minimum quarterly). In cats, 63.6% were being treated with endoparasitic drugs and 85.7% of these were irregularly dewormed every four months or longer and merely 5.5% with the recommended treatment regimen (minimum quarterly). Combinations of praziquantel, pyrantel embonate and febantel were the most commonly used drugs in dogs, whereas macrocyclic lactones were more frequently used in cats. Regarding external parasitic control, 92.2% of the dogs were being treated, 50.5% of these at monthly intervals (all-year round or seasonally). The most common ectoparasitic drug formulation used on dogs was the spot-on imidacloprid+permethrin (89%). Only 28.4% of the dogs were uninterruptedly protected throughout the year from the main canine vector borne diseases transmitted by fleas, ticks, sandflies and mosquitoes. Merely 63.6% of the cats were being controlled with ectoparasitic drugs, most at infrequent drug intervals and imidacloprid was the most frequently used drug on cats (44.4%). Additionally, 85% of the respondents had never heard of the word "zoonosis" and 37% of them did not collect their dog's faeces in all public places. Scabies, toxoplasmosis and leishmaniasis were the most frequent parasitic diseases identified by the public in this survey. Although the

  15. Pathogenesis of Chagas' Disease: Parasite Persistence and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Hecht, Mariana M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Nitz, Nadjar

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Acute Trypanosoma cruzi infections can be asymptomatic, but chronically infected individuals can die of Chagas' disease. The transfer of the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircle to the genome of chagasic patients can explain the pathogenesis of the disease; in cases of Chagas' disease with evident cardiomyopathy, the kDNA minicircles integrate mainly into retrotransposons at several chromosomes, but the minicircles are also detected in coding regions of genes that regulate cell growth, differentiation, and immune responses. An accurate evaluation of the role played by the genotype alterations in the autoimmune rejection of self-tissues in Chagas' disease is achieved with the cross-kingdom chicken model system, which is refractory to T. cruzi infections. The inoculation of T. cruzi into embryonated eggs prior to incubation generates parasite-free chicks, which retain the kDNA minicircle sequence mainly in the macrochromosome coding genes. Crossbreeding transfers the kDNA mutations to the chicken progeny. The kDNA-mutated chickens develop severe cardiomyopathy in adult life and die of heart failure. The phenotyping of the lesions revealed that cytotoxic CD45, CD8+ γδ, and CD8α+ T lymphocytes carry out the rejection of the chicken heart. These results suggest that the inflammatory cardiomyopathy of Chagas' disease is a genetically driven autoimmune disease. PMID:21734249

  16. Focally enhanced gastritis in newly diagnosed pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ushiku, Tetsuo; Moran, Christopher J; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2013-12-01

    Although the significance of focally enhanced gastritis (FEG) as a marker of Crohn disease (CD) in adults has been contested, several studies suggest that it may be more specific of CD in pediatric patients. This study describes the detailed histologic features of FEG in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and clarifies its association with CD. A series of 119 consecutive newly diagnosed IBD patients (62 CD cases, 57 ulcerative colitis [UC] cases) with upper and lower gastrointestinal biopsies were evaluated. The histology of the gastric biopsies was reviewed blinded to final diagnoses and compared with age-matched healthy controls (n=66). FEG was present in 43% of IBD patients (CD 55% vs. UC 30%, P=0.0092) and in 5% of controls. Among CD patients, FEG was more common in younger patients (73% in children aged 10 y and below, 43% in children above 10 y of age, P=0.0358), with the peak in the 5- to 10-year age group (80%). The total number of glands involved in each FEG focus was higher in UC (6.4±5.1 glands) than in CD (4.0±3.0 glands, P=0.0409). Amongst the CD cohort, patients with FEG were more likely than those without FEG to have active ileitis (79% vs. 40%, P=0.0128) and granulomas elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract (82% vs. 43%, P=0.0016). There was no correlation between FEG and other gastrointestinal findings of UC. We demonstrate that differences in FEG seen in pediatric CD and UC relate to not only their frequencies but also the morphology and relationship with other gastrointestinal lesions. Further, FEG is associated with disease activity and the presence of granulomas in pediatric CD.

  17. Impact of vectorborne parasitic neglected tropical diseases on child health.

    PubMed

    Barry, Meagan A; Murray, Kristy O; Hotez, Peter J; Jones, Kathryn M

    2016-07-01

    Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis are all vectorborne neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) that are responsible for significant disease burden in impoverished children and adults worldwide. As vectorborne parasitic diseases, they can all be targeted for elimination through vector control strategies. Examples of successful vector control programmes for these diseases over the past two decades have included the Southern Cone Initiative against Chagas disease, the Kala-azar Control Scheme against leishmaniasis, the Onchocerciasis Control Programme and the lymphatic filariasis control programme in The Gambia. A common vector control component in all of these programmes is the use of adulticides including dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and newer synthetic pyrethroid insecticides against the insect vectors of disease. Household spraying has been used against Chagas disease and leishmaniasis, and insecticide-treated bed nets have helped prevent leishmaniasis and lymphatic filariasis. Recent trends in vector control focus on collaborations between programmes and sectors to achieve integrated vector management that addresses the holistic vector control needs of a community rather than approaching it on a disease-by-disease basis, with the goals of increased efficacy, sustainability and cost-effectiveness. As evidence of vector resistance to currently used insecticide regimens emerges, research to develop new and improved insecticides and novel control strategies will be critical in reducing disease burden. In the quest to eliminate these vectorborne NTDs, efforts need to be made to continue existing control programmes, further implement integrated vector control strategies and stimulate research into new insecticides and control methods.

  18. Insights into Population Health Management Through Disease Diagnoses Networks

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Keith; Stiglic, Gregor; Dasgupta, Dipanwita; Kricheff, Mark; Obradovic, Zoran; Chawla, Nitesh V.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of electronic health care records has provided remarkable progress in the field of population health. In particular the identification of disease risk factors has flourished under the surge of available data. Researchers can now access patient data across a broad range of demographics and geographic locations. Utilizing this Big healthcare data researchers have been able to empirically identify specific high-risk conditions found within differing populations. However to date the majority of studies approached the issue from the top down, focusing on the prevalence of specific diseases within a population. Through our work we demonstrate the power of addressing this issue bottom-up by identifying specifically which diseases are higher-risk for a specific population. In this work we demonstrate that network-based analysis can present a foundation to identify pairs of diagnoses that differentiate across population segments. We provide a case study highlighting differences between high and low income individuals in the United States. This work is particularly valuable when addressing population health management within resource-constrained environments such as community health programs where it can be used to provide insight and resource planning into targeted care for the population served. PMID:27461860

  19. Positron emission tomography in patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    McGeer, P L; Kamo, H; Harrop, R; Li, D K; Tuokko, H; McGeer, E G; Adam, M J; Ammann, W; Beattie, B L; Calne, D B

    1986-01-01

    Fourteen patients who had clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease with mild to severe dementia (mean age 69.1 years) were evaluated by calculation of local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (LCMR-gl) based on uptake of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) detected with positron emission tomography (PET). PET scanning showed that the patients had significantly lower LCMR-gl values than 11 age-matched neurologically normal volunteers (mean age 66.3 years). The differences were most marked in the temporal cortex, followed by the frontal, parietal and occipital cortex. In each case the LCMR-gl value was below the lowest control value in at least one cortical area and usually in several; the reduction in LCMR-gl and the number of regions involved in the patients increased with the severity of the dementia. Deficits noted in neuropsychologic testing generally correlated with those predicted from loss of regional cortical metabolism. The patients with Alzheimer's disease were also examined with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography or both; the degree of atrophy found showed only a poor correlation with the neuropsychologic deficit. Significant atrophy was also noted in some of the controls. A detailed analysis of LCMR-gl values in selected cerebral regions of various sizes refuted the hypothesis that the reduction in cortical glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's disease is due to the filling by metabolically inert cerebrospinal fluid of space created by tissue atrophy. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:3512063

  20. [Health education for major parasitic diseases in rural community of China: current status and future development].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lin, Dan-dan

    2013-08-01

    Owing to human parasitic diseases being related to behavior, the health education as an important measure to prevent parasite infections through human behavior intervention, has played an important role in the process of parasitic disease prevention and control in rural area of China. This paper comments on the development history of the health education for parasitic disease prevention and control, current intervention modes and the effect of the health education for parasitic diseases in rural area. This paper also summarizes the role and impact of different modes of the health education for parasitic disease prevention and control and gives some suggestions to future development of the health education in rural area under current prevalent situation of parasitic diseases.

  1. Diagnosing anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: beyond the established markers.

    PubMed

    Oustamanolakis, Pantelis; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E; Kouroumalis, Elias A

    2011-10-01

    The main types of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of inflammatory etiology, or anemia of chronic disease (ACD). In the management of IBD patients with anemia it is essential for the physician to diagnose the type of anemia in order to decide in an evidence-based manner for the appropriate treatment. However, the assessment of iron status in IBD in many cases is rather difficult due to coexistent inflammation. For this assessment several indices and markers have been suggested. Ferritin, seems to play a central role in the definition and diagnosis of anemia in IBD and transferrin, transferrin saturation (Tsat), and soluble transferrin receptors are also valuable markers. All these biochemical markers have several limitations because they are not consistently reliable indices, since they are influenced by factors other than changes in iron balance. In this review, in addition to them, we discuss the newer alternative markers for iron status that may be useful when serum ferritin and Tsat are not sufficient. The iron metabolism regulators, hepcidin and prohepcidin, are still under investigation in IBD. Erythrocytes parameters like the red cell distribution width (RDW) and the percentage of hypochromic red cells as well as reticulocyte parameters such as hemoglobin concentration of reticulocytes, red blood cell size factor and reticulocyte distribution width could be useful markers for the evaluation of anemia in IBD.

  2. Bone Disease in Newly Diagnosed Lupus Nephritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Aline Lázara; dos Reis, Luciene Machado; Dias, Cristiane Bitencourt; Custódio, Melani Ribeiro; Jorgetti, Vanda; Woronik, Viktoria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Bone loss in Lupus Nephritis (LN) patients is common and multifactorial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone status of newly diagnosed LN patients and their correlation with inflammatory factors involved in LN physiopathology. Methods We studied 15 pre-menopausal patients with ≤2 months of diagnosed SLE and LN. Patients with prior kidney or bone disease were excluded. In addition to biochemical evaluation (including 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D] and Monocyte Chemotactic Protein (MCP1) dosage), we performed bone biopsies followed by osteoblast culture, histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analysis. Results LN patients presented a mean age of 29.5±10 years, a proteinuria of 4.7±2.9 g/day and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 37(31–87) ml/min/1,73 m2. They were on glucocorticoid therapy for 34±12 days. All patients presented vitamin D insufficiency (9.9±4.4 ng/ml, range 4–20). Urinary MCP1 correlated negatively with 25(OH)D (r = −0.53, p = 0.003) and positively with serum deoxypyridinoline (r = 0.53, p = 0.004). Osteoblasts isolated from LN bone biopsies presented a significantly higher expression of MCP-1 when compared to controls (32.0.±9.1 vs. 22.9±5.3 mean fluorescence intensities, p = 0.01). LN patients presented a significantly reduced osteoid volume, osteoid thickness, osteoid surface, mineralization surface and bone formation rate, associated with an increased eroded surface and osteoclast surface. Patient’s bone specimens demonstrated a reduced immunostaining for osteoprotegerin (0.61±0.82 vs. 1.08±0.50%, p = 0.003), and an increased expression of Receptor Activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) (1.76±0.92 vs. 0.41±0.28%, p<0.001) when compared to controls. Discussion Newly diagnosed LN patients presented a significant disturbance in bone metabolism, characterized by an impaired bone formation and mineralization, associated with an increase in resorption parameters

  3. Trends in parasitic diseases in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Hee; Guk, Sang-Mee; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Soon-Hyung; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2008-03-01

    In the Republic of Korea, cases of zoonotic, opportunistic and imported parasitoses are being detected increasingly. Vivax malaria disappeared in the late 1970s but re-emerged in 1993 and, currently, 1000-2000 cases occur annually. Brugian filariasis was endemic on offshore islands until 1990 but has now been eradicated. Soil-transmitted helminthiases (ascariasis, trichuriasis and hookworm infections) were highly prevalent until the 1970s but are now well controlled. However, food-borne trematode infections, such as clonorchiasis and intestinal trematodiases (including heterophyidiasis, echinostomiasis and gymnophalloidiasis), each show steady prevalence. This review focuses on trends in parasitic diseases in the Republic of Korea.

  4. Diagnosing Medical Parasites: A Public Health Officers Guide to Assisting Laboratory and Medical Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    PHIL 5968 – CDC) Diseases Both Dermacentor and Amblyomma transmit Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (Rickettsia rickettsia). The different strains...granulocytic erlichiosis (Ehrlichia chaffeensis). Rhipicephalus sanguineus transmits Mediterranean Spotted Fever and African Tick Typhus...crushed tissues or feces of the tick. • Spotted fever due to Rickettsia rickettsii occurs in Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Mexico, Panama and the USA

  5. Host behaviour–parasite feedback: an essential link between animal behaviour and disease ecology

    PubMed Central

    Archie, Elizabeth A.; Craft, Meggan E.; Hawley, Dana M.; Martin, Lynn B.; Moore, Janice; White, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Animal behaviour and the ecology and evolution of parasites are inextricably linked. For this reason, animal behaviourists and disease ecologists have been interested in the intersection of their respective fields for decades. Despite this interest, most research at the behaviour–disease interface focuses either on how host behaviour affects parasites or how parasites affect behaviour, with little overlap between the two. Yet, the majority of interactions between hosts and parasites are probably reciprocal, such that host behaviour feeds back on parasites and vice versa. Explicitly considering these feedbacks is essential for understanding the complex connections between animal behaviour and parasite ecology and evolution. To illustrate this point, we discuss how host behaviour–parasite feedbacks might operate and explore the consequences of feedback for studies of animal behaviour and parasites. For example, ignoring the feedback of host social structure on parasite dynamics can limit the accuracy of predictions about parasite spread. Likewise, considering feedback in studies of parasites and animal personalities may provide unique insight about the maintenance of variation in personality types. Finally, applying the feedback concept to links between host behaviour and beneficial, rather than pathogenic, microbes may shed new light on transitions between mutualism and parasitism. More generally, accounting for host behaviour–parasite feedbacks can help identify critical gaps in our understanding of how key host behaviours and parasite traits evolve and are maintained. PMID:27053751

  6. Host behaviour-parasite feedback: an essential link between animal behaviour and disease ecology.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Archie, Elizabeth A; Craft, Meggan E; Hawley, Dana M; Martin, Lynn B; Moore, Janice; White, Lauren

    2016-04-13

    Animal behaviour and the ecology and evolution of parasites are inextricably linked. For this reason, animal behaviourists and disease ecologists have been interested in the intersection of their respective fields for decades. Despite this interest, most research at the behaviour-disease interface focuses either on how host behaviour affects parasites or how parasites affect behaviour, with little overlap between the two. Yet, the majority of interactions between hosts and parasites are probably reciprocal, such that host behaviour feeds back on parasites and vice versa. Explicitly considering these feedbacks is essential for understanding the complex connections between animal behaviour and parasite ecology and evolution. To illustrate this point, we discuss how host behaviour-parasite feedbacks might operate and explore the consequences of feedback for studies of animal behaviour and parasites. For example, ignoring the feedback of host social structure on parasite dynamics can limit the accuracy of predictions about parasite spread. Likewise, considering feedback in studies of parasites and animal personalities may provide unique insight about the maintenance of variation in personality types. Finally, applying the feedback concept to links between host behaviour and beneficial, rather than pathogenic, microbes may shed new light on transitions between mutualism and parasitism. More generally, accounting for host behaviour-parasite feedbacks can help identify critical gaps in our understanding of how key host behaviours and parasite traits evolve and are maintained.

  7. [Control situation and primary task of key parasitic diseases in China].

    PubMed

    Lei, Zheng-long; Wang, Li-ying

    2012-02-29

    In the "11th Five-year Plan" period, China unveiled a mid-term planning on the control of the key parasitic diseases, including schistosomiasis, malaria, echinococcosis (hydatid disease), as well as some other parasitic diseases. It clarifies the goals on the control of the major parasitic diseases in the national control program during the "12th Five-year' Plan" period (2011-2015) , formulates current main tasks based on analyzing the progress of the national control program on key parasitic diseases, in order to meet the challenges appearing in the future implementation.

  8. Major parasitic diseases of poverty in mainland China: perspectives for better control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Lei; Li, Ting-Ting; Huang, Si-Yang; Cong, Wei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-08-01

    Significant progress has been made in the prevention, control, and elimination of human parasitic diseases in China in the past 60 years. However, parasitic diseases of poverty remain major causes of morbidity and mortality, and inflict enormous economic costs on societies.In this article, we review the prevalence rates, geographical distributions, epidemic characteristics, risk factors, and clinical manifestations of parasitic diseases of poverty listed in the first issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty on 25 October 2012. We also address the challenges facing control of parasitic diseases of poverty and provide suggestions for better control.

  9. [Design and implementation of command system for emergency events of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Shi-zhu; Fu, Qing; Shi, Wei-jie; Song, Wei; Ji, Lin; Peng, Zhi-xiong; Lin, Qing-shuai; Hu, Jiang-long; Zhang, Li; Qian, Ying-jun; Ruan, Yao; Lu, Yan-xin; Xiao, Ning; Xu, Xue-nian; Zhou, Xiao-nong

    2014-10-01

    Based on the requirement analysis and functional design of the command system for parasitic disease outbreaks, the system was constructed by workflow technique, function modules and technical architecture. The command system was a multi-platform system, could achieve multiple functions, such as monitoring and early warning of parasitic diseases, emergency video communication, emergency dispatcher, and emergency management. The system can meet the needs in emergency events of parasitic diseases, and increase preparedness level.

  10. [Status and future focus of the national control program on parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Xiao-Nong, Zhou

    2011-10-01

    The achievements and challenges in the national control program on parasitic diseases in PR China were presented after trend analysis of the national and international control activities and programs. The future focus on research and control of parasitic diseases in PR China was put forward in order to achieve the long-term goal of eliminating the parasitic diseases as public health problem in the country.

  11. [Spreading experience of demonstration plots and strengthening control of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Yu, Wang

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes the achievements and experiences of demonstration plots carrying out comprehensive control measures of parasite diseases in China, and elaborates the hard task of the control of parasitic diseases as one of main public health problems. The article also elaborates the significance of spreading the experiences of demonstration plots carrying out comprehensive control measures of parasite diseases for improving the health of people and promoting the construction of new countryside.

  12. Viral, parasitic and prion diseases of farmed deer and bison.

    PubMed

    Haigh, J C; Mackintosh, C; Griffin, F

    2002-08-01

    The most important viral disease of farmed deer and bison is malignant catarrhal fever. The other herpesviruses which have been isolated from these species are briefly described. Other viral agents that are recognised in these animals, including adenovirus, parapox, foot and mouth disease, bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, bovine virus diarrhoea, rotavirus and coronavirus, are also discussed. Ectoparasites of importance in this group in various parts of the world include a variety of ticks, as well as lice, keds, Oestridae, mange mites and fire ants. Helminth parasites include liver flukes (Fascioloides and Fasciola), gastrointestinal nematodes of the family Trichostrongylidae, pulmonary lungworms of the genus Dictyocaulus and extra-pulmonary lungworms of the family Protostrongylidae. Chronic wasting disease is principally important in North America, where the disease occurs in wild cervids in a limited area and has been reported in farmed deer in a small number of states in the United States of America and one province in Canada. These diseases are summarised in terms of their classification, epidemiology, clinical signs, pathology, diagnosis, treatment and control.

  13. Proliferative kidney disease in rainbow trout: time- and temperature-related renal pathology and parasite distribution.

    PubMed

    Bettge, Kathrin; Wahli, Thomas; Segner, Helmut; Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike

    2009-01-28

    Proliferative kidney disease is a parasitic infection of salmonid fishes caused by Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae. The main target organ of the parasite in the fish is the kidney. To investigate the influence of water temperature on the disease in fish, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss infected with T bryosalmonae were kept at 12 degrees C and 18 degrees C. The number of parasites, the type and degree of lesions in the kidney and the mortality rate was evaluated from infection until full development of disease. While mortality stayed low at 12 degrees C, it reached 77% at 18 degrees C. At 12 degrees C, pathological lesions were dominated by a multifocal proliferative and granulomatous interstitial nephritis. This was accompanied by low numbers of T. bryosalmonae, mainly located in the interstitial lesions. With progression of the disease, small numbers of parasites appeared in the excretory tubuli, and parasite DNA was detected in the urine. Parasite degeneration in the interstitium was observed at late stages of the disease. At 18 degrees C, pathological lesions in kidneys were more severe and more widely distributed, and accompanied by significantly higher parasite numbers. Distribution of parasites in the renal compartments, onset of parasite degeneration and time course of appearance of parasite DNA in urine were not clearly different from the 12 degrees C group. These findings indicate that higher mortality at 18 degrees C compared to 12 degrees C is associated with an enhanced severity of renal pathology and increased parasite numbers.

  14. 25 CFR 168.15 - Control of livestock diseases and parasites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Control of livestock diseases and parasites. 168.15... REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.15 Control of livestock diseases and parasites. Whenever livestock within the Hopi Partitioned Lands become infected with contagious or infectious diseases...

  15. 25 CFR 168.15 - Control of livestock diseases and parasites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Control of livestock diseases and parasites. 168.15... REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.15 Control of livestock diseases and parasites. Whenever livestock within the Hopi Partitioned Lands become infected with contagious or infectious diseases...

  16. 25 CFR 168.15 - Control of livestock diseases and parasites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Control of livestock diseases and parasites. 168.15... REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.15 Control of livestock diseases and parasites. Whenever livestock within the Hopi Partitioned Lands become infected with contagious or infectious diseases...

  17. 25 CFR 168.15 - Control of livestock diseases and parasites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Control of livestock diseases and parasites. 168.15... REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.15 Control of livestock diseases and parasites. Whenever livestock within the Hopi Partitioned Lands become infected with contagious or infectious diseases...

  18. 25 CFR 168.15 - Control of livestock diseases and parasites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Control of livestock diseases and parasites. 168.15... REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.15 Control of livestock diseases and parasites. Whenever livestock within the Hopi Partitioned Lands become infected with contagious or infectious diseases...

  19. Parasitic skin diseases: health care-seeking in a slum in north-east Brazil.

    PubMed

    Heukelbach, Jörg; van Haeff, Evelien; Rump, Babette; Wilcke, Thomas; Moura, Rômulo César Sabóia; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2003-04-01

    Ectoparasitic diseases are endemic in many poor communities in north-east Brazil, and heavy infestation is frequent. We conducted two studies to assess disease perception and health care seeking behaviour in relation to parasitic skin diseases and to determine their public health importance. The first study comprised a representative cross-sectional survey of the population of a slum in north-east Brazil. Inhabitants were examined for the presence of scabies, tungiasis, pediculosis and cutaneous larva migrans (CLM). The second study assessed health care seeking behaviour related to these ectoparasitic diseases of patients attending a Primary Health Care Centre (PHCC) adjacent to the slum. Point prevalence rates in the community were: head lice 43.3% (95% CI: 40.5-46.3), tungiasis 33.6% (95% CI: 30.9-36.4), scabies 8.8% (95% CI: 7.3-10.6) and CLM 3.1% (95% CI: 2.2-4.3). Point prevalence rates of patients attending the PHCC were: head lice 38.2% (95% CI: 32.6-44.1), tungiasis 19.1% (95% CI: 14.7-24.1), scabies 18.8% (95% CI: 14.4-23.7) and CLM 2.1% (95% CI: 0.8-4.5). Only 28 of 54 patients with scabies, three of 55 patients with tungiasis, four of six patients with CLM and zero of 110 patients with head lice sought medical assistance. The physicians of the PHCC only diagnosed a parasitic skin disease when it was pointed out by the patient himself. In all cases patients were correctly informed about the ectoparasites they carried. The results show that tungiasis and pediculosis, and to a lesser extent scabies and CLM, are hyperendemic but neglected by both population and physicians, and that prevalence rates of tungiasis and scabies at the PHCC do not reflect the true prevalence of these diseases in the community.

  20. Host and parasite diversity jointly control disease risk in complex communities

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Pieter T. J.; Preston, Daniel L.; Hoverman, Jason T.; LaFonte, Bryan E.

    2013-01-01

    Host–parasite interactions are embedded within complex communities composed of multiple host species and a cryptic assemblage of other parasites. To date, however, surprisingly few studies have explored the joint effects of host and parasite richness on disease risk, despite growing interest in the diversity–disease relationship. Here, we combined field surveys and mechanistic experiments to test how transmission of the virulent trematode Ribeiroia ondatrae was affected by the diversity of both amphibian hosts and coinfecting parasites. Within natural wetlands, host and parasite species richness correlated positively, consistent with theoretical predictions. Among sites that supported Ribeiroia, however, host and parasite richness interacted to negatively affect Ribeiroia transmission between its snail and amphibian hosts, particularly in species-poor assemblages. In laboratory and outdoor experiments designed to decouple the relative contributions of host and parasite diversity, increases in host richness decreased Ribeiroia infection by 11–65%. Host richness also tended to decrease total infections by other parasite species (four of six instances), such that more diverse host assemblages exhibited ∼40% fewer infections overall. Importantly, parasite richness further reduced both per capita and total Ribeiroia infection by 15–20%, possibly owing to intrahost competition among coinfecting species. These findings provide evidence that parasitic and free-living diversity jointly regulate disease risk, help to resolve apparent contradictions in the diversity–disease relationship, and emphasize the challenges of integrating research on coinfection and host heterogeneity to develop a community ecology-based approach to infectious diseases. PMID:24082092

  1. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in the Batken Region, Kyrgyz Republic].

    PubMed

    Toĭgombaeva, V S

    2009-01-01

    The paper compares the data of parasitological studies made according to the plan and epidemiological indications with the results of screening surveys of 1256 children from the Batken Region. The proportion of positive findings at the laboratories of therapeutic-and-prophylactic institutions was found to total 4.5%. According to the results of the screening surveys, the invasiveness was more than 100% with mixed invasions being kept in mind. Analysis of replies to questionnaires suggests that there was a high risk of infection in children. Thus, 84% of the respondents had bad habits; 62% did not wash fruits before eating. The Batken Region's population including 345984 persons was dehelmintized. The screening surveys carried out after dehelmintization revealed no ascarid eggs in 637 children. Health education on the prevention of parasitic diseases was simultaneously conducted.

  2. Global change, parasite transmission and disease control: lessons from ecology

    PubMed Central

    Boag, Brian; Ellison, Amy R.; Morgan, Eric R.; Murray, Kris; Pascoe, Emily L.; Sait, Steven M.; Booth, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Parasitic infections are ubiquitous in wildlife, livestock and human populations, and healthy ecosystems are often parasite rich. Yet, their negative impacts can be extreme. Understanding how both anticipated and cryptic changes in a system might affect parasite transmission at an individual, local and global level is critical for sustainable control in humans and livestock. Here we highlight and synthesize evidence regarding potential effects of ‘system changes’ (both climatic and anthropogenic) on parasite transmission from wild host–parasite systems. Such information could inform more efficient and sustainable parasite control programmes in domestic animals or humans. Many examples from diverse terrestrial and aquatic natural systems show how abiotic and biotic factors affected by system changes can interact additively, multiplicatively or antagonistically to influence parasite transmission, including through altered habitat structure, biodiversity, host demographics and evolution. Despite this, few studies of managed systems explicitly consider these higher-order interactions, or the subsequent effects of parasite evolution, which can conceal or exaggerate measured impacts of control actions. We call for a more integrated approach to investigating transmission dynamics, which recognizes these complexities and makes use of new technologies for data capture and monitoring, and to support robust predictions of altered parasite dynamics in a rapidly changing world. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Opening the black box: re-examining the ecology and evolution of parasite transmission’. PMID:28289256

  3. The Impact of Cultural Behaviours, Local Beliefs, and Practices on Emerging Parasitic Diseases in Tropical Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onwuliri, Celestine O. E.; Anosike, Jude C.; Oguoma, Chibuzor; Onwuliri, Viola A.; Nwoke, Betram E. B.; Dozie, Ikechukwu, N. S.; Iwuala, Moses O. E.

    2005-01-01

    The scourge of emerging parasitic diseases (e.g., urinary schistosomiasis, ascariasis, malaria, chagas disease, leishmaniasis, trachoma, trichiuriasis, taeniasis, dracunculiasis, sleeping sickness, filariasis) causes tremendous pain, suffering, and eventually death in tropical African communities. Patterns of transmission of these emerging…

  4. The butterfly effect: parasite diversity, environment, and emerging disease in aquatic wildlife.

    PubMed

    Adlard, Robert D; Miller, Terrence L; Smit, Nico J

    2015-04-01

    Aquatic wildlife is increasingly subjected to emerging diseases often due to perturbations of the existing dynamic balance between hosts and their parasites. Accelerating changes in environmental factors, together with anthropogenic translocation of hosts and parasites, act synergistically to produce hard-to-predict disease outcomes in freshwater and marine systems. These outcomes are further complicated by the intimate links between diseases in wildlife and diseases in humans and domestic animals. Here, we explore the interactions of parasites in aquatic wildlife in terms of their biodiversity, their response to environmental change, their emerging diseases, and the contribution of humans and domestic animals to parasitic disease outcomes. This work highlights the clear need for interdisciplinary approaches to ameliorate disease impacts in aquatic wildlife systems.

  5. Global parasite and Rattus rodent invasions: The consequences for rodent-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Morand, Serge; Bordes, Frédéric; Chen, Hsuan-Wien; Claude, Julien; Cosson, Jean-François; Galan, Maxime; Czirják, Gábor Á; Greenwood, Alex D; Latinne, Alice; Michaux, Johan; Ribas, Alexis

    2015-09-01

    We summarize the current knowledge on parasitism-related invasion processes of the globally invasive Rattus lineages, originating from Asia, and how these invasions have impacted the local epidemiology of rodent-borne diseases. Parasites play an important role in the invasion processes and successes of their hosts through multiple biological mechanisms such as "parasite release," "immunocompetence advantage," "biotic resistance" and "novel weapon." Parasites may also greatly increase the impact of invasions by spillover of parasites and other pathogens, introduced with invasive hosts, into new hosts, potentially leading to novel emerging diseases. Another potential impact is the ability of the invader to amplify local parasites by spillback. In both cases, local fauna and humans may be exposed to new health risks, which may decrease biodiversity and potentially cause increases in human morbidity and mortality. Here we review the current knowledge on these processes and propose some research priorities.

  6. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease diagnosed in utero. Review.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Magdalena; Huras, Hubert; Wiecheć, Marcin; Jach, Robert; Radoń-Pokracka, Małgorzata; Górecka, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of most common inherited renal diseases. It is estimated that very early onset ADPKD affects even 2% patients. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of genetics, prenatal diagnosis and prognosis in very early onset autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  7. Impacts of parasite infection on columnaris disease of tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is no information available on whether parasite infection will increase the susceptibility of tilapia to Flavobacterium columnare and whether parasite treatment could improve fish survival after F. columnare exposure. Two trials were conducted to evaluate 1) the susceptibility of hybrid tilapi...

  8. Ocular parasitic diseases: a review on toxocariasis and diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Rafael T; Ramirez, Gema; Collet, Lucienne; Giuliari, Gian Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic infections may damage various ocular tissues, thereby causing visual dysfunction. In 1950, Wilder described the first case in which larval forms of nematodal intestinal roundworms (Ascaridoidea: Ascaris, Toxocara, Ancylostoma, Necator, and Strongyloides) were implicated as a cause of intraocular disease. This review focuses on two disorders associated with parasitic infections: ocular toxocariasis and diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis.

  9. Interest of antioxidant agents in parasitic diseases. The case study of coumarins.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Guiñez, Roberto; Matos, Maria João; Vazquez-Rodriguez, Saleta; Santana, Lourdes; Uriarte, Eugenio; Borges, Fernanda; Olea-Azar, Claudio; Maya, Juan Diego

    2015-01-01

    Tropical parasitic diseases, especially those produced by protozoan parasites, are a major public health problem in many countries, and their impact in the health burden is significant. Oxidative processes proved to be related to these diseases, being the antioxidant agents promising therapeutic solutions for them. Therefore, this review provides an overview of published manuscripts regarding both activities. In particular, the interest of the coumarin derivatives as antioxidant agents with application in parasitic diseases is discussed in this manuscript. The recent findings in this field are highlighted.

  10. Nuclear receptors: emerging drug targets for parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Schaffer, Nathaniel E; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2017-02-06

    Parasitic worms infect billions of people worldwide. Current treatments rely on a small group of drugs that have been used for decades. A shortcoming of these drugs is their inability to target the intractable infectious stage of the parasite. As well-known therapeutic targets in mammals, nuclear receptors have begun to be studied in parasitic worms, where they are widely distributed and play key roles in governing metabolic and developmental transcriptional networks. One such nuclear receptor is DAF-12, which is required for normal nematode development, including the all-important infectious stage. Here we review the emerging literature that implicates DAF-12 and potentially other nuclear receptors as novel anthelmintic targets.

  11. Gene-deleted live-attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as vaccines to protect against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Valdéz, Fernando J; Pérez Brandán, Cecilia; Ferreira, Arturo; Basombrío, Miguel Ángel

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This illness is now becoming global, mainly due to congenital transmission, and so far, there are no prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines available to either prevent or treat Chagas disease. Therefore, different approaches aimed at identifying new protective immunogens are urgently needed. Live vaccines are likely to be more efficient in inducing protection, but safety issues linked with their use have been raised. The development of improved protozoan genetic manipulation tools and genomic and biological information has helped to increase the safety of live vaccines. These advances have generated a renewed interest in the use of genetically attenuated parasites as vaccines against Chagas disease. This review discusses the protective capacity of genetically attenuated parasite vaccines and the challenges and perspectives for the development of an effective whole-parasite Chagas disease vaccine.

  12. Hemorheological Alteration in Patients Clinically Diagnosed with Chronic Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since liver function is changed by chronic liver diseases, chronic liver disease can lead to different hemorheological alterations during the course of the progression. This study aims to compare alterations in whole blood viscosity in patients with chronic liver disease, focusing on the gender effect. Chronic liver diseases were classified into three categories by patient’s history, serologic markers, and radiologic findings: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 63), chronic viral hepatitis B and C (n = 50), and liver cirrhosis (LC) (n = 35). Whole blood viscosity was measured by automated scanning capillary tube viscometer, while liver stiffness was measured by transient elastography using FibroScan®. Both systolic and diastolic whole blood viscosities were significantly lower in patients with LC than NAFLD and chronic viral hepatitis (P < 0.001) in male patients, but not in female patients. In correlation analysis, there were inverse relationships between both systolic and diastolic whole blood viscosity and liver stiffness (systolic: r = −0.25, diastolic: r = −0.22). Whole blood viscosity was significantly lower in male patients with LC than NAFLD or chronic viral hepatitis. Our data suggest that whole blood viscosity test can become a useful tool for classifying chronic liver disease and determining the prognosis for different types of chronic liver diseases. PMID:27822933

  13. Hemorheological Alteration in Patients Clinically Diagnosed with Chronic Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bohyun; Han, Ji Won; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Jeong Won; Bae, Si Hyun; Choi, Jong Young; Cho, Young I; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2016-12-01

    Since liver function is changed by chronic liver diseases, chronic liver disease can lead to different hemorheological alterations during the course of the progression. This study aims to compare alterations in whole blood viscosity in patients with chronic liver disease, focusing on the gender effect. Chronic liver diseases were classified into three categories by patient's history, serologic markers, and radiologic findings: nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 63), chronic viral hepatitis B and C (n = 50), and liver cirrhosis (LC) (n = 35). Whole blood viscosity was measured by automated scanning capillary tube viscometer, while liver stiffness was measured by transient elastography using FibroScan®. Both systolic and diastolic whole blood viscosities were significantly lower in patients with LC than NAFLD and chronic viral hepatitis (P < 0.001) in male patients, but not in female patients. In correlation analysis, there were inverse relationships between both systolic and diastolic whole blood viscosity and liver stiffness (systolic: r = -0.25, diastolic: r = -0.22). Whole blood viscosity was significantly lower in male patients with LC than NAFLD or chronic viral hepatitis. Our data suggest that whole blood viscosity test can become a useful tool for classifying chronic liver disease and determining the prognosis for different types of chronic liver diseases.

  14. [Use of geographical information systems in parasitic diseases and the importance of animal health economics].

    PubMed

    Ciçek, Hasan; Ciçek, Hatice; Senkul, Cetin; Tandoğan, Murat

    2008-01-01

    In the world, economical losses due to the parasitic diseases reach enormous ratios in animal production. Both developed and developing countries set aside a considerable budget to control these parasitic diseases. This situation aids in the improvement of control methods of parasitic diseases. Also, it causes new ways of investigation that includes observation, evaluation and prevention of parasitic diseases. The Geographical Information System (GIS) has recently become one of the most common methods utilized to provide disease information technology with computer supported technology in many countries. The most important qualities of GIS are the formation of a powerful database, continual updating and rapid provision of coordination related to units. Many factors are evaluated at the same time by the system and also, results from analysis of data related to disease and their causes could reduce or prevent economical losses due to parasitic disease. In this study, possible uses of Geographical Information Systems against parasitic diseases and an approach in terms of animal health economics were presented.

  15. Other vector-borne parasitic diseases: animal helminthiases, bovine besnoitiosis and malaria.

    PubMed

    Duvallet, G; Boireau, P

    2015-08-01

    The parasitic diseases discussed elsewhere in this issue of the Scientific and Technical Review are not the only ones to make use of biological vectors (such as mosquitoes or ticks) or mechanical vectors (such as horse flies or Stomoxys flies). The authors discuss two major groups of vector-borne parasitic diseases: firstly, helminthiasis, along with animal filariasis and onchocerciasis, which are parasitic diseases that often take a heavytoll on artiodactylsthroughoutthe world; secondly, parasitic diseases caused by vector-borne protists, foremost of which is bovine besnoitiosis (or anasarca of cattle), which has recently spread through Europe by a dual mode of transmission (direct and by vector). Other protists, such as Plasmodium and Hepatozoon, are also described briefly.

  16. Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system: lessons for clinicians and policy makers.

    PubMed

    Carpio, Arturo; Romo, Matthew L; Parkhouse, R M E; Short, Brooke; Dua, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system are associated with high mortality and morbidity, especially in resource-limited settings. The burden of these diseases is amplified as survivors are often left with neurologic sequelae affecting mobility, sensory organs, and cognitive functions, as well as seizures/epilepsy. These diseases inflict suffering by causing lifelong disabilities, reducing economic productivity, and causing social stigma. The complexity of parasitic life cycles and geographic specificities, as well as overlapping clinical manifestations in the host reflecting the diverse pathogenesis of parasites, can present diagnostic challenges. We herein provide an overview of these parasitic diseases and summarize clinical aspects, diagnosis, therapeutic strategies and recent milestones, and aspects related to prevention and control.

  17. Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system: lessons for clinicians and policy makers

    PubMed Central

    Carpio, Arturo; Romo, Matthew L.; Parkhouse, R. M. E.; Short, Brooke; Dua, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system are associated with high mortality and morbidity, especially in resource-limited settings. The burden of these diseases is amplified as survivors are often left with neurologic sequelae affecting mobility, sensory organs, and cognitive functions, as well as seizures/epilepsy. These diseases inflict suffering by causing lifelong disabilities, reducing economic productivity, and causing social stigma. The complexity of parasitic life cycles and geographic specificities, as well as overlapping clinical manifestations in the host reflecting the diverse pathogenesis of parasites, can present diagnostic challenges. We herein provide an overview of these parasitic diseases and summarize clinical aspects, diagnosis, therapeutic strategies and recent milestones, and aspects related to prevention and control. PMID:26894629

  18. [Diagnosing Alzheimer's disease: from research to clinical practice and ethics].

    PubMed

    Tarquini, Daniela; Pucci, Eugenio; Gasparini, Maddalena; Zullo, Silvia; Tiraboschi, Pietro; Bonito, Virginio; Defanti, Carlo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the so-called Dubois criteria introduced the use of biomarkers in research (in particular, brain amyloid positron emission tomography imaging and the cerebrospinal fluid levels of tau/fosfo-tau and beta-amyloid 1-42) for the early or preclinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Even so, we are looking at an increased use of these markers in clinical practice. In the 1960s, Alzheimer's disease was considered a rare form of presenile dementia, but gradually it has been recognized as the prevalent form of old-age dementia. As a consequence, what was once regarded as an inevitable outcome of old age is now recognized as a true disease. Several factors contributed to this paradigm shift, in particular a longer lifespan, new techniques of in vivo study of the central nervous system, and the pressure exerted by the pharmaceutical industry and patient groups. The current lack of disease-modifying therapies and the high incidence of mild cognitive impairment, which is a risk factor for dementia, raise a series of clinical ethical problems ranging from how diagnosis is communicated to how resources are used. This article offers a conceptual scheme through which these issues can be addressed.

  19. Estrogen-related and other disease diagnoses preceding Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dybdahl, Merete; Destefano, Anita L; Myers, Richard H; Lash, Timothy L

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Estrogen exposure has been associated with the occurrence of Parkinson’s disease (PD), as well as many other disorders, and yet the mechanisms underlying these relations are often unknown. While it is likely that estrogen exposure modifies the risk of various diseases through many different mechanisms, some estrogen-related disease processes might work in similar manners and result in association between the diseases. Indeed, the association between diseases need not be due only to estrogen-related factors, but due to similar disease processes from a variety of mechanisms. Patients and methods: All female Parkinson’s disease cases between 1982 and 2007 (n = 12,093) were identified from the Danish National Registry of Patients, along with 10 controls matched by years of birth and enrollment. Conditional logistic regressions (CLR) were used to calculate risk of PD after diagnosis of the estrogen-related diseases, endometriosis and osteoporosis, conditioning on years of birth and enrollment. To identify novel associations between PD and any other preceding conditions, CLR was also used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) for risk of PD for 202 different categories of preceding disease diagnoses. Empirical Bayes methods were used to identify the robust associations from the over 200 associations produced by this analysis. Results: We found a positive association between osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures and PD (OR = 1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] of 1.08–1.28), while a lack of association was observed between endometriosis and PD (OR = 1.37, 95% CI 0.99–1.90). Using empirical Bayes analyses, 24 additional categories of diseases, likely unrelated to estrogen exposure, were also identified as potentially associated with PD. Conclusion: We identified several novel associations, which may provide insight into common causal mechanisms between the diseases or greater understanding of potential early preclinical signs of PD. In particular, the

  20. A preface on advances in diagnostics for infectious and parasitic diseases: detecting parasites of medical and veterinary importance.

    PubMed

    Stothard, J Russell; Adams, Emily

    2014-12-01

    There are many reasons why detection of parasites of medical and veterinary importance is vital and where novel diagnostic and surveillance tools are required. From a medical perspective alone, these originate from a desire for better clinical management and rational use of medications. Diagnosis can be at the individual-level, at close to patient settings in testing a clinical suspicion or at the community-level, perhaps in front of a computer screen, in classification of endemic areas and devising appropriate control interventions. Thus diagnostics for parasitic diseases has a broad remit as parasites are not only tied with their definitive hosts but also in some cases with their vectors/intermediate hosts. Application of current diagnostic tools and decision algorithms in sustaining control programmes, or in elimination settings, can be problematic and even ill-fitting. For example in resource-limited settings, are current diagnostic tools sufficiently robust for operational use at scale or are they confounded by on-the-ground realities; are the diagnostic algorithms underlying public health interventions always understood and well-received within communities which are targeted for control? Within this Special Issue (SI) covering a variety of diseases and diagnostic settings some answers are forthcoming. An important theme, however, throughout the SI is to acknowledge that cross-talk and continuous feedback between development and application of diagnostic tests is crucial if they are to be used effectively and appropriately.

  1. Susceptibility, likelihood to be diagnosed, worry and fear for contracting Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Joshua; Chawla, Gurasees S

    Risk perception and psychological concerns are relevant for understanding how people view Lyme disease. This study investigates the four separate outcomes of susceptibility, likelihood to be diagnosed, worry, and fear for contracting Lyme disease. University students (n=713) were surveyed about demographics, perceived health, Lyme disease knowledge, Lyme disease preventive behaviors, Lyme disease history, and Lyme disease miscellaneous variables. We found that women were associated with increased susceptibility and fear. Asian/Asian-American race/ethnicity was associated with increased worry and fear. Perceived good health was associated with increased likelihood to be diagnosed, worry, and fear. Correct knowledge was associated with increased susceptibility and likelihood to be diagnosed. Those who typically spend a lot of time outdoors were associated with increased susceptibility, likelihood to be diagnosed, worry, and fear. In conclusion, healthcare providers and public health campaigns should address susceptibility, likelihood to be diagnosed, worry, and fear about Lyme disease, and should particularly target women and Asians/Asian-Americans to address any possible misconceptions and/or offer effective coping strategies.

  2. Interacting parasites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Parasitism is the most popular life-style on Earth, and many vertebrates host more than one kind of parasite at a time. A common assumption is that parasite species rarely interact, because they often exploit different tissues in a host, and this use of discrete resources limits competition (1). On page 243 of this issue, however, Telfer et al. (2) provide a convincing case of a highly interactive parasite community in voles, and show how infection with one parasite can affect susceptibility to others. If some human parasites are equally interactive, our current, disease-by-disease approach to modeling and treating infectious diseases is inadequate (3).

  3. Pilot study: peripheral biomarkers for diagnosing sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Grünblatt, Edna; Zehetmayer, Sonja; Jacob, Christian P; Müller, Thomas; Jost, Wolfgang H; Riederer, Peter

    2010-12-01

    The need for an early and differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is undoubtedly one of the main quests of the century. An early biomarker would enable therapy to begin sooner and would, hopefully, slow or better prevent progression of the disease. We performed transcript profiling via quantitative RT-PCR in RNA originating from peripheral blood samples. The groups were de novo (n = 11) and medicated PD (n = 94) subjects and healthy controls (n = 34), while for negative control Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 14) subjects were recruited as an additional neurodegenerative disease. The results were retested on a second recruitment consisting 22 medicated PD subjects versus 33 controls and 12 AD. Twelve transcripts were chosen as candidate genes, according to previous postmortem brain profiling. Multiple analyses resulted in four significant genes: proteasome (prosome, macropain) subunit-alpha type-2 (PSMA2; p = 0.0002, OR = 1.15 95% CI 1.07-1.24), laminin, beta-2 (laminin S) (LAMB2; p = 0.0078, OR = 2.26 95% CI 1.24-4.14), aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family-member A1 (ALDH1A1; p = 0.016, OR = 1.05 95% CI 1.01-1.1), and histone cluster-1 H3e (HIST1H3E; p = 0.03, OR = 0.975 95% CI 0.953-0.998) differentiating between medicated PD subjects versus controls. Using these four biomarkers for PD diagnosis, we achieved sensitivity and specificity of more than 80%. These biomarkers might be specific for PD diagnosis, since in AD subjects no significant results were observed. In the second validation, three genes (PSMA2, LAMB2 and ALDH1A1) demonstrated high reproducibility. This result supports previous studies of gene expression profiling and may facilitate the development of biomarkers for early diagnosis of PD.

  4. Diagnosing the dead: the retrospective analysis of genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rushton, A R

    2013-01-01

    The suspected presence of hereditary disease in important historical and political figures has interested researchers for many decades. Whether Abraham Lincoln suffered from Marfan syndrome, if George III became 'mad' because he inherited variegate porphyria, and if the Romanov dynasty collapsed because the heir Alexei inherited haemophilia are important questions; physical illness can adversely affect the ability of leaders to function within the social and political realm of their day. This article will outline an approach to such a medical-historical analysis including assessment of hereditary predisposition, family history and the use of DNA technology to confirm or deny the clinical suspicions of the investigator.

  5. Application of plant impedance for diagnosing plant disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huirong; Jiang, Xuesong; Zhu, Shengpan; Ying, Yibin

    2006-10-01

    Biological cells have components acting as electrical elements that maintain the health of the cell by regulation of the electrical charge content. Plant impedance is decided by the state of plant physiology and pathology. Plant physiology and pathology can be studies by measuring plant impedance. The effect of Cucumber Mosaic Virus red bean isolate (CMV-RB) on electrical resistance of tomato leaves was studied by the method of impedance measurement. It was found that the value of resistance of tomato leaves infected with CMV-RB was smaller than that in sound plant leaves. This decrease of impedances in leaf tissue was occurred with increased severity of disease. The decrease of resistance of tomato leaves infected with CMV-RB could be detected by electrical resistance detecting within 4 days after inoculation even though significant visible differences between the control and the infected plants were not noted, so that the technique for measurement of tomato leaf tissue impedance is a rapid, clever, simple method on diagnosis of plant disease.

  6. Corticosteroids increase protein breakdown and loss in newly diagnosed pediatric Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Steven J; Noe, Joshua D; Denne, Scott C

    2011-11-01

    Children with Crohn disease have altered growth and body composition. Previous studies have demonstrated decreased protein breakdown after either corticosteroid or anti-TNF-α therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whole body protein metabolism during corticosteroid therapy in children with newly diagnosed Crohn disease. Children with suspected Crohn disease and children with abdominal symptoms not consistent with Crohn disease underwent outpatient metabolic assessment. Patients diagnosed with Crohn disease and prescribed corticosteroid therapy returned in 2 wk for repeat metabolic assessment. Using the stable isotopes [d5] phenylalanine, [1-(13)C] leucine, and [(15)N(2)] urea, protein kinetics were determined in the fasting state. Thirty-one children (18 controls and 13 newly diagnosed with Crohn disease) completed the study. There were no significant differences in protein breakdown or loss between patients with Crohn disease at diagnosis and controls. After corticosteroid therapy in patients with Crohn disease, the rates of appearance of phenylalanine (32%) and leucine (26%) increased significantly, reflecting increased protein breakdown, and the rate of appearance of urea also increased significantly (273%), reflecting increased protein loss. Whole body protein breakdown and loss increased significantly after 2 wk of corticosteroid therapy in children with newly diagnosed Crohn disease, which may have profound effects on body composition.

  7. [Advances in research of dihydroartemisinin against parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Jun; Wang, Wei; Liang, You-Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Dihydroartemisinin, the main metabolite of artemisinin and two artemisinin derivatives, artemether and artesunate, is a broad-spectrum anti-parasitic drug. The present paper systematically reviews the advances in research of dihydroartemisinin against Plasmodium, Schistosoma, Pneumocystis, Toxoplasma, Trichomonas vaginalis, Leishmania, Giardia lamblia.

  8. Natural Products as Source of Therapeutics against Parasitic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hertweck, Christian

    2015-12-01

    An end to suffering: Parasitic infections with protozoa and worms cause unimaginable misery, in particular in the tropics. Fortunately, natural products, such as the antimalarial artemisinin (1) and the anthelmintic avermectin (2) were discovered and developed into therapeutics. These major achievements now culminated in the 2015 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

  9. Managing the patient with newly diagnosed Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Singer, Carlos

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of early Parkinson disease (PD) is generally symptomatic, although therapy that also offers neuroprotection in early-stage PD would be welcomed. Levodopa remains the most effective agent for relief of PD symptoms, but chronic levodopa therapy is associated with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, and clinicians may therefore opt to postpone its use. Alternatives to levodopa in early PD include monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitors, amantadine, and dopamine agonists. MAO-B inhibitors have only mild symptomatic effects. Amantadine is associated with improvement in functional disability and, in a subset of PD patients, a robust symptomatic improvement. Dopamine agonists improve symptoms and may have a neuroprotective effect. Partial dopamine agonists, adenosine A(2A)-receptor antagonists, and safinamide are symptomatic therapies that are under investigation. Neuro protective strategies under study include enhancement of mitochondrial function, antiinflammatory mechanisms, calcium channel blockade, and uric acid elevation. Deep brain stimulation may slow cognitive and motor decline when used in early PD. Stem cell therapy and gene therapy are still under investigation.

  10. Diagnosing and treating renal disease in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis is mostly related to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), precipitated by either an acute disturbance of hemodynamics, or acute structural damage to the kidneys. The incidence of chronic renal failure is rising, due to increasing prevalence of conditions such as diabetes, viral hepatitis, which can be associated with renal damage. AKI is defined as a rise in serum creatinine of 0.3 mg/dL in <48 hours or by 50% from baseline within the past 3 months without setting a threshold for the final serum creatinine. Stages 1, 2, and 3 of AKI are defined as 150%, 200% and 300% of baseline serum creatinine respectively, which allows for assessment of AKI progression. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min for >3 months. Treatment of AKI consists of removal of precipitating factors and replenishment of the intravascular volume using colloids such as albumin. Frequently, AKI can be reversed using these measures alone. Non-responders to removal of precipitating factors and volume challenge can receive vasoconstrictors such as terlipressin or norepinephrine together with albumin. Midodrine is inferior in efficacy as a vasoconstrictor when compared to terlipressin. Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for type 1 hepatorenal syndrome with liver failure. Delay in receiving a liver transplant can result in non-recovery of renal function post transplant. Treatment of CKD in cirrhosis is unsatisfactory, mostly aimed at optimizing management of comorbid conditions, or treating the underlying refractory ascites in patients with type 2 hepatorenal syndrome.

  11. [Endemic, Trend, Research and Direction of Food-borne Parasitic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Yu, Xin-bing

    2015-12-01

    Food-borne parasitic diseases are exhibiting new epidemiological characteristics in such society that is filled with economic development, ecological environmental changes, more frequent population flow, as well as diversities of dietary source and style. The food-borne parasitic diseases have become a major risk factor for food safety and health care, and a global public health problem. In this review, we will give an overview on the epidemiological information of some major food-borne parasitic diseases both in China and in the world, and summarize their emerging characteristics and epidemiological trends. Research on the prevention techniques and pathogenesis of the diseases is reviewed as well. Finally, perspectives are given on the diagnosis/detection, basic mechanisms of the diseases, and the strategies for prevention and transmission interruption.

  12. Hospitalisation due to infectious and parasitic diseases in District Civil Hospital, Belgaum, Karnataka.

    PubMed

    Naik, A C; Bhat, S; Kholkute, S D

    2008-01-01

    To assess the burden of infectious and parasitic diseases on hospital services at District Civil Hospital (DCH) Belgaum, a retrospective study was carried out using discharge records concerning 8506 inpatients due to infectious and parasitic diseases among 95,655 patients admitted for all causes during the reference period 2000-2003. Out of the 21 causes of infectious and parasitic diseases, only 5 contributed maximally towards hospital admission. The most frequent cause was intestinal infections (44.0%) followed by tuberculosis (35.4%). 57.5% of these admissions were from the productive age group of 20-54 years. Tuberculosis is the most important disease in terms of hospital bed days (59.7%). Tuberculosis and intestinal infectious diseases represent more than three-fourth of the overall burden in terms of hospital bed days.

  13. Diagnosing infection levels of four human malaria parasite species by a polymerase chain reaction/ligase detection reaction fluorescent microsphere-based assay.

    PubMed

    McNamara, David T; Kasehagen, Laurin J; Grimberg, Brian T; Cole-Tobian, Jennifer; Collins, William E; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2006-03-01

    Improving strategies for diagnosing infection by the four human Plasmodium species parasites is important as field-based epidemiologic and clinical studies focused on malaria become more ambitious. Expectations for malaria diagnostic assays include rapid processing with minimal expertise, very high specificity and sensitivity, and quantitative evaluation of parasitemia to be delivered at a very low cost. Toward fulfilling many of these expectations, we have developed a post-polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/ligase detection reaction-fluorescent microsphere assay (LDR-FMA). This assay, which uses Luminex FlexMAP microspheres, provides simultaneous, semi-quantitative detection of infection by all four human malaria parasite species at a sensitivity and specificity equal to other PCR-based assays. In blinded studies using P. falciparum-infected blood from in vitro cultures, we identified infected and uninfected samples with 100% concordance. Additionally, in analyses of P. falciparum in vitro cultures and P. vivax-infected monkeys, comparisons between parasitemia and LDR-FMA signal intensity showed very strong positive correlations (r > 0.95). Application of this multiplex Plasmodium species LDR-FMA diagnostic assay will increase the speed, accuracy, and reliability of diagnosing human Plasmodium species infections in epidemiologic studies of complex malaria-endemic settings.

  14. Parasites: Water

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Water Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Parasites can live in natural water sources. When outdoors, treat your water before drinking ...

  15. [How can serology contribute to the diagnosis of parasitic diseases?].

    PubMed

    Kramme, S; Marti, H; Genton, B; Hatz, C

    2011-05-11

    From a technical standpoint the most widely used tests for serology include the ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), the IFA (indirect fluorescence assay), and the immunoblot. ELISA tests are widely used as screening assays since they harbor a high sensitivity. The main pitfall of serologies is the frequency of cross-reactions, especially between the different helminths. This is why positive results should be confirmed by a second test method with a higher specificity. Results need also to be put in the perspective of the patient history, clinical signs and laboratory findings. Serological tests are most appropriate when the parasite cannot be documented by direct examination (by eye or under the microscope) and during the pre-patent period. Serologies for parasites are also useful when an unexplained eosinophilia is present.

  16. Diagnosing coronary artery disease with a backpropagation neural network: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D.; Holmes, E.R.

    1995-12-31

    The SPECT (single photon emitted computed tomography) procedure, while widely used for diagnosing coronary artery disease, is not a perfect technology. We have investigated using a backpropagation neural network to diagnose patients suffering from coronary artery disease that is independent from the SPECT procedure. The raw thallium-201 scintigrams produced before the SPECT tomographic reconstruction were used as input patterns for the backpropagation neural network, and the diagnoses resulting mainly from cardiac catheterization as the desired outputs for each pattern. Several preprocessing techniques were applied to the scintigrams, in an attempt to improve the information to noise ratio. After using the a procedure that extracted a subimage containing the heart from each scintigram, we used a data reduction technique, thereby encoding the scintigram in 12 values, which were the inputs to the backpropagation neural network. The network was then trained. This network per-formed superbly for patients suffering from inferolateral disease (classifying 10 out of 10 correctly), but performance was less than optimal for cases involving other coronary zones. While the scope of this project was limited to diagnosing coronary artery disease, this initial work can be extended to other medical imaging procedures, such as diagnosing breast cancer from a mammogram and evaluating lung perfusion studies.

  17. [SWOT Analysis of the National Survey on Current Status of Major Human Parasitic Diseases in China].

    PubMed

    ZHU, Hui-hui; ZHOU, Chang-hai; CHEN, Ying-dan; ZANG, Wei; XIAO, Ning; ZHOU, Xiao-nong

    2015-10-01

    The National Survey on Current Status of Major Human Parasitic Diseases in China has been carried out since 2014 under the organization of the National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China. The National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (NIPD, China CDC) provided technical support and was responsible for quality control in this survey. This study used SWOT method to analyze the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats that were encountered by he NIPD, China CDC during the completion of the survey. Accordingly, working strategies were proposed to facilitate the future field work.

  18. MicroRNAs in parasitic diseases: potential for diagnosis and targeting.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Román, Raúl; Siles-Lucas, Mar

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of small non-coding RNAs that can down-regulate protein expression by specific mRNA recognition. Evidence is accumulating that the miRNAs are implicated in the course and outcome of infectious and non-infectious diseases. Both parasites specific miRNA sequences and the phenomenon of the alteration of host miRNA levels after parasite infection are known, although detailed information about the direct intervention of parasites in the alteration of host miRNA levels and how this is regulated by parasites at molecular level is still lacking. Circulating miRNAs can be detected in biological fluids as serum, saliva and others, exhibiting a good potential as non-invasive biomarkers. Their ability to function as master regulators of the gene expression and the possibility for a relative easy manipulation of the miRNA machinery and related events, coupled with their apparent lack of adverse events when administered, place miRNAs as promising targets for the treatment of diseases. Moreover, the dependence of parasites over the host cellular machinery to accomplish infection and complete their biological cycles, together with the potential manipulation of host's responses through parasite miRNAs, point out that the miRNA machinery is particularly interesting to seek for alternative therapeutic approaches against parasites. Additionally, the studies about parasitic manipulation of the host immune responses thought miRNAs could broaden our knowledge about basic aspects of the host-parasite relationships.

  19. [Brief discussion on experiences from laboratory certification and accreditation on detection of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan-Hong; Guan, Ya-Yi; Cao, Jian-Ping; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Yan-Juan; Zhang, Min-Qi; Zhou, Xiao-Jun

    2013-12-01

    The laboratory certification and accreditation is the development trend of domestic and international laboratories. The National Institute for Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention passed through the site assessment in September 2012 successfully, 26 items in 8 fields declared were all adopted. This article summarizes some work experiences during carrying out the laboratory certification and accreditation.

  20. A Renal Variant of Fabry Disease Diagnosed by the Presence of Urinary Mulberry Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimohata, Homare; Ogawa, Yujiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of α-galactosidase A. This disease is classified into two types, namely a classical and variant type. We herein present the case of a 36-year-old man who showed a renal variant of Fabry disease and was diagnosed at an early stage by the presence of mulberry cells. He had no history of general symptoms except for proteinuria. The presence of mulberry cells caused us to suspect Fabry disease and he was thereafter diagnosed to have a renal variant of Fabry disease based on the findings of a renal biopsy, a mutation analysis and a low level of α-galactosidase A activity. PMID:27904112

  1. Food plant derived disease tolerance and resistance in a natural butterfly-plant-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Eleanore D; Lefèvre, Thierry; Li, James; de Castillejo, Carlos Lopez Fernandez; Li, Hui; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2012-11-01

    Organisms can protect themselves against parasite-induced fitness costs through resistance or tolerance. Resistance includes mechanisms that prevent infection or limit parasite growth while tolerance alleviates the fitness costs from parasitism without limiting infection. Although tolerance and resistance affect host-parasite coevolution in fundamentally different ways, tolerance has often been ignored in animal-parasite systems. Where it has been studied, tolerance has been assumed to be a genetic mechanism, unaffected by the host environment. Here we studied the effects of host ecology on tolerance and resistance to infection by rearing monarch butterflies on 12 different species of milkweed food plants and infecting them with a naturally occurring protozoan parasite. Our results show that monarch butterflies experience different levels of tolerance to parasitism depending on the species of milkweed that they feed on, with some species providing over twofold greater tolerance than other milkweed species. Resistance was also affected by milkweed species, but there was no relationship between milkweed-conferred resistance and tolerance. Chemical analysis suggests that infected monarchs obtain highest fitness when reared on milkweeds with an intermediate concentration, diversity, and polarity of toxic secondary plant chemicals known as cardenolides. Our results demonstrate that environmental factors-such as interacting species in ecological food webs-are important drivers of disease tolerance.

  2. Differential diagnoses of the heart disease program have better sensitivity than resident physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, H. S.; Long, W. J.; Naimi, S.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a prospective clinical evaluation of a computer program to assist with the diagnosis of heart disease. The Heart Disease Program (HDP) is a large diagnostic program covering most areas of heart disease and some related areas of general medicine. The program's output is a set of differential diagnoses with explanations and it can be deployed in a clinical setting using a web interface. A framework for assessing the complex diagnostic summaries generated by the HDP was developed and the program's diagnostic accuracy in a clinical setting was assessed. The diagnoses used for comparison came from the physician entering the case, a "gold standard" assigned by review of patient charts and investigations, and the opinions of expert cardiologists. The data collection, methods of comparison, example analyses and results on 114 cases are presented here. The HDP had a significantly higher sensitivity for both the gold standard (60%) and the cardiologist's diagnoses (58%) than the physicians did (39%, 34%). These findings were consistent in the 2 collection cohorts and for the more serious diagnoses alone. The significance of these findings and the many challenges in comparing these different diagnoses and minimizing bias are discussed. Images Figure 2 PMID:9929294

  3. Network transmission inference: host behavior and parasite life cycle make social networks meaningful in disease ecology.

    PubMed

    Grear, Daniel A; Luong, Lien T; Hudson, Peter J

    2013-12-01

    The process of disease transmission is determined by the interaction of host susceptibility and exposure to parasite infectious stages. Host behavior is an important determinant of the likelihood of exposure to infectious stages but is difficult to measure and often assumed to be homogenous in models of disease spread. We evaluated the importance of precisely defining host contact when using networks that estimate exposure and predict infection prevalence in a replicated, empirical system. In particular, we hypothesized that infection patterns would be predicted only by a contact network that is defined according to host behavior and parasite life cycle. Two competing host contact criteria were used to construct networks defined by parasite life cycle and social contacts. First, parasite-defined contacts were based on shared space with a time delay corresponding to the environmental development time of nematode parasites with a direct fecal-oral life cycle. Second, social contacts were defined by shared space in the same time period. To quantify the competing networks of exposure and infection, we sampled natural populations of the eastern chipmunk (Tamias striatus) and infection of their gastrointestinal helminth community using replicated longitudinal capture-mark-recapture techniques. We predicted that (1) infection with parasites with direct fecal-oral life cycles would be explained by the time delay contact network, but not the social contact network; (2) infection with parasites with trophic life cycles (via a mobile intermediate host; thus, spatially decoupling transmission from host contact) would not be explained by either contact network. The prevalence of fecal-oral life cycle nematode parasites was strongly correlated to the number and strength of network connections from the parasite-defined network (including the time delay), while the prevalence of trophic life cycle parasites was not correlated with any network metrics. We concluded that

  4. Lived Experiences of Adult Children Who Have a Parent Diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Amy; Hodgson, Jennifer; Lamson, Angela; Dosser, David

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the experience among adult children who have a parent with Parkinson's Disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to explore, appreciate, and describe their experiences using a phenomenological methodology. Narratives were collected from seven participants who have a parent diagnosed with PD and analyzed according to…

  5. Role of Experience and Context in Learning To Diagnose Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakken, Lori L.

    2002-01-01

    Using grounded theory, the learning processes used by nine physicians to diagnose Lyme Disease were investigated. Repetition and counterexperiences served to frame the problem along a continuum of familiarity. Results suggest ways to prepare case studies that include variety, repetition, and counterexperiences to teach diagnosis. (Contains 28…

  6. [ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL RISK FOR CONTAMINATION OF SURFACE WATER RESERVOIRS BY PATHOGENS OF HUMAN PARASITIC DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Khromenkova, E P; Dimidova, L L; Dumbadze, O S; Aidinov, G T; Shendo, G L; Agirov, A Kh; Batchaev, Kh Kh

    2015-01-01

    Sanitary and parasitological studies of the waste effluents and surface reservoir waters were conducted in the south of Russia. The efficiency of purification of waste effluents from the pathogens of parasitic diseases was investigated in the region's sewage-purification facilities. The water of the surface water reservoirs was found to contain helminthic eggs and larvae and intestinal protozoan cysts because of the poor purification and disinfection of service fecal sewage waters. The poor purification and disinvasion of waste effluents in the region determine the potential risk of contamination of the surface water reservoirs and infection of the population with the pathogens of human parasitic diseases.

  7. [Basic features in the current practice of clinical medicine in the tropics (I). Parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Ramos, J M; de Górgolas, M; Cuadros, J; Malmierca, E

    2012-06-01

    In recent years an increasing number of physicians want to spend part of their medical training in health facilities in developing countries. Working in these areas requires good clinical skills, particularly where diagnostic resources are limited. Trainees will attend patients with many different parasitic diseases such as malaria and soil transmitted helminthic infections. The aim of this work is to provide basic concepts of epidemiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of the principal parasitic diseases that could occur in a rural health post in the tropics.

  8. Behçet's disease diagnosed after acute HIV infection: viral replication activating underlying autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Clay; Kinney, Rebecca; Gilles, Ryan; Blue, Sky

    2015-05-01

    Behçet's disease is an autoimmune systemic vasculitis that can occur after exposure to infectious agents. Behçet's disease also has been associated with HIV infection, including de novo development of this condition during chronic HIV infection and resolution of Behçet's disease symptoms following initiation of antiretroviral therapy. We describe a patient who presented with systemic vasculitis with skin and mucous membrane ulcerations in the setting of acute HIV infection, who was eventually diagnosed with Behçet's disease, demonstrating a possible link between acute HIV infection, immune activation and development of autoimmunity.

  9. Immunodominance: a new hypothesis to explain parasite escape and host/parasite equilibrium leading to the chronic phase of Chagas' disease?

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M M; Alencar, B C G de; Claser, C; Tzelepis, F

    2009-03-01

    Intense immune responses are observed during human or experimental infection with the digenetic protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The reasons why such immune responses are unable to completely eliminate the parasites are unknown. The survival of the parasite leads to a parasite-host equilibrium found during the chronic phase of chagasic infection in most individuals. Parasite persistence is recognized as the most likely cause of the chagasic chronic pathologies. Therefore, a key question in Chagas' disease is to understand how this equilibrium is established and maintained for a long period. Understanding the basis for this equilibrium may lead to new approaches to interventions that could help millions of individuals at risk for infection or who are already infected with T. cruzi. Here, we propose that the phenomenon of immunodominance may be significant in terms of regulating the host-parasite equilibrium observed in Chagas' disease. T. cruzi infection restricts the repertoire of specific T cells generating, in some cases, an intense immunodominant phenotype and in others causing a dramatic interference in the response to distinct epitopes. This immune response is sufficiently strong to maintain the host alive during the acute phase carrying them to the chronic phase where transmission usually occurs. At the same time, immunodominance interferes with the development of a higher and broader immune response that could be able to completely eliminate the parasite. Based on this, we discuss how we can interfere with or take advantage of immunodominance in order to provide an immunotherapeutic alternative for chagasic individuals.

  10. Parasitic gastroenteritis in lambs widespread.

    PubMed

    2015-01-24

    Parasitic gastroenteritis diagnosed in lambs by all veterinary investigation centres, Clostridium perfringens epsilon enterotoxaemia suspected in two cows, Comparative quarterly porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome diagnoses reach a 10-year peak, Failure of an entire colony of gulls in Cumbria, Endoparasitism the predominant feature in exotic farmed animals, These are among matters discussed in the Animal and Plant Health Agency's (APHA's) disease surveillance report for September 2014.

  11. Edible vaccines against veterinary parasitic diseases--current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Siju S; Cherian, Susan; Sumithra, T G; Raina, O K; Sankar, M

    2013-04-08

    Protection of domestic animals against parasitic infections remains a major challenge in most of the developing countries, especially in the surge of drug resistant strains. In this circumstance vaccination seems to be the sole practical strategy to combat parasites. Most of the presently available live or killed parasitic vaccines possess many disadvantages. Thus, expression of parasitic antigens has seen a continued interest over the past few decades. However, only a limited success was achieved using bacterial, yeast, insect and mammalian expression systems. This is witnessed by an increasing number of reports on transgenic plant expression of previously reported and new antigens. Oral delivery of plant-made vaccines is particularly attractive due to their exceptional advantages. Moreover, the regulatory burden for veterinary vaccines is less compared to human vaccines. This led to an incredible investment in the field of transgenic plant vaccines for veterinary purpose. Plant based vaccine trials have been conducted to combat various significant parasitic diseases such as fasciolosis, schistosomosis, poultry coccidiosis, porcine cycticercosis and ascariosis. Besides, passive immunization by oral delivery of antibodies expressed in transgenic plants against poultry coccidiosis is an innovative strategy. These trials may pave way to the development of promising edible veterinary vaccines in the near future. As the existing data regarding edible parasitic vaccines are scattered, an attempt has been made to assemble the available literature.

  12. Cardiac Involvement with Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hidron, Alicia; Vogenthaler, Nicholas; Santos-Preciado, José I.; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Rassi, Anis

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Parasitic infections previously seen only in developing tropical settings can be currently diagnosed worldwide due to travel and population migration. Some parasites may directly or indirectly affect various anatomical structures of the heart, with infections manifested as myocarditis, pericarditis, pancarditis, or pulmonary hypertension. Thus, it has become quite relevant for clinicians in developed settings to consider parasitic infections in the differential diagnosis of myocardial and pericardial disease anywhere around the globe. Chagas' disease is by far the most important parasitic infection of the heart and one that it is currently considered a global parasitic infection due to the growing migration of populations from areas where these infections are highly endemic to settings where they are not endemic. Current advances in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis offer hope to prevent not only the neurological complications but also the frequently identified cardiac manifestations of this life-threatening parasitic infection. The lack of effective vaccines, optimal chemoprophylaxis, or evidence-based pharmacological therapies to control many of the parasitic diseases of the heart, in particular Chagas' disease, makes this disease one of the most important public health challenges of our time. PMID:20375355

  13. [SWOT analysis of laboratory certification and accreditation on detection of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan-hong; Zheng, Bin

    2014-04-01

    This study analyzes the strength, weakness, opportunity and threat (SWOT) of laboratory certification and accreditation on detection of parasitic diseases by SWOT analysis comprehensively, and it puts forward some development strategies specifically, in order to provide some indicative references for the further development.

  14. Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans is an important public problem in co-endemic areas in developing countries. However, there is a paucity of studies on co-infection and even fewer reviews. This review examines 44 appropriate papers by PRISMA from 289 papers searched in PubMed via the NCBI Entrez system (no grey literature) up to December 2012 in order to analyze the factors that influence epidemic and host’s immunity of co-infection. The limited evidence in this review indicates that most common parasite species are concurrent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in multiple organs; socio-demographics such as gender and age, special populations with susceptibility such as renal transplant recipients, patients on maintenance haemodialysis, HIV positive patients and migrants, and living in or coming from co-endemic areas are all likely to have an impact on co-infection. Pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases were shown to be risk factors for each other. Co-infection may significantly inhibit the host’s immune system, increase antibacterial therapy intolerance and be detrimental to the prognosis of the disease; in addition, infection with parasitic diseases can alter the protective immune response to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:23522098

  15. Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2013-03-22

    Co-infection of tuberculosis and parasitic diseases in humans is an important public problem in co-endemic areas in developing countries. However, there is a paucity of studies on co-infection and even fewer reviews. This review examines 44 appropriate papers by PRISMA from 289 papers searched in PubMed via the NCBI Entrez system (no grey literature) up to December 2012 in order to analyze the factors that influence epidemic and host's immunity of co-infection. The limited evidence in this review indicates that most common parasite species are concurrent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in multiple organs; socio-demographics such as gender and age, special populations with susceptibility such as renal transplant recipients, patients on maintenance haemodialysis, HIV positive patients and migrants, and living in or coming from co-endemic areas are all likely to have an impact on co-infection. Pulmonary tuberculosis and parasitic diseases were shown to be risk factors for each other. Co-infection may significantly inhibit the host's immune system, increase antibacterial therapy intolerance and be detrimental to the prognosis of the disease; in addition, infection with parasitic diseases can alter the protective immune response to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  16. Environmental change and the dynamics of parasitic diseases in the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Confalonieri, Ulisses E C; Margonari, Carina; Quintão, Ana Flávia

    2014-01-01

    The Amazonian environment is changing rapidly, due to deforestation, in the short term, and, climatic change is projected to alter its forest cover, in the next few decades. These modifications to the, environment have been altering the dynamics of infectious diseases which have natural foci in the, Amazonian biome, especially in its forest. Current land use practices which are changing the, epidemiological profile of the parasitic diseases in the region are road building; logging; mining; expansion of agriculture and cattle ranching and the building of large dams. Malaria and the cutaneous, leishmaniasis are the diseases best known for their rapid changes in response to environmental, modifications. Others such as soil-transmitted helminthiases, filarial infections and toxoplasmosis, which have part of their developmental cycles in the biophysical environment, are also expected to, change rapidly. An interdisciplinary approach and an integrated, international surveillance are needed, to manage the environmentally-driven changes in the Amazonian parasitic diseases in the near future.

  17. Disease, parasite, and commensal prevalences for blue crab Callinectes sapidus at shedding facilities in Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Holly A; Taylor, Sabrina S; Hawke, John P; Schott, Eric J; Anderson Lively, Julie A

    2015-01-15

    Blue crab diseases, parasites, and commensals are not well studied in the Gulf of Mexico, and their prevalence rates have only been sporadically determined. Commercial soft shell shedding facilities in Louisiana experience high mortality rates of pre-molt crabs, and some of these deaths may be attributable to diseases or parasites. During the active shedding season in 2013, we determined the prevalence of shell disease, Vibrio spp., Lagenophrys callinectes, and Hematodinium perezi at 4 commercial shedding facilities along the Louisiana coast. We also detected Ameson michaelis and reo-like virus infections. Shell disease was moderately prevalent at rates above 50% and varied by shedding facility, collection month, and crab size. Vibrio spp. bacteria were prevalent in the hemolymph of 37% of the pre-molt crabs. Lagenophrys callinectes was highly prevalent in the pre-molt crabs, but because it is a commensal species, it may not cause high mortality rates. Hematodinium perezi was absent in all pre-molt crabs.

  18. Parasite biomass-related inflammation, endothelial activation, microvascular dysfunction and disease severity in vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Barber, Bridget E; William, Timothy; Grigg, Matthew J; Parameswaran, Uma; Piera, Kim A; Price, Ric N; Yeo, Tsin W; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax can cause severe malaria, however its pathogenesis is poorly understood. In contrast to P. falciparum, circulating vivax parasitemia is low, with minimal apparent sequestration in endothelium-lined microvasculature, and pathogenesis thought unrelated to parasite biomass. However, the relationships between vivax disease-severity and total parasite biomass, endothelial autocrine activation and microvascular dysfunction are unknown. We measured circulating parasitemia and markers of total parasite biomass (plasma parasite lactate dehydrogenase [pLDH] and PvLDH) in adults with severe (n = 9) and non-severe (n = 53) vivax malaria, and examined relationships with disease-severity, endothelial activation, and microvascular function. Healthy controls and adults with non-severe and severe falciparum malaria were enrolled for comparison. Median peripheral parasitemia, PvLDH and pLDH were 2.4-fold, 3.7-fold and 6.9-fold higher in severe compared to non-severe vivax malaria (p = 0.02, p = 0.02 and p = 0.015, respectively), suggesting that, as in falciparum malaria, peripheral P. vivax parasitemia underestimates total parasite biomass, particularly in severe disease. P. vivax schizonts were under-represented in peripheral blood. Severe vivax malaria was associated with increased angiopoietin-2 and impaired microvascular reactivity. Peripheral vivax parasitemia correlated with endothelial activation (angiopoietin-2, von-Willebrand-Factor [VWF], E-selectin), whereas markers of total vivax biomass correlated only with systemic inflammation (IL-6, IL-10). Activity of the VWF-cleaving-protease, ADAMTS13, was deficient in proportion to endothelial activation, IL-6, thrombocytopenia and vivax disease-severity, and associated with impaired microvascular reactivity in severe disease. Impaired microvascular reactivity correlated with lactate in severe vivax malaria. Findings suggest that tissue accumulation of P. vivax may occur, with the hidden

  19. Parasite Biomass-Related Inflammation, Endothelial Activation, Microvascular Dysfunction and Disease Severity in Vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Bridget E.; William, Timothy; Grigg, Matthew J.; Parameswaran, Uma; Piera, Kim A.; Price, Ric N.; Yeo, Tsin W.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax can cause severe malaria, however its pathogenesis is poorly understood. In contrast to P. falciparum, circulating vivax parasitemia is low, with minimal apparent sequestration in endothelium-lined microvasculature, and pathogenesis thought unrelated to parasite biomass. However, the relationships between vivax disease-severity and total parasite biomass, endothelial autocrine activation and microvascular dysfunction are unknown. We measured circulating parasitemia and markers of total parasite biomass (plasma parasite lactate dehydrogenase [pLDH] and PvLDH) in adults with severe (n = 9) and non-severe (n = 53) vivax malaria, and examined relationships with disease-severity, endothelial activation, and microvascular function. Healthy controls and adults with non-severe and severe falciparum malaria were enrolled for comparison. Median peripheral parasitemia, PvLDH and pLDH were 2.4-fold, 3.7-fold and 6.9-fold higher in severe compared to non-severe vivax malaria (p = 0.02, p = 0.02 and p = 0.015, respectively), suggesting that, as in falciparum malaria, peripheral P. vivax parasitemia underestimates total parasite biomass, particularly in severe disease. P. vivax schizonts were under-represented in peripheral blood. Severe vivax malaria was associated with increased angiopoietin-2 and impaired microvascular reactivity. Peripheral vivax parasitemia correlated with endothelial activation (angiopoietin-2, von-Willebrand-Factor [VWF], E-selectin), whereas markers of total vivax biomass correlated only with systemic inflammation (IL-6, IL-10). Activity of the VWF-cleaving-protease, ADAMTS13, was deficient in proportion to endothelial activation, IL-6, thrombocytopenia and vivax disease-severity, and associated with impaired microvascular reactivity in severe disease. Impaired microvascular reactivity correlated with lactate in severe vivax malaria. Findings suggest that tissue accumulation of P. vivax may occur, with the hidden

  20. Diagnosing Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Accuracy of CSF 14-3-3 Protein Test of the Spinal Fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... JAKOB DISEASE: ACCURACY OF THE 14-3-3 PROTEIN TEST OF THE SPINAL FLUID This information sheet ... help you understand how the 14-3-3 protein test helps in diagnosing sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease ( ...

  1. Progression of the load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases in the State of Amazonas.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marilaine; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Moura, Marco Antonio Saboia; Santos, Eyde Cristianne Saraiva; Saraceni, Valéria; Saraiva, Maria Graças Gomes

    2015-01-01

    In the State of Amazonas, Brazil, urban expansion together with precarious basic sanitation conditions and human settlement on river banks has contributed to the persistence of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases. Time series of the recorded cases of cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A and leptospirosis are described, using data from different levels of the surveillance systems. The sources for intestinal parasitosis prevalence data (non-compulsory reporting in Brazil) were Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Literatura Latino-Americana (LILACS) and the annals of major scientific meetings. Relevant papers and abstracts in all languages were accessed by two independent reviewers. The references cited by each relevant paper were scrutinized to locate additional papers. Despite its initial dissemination across the entire State of Amazonas, cholera was controlled in 1998. The magnitude of typhoid fever has decreased; however, a pattern characterized by eventual outbreaks still remains. Leptospirosis is an increasing cause of concern in association with the annual floods. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites is high regardless of the municipality and the characteristics of areas and populations. The incidence of hepatitis A has decreased over the past decade. A comparison of older and recent surveys shows that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases has remained constant. The load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases ranks high among the health problems present in the State of Amazonas. Interventions aiming at basic sanitation and vaccination for hepatitis A were formulated and implemented, but assessment of their effectiveness in the targeted populations is still needed.

  2. Diseases of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Individuals Diagnosed as Children with Atypical Autism: A Danish Register Study Based on Hospital Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Isager, Torben; Rich, Bente

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the prevalence and types of diseases (International Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders, 10th Edition codes K20-K93) relating to the gastrointestinal tract in a clinical sample of 89 individuals diagnosed as children with atypical autism/pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified…

  3. Immunoendocrine mechanisms associated with resistance or susceptibility to parasitic diseases during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Villavicencio, José Antonio; De León-Nava, Marco A; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    During pregnancy, the mammalian endocrine system plays a leading role in maintaining the fetus, characterized by an increase in the level of hormones such as progesterone, oestradiol and some gonadotropic hormones. The immune system participates during pregnancy by self-regulating to prevent fetus rejection. The distinctive type of immunity during gestation is characterized by an increase in levels of Th2 type cytokines IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10, concomitant with a decrease in IL-2, INF-gamma and TNF-alpha levels. Along pregnancy, sex steroids and factors associated with them regulate the immune response. In this way, endocrine and immunologic factors have an impact on the pregnant female's susceptibility or resistance to parasitic diseases. There are three main mechanisms proposed to explain this susceptibility or resistance: (1) sex steroids influence the host's immune system; (2) hormones acting directly on the parasites inhibit or promote their reproduction, or (3) the two effects can occur simultaneously within a network of immuno-endocrine host-parasite interactions, mediated by hormones, cytokines, antibodies and other factors interacting directly and bidirectionally. The present work reviews recent literature concerning the most frequent parasitic infections during pregnancy and discusses the mechanisms implied in the establishment, growth, reproduction or elimination of the parasite.

  4. A preliminary spatial analysis of diagnosed stroke disease in Osun state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adzandeh, Ayila Emmanuel; Awope, John; Oviasu, Osaretin Isoken

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There have been a number of clinical studies on diagnosed Stroke disease. However, there have been few studies on the geographical disparities for stroke. This study investigates the spatial pattern of stroke disease reflecting socio-demographic characteristics in the State. Methods Stroke patients' admissions for 22 years (from 1990 to 2012) were examined. Their socio-demographic characteristics were extracted from their health records and analyzed. The location of the stroke patients were categorized by Local Governments Areas (LGAs). Spatial maps were generated and produced in a Geographical Information System (GIS) environment. It involves the analysis of the distribution of stroke cases in relation to their underlying population to determine the areas of high and low density of diagnosed cases across the state. Results The result highlighted the spatial distribution of diagnosed stroke cases and also highlighted the areas of concern regarding their spatial distribution within the state. Social inequalities in stroke were persistent as incidence rates in urban areas (North) were around 3 times higher than in the rural areas (South). However, this could be due to better healthcare access in the urban areas than in the rural areas as there were disparities in the distribution of healthcare facilities involved in administering care to stroke patients in Osun State. Conclusion The outcome of this study appears to indicate that spatial inequalities in the access to Stroke healthcare is a concern that needs to be addressed in order to manage the disease adequately. PMID:28250887

  5. Newly Diagnosed Anemia Increases Risk of Parkinson's disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chien Tai; Huang, Yao Hsien; Liu, Hung Yi; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chan, Lung; Chien, Li-Nien

    2016-07-14

    Anemia and low hemoglobin have been identified to increase Parkinson's disease (PD) risk. This population-based cohort study investigated PD risk in newly diagnosed anemic patients by using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. All newly diagnosed anemic patients (n = 86,334) without a history of stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, major operations, or blood loss diseases were enrolled. A cohort of nonanemic controls, 1:1 matched with anemic patients on the basis of the demographics and pre-existing medical conditions, was also included. Competing risk analysis was used to evaluate PD risk in anemic patients compared with that in their matched controls. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of PD risk in the anemic patients was 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-1.52, p < 0.001). Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) patients tended to exhibit a higher PD risk (aHR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.24-1.79, p < 0.001). Furthermore, Iron supplement did not significantly affect the PD risk: the aHRs for PD risk were 1.32 (95% CI: 1.07-1.63, p < 0.01) and 1.86 (95% CI: 1.46-2.35, p < 0.001) in IDA patients with and without iron supplementation, respectively. The population-based cohort study indicated newly diagnosed anemia increases PD risk.

  6. Counter-insurgents of the blue revolution? Parasites and diseases affecting aquaculture and science.

    PubMed

    Blaylock, Reginald B; Bullard, Stephen A

    2014-12-01

    Aquaculture is the fastest-growing segment of food production and is expected to supply a growing portion of animal protein for consumption by humans. Because industrial aquaculture developed only recently compared to industrial agriculture, its development occurred within the context of a growing environmental awareness and acknowledgment of environmental issues associated with industrial farming. As such, parasites and diseases have become central criticisms of commercial aquaculture. This focus on parasites and diseases, however, has created a nexus of opportunities for research that has facilitated considerable scientific advances in the fields of parasitology and aquaculture. This paper reviews Myxobolus cerebralis , Lepeophtheirus salmonis , white spot syndrome virus, and assorted flatworms as select marquee aquaculture pathogens, summarizes the status of the diseases caused by each and their impacts on aquaculture, and highlights some of the significant contributions these pathogens have made to the science of parasitology and aquaculture.

  7. Epizootiology of diseases of oysters (Crassostrea virginica), and parasites of associated organisms in eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, J. D.

    1984-03-01

    Haplosporidan parasites of oysters have been reported from four continents. Those of the general Minchinia, Haplosporidium, and Marteilia, which cause serious diseases of oysters, have been intensively studied. Epizootiology of these highly pathogenic species is well known. Life cycles are obscure for all haplosporidans because artificial infections have not been achieved. The high pathogenicity of newly-discovered haplosporidan diseases to native oysters in eastern North America and western Europe may indicate that these are exotic pathogens parasitizing susceptible oysters not previously exposed to these disease agents. Epizootiology of two haplosporidan pathogens along the middle Atlantic Coast of North America during 25 years of disease activity is discussed. Haplosporidium nelsoni sporulates only rarely and its life cycle remains unconfirmed. Resistant oysters were developed in nature and from laboratory breeding. Haplosporidium costale which causes “Seaside Disease” in high-salinity waters appears to be a more acclimated disease with regular patterns of infection and mortality. Several minor parasites whose life cycles and host species need more study are mentioned.

  8. World Health Organization Estimates of the Global and Regional Disease Burden of 11 Foodborne Parasitic Diseases, 2010: A Data Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Torgerson, Paul R.; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Praet, Nicolas; Speybroeck, Niko; Willingham, Arve Lee; Kasuga, Fumiko; Rokni, Mohammad B.; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Fèvre, Eric M.; Sripa, Banchob; Gargouri, Neyla; Fürst, Thomas; Budke, Christine M.; Carabin, Hélène; Kirk, Martyn D.; Angulo, Frederick J.; Havelaar, Arie; de Silva, Nilanthi

    2015-01-01

    Background Foodborne diseases are globally important, resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. Parasitic diseases often result in high burdens of disease in low and middle income countries and are frequently transmitted to humans via contaminated food. This study presents the first estimates of the global and regional human disease burden of 10 helminth diseases and toxoplasmosis that may be attributed to contaminated food. Methods and Findings Data were abstracted from 16 systematic reviews or similar studies published between 2010 and 2015; from 5 disease data bases accessed in 2015; and from 79 reports, 73 of which have been published since 2000, 4 published between 1995 and 2000 and 2 published in 1986 and 1981. These included reports from national surveillance systems, journal articles, and national estimates of foodborne diseases. These data were used to estimate the number of infections, sequelae, deaths, and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), by age and region for 2010. These parasitic diseases, resulted in 48.4 million cases (95% Uncertainty intervals [UI] of 43.4–79.0 million) and 59,724 (95% UI 48,017–83,616) deaths annually resulting in 8.78 million (95% UI 7.62–12.51 million) DALYs. We estimated that 48% (95% UI 38%-56%) of cases of these parasitic diseases were foodborne, resulting in 76% (95% UI 65%-81%) of the DALYs attributable to these diseases. Overall, foodborne parasitic disease, excluding enteric protozoa, caused an estimated 23.2 million (95% UI 18.2–38.1 million) cases and 45,927 (95% UI 34,763–59,933) deaths annually resulting in an estimated 6.64 million (95% UI 5.61–8.41 million) DALYs. Foodborne Ascaris infection (12.3 million cases, 95% UI 8.29–22.0 million) and foodborne toxoplasmosis (10.3 million cases, 95% UI 7.40–14.9 million) were the most common foodborne parasitic diseases. Human cysticercosis with 2.78 million DALYs (95% UI 2.14–3.61 million), foodborne trematodosis with 2.02 million DALYs (95

  9. [The evolution of the Th2 immune responses and its relationships with parasitic diseases and allergy].

    PubMed

    Caraballo, Luis; Zakzuk, Josefina

    2012-01-01

    A variety of links occur between parasites, particularly helminths, and allergic diseases--both common conditions of epidemiological importance in tropical regions. Although speculations are often made about the effects of parasitic diseases on the evolution of the immune system, the selective forces that have shaped the allergic response are unknown and probably include evolutionary mechanisms different to those traditionally reported. Helminths, infectious and antigenic sources that induce allergic-like responses, established themselves as parasites in organisms that already had cell groups related to the type 2 immunity. An essential component in the relationship between helminths and their hosts is that the former induce immunosuppression, creating a kind of balance that allows the survival of both. The development of this equilibrium undoubtedly includes adaptations in both organisms, and the survival of the parasite is the result of (a) acquiring immune suppressor mechanisms and (b) finding hosts with lower intensity of the type 2 response. This in turn suggests that although helminth infections have influenced the formation of type 2 immunity, they have not been an important selective force in the particular case of allergic response. The latter is more related to an exaggerated Th2/IgE response.

  10. Liver disease among children in Hawai'i diagnosed with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    St-Jules, David E; Watters, Corilee A; Davis, James; Waxman, Sorrell H

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of and factors related to liver disease among children in Hawai'i with metabolic syndrome. The medical charts of children diagnosed with metabolic syndrome by an outpatient endocrinologist between January 2000 and December 2010 were reviewed. Liver disease prevalence was estimated based on serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, which were then assessed for associations with demographic (age, gender, ethnicity), anthropometric (body mass index), biochemical (fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, triglycerides, and total, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol), and clinical (blood pressure) characteristics of subjects. Serum ALT was available for 167 of the 195 subjects. The proportion of subjects with liver disease (105/167 [63%]) was greater than many traditional features of metabolic syndrome including hypertriglyceridemia (73/177 [41%]), hypertension (37/194 [19%]) and hyperglycemia (37/170 [22%]). Serum ALT values were positively associated with age (P=.030), and liver disease was more common among boys than girls (62/91 [68%] vs 43/76 [57%]), although this difference was not statistically significant (P=.123). There was a significant difference in liver disease across ethnicities (P=.029), and appeared to be more common in children with Pacific Islander surnames (14/16 [88%]), and less common in children with Hispanic surnames (7/20 [35%]). Diastolic blood pressure was the only obesity-related disease parameter associated with serum ALT after adjusting for age and gender (P=.018). In conclusion, liver disease was common among children diagnosed with metabolic syndrome in Hawai'i. Age, gender, and ethnicity may be important determinants of liver disease risk, and should be investigated further.

  11. Liver Disease Among Children in Hawai‘i Diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    St-Jules, David E; Davis, James; Waxman, Sorrell H

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of and factors related to liver disease among children in Hawai‘i with metabolic syndrome. The medical charts of children diagnosed with metabolic syndrome by an outpatient endocrinologist between January 2000 and December 2010 were reviewed. Liver disease prevalence was estimated based on serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, which were then assessed for associations with demographic (age, gender, ethnicity), anthropometric (body mass index), biochemical (fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, triglycerides, and total, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol), and clinical (blood pressure) characteristics of subjects. Serum ALT was available for 167 of the 195 subjects. The proportion of subjects with liver disease (105/167 [63%]) was greater than many traditional features of metabolic syndrome including hypertriglyceridemia (73/177 [41%]), hypertension (37/194 [19%]) and hyperglycemia (37/170 [22%]). Serum ALT values were positively associated with age (P=.030), and liver disease was more common among boys than girls (62/91 [68%] vs 43/76 [57%]), although this difference was not statistically significant (P=.123). There was a significant difference in liver disease across ethnicities (P=.029), and appeared to be more common in children with Pacific Islander surnames (14/16 [88%]), and less common in children with Hispanic surnames (7/20 [35%]). Diastolic blood pressure was the only obesity-related disease parameter associated with serum ALT after adjusting for age and gender (P=.018). In conclusion, liver disease was common among children diagnosed with metabolic syndrome in Hawai‘i. Age, gender, and ethnicity may be important determinants of liver disease risk, and should be investigated further. PMID:23795321

  12. New vaccines for neglected parasitic diseases and dengue.

    PubMed

    Beaumier, Coreen M; Gillespie, Portia M; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2013-09-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a significant source of morbidity and socioeconomic burden among the world's poor. Virtually all of the 2.4 billion people who live on less than $2 per d, more than a third of the world's population, are at risk for these debilitating NTDs. Although chemotherapeutic measures exist for many of these pathogens, they are not sustainable countermeasures on their own because of rates of reinfection, risk of drug resistance, and inconsistent maintenance of drug treatment programs. Preventative and therapeutic NTD vaccines are needed as long-term solutions. Because there is no market in the for-profit sector of vaccine development for these pathogens, much of the effort to develop vaccines is driven by nonprofit entities, mostly through product development partnerships. This review describes the progress of vaccines under development for many of the NTDs, with a specific focus on those about to enter or that are currently in human clinical trials. Specifically, we report on the progress on dengue, hookworm, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, Chagas disease, and onchocerciasis vaccines. These products will be some of the first with specific objectives to aid the world's poorest populations.

  13. Exploring the genetic counselor's role in facilitating meaning-making: rare disease diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Helm, Benjamin M

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of the constructivist meaning-making framework is to encourage grief adaptation through the search for meaning in loss. Strategies to help patients construct meaning from their experiences may lead to positive adaptation. This strategy has been used in contemporary grief counseling, but it may also be beneficial in the genetic counseling scenario. The diagnosis of a rare genetic disorder often has considerable psychosocial impact as patients and families describe feelings of isolation and hopelessness. Negative experiences with healthcare providers often reinforce these feelings. Genetic counselors continue to provide education and psychosocial support to patients and families with rare genetic disorders, and meaning-making strategies may provide a framework for which to help patients and families adapt to these challenging diagnoses. In this paper I explore the background of meaning-making counseling strategy and describe an experience in which it was used for counseling a family with a child with Mowat-Wilson syndrome. I show how a meaning-making framework can help families explore and construct meaning from their experiences and encourage positive adaptation. I also address the possible limitations of this strategy and the need to share additional experiences with this counseling framework. Meaning-making can be another tool for genetic counselors to help guide families in their grief and adaptation to rare disease diagnoses. I also describe qualities and aspects of counseling through the lens of meaning-making and stress the importance of addressing psychosocial dimensions of rare disease diagnoses.

  14. Validity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease diagnoses in a large administrative database

    PubMed Central

    Lacasse, Yves; Daigle, Jean-Marc; Martin, Sylvie; Maltais, François

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Administrative databases are often used for research purposes, with minimal attention devoted to the validity of the included diagnoses. AIMS: To determine whether the principal diagnoses of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) made in hospitalized patients and recorded in a large administrative database are valid. METHODS: The medical charts of 1221 patients hospitalized in 40 acute care centres in Quebec and discharged between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004, with a principal discharge diagnosis of COPD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes 491, 492 or 496) were reviewed. The diagnosis of COPD was independently adjudicated by two pulmonologists using clinical history (including smoking status) and spirometry. The primary outcome measure was the positive predictive value (PPV) of the database for the diagnosis of COPD (ie, the proportion of patients with an accurate diagnosis of COPD corroborated by clinical history and spirometry). RESULTS: The diagnosis of COPD was validated in 616 patients (PPV 50.4% [95% CI 47.7% to 53.3%]), with 372 patients (30.5%) classified as ‘indeterminate’. Older age and female sex were associated with a lower probability of an accurate diagnosis of COPD. Hospitalization in a teaching institution was associated with a twofold increase in the probability of a correct diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: The results support the routine ascertainment of the validity of diagnoses before using administrative databases in clinical and health services research. PMID:22536584

  15. Eosinophils in Gastrointestinal disorders- eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases and parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Pooja; Furuta, Glenn T.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The gastrointestinal tract provides an intriguing organ for considering the eosinophil’s role in health and disease. The normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract, except for the esophagus, is populated by eosinophils that are present throughout the mucosa in varying numbers. This latter fact raises the possibility that eosinophils participate in innate mechanisms of defense. In contrast, a number of clinical studies provide a wealth of data that associates increased numbers of eosinophils with inflammatory GI diseases; these findings prompt concerns that eosinophils may have a deleterious effect on the gut. In this article we present clinical features of 4 disease processes that have been associated with eosinophilia and suggest areas requiring investigation as to their clinical significance and scientific relevance. PMID:26209893

  16. Disease dynamics of honeybees with Varroa destructor as parasite and virus vector.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yun; Blanco, Krystal; Davis, Talia; Wang, Ying; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria

    2016-05-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses carried by Varroa mites. In this paper, we propose a honeybee-mite-virus model that incorporates (1) parasitic interactions between honeybees and the Varroa mites; (2) five virus transmission terms between honeybees and mites at different stages of Varroa mites: from honeybees to honeybees, from adult honeybees to the phoretic mites, from brood to the reproductive mites, from the reproductive mites to brood, and from adult honeybees to the phoretic mites; and (3) Allee effects in the honeybee population generated by its internal organization such as division of labor. We provide completed local and global analysis for the full system and its subsystems. Our analytical and numerical results allow us have a better understanding of the synergistic effects of parasitism and virus infections on honeybee population dynamics and its persistence. Interesting findings from our work include: (a) due to Allee effects experienced by the honeybee population, initial conditions are essential for the survival of the colony. (b) Low adult honeybees to brood ratios have destabilizing effects on the system which generate fluctuating dynamics that lead to a catastrophic event where both honeybees and mites suddenly become extinct. This catastrophic event could be potentially linked to Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) of honeybee colonies. (c) Virus infections may have stabilizing effects on the system, and parasitic mites could make disease more persistent. Our model illustrates how the synergy between the parasitic mites and virus infections consequently generates rich dynamics including multiple attractors where all species can coexist or go extinct depending on initial conditions. Our findings may provide important insights on honeybee viruses and parasites and how to best control them.

  17. [The low prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease children and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Sładek, Małgorzata; Jedynak-Wasowicz, Urszula; Wedrychowicz, Andrzej; Kowalska-Duplaga, Kinga; Pieczarkowski, Stanisław; Fyderek, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    Data concerning prevalence rate of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients is conflicting. We had studied the prevalence of Hp gastritis in newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease children before any pharmacological treatment was introduced. Ninety four consecutive children with inflammatory bowel diseased were enrolled into study, mean age 12.9 +/- 3.75 years, including 50 with Crohn's Disease (CD) and 44 with ulcerative colitis (UC). One hundred and four patients (mean age 13.6 +/- 4.2 year) referred for diagnostic evaluation because of recurrent abdominal pain, matched for age, sex and socioeconomic status served as a control. The results revealed a highly statistically lower prevalence of Hp gastritis in children with IBD as compared with controls (9.6% vs. 38.4%, p < 0.0001). Significantly more often Hp gastritis occurred in CD than UC patients. There was no statistical difference in mean age of IBD onset between Hp gastritis positive and negative groups (14.3 +/- 3.75 vs. 13.6 +/- 4.3 yr) was found. Our results show that in newly diagnosed IBD children, Hp gastritis is not unusual, but the prevalence rate is significantly lower comparing to the control group. The low Hp gastritis rate is not related to medical treatment, since the patients were studied before any was introduced.

  18. Baseline and longitudinal grey matter changes in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: ICICLE-PD study.

    PubMed

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; Firbank, Michael J; Lawson, Rachael A; Yarnall, Alison J; Duncan, Gordon W; Owen, Adrian M; Khoo, Tien K; Brooks, David J; Rowe, James B; Barker, Roger A; Burn, David J; O'Brien, John T

    2015-10-01

    Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease is associated with progression to dementia (Parkinson's disease dementia) in a majority of patients. Determining structural imaging biomarkers associated with prodromal Parkinson's disease dementia may allow for the earlier identification of those at risk, and allow for targeted disease modifying therapies. One hundred and five non-demented subjects with newly diagnosed idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 37 healthy matched controls had serial 3 T structural magnetic resonance imaging scans with clinical and neuropsychological assessments at baseline, which were repeated after 18 months. The Movement Disorder Society Task Force criteria were used to classify the Parkinson's disease subjects into Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment (n = 39) and Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment (n = 66). Freesurfer image processing software was used to measure cortical thickness and subcortical volumes at baseline and follow-up. We compared regional percentage change of cortical thinning and subcortical atrophy over 18 months. At baseline, cases with Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment demonstrated widespread cortical thinning relative to controls and atrophy of the nucleus accumbens compared to both controls and subjects with Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment. Regional cortical thickness at baseline was correlated with global cognition in the combined Parkinson's disease cohort. Over 18 months, patients with Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment demonstrated more severe cortical thinning in frontal and temporo-parietal cortices, including hippocampal atrophy, relative to those with Parkinson's disease and no cognitive impairment and healthy controls, whereas subjects with Parkinson's disease and no cognitive impairment showed more severe frontal cortical thinning compared to healthy controls. At baseline, Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment

  19. Diseases diagnosed in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) of the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Davidson, W R; Nettles, V F; Couvillion, C E; Howerth, E W

    1985-10-01

    Diagnostic findings are presented on 139 sick or dead wild turkeys examined during the period 1972 through 1984. Turkeys originated from eight southeastern states (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia) and included 31 turkeys categorized as capture-related mortalities and 108 turkeys categorized as natural mortalities. Frequent diagnoses (greater than or equal to 10% of case accessions) in the natural mortality group were trauma, avian pox, and histomoniasis. Less frequent diagnoses (less than or equal to 4% of case accessions) included malnutrition/environmental stress syndrome, coligranuloma-like condition, crop impaction, bumblefoot, organophosphate toxicosis, infectious sinusitis, a lympho-proliferative disease, salmonellosis, aspergillosis, toxoplasmosis, crop trichomoniasis, and melorheostosis.

  20. Integrating gut microbiota immaturity and disease-discriminatory taxa to diagnose the initiation and severity of shrimp disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jinbo; Zhu, Jinyong; Dai, Wenfang; Dong, Chunming; Qiu, Qiongfen; Li, Chenghua

    2017-04-01

    Increasing evidence has emerged a tight link among the gut microbiota, host age and health status. This osculating interplay impedes the definition of gut microbiome features associated with host health from that in developmental stages. Consequently, gut microbiota-based prediction of health status is promising yet not well established. Here we firstly tracked shrimp gut microbiota (N = 118) over an entire cycle of culture; shrimp either stayed healthy or progressively transitioned into severe disease. The results showed that the gut microbiota were significantly distinct over shrimp developmental stages and disease progression. Null model and phylogenetic-based mean nearest taxon distance (MNTD) analyses indicated that deterministic processes that governed gut community became less important as the shrimp aged and disease progressed. The predicted gut microbiota age (using the profiles of age-discriminatory bacterial species as independent variables) fitted well (r = 0.996; P < 0.001) with the age of healthy subjects, while this defined trend was disrupted by disease. Microbiota-for-age Z-scores (MAZ, here defined as immaturity) were relative stable among healthy shrimp, but sharply decreased when disease emerged. By distinguishing between age- and disease- discriminatory taxa, we developed a model, bacterial indicators of shrimp health status, to diagnose disease from healthy subjects with 91.5% accuracy. Notably, the relative abundances of the bacterial indicators were indicative for shrimp disease severity. These findings, in aggregate, add our understanding on the gut community assembly patterns over shrimp developmental stages and disease progression. In addition, shrimp disease initiation and severity can be accurately diagnosed using gut microbiota immaturity and bacterial indicators.

  1. Outcomes of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease diagnosed with or without pulmonary function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Andrea; Mecredy, Graham; Croxford, Ruth; To, Teresa; Stanbrook, Matthew B.; Aaron, Shawn D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A small number of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) receive pulmonary function testing around the time of diagnosis. Because omitting testing increases misdiagnosis, we sought to determine whether health outcomes differed between patients whose COPD was diagnosed with or without pulmonary function testing. METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal population study of patients with physician-diagnosed COPD from 2005 to 2012 using health administrative data from Ontario, Canada. We assessed whether having pulmonary function testing around the time of diagnosis was associated with the composite outcome of admission to hospital for COPD or all-cause death, using adjusted survival analysis. RESULTS: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was diagnosed in 68 898 patients during the study period; 41.2% of patients received peridiagnostic pulmonary function testing. In adjusted analysis, patients who underwent testing were less likely to die or be admitted to hospital for COPD (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89–0.94) and were more likely to be prescribed an inhaled long-acting bronchodilator than patients who did not undergo testing. Subgroup analysis suggested that the association of testing and outcomes was confined to patients with COPD diagnosed in the ambulatory care setting (adjusted HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.76–0.84). INTERPRETATION: Confirmation of a COPD diagnosis using pulmonary function testing is associated with a decreased risk of death and admission to hospital for COPD. In ambulatory patients, this effect may be from increased use of appropriate COPD medications. The findings of this study validate current guideline recommendations that encourage pulmonary function testing for diagnosis in all patients with suspected COPD.

  2. Diagnosing Discogenic Low Back Pain Associated with Degenerative Disc Disease Using a Medical Interview

    PubMed Central

    Tonosu, Juichi; Inanami, Hirohiko; Oka, Hiroyuki; Katsuhira, Junji; Takano, Yuichi; Koga, Hisashi; Yuzawa, Yohei; Shiboi, Ryutaro; Oshima, Yasushi; Baba, Satoshi; Tanaka, Sakae; Matsudaira, Ko

    2016-01-01

    Purposes To evaluate the usefulness of our original five questions in a medical interview for diagnosing discogenic low back pain (LBP), and to establish a support tool for diagnosing discogenic LBP. Materials and Methods The degenerative disc disease (DDD) group (n = 42) comprised patients diagnosed with discogenic LBP associated with DDD, on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging findings and response to analgesic discography (discoblock). The control group (n = 30) comprised patients with LBP due to a reason other than DDD. We selected patients from those who had been diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis and had undergone decompression surgery without fusion. Of them, those whose postoperative LBP was significantly decreased were included in the control group. We asked patients in both groups whether they experienced LBP after sitting too long, while standing after sitting too long, squirming in a chair after sitting too long, while washing one’s face, and in the standing position with flexion. We analyzed the usefulness of our five questions for diagnosing discogenic LBP, and performed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to develop a diagnostic support tool. Results There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics, except age, between the groups. There were significant differences between the groups for all five questions. In the age-adjusted analyses, the odds ratios of LBP after sitting too long, while standing after sitting too long, squirming in a chair after sitting too long, while washing one’s face, and in standing position with flexion were 10.5, 8.5, 4.0, 10.8, and 11.8, respectively. The integer scores were 11, 9, 4, 11, and 12, respectively, and the sum of the points of the five scores ranged from 0 to 47. Results of the ROC analysis were as follows: cut-off value, 31 points; area under the curve, 0.92302; sensitivity, 100%; and specificity, 71.4%. Conclusions All five questions were useful for diagnosing

  3. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  4. Interactions Between Trypanosoma cruzi the Chagas Disease Parasite and Naturally Infected Wild Mepraia Vectors of Chile.

    PubMed

    Campos-Soto, Ricardo; Ortiz, Sylvia; Cordova, Ivan; Bruneau, Nicole; Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Solari, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease, which ranks among the world's most neglected diseases, is a chronic, systemic, parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Mepraia species are the wild vectors of this parasite in Chile. Host-parasite interactions can occur at several levels, such as co-speciation and ecological host fitting, among others. Thus, we are exploring the interactions between T. cruzi circulating in naturally infected Mepraia species in all areas endemic of Chile. We evaluated T. cruzi infection rates of 27 different haplotypes of the wild Mepraia species and identified their parasite genotypes using minicircle PCR amplification and hybridization tests with genotype-specific DNA probes. Infection rates were lower in northern Chile where Mepraia gajardoi circulates (10-35%); in central Chile, Mepraia spinolai is most abundant, and infection rates varied in space and time (0-55%). T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI, TcII, TcV, and Tc VI were detected. Mixed infections with two or more DTUs are frequently found in highly infected insects. T. cruzi DTUs have distinct, but not exclusive, ecological and epidemiological associations with their hosts. T. cruzi infection rates of M. spinolai were higher than in M. gajardoi, but the presence of mixed infection with more than one T. cruzi DTU was the same. The same T. cruzi DTUs (TcI, TcII, TcV, and TcVI) were found circulating in both vector species, even though TcI was not equally distributed. These results suggest that T. cruzi DTUs are not associated with any of the two genetically related vector species nor with the geographic area. The T. cruzi vectors interactions are discussed in terms of old and recent events. By exploring T. cruzi DTUs present in Mepraia haplotypes and species from northern to central Chile, we open the analysis on these invertebrate host-parasite interactions.

  5. Centrality in primate–parasite networks reveals the potential for the transmission of emerging infectious diseases to humans

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, José María; Nunn, Charles L.; Verdú, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Most emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) in humans have arisen from animals. Identifying high-risk hosts is therefore vital for the control and surveillance of these diseases. Viewing hosts as connected through the parasites they share, we use network tools to investigate predictors of parasitism and sources of future EIDs. We generated host–parasite networks that link hosts when they share a parasite, using nonhuman primates as a model system because—owing to their phylogenetic proximity and ecological overlap with humans—they are an important source of EIDs to humans. We then tested whether centrality in the network of host species—a measurement of the importance of a given node (i.e., host species) in the network—is associated with that host serving as a potential EID source. We found that centrality covaries with key predictors of parasitism, such as population density and geographic range size. Importantly, we also found that primate species having higher values of centrality in the primate–parasite network harbored more parasites identified as EIDs in humans and had parasite communities more similar to those found in humans. These relationships were robust to the use of different centrality metrics and to multiple ways of controlling for variation in how well each species has been studied (i.e., sampling effort). Centrality may therefore estimate the role of a host as a source of EIDs to humans in other multispecific host–parasite networks. PMID:23610389

  6. Sinuolinea niloticus n. sp., a myxozoan parasite that causes disease in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Vaz Rodrigues, Marianna; Francisco, Claire Juliana; Biondi, Germano Francisco; Júnior, João Pessoa Araújo

    2016-11-01

    Sinuolinea species are myxozoans of the order Bivalvulida, suborder Variisporina, and family Sinuolineidae, which can be parasites for freshwater and marine fish. The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of Sinuolinea niloticus n. sp. infecting Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) from aquaculture and from river sources with morphological and molecular analyses. Between March 2010 and November 2012, 116 Nile tilapia were randomly sampled from aquaculture net fishing (n = 56) in Mira Estrela, São Paulo, and from the Capivari River (n = 60) in Botucatu, São Paulo. The fishes that were sampled were examined by necropsy, microscopic observation and molecular techniques for detection and identification of the myxozoan causing disease in tilapia. All of the tissues that were sampled for analysis showed the presence of the parasite. It was observed by microscopy that the myxozoan belongs to the Sinuolinea genus. This identification was performed based on morphological characteristics and histopathology findings, such as structures consistent with myxozoan in the interstices in all analysed tissues, coagulative necrosis, haemorrhage, inflammatory processes, presence of melano-macrophages and eosinophils. The results of the molecular analyses revealed that the myxozoan detected and identified in this study is sister to a group of other Sinuolinea species. Because this is the first report of this parasite in Nile tilapia, the parasite was named S. niloticus n. sp. This is the first report of a Sinuolinea species in Brazil and in tilapia.

  7. Histopathology and Florbetaben PET in Patients Incorrectly Diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Marwan N; Schäuble, Barbara; Anand, Keshav; Richards, Danielle; Murayama, Shigeo; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Takao, Masaki; Rowe, Christopher C; Masters, Colin L; Barthel, Henryk; Gertz, Hermann-Josef; Peters, Oliver; Rasgon, Natalie; Jovalekic, Aleksandar; Sabri, Osama; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Seibyl, John

    2017-01-01

    Of 57 individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a phase III study, 13 (23%) had amyloid-β (Aβ) levels on postmortem histopathology that did not explain the dementia. Based on postmortem histopathology, a wide range of different non-AD conditions was identified, including frontotemporal dementia, hippocampal sclerosis, and dementia with Lewy bodies. Of the histopathologically Aβ negative scored cases ante-mortem Florbetaben PET scans were classified as negative for Aβ in 11 patients based on visual analysis and in all 12 quantifiable cases based on composite standardized uptake value ratios. Thus, florbetaben PET can assist physicians in the differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders by reliably excluding Aβ pathology.

  8. Prevalence of adult Huntington's disease in the UK based on diagnoses recorded in general practice records

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Stephen JW; Douglas, Ian; Rawlins, Michael D; Wexler, Nancy S; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Smeeth, Liam

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The prevalence of Huntington's disease (HD) in the UK is uncertain. Recently, it has been suggested that the prevalence may be substantially greater than previously reported. This study was undertaken to estimate the overall UK prevalence in adults diagnosed with HD, using data from primary care. Methods The electronic medical records of patients aged 21 years or more, with recorded diagnoses of HD, were retrieved from the UK's General Practice Research Database. Prevalence was estimated from the number of persons with recorded diagnoses of HD, on 1 July each year, between 1990 and 2010. This number was divided by the total number of persons registered with participating general practices on that same date. These data were also used to estimate both age specific prevalence and prevalence in various regions of the UK. Results A total of 1136 patients diagnosed with HD, aged 21 years or more, were identified from the database. The estimated prevalence (expressed per 100 000 population) rose from 5.4 (95% CI 3.8 to 7.5) in 1990 to 12.3 (95% CI 11.2 to 13.5) in 2010. Although an increased prevalence was observed within every age group, the most dramatic was in older patients. Age specific prevalence was highest in the 51–60 year age range (15.8 95% CI 9.0 to 22.3). The prevalence of adult HD was lowest in the London region (5.4 (95% CI 3.0 to 8.9)) and highest in the North East of England (18.3 (95% CI 8.6 to 34.6)) and Scotland (16.1 (95% CI 10.8 to 22.9)). Conclusions The prevalence of diagnosed HD is clearly substantially higher in the UK than suggested from previous studies. By extrapolation to the UK as a whole, it is estimated that there are more than 5700 people, aged 21 years or more, with HD. There has also been a surprising doubling of the HD population between 1990 and 2010. Many factors may have caused this increase, including more accurate diagnoses, better and more available therapies and an improved life expectancy

  9. Problems in Diagnosing Scabies, a Global Disease in Human and Animal Populations

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Shelley F.; Currie, Bart J.

    2007-01-01

    Scabies is a worldwide disease and a major public health problem in many developing countries, related primarily to poverty and overcrowding. In remote Aboriginal communities in northern Australia, prevalences of up to 50% among children have been described, despite the availability of effective chemotherapy. Sarcoptic mange is also an important veterinary disease engendering significant morbidity and mortality in wild, domestic, and farmed animals. Scabies is caused by the ectoparasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei burrowing into the host epidermis. Clinical symptoms include intensely itchy lesions that often are a precursor to secondary bacterial pyoderma, septicemia, and, in humans, poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. Although diagnosed scabies cases can be successfully treated, the rash of the primary infestation takes 4 to 6 weeks to develop, and thus, transmission to others often occurs prior to therapy. In humans, the symptoms of scabies infestations can mimic other dermatological skin diseases, and traditional tests to diagnose scabies are less than 50% accurate. To aid early identification of disease and thus treatment, a simple, cheap, sensitive, and specific test for routine diagnosis of active scabies is essential. Recent developments leading to the expression and purification of S. scabiei recombinant antigens have identified a number of molecules with diagnostic potential, and current studies include the investigation and assessment of the accuracy of these recombinant proteins in identifying antibodies in individuals with active scabies and in differentiating those with past exposure. Early identification of disease will enable selective treatment of those affected, reduce transmission and the requirement for mass treatment, limit the potential for escalating mite resistance, and provide another means of controlling scabies in populations in areas of endemicity. PMID:17428886

  10. Comparison of methods used to diagnose generalized inflammatory disease in manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Harr, Kendal; Harvey, John; Bonde, Robert; Murphy, David; Lowe, Mark; Menchaca, Maya; Haubold, Elsa; Francis-Floyd, Ruth

    2006-06-01

    Manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are afflicted with inflammatory and infectious disease secondary to human interaction, such as boat strike and entanglement, as well as "cold stress syndrome" and pneumonia. White-blood-cell count and fever, primary indicators of systemic inflammation in most species, are insensitive in diagnosing inflammatory disease in manatees. Acute phase-response proteins, such as haptoglobin and serum amyloid A, have proven to be sensitive measures of inflammation/infection in domestic large animal species. This study assessed diagnosis of generalized inflammatory disease by different methods including total white-blood-cell count, albumin: globulin ratio, gel electrophoresis analysis, C-reactive protein, alpha, acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, and serum amyloid A. Samples were collected from 71 apparently healthy and 27 diseased animals during diagnostic medical examination. Serum amyloid A, measured by ELISA, followed by albumin:globulin ratio, measured by plasma gel electrophoresis, were most sensitive in diagnosing inflammatory disease, with diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of approximately 90%. The reference interval for serum amyloid A is <10-50 microg/ml with an equivocal interval of 51-70 microg/ml. The reference interval for albumin:globulin ratio by plasma gel electrophoresis is 0.7-1.1. Albumin: globulin ratio, calculated using biochemical techniques, was not accurate due to overestimation of albumin by bromcresol green dye-binding methodology. Albumin:globulin ratio, measured by serum gel electrophoresis, has a low sensitivity of 15% due to the lack of fibrinogen in the sample. Haptoglobin, measured by hemoglobin titration, had a reference interval of 0.4-2.4 mg/ml, a diagnostic sensitivity of 60%, and a diagnostic specificity of 93%. The haptoglobin assay is significantly affected by hemolysis. Fibrinogen, measured by heat precipitation, has a reference interval of 100-400 mg/dl, a diagnostic sensitivity

  11. Comparison of methods used to diagnose generalized inflammatory disease in manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harr, K.E.; Harvey, J.W.; Bonde, R.K.; Murphy, D.; Lowe, Mark; Menchaca, M.; Haubold, E.M.; Francis-Floyd, R.

    2006-01-01

    Manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are afflicted with inflammatory and infectious disease secondary to human interaction, such as boat strike and entanglement, as well as “cold stress syndrome” and pneumonia. White-blood-cell count and fever, primary indicators of systemic inflammation in most species, are insensitive in diagnosing inflammatory disease in manatees. Acute phase-response proteins, such as haptoglobin and serum amyloid A, have proven to be sensitive measures of inflammation/infection in domestic large animal species. This study assessed diagnosis of generalized inflammatory disease by different methods including total white-blood-cell count, albumin: globulin ratio, gel electrophoresis analysis, C-reactive protein, alpha1 acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, and serum amyloid A. Samples were collected from 71 apparently healthy and 27 diseased animals during diagnostic medical examination. Serum amyloid A, measured by ELISA, followed by albumin:globulin ratio, measured by plasma gel electrophoresis, were most sensitive in diagnosing inflammatory disease, with diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of approximately 90%. The reference interval for serum amyloid A is <10–50 μg/ml with an equivocal interval of 51–70 μg/ml. The reference interval for albumin:globulin ratio by plasma gel electrophoresis is 0.7–1.1. Albumin: globulin ratio, calculated using biochemical techniques, was not accurate due to overestimation of albumin by bromcresol green dye-binding methodology. Albumin:globulin ratio, measured by serum gel electrophoresis, has a low sensitivity of 15% due to the lack of fibrinogen in the sample. Haptoglobin, measured by hemoglobin titration, had a reference interval of 0.4–2.4 mg/ml, a diagnostic sensitivity of 60%, and a diagnostic specificity of 93%. The haptoglobin assay is significantly affected by hemolysis. Fibrinogen, measured by heat precipitation, has a reference interval of 100–400 mg/dl, a diagnostic

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi in the Chicken Model: Chagas-Like Heart Disease in the Absence of Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Gomes, Clever; Nitz, Nadjar; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Alves, Rozeneide M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Cordeiro, Ciro; Bernal, Francisco M.; Rosa, Ana C.; Hejnar, Jiri; Leonardecz, Eduardo; Hecht, Mariana M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The administration of anti-trypanosome nitroderivatives curtails Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Chagas disease patients, but does not prevent destructive lesions in the heart. This observation suggests that an effective treatment for the disease requires understanding its pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the origin of clinical manifestations of the heart disease we used a chicken model system in which infection can be initiated in the egg, but parasite persistence is precluded. T. cruzi inoculation into the air chamber of embryonated chicken eggs generated chicks that retained only the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA minicircle in their genome after eight days of gestation. Crossbreeding showed that minicircles were transferred vertically via the germ line to chicken progeny. Minicircle integration in coding regions was shown by targeted-primer thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and detected by direct genomic analysis. The kDNA-mutated chickens died with arrhythmias, shortness of breath, cyanosis and heart failure. These chickens with cardiomyopathy had rupture of the dystrophin and other genes that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Tissue pathology revealed inflammatory dilated cardiomegaly whereby immune system mononuclear cells lyse parasite-free target heart fibers. The heart cell destruction implicated a thymus-dependent, autoimmune; self-tissue rejection carried out by CD45+, CD8γδ+, and CD8α lymphocytes. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that genetic alterations resulting from kDNA integration in the host genome lead to autoimmune-mediated destruction of heart tissue in the absence of T. cruzi parasites. PMID:21468314

  13. PROGRESSION OF DISEASES CAUSED BY THE OYSTER PARASITES, PERKINSUS MARINUS AND HAPLOSPORIDIUM NELSONI IN CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA ON CONSTRUCTED INTERTIDAL REEFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The progression of diseases caused by the oyster parasites, Perkinsus marinus and Haplosporidium nelsoni, were evaluated by periodic sampling (May 1994 - December 1995) of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, on an artificial reef located in the Piankatank River, Virginia. The infecti...

  14. Diagnostics are central for a truly holistic approach against intestinal parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Harhay, Michael O; Horton, John; Olliaro, Piero L; Utzinger, Jürg

    2011-02-01

    This is a perspectives piece on the central role of diagnostics for a truly holistic approach against gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic diseases. This article was motivated by a recent review in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases, where Absar Alum and colleagues (September 2010) reviewed the global burden, key transmission pathways, current tools and strategies, and provided their vision of a holistic approach to control GI protozoan and helminthic infections in humans. We argue that, as the success of multiple rounds of national deworming campaigns are actualized in various parts of the world, diagnostics become vital to achieve successful elimination and to aid pharmacovigilance against emerging pathogen resistance to the limited deworming pharmacopoeia.

  15. 613 cases of splenic rupture without risk factors or previously diagnosed disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rupture of the spleen in the absence of trauma or previously diagnosed disease is largely ignored in the emergency literature and is often not documented as such in journals from other fields. We have conducted a systematic review of the literature to highlight the surprisingly frequent occurrence of this phenomenon and to document the diversity of diseases that can present in this fashion. Methods Systematic review of English and French language publications catalogued in Pubmed, Embase and CINAHL between 1950 and 2011. Results We found 613 cases of splenic rupture meeting the criteria above, 327 of which occurred as the presenting complaint of an underlying disease and 112 of which occurred following a medical procedure. Rupture appeared to occur spontaneously in histologically normal (but not necessarily normal size) spleens in 35 cases and after minor trauma in 23 cases. Medications were implicated in 47 cases, a splenic or adjacent anatomical abnormality in 31 cases and pregnancy or its complications in 38 cases. The most common associated diseases were infectious (n = 143), haematologic (n = 84) and non-haematologic neoplasms (n = 48). Amyloidosis (n = 24), internal trauma such as cough or vomiting (n = 17) and rheumatologic diseases (n = 10) are less frequently reported. Colonoscopy (n = 87) was the procedure reported most frequently as a cause of rupture. The anatomic abnormalities associated with rupture include splenic cysts (n = 6), infarction (n = 6) and hamartomata (n = 5). Medications associated with rupture include anticoagulants (n = 21), thrombolytics (n = 13) and recombinant G-CSF (n = 10). Other causes or associations reported very infrequently include other endoscopy, pulmonary, cardiac or abdominal surgery, hysterectomy, peliosis, empyema, remote pancreato-renal transplant, thrombosed splenic vein, hemangiomata, pancreatic pseudocysts, splenic artery aneurysm, cholesterol embolism

  16. Isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis offers potential targets for drug discovery against diseases caused by apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Hunter, William N

    2011-01-01

    Two, simple, C5 compounds, dimethylally diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate, are the universal precursors of isoprenoids, a large family of natural products involved in numerous important biological processes. Two distinct biosynthetic pathways have evolved to supply these precursors. Humans use the mevalonate route whilst many species of bacteria including important pathogens, plant chloroplasts and apicomplexan parasites exploit the non-mevalonate pathway. The absence from humans, combined with genetic and chemical validation suggests that the non-mevalonate pathway holds the potential to support new drug discovery programmes targeting Gram-negative bacteria and the apicomplexan parasites responsible for causing serious human diseases, and also infections of veterinary importance. The non-mevalonate pathway relies on eight enzyme-catalyzed stages exploiting a range of cofactors and metal ions. A wealth of structural and mechanistic data, mainly derived from studies of bacterial enzymes, now exists for most components of the pathway and these will be described. Particular attention will be paid to how these data inform on the apicomplexan orthologues concentrating on the enzymes from Plasmodium spp. these cause malaria, one the most important parasitic diseases in the world today.

  17. Incidence of Clinician-Diagnosed Lyme Disease, United States, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christina A; Saha, Shubhayu; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Delorey, Mark J; Shankar, Manjunath B; Hinckley, Alison F; Mead, Paul S

    2015-09-01

    National surveillance provides important information about Lyme disease (LD) but is subject to underreporting and variations in practice. Information is limited about the national epidemiology of LD from other sources. Retrospective analysis of a nationwide health insurance claims database identified patients from 2005-2010 with clinician-diagnosed LD using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, codes and antimicrobial drug prescriptions. Of 103,647,966 person-years, 985 inpatient admissions and 44,445 outpatient LD diagnoses were identified. Epidemiologic patterns were similar to US surveillance data overall. Outpatient incidence was highest among boys 5-9 years of age and persons of both sexes 60-64 years of age. On the basis of extrapolation to the US population and application of correction factors for coding, we estimate that annual incidence is 106.6 cases/100,000 persons and that ≈329,000 (95% credible interval 296,000-376,000) LD cases occur annually. LD is a major US public health problem that causes substantial use of health care resources.

  18. The Heterogeneity of Early Parkinson’s Disease: A Cluster Analysis on Newly Diagnosed Untreated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Amboni, Marianna; Picillo, Marina; Moccia, Marcello; Longo, Katia; Santangelo, Gabriella; De Rosa, Anna; Allocca, Roberto; Giordano, Flavio; Orefice, Giuseppe; De Michele, Giuseppe; Santoro, Lucio; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Barone, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Background The variability in the clinical phenotype of Parkinson’s disease seems to suggest the existence of several subtypes of the disease. To test this hypothesis we performed a cluster analysis using data assessing both motor and non-motor symptoms in a large cohort of newly diagnosed untreated PD patients. Methods We collected data on demographic, motor, and the whole complex of non-motor symptoms from 100 consecutive newly diagnosed untreated outpatients. Statistical cluster analysis allowed the identification of different subgroups, which have been subsequently explored. Results The data driven approach identified four distinct groups of patients, we have labeled: 1) Benign Pure Motor; 2) Benign mixed Motor-Non-Motor; 3) Non-Motor Dominant; and 4) Motor Dominant. Conclusion Our results confirmed the existence of different subgroups of early PD patients. Cluster analysis revealed the presence of distinct subtypes of patients profiled according to the relevance of both motor and non-motor symptoms. Identification of such subtypes may have important implications for generating pathogenetic hypotheses and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23936396

  19. Examinations regarding the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases in Polish soldiers contingents assigned to missions abroad.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the program of diagnostic examinations regarding the detection and following treatment of intestinal parasitic diseases in the population of Polish soldiers serving in different climatic and sanitary conditions. Intestinal parasitoses remain one of the health problems of soldiers participating in contemporary military operations. This fact mainly results from unsatisfactory sanitary and hygienic standards in the regions where troops are deployed, contamination of water and soil, inappropriate processes of purifying drinking water, and the terrible condition of sewage systems, water purification plants, or sewage treatment facilities. The occurrence of such diseases is further facilitated by disregard of some basic principles of food and feeding hygiene. Mass examinations of Polish troops to find the prevalence of intestinal parasitoses will cause a decrease in the morbidity rate of parasitic diseases among Polish soldiers deployed in military operations. They can also lead to a decrease in expenditure on medical treatment of disease-related complications and on damages awarded to soldiers who have developed a serious disease while being engaged in a mission abroad.

  20. Newly diagnosed rheumatic heart disease among indigenous populations in the Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Mirabel, Mariana; Tafflet, Muriel; Noël, Baptiste; Parks, Tom; Axler, Olivier; Robert, Jacques; Nadra, Marie; Phelippeau, Gwendolyne; Descloux, Elodie; Cazorla, Cécile; Missotte, Isabelle; Gervolino, Shirley; Barguil, Yann; Rouchon, Bernard; Laumond, Sylvie; Jubeau, Thierry; Braunstein, Corinne; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Marijon, Eloi; Jouven, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains the leading acquired heart disease in the young worldwide. We aimed at assessing outcomes and influencing factors in the contemporary era. Methods Hospital-based cohort in a high-income island nation where RHD remains endemic and the population is captive. All patients admitted with newly diagnosed RHD according to World Heart Federation echocardiographic criteria were enrolled (2005–2013). The incidence of major cardiovascular events (MACEs) including heart failure, peripheral embolism, stroke, heart valve intervention and cardiovascular death was calculated, and their determinants identified. Results Of the 396 patients, 43.9% were male with median age 18 years (IQR 10–40)). 127 (32.1%) patients presented with mild, 131 (33.1%) with moderate and 138 (34.8%) with severe heart valve disease. 205 (51.8%) had features of acute rheumatic fever. 106 (26.8%) presented with at least one MACE. Among the remaining 290 patients, after a median follow-up period of 4.08 (95% CI 1.84 to 6.84) years, 7 patients (2.4%) died and 62 (21.4%) had a first MACE. The annual incidence of first MACE and of heart failure were 59.05‰ (95% CI 44.35 to 73.75) and 29.06‰ (95% CI 19.29 to 38.82), respectively. The severity of RHD at diagnosis (moderate vs mild HR 3.39 (0.95 to 12.12); severe vs mild RHD HR 10.81 (3.11 to 37.62), p<0.001) and ongoing secondary prophylaxis at follow-up (HR 0.27 (0.12 to 0.63), p=0.01) were the two most influential factors associated with MACE. Conclusions Newly diagnosed RHD is associated with poor outcomes, mainly in patients with moderate or severe valve disease and no secondary prophylaxis. PMID:26537732

  1. Exploring the interface between diagnostics and maps of neglected parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Laura; Cringoli, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Although not new, the 'One Health' concept is gaining progressively more importance in parasitology. Now more than ever, veterinary and human perspectives should be closely joined in diagnosis and surveillance of neglected parasitic diseases. We argue that concerted, standardized and harmonized diagnostic and surveillance strategies are needed for the control and/or elimination of animal and human neglected parasitic infections. A key challenge is to integrate parasitological data with available geospatial methods in an accessible and user-friendly framework. We discuss the capability of new diagnostic devices (e.g. Mini-FLOTAC) and geospatial technologies supported by mobile- and electronic-based approaches as one of the research priorities of the new millennium.

  2. Molecular diagnosis of Chagas' disease and use of an animal model to study parasite tropism.

    PubMed

    Vera-Cruz, J M; Magallón-Gastelum, E; Grijalva, G; Rincón, A R; Ramos-García, C; Armendáriz-Borunda, J

    2003-04-01

    Chagas' disease, which is an important health problem in humans, is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The cellular and molecular mechanisms, involved in the selective tropism of T. cruzi to different organs remain largely unknown. In this study we designed a PCR-based molecular diagnosis method in order to study the tropism and growth kinetics of T. cruzi in a murine model infected with parasites isolated from an endemic area of Mexico. The growth kinetics and parasite tropism of T. cruzi were also evaluated in the blood and other tissues. We observed that T. cruzi isolates from the Western Mexico showed a major tropism to mouse heart and skeletal muscles in this murine model.

  3. Parasitic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; McQuade, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Over one billion people worldwide harbor intestinal parasites. Parasitic intestinal infections have a predilection for developing countries due to overcrowding and poor sanitation but are also found in developed nations, such as the United States, particularly in immigrants or in the setting of sporadic outbreaks. Although the majority of people are asymptomatically colonized with parasites, the clinical presentation can range from mild abdominal discomfort or diarrhea to serious complications, such as perforation or bleeding. Protozoa and helminths (worms) are the two major classes of intestinal parasites. Protozoal intestinal infections include cryptosporidiosis, cystoisosporiasis, cyclosporiasis, balantidiasis, giardiasis, amebiasis, and Chagas disease, while helminth infections include ascariasis, trichuriasis, strongyloidiasis, enterobiasis, and schistosomiasis. Intestinal parasites are predominantly small intestine pathogens but the large intestine is also frequently involved. This article highlights important aspects of parasitic infections of the colon including epidemiology, transmission, symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as appropriate medical and surgical treatment. PMID:26034403

  4. Associations of obesity with newly diagnosed and previously known atopic diseases in Chinese adults: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Biao; Wang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yupeng; Liu, Meina; Wang, Yongchen

    2017-01-01

    To assess the associations of obesity with newly diagnosed and previously known atopic disorders in Chinese adults. 4,629 adults aged 18 years or older were recruited in Harbin, China. Among them, 1,114 were previously diagnosed atopic cases, 1,298 were newly diagnosed cases, and 2,217 non-atopic controls. Obesity and overweight are defined according to the criteria established by the Working Group on Obesity in China. The associations of obesity with known and newly diagnosed atopic disorders were assessed using logistic regressions. Obesity was significantly associated with known atopic disorders (adjusted OR = 2.41 (95% CI: 1.81, 3.22)). The association of obesity with newly diagnosed atopic cases was not as strong as that with known cases, and was not statistically significant (adjusted OR = 1.27 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.72)). The similar pattern was observed in different allergic diseases, gender and age stratifications. The association between overweight and atopic diseases were not significant. Obesity is strongly associated with previously diagnosed atopic cases but not so with newly diagnosed atopic cases in Chinese adults. It is likely that people with atopic disorders have a higher risk of developing obesity. Our findings are important for the management of atopic disorders and chronic disease prevention among atopic disease patients. PMID:28252017

  5. Plasma concentration of parasite DNA as a measure of disease severity in falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Imwong, Mallika; Woodrow, Charles J; Hendriksen, Ilse C E; Veenemans, Jacobien; Verhoef, Hans; Faiz, M Abul; Mohanty, Sanjib; Mishra, Saroj; Mtove, George; Gesase, Samwel; Seni, Amir; Chhaganlal, Kajal D; Day, Nicholas P J; Dondorp, Arjen M; White, Nicholas J

    2015-04-01

    In malaria-endemic areas, Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia is common in apparently healthy children and severe malaria is commonly misdiagnosed in patients with incidental parasitemia. We assessed whether the plasma Plasmodium falciparum DNA concentration is a useful datum for distinguishing uncomplicated from severe malaria in African children and Asian adults. P. falciparum DNA concentrations were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 224 African children (111 with uncomplicated malaria and 113 with severe malaria) and 211 Asian adults (100 with uncomplicated malaria and 111 with severe malaria) presenting with acute falciparum malaria. The diagnostic accuracy of plasma P. falciparum DNA concentrations in identifying severe malaria was 0.834 for children and 0.788 for adults, similar to that of plasma P. falciparum HRP2 levels and substantially superior to that of parasite densities (P < .0001). The diagnostic accuracy of plasma P. falciparum DNA concentrations plus plasma P. falciparum HRP2 concentrations was significantly greater than that of plasma P. falciparum HRP2 concentrations alone (0.904 for children [P = .004] and 0.847 for adults [P = .003]). Quantitative real-time PCR measurement of parasite DNA in plasma is a useful method for diagnosing severe falciparum malaria on fresh or archived plasma samples.

  6. Method and system for the diagnosis of disease using retinal image content and an archive of diagnosed human patient data

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Kenneth W; Karnowski, Thomas P; Chaum, Edward

    2013-08-06

    A method for diagnosing diseases having retinal manifestations including retinal pathologies includes the steps of providing a CBIR system including an archive of stored digital retinal photography images and diagnosed patient data corresponding to the retinal photography images, the stored images each indexed in a CBIR database using a plurality of feature vectors, the feature vectors corresponding to distinct descriptive characteristics of the stored images. A query image of the retina of a patient is obtained. Using image processing, regions or structures in the query image are identified. The regions or structures are then described using the plurality of feature vectors. At least one relevant stored image from the archive based on similarity to the regions or structures is retrieved, and an eye disease or a disease having retinal manifestations in the patient is diagnosed based on the diagnosed patient data associated with the relevant stored image(s).

  7. Incidence of Symptomatic Vertebral Fractures Among Newly Diagnosed Autoimmune Diseases Initiating Glucocorticoid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Migita, Kiyoshi; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Imadachi, Shunsuke; Jiuchi, Yuka; Izumi, Yasumori; Tsuji, Yoshika; Kawahara, Chieko; Kawakami, Atsushi; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Tohma, Shigeto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Few data are available regarding vertebral fracture risk in patients treated with corticosteroids including patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). The aim of the present study was to identify risk factors for symptomatic vertebral fracture analyzed in patients with newly diagnosed autoimmune diseases. This was an observational cohort study conducted in the National Hospital Organization-EBM study group from 2006 to 2008. The study subjects were autoimmune disease patients who were newly treated with glucocorticoids (GCs). The primary endpoint was the first occurrence of vertebral fracture diagnosed by x-rays. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to determine independent risk factors for vertebral fracture with covariates including sex, age, comorbidity, laboratory data, use of immunosuppressants, and dose of GCs. Survival was analyzed according to the Kaplan–Meier method and assessed by the log-rank test. Among 604 patients of mean age 59.5 years and mean GC dose 50.4 mg/d (first 1 months), 19 patient (3.1%) had at least 1 symptomatic vertebral fracture during 1.9 years of follow-up period. Cox regression model demonstrated that the relative risk for symptomatic vertebral fracture was independently higher in patient with ILD (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10–7.42, P = 0.031) and in every 10-year increment of the age of disease onset (HR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.09–2.26, P = 0.015). Kaplan–Meier analyses demonstrated that the incidence of vertebral fractures in patients with ILD was significantly higher in comparison with those without ILD. Our results indicate a higher risk of vertebral facture in patients with ILD and elderly patients during the initial GC treatment against autoimmune diseases. There is a need for further, even longer-term, prospective studies subjected patients with autoimmune disease, including ILD, under GC treatment. PMID:26166127

  8. Clinical Correlates of Apathy in Patients Recently Diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease: The ANIMO Study

    PubMed Central

    Cubo, Esther; Benito-León, Julián; Coronell, Carlos; Armesto, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Objective Little is known about apathy in the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). We determined the clinical correlates of apathy in a large representative sample of patients recently diagnosed with PD (ANIMO study). Methods PD patients, diagnosed within 2 years of inclusion, were recruited in 102 outpatient clinics situated in 82 populations throughout Spain. Apathy was quantified using the Lille Apathy Rating Scale (LARS). Clinical comparisons and correlations were performed using nonparametric tests. Regression analyses were used to test the association of clinical variables with apathy. Results We recruited 557 PD patients (60.3% men) with a mean age of 68.8 ± 9.7 years, and UPDRS motor score of 21.1 ± 10.8. Apathy only was diagnosed in 186 (33.4%), and apathy and depression in 215 patients (38.6%). Patients with higher comorbidity (OR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.01−1.20, p = 0.001), motor impairment (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03−1.10, p < 0.0001), and lower education (OR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.21−;3.85, p = 0.009) had higher odds of having apathy, in contrast to patients living in a rural environment (OR = 0.35, 95% CI 0.32–0.85, p = 0.01), and left predominant PD motor laterality (OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.13–0.88, p = 0.01). LARS scores were significantly correlated with UPDRS motor scores (rs = 0.44, p < 0.001), predominantly with axial score (rs = 0.43, p < 0.001). Conclusions In PD, apathy is a very common and disabling nonmotor symptom separable from depression. Patients living in a rural environment, with lower comorbidity and motor impairment, higher education background, and left predominant PD motor laterality are at lower risk of suffering from apathy. PMID:22236943

  9. Nosocomial transmission and infection control aspects of parasitic and ectoparasitic diseases. Part III. Ectoparasites/summary and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Lettau, L A

    1991-03-01

    As a rule, both the standard of hygiene and sanitation prevalent in hospitals in the United States and the rarity of parasitic diseases compared to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections, reduce the hazard of nosocomial acquisition of parasites to relatively trivial levels. However, abetted by the resultant low index of suspicion on the part of clinical staff, certain parasitic microorganisms may at times cause significant morbidity and even mortality in both normal and immunocompromised patients, as summarized in this review. Also, the nosocomial acquisition of parasites may be somewhat underappreciated because the incubation period for clinical illness may be days to weeks and thus a hospital-acquired infection may not be recognized as such, particularly if the parasite is endemic locally. Parasitic diseases have been a much more significant problem in certain special facilities, such as custodial institutions for the mentally ill or retarded, where crowding, poor environmental sanitation, and low levels of personal hygiene have in the past allowed the rapid dissemination and endemic occurrence of a large variety of parasitic infections. It is likely that nosocomial transmission of parasites may be an even greater problem in some hospitals in the tropics, where strict hygienic standards are costly or otherwise more difficult to maintain, and where often an increased proportion of the patient population harbors one or more parasites. However, the exact magnitude of the problem in tropical hospitals is also more difficult to determine because nosocomial acquisition of a parasitic infection may not be distinguished easily versus exogenous infection or reactivation of latent infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. The distribution of parasite strains among hosts affects disease spread in a social insect.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Yuko; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Social insects present highly interesting and experimentally amenable systems for the study of disease transmission because they naturally live in dense groups of frequently interacting individuals. Using experimental inoculations of five trypanosomatid strains into groups of its natural host, the bumblebee Bombus terrestris, we investigate the effects of the initial parasite strain distribution across group members on the establishment and transmission success of the different strains to new hosts. For a given number of parasite strains circulating within a host group, transmission to new hosts was increased when the strains were initially inoculated as mixed infections (as opposed to separate single infections), presumably because mixed infections generally favored fast replicating strains. In contrast, separate single infections reduced transmission at least in part through a precedence effect, whereby weak strains appeared to persist by making their host unavailable to superinfection. These results suggest that host groups could benefit from 'compartmentalizing' infections by different parasite strains across different group members, which might be achieved in social insects, for example, by division of labor.

  11. Profiling the erythrocyte membrane proteome isolated from patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Bruno M; Charro, Nuno; Blonder, Josip; Lopes, Carlos; Azevedo, Pilar; Bugalho de Almeida, António; Chan, King C; Prieto, DaRue A; Issaq, Haleem; Veenstra, Timothy D; Penque, Deborah

    2012-12-05

    Structural and metabolic alterations in erythrocytes play an important role in the pathophysiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Whether these dysfunctions are related to the modulation of erythrocyte membrane proteins in patients diagnosed with COPD remains to be determined. Herein, a comparative proteomic profiling of the erythrocyte membrane fraction isolated from peripheral blood of smokers diagnosed with COPD and smokers with no COPD was performed using differential (16)O/(18)O stable isotope labeling. A total of 219 proteins were quantified as being significantly differentially expressed within the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of smokers with COPD and healthy smokers. Functional pathway analysis showed that the most enriched biofunctions were related to cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development, immune response, oxidative stress and cytoskeleton. Chorein (VPS13A), a cytoskeleton related protein whose defects had been associated with the presence of cell membrane deformation of circulating erythrocytes was found to be down-regulated in the membrane fraction of erythrocytes obtained from COPD patients. Methemoglobin reductase (CYB5R3) was also found to be underexpressed in these cells, suggesting that COPD patients may be at higher risk for developing methemoglobinemia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  12. Kidney pathology and parasite intensity in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss surviving proliferative kidney disease: time course and influence of temperature.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike; Bettge, Kathrin; Forster, Ursula; Segner, Helmut; Wahli, Thomas

    2012-01-24

    Proliferative kidney disease (PKD) is an endoparasitic disease of salmonids caused by the myxozoan parasite Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae. We recently described the development of the disease from initial infection until manifestation of clinical disease signs in rainbow trout held at 2 water temperatures, 12 and 18°C. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether (1) infected fish surviving the clinical phase would recover from renal pathological changes, (2) whether they would be able to reduce the parasite load in the kidneys, and (3) whether water temperatures would influence renal recovery and parasite clearance. At 18°C, fish showed a gradual recovery of normal kidney morphology which was associated with a decline in parasite numbers and infection prevalence. Fish kept at 12°C initially showed an enhancement of kidney lesions before recovery of normal kidney morphology took place. The decrease in renal parasite load was retarded compared to 18°C. The results from the present study provide evidence that rainbow trout surviving the clinical phase of PKD are able to (1) fully restore renal structure, and (2) significantly reduce renal parasite loads, although 100% clearance was not achieved within the experimental period of this study. Water temperature influences the rate but not the outcome of the recovery process.

  13. Onchocerciasis in Yemen: Time to take action against a neglected tropical parasitic disease.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Beier, John C

    2016-10-01

    Onchocerciasis is a neglected parasitic disease affecting the poorest underserved people in Yemen. A national control programme with goals to eliminate onchocerciasis has yet to be launched due to the current upheaval and social unrest in the country. The disease, locally termed as sowda, is unique in its clinicopathologic pattern, being of the localized, non-blinding, hyperreactive onchocercal skin disease. Although early reports identified endemic foci along seasonal watercourses, there is a need to redefine its epidemiologic patterns as well as health and socioeconomic impacts. Laboratory diagnosis of sowda among Yemeni patients is difficult due to the low load of microfilariae in skin snips and the presence of asymptomatic itching-free microfilaria carriers. Adoption of ivermectin use at three-month intervals as a control strategy has not been evaluated because the drug is mostly used in clinics and distributed to only a few affected communities. This paper addresses key aspects of onchocerciasis in Yemen and highlights the need for screening at-risk populations using highly sensitive techniques and mapping the distributions of the parasite in human and vector populations of blackflies. The new research should be integrated with the launch of a national onchocerciasis control programme to achieve onchocerciasis elimination.

  14. [Development and application of information system for epidemiological investigation on parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Hu, Fei; Li, Yi-feng; Yuan, Min; Li, Jian-ying; Liu, Yue-min; Li, Zhao-jun; Lin, Dan-dan

    2014-10-01

    An information system for epidemiological investigation on parasitic diseases was developed. The foreground of this system was realized by using C# programming language, and the ACCESS database was used to implement the data management. The system was improved by continuous field application, and has been updated from version 1.0 to 3.0. The average treatment time, logic error rate, rate of sample loss, and post-processing error rate have now been reduced by 88.0%, 100%, 98.1%, and 100%, respectively (P<0.01). This system can reduce the human error and change the field investigation into effective and high-quality pattern.

  15. Acceptance of the 2016 Eminent Parasitologist Award: Chemotherapy in the Context of Emerging Parasitic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Campbell, William C

    2016-12-01

    It seems inevitable that chemotherapy will continue, at least in the near-term, to be a significant factor in the control of infectious diseases. The effectiveness of new drugs has invariably been reduced by the emergence of drug resistance. Efforts to thwart resistance should continue, but there are also other areas that might profitably be re-examined. They include (1) methods of new-drug discovery; (2) selection of parasite life-cycle targets; (3) epidemiological determinants of effectiveness in large-scale control programs; and (4) the economic, managerial, psychological, and political ramifications of drug discovery and drug utilization.

  16. Emerging Animal Parasitic Diseases: A Global Overview and Appropriate Strategies for their Monitoring and Surveillance in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Atehmengo, Ngongeh L; Nnagbo, Chiejina S

    2014-01-01

    Emerging animal parasitic diseases are reviewed and appropriate strategies for efficient monitoring and surveillance in Nigeria are outlined. Animal and human parasitic infections are distinguished. Emerging diseases have been described as those diseases that are being recognised for the first time or diseases that are already recorded but their frequency and/or geographic range is being increased tremendously. Emergence of new diseases may be due to a number of factors such as the spread of a new infectious agent, recognition of an infection that has been in existence but undiagnosed, or when it is realised that an established disease has an infectious origin. The terms could also be used to describe the resurgence of a known infection after its incidence had been known to have declined. Emerging infections are compounding the control of infectious diseases and huge resources are being channeled to alleviate the rising challenge. The diseases are numerous and include helminth, protozoal / rickettsial and entomological. A list of parasitic emerging diseases in Nigeria is included. Globally occurring emerging parasitic diseases are also outlined. Emerging and re-emerging infections can be brought about by many factors including climate change and global warming, changes in biodiversity, population mobility, movement of animals, globalisation of commerce/trade and food supply, social and cultural factors such as food eating habits, religious beliefs, farming practices, trade of infected healthy animals, reduction in the available land for animals, immune-suppressed host and host density and misuse or over use of some drugs leading to drug resistance.

  17. Genetic impact on cognition and brain function in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: ICICLE-PD study.

    PubMed

    Nombela, Cristina; Rowe, James B; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie E; Hampshire, Adam; Owen, Adrian M; Breen, David P; Duncan, Gordon W; Khoo, Tien K; Yarnall, Alison J; Firbank, Michael J; Chinnery, Patrick F; Robbins, Trevor W; O'Brien, John T; Brooks, David J; Burn, David J; Barker, Roger A

    2014-10-01

    associated with memory encoding. This study demonstrates that neurocognitive deficits are common even in recently diagnosed patients with Parkinson's disease, and that the associated regional brain activations are influenced by genotype. These data further support the dual syndrome hypothesis of cognitive change in Parkinson's disease. Longitudinal data will confirm the extent to which these early neurocognitive changes, and their genetic factors, influence the long-term risk of dementia in Parkinson's disease. The combination of genetics and functional neuroimaging provides a potentially useful method for stratification and identification of candidate markers, in future clinical trials against cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease.

  18. [Evaluation of preventive vaccination against rabies performed at the Department of Parasitic and Occupational Diseases in Białystok in 1989-1990].

    PubMed

    Ostrowska, J; Rutkowska, E; Pancewicz, S; Zajkowska, J; Szpakowicz, T; Siwak, E

    Between 1989-1990, 502 individuals exposed to the animals with rabies or suspected of rabies reported to out-patient clinic of agricultural occupational diseases at the K. Dłuski Hospital and to the Department of Parasitic and Occupational Diseases in the Medical Academy in Białystok. Sixty one (12.2%) of these individuals were vaccinated. Most frequently these people were attacked by dogs (70.4%), cats (11.4%), rats (6.5%), and foxes (3.2%). Rabies was diagnosed only in 9.8% of cases (Negri bodies in the brain and positive immunofluorescence test.). A vaccine inactivated on the human diploid tissue (Institute Merieux) was applied without any postvaccination complications. Transient micro-macular rash on face and chest of 3 patients, and local inflammatory reaction in 2 patients did not disturb vaccination process. Active-passive immunization was used in case of extensive lesions.

  19. Nanocarriers as pulmonary drug delivery systems to treat and to diagnose respiratory and non respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Smola, Malgorzata; Vandamme, Thierry; Sokolowski, Adam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of nanocarriers administered by pulmonary route to treat and to diagnose respiratory and non respiratory diseases. Indeed, during the past 10 years, the removal of chlorofluorocarbon propellants from industrial and household products intended for the pulmonary route has lead to the developments of new alternative products. Amongst these ones, on one hand, a lot of attention has been focused to improve the bioavailability of marketed drugs intended for respiratory diseases and to develop new concepts for pulmonary administration of drugs and, on the other hand, to use the pulmonary route to administer drugs for systemic diseases. This has led to some marketed products through the last decade. Although the introduction of nanotechnology permitted to step over numerous problems and to improve the bioavailability of drugs, there are, however, unresolved delivery problems to be still addressed. These scientific and industrial innovations and challenges are discussed along this review together with an analysis of the current situation concerning the industrial developments. PMID:18488412

  20. Diagnosing and ranking retinopathy disease level using diabetic fundus image recuperation approach.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, K; Rajendran, P Alli

    2015-01-01

    Retinal fundus images are widely used in diagnosing different types of eye diseases. The existing methods such as Feature Based Macular Edema Detection (FMED) and Optimally Adjusted Morphological Operator (OAMO) effectively detected the presence of exudation in fundus images and identified the true positive ratio of exudates detection, respectively. These mechanically detected exudates did not include more detailed feature selection technique to the system for detection of diabetic retinopathy. To categorize the exudates, Diabetic Fundus Image Recuperation (DFIR) method based on sliding window approach is developed in this work to select the features of optic cup in digital retinal fundus images. The DFIR feature selection uses collection of sliding windows with varying range to obtain the features based on the histogram value using Group Sparsity Nonoverlapping Function. Using support vector model in the second phase, the DFIR method based on Spiral Basis Function effectively ranks the diabetic retinopathy disease level. The ranking of disease level on each candidate set provides a much promising result for developing practically automated and assisted diabetic retinopathy diagnosis system. Experimental work on digital fundus images using the DFIR method performs research on the factors such as sensitivity, ranking efficiency, and feature selection time.

  1. PYGM expression analysis in white blood cells: a complementary tool for diagnosing McArdle disease?

    PubMed

    de Luna, Noemí; Brull, Astrid; Lucia, Alejandro; Santalla, Alfredo; Garatachea, Nuria; Martí, Ramon; Andreu, Antoni L; Pinós, Tomàs

    2014-12-01

    McArdle disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme myophosphorylase, resulting in exercise intolerance from childhood and acute crises of early fatigue and contractures. In severe cases, these manifestations can be accompanied by rhabdomyolysis, myoglobinuria, and fatal renal failure. Diagnosis of McArdle disease is based on clinical diagnostic tests, together with an absence of myophosphorylase activity in skeletal muscle biopsies and genetic analysis of the myophosphorylase-encoding gene, PYGM. The recently reported association between myophosphorylase and Rac1 GTPase in a T lymphocyte cell line prompted us to study myophosphorylase expression in white blood cells (WBCs) from 20 healthy donors and 30 McArdle patients by flow cytometry using a fluorescent-labeled PYGM antibody. We found that T lymphocytes expressed myophosphorylase in healthy donors, but expression was significantly lower in McArdle patients (p<0.001). PYGM mRNA levels were also lower in white blood cells from McArdle patients. Nevertheless, in 13% of patients (who were either heterozygotes or homozygotes for the most common PYGM pathogenic mutation among Caucasians (p.R50X)), the percentage of myophosphorylase-positive white blood cells was not different compared with the control group. Our findings suggest that analysis of myophosphorylase expression in white blood cells might be a useful, less-invasive, complementary test for diagnosing McArdle disease.

  2. CLIPPERS among patients diagnosed with non-specific CNS neuroinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Kerrn-Jespersen, B M; Lindelof, M; Illes, Zsolt; Blaabjerg, Morten; Lund, E L; Klausen, C; Christiansen, I; Sellebjerg, F; Kondziella, D

    2014-08-15

    Chronic Lymphocytic Inflammation with Pontine Perivascular Enhancement Responsive to Steroids (CLIPPERS) is an inflammatory CNS disorder characterized by 1) subacute onset of cerebellar and brainstem symptoms, 2) peripontine contrast-enhancing perivascular lesions with a "salt-and-pepper" appearance on MRI, and 3) angiocentric, predominantly T-lymphocytic infiltration as revealed by brain biopsy. Inflammatory diseases including neuroinfections, CNS lymphoma and neurosarcoidosis must be excluded. Since CLIPPERS was described in 2010, many patients might have been misdiagnosed in the past. We therefore searched medical records from a large tertiary neurological center, the Department of Neurology at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, for patients discharged between 1999 and 2013 with a diagnosis of "sarcoidosis with other localization", "other acute disseminating demyelination", "other demyelinating disease in the CNS" or "encephalitis, myelitis or encephalomyelitis". Of 206 identified patients, 24 had been examined by brain biopsy and were included for further evaluation. Following clinical, neuroradiological and neuropathological review, 3 patients (12.5%) were reclassified as having CLIPPERS. Median long-term follow-up was 75 months. The present results suggest that clinical re-evaluation of patients previously diagnosed with unspecified inflammatory demyelinating CNS disease or atypical neurosarcoidosis may increase the detection rate of CLIPPERS. Further, potentially severe neurological deficits and progressive parenchymal atrophy on MRI may suggest neurodegenerative features, which emphasizes the need for early immunomodulatory treatment.

  3. [Possibilities and limits of retrospective diagnoses. Pathobiografical notes on Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's diseases (1756-1791)].

    PubMed

    Bauer, Axel W

    2006-01-01

    On December 5th, 1791, Wolfgang Amadé Mozart died from an acute febrile disease which had been accompanied by painful tumefactions around his hands and feet. The official diagnosis 'hitziges Frieselfieber' (severe military fever) cannot be decoded or translated into modern medical terms. Hypotheses which assert either a wilful or an erroneous poisoning with mercuric chloride have not been corroborated. Innumerable diverging retrospective diagnoses have been made by physicians during the 19th and 20th centuries. In this essay, we give a pathobiografical description of Mozart's three severe diseases from which he suffered as a boy: When traveling through Europe with his parents and his sister to give many exhausting concerts Wolfgang Amadé fell ill with an Erythema nodosum (1762), an abdominal typhus (1765), and with smallpox (1767). With regard to the 24 years between 1767 and 1791, however, we don't have much evidence for the suspicion that Mozart has had severe acute or chronic diseases as a grown-up. He may have been physically robust, but mentally he was rather sensitive. In his letters, Mozart sometimes portrayed a temporary bad state of health in order to illustrate his inconvenient emotional and/or financial situation. Up to November 18, 1791, Mozart's creativity was unbroken. His death came unexpectedly after an illness of 15 days.

  4. Exome sequencing and directed clinical phenotyping diagnose cholesterol ester storage disease presenting as autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Stitziel, Nathan O.; Fouchier, Sigrid W.; Sjouke, Barbara; Peloso, Gina M.; Moscoso, Alessa M.; Auer, Paul L.; Goel, Anuj; Gigante, Bruna; Barnes, Timothy A.; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Duga, Stefano; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Nikpay, Majid; Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kooperberg, Charles; Lange, Leslie A.; Ardissino, Diego; McPherson, Ruth; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rader, Daniel J.; de Faire, Ulf; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.; Charnas, Lawrence; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kastelein, John J.P.; Defesche, Joep C.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hovingh, G. Kees

    2014-01-01

    Objective Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by extremely high total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels that has been previously linked to mutations in LDLRAP1. We identified a family with ARH not explained by mutations in LDLRAP1 or other genes known to cause monogenic hypercholesterolemia. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of ARH in this family. Approach and Results We used exome sequencing to assess all protein coding regions of the genome in three family members and identified a homozygous exon 8 splice junction mutation (c.894G>A, also known as E8SJM) in LIPA that segregated with the diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia. Since homozygosity for mutations in LIPA is known to cause cholesterol ester storage disease (CESD), we performed directed follow-up phenotyping by non-invasively measuring hepatic cholesterol content. We observed abnormal hepatic accumulation of cholesterol in the homozygote individuals, supporting the diagnosis of CESD. Given previous suggestions of cardiovascular disease risk in heterozygous LIPA mutation carriers, we genotyped E8SJM in >27,000 individuals and found no association with plasma lipid levels or risk of myocardial infarction, confirming a true recessive mode of inheritance. Conclusions By integrating observations from Mendelian and population genetics along with directed clinical phenotyping, we diagnosed clinically unapparent CESD in the affected individuals from this kindred and addressed an outstanding question regarding risk of cardiovascular disease in LIPA E8SJM heterozygous carriers. PMID:24072694

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease in Nigeria: An Evaluation of the Spatial Accessibility to Healthcare for Diagnosed Cases in Edo State

    PubMed Central

    Oviasu, Osaretin; Rigby, Janette E.; Ballas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing problem in Nigeria, presenting challenges to the nation’s health and economy. This study evaluates the accessibility to healthcare in Edo State of CKD patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2009. Using cost analysis techniques within a geographical information system, an estimated travel time to the hospital was used to examine the spatial accessibility of diagnosed patients to available CKD healthcare in the state. The results from the study indicated that although there was an annual rise in the number of diagnosed cases, there were no significant changes in the proportion of patients that were diagnosed at the last stage of CKD. However, there were indications that the travel time to the hospital for CKD treatment might be a contributing factor to the number of diagnosed CKD cases. This implies that the current structure for CKD management within the state might not be adequate. PMID:28299133

  6. Health and disease: exploring the relation between parasitic infections, child nutrition status, and markets.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Susan

    2014-10-01

    Research in bioarchaeology and among living people provides insight into the biological and biocultural consequences of subsistence, political, and economic transitions. Central to this effort is examining infectious disease, such as diarrheal disease, respiratory infections, and parasitic infections because they are an important source of nutritional and energetic stress in both past and current groups. Although infection may not always result in overt disease, frequent exposure results in biological stress with a negative effect on child growth and, by extension, health. The goal of this article is to examine the association between a common class of infectious disease, soil-transmitted helminth worms, and nutritional status among youth living in communities that vary with respect to their distance from a commercial center. In 2007, anthropometric measurements and parasitological surveys were collected for 338 2-14-year-old children and adolescents living in lowland Bolivia as part of the Tsimane' Amazonian Panel Study. Associations between the presence of helminth infections and markers of both short- and long-term nutritional status were overall weak. Youth living in communities distant from the commercial center were more likely to be positive for multiple parasite species than youth in near communities, but youth in mid-distance communities had lower infection rates. This article demonstrates the challenge of identifying associations between nutritional and disease stress when individual and household factors are nested in a larger context of socioeconomic and environmental change. Increased collaboration between bioarchaeology and human biology should continue to examine the connections between stress and disease across time.

  7. The Interplay of Host Microbiota and Parasitic Protozoans at Mucosal Interfaces: Implications for the Outcomes of Infections and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bär, Ann-Katrein; Phukan, Niha; Pinheiro, Jully; Simoes-Barbosa, Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Infections by parasitic protozoans are largely neglected, despite threatening millions of people, particularly in developing countries. With descriptions of the microbiota in humans, a new frontier of investigation is developing to decipher the complexity of host-parasite-microbiota relationships, instead of the classic reductionist approach, which considers host-parasite in isolation. Here, we review with specific examples the potential roles that the resident microbiota can play at mucosal interfaces in the transmission of parasitic protozoans and in the progress of infection and disease. Although the mechanisms underlying these relationships remain poorly understood, some examples provide compelling evidence that specific components of the microbiota can potentially alter the outcomes of parasitic infections and diseases in humans. Most findings suggest a protective role of the microbiota, which might lead to exploratory research comprising microbiota-based interventions to prevent and treat protozoal infections in the future. However, these infections are often accompanied by an unbalanced microbiota and, in some specific cases, apparently, these bacteria may contribute synergistically to disease progression. Taken together, these findings provide a different perspective on the ecological nature of protozoal infections. This review focuses attention on the importance of considering polymicrobial associations, i.e., parasitic protozoans and the host microbiota, for understanding these human infections in their natural microbial context.

  8. Disease ecology across soil boundaries: effects of below-ground fungi on above-ground host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Tao, Leiling; Gowler, Camden D; Ahmad, Aamina; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2015-10-22

    Host-parasite interactions are subject to strong trait-mediated indirect effects from other species. However, it remains unexplored whether such indirect effects may occur across soil boundaries and connect spatially isolated organisms. Here, we demonstrate that, by changing plant (milkweed Asclepias sp.) traits, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) significantly affect interactions between a herbivore (the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus) and its protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha), which represents an interaction across four biological kingdoms. In our experiment, AMF affected parasite virulence, host resistance and host tolerance to the parasite. These effects were dependent on both the density of AMF and the identity of milkweed species: AMF indirectly increased disease in monarchs reared on some species, while alleviating disease in monarchs reared on other species. The species-specificity was driven largely by the effects of AMF on both plant primary (phosphorus) and secondary (cardenolides; toxins in milkweeds) traits. Our study demonstrates that trait-mediated indirect effects in disease ecology are extensive, such that below-ground interactions between AMF and plant roots can alter host-parasite interactions above ground. In general, soil biota may play an underappreciated role in the ecology of many terrestrial host-parasite systems.

  9. Risk of parasite transmission influences perceived vulnerability to disease and perceived danger of disease-relevant animals.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Pavol; Usak, Muhammet; Fancovicová, Jana

    2010-09-01

    Adaptationist view proposes that emotions were shaped by natural selection and their primary function is to protect humans against predators and/or disease threat. This study examined cross-cultural and inter-personal differences in behavioural immune system measured by disgust, fear and perceived danger in participants from high (Turkey) and low (Slovakia) pathogen prevalence areas. We found that behavioural immune system in Turkish participants was activated more than those of Slovakian participants when exposed to photographs depicting disease-relevant cues, but not when exposed to disease-irrelevant cues. However, participants from Slovakia, where human to human disease transmission is expected to be more prevalent than in Turkey, showed lower aversion in Germ Aversion subscale supporting hypersensitiveness of the behavioural immune system. Having animals at home was less frequent both in Turkey and in participants who perceived higher danger about disease relevant animals. Participants more vulnerable to diseases reported higher incidence of illness last year and considered perceived disease-relevant animals more dangerous than others. Females showed greater fear, disgust and danger about disease-relevant animals than males. Our results further support the finding that cultural and inter-personal differences in human personality are influenced by parasite threat.

  10. Use of the star sign to diagnose internal fistulas in pediatric patients with penetrating Crohn disease by MR enterography.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Kiery A; Alazraki, Adina L

    2014-08-01

    Development of internal fistula due to extramural spread of inflammatory bowel disease is a characteristic feature of penetrating disease in patients with Crohn disease. The "star sign" is a radiological finding of internal fistula that has previously been described in the gastroenterology literature in adult Crohn disease patients undergoing MR enteroclysis. The goal of this paper is to review the clinical and imaging features of penetrating disease in pediatric Crohn disease patients, highlighting the star sign as a useful diagnostic tool for diagnosing internal fistula in children by MR enterography. The recognition of penetrating complications by MR imaging can have important therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  11. Environmental effects on parasitic disease transmission exemplified by schistosomiasis in western China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Song; Seto, Edmund Y. W.; Remais, Justin V.; Zhong, Bo; Yang, Changhong; Hubbard, Alan; Davis, George M.; Gu, Xueguang; Qiu, Dongchuan; Spear, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental effects on the transmission of many parasitic diseases are well recognized, but the role of specific factors like climate and agricultural practices in modulating transmission is seldom characterized quantitatively. Based on studies of Schistosoma japonicum transmission in irrigated agricultural environments in western China, a mathematical model was used to quantify environmental impacts on transmission intensity. The model was calibrated by using field data from intervention studies in three villages and simulated to predict the effects of alternative control options. Both the results of these interventions and earlier epidemiological findings confirm the central role of environmental factors, particularly those relating to snail habitat and agricultural and sanitation practices. Moreover, the findings indicate the inadequacy of current niclosamide-praziquantel strategies alone to achieve sustainable interruption of transmission in some endemic areas. More generally, the analysis suggests a village-specific index of transmission potential and how this potential is modulated by time-varying factors, including climatological variables, seasonal water-contact patterns, and irrigation practices. These time-variable factors, a village's internal potential, and its connectedness to its neighbors provide a framework for evaluating the likelihood of sustained schistosomiasis transmission and suggest an approach to quantifying the role of environmental factors for other parasitic diseases. PMID:17438266

  12. [Parasitic diseases are a risk factor of inflammations of the small pelvis organs. Trichomoniasis].

    PubMed

    Gasanova, T A

    2002-01-01

    Clinical and laboratory studies were made in 2259 persons by using serological assays, including cultural and bacterioscopic assays in 1824 and 363 persons, respectively, in order to indicate Trichomonas infection among men, women, and 2-15-year-old children who had chronic inflammation of the urogenital system, as well as among children aged 2 months to 16 years who had a severe somatic disease. Parasitic cenoses of the urogenital tract were studied in women with trichomoniasis and reproductive dysfunction. Trichomonas invasion is an etiological factor of inflammatory small pelvic diseases, chronic prostatitis, reproductive dysfunction in males and females. Furthermore, trichomoniasis is an essential factor, that predisposes to recurrent viral infections: genital herpes and pointed condyloma, and substantially increases the risk of birth of babies with clinical manifestations of intrauterine infection. According to the studies, a laboratory diagnosis of trichomoniasis should be made by cultural assay due to the low sensitivity of bacterioscopy by sampling a biological material from females in the periovulatory period that corresponds to the hyperestrogenicity, which substantially increases the number of isolated cultures and characterizes the depth of integration of metabolic processes of a parasite and its host.

  13. Periodic fever in MVK deficiency: a patient initially diagnosed with incomplete Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Thors, Valtyr S; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Wulffraat, Nico; van Royen, Annet; Frenkel, Joost; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique; de Koning, Tom J

    2014-02-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder causing 1 of 2 phenotypes, hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome and mevalonic aciduria, presenting with recurrent fever episodes, often starting in infancy, and sometimes evoked by stress or vaccinations. This autoinflammatory disease is caused by mutations encoding the mevalonate kinase (MVK) gene and is classified in the group of periodic fever syndromes. There is often a considerable delay in the diagnosis among pediatric patients with recurrent episodes of fever. We present a case of an 8-week-old girl with fever of unknown origin and a marked systemic inflammatory response. After excluding infections, a tentative diagnosis of incomplete Kawasaki syndrome was made, based on the finding of dilated coronary arteries on cardiac ultrasound and fever, and she was treated accordingly. However, the episodes of fever recurred, and alternative diagnoses were considered, which eventually led to the finding of increased excretion of mevalonic acid in urine. The diagnosis of MKD was confirmed by mutation analysis of the MVK gene. This case shows that the initial presentation of MKD can be indistinguishable from incomplete Kawasaki syndrome. When fever recurs in Kawasaki syndrome, other (auto-)inflammatory diseases must be ruled out to avoid inappropriate diagnostic procedures, ineffective interventions, and treatment delay.

  14. Diagnosing Coronary Artery Disease via Data Mining Algorithms by Considering Laboratory and Echocardiography Features

    PubMed Central

    Alizadehsani, Roohallah; Habibi, Jafar; Alizadeh Sani, Zahra; Mashayekhi, Hoda; Boghrati, Reihane; Ghandeharioun, Asma; Khozeimeh, Fahime; Alizadeh-Sani, Fariba

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the result of the accumulation of athermanous plaques within the walls of coronary arteries, which supply the myocardium with oxygen and nutrients. CAD leads to heart attacks or strokes and is, thus, one of the most important causes of death worldwide. Angiography, an imaging modality for blood vessels, is currently the most accurate method of diagnosing artery stenosis. However, the disadvantages of this method such as complications, costs, and possible side effects have prompted researchers to investigate alternative solutions. Objectives: The current study aimed to use data analysis, a non-invasive and less costly method, and various data mining algorithms to predict the stenosis of arteries. Among many people who refer to hospitals due to chest pain, a great number of them are normal and as such do not need angiography. The objective of this study was to predict patients who are most probably normal using features with the highest correlations with CAD with a view to obviate angiography costs and complications. Not a substitute for angiography, this method would select high-risk cases that definitely need angiography. Patients and Methods: Different features were measured and collected from potential patients in order to construct a dataset, which was later utilized for model extraction. Most of the proposed methods in the literature have not considered the stenosis of each artery separately, whereas the present study employed laboratory and echocardiographic data to diagnose the stenosis of each artery separately. The data were gathered from 303 random visitors to Rajaie Cardiovascular, Medical and Research Center. Electrocardiographic (ECG) data were studied in our previous works. The goal of this study was, therefore, to seek the accuracy of echocardiographic and laboratory features to predict CAD patients that require angiography. Results: Bagging and C4.5 classification algorithms were drawn upon to analyse the

  15. Acute Schistosomiasis in Brazilian Traveler: The Importance of Tourism in The Epidemiology of Neglected Parasitic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guiguet Leal, Diego Averaldo; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno; Neves, Maria Francisca; Simões, Luciana Franceschi; Bastos, Letícia Aparecida Duart; Allegretti, Silmara Marques; Zanotti-Magalhães, Eliana Maria; Magalhães, Luiz Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic infectious diseases acquired in tourist areas may pose a challenge to physicians and to travel medicine practitioners. Acute schistosomiasis may be seen in returning travelers and migrants after primary infection. This form of schistosomiasis is frequently misdiagnosed due to its temporal delay and its nonspecific presentation and might occur even in countries where the disease is endemic, such as in Brazil. The patient developed the acute phase of schistosomiasis with severe clinical manifestations. The quantitative analysis revealed the presence of 240 eggs per gram of stool. The treatment was administered with oxamniquine, and the control of cure of the patient was monitored and was favorable. The present paper aims to emphasize the importance of a detailed clinical history including information regarding travel history. PMID:22844623

  16. [Analysis on theses of the Chinese Journal of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases in 2009-2012].

    PubMed

    Yi, Feng-Yun; Qu, Lin-Ping; Yan, He; Sheng, Hui-Feng

    2013-12-01

    The published articles at the Chinese Journal of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases in 2009-2012 were statistically analyzed. Among 547 papers published in the four years, original articles occupied 45.3% (248/547). The number of authors was 2712, with an average cooperation degree of 5.0, and the co-authorship accounted for 95.4% of the papers. Authors were mainly from colleges/universities (51.9%, 284/547), institutions for disease control (34.4%, 188/547) and hospitals health centers (13.7%, 75/547). The average publishing delay was 212, 141, 191 and 207 d in 2009-2012. Statistical analysis reflected the characteristics and academic level for improving the quality of the journal, and revealed the latest development and trends.

  17. Acute schistosomiasis in brazilian traveler: the importance of tourism in the epidemiology of neglected parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Guiguet Leal, Diego Averaldo; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno; Neves, Maria Francisca; Simões, Luciana Franceschi; Bastos, Letícia Aparecida Duart; Allegretti, Silmara Marques; Zanotti-Magalhães, Eliana Maria; Magalhães, Luiz Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic infectious diseases acquired in tourist areas may pose a challenge to physicians and to travel medicine practitioners. Acute schistosomiasis may be seen in returning travelers and migrants after primary infection. This form of schistosomiasis is frequently misdiagnosed due to its temporal delay and its nonspecific presentation and might occur even in countries where the disease is endemic, such as in Brazil. The patient developed the acute phase of schistosomiasis with severe clinical manifestations. The quantitative analysis revealed the presence of 240 eggs per gram of stool. The treatment was administered with oxamniquine, and the control of cure of the patient was monitored and was favorable. The present paper aims to emphasize the importance of a detailed clinical history including information regarding travel history.

  18. Parasitic, fungal and prion zoonoses: an expanding universe of candidates for human disease.

    PubMed

    Akritidis, N

    2011-03-01

    Zoonotic infections have emerged as a burden for millions of people in recent years, owing to re-emerging or novel pathogens often causing outbreaks in the developing world in the presence of inadequate public health infrastructure. Among zoonotic infections, those caused by parasitic pathogens are the ones that affect millions of humans worldwide, who are also at risk of developing chronic disease. The present review discusses the global effect of protozoan pathogens such as Leishmania sp., Trypanosoma sp., and Toxoplasma sp., as well as helminthic pathogens such as Echinococcus sp., Fasciola sp., and Trichinella sp. The zoonotic aspects of agents that are not essentially zoonotic are also discussed. The review further focuses on the zoonotic dynamics of fungal pathogens and prion diseases as observed in recent years, in an evolving environment in which novel patient target groups have developed for agents that were previously considered to be obscure or of minimal significance.

  19. Diagnosing Polyparasitism in a High-Prevalence Setting in Beira, Mozambique: Detection of Intestinal Parasites in Fecal Samples by Microscopy and Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Polderman, Anton M.; Vinkeles Melchers, Natalie V. S.; Brienen, Eric A. T.; Verweij, Jaco J.; Groosjohan, Bernhard; Mendes, Felisberto; Mechendura, Manito; Hepp, Dagmar H.; Langenberg, Marijke C. C.; Edelenbosch, Rosanne; Polman, Katja; van Lieshout, Lisette

    2017-01-01

    Background Many different intestinal parasite species can co-occur in the same population. However, classic diagnostic tools can only frame a particular group of intestinal parasite species. Hence, one or two tests do not suffice to provide a complete picture of infecting parasite species in a given population. The present study investigated intestinal parasitic infections in Beira, Mozambique, i.e. in the informal settlement of Inhamudima. Diagnostic accuracy of five classical microscopy techniques and real-time PCR for the detection of a broad spectrum of parasites was compared. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional population-based survey was performed. One stool sample per participant (n = 303) was examined by direct smear, formal-ether concentration (FEC), Kato smear, Baermann method, coproculture and real-time PCR. We found that virtually all people (96%) harbored at least one helminth, and that almost half (49%) harbored three helminths or more. Remarkably, Strongyloides stercoralis infections were widespread with a prevalence of 48%, and Ancylostoma spp. prevalence was higher than that of Necator americanus (25% versus 15%), the hookworm species that is often assumed to prevail in East-Africa. Among the microscopic techniques, FEC was able to detect the broadest spectrum of parasite species. However, FEC also missed a considerable number of infections, notably S. stercoralis, Schistosoma mansoni and G. intestinalis. PCR outperformed microscopy in terms of sensitivity and range of parasite species detected. Conclusions/Significance We showed intestinal parasites—especially helminths—to be omnipresent in Inhamudima, Beira. However, it is a challenge to achieve high diagnostic sensitivity for all species. Classical techniques such as FEC are useful for the detection of some intestinal helminth species, but they lack sensitivity for other parasite species. PCR can detect intestinal parasites more accurately but is generally not feasible in

  20. Imaging diagnoses and outcome in patients presenting for primary angioplasty but no obstructive coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Tarun K; Reichmuth, Luise; Ariff, Ben; Rao, Praveen P G; Baltabaeva, Aigul; Rahman-Haley, Shelley; Kabir, Tito; Wong, Joyce; Dalby, Miles

    2016-01-01

    Objective A proportion of patients with suspected ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) presenting for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) do not have obstructive coronary disease and other conditions may be responsible for their symptoms and ECG changes. In this study, we set out to determine the prevalence and aetiology of alternative diagnoses in a large PPCI cohort as determined with multimodality imaging and their outcome. Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5238 patients with suspected STEMI were referred for consideration of PPCI. Patients who underwent angiography but had no culprit artery for revascularisation and no previous history of coronary artery disease were included in the study. Troponin values, imaging findings and all-cause mortality were obtained from hospital and national databases. Results A total of 575 (13.0%) patients with a mean age of 58±15 years (69% men) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A specific diagnosis based on imaging was made in 237 patients (41.2%) including cardiomyopathies (n=104, 18%), myopericarditis (n=48, 8.4%), myocardial infarction/other coronary abnormality (n=27, 4.9%) and severe valve disease (n=23, 4%). Pulmonary embolism and type A aortic dissection were identified in seven (1.2%) and four (0.7%) cases respectively. A total of 40 (7.0%) patients died over a mean follow-up of 42.6 months. Conclusions A variety of cardiac and non-cardiac conditions are prevalent in patients presenting with suspected STEMI but culprit-free angiogram, some of which may have adverse outcomes. Further imaging of such patients could thus be useful to help in appropriate management and follow-up. PMID:27368743

  1. Evasion and Immuno-Endocrine Regulation in Parasite Infection: Two Sides of the Same Coin in Chagas Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Morrot, Alexandre; Villar, Silvina R.; González, Florencia B.; Pérez, Ana R.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a serious illness caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Nearly 30% of chronically infected people develop cardiac, digestive, or mixed alterations, suggesting a broad range of host-parasite interactions that finally impact upon chronic disease outcome. The ability of T. cruzi to persist and cause pathology seems to depend on diverse factors like T. cruzi strains, the infective load and the route of infection, presence of virulence factors, the parasite capacity to avoid protective immune response, the strength and type of host defense mechanisms and the genetic background of the host. The host-parasite interaction is subject to a constant neuro-endocrine regulation that is thought to influence the adaptive immune system, and as the infection proceeds it can lead to a broad range of outcomes, ranging from pathogen elimination to its continued persistence in the host. In this context, T. cruzi evasion strategies and host defense mechanisms can be envisioned as two sides of the same coin, influencing parasite persistence and different outcomes observed in Chagas disease. Understanding how T. cruzi evade host's innate and adaptive immune response will provide important clues to better dissect mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of Chagas disease. PMID:27242726

  2. A Case of Nasu-Hakola Disease without Fractures or Consanguinity Diagnosed Using Exome Sequencing and Treated with Sodium Valproate

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Kiyohiro; Yoshino, Yuta; Mori, Yoko; Ochi, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Taku; Ishimaru, Takashi; Ueno, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD) is a rare autosomal recessive neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by bone cysts, fractures, and cognitive impairment. Two genes are responsible for the development of NHD; TYROBP and TREM2. Although it presents with typical signs and symptoms, diagnosing this disease remains difficult. This case report describes a male with NHD with no family or past history of bone fractures who was diagnosed using exome sequencing. His frontal lobe psychiatric symptoms recovered partially following treatment with sodium valproate, but not with an antipsychotic. PMID:26598595

  3. Vitamin D and Sunlight Exposure in Newly-Diagnosed Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Yang, Deyu; Yu, Yu; Shao, Gaohai; Wang, Qunbo

    2016-03-04

    Circulating vitamin D has previously been found to be lower in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), while the effects of sunlight exposure have not yet been fully investigated. Therefore, we evaluated the associations between serum vitamin D, vitamin D intake, sunlight exposure, and newly-diagnosed PD patients in a Chinese population. This case-control study measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and sunlight exposure in 201 patients with newly-diagnosed PD and 199 controls without neurodegenerative diseases. Data on vitamin D intake and sunlight exposure were obtained using a self-report questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regressions were employed to evaluate the associations between serum 25(OH)D levels, sunlight exposure, and PD. Adjustments were made for sex, age, smoking, alcohol use, education, BMI, and vitamin D intake. There were significantly lower levels of serum 25(OH)D (20.6 ± 6.5 ng/mL), daily vitamin D intake (8.3 ± 3.7 g/day), and sunlight exposure (9.7 ± 4.1 h/week) in patients with PD compared to healthy controls (p < 0.05). Crude odds ratios (ORs) for PD in the quartiles of serum 25(OH)D were 1 (reference), 0.710 (0.401, 1.257), 0.631 (0.348, 1.209), and 0.483 (0.267, 0.874), respectively. Crude ORs for PD in quartiles of sunlight exposure were 1 (reference), 0.809 (0.454, 1.443), 0.623 (0.345, 1.124) and 0.533 (0.294, 0.966), respectively. A significant positive correlation between serum 25(OH)D and sunlight exposure was found, but serum 25(OH)D was not correlated with daily vitamin D intake. This study indicates that lower levels of serum 25(OH)D and sunlight exposure are significantly associated with an increased risk for PD.

  4. Demodectic mange, dermatophilosis, and other parasitic and bacterial dermatologic diseases in free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the United States from 1975 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, N M; Ruder, M G; Gerhold, R W; Brown, J D; Munk, B A; Oesterle, P T; Kubiski, S V; Keel, M K

    2014-05-01

    The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is a common and widespread North American game species. To evaluate the incidence, clinical manifestations, demography, and pathology of bacterial and parasitic dermatologic diseases in white-tailed deer in the southeastern United States, we retrospectively evaluated white-tailed deer cases submitted to the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study from 1975 to 2012. Among 2569 deer examined, bacterial or parasitic dermatologic disease was diagnosed in 88 (3.4%) individuals, with Demodex spp (n = 37; 42.0%) and Dermatophilus congolensis (n = 19; 21.6%) as the most common causes. Demodicosis was significantly more common in deer older than 2 years and was most often detected in the fall; no statistically significant sex predilection was identified. Affected animals had patchy to generalized alopecia, often distributed over the head, neck, limbs, and trunk; microscopic lesions included epidermal crusts and cutaneous nodules with mild perifollicular, lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Dermatophilosis was most common in males younger than 1 year that were often found dead. Crusting, erythema, and alopecia occurred on the face, ears, and distal extremities. Less commonly, infectious dermatologic diseases were associated with other bacteria (n = 13; 14.8%), fungi (n = 5; 5.7%), ectoparasites (chiggers, lice, mites, and ticks; n = 11; 12.5%), and larval nematodes (n = 7; 8.0%). Population-level effects of these diseases in white-tailed deer are likely minimal; however, due to their dramatic presentation, demodicosis, dermatophilosis, and other infectious skin diseases can be of concern to hunters and, in some cases, may have zoonotic potential.

  5. Induction of regulatory cells by helminth parasites: exploitation for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Conor M; Walsh, Kevin P; Mills, Kingston H G

    2014-05-01

    Helminth parasites are highly successful pathogens, chronically infecting a quarter of the world's population, causing significant morbidity but rarely causing death. Protective immunity and expulsion of helminths is mediated by T-helper 2 (Th2) cells, type 2 (M2) macrophages, type 2 innate lymphoid cells, and eosinophils. Failure to mount these type 2 immune responses can result in immunopathology mediated by Th1 or Th17 cells. Helminths have evolved a wide variety of approaches for immune suppression, especially the generation of regulatory T cells and anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β. This is a very effective strategy for subverting protective immune responses to prolong their survival in the host but has the bystander effect of modulating immune responses to unrelated antigens. Epidemiological studies in humans have shown that infection with helminth parasites is associated with a low incidence of allergy/asthma and autoimmunity in developing countries. Experimental studies in mice have demonstrated that regulatory immune responses induced by helminth can suppress Th2 and Th1/Th17 responses that mediate allergy and autoimmunity, respectively. This has provided a rational explanation of the 'hygiene hypothesis' and has also led to the exploitation of helminths or their immunomodulatory products in the development of new immunosuppressive therapies for inflammatory diseases in humans.

  6. Survey of infectious and parasitic diseases in stray cats at the Lisbon Metropolitan Area, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Ana; Castro, Isabel; Pereira da Fonseca, Isabel M; Almeida, Virgilio; Madeira de Carvalho, Luis M; Meireles, José; Fazendeiro, Maria I; Tavares, Luis; Vaz, Yolanda

    2010-06-01

    A survey of infectious and parasitic diseases of stray cats was carried out using biological samples collected from animals captured during a catch-neuter-release programme in four counties of the Lisbon Metropolitan Area. The main objective was to investigate the potential threat of stray cats for animal and public health. Samples of blood, stool, hair and auricular swabs were collected from 231 cats in 27 colonies. Anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies were detected in 47/194 samples (24.2%); anti-Leishmania infantum antibodies in 1/180 cats (0.6%); intestinal parasites in 23/74 samples (Toxocara cati, Isospora felis, Ancylostoma tubaeforme, Dipylidium caninum, Uncinaria stenocephala, Toxascaris leonina) and Otodectes cynotis in 4/182 cats (2.2%); dermatophyte fungi were isolated in 40/136 samples (29.4%); feline immunodeficiency virus antibodies were detected in 23/226 samples (10.2%); feline leukaemia virus antigen in 14/198 samples (7.1%); and feline coronavirus RNA in 9/127 samples (7.1%). Our results revealed that zoonotic agents, namely dermatophyte fungi and Toxocara cati were present in stray cat colonies in the investigated counties. Overall the low frequency of major pathogens suggests a balanced relationship between host and agents.

  7. Intraepithelial lymphocytes, scores, mimickers and challenges in diagnosing gluten-sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease)

    PubMed Central

    Sergi, Consolato; Shen, Fan; Bouma, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    The upper digestive tract is routinely scoped for several causes of malabsorption, and the number of duodenal biopsy specimens has increased notably in the last 10 years. Gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE) is an autoimmune disease, which shows an increasing prevalence worldwide and requires a joint clinico-pathological approach. The classical histopathology of GSE with partial or total villous blunting is well recognized, but the classification of GSE is not straightforward. Moreover, several mimickers of GSE with intraepithelial lymphocytosis have been identified in the last 20 years, with drug interactions and medical comorbidities adding to the conundrum. In this review, we report on the normal duodenal mucosa, the clinical presentation and laboratory diagnosis of GSE, the duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytes and immunophenotype of GSE-associated lymphocytes, the GSE mimickers, the differences “across oceans” among guidelines in diagnosing GSE, and the use of a synoptic report for reporting duodenal biopsies in both children and adults in the 21st century. PMID:28216964

  8. Accuracy of FDG-PET to diagnose lung cancer in a region of endemic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Deppen, Stephen; Putnam, Joe B.; Andrade, Gabriela; Speroff, Theodore; Nesbitt, Jonathan C.; Lambright, Eric S.; Massion, Pierre P.; Walker, Ron; Grogan, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Background 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is used to evaluate suspicious pulmonary lesions due to its diagnostic accuracy. The southeastern United States has a high prevalence of infectious granulomatous lung disease, and the accuracy of FDGPET may be reduced in this population. We examined the diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET in patients with known or suspected NSCLC treated at our institution. Methods 279 patients identified through our prospective database, underwent an operation for known or suspected lung cancer. Preoperative FDG-PET in 211 eligible patients was defined by standardized uptake value, SUV > 2.5 or by description (“moderate” or “intense”) as avid. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios, and decision diagrams were calculated for FDG-PET in all patients and in patients with indeterminate nodules. Results In all eligible patients (n=211), sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET were 92% and 40%. Positive and negative predictive values were 86% and 55%. Overall FDG-PET accuracy to diagnose lung cancer was 81%. Preoperative positive likelihood ratio for FDG-PET diagnosis of lung cancer in this population was 1.5 compared to previously published values of 7.1. In 113 indeterminate lesions, 65% had lung cancer and the sensitivity and specificity were 89% and 40% respectively. 24 benign nodules (60%) had false positive FDG-PET scans. 22 of 43 benign nodules (51%) were granulomas. Conclusions In a region with endemic granulomatous diseases, the specificity of FDG-PET for diagnosis of lung cancer was 40%. Clinical decisions and future clinical predictive models for lung cancer must accommodate regional variation of FDG-PET scan results. PMID:21592456

  9. Quantitative appraisal of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in neuropathologically diagnosed Parkinson's disease cases lacking Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Maarouf, Chera L; Beach, Thomas G; Adler, Charles H; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Kokjohn, Tyler A; Dugger, Brittany N; Walker, Douglas G; Shill, Holly A; Jacobson, Sandra A; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Roher, Alex E

    2013-01-01

    Identifying biomarkers that distinguish Parkinson's disease (PD) from normal control (NC) individuals has the potential to increase diagnostic sensitivity for the detection of early-stage PD. A previous proteomic study identified potential biomarkers in postmortem ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (V-CSF) from neuropathologically diagnosed PD subjects lacking Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. In the present study, we assessed these biomarkers as well as p-tau(181), Aβ42, and S100B by ELISA in PD (n = 43) and NC (n = 49) cases. The p-tau(181)/Aβ42 ratio and ApoA-1 showed statistically significant differences between groups. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that p-tau(181)/Aβ42 had a significant odds ratio: OR = 1.42 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.84), P = 0.006. Among the molecules investigated, intriguing correlations were observed that require further investigation. Our results suggest coexistent AD CSF biomarkers within the PD group notwithstanding that it was selected to minimize AD neuropathological lesions.

  10. The Interplay of Host Microbiota and Parasitic Protozoans at Mucosal Interfaces: Implications for the Outcomes of Infections and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Jully; Simoes-Barbosa, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Infections by parasitic protozoans are largely neglected, despite threatening millions of people, particularly in developing countries. With descriptions of the microbiota in humans, a new frontier of investigation is developing to decipher the complexity of host–parasite–microbiota relationships, instead of the classic reductionist approach, which considers host–parasite in isolation. Here, we review with specific examples the potential roles that the resident microbiota can play at mucosal interfaces in the transmission of parasitic protozoans and in the progress of infection and disease. Although the mechanisms underlying these relationships remain poorly understood, some examples provide compelling evidence that specific components of the microbiota can potentially alter the outcomes of parasitic infections and diseases in humans. Most findings suggest a protective role of the microbiota, which might lead to exploratory research comprising microbiota-based interventions to prevent and treat protozoal infections in the future. However, these infections are often accompanied by an unbalanced microbiota and, in some specific cases, apparently, these bacteria may contribute synergistically to disease progression. Taken together, these findings provide a different perspective on the ecological nature of protozoal infections. This review focuses attention on the importance of considering polymicrobial associations, i.e., parasitic protozoans and the host microbiota, for understanding these human infections in their natural microbial context. PMID:26658061

  11. Global Eradication of Lymphatic Filariasis: The Value of Chronic Disease Control in Parasite Elimination Programmes

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Edwin; Malecela, Mwele N.; Zervos, Mihail; Kazura, James W.

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the global programme against lymphatic filariasis is eradication through irrevocable cessation of transmission using 4 to 6 years of annual single dose mass drug administration. The costs of eradication, managerial impediments to executing national control programmes, and scientific uncertainty about transmission endpoints, are challenges to the success of this effort, especially in areas of high endemicity where financial resources are limited. We used a combined analysis of empirical community data describing the association between infection and chronic disease prevalence, mathematical modelling, and economic analyses to identify and evaluate the feasibility of setting an infection target level at which the chronic pathology attributable to lymphatic filariasis - lymphoedema of the extremities and hydroceles - becomes negligible in the face of continuing transmission as a first stage option in achieving the elimination of this parasitic disease. The results show that microfilaria prevalences below a threshold of 3.55% at a blood sampling volume of 1 ml could constitute readily achievable and sustainable targets to control lymphatic filarial disease. They also show that as a result of the high marginal cost of curing the last few individuals to achieve elimination, maximal benefits can occur at this threshold. Indeed, a key finding from our coupled economic and epidemiological analysis is that when initial uncertainty regarding eradication occurs and prospects for resolving this uncertainty over time exist, it is economically beneficial to adopt a flexible, sequential, eradication strategy based on controlling chronic disease initially. PMID:18698350

  12. Case report: Cutaneous amebiasis: the importance of molecular diagnosis of an emerging parasitic disease.

    PubMed

    Morán, Patricia; Rojas, Liliana; Cerritos, René; Zermeño, Valeria; Valadez, Alicia; de Oca, Griselda Montes; Reyes, Miguel Ángel; González, Enrique; Partida, Oswaldo; Hernández, Eric; Nieves, Miriam; Portillo, Tobías; Gudiño, Marco; Ramiro, Manuel; Ximénez, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous amebiasis is the least common clinical form of human amebiasis in Mexico, sexual amebiasis was only occasionally observed before the late 1980s. However, in the last few decades, most of the documented cases of cutaneous amebiasis from around the world are sexually transmitted. We present two cases of sexually transmitted genital amebiasis. The molecular characterization of the Entamoeba species in the affected tissues underlines the importance of an etiological diagnosis using specific and sensitive techniques that avoid the rapid destruction of tissues and the irreversible sequelae to the anatomy and function of the affected organs. In addition, for those interested in the study of the human-amoebic disease relationship and its epidemiology, the detection of a new, mixed infection in an invasive case of amebiasis reveals new perspectives in the study of the extraordinarily complex host-parasite relationship in amebiasis.

  13. PSMA-PET/CT-Positive Paget Disease in a Patient with Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer: Imaging and Bone Biopsy Findings.

    PubMed

    Froehner, Michael; Toma, Marieta; Zöphel, Klaus; Novotny, Vladimir; Laniado, Michael; Wirth, Manfred P

    2017-01-01

    A 67-year-old man diagnosed with Gleason score 4 + 5 = 9 clinically localized prostate cancer with (68)Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) positive Paget bone disease is described. Immunohistochemical staining revealed weak PSMA positivity of the bone lesion supporting the hypothesis that neovasculature might explain positive PSMA-PET/CT findings in Paget disease.

  14. PSMA-PET/CT-Positive Paget Disease in a Patient with Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer: Imaging and Bone Biopsy Findings

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Marieta; Zöphel, Klaus; Novotny, Vladimir; Laniado, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A 67-year-old man diagnosed with Gleason score 4 + 5 = 9 clinically localized prostate cancer with 68Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) positive Paget bone disease is described. Immunohistochemical staining revealed weak PSMA positivity of the bone lesion supporting the hypothesis that neovasculature might explain positive PSMA-PET/CT findings in Paget disease.

  15. Emerging Animal Parasitic Diseases: A Global Overview and Appropriate Strategies for their Monitoring and Surveillance in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Atehmengo, Ngongeh L; Nnagbo, Chiejina S

    2014-01-01

    Emerging animal parasitic diseases are reviewed and appropriate strategies for efficient monitoring and surveillance in Nigeria are outlined. Animal and human parasitic infections are distinguished. Emerging diseases have been described as those diseases that are being recognised for the first time or diseases that are already recorded but their frequency and/or geographic range is being increased tremendously. Emergence of new diseases may be due to a number of factors such as the spread of a new infectious agent, recognition of an infection that has been in existence but undiagnosed, or when it is realised that an established disease has an infectious origin. The terms could also be used to describe the resurgence of a known infection after its incidence had been known to have declined. Emerging infections are compounding the control of infectious diseases and huge resources are being channeled to alleviate the rising challenge. The diseases are numerous and include helminth, protozoal / rickettsial and entomological. A list of parasitic emerging diseases in Nigeria is included. Globally occurring emerging parasitic diseases are also outlined. Emerging and re-emerging infections can be brought about by many factors including climate change and global warming, changes in biodiversity, population mobility, movement of animals, globalisation of commerce/trade and food supply, social and cultural factors such as food eating habits, religious beliefs, farming practices, trade of infected healthy animals, reduction in the available land for animals, immune-suppressed host and host density and misuse or over use of some drugs leading to drug resistance. PMID:25328553

  16. Ecto-Nucleotidase Activities of Promastigotes from Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis Relates to Parasite Infectivity and Disease Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Pauline M.; Gomes, Rodrigo S.; Figueiredo, Amanda B.; Serafim, Tiago D.; Tafuri, Wagner L.; de Souza, Carolina C.; Moura, Sandra A. L.; Fietto, Juliana L. R.; Melo, Maria N.; Ribeiro-Dias, Fátima; Oliveira, Milton A. P.; Rabello, Ana; Afonso, Luís C. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis has been associated with a broad range of clinical manifestations ranging from a simple cutaneous ulcer to destructive mucosal lesions. Factors leading to this diversity of clinical presentations are not clear, but parasite factors have lately been recognized as important in determining disease progression. Given the fact that the activity of ecto-nucleotidases correlates with parasitism and the development of infection, we evaluated the activity of these enzymes in promastigotes from 23 L. braziliensis isolates as a possible parasite-related factor that could influence the clinical outcome of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Our results show that the isolates differ in their ability to hydrolyze adenine nucleotides. Furthermore, we observed a positive correlation between the time for peak of lesion development in C57BL/6J mice and enzymatic activity and clinical manifestation of the isolate. In addition, we found that L. (V.) braziliensis isolates obtained from mucosal lesions hydrolyze higher amounts of adenine nucleotides than isolates obtained from skin lesions. One isolate with high (PPS6m) and another with low (SSF) ecto-nucleotidase activity were chosen for further studies. Mice inoculated with PPS6m show delayed lesion development and present larger parasite loads than animals inoculated with the SSF isolate. In addition, PPS6m modulates the host immune response by inhibiting dendritic cell activation and NO production by activated J774 macrophages. Finally, we observed that the amastigote forms from PPS6m and SSF isolates present low enzymatic activity that does not interfere with NO production and parasite survival in macrophages. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that ecto-nucleotidases present on the promastigote forms of the parasite may interfere with the establishment of the immune response with consequent impaired ability to control parasite dissemination and this may be an important

  17. Disease identification based on ambulatory drugs dispensation and in-hospital ICD-10 diagnoses: a comparison

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pharmacy-based case mix measures are an alternative source of information to the relatively scarce outpatient diagnoses data. But most published tools use national drug nomenclatures and offer no head-to-head comparisons between drugs-related and diagnoses-based categories. The objective of the study was to test the accuracy of drugs-based morbidity groups derived from the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification of drugs by checking them against diagnoses-based groups. Methods We compared drugs-based categories with their diagnoses-based analogues using anonymous data on 108,915 individuals insured with one of four companies. They were followed throughout 2005 and 2006 and hospitalized at least once during this period. The agreement between the two approaches was measured by weighted kappa coefficients. The reproducibility of the drugs-based morbidity measure over the 2 years was assessed for all enrollees. Results Eighty percent used a drug associated with at least one of the 60 morbidity categories derived from drugs dispensation. After accounting for inpatient under-coding, fifteen conditions agreed sufficiently with their diagnoses-based counterparts to be considered alternative strategies to diagnoses. In addition, they exhibited good reproducibility and allowed prevalence estimates in accordance with national estimates. For 22 conditions, drugs-based information identified accurately a subset of the population defined by diagnoses. Conclusions Most categories provide insurers with health status information that could be exploited for healthcare expenditure prediction or ambulatory cost control, especially when ambulatory diagnoses are not available. However, due to insufficient concordance with their diagnoses-based analogues, their use for morbidity indicators is limited. PMID:24171918

  18. Genetic variants of Kudoa septempunctata (Myxozoa: Multivalvulida), a flounder parasite causing foodborne disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, F; Ogasawara, Y; Kato, K; Sekizuka, T; Nozaki, T; Sugita-Konishi, Y; Ohnishi, T; Kuroda, M

    2016-06-01

    Foodborne disease outbreaks caused by raw olive flounders (Paralichthys olivaceus) parasitized with Kudoa septempunctata have been reported in Japan. Origins of olive flounders consumed in Japan vary, being either domestic or imported, and aquaculture-raised or natural. Although it is unknown whether different sources are associated with different outcomes, it is desirable to identify whether this is the case by determining whether unique K. septempunctata strains occur and if so, whether some are associated with foodborne illness. We here developed an intraspecific genotyping method, using the sequence variation of mitochondrial genes. We collected olive flounder samples from foodborne disease outbreaks, domestic fish farms or quarantine offices and investigated whether K. septempunctata genotype is associated with pathogenicity or geographic origin. The 104 samples were classified into three genotypes, ST1, ST2 and ST3. Frequency of symptomatic cases differed by genotypes, but the association was not statistically significant. Whereas K. septempunctata detected from aquaculture-raised and natural fish from Japan were either ST1 or ST2, those from fish inspected at quarantine from Korea to Japan were ST3. Our method can be applied to phylogeographic analysis of K. septempunctata and contribute to containing the foodborne disease. The genotype database is hosted in the PubMLST website (http://pubmlst.org/kseptempunctata/).

  19. The health impact of polyparasitism in humans: are we under-estimating the burden of parasitic diseases?

    PubMed

    Pullan, R; Brooker, S

    2008-06-01

    Parasitic infections are widespread throughout the tropics and sub-tropics, and infection with multiple parasite species is the norm rather than the exception. Despite the ubiquity of polyparasitism, its public health significance has been inadequately studied. Here we review available studies investigating the nutritional and pathological consequences of multiple infections with Plasmodium and helminth infection and, in doing so, encourage a reassessment of the disease burden caused by polyparasitism. The available evidence is conspicuously sparse but is suggestive that multiple human parasite species may have an additive and/or multiplicative impact on nutrition and organ pathology. Existing studies suffer from a number of methodological limitations and adequately designed studies are clearly necessary. Current methods of estimating the potential global morbidity due to parasitic diseases underestimate the health impact of polyparasitism, and possible reasons for this are presented. As international strategies to control multiple parasite species are rolled-out, there is a number of options to investigate the complexity of polyparasitism, and it is hoped that that the parasitological research community will grasp the opportunity to understand better the health of polyparasitism in humans.

  20. Two-stage hybrid feature selection algorithms for diagnosing erythemato-squamous diseases.

    PubMed

    Xie, Juanying; Lei, Jinhu; Xie, Weixin; Shi, Yong; Liu, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes two-stage hybrid feature selection algorithms to build the stable and efficient diagnostic models where a new accuracy measure is introduced to assess the models. The two-stage hybrid algorithms adopt Support Vector Machines (SVM) as a classification tool, and the extended Sequential Forward Search (SFS), Sequential Forward Floating Search (SFFS), and Sequential Backward Floating Search (SBFS), respectively, as search strategies, and the generalized F-score (GF) to evaluate the importance of each feature. The new accuracy measure is used as the criterion to evaluated the performance of a temporary SVM to direct the feature selection algorithms. These hybrid methods combine the advantages of filters and wrappers to select the optimal feature subset from the original feature set to build the stable and efficient classifiers. To get the stable, statistical and optimal classifiers, we conduct 10-fold cross validation experiments in the first stage; then we merge the 10 selected feature subsets of the 10-cross validation experiments, respectively, as the new full feature set to do feature selection in the second stage for each algorithm. We repeat the each hybrid feature selection algorithm in the second stage on the one fold that has got the best result in the first stage. Experimental results show that our proposed two-stage hybrid feature selection algorithms can construct efficient diagnostic models which have got better accuracy than that built by the corresponding hybrid feature selection algorithms without the second stage feature selection procedures. Furthermore our methods have got better classification accuracy when compared with the available algorithms for diagnosing erythemato-squamous diseases.

  1. CSF amyloid-β peptides in neuropathologically diagnosed dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mollenhauer, Brit; Esselmann, Herrmann; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Kretzschmar, Hans; Otto, Markus; Wiltfang, Jens; Bibl, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate treatment of dementia requires biomarkers that provide an exact and differential diagnosis. We recently presented differentially expressed amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide patterns in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as biomarker candidates for neurochemical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). The objective of the present study was to investigate CSF Aβ peptide patterns in both neuropathologically and clinically defined diagnostic groups of AD and DLB. Using the quantitative Aβ-SDS-PAGE/immunoblot, we analyzed CSF samples of neuropathologically defined patients with AD (definite AD, dAD; n = 11) and DLB (definite, dDLB; n = 12). We compared absolute and relative quantities of CSF Aβ-peptides with a larger cohort of clinically diagnosed patients with probable AD (pAD; n = 71), probable DLB (pDLB; n = 32), and non-demented controls (NDC; n = 71). Each neuropathologically and clinically defined diagnostic group showed a similar relative distribution of CSF Aβ-peptides (Aβ(1-X%)). Aβ(1-42%) was lowered in dAD compared to NDC (p = 1.6 × 10⁻⁷, but did not differ between dAD and pAD. Aβ(1-40ox%) was elevated in dDLB as compared to NDC (p = 1.8 × 10⁻⁵, but did not differ between dDLB and pDLB. Thus, we were able to confirm previous results on Aβ peptide patterns in neuropathologically characterized patients with AD and DLB. Our results underline the usefulness of the CSF Aβ(1-42%) and Aβ(1-40ox%) as diagnostic biomarkers for AD and DLB, respectively.

  2. Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies Are Highly Prevalent in Newly Diagnosed Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wierdsma, Nicolette J.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A. E.; Berkenpas, Marijke; Mulder, Chris J. J.; van Bodegraven, Ad A.

    2013-01-01

    Malabsorption, weight loss and vitamin/mineral-deficiencies characterize classical celiac disease (CD). This study aimed to assess the nutritional and vitamin/mineral status of current “early diagnosed” untreated adult CD-patients in the Netherlands. Newly diagnosed adult CD-patients were included (n = 80, 42.8 ± 15.1 years) and a comparable sample of 24 healthy Dutch subjects was added to compare vitamin concentrations. Nutritional status and serum concentrations of folic acid, vitamin A, B6, B12, and (25-hydroxy) D, zinc, haemoglobin (Hb) and ferritin were determined (before prescribing gluten free diet). Almost all CD-patients (87%) had at least one value below the lower limit of reference. Specifically, for vitamin A, 7.5% of patients showed deficient levels, for vitamin B6 14.5%, folic acid 20%, and vitamin B12 19%. Likewise, zinc deficiency was observed in 67% of the CD-patients, 46% had decreased iron storage, and 32% had anaemia. Overall, 17% were malnourished (>10% undesired weight loss), 22% of the women were underweight (Body Mass Index (BMI) < 18.5), and 29% of the patients were overweight (BMI > 25). Vitamin deficiencies were barely seen in healthy controls, with the exception of vitamin B12. Vitamin/mineral deficiencies were counter-intuitively not associated with a (higher) grade of histological intestinal damage or (impaired) nutritional status. In conclusion, vitamin/mineral deficiencies are still common in newly “early diagnosed” CD-patients, even though the prevalence of obesity at initial diagnosis is rising. Extensive nutritional assessments seem warranted to guide nutritional advices and follow-up in CD treatment. PMID:24084055

  3. International Symposium on Nuclear Techniques in the Study and Control of Parasitic Diseases of Man and Animals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    sensitivity. The functional RIAs that are presently available for the major parasitic diseases of man, including amebiasis, toxoplasmosis , malaria...specificity. The antigen assays appear more specific and offer quantitative analyses which will aid investigators to explore the humoral response more fully. J

  4. PROGRESSION OF DISEASES CAUSED BY THE OYSTER PARASITES, PERKINSUS MARINUS AND HAPLOSPORIDIUM NELSONI, IN CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA ON CONSTRUCTED INTERTIDAL REEFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The progression of diseases caused by the oyster parasites, Perkinsus marinus and Haplosporidium nelsoni, were evaluated by periodic sampling (May 1994-Dec. 1995) of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, that set on an artificial reef located in the Piankatank River, Virginia, in Augus...

  5. [Progress of research on genetic engineering antibody and its application in prevention and control of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Yu, Chuan-xin

    2013-08-01

    Antibody has extensive application prospects in the biomedical field. The inherent disadvantages of traditional polyclonal antibody and monoclonal antibody limit their application values. The humanized and fragmented antibody remodeling has given a rise to a series of genetic engineered antibody variant. This paper reviews the progress of research on genetic engineering antibody and its application in prevention and control of parasitic diseases.

  6. Equine immunity to parasites.

    PubMed

    Klei, T R

    2000-04-01

    Helminths are among the most significant parasites of horses in developed countries. This article examines immune responses against helminth parasites and the implications that immunologic investigations have on vaccine development, improvement of diagnostic procedures, and disease eradication.

  7. Parasitic diseases as the cause of death of prisoners of war during the Korean War (1950-1953).

    PubMed

    Huh, Sun

    2014-06-01

    To determine the cause of death of prisoners of war during the Korean War (1950-1953), death certificates or medical records were analyzed. Out of 7,614 deaths, 5,013 (65.8%) were due to infectious diseases. Although dysentery and tuberculosis were the most common infectious diseases, parasitic diseases had caused 14 deaths: paragonimiasis in 5, malaria in 3, amoebiasis in 2, intestinal parasitosis in 2, ascariasis in 1, and schistosomiasis in 1. These results showed that paragonimiasis, malaria, and amoebiasis were the most fatal parasitic diseases during the early 1950s in the Korean Peninsula. Since schistosomiasis is not endemic to Korea, it is likely that the infected private soldier moved from China or Japan to Korea.

  8. Screening of coeliac disease in undetected adults and patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Ajlan, Abdulrahman S

    2016-07-01

    The present study is to determine the prevalence and implication of coeliac disease (CD) among adult Saudis and compared to those with diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome. This prospective study was conducted among 980 adults. Out of that, 482 subjects (staff and students of Riyadh Health Science College) were designated as control cohorts for undetected coeliac disease. Furthermore, another contingent of 498 subjects diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) at Prince Salman Hospital and Al-Iman General Hospital also constituted a segment of the overall initial 1020 subjects. Both cases and control were tested for serological markers of coeliac disease (tissues transglutaminase (tTGAs) and endomysial autoantibody (EMAs) and were confirmed by histopathology test. All the positive for cases of coeliac disease were screened for iron deficiency anaemia, Vitamin D deficiency, and osteoporosis and weight assessment. The percentage of coeliac disease in control subjects and patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were found to be 1.9% and 9.6% respectively, about 38% of the total coeliac disease patients are among females of middle age (20-39-years) and 16% of the males in the same age range. Whereas, 20% and 25% of all coeliac disease cases with ages of 40-59 were remarked as females and males respectively. The identical nature and overlap of symptoms of the two conditions could possibly result in misdiagnosis of coeliac diseases or over-diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome. The findings of the study might also give considerable implications of the disease in the nutritional level which is noticeable.

  9. Hypereosinophilic syndrome, Churg-Strauss syndrome and parasitic diseases: possible links between eosinophilia and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Maino, Alberto; Rossio, Raffaella; Cugno, Massimo; Marzano, Angelo V; Tedeschi, Alberto

    2012-09-01

    Throughout the past decade, a possible role of eosinophils in blood coagulation and thrombosis has been suggested. We conducted a Pubmed (MEDLINE) search of case and series referring to any kind of thrombotic events described in three conditions characterised by persistent blood eosinophilia, i.e. the hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES), the Churg Strauss syndrome (CSS), and parasitic infestations from 1966 to date. One hundred and ninety-two articles were found regarding thrombotic events in HES and CSS, and 209 cases of thrombosis were extracted. One hundred and seventy- seven articles dealing with parasitic diseases and thrombosis were found, but only 15 manuscripts reporting thrombosis of unknown origin in 22 patients were selected. In HES, arterial thromboses were more frequent than in CSS (p=0.006), representing almost half of the cases (45%), while venous and mixed artero-venous thrombosis were respectively 28% and 27%. In contrast, in CSS there was a predominance of venous thrombosis (56%, p=0.006), with arterial thrombosis representing 38% of total thrombotic events, and mixed thrombosis being the least frequent (4%). The higher incidence of arterial thrombosis in HES patients can be explained by the common cardiac involvement (64% of patients). In the 22 patients with parasitoses and thrombosis, 15 had arterial thrombosis (68%) and 7 had venous thrombosis (32 %). Literature analysis shows that there are numerous reports of thrombotic events in patients with eosinophil-related disorders supporting a role for eosinophils in thrombosis. This observation raises the problem of prevention and treatment of thromboembolism particularly in HES and CSS patients.

  10. [Impact of effect of natural disasters on the circulation of causative agents of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Vaserin, Iu I; Khromenkova, E P; Dimidova, L L; Tverdokhlebova, T I; Nagornyĭ, S A; Prokopova, L V; Dumbadze, O S; Murashov, N E; Butaev, T M; Agirov, A Kh; Osmolovskiĭ, S V; Papatsenko, L B; Soldatova, M V

    2005-01-01

    The southern region is marked by a high incidence of parasitic diseases and a significant contamination of environmental objects with the eggs and cysts of their pathogens. Background examinations revealed the greatest soil contamination with helminthic eggs in the Temryuksky District of the Krasnodar Territory and in the towns of Vladikavkaz and Digora of the Republic of North Ossetia (Alania). The least contamination was found in Rostov-on-Don and the towns of the south-western area of the Krasnodar Territory. The eggs of Toxocara and astamination. There is an increase in the proportion of soil positive tests from 26.6 to 50.0, with the high (up to 82.0-100.0%) viability of eggs and a rise in the intensive index of their content per kg of soil (from 2.7 to 4.7-11.0). Toxocara eggs were mainly detected. The established high proportion of seropositive persons (10.7-18.0%) among the local population is an additional verification of the wide circulation of Toxocara eggs in nature. By the helminthic egg contamination index, the soils of localities of the south of Russia are qualified as those of moderate epidemic hazard. The floods accompanied by the increased helminthological contamination of the upper soil layer may lead to a higher human risk for contamination with helminthic diseases.

  11. Onchocerciasis in Plateau State; Nigeria: ecological background, local disease perception & treatment; and vector/parasite dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nwoke, B E; Onwuliri, C O; Ufomadu, G O

    1992-01-01

    The physico-biological ecological complex in Plateau State has by definition increased the potential of most rivers to support the breeding and dispersal of vector species as well as human acquisition and dissemination of the disease for several months in a year. Though villagers in endemic areas are of the know of the nuisance of blackfly bites, but the majority of them lacked the aetiological knowledge of onchocercal lesion. Hence disease management is misdirected towards consulting the oracle and appeasing the gods. The vectors of onchocerciasis in Plateau State, S. damnosum, and S. sirbanum are wet season breeders with their peak biting density occurring at the height of rainy season. However, biting flies carry more infective parasites at the beginning and end of rain. These vectors exhibit bimodal biting activity: a small one in the morning hours and a pronounced evening peak. Biting activity is at least influenced by two major climatic factors; illumination and temperature. However, the fastest changing climatic factor relative to an increase in the biting activity of flies was illumination. Microfilarial load in the skin of patients does not significantly change throughout the year or when biopsies are taken under shade throughout the day. Extreme temperatures, however, have significant reducing effect on the skin microfilarial. The epidemiological relevance of these in the ongoing MECTIZAN delivery in the State are discussed.

  12. Comparison between Two Decades of Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Diseases and Risk Factors in a Brazilian Urban Centre.

    PubMed

    Alves de Oliveira Serra, Maria Aparecida; Chaves, Cristina de Souza; Branco Coêlho, Zirlane Castelo; de Castro Rodrigues, Naya Lúcia; Martins Vale, Josias; Teixeira, Maria Jânia; de Oliveira, Francisco Josemar Alves; de Araújo, Márcio Flávio Moura; Coelho, Ivo Castelo Branco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study's objective was to compare the prevalence of intestinal parasites and associated risk factors in children in urban communities, in the Brazilian Northeast, between two decades. Methods. This quantitative transversal study consisted of a comparative analysis of two different samples: the first viewing the years 1992-1996 and the other through a coproepidemiological data survey undertaken in 2010-2011. Results. It was evidenced that there was a reduction of intestinal parasites and that there were improvements in the socioenvironmental conditions between the two decades evaluated. It was observed that, in the period 1992-1996, playing out in the streets was associated with a higher risk for acquiring intestinal parasites. Over the 2010-2011 period, the characteristics of more than five residents per household, houses with dirt floors, children who live in homes without piped water, and children who play out in the streets were associated with a higher risk of intestinal parasitic infection. Conclusion. The study showed a reduction of intestinal parasitic diseases to 23.8% in 2010-2011 from 81.3% in 1992-1996 and improvement of the social-sanitary conditions of the population between the decades analyzed.

  13. Comparison between Two Decades of Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Diseases and Risk Factors in a Brazilian Urban Centre

    PubMed Central

    Alves de Oliveira Serra, Maria Aparecida; Chaves, Cristina de Souza; Branco Coêlho, Zirlane Castelo; de Castro Rodrigues, Naya Lúcia; Martins Vale, Josias; Teixeira, Maria Jânia; de Oliveira, Francisco Josemar Alves; de Araújo, Márcio Flávio Moura; Coelho, Ivo Castelo Branco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study's objective was to compare the prevalence of intestinal parasites and associated risk factors in children in urban communities, in the Brazilian Northeast, between two decades. Methods. This quantitative transversal study consisted of a comparative analysis of two different samples: the first viewing the years 1992–1996 and the other through a coproepidemiological data survey undertaken in 2010-2011. Results. It was evidenced that there was a reduction of intestinal parasites and that there were improvements in the socioenvironmental conditions between the two decades evaluated. It was observed that, in the period 1992–1996, playing out in the streets was associated with a higher risk for acquiring intestinal parasites. Over the 2010-2011 period, the characteristics of more than five residents per household, houses with dirt floors, children who live in homes without piped water, and children who play out in the streets were associated with a higher risk of intestinal parasitic infection. Conclusion. The study showed a reduction of intestinal parasitic diseases to 23.8% in 2010-2011 from 81.3% in 1992–1996 and improvement of the social-sanitary conditions of the population between the decades analyzed. PMID:26692338

  14. Guide to the identification of fish protozoan and metazoan parasites in stained tissue sections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruno, D.W.; Nowak, B.; Elliott, D.G.

    2006-01-01

    The identification of protozoan and metazoan parasites is traditionally carried out using a series of classical keys based upon the morphology of the whole organism. However, in stained tissue sections prepared for light microscopy, taxonomic features will be missing, thus making parasite identification difficult. This work highlights the characteristic features of representative parasites in tissue sections to aid identification. The parasite examples discussed are derived from species affecting finfish, and predominantly include parasites associated with disease or those commonly observed as incidental findings in disease diagnostic cases. Emphasis is on protozoan and small metazoan parasites (such as Myxosporidia) because these are the organisms most likely to be missed or mis-diagnosed during gross examination. Figures are presented in colour to assist biologists and veterinarians who are required to assess host/parasite interactions by light microscopy.

  15. Foodborne Parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and foodborne parasitic diseases, though not as widespread as bacterial and viral infections, are common on all continents and in most ecosystems, including arctic, temperate, and tropical regions. Certain foodborne ...

  16. Disease transmission in an extreme environment: nematode parasites infect reindeer during the Arctic winter.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anja M; Justin Irvine, R; Wilson, Kenneth; Piertney, Stuart B; Halvorsen, Odd; Coulson, Stephen J; Stien, Audun; Albon, Steve D

    2012-07-01

    Parasitic nematodes are found in almost all wild vertebrate populations but few studies have investigated these host-parasite relationships in the wild. For parasites with free-living stages, the external environment has a major influence on life-history traits, and development and survival is generally low at sub-zero temperatures. For reindeer that inhabit the high Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, parasite transmission is expected to occur in the summer, due to the extreme environmental conditions and the reduced food intake by the host in winter. Here we show experimentally that, contrary to most parasitic nematodes, Marshallagia marshalli of Svalbard reindeer is transmitted during the Arctic winter. Winter transmission was demonstrated by removing parasites in the autumn, using a novel delayed-release anthelmintic bolus, and estimating re-infection rates in reindeer sampled in October, February and April. Larval stages of nematodes were identified using molecular tools, whereas adult stages were identified using microscopy. The abundance of M. marshalli adult worms and L4s increased significantly from October to April, indicating that reindeer were being infected with L3s from the pasture throughout the winter. To our knowledge, this study is the first to experimentally demonstrate over-winter transmission of a gastro-intestinal nematode parasite in a wild animal. Potential mechanisms associated with this unusual transmission strategy are discussed in light of our knowledge of the life-history traits of this parasite.

  17. Ecomorphology and disease: cryptic effects of parasitism on host habitat use, thermoregulation, and predator avoidance.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Brett A; Johnson, Pieter T J

    2011-03-01

    Parasites can cause dramatic changes in the phenotypes of their hosts, sometimes leading to a higher probability of predation and parasite transmission. Because an organism's morphology directly affects its locomotion, even subtle changes in key morphological traits may affect survival and behavior. However, despite the ubiquity of parasites in natural communities, few studies have incorporated parasites into ecomorphological research. Here, we evaluated the effects of parasite-induced changes in host phenotype on the habitat use, thermal biology, and simulated predator-escape ability of Pacific chorus frogs (Pseudacris regilla) in natural environments. Frogs with parasite-induced limb malformations were more likely to use ground microhabitats relative to vertical refugia and selected less-angled perches closer to the ground in comparison with normal frogs. Although both groups had similar levels of infection, malformed frogs used warmer microhabitats, which resulted in higher body temperatures. Likely as a result of their morphological abnormalities, malformed frogs allowed a simulated predator to approach closer before escaping and escaped shorter distances relative to normal frogs. These data indicate that parasite-induced morphological changes can significantly alter host behavior and habitat use, highlighting the importance of incorporating the ubiquitous, albeit cryptic, role of parasites into ecomorphological research.

  18. Vascular disease in women: comparison of diagnoses in hospital episode statistics and general practice records in England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Electronic linkage to routine administrative datasets, such as the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) in England, is increasingly used in medical research. Relatively little is known about the reliability of HES diagnostic information for epidemiological studies. In the United Kingdom (UK), general practitioners hold comprehensive records for individuals relating to their primary, secondary and tertiary care. For a random sample of participants in a large UK cohort, we compared vascular disease diagnoses in HES and general practice records to assess agreement between the two sources. Methods Million Women Study participants with a HES record of hospital admission with vascular disease (ischaemic heart disease [ICD-10 codes I20-I25], cerebrovascular disease [G45, I60-I69] or venous thromboembolism [I26, I80-I82]) between April 1st 1997 and March 31st 2005 were identified. In each broad diagnostic group and in women with no such HES diagnoses, a random sample of about a thousand women was selected for study. We asked each woman’s general practitioner to provide information on her history of vascular disease and this information was compared with the HES diagnosis record. Results Over 90% of study forms sent to general practitioners were returned and 88% of these contained analysable data. For the vast majority of study participants for whom information was available, diagnostic information from general practice and HES records was consistent. Overall, for 93% of women with a HES diagnosis of vascular disease, general practice records agreed with the HES diagnosis; and for 97% of women with no HES diagnosis of vascular disease, the general practitioner had no record of a diagnosis of vascular disease. For severe vascular disease, including myocardial infarction (I21-22), stroke, both overall (I60-64) and by subtype, and pulmonary embolism (I26), HES records appeared to be both reliable and complete. Conclusion Hospital admission data in England provide

  19. Smart cloud system with image processing server in diagnosing brain diseases dedicated for hospitals with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Fahmi; Nasution, Tigor H

    2017-01-19

    The use of medical imaging in diagnosing brain disease is growing. The challenges are related to the big size of data and complexity of the image processing. High standard of hardware and software are demanded, which can only be provided in big hospitals. Our purpose was to provide a smart cloud system to help diagnosing brain diseases for hospital with limited infrastructure. The expertise of neurologists was first implanted in cloud server to conduct an automatic diagnosis in real time using image processing technique developed based on ITK library and web service. Users upload images through website and the result, in this case the size of tumor was sent back immediately. A specific image compression technique was developed for this purpose. The smart cloud system was able to measure the area and location of tumors, with average size of 19.91 ± 2.38 cm2 and an average response time 7.0 ± 0.3 s. The capability of the server decreased when multiple clients accessed the system simultaneously: 14 ± 0 s (5 parallel clients) and 27 ± 0.2 s (10 parallel clients). The cloud system was successfully developed to process and analyze medical images for diagnosing brain diseases in this case for tumor.

  20. Impact of apathy on health-related quality of life in recently diagnosed Parkinson's disease: the ANIMO study.

    PubMed

    Benito-León, Julián; Cubo, Esther; Coronell, Carlos

    2012-02-01

    The impact of apathy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in recently diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been systematically investigated. The objective of this cross-sectional survey (ANIMO study) was to examine the contribution of apathy to HRQOL in a Spanish sample of recently diagnosed PD patients. PD patients, diagnosed within 2 years of inclusion, were recruited at 102 outpatient clinics in 82 communities throughout Spain. Apathy was quantified using the Lille Apathy Rating Scale and HRQOL with the EuroQol-5D questionnaire. A mean EuroQol-5D index score of 0.89 obtained from population references in Spain was used as the cutoff for this study. The relationship between apathy and the dichotomized EuroQol-5D index score (<0.89 [lower HRQOL] vs ≥0.89 [reference]) was examined using multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical variables. We consecutively recruited 557 patients (60.3% men) with a mean age of 68.8 ± 9.7 years. Apathy was diagnosed in 291 (52.2%) and was related to problems in each of the EuroQoL dimensions. Apathetic PD patients showed EuroQol-5D index scores significantly lower than those without apathy (0.64 vs 0.83). In an adjusted model, apathetic PD patients were 2.49 times more likely to have lower HRQOL than nonapathetic patients (odds ratio, 2.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-4.15, P < 0.01). Apathy is very common in those with recently diagnosed PD and is one of the major clinical determinants of HRQOL in this disease. It should be one of the primary concerns among clinicians who provide treatment to individuals affected by PD.

  1. Cracking the nodule worm code advances knowledge of parasite biology and biotechnology to tackle major diseases of livestock.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rahul; Joachim, Anja; Ruttkowski, Bärbel; Rosa, Bruce A; Martin, John C; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Zhang, Xu; Ozersky, Philip; Wilson, Richard K; Ranganathan, Shoba; Sternberg, Paul W; Gasser, Robin B; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-11-01

    Many infectious diseases caused by eukaryotic pathogens have a devastating, long-term impact on animal health and welfare. Hundreds of millions of animals are affected by parasitic nematodes of the order Strongylida. Unlocking the molecular biology of representatives of this order, and understanding nematode-host interactions, drug resistance and disease using advanced technologies could lead to entirely new ways of controlling the diseases that they cause. Oesophagostomum dentatum (nodule worm; superfamily Strongyloidea) is an economically important strongylid nematode parasite of swine worldwide. The present article reports recent advances made in biology and animal biotechnology through the draft genome and developmental transcriptome of O. dentatum, in order to support biological research of this and related parasitic nematodes as well as the search for new and improved interventions. This first genome of any member of the Strongyloidea is 443 Mb in size and predicted to encode 25,291 protein-coding genes. Here, we review the dynamics of transcription throughout the life cycle of O. dentatum, describe double-stranded RNA interference (RNAi) machinery and infer molecules involved in development and reproduction, and in inducing or modulating immune responses or disease. The secretome predicted for O. dentatum is particularly rich in peptidases linked to interactions with host tissues and/or feeding activity, and a diverse array of molecules likely involved in immune responses. This research progress provides an important resource for future comparative genomic and molecular biological investigations as well as for biotechnological research toward new anthelmintics, vaccines and diagnostic tests.

  2. Diseases and parasites of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, in the Lake Huron basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLain, Alberton L.

    1952-01-01

    Sea lampreys from the Lake Huron basin carried no external parasites and showed a fairly low degree of infection by internal parasites. The material examined represented three life-history stages of the sea lamprey. Recently transformed downstream migrants (215 specimens) harbored only nematodes belonging to the genus Camallanus. The percentage of infection was 2.3. Active feeders from the lake (29 lampreys) revealed the highest degree of parasitism (31.0 percent) with the following parasites present: Echinorhynchus coregoni Linkins; Triaenophorus crassus Forel; and Camallanus sp. Among the 257 sexually mature upstream migrants (14.8 percent infected) Echinorhynchus coregoni and E. leidyi Van Cleave were the most common. Only occasional nematodes and cestodes were found, which fact indicates a failure of the lamprey to carry these parasites to the end of its natural life. Of the parasites observed, only the nematodes gave evidence of serious damage to the host. The study suggests that the role played by parasites in the natural control of the sea lamprey in its new habitat in the upper Great Lakes is of minor importance.

  3. Long-Term Disease Dynamics for a Specialized Parasite of Ant Societies: A Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Loreto, Raquel G.; Elliot, Simon L.; Freitas, Mayara L. R.; Pereira, Thairine M.; Hughes, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have investigated how social insects behave when a parasite is introduced into their colonies. These studies have been conducted in the laboratory, and we still have a limited understanding of the dynamics of ant-parasite interactions under natural conditions. Here we consider a specialized parasite of ant societies (Ophiocordyceps camponoti-rufipedis infecting Camponotus rufipes) within a rainforest. We first established that the parasite is unable to develop to transmission stage when introduced within the host nest. Secondly, we surveyed all colonies in the studied area and recorded 100% prevalence at the colony level (all colonies were infected). Finally, we conducted a long-term detailed census of parasite pressure, by mapping the position of infected dead ants and foraging trails (future hosts) in the immediate vicinity of the colonies over 20 months. We report new dead infected ants for all the months we conducted the census – at an average of 14.5 cadavers/month/colony. Based on the low infection rate, the absence of colony collapse or complete recovery of the colonies, we suggest that this parasite represents a chronic infection in the ant societies. We also proposed a “terminal host model of transmission” that links the age-related polyethism to the persistence of a parasitic infection. PMID:25133749

  4. Intestinal parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Suk; Kim, Ki Whang; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Dong Ho

    2008-01-01

    In general, gastrointestinal tract is the primary involvement site of parasites during their life cycle. In this article, we will describe amebiasis, ascariasis, and anisakiasis among the many common intestinal parasitic diseases. We will review the epidemiology, life cycles, clinical manifestations and complications, and illustrate detailed imaging findings of intestinal parasites. Recognizing features of parasitic infection is important to establish an early diagnosis that leads to prompt treatment and helps avoid unnecessary surgery.

  5. Parasites, diseases, and health status of sympatric populations of sika deer and white-tailed deer in Maryland and Virginia.

    PubMed

    Davidson, W R; Crow, C B

    1983-10-01

    In July 1981, investigations on parasites, diseases, and herd health status were conducted on sympatric populations of sika deer (Cervus nippon) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (Maryland) and Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge (Virginia) on the Delmarva Peninsula. Five adult deer of each species were collected from each location and subjected to thorough necropsy examinations and laboratory tests. White-tailed deer at both locations harbored protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites typically associated with this species throughout the southeastern United States. In contrast, sika deer at both locations harbored only light burdens of ticks, chiggers, and sarcocysts. Serologic tests for antibodies to seven infectious disease agents revealed evidence of exposure to bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, and parainfluenza3 virus in white-tailed deer, but only BVD virus in sika deer. At both locations the general health status of sika deer was superior to that of white-tailed deer.

  6. Molecular Diagnosis of Chagas Disease in Colombia: Parasitic Loads and Discrete Typing Units in Patients from Acute and Chronic Phases

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Carolina; Cucunubá, Zulma; Flórez, Carolina; Olivera, Mario; Valencia, Carlos; Zambrano, Pilar; León, Cielo; Ramírez, Juan David

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of Chagas disease is complex due to the dynamics of parasitemia in the clinical phases of the disease. The molecular tests have been considered promissory because they detect the parasite in all clinical phases. Trypanosoma cruzi presents significant genetic variability and is classified into six Discrete Typing Units TcI-TcVI (DTUs) with the emergence of foreseen genotypes within TcI as TcIDom and TcI Sylvatic. The objective of this study was to determine the operating characteristics of molecular tests (conventional and Real Time PCR) for the detection of T. cruzi DNA, parasitic loads and DTUs in a large cohort of Colombian patients from acute and chronic phases. Methodology/Principal Findings Samples were obtained from 708 patients in all clinical phases. Standard diagnosis (direct and serological tests) and molecular tests (conventional PCR and quantitative PCR) targeting the nuclear satellite DNA region. The genotyping was performed by PCR using the intergenic region of the mini-exon gene, the 24Sa, 18S and A10 regions. The operating capabilities showed that performance of qPCR was higher compared to cPCR. Likewise, the performance of qPCR was significantly higher in acute phase compared with chronic phase. The median parasitic loads detected were 4.69 and 1.33 parasite equivalents/mL for acute and chronic phases. The main DTU identified was TcI (74.2%). TcIDom genotype was significantly more frequent in chronic phase compared to acute phase (82.1% vs 16.6%). The median parasitic load for TcIDom was significantly higher compared with TcI Sylvatic in chronic phase (2.58 vs.0.75 parasite equivalents/ml). Conclusions/Significance The molecular tests are a precise tool to complement the standard diagnosis of Chagas disease, specifically in acute phase showing high discriminative power. However, it is necessary to improve the sensitivity of molecular tests in chronic phase. The frequency and parasitemia of TcIDom genotype in chronic

  7. Amplicon-Based Pyrosequencing Reveals High Diversity of Protistan Parasites in Ships' Ballast Water: Implications for Biogeography and Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pagenkopp Lohan, K M; Fleischer, R C; Carney, K J; Holzer, K K; Ruiz, G M

    2016-04-01

    Ships' ballast water (BW) commonly moves macroorganisms and microorganisms across the world's oceans and along coasts; however, the majority of these microbial transfers have gone undetected. We applied high-throughput sequencing methods to identify microbial eukaryotes, specifically emphasizing the protistan parasites, in ships' BW collected from vessels calling to the Chesapeake Bay (Virginia and Maryland, USA) from European and Eastern Canadian ports. We utilized tagged-amplicon 454 pyrosequencing with two general primer sets, amplifying either the V4 or V9 domain of the small subunit (SSU) of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene complex, from total DNA extracted from water samples collected from the ballast tanks of bulk cargo vessels. We detected a diverse group of protistan taxa, with some known to contain important parasites in marine systems, including Apicomplexa (unidentified apicomplexans, unidentified gregarines, Cryptosporidium spp.), Dinophyta (Blastodinium spp., Euduboscquella sp., unidentified syndinids, Karlodinium spp., Syndinium spp.), Perkinsea (Parvilucifera sp.), Opisthokonta (Ichthyosporea sp., Pseudoperkinsidae, unidentified ichthyosporeans), and Stramenopiles (Labyrinthulomycetes). Further characterization of groups with parasitic taxa, consisting of phylogenetic analyses for four taxa (Cryptosporidium spp., Parvilucifera spp., Labyrinthulomycetes, and Ichthyosporea), revealed that sequences were obtained from both known and novel lineages. This study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing is a viable and sensitive method for detecting parasitic protists when present and transported in the ballast water of ships. These data also underscore the potential importance of human-aided dispersal in the biogeography of these microbes and emerging diseases in the world's oceans.

  8. Eosinophilic fasciitis after parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta; Patinha, Fabia; Marinho, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by symmetrical swelling and skin induration of the distal portions of the arms and/or legs, evolving into a scleroderma-like appearance, accompanied by peripheral blood eosinophilia. It is a rare disease with a poorly understood etiology. Corticosteroid treatment remains the standard therapy, either taken alone or in association with an immunosuppressive drug. This paper presents a case of a male patient with palpebral edema and marked eosinophilia, diagnosed with intestinal parasitic infection in October 2006. He was treated with an antiparasitic drug, but both the swelling and the analytical changes remained. This was followed by a skin and muscle biopsy, which turned out to be compatible with eosinophilic fasciitis. There was progressive worsening of the clinical state, with stiffness of the abdominal wall and elevated inflammatory parameters, and the patient was referred to the Immunology Department, medicated with corticosteroids and methotrexate. Over the years there were therapeutic adjustments and other causes were excluded. Currently the patient continues to be monitored, and there is no evidence of active disease. The case described in this article is interesting because of the diagnosis of eosinophilic fasciitis probably associated/coexisting with a parasite infection. This case report differs from others in that there is an uncommon cause associated with the onset of the disease, instead of the common causes such as trauma, medication, non-parasitic infections or cancer.

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization risk in the second year of life by specific congenital heart disease diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Deborah; Fryzek, Jon; Jiang, Xiaohui; Bloomfield, Adam; Ambrose, Christopher S; Wong, Pierre C

    2017-01-01

    Children with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease (CHD) are at elevated risk of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease compared to their healthy peers. Previous studies have demonstrated lower RSV hospitalization risk among all children with CHD at 12-23 months of age versus 0-11 months of age. However, RSV hospitalization risk at 12-23 months of age by specific CHD diagnosis has not been characterized. Both case-control and cohort studies were conducted using data from the US National Inpatient Sample from 1997 to 2013 to characterize relative risk of RSV hospitalization among children 12-23 months of age with CHD. Related CHD diagnoses were combined for analysis. Hospitalizations for RSV and unspecified bronchiolitis were described by length of stay, mechanical ventilation use, mortality, and total charges. Over the 17-year period, 1,168,886 live birth hospitalizations with CHD were identified. Multiple specific CHD conditions had an elevated odds ratio or relative risk of RSV hospitalization. Mean total RSV hospitalization charges were significantly higher among children with CHD relative to those without CHD ($19,650 vs $7,939 in 2015 dollars) for this period. Compared to children without CHD, children with Ebstein's anomaly, transposition of the great arteries, aortic stenosis, heterotaxia, and aortic arch anomalies had 367-, 344-, 203-, 117- and 47-fold increased risk of inpatient RSV mortality, respectively. Unspecified bronchiolitis hospitalization odds and relative risk across CHD diagnoses were similar to those observed with RSV hospitalization; however, unspecified bronchiolitis hospitalizations were associated with shorter mean days of stay and less frequently associated with mechanical ventilation or mortality. Among children with more severe CHD diagnoses, RSV disease remains an important health risk through the second year of life. These data can help inform decisions regarding interventions to

  10. Respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization risk in the second year of life by specific congenital heart disease diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Deborah; Fryzek, Jon; Jiang, Xiaohui; Bloomfield, Adam; Ambrose, Christopher S.; Wong, Pierre C.

    2017-01-01

    Children with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease (CHD) are at elevated risk of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease compared to their healthy peers. Previous studies have demonstrated lower RSV hospitalization risk among all children with CHD at 12–23 months of age versus 0–11 months of age. However, RSV hospitalization risk at 12–23 months of age by specific CHD diagnosis has not been characterized. Both case-control and cohort studies were conducted using data from the US National Inpatient Sample from 1997 to 2013 to characterize relative risk of RSV hospitalization among children 12–23 months of age with CHD. Related CHD diagnoses were combined for analysis. Hospitalizations for RSV and unspecified bronchiolitis were described by length of stay, mechanical ventilation use, mortality, and total charges. Over the 17-year period, 1,168,886 live birth hospitalizations with CHD were identified. Multiple specific CHD conditions had an elevated odds ratio or relative risk of RSV hospitalization. Mean total RSV hospitalization charges were significantly higher among children with CHD relative to those without CHD ($19,650 vs $7,939 in 2015 dollars) for this period. Compared to children without CHD, children with Ebstein’s anomaly, transposition of the great arteries, aortic stenosis, heterotaxia, and aortic arch anomalies had 367-, 344-, 203-, 117- and 47-fold increased risk of inpatient RSV mortality, respectively. Unspecified bronchiolitis hospitalization odds and relative risk across CHD diagnoses were similar to those observed with RSV hospitalization; however, unspecified bronchiolitis hospitalizations were associated with shorter mean days of stay and less frequently associated with mechanical ventilation or mortality. Among children with more severe CHD diagnoses, RSV disease remains an important health risk through the second year of life. These data can help inform decisions regarding

  11. Vaccines 85: Molecular and chemical basis of resistance to parasitic, bacterial, and viral diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, R.A.; Chanock, R.M.; Brown, F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 70 selections. Some of the selection titles are: Structure of the Gene Encoding of Immunodominant Surface Antigen on the Sprozoite of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum; Cloning and Expression in Bacteria of the Genes for Merozite-specific Antigens from the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum; A Major Surface Antigen of Plasmodium falciparum in Merozoites: Studies on the Protein and its Gene; Genetic Construction of Cholera Vaccine Prototypes; and Viral Genes, Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes and Immunity.

  12. The origin and dispersion of human parasitic diseases in the old world (Africa, Europe and Madagascar).

    PubMed

    Nozais, Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    The ancestors of present-day man (Homo sapiens sapiens) appeared in East Africa some three and a half million years ago (Australopithecs), and then migrated to Europe, Asia, and later to the Americas, thus beginning the differentiation process. The passage from nomadic to sedentary life took place in the Middle East in around 8000 BC. Wars, spontaneous migrations and forced migrations (slave trade) led to enormous mixtures of populations in Europe and Africa and favoured the spread of numerous parasitic diseases with specific strains according to geographic area. The three human plasmodia (Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, and P. malariae) were imported from Africa into the Mediterranean region with the first human migrations, but it was the Neolithic revolution (sedentarisation, irrigation, population increase) which brought about actual foci for malaria. The reservoir for Leishmania infantum and L. donovani--the dog--has been domesticated for thousands of years. Wild rodents as reservoirs of L. major have also long been in contact with man and probably were imported from tropical Africa across the Sahara. L. tropica, by contrast, followed the migrations of man, its only reservoir. L. infantum and L. donovani spread with man and his dogs from West Africa. Likewise, for thousands of years, the dog has played an important role in the spread and the endemic character of hydatidosis through sheep (in Europe and North Africa) and dromadary (in the Sahara and North Africa). Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni have existed since prehistoric times in populations living in or passing through the Sahara. These populations then transported them to countries of Northern Africa where the specific, intermediary hosts were already present. Madagascar was inhabited by populations of Indonesian origin who imported lymphatic filariosis across the Indian Ocean (possibly of African origin since the Indonesian sailors had spent time on the African coast before reaching Madagascar

  13. Efficiency of the confocal method of laser endomicroscopy in complex diagnoses of diseases of common bile duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaskin, S. G.; Panchenkov, D. N.; Chertyuk, V. B.; Sazonov, D. V.; Zabozlayev, F. G.; Danilevskaya, O. V.; Mokshina, N. V.; Korniletsky, I. D.

    2017-01-01

    One of the more frequent manifestations of diseases of the bile ducts are its’ strictures or stenoses that could be of either malignant or benign nature. Current methods of diagnosing this pathology include computer tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, these methods are not always informative, which makes this a current and topical problem. A fundamentally new method that broadens the capabilities of ERCP when diagnosing diseases of the bile duct accompanied by the development of strictures or stenoses is probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE). The method is based on the principle of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The most elaborate complications arise with the presence of the pre-existing pancreatobiliary pathology: pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis, acute cholangitis, etc. Early stage cholangiocarcinoma diagnosis can be difficult (and not always possible) even with the help of modern research methods. For the timely diagnostic it is advantageous to conduct pCLE and targeted biopsy of the zone with most manifested changes. In all instances, the first use of the pCLE method for diagnostic purposes allowed us to clarify and correctly verify the diagnosis. When concerning the diseases of the bile duct, the modern stage of pCLE development can be of critical importance when other methods are not effective.

  14. Clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities in Latin American migrants with newly diagnosed Chagas disease 2005-2009, Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Valerio, L; Roure, S; Sabria, M; Balanzo, X; Valles, X; Seres, L

    2011-09-22

    Following Latin American migration, Chagas disease has inevitably appeared in non-endemic countries in Europe and elsewhere. New policies are necessary to prevent transmission in those countries but the long, often undetected chronic period of the early stages of the disease also renders epidemiological studies important. The main objective of our study was to determine the presence of clinical, electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiographic abnormalities in a population of Latin American migrants infected with Trypanosoma cruzi at the moment of diagnosis. We performed a hospital-based observational study of 100 adult patients with newly diagnosed Chagas infection between January 2005 and December 2009. Thirty-seven patients were classified within the Brazilian Consensus on Chagas cardiomyopathy early cardiac stages (A or B1) and 49 presented pathological findings (stage B2) according to the Panamerican Health Organization Classification. Overall, 49 patients showed ECG and/or echocardiographic alterations. The presence of ECG and ecocardiographic alterations were significantly associated (p=0.038). The most frequent ECG and echocardiographic findings were right bundle branch block (12 cases) and impaired left ventricular wall relaxation (24 cases), respectively. In conclusion, ECG and echocardiographic alterations coherent with Chagas cardiomyopathy were found in a large proportion of newly diagnosed Latin American migrants infected with T. cruzi. In the mid-term, Chagas disease might become an important cause of chronic cadiomyopathy in our attendance area.

  15. Complementary approaches to diagnosing marine diseases: a union of the modern and the classic

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Colleen A.; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Getchell, Rodman; House, Marcia; Mydlarz, Laura D.; Prager, Katherine C.; Renault, Tristan; Kiryu, Ikunari; Vega-Thurber, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Linking marine epizootics to a specific aetiology is notoriously difficult. Recent diagnostic successes show that marine disease diagnosis requires both modern, cutting-edge technology (e.g. metagenomics, quantitative real-time PCR) and more classic methods (e.g. transect surveys, histopathology and cell culture). Here, we discuss how this combination of traditional and modern approaches is necessary for rapid and accurate identification of marine diseases, and emphasize how sole reliance on any one technology or technique may lead disease investigations astray. We present diagnostic approaches at different scales, from the macro (environment, community, population and organismal scales) to the micro (tissue, organ, cell and genomic scales). We use disease case studies from a broad range of taxa to illustrate diagnostic successes from combining traditional and modern diagnostic methods. Finally, we recognize the need for increased capacity of centralized databases, networks, data repositories and contingency plans for diagnosis and management of marine disease. PMID:26880839

  16. Complementary approaches to diagnosing marine diseases: a union of the modern and the classic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burge, Colleen A.; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Getchell, Rodman G.; House, Marcia; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Mydlarz, Laura D.; Prager, Katherine C.; Sutherland, Kathryn P.; Renault, Tristan; Kiryu, Ikunari; Vega-Thurber, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Linking marine epizootics to a specific aetiology is notoriously difficult. Recent diagnostic successes show that marine disease diagnosis requires both modern, cutting-edge technology (e.g. metagenomics, quantitative real-time PCR) and more classic methods (e.g. transect surveys, histopathology and cell culture). Here, we discuss how this combination of traditional and modern approaches is necessary for rapid and accurate identification of marine diseases, and emphasize how sole reliance on any one technology or technique may lead disease investigations astray. We present diagnostic approaches at different scales, from the macro (environment, community, population and organismal scales) to the micro (tissue, organ, cell and genomic scales). We use disease case studies from a broad range of taxa to illustrate diagnostic successes from combining traditional and modern diagnostic methods. Finally, we recognize the need for increased capacity of centralized databases, networks, data repositories and contingency plans for diagnosis and management of marine disease.

  17. Prevalence and predictors of chronic kidney disease in newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus patients in Owerri, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Anyabolu, E. N.; Chukwuonye, I. I.; Arodiwe, E.; Ijoma, C. K.; Ulasi, I.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a common cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Sub-Saharan Africa. This study aims at identifying the prevalence and predictors of CKD in newly diagnosed HIV patients in Owerri, South East Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional study consisting of 393 newly diagnosed HIV-seropositive subjects and 136 age- and sex-matched seronegative subjects as controls. CKD was defined as 24-hour urine protein (24-HUP) ≥0.3 g and/or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 60 ml/min. Subjects were recruited from the HIV clinic and the Medical Outpatient Department of Federal Medical Centre, Owerri. Clinical and anthropometric data were collected. Relevant investigations were performed, including HIV screening and relevant urine and blood investigations. The mean age of the HIV subjects was 38.84 ± 10.65 years. CKD was present in 86 (22.9%) HIV subjects and 11 (8.l %) controls. Low waist circumference (WC), high serum creatinine, high spot urine protein/creatinine ratio (SUPCR), high 24-HUP/creatinine Ratio (24-HUPCR), high 24-HUP/osmolality Ratio (24-HUPOR) predicted CKD in HIV subjects. CKD prevalence is high (22.9%) among newly diagnosed HIV patients in South East Nigeria. The predictors of CKD included WC, serum creatinine, SUPCR, 24-HUPCR, and 24-HUPOR. PMID:26937072

  18. Characterization of the Skin Microbiota in Italian Stream Frogs (Rana italica) Infected and Uninfected by a Cutaneous Parasitic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Federici, Ermanno; Rossi, Roberta; Fidati, Laura; Paracucchi, Romina; Scargetta, Silvia; Montalbani, Elena; Franzetti, Andrea; La Porta, Gianandrea; Fagotti, Anna; Simonceli, Francesca; Cenci, Giovanni; Di Rosa, Ines

    2015-01-01

    In human and wildlife populations, the natural microbiota plays an important role in health maintenance and the prevention of emerging infectious diseases. In amphibians, infectious diseases have been closely associated with population decline and extinction worldwide. Skin symbiont communities have been suggested as one of the factors driving the different susceptibilities of amphibians to diseases. The activity of the skin microbiota of amphibians against fungal pathogens, such as Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, has been examined extensively, whereas its protective role towards the cutaneous infectious diseases caused by Amphibiocystidium parasites has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, we investigated, for the first time, the cutaneous microbiota of the Italian stream frog (Rana italica) and characterized the microbial assemblages of frogs uninfected and infected by Amphibiocystidium using the Illumina next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. A total of 629 different OTUs belonging to 16 different phyla were detected. Bacterial populations shared by all individuals represented only one fifth of all OTUs and were dominated by a small number of OTUs. Statistical analyses based on Bray-Curtis distances showed that uninfected and infected specimens had distinct cutaneous bacterial community structures. Phylotypes belonging to the genera Janthinobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Flavobacterium were more abundant, and sometimes almost exclusively present, in uninfected than in infected specimens. These bacterial populations, known to exhibit antifungal activity in amphibians, may also play a role in protection against cutaneous infectious diseases caused by Amphibiocystidium parasites. PMID:26370166

  19. Characterization of the Skin Microbiota in Italian Stream Frogs (Rana italica) Infected and Uninfected by a Cutaneous Parasitic Disease.

    PubMed

    Federici, Ermanno; Rossi, Roberta; Fidati, Laura; Paracucchi, Romina; Scargetta, Silvia; Montalbani, Elena; Franzetti, Andrea; La Porta, Gianandrea; Fagotti, Anna; Simonceli, Francesca; Cenci, Giovanni; Di Rosa, Ines

    2015-01-01

    In human and wildlife populations, the natural microbiota plays an important role in health maintenance and the prevention of emerging infectious diseases. In amphibians, infectious diseases have been closely associated with population decline and extinction worldwide. Skin symbiont communities have been suggested as one of the factors driving the different susceptibilities of amphibians to diseases. The activity of the skin microbiota of amphibians against fungal pathogens, such as Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, has been examined extensively, whereas its protective role towards the cutaneous infectious diseases caused by Amphibiocystidium parasites has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, we investigated, for the first time, the cutaneous microbiota of the Italian stream frog (Rana italica) and characterized the microbial assemblages of frogs uninfected and infected by Amphibiocystidium using the Illumina next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. A total of 629 different OTUs belonging to 16 different phyla were detected. Bacterial populations shared by all individuals represented only one fifth of all OTUs and were dominated by a small number of OTUs. Statistical analyses based on Bray-Curtis distances showed that uninfected and infected specimens had distinct cutaneous bacterial community structures. Phylotypes belonging to the genera Janthinobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Flavobacterium were more abundant, and sometimes almost exclusively present, in uninfected than in infected specimens. These bacterial populations, known to exhibit antifungal activity in amphibians, may also play a role in protection against cutaneous infectious diseases caused by Amphibiocystidium parasites.

  20. A parasite-derived 68-mer peptide ameliorates autoimmune disease in murine models of Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Maria E.; Greer, Judith; Dixit, Aakanksha; Alvarado, Raquel; McCauley-Winter, Padraig; To, Joyce; Tanaka, Akane; Hutchinson, Andrew T.; Robinson, Mark W.; Simpson, Ann M.; O’Brien, Bronwyn A.; Dalton, John P.; Donnelly, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Helminth parasites secrete molecules that potently modulate the immune responses of their hosts and, therefore, have potential for the treatment of immune-mediated human diseases. FhHDM-1, a 68-mer peptide secreted by the helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica, ameliorated disease in two different murine models of autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes and relapsing-remitting immune-mediated demyelination. Unexpectedly, FhHDM-1 treatment did not affect the proliferation of auto-antigen specific T cells or their production of cytokines. However, in both conditions, the reduction in clinical symptoms was associated with the absence of immune cell infiltrates in the target organ (islets and the brain tissue). Furthermore, after parenteral administration, the FhHDM-1 peptide interacted with macrophages and reduced their capacity to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF and IL-6. We propose this inhibition of innate pro-inflammatory immune responses, which are central to the initiation of autoimmunity in both diseases, prevented the trafficking of autoreactive lymphocytes from the periphery to the site of autoimmunity (as opposed to directly modulating their function per se), and thus prevented tissue destruction. The ability of FhHDM-1 to modulate macrophage function, combined with its efficacy in disease prevention in multiple models, suggests that FhHDM-1 has considerable potential as a treatment for autoimmune diseases. PMID:27883079

  1. Gastrointestinal parasite infestation.

    PubMed

    Abd El Bagi, Mohamed E; Sammak, Bassam M; Mohamed, Abdulrahman E; Al Karawi, Mohamed A; Al Shahed, Mona; Al Thagafi, Mohamed A

    2004-03-01

    Twenty-five percent of the world's population could be suffering parasitic infestation. Highest prevalence is in underdeveloped agricultural and rural areas in the tropical and subtropical regions. In some areas incidence may reach 90% of the population. In contrast, some major economic projects intended to promote local development have, paradoxically, caused parasitic proliferation, e.g. bilharziasis in Egypt and Sudan and Chagas disease in Brazil. The commonest cosmopolitan gastrointestinal parasite is Entamoeba histolytica. Some intestinal parasite are endemic in temperate climates, e.g. Entrobius vermicularis. The AIDS epidemic has increased the prevalence and severity of parasitic disease, particularly Strongyloides stercolaris. Tropical parasites are seen in Western people who travel to tropical countries. Radiology has acquired a major role in diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal parasite infestations and their complications.

  2. A disease difficult to diagnose: Gardner-Diamond syndrome accompanied by platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Zeynep; Karaman, Serap; Avcı, Burcu; Ünüvar, Ayşegül; Öztürk, Gülyüz; Anak, Sema; Devecioğlu, Ömer

    2014-01-01

    Gardner Diamond syndrome is a rare condition characterized with painful ecchymoses in different parts of the body and cutaneous and mucosal hemorrhages. The etiology is not known fully and psychogenic factors are thought to be involved. Cutaneous lesions and hemorrhages develop mostly following emotional stress and rarely minor traumas and may recur. Although the extremities are involved with the highest rate, the lesions may be observed in any part of the body. Hemostatic tests are generally normal. The majority of the subjects is composed of young women. It is observed more rarely in men and children. In this article, a patient who presented with recurring painful echymoses and bleeding disorder and diagnosed with Gardner Diamond syndrome by intracutaneous injection of autologous blood was presented to emphasize that this syndrome is observed rarely in the childhood and should be considered not only in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions, but also in the differential diagnosis of various system hemorrhages. PMID:26078671

  3. IgG4-related disease with cavernous sinus and intra-orbital lesions diagnosed by nasal mucosa biopsy.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Ruka; Yoshimura, Shunsuke; Motomura, Masakatsu; Tsujino, Akira; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Hara, Minoru

    2016-09-29

    IgG4-related disease is a systemic disease characterized by lesions with IgG4 positive plasma cell infiltration in the involved organs and a raised serum IgG4 level. We report a patient of 70-year-old male presented orbital inflammation of IgG4-related disease. The patient developed right eye pain, double vision, and reduced eye sight. MRI image revealed mild right ocular proptosis and swelling of right carvenous sinus, bilateral intraorbital extraocular muscles and right optic nerve. Right optic nerve showed ring-like enhancement. IgG4-related disease was suspected with increased serum IgG4 level of 355 mg/dl, mediastinal lymphadenopathy and prostate enlargement. Transbronchial lung biopsy and prostate needle biopsy were administered with negative results. The eye related symptoms resolved with time, but serum IgG4 continuously increased. IgG4-related disease was diagnosed by nasal mucosa biopsy, which showed IgG4 positive plasma cells within the inflammatory infiltrate. This report emphasizes the usefulness of nasal mucosa biopsy for the diagnosis of IgG4 related disease with lesions difficult to approach.

  4. Treatment of Parasitic Skin Diseases with Dimeticones A New Family of Compounds with a Purely Physical Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal parasitic skin diseases (EPSD) are common in the tropics and sub-tropics. They are caused by mites, lice and other blood-sucking insects. In resource-poor countries they are associated with considerable morbidity. Hitherto, EPSD are treated with insecticides with a neurotoxic mode of action. The efficacy of this treatment is variable, and the development and spread of resistant mites and lice is alarming. A new concept for treating EPSD is presented which is based on the topical application of dimeticones, silicone oils of low viscosity which rapidly kill insects and mites by a physical mode of action. They creep into the respiratory system and block oxygen supply. The physical mode of action makes the development of resistant parasite strains very unlikely. Due to their safety and efficacy, dimeticones are promising candidates for population-based intervention programmes targeted against EPSD in resource-poor settings. PMID:25425946

  5. New ways to diagnose and treat equine dental-related sinus disease.

    PubMed

    Easley, Jeremiah T; Freeman, David E

    2013-08-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of equine dental-related sinus disease is often challenging. Dental-related sinus disease is common and knowledge of these diseases is becoming increasingly important in veterinary medicine. Diagnostic capabilities are continually improving, leading to early diagnostic and therapeutic successes. With advanced imaging modalities, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, understanding of the intimate anatomic relationship between teeth and the paranasal sinuses continues to progress. There are many therapeutic options available for the treatment of these common and challenging disorders. A complete understanding of the disease, therapeutic options, and potential complications is vital to overall successful resolution of clinical signs in equine dental-related sinus disorders.

  6. Cultivation of parasites

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nishat Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Parasite cultivation techniques constitute a substantial segment of present-day study of parasites, especially of protozoa. Success in establishing in vitro and in vivo culture of parasites not only allows their physiology, behavior and metabolism to be studied dynamically, but also allows the nature of the antigenic molecules in the excretory and secretory products to be vigorously pursued and analyzed. The complex life-cycles of various parasites having different stages and host species requirements, particularly in the case of parasitic helminths, often make parasite cultivation an uphill assignment. Culturing of parasites depends on the combined expertise of all types of microbiological cultures. Different parasites require different cultivation conditions such as nutrients, temperature and even incubation conditions. Cultivation is an important method for diagnosis of many clinically important parasites, for example, Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis, Leishmania spp., Strongyloides stercoralis and free-living amoebae. Many commercial systems like InPouch TV for T. vaginalis, microaerophilous stationary phase culture for Babesia bovis and Harada-Mori culture technique for larval-stage nematodes have been developed for the rapid diagnosis of the parasitic infections. Cultivation also has immense utility in the production of vaccines, testing vaccine efficacy, and antigen - production for obtaining serological reagents, detection of drug-resistance, screening of potential therapeutic agents and conducting epidemiological studies. Though in vitro cultivation techniques are used more often compared with in vivo techniques, the in vivo techniques are sometimes used for diagnosing some parasitic infections such as trypanosomiasis and toxoplasmosis. Parasite cultivation continues to be a challenging diagnostic option. This review provides an overview of intricacies of parasitic culture and update on popular methods used for cultivating parasites. PMID

  7. A parasitic helminth-derived peptide that targets the macrophage lysosome is a novel therapeutic option for autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Raquel; O'Brien, Bronwyn; Tanaka, Akane; Dalton, John P; Donnelly, Sheila

    2015-02-01

    Parasitic worms (helminths) reside in their mammalian hosts for many years. This is attributable, in part, to their ability to skew the host's immune system away from pro-inflammatory responses and towards anti-inflammatory or regulatory responses. This immune modulatory ability ensures helminth longevity within the host, while simultaneously minimises tissue destruction for the host. The molecules that the parasite releases clearly exert potent immune-modulatory actions, which could be exploited clinically, for example in the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of pro-inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. We have identified a novel family of immune-modulatory proteins, termed helminth defence molecules (HDMs), which are secreted by several medically important helminth parasites. These HDMs share biochemical and structural characteristics with mammalian cathelicidin-like host defence peptides (HDPs), which are significant components of the innate immune system. Like their mammalian counterparts, parasite HDMs block the activation of macrophages via toll like receptor (TLR) 4 signalling, however HDMs are significantly less cytotoxic than HDPs. HDMs can traverse the cell membrane of macrophages and enter the endolysosomal system where they reduce the acidification of lysosomal compartments by inhibiting vacuolar (v)-ATPase activity. In doing this, HDMs can modulate critical cellular functions, such as cytokine secretion and antigen processing/presentation. Here, we review the role of macrophages, specifically their lysosomal mediated activities, in the initiation and perpetuation of pro-inflammatory immune responses. We also discuss the potential of helminth defence molecules (HDMs) as therapeutics to counteract the pro-inflammatory responses underlying autoimmune disease. Given the current lack of effective, non-cytotoxic treatment options to limit the progression of autoimmune pathologies, HDMs open novel treatment avenues.

  8. INTESTINAL PARASITIC INFECTIONS AND ATOPIC DISEASES IN CHILDREN: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY.

    PubMed

    Al Ghwass, Mohamed Me; El Dash, Hanaa H; Amin, Sayed A; Hussin, Shimaa S

    2015-08-01

    Different helminth parasites may have different effects on allergy depending on the timing of the exposure. A meta-analysis of many of studies reported the association between the presence of geohelminth eggs in stool samples and asthma provided some evidence for parasite-specific effects. This study evaluated the occurrence of allergy among different intestinal parasitic infected patients. A cross sectional study was carried out from June, 2013 to October, 2013 in the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic of Al-Fayoum University Hospitals among 55 children aged 2 years to 13 years. The data were collected using ISSAC questionnaire of allergy (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood) also laboratory analysis of complete blood picture, stool analysis and measurement of total serum IgE were performed for the patients. Among the patients 27 suffered from allergy and 28 had no allergic complain. Stool examinations showed Entrobius vernicularis (15), Trichostrongylus species (9), Hymenolepis nana (8), Entameba histolytica (8), Giardia lamblia (6), and mixed infections (9). The allergic group by parasitological examination 7 children (25.9%) had Entrobius vermicularis; 6 children (22.2%) Entameba histolytica; and 2 children (7.4 %) Giardia lamblia, with eosinophilic count was higher in the enterobiasis infected children than in protozoa infected ones. There were significantly high IgE levels in mixed parasitic infection (P= 0.006) and with Entrobius vermicularis infections (P=0.04). Also statistically significant difference between allergic groups by ISAAC score and the non allergic group regarding Ig E levels (P= 0.03). There was no significant difference between numbers of children with allergy and those without allergy among different parasitic infections. However, a marked significant association between the allergy and parasitic infected children was not declaimed.

  9. Concurrent physician-diagnosed asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A population study of prevalence, incidence and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sadatsafavi, Mohsen; Aaron, Shawn D.; To, Teresa M.; Lougheed, M. Diane; FitzGerald, J. Mark; Gershon, Andrea S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective We conducted a population-based cohort study to estimate trends in prevalence, incidence, and mortality of concurrent physician-diagnosed asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Study design and setting Two validated health administrative case definitions were used to identify asthma and COPD among all individuals aged 35 years and older living in Ontario, Canada. Annual asthma, COPD, and concurrent asthma and COPD prevalence, incidence, and mortality, standardized for age and sex, were estimated, and compared from 2002 to 2012, using generalized linear models. Results Standardized prevalence of concurrent asthma and COPD increased by 10.5%, from 2.9% in 2002 to 3.2% in 2012 overall, but more prominently in women compared to men. Overall, standardized incidence decreased by16%, from 2.5 to 2.1 per 1000 individuals, but increased significantly in young adults. All-cause mortality among patients with concurrent asthma and COPD decreased by 11.2%, from 2.6% to 2.2%. Being diagnosed with both diseases was significantly associated with higher all-cause mortality compared to asthma (OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.50–1.58), but not compared to COPD (OR = 0.97, 0.96–0.98), except in young adults aged 35 to 49 years where people with asthma and COPD had higher mortality (OR = 1.21, 1.15–1.27). Conclusions In a large North American population, the burden of concurrent physician-diagnosed asthma and COPD is increasing, particularly in women and young adults. PMID:28301574

  10. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Dydensborg Sander, Stine; Størdal, Ketil; Plato Hansen, Tine; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Murray, Joseph A; Lillevang, Søren Thue; Husby, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. Patients and methods We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. Results We identified 2,247 children who were registered in the Danish National Patient Register with celiac disease. Duodenal biopsies for 1,555 of the children (69%) were registered in the Patobank; 1,127 (50%) had a biopsy that was compatible with celiac disease (ie, Marsh 2–3). We accessed the medical records of 95% of the children who were registered in the Danish National Patient Register with celiac disease. We found that 1,510 (67%) had one or more positive antibody-test results; 1,120 (50%) had anti-tissue transglutaminase 2, IgA at tenfold or greater the upper limit of the normal range and/or positive endomysial antibody results. The positive predictive value depended on the criteria used for validation and the types and numbers of registrations that were included in the analysis and ranged from 62% (95% confidence interval: 60%–64%) to 86% (95% confidence interval: 84%–87%). Conclusion Our findings indicate that the Danish National Patient Register is a valuable source to identify patients who have been diagnosed with celiac disease. However, validation of the diagnoses is warranted before data on the

  11. Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) disease diagnosed on a British Columbia salmon farm through a longitudinal farm study

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Hugh W.; Schulze, Angela D.; Kaukinen, Karia H.; Li, Shaorong; Vanderstichel, Raphaël; Wessel, Øystein; Rimstad, Espen; Gardner, Ian A.; Hammell, K. Larry; Miller, Kristina M.

    2017-01-01

    Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) is an emerging disease of marine-farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar), first recognized in 1999 in Norway, and later also reported in Scotland and Chile. We undertook a longitudinal study involving health evaluation over an entire marine production cycle on one salmon farm in British Columbia (Canada). In previous production cycles at this farm site and others in the vicinity, cardiac lesions not linked to a specific infectious agent or disease were identified. Histologic assessments of both live and moribund fish samples collected at the farm during the longitudinal study documented at the population level the development, peak, and recovery phases of HSMI. The fish underwent histopathological evaluation of all tissues, Twort’s Gram staining, immunohistochemistry, and molecular quantification in heart tissue of 44 agents known or suspected to cause disease in salmon. Our analysis showed evidence of HSMI histopathological lesions over an 11-month timespan, with the prevalence of lesions peaking at 80–100% in sampled fish, despite mild clinical signs with no associated elevation in mortalities reported at the farm level. Diffuse mononuclear inflammation and myodegeneration, consistent with HSMI, was the predominant histologic observation in affected heart and skeletal muscle. Infective agent monitoring identified three agents at high prevalence in salmon heart tissue, including Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV), and parasites Paranucleospora theridion and Kudoa thyrsites. However, PRV alone was statistically correlated with the occurrence and severity of histopathological lesions in the heart. Immunohistochemical staining further localized PRV throughout HSMI development, with the virus found mainly within red blood cells in early cases, moving into the cardiomyocytes within or, more often, on the periphery of the inflammatory reaction during the peak disease, and reducing to low or undetectable levels later in the

  12. Peripheral arterial disease diagnosed with high-count-rate radionuclide arteriography

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, M.; Ijima, H.; Kohda, Y.; Kuramoto, K.; Kikuchi, Y.; Wada, M.; Akisada, M.

    1984-07-01

    Thirty-seven patients with peripheral vascular disease involving the legs were studied with first-pass peripheral radio-nuclide arteriography (RNA) and contrast arteriography to determine whether RNA could be used to evaluate perfusion of the toes. Peripheral time-activity curves were examined and the time required for activity to decline to 75% of peak activity (T75) was recorded. These data suggest that peripheral RNA of the toes is a reliable, noninvasive procedure for evaluation of peripheral arterial disease; it can be valuable as a screening test prior to contrast arteriography as well as for follow-up.

  13. Cracking the nodule worm code advances knowledge of parasite biology and biotechnology to tackle major diseases of livestock

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Rahul; Joachim, Anja; Ruttkowski, Bärbel; Rosa, Bruce A.; Martin, John C.; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Zhang, Xu; Ozersky, Philip; Wilson, Richard K.; Ranganathan, Shoba; Sternberg, Paul W.; Gasser, Robin B.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    Many infectious diseases caused by eukaryotic pathogens have a devastating, long-term impact on animal health and welfare. Hundreds of millions of animals are affected by parasitic nematodes of the order Stronglida. Unlocking the molecular biology of representatives of this order, and understanding nematode-host interactions, drug resistance and disease using advanced technologies could lead to entirely new ways of controlling the diseases that they cause. Oesphagostomum dentatum (nodule worm; superfamily Strongyloidea) is an economically important strongylid nematode of swine worldwide. The present article reports recent advances made in biology and animal biotechnology through the draft genome and developmental transcriptome of O. dentatum, in order to support biological research of this and related parasitic nematodes as well as the search for new and improved interventions. This first genome of any member of the Strongyloidea is 443 Mb in size and predicted to encode 25,291 protein-coding genes. Here, we review the dynamics of transcription throughout the life cycle of O. dentatum, describe double-stranded RNA interference (RNAi) machinery and infer molecules involved in development and reproduction, and in inducing or modulating immune responses or disease. The secretome predicted for O. dentatum is particularly rich in peptidases linked to interactions with host tissues and/or feeding activity, and a diverse array of molecules likely involved in immune responses. This research progress provides an important resource for future comparative genomic and molecular biological investigations as well as for biotechnological research toward new anthelmintics, vaccines and diagnostic tests. PMID:26026709

  14. Variations in prevalence of viral, bacterial, and rhizocephalan diseases and parasites of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus).

    PubMed

    Rogers, Holly A; Taylor, Sabrina S; Hawke, John P; Anderson Lively, Julie A

    2015-05-01

    Prevalence of blue crab diseases and parasites has not been consistently monitored in the Gulf of Mexico. To establish current prevalence levels and to more fully understand population dynamics, commercial landing trends, and effects of future natural and anthropogenic disasters on animal health, we measured the prevalence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), Loxothylacus texanus, shell disease, and Vibrio spp. in blue crabs collected from Louisiana in 2013 and the beginning of 2014. We used PCR to detect WSSV and L. texanus infections, visual gross diagnosis for L. texanus externae and shell disease, and standard microbiological culture techniques and biochemical testing for Vibrio spp. We found no crabs infected with WSSV or L. texanus. Absence of L. texanus parasitization was expected based on the sampled salinities and the sampling focus on large crabs. Shell disease was present at a level of 54.8% and was most prevalent in the winter and summer and least prevalent in the spring. Vibrio spp. were found in the hemolymph of 22.3% of the crabs and prevalence varied by site, season, and sex. Additionally, three of 39 crabs tested were infected with reo-like virus.

  15. Validity of peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses in administrative databases: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Montedori, Alessandro; Abraha, Iosief; Chiatti, Carlos; Cozzolino, Francesco; Orso, Massimiliano; Luchetta, Maria Laura; Rimland, Joseph M; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Administrative healthcare databases are useful to investigate the epidemiology, health outcomes, quality indicators and healthcare utilisation concerning peptic ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding, but the databases need to be validated in order to be a reliable source for research. The aim of this protocol is to perform the first systematic review of studies reporting the validation of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision and 10th version (ICD-9 and ICD-10) codes for peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses. Methods and analysis MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases will be searched, using appropriate search strategies. We will include validation studies that used administrative data to identify peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding diagnoses or studies that evaluated the validity of peptic ulcer and upper gastrointestinal bleeding codes in administrative data. The following inclusion criteria will be used: (a) the presence of a reference standard case definition for the diseases of interest; (b) the presence of at least one test measure (eg, sensitivity, etc) and (c) the use of an administrative database as a source of data. Pairs of reviewers will independently abstract data using standardised forms and will evaluate quality using the checklist of the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) criteria. This systematic review protocol has been produced in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocol (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required given that this is a protocol for a systematic review. We will submit results of this study to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. The results will serve as a guide for researchers validating administrative healthcare databases to determine appropriate case definitions for peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal

  16. Chemical Factors in Development and Transmission of Human Parasites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PARASITES, *PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, *BIOCIDES, *REPELLENTS, HORMONES, TABLES(DATA), SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI , BRAZIL, PARASITIC DISEASES, DISEASE VECTORS, INSECT REPELLENTS, CHAGAS DISEASE, TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.

  17. Glucocorticoid Therapy and the Risk of Infection in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yasuharu; Ishizuka, Naoki; Arai, Toru; Kiyokawa, Tetsuyuki; Suematsu, Eiichi; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Kawabe, Yojiro; Matsumura, Ryutaro; Akagawa, Shinobu; Mori, Shunsuke; Shirai, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yukio; Minami, Naoya; Soga, Takayoshi; Owan, Isoko; Ohshima, Shiro; Yoshizawa, Shigeru; Matsui, Toshihiro; Tohma, Shigeto; Bito, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is associated with the risk of life-threatening adverse events in patients with autoimmune disease. To determine accurately the incidence and predictors of GC-related adverse events during initial GC treatment, we conducted a cohort study. Patients with autoimmune disease who were initially treated with GCs in Japan National Hospital Organization (NHO) hospitals were enrolled. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to determine the independent risks for GC-related serious adverse events and mortality. Survival was analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method and was assessed with the log-rank test. The 604 patients had a total follow-up of 1105.8 person-years (mean, 1.9 year per patient). One hundred thirty-six patients had at least 1 infection with objective confirmation, and 71 patients had serious infections. Twenty-two cardiovascular events, 55 cases of diabetes, 30 fractures, 23 steroid psychosis events, and 4 avascular bone necrosis events occurred during the follow-up period. The incidence of serious infections was 114.8 (95% confidence interval, 95.7–136.6) per 1000 person-years. After adjustment for covariates, the following independent risk factors for serious infection were found: elderly age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.25/10-yr age increment; p = 0.016), presence of interstitial lung disease (HR, 2.01; p = 0.011), high-dose GC use (≥29.9 mg/d) (HR, 1.71; p = 0.047), and low performance status (Karnofsky score, HR, 0.98/1-score increment; p = 0.002). During the follow-up period, 73 patients died, 35 of whom died of infection. Similarly, elderly age, the presence of interstitial lung disease, and high-dose GC use were found to be significant independent risk factors for mortality. The incidence of serious and life-threatening infection was higher in patients with autoimmune disease who were initially treated with GCs. Although the primary diseases are important confounding factors, elderly age, male sex, the

  18. Fatigue is highly associated with poor health-related quality of life, disability and depression in newly-diagnosed patients with inflammatory bowel disease, independent of disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, B L; Zoëga, H; Shah, S A; LeLeiko, N; Lidofsky, S; Bright, R; Flowers, N; Law, M; Moniz, H; Merrick, M; Sands, B E

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatigue is common in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Data on fatigue in newly diagnosed patients are unavailable. Aim To report prevalence of fatigue in newly diagnosed CD and UC patients and examine its association with health-related quality of life (HRQOL), depression and disability. Methods The Ocean State Crohn's and Colitis Area Registry (OSCCAR) is a statewide cohort of newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease patients in Rhode Island. Fatigue was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue Scale. Patients were administered instruments measuring HRQOL, overall disability and work impairment, and depression. Results Fatigue was prevalent in 26.4% of 220 subjects. Cohen's d effect sizes for fatigue were large: Short-Form 36 Health Survey mental health component (CD 1.5, UC 1.4) and physical health component (CD 1.4, UC 1.4), EuroQol-5D valuation of current health state (CD 1.2, UC 1.0), Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (CD 1.9, UC 1.6) and Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale (CD 1.8, UC 1.7). Fatigued patients reported more work impairment (Score difference: CD 29.5%, UC 23.8%) and activity impairment (score difference: CD 32.3%, UC 25.7%) on the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire. Fatigue's association with all scores remained highly significant despite controlling for disease activity. Conclusions Fatigue is strongly associated with poor HRQOL, disability and depression similarly in CD and UC even when controlling for disease activity. Fatigue's association with a wide range of patient-reported outcome measures suggests that monitoring fatigue is a simple way to screen for overall disruption in patient life. PMID:24612278

  19. Selective mass treatment with ivermectin to control intestinal helminthiases and parasitic skin diseases in a severely affected population.

    PubMed Central

    Heukelbach, Jörg; Winter, Benedikt; Wilcke, Thomas; Muehlen, Marion; Albrecht, Stephan; de Oliveira, Fabíola Araújo Sales; Kerr-Pontes, Lígia Regina Sansigolo; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the short-term and long-term impact of selective mass treatment with ivermectin on the prevalence of intestinal helminthiases and parasitic skin diseases in an economically depressed community in north-east Brazil. METHODS: An intervention was carried out in a traditional fishing village in north-east Brazil where the population of 605 is heavily affected by ectoparasites and enteroparasites. The prevalence of intestinal helminths was determined by serial stool examination and the prevalence of parasitic skin diseases by clinical inspection. A total of 525 people out of a target population of 576 were treated at baseline. The majority of these were treated with ivermectin (200 microg/kg with a second dose given after 10 days). If ivermectin was contraindicated, participants were treated with albendazole or mebendazole for intestinal helminths or with topical deltamethrin for ectoparasites. Follow-up examinations were performed at 1 month and 9 months after treatment. FINDINGS: Prevalence rates of intestinal helminthiases before treatment and at 1 month and 9 months after mass treatment were: hookworm disease 28.5%, 16.4% and 7.7%; ascariasis 17.1%, 0.4% and 7.2%; trichuriasis 16.5%, 3.4% and 9.4%; strongyloidiasis 11.0%, 0.6% and 0.7%; and hymenolepiasis 0.6%; 0.4% and 0.5%, respectively. Prevalence rates of parasitic skin diseases before treatment and 1 month and 9 months after mass treatment were: active pediculosis 16.1%, 1.0% and 10.3%; scabies 3.8%, 1.0% and 1.5%; cutaneous larva migrans 0.7%, 0% and 0%; tungiasis 51.3%, 52.1% and 31.2%, respectively. Adverse events occurred in 9.4% of treatments. They were all of mild to moderate severity and were transient. CONCLUSION: Mass treatment with ivermectin was an effective and safe means of reducing the prevalence of most of the parasitic diseases prevalent in a poor community in north-east Brazil. The effects of treatment lasted for a prolonged period of time. PMID:15375445

  20. Disease dynamics of honeybees with Varroa destructor as parasite and virus vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses carried by Varroa mites. In this article, we propose a honeybee-mite-virus model that incorporates (1) par...

  1. Artificial intelligence techniques applied to the development of a decision–support system for diagnosing celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tenório, Josceli Maria; Hummel, Anderson Diniz; Cohrs, Frederico Molina; Sdepanian, Vera Lucia; Pisa, Ivan Torres; de Fátima Marin, Heimar

    2013-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a difficult-to-diagnose condition because of its multiple clinical presentations and symptoms shared with other diseases. Gold-standard diagnostic confirmation of suspected CD is achieved by biopsying the small intestine. Objective To develop a clinical decision–support system (CDSS) integrated with an automated classifier to recognize CD cases, by selecting from experimental models developed using intelligence artificial techniques. Methods A web-based system was designed for constructing a retrospective database that included 178 clinical cases for training. Tests were run on 270 automated classifiers available in Weka 3.6.1 using five artificial intelligence techniques, namely decision trees, Bayesian inference, k-nearest neighbor algorithm, support vector machines and artificial neural networks. The parameters evaluated were accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and area under the ROC curve (AUC). AUC was used as a criterion for selecting the CDSS algorithm. A testing database was constructed including 38 clinical CD cases for CDSS evaluation. The diagnoses suggested by CDSS were compared with those made by physicians during patient consultations. Results The most accurate method during the training phase was the averaged one-dependence estimator (AODE) algorithm (a Bayesian classifier), which showed accuracy 80.0%, sensitivity 0.78, specificity 0.80 and AUC 0.84. This classifier was integrated into the web-based decision–support system. The gold-standard validation of CDSS achieved accuracy of 84.2% and k = 0.68 (p < 0.0001) with good agreement. The same accuracy was achieved in the comparison between the physician’s diagnostic impression and the gold standard k = 0. 64 (p < 0.0001). There was moderate agreement between the physician’s diagnostic impression and CDSS k = 0.46 (p = 0.0008). Conclusions The study results suggest that CDSS could be used to help in diagnosing CD, since the algorithm tested achieved excellent

  2. 1974 outbreak of Legionnaires' Disease diagnosed in 1977. Clinical and epidemiological features.

    PubMed

    Terranova, W; Cohen, M L; Fraser, D W

    1978-07-15

    An illness characterized by high fever and pneumonia struck 2.9% of a group of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows attending a convention held in Philadelphia, in September, 1974. The convention headquarters was the hotel where the American Legion met in July, 1976. The epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory characteristics of the illness were nearly identical to those of the disease in American legionnaires in 1976. Illness was significantly associated with attendance at one convention activity held on Monday morning, Sept. 16, 1974, in the grand ballroom of the hotel. A serological survey in February and March, 1977, showed that people who had attended the convention and became ill were more likely to have raised indirect fluorescent antibody titres than persons who had attended and remained well. The illness seen in Odd Fellows members in September, 1974, was caused by the legionnaire's disease organism.

  3. Differential Diagnoses of Overgrowth Syndromes: The Most Important Clinical and Radiological Disease Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Letícia da Silva; Alves, Úrsula David; Zanier, José Fernando Cardona; Machado, Dequitier Carvalho; Camilo, Gustavo Bittencourt; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Overgrowth syndromes comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that are characterized by excessive tissue development. Some of these syndromes may be associated with dysfunction in the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/PI3K/AKT pathway, which results in an increased expression of the insulin receptor. In the current review, four overgrowth syndromes were characterized (Proteus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome, Madelung's disease, and neurofibromatosis type I) and illustrated using cases from our institution. Because these syndromes have overlapping clinical manifestations and have no established genetic tests for their diagnosis, radiological methods are important contributors to the diagnosis of many of these syndromes. The correlation of genetic discoveries and molecular pathways that may contribute to the phenotypic expression is also of interest, as this may lead to potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25009745

  4. Up to date concepts about Von Willebrand disease and the diagnose of this hemostatic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Buga-Corbu, I; Arion, C

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The authors review the current data in literature regarding the recent knowledge about hemostase, coagulation and clinical and laboratory diagnostic algorithms of hemostatic disorders. They also present the pathological classification of bleeding disorders - the basis to clinical approach of these diseases. Abbreviations: AD=autosomal dominant; Ag=antigen; DNA=deoxyribonucleic acid; ADAMTS13=serum metalloproteinase; AR=autosomal recessive; Arg=arginine; RNA=ribonucleic acid; VWD=von Willebrand disease; Cys=cysteine; C1—C9=factors of the seric complement; ELISA=enzyme linked immuno assay; FI---FXIII=plasmatic factors of coagulation; Glu=glutamines; Pg=platelet glycoprotein; HMW=high molecular weight; IL=interleukin; SLE=systemic lupus erythematosus; Met=methionine; PFA=automated study test of platelets aggregation; RCo=ristocetin cofactor; RI PA=ristocetin induced platelet aggregation; Tyr=tyrosine; VWF= von Willebrand factor PMID:25408749

  5. Diagnosing cardiovascular disease from the perspective of the brain and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Nicholas R S

    2013-01-01

    Numerous lifestyle, emotional, and biological factors have been identified as risk factors for heart disease. These include socioeconomic status, early childhood and intimate partner abuse, disruption of sleep patterns, lack of exercise, and unhealthy food choices. Genetic and epigenetic factors are also critical components of the equation. A common denominator that links directly or indirectly all of these factors is inflammation. In some instances, the production of inflammatory molecules may precipitate the illness, while in others they may be produced in response to the underlying cause. Regardless of whether through direct or indirect means, inflammation contributes to the gradual loss of cellular energy substrates, which culminates in impaired diastolic performance. For that reason, to refer to a failure of the cardiovascular system as heart or cardiovascular disease lessens the potentially important contribution of a myriad of other factors. This article begins with the premise that impaired cardiac functioning is more than a heart disorder. An argument will be made that impaired cardiac functioning can also be an economic, behavioral, and/or emotional disorder, which subsequently gives rise to a metabolic failure. Therefore, a multi-systems approach should be taken to identify prior to the onset of damage biological and non-biological predictors of impending heart disease.

  6. A challenging diagnosis for potential fatal diseases: recommendations for diagnosing acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Paolo; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Guida, Claudio Carmine; Rocchi, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Acute porphyrias are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders resulting from a variable catalytic defect of four enzymes out of the eight involved in the haem biosynthesis pathway; they are rare and mostly inherited diseases, but in some circumstances, the metabolic disturbance may be acquired. Many different environmental factors or pathological conditions (such as drugs, calorie restriction, hormones, infections, or alcohol abuse) often play a key role in triggering the clinical exacerbation (acute porphyric attack) of these diseases that may often mimic many other more common acute medical and neuropsychiatric conditions and whose delayed diagnosis and treatment may be fatal. In order to obtain an accurate diagnosis of acute porphyria, the knowledge and the use of appropriate diagnostic tools are mandatory, even in order to provide as soon as possible the more effective treatment and to prevent the use of potentially unsafe drugs, which can severely precipitate these diseases, especially in the presence of life-threatening symptoms. In this paper, we provide some recommendations for the diagnostic steps of acute porphyrias by reviewing literature and referring to clinical experience of the board members of the Gruppo Italiano Porfiria (GrIP).

  7. Bioluminescence imaging of chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections reveals tissue-specific parasite dynamics and heart disease in the absence of locally persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michael D; Fortes Francisco, Amanda; Taylor, Martin C; Burrell-Saward, Hollie; McLatchie, Alex P; Miles, Michael A; Kelly, John M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections lead to cardiomyopathy in 20–30% of cases. A causal link between cardiac infection and pathology has been difficult to establish because of a lack of robust methods to detect scarce, focally distributed parasites within tissues. We developed a highly sensitive bioluminescence imaging system based on T. cruzi expressing a novel luciferase that emits tissue-penetrating orange-red light. This enabled long-term serial evaluation of parasite burdens in individual mice with an in vivo limit of detection of significantly less than 1000 parasites. Parasite distributions during chronic infections were highly focal and spatiotemporally dynamic, but did not localize to the heart. End-point ex vivo bioluminescence imaging allowed tissue-specific quantification of parasite loads with minimal sampling bias. During chronic infections, the gastro-intestinal tract, specifically the colon and stomach, was the only site where T. cruzi infection was consistently observed. Quantitative PCR-inferred parasite loads correlated with ex vivo bioluminescence and confirmed the gut as the parasite reservoir. Chronically infected mice developed myocarditis and cardiac fibrosis, despite the absence of locally persistent parasites. These data identify the gut as a permissive niche for long-term T. cruzi infection and show that canonical features of Chagas disease can occur without continual myocardium-specific infection. PMID:24712539

  8. New technologies to diagnose and monitor infectious diseases of livestock: challenges for sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    King, Donald P; Madi, Miki; Mioulet, Valerie; Wadsworth, Jemma; Wright, Caroline F; Valdazo-González, Begoña; Ferris, Nigel P; Knowles, Nick J; Hammond, Jef

    2012-06-20

    Using foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) as an example, this review describes new tools that can be used to detect and characterise livestock diseases. In recent years, molecular tests that can detect and characterise pathogens in a diverse range of sample types have revolutionised laboratory diagnostics. In addition to use in centralised laboratories, there are opportunities to locate diagnostic technologies close to the animals with suspected clinical signs. Work in this area has developed simple-to-use lateral-flow devices for the detection of FMD virus (FMDV), as well as new hardware platforms to allow molecular testing to be deployed into the field for use by non-specialists. Once FMDV has been detected, nucleotide sequencing is used to compare field strains with reference viruses. Transboundary movements of FMDV are routinely monitored using VP1 sequence data, while higher resolution transmission trees (at the farm-to-farm level) can be reconstructed using full-genome sequencing approaches. New technologies such as next-generation sequencing technologies are now being applied to dissect the viral sequence populations that exist within single samples. The driving force for the use of these technologies has largely been influenced by the priorities of developed countries with FMD-free (without vaccination) status. However, it is important to recognise that these approaches also show considerable promise for use in countries where FMD is endemic, although further modifications (such as sample archiving and strain and serotype characterisation) may be required to tailor these tests for use in these regions. Access to these new diagnostic and sequencing technologies in sub-Saharan Africa have the potential to provide novel insights into FMD epidemiology and will impact upon improved strategies for disease control.Effective control of infectious diseases is reliant upon accurate diagnosis of clinical cases using laboratory tests, together with an understanding of factors

  9. [Retrospective analysis of granted projects of the National Institute of Parasitic Disease, China CDC during 2002-2012].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Jun; Guan, Ya-Yi; Zhang, Min-Qi; Xiong, Yan-Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the granted projects of the National Institute of Parasitic Diseases (NIPD), China CDC, was analyzed. The results showed that from 2002 to 2012, 126 projects were granted to NIPD. 28.6% (36/126) of the projects were at the national level; 27% (34/126) were at provincial and ministrerial level. International cooperation projects and those supported by state key laboratory and enterprises accounted for 28.6% (36/126) and 15.8% (20/126), respectively. 94 projects belonged to applied researches and 32 belonged to basic researches. Most project leaders were young and middle-aged researchers with senior professional titles.

  10. First Report of Aprostocetus asthenogmus (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in South America and Parasitizing Eggs of Triatominae Vectors of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Claudiney Biral; Leite, Gustavo Rocha; Ferreira, Adelson Luiz; Rocha, Leonardo de Souza; Falqueto, Aloísio

    2014-01-01

    We report for the first time the parasitism of eggs of two triatomine Chagas disease vectors, Triatoma infestans and T. vitticeps, by the microhymenopterous parasitoid Aprostocetus asthenogmus. We also describe the first identification of this parasitoid in South America. A. asthenogmus were captured near unparasitized triatomine colonies in the municipality of Vitória, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil, and placed into pots with recently laid triatomine eggs. After 24 days, we observed wasps emerging from T. infestans and T. vitticeps eggs. Several characteristics of this parasitoid species suggest that it could be a potential biological control agent of triatomine species. PMID:24575298

  11. Infections and parasitic diseases of the gray wolf and their potential effects on wolf populations in North America.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, C.J.; Pybus, M.J.; Ballard, W.B.; Peterson, R.O.

    1995-01-01

    Numerous infections and parasitic diseases have been reported for the gray wolf, including more than 10 viral, bacterial, and mycotic disease and more than 70 species of helminths and ectoparasites. However, few studies have documented the role of diseases in population dynamics. Disease can affect wolf populations directly by causing mortality or indirectly by affecting physiological and homeostatic processes, thriftiness, reproduction, behavior, or social structure. In addition, wolves are hosts to diseases that can affect prey species, thus affecting wolf populations indirectly by reducing prey abundance or increasing vulnerability to predation. Diseases such as canine distemper and infectious canine hepatitis are enzootic in wolf populations, whereas rabies occurs in wolves primarily as a result of transmission from other species such as artic and red foxes. Contact between wolves and domestic pets and livestock may affect the composition of diseases in wolves and their effects on wolf populations. Dogs were suspected of introducing lice and canine parovirus to several wolf populations. THe potential for disease to affect wolf populations and other wild and domestic animals should be considered in wolf management plans, particularly in plans for reintroduction of wolves to area within their former range.

  12. Amyloid negativity in patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer disease and MCI

    PubMed Central

    Horng, Andy; Fero, Allison; Jagust, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the clinical and biomarker characteristics of patients with amyloid-negative Alzheimer disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a prospective cohort study. Methods: We first investigated the reliability of florbetapir− PET in patients with AD and patients with MCI using CSF-Aβ1–42 as a comparison amyloid measurement. We then compared florbetapir− vs florbetapir+ patients with respect to several AD-specific biomarkers, baseline and longitudinal cognitive measurements, and demographic and clinician report data. Results: Florbetapir and CSF-Aβ1–42 +/− status agreed for 98% of ADs (89% of MCIs), indicating that most florbetapir− scans were a reliable representation of amyloid status. Florbetapir− AD (n = 27/177; 15%) and MCI (n = 74/217, 34%) were more likely to be APOE4-negative (MCI 83%, AD 96%) than their florbetapir+ counterparts (MCI 30%, AD 24%). Florbetapir− patients also had less AD-specific hypometabolism, lower CSF p-tau and t-tau, and better longitudinal cognitive performance, and were more likely to be taking medication for depression. In MCI only, florbetapir− participants had less hippocampal atrophy and hypometabolism and lower functional activity questionnaire scores compared to florbetapir+ participants. Conclusions: Overall, image analysis problems do not appear to be a primary explanation of amyloid negativity. Florbetapir− ADNI patients have a variety of clinical and biomarker features that differ from their florbetapir+ counterparts, suggesting that one or more non-AD etiologies (which may include vascular disease and depression) account for their AD-like phenotype. PMID:26968515

  13. Development and external validation of a prognostic model in newly diagnosed Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    de Bie, Rob M.A.; Wieske, Luuk; Evans, Jonathan R.; Mason, Sarah L.; Foltynie, Thomas; Schmand, Ben; de Haan, Rob J.; Post, Bart; Barker, Roger A.; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop a prognostic model to predict disease outcomes in individual patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and perform an external validation study in an independent cohort. Methods: Model development was done in the Comorbidity and Aging in Rehabilitation Patients: The Influence on Activities (CARPA) cohort (Netherlands). External validation was performed using the Cambridgeshire Parkinson's Incidence from GP to Neurologist (CamPaIGN) cohort (UK). Both are longitudinal incident cohort studies that prospectively followed up patients with PD from the time of diagnosis. A composite outcome measure was made in which patients were classified as having an unfavorable prognosis when they had postural instability or dementia at the 5-year assessment (or at the last assessment before loss to follow-up), or had died before this time. The final model was derived with a backward selection strategy from candidate predictor variables that were measured at baseline. Results: In the resulting model, higher patient age, higher Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor examination axial score, and a lower animal fluency score were all associated with a higher probability of an unfavorable outcome. External validation confirmed good discriminative ability between favorable and unfavorable outcomes with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.85 (95% confidence interval 0.77–0.93) and a well-calibrated model with a calibration slope of 1.13 and no significant lack of fit (Hosmer-Lemeshow test: p = 0.39). Conclusion: We constructed a model that allows individual patient prognostication at 5 years from diagnosis, using a small set of predictor variables that can easily be obtained by clinicians or research nurses. PMID:26888991

  14. Approach to diagnosing celiac disease in patients with low bone mineral density or fragility fractures

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Lorena P.; Khan, Aliya; Sultan, Muhammad; McAssey, Karen; Fouda, Mona A.; Armstrong, David

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide clinicians with an update on the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) and to make recommendations on the indications to screen for CD in patients presenting with low bone mineral density (BMD) or fragility fractures. Quality of evidence A multidisciplinary task force developed clinically relevant questions related to the diagnosis of CD as the basis for a literature search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases (January 2000 to January 2009) using the key words celiac disease, osteoporosis, osteopenia, low bone mass, and fracture. The existing literature consists of level I and II studies. Main message The estimated prevalence of asymptomatic CD is 2% to 3% in individuals with low BMD. Routine screening for CD is not justified in patients with low BMD. However, targeted screening for CD is recommended for patients who have T-scores of −1.0 or less at the spine or hip, or a history of fragility fractures in association with any CD-related symptoms or conditions; family history of CD; or low urinary calcium levels, vitamin D insufficiency, and raised parathyroid hormone levels despite adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D. Celiac disease testing should be performed while the subject is consuming a gluten-containing diet; initial screening should be performed with human recombinant immunoglobulin (Ig) A tissue transglutaminase or other IgA tissue transglutaminase assays, in association with IgA endomysial antibody immunofluorescence. Duodenal biopsy is necessary to confirm the diagnosis of CD. Human leukocyte antigen typing might assist in confirming or ruling out the diagnosis of CD in cases where serology and histology are discordant. Definitive diagnosis is based on clinical, serologic, and histologic features, combined with a positive response to a gluten-free diet. Conclusion Current evidence does not support routine screening for CD in all patients with low BMD. A targeted case-finding approach is appropriate for patients

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Diagnosing Alzheimer's Disease in Clinical Practice: An Illustration with 3 Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Slats, Diane; Spies, Petra E.; Sjögren, Magnus J.C.; Verhey, Frans R.J.; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the brain specific biomarkers amyloid β42 (Aβ42) and total tau (t-tau) protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has a sensitivity and specificity of more than 85% for differentiating Alzheimer's Disease (AD) from non-demented controls. International guidelines are contradictory in their advice on the use of CSF biomarkers in AD diagnostics, resulting in a lack of consistency in clinical practice. We present three case reports that illustrate clinical practice according to the Dutch and European guidelines and portray the value of CSF biomarker analysis as an add-on diagnostic to the standard diagnostic workup for AD. PMID:20689628

  16. Brain Event-Related Potentials: Diagnosing Early-Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Robert M.; Nowlis, Geoffrey H.; McCrary, John W.; Chapman, John A.; Sandoval, Tiffany C.; Guillily, Maria D.; Gardner, Margaret N.; Reilly, Lindsey A.

    2009-01-01

    A pattern of components from brain Event-Related Potentials (ERP) (cognitive non-invasive electrical brain measures) performed well in separating early-stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) subjects from normal-aging control subjects and shows promise for developing a clinical diagnostic for Probable AD. A Number-Letter task elicited brain activity related to cognitive processes. In response to the task stimuli, brain activity was recorded as ERPs, whose components were measured by Principal Components Analysis (PCA). The ERP component scores to relevant and irrelevant stimuli were used in Discriminant Analyses to develop functions that successfully classified individuals as belonging to an early-stage Alzheimer’s disease group or a like-aged Control group, with probabilities of an individual belonging to each group. Applying the discriminant function to the developmental half of the data showed 92% of the subjects were correctly classified into either the AD group or the Control group with a sensitivity of 1.00. The two crossvalidation results were good with sensitivities of 0.83 and classification accuracies of 0.75–0.79. P3 and CNV components, as well as other, earlier ERP components, e.g. C145 and the memory “Storage” component, were useful in the discriminant functions. PMID:16430992

  17. Untreated newly diagnosed essential hypertension is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in a population of a hypertensive center

    PubMed Central

    Michopoulos, Spyros; Chouzouri, Vasiliki I; Manios, Efstathios D; Grapsa, Eirini; Antoniou, Zoi; Papadimitriou, Christos A; Zakopoulos, Nikolaos; Dimopoulos, Athanasios-Meletios

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have demonstrated that hypertension (HTN) is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in treated hypertensive patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between newly diagnosed essential HTN and NAFLD in untreated hypertensive patients. Patients and methods A consecutive series of 240 subjects (143 hypertensives and 97 normotensives), aged 30–80 years, without diabetes mellitus were enrolled in the study. Subjects with 24-hour systolic blood pressure (SBP) values ≥130 mmHg and/or diastolic BP values ≥80 mmHg were defined as hypertensives. NAFLD was defined as the presence of liver hyperechogenicity on ultrasound. Results Body mass index (P=0.002) and essential HTN (P=0.016) were independently associated with NAFLD in the multivariate logistic regression model. Furthermore, the multivariate analysis revealed that morning SBP (P=0.044) was independently associated with NAFLD. Conclusion Untreated, newly diagnosed essential HTN is independently associated with NAFLD. Ambulatory BP monitoring could be used for the diagnosis of essential HTN in patients with NAFLD. PMID:26834493

  18. Malaria, microscopic view of cellular parasites (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Malaria is a disease caused by parasites that are carried by mosquitoes. Once in the bloodstream, the parasite inhabits the red blood cell (RBC). This picture shows purple-stained malaria parasites inside red blood cells.

  19. PSO-based support vector machine with cuckoo search technique for clinical disease diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyong; Fu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Disease diagnosis is conducted with a machine learning method. We have proposed a novel machine learning method that hybridizes support vector machine (SVM), particle swarm optimization (PSO), and cuckoo search (CS). The new method consists of two stages: firstly, a CS based approach for parameter optimization of SVM is developed to find the better initial parameters of kernel function, and then PSO is applied to continue SVM training and find the best parameters of SVM. Experimental results indicate that the proposed CS-PSO-SVM model achieves better classification accuracy and F-measure than PSO-SVM and GA-SVM. Therefore, we can conclude that our proposed method is very efficient compared to the previously reported algorithms.

  20. Pituitary tumor with gigantism, acromegaly and preclinical Cushing's disease diagnosed from the 10th row.

    PubMed

    Tourtelot, John B; Vesely, David L

    2013-08-01

    A 7'3" basketball player was noted to have 2 to 3 times thicker tissue in his hands than 6'10" players by an endocrinologist sitting 10 rows above the player in a basketball arena. This led to the diagnosis of pituitary gigantism where the history revealed that he was 7'3" at 15 years of age. At age 19 when the acryl enlargement was noted, a diagnostic workup revealed elevated growth hormones and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) with a 2 × 1.3 cm pituitary tumor. His history suggested that his epiphyseal plates had closed at age 15, and because he continued to produce IGF-1, he now has acromegaly. His elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) before surgery suggests that he also had preclinical Cushing's disease. After pituitary transsphenoidal surgery, all acryl enlargement in hands and ligaments disappeared. His growth hormone, IGF-1 and ACTH returned to normal 2 weeks after surgery.

  1. Genetic impact on cognition and brain function in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease: ICICLE-PD study

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, James B.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie E.; Hampshire, Adam; Owen, Adrian M.; Breen, David P.; Duncan, Gordon W.; Khoo, Tien K.; Yarnall, Alison J.; Firbank, Michael J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Robbins, Trevor W.; O’Brien, John T.; Brooks, David J.; Burn, David J.; Barker, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    activation associated with memory encoding. This study demonstrates that neurocognitive deficits are common even in recently diagnosed patients with Parkinson’s disease, and that the associated regional brain activations are influenced by genotype. These data further support the dual syndrome hypothesis of cognitive change in Parkinson’s disease. Longitudinal data will confirm the extent to which these early neurocognitive changes, and their genetic factors, influence the long-term risk of dementia in Parkinson’s disease. The combination of genetics and functional neuroimaging provides a potentially useful method for stratification and identification of candidate markers, in future clinical trials against cognitive decline in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25080285

  2. Is ApoE ε4 Associated with Cognitive Functioning in African Americans Diagnosed with Alzheimer Disease? An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Mount, David L.; Ashley, Angela V.; Lah, James J.; Levey, Allan I.; Goldstein, Felicia C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The effect of the apolipoprotein ε4 allele (ApoE ε4) on cognitive performance in patients with probable Alzheimer disease (AD) has been studied in primarily Caucasian samples. The aim of this exploratory study was to examine whether the presence of ApoE ε4 is associated with cognitive performance in African American AD patients. Methods A cross-sectional, retrospective design was used to address the study objective. Data were extracted from the records of 65 African American patients who participated in the National Institutes of Health-National Institute on Aging (NIH-NIA) Emory University Alzheimer Disease Center Registry. Inclusion criteria were a clinical diagnosis of probable AD, cognitive testing using the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale and the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer Disease (CERAD) neuropsychological battery, and ApoE genotyping. Results Seventy percent of the patients were ApoE ε4 positive. Multiple regression analyses indicated that ApoE ε4 was significantly associated with poorer design copying (CERAD Constructional Praxis subtest), but other significant relationships were not observed between positive ε4 status and cognitive performance. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that the ApoE ε4 allele is not strongly associated with a particular pattern of cognitive functioning in African Americans once they are diagnosed with AD. However, these findings require replication in a large prospectively recruited and population-based sample of African American AD patients before firm conclusions can be reached. PMID:19668025

  3. The Influence of Background Music on the Performance of the Mini Mental State Examination with Patients Diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Silber

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether background music had an influence on the scores of patients with Alzheimer's disease during the Mini Mental State Examination (MMS). Eighteen patients diagnosed with dementia from a day care center participated in the study. Eleven (experimental group) were examined 3 times, each time 1 month apart. The first examination, called pretest, served as a baseline and was done without background music. The second and third examinations (test and posttest) were done with background music. Seven people (control group) were examined 3 times, each time one-month apart. The three tests (pretest, test, posttest) were done without background music. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs test was used to compare the results within each group. No significant differences were found between the three tests for both groups. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the results between the experimental and control groups. No significant differences were found between these two groups. This suggests that background music used with persons affected by dementia at this second stage of the disease plays a neutral role during the MMS. Another suggestion is that perhaps people at this stage of the disease do not feel any stress or threat that may have an impact on their concentration during the MMS. Other suggestions are made for possible further research.

  4. Estimating the time interval between exposure to the World Trade Center disaster and incident diagnoses of obstructive airway disease.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Michelle S; Webber, Mayris P; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Liu, Xiaoxue; Ye, Fen; Cohen, Hillel W; Aldrich, Thomas K; Kelly, Kerry J; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D; Prezant, David J; Hall, Charles B

    2014-08-01

    Respiratory disorders are associated with occupational and environmental exposures. The latency period between exposure and disease onset remains uncertain. The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. This prospective cohort study of New York City firefighters compared the timing and incidence of physician-diagnosed OAD relative to WTC exposure. Exposure was categorized by WTC arrival time as high (on the morning of September 11, 2001), moderate (after noon on September 11, 2001, or on September 12, 2001), or low (during September 13-24, 2001). We modeled relative rates and 95% confidence intervals of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 5 years after September 11, 2001, estimating the times of change in the relative rate with change point models. We observed a change point at 15 months after September 11, 2001. Before 15 months, the relative rate for the high- versus low-exposure group was 3.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.51, 6.26) and thereafter, it was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.46). Incident OAD was associated with WTC exposure for at least 5 years after September 11, 2001. There were higher rates of new-onset OAD among the high-exposure group during the first 15 months and, to a lesser extent, throughout follow-up. This difference in relative rate by exposure occurred despite full and free access to health care for all WTC-exposed firefighters, demonstrating the persistence of WTC-associated OAD risk.

  5. Estimating the Time Interval Between Exposure to the World Trade Center Disaster and Incident Diagnoses of Obstructive Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Michelle S.; Webber, Mayris P.; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Liu, Xiaoxue; Ye, Fen; Cohen, Hillel W.; Aldrich, Thomas K.; Kelly, Kerry J.; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D.; Prezant, David J.; Hall, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory disorders are associated with occupational and environmental exposures. The latency period between exposure and disease onset remains uncertain. The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. This prospective cohort study of New York City firefighters compared the timing and incidence of physician-diagnosed OAD relative to WTC exposure. Exposure was categorized by WTC arrival time as high (on the morning of September 11, 2001), moderate (after noon on September 11, 2001, or on September 12, 2001), or low (during September 13–24, 2001). We modeled relative rates and 95% confidence intervals of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 5 years after September 11, 2001, estimating the times of change in the relative rate with change point models. We observed a change point at 15 months after September 11, 2001. Before 15 months, the relative rate for the high- versus low-exposure group was 3.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.51, 6.26) and thereafter, it was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.46). Incident OAD was associated with WTC exposure for at least 5 years after September 11, 2001. There were higher rates of new-onset OAD among the high-exposure group during the first 15 months and, to a lesser extent, throughout follow-up. This difference in relative rate by exposure occurred despite full and free access to health care for all WTC-exposed firefighters, demonstrating the persistence of WTC-associated OAD risk. PMID:24980522

  6. Getting Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... also for those with related disorders. How is Marfan syndrome diagnosed? getting_diagnosed.jpg A Marfan diagnosis ... spinal column). Is there a genetic test for Marfan syndrome? Genetic testing can provide helpful information in ...

  7. A Boolean Consistent Fuzzy Inference System for Diagnosing Diseases and Its Application for Determining Peritonitis Likelihood

    PubMed Central

    Dragović, Ivana; Turajlić, Nina; Pilčević, Dejan; Petrović, Bratislav; Radojević, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Fuzzy inference systems (FIS) enable automated assessment and reasoning in a logically consistent manner akin to the way in which humans reason. However, since no conventional fuzzy set theory is in the Boolean frame, it is proposed that Boolean consistent fuzzy logic should be used in the evaluation of rules. The main distinction of this approach is that it requires the execution of a set of structural transformations before the actual values can be introduced, which can, in certain cases, lead to different results. While a Boolean consistent FIS could be used for establishing the diagnostic criteria for any given disease, in this paper it is applied for determining the likelihood of peritonitis, as the leading complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Given that patients could be located far away from healthcare institutions (as peritoneal dialysis is a form of home dialysis) the proposed Boolean consistent FIS would enable patients to easily estimate the likelihood of them having peritonitis (where a high likelihood would suggest that prompt treatment is indicated), when medical experts are not close at hand. PMID:27069500

  8. Physiotherapy Management of People Diagnosed with de Quervain's Disease: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Israeli, Tomer; Kozol, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To report the outcomes of a physiotherapy management approach for de Quervain's disease (DQD), a common hand disorder for which evidence for physiotherapy management is lacking, in 4 consecutive patients with DQD. Methods: Participants underwent a median of eight treatment sessions, consisting of mobilizations with movement, eccentric muscle training, and high-voltage electrical stimulation. Outcomes were assessed with an 11-point numeric pain rating scale (NPRS; range 1–10) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH; range 0%–100%). Results: Median NPRS and DASH scores decreased from a baseline of 5 and 48, respectively, to 2.8 and 19 after treatment; at 6-month follow-up, all participants reported minimal pain and disability, but one participant required a corticosteroid injection shortly after discharge from physiotherapy. Conclusions: Overall outcome was considered successful for three of four patients, comparable to the success rate previously reported for corticosteroid injections. A randomized clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of this intervention seems warranted. PMID:26839455

  9. [Methylmercury causes diffuse damage to the somatosensory cortex: how to diagnose Minamata disease].

    PubMed

    Ekino, Shigeo; Ninomiya, Tadashi; Imamura, Keiko; Susa, Mari

    2007-01-01

    The first acute case of methylmercury (MeHg) poisoning by the consumption of fish arose in Minamata, Japan, in 1953. It was officially recognized and called Minamata disease (MD) in 1956. There are still arguments about the definition of MD in terms of its associated clinical symptoms and lesions even 50 years after the initial recognition of MD. Studies on this MD epidemic are reviewed along with its historical background. Since MeHg dispersed from Minamata to the Shiranui Sea, residents living around the sea had been exposed to low-dose MeHg through fish consumption for about 20 years (at least from 1950 to 1968). These chronic MeHg poisoning patients complained of paresthesia at the distal parts of their extremities and around the lips even 30 years after the cessation of exposure to MeHg of anthropogenic origin. The persisting somatosensory disorders after the discontinuation of exposure to MeHg were induced by diffuse damage to the somatosensory cortex, but not by damage to the peripheral nervous system, as previously believed. Based on these findings, symptoms and lesions in MeHg poisoning are reappraised.

  10. Fire and Parasites: An Under-Recognized Form of Anthropogenic Land Use Change and Mechanism of Disease Exposure.

    PubMed

    Scasta, John Derek

    2015-09-01

    Anthropogenic land use changes have altered ecosystems and exacerbated the spread of infectious diseases. Recent reviews, however, have revealed that fire suppression in fire-prone natural areas has not been recognized as a form of anthropogenic land use change. Furthermore, fire suppression has been an under-recognized mechanism altering the risk and transmission of infectious disease pathogens and host-parasite dynamics. However, as settlement patterns changed, especially due to colonial expansion in North America, Africa, and Australia, fire suppression became a major form of land use change which has led to broad-scale ecosystem changes. Because parasites of humans and animals can vector viral, bacterial, prion, fungal, or protozoan pathogens, concomitant changes associated with anthropogenic-induced changes to fire frequencies and intensities are of concern. I provide reference to 24 studies that indicate that restoring fire in natural areas has the potential to reduce ectoparasites without wings such as ticks, chiggers, fleas, and lice; ectoparasites with wings such as mosquitos, horn flies, face flies, and stable flies; and endoparasites affecting livestock and wildlife. This suggests that fire ecology and parasitology be considered as a priority area for future research that has implications for both humans and animals.

  11. Reactivation of Chagas Disease in a Patient With Follicular Lymphoma Diagnosed by Means of Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Garzón, Maria I.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Goy, Maria C.; Alvarellos, Teresita; Zarate, Abel H.; Basquiera, Ana L.; Garcia, Juan J.; Caeiro, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Chagas disease reactivation in a patient with stage IIb follicular lymphoma in the cecum. He was admitted to the hospital with neutropenia and fever. He had a history of right hemicolectomy 6 months earlier and had received the sixth cycle of chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisone/rituximab. Blood and urine cultures were negative, but the fever persisted. Reactivation of Chagas disease was confirmed by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Parasitic load was 577 950 parasite equivalents/mL. The patient began treatment with benznidazole 5 mg/k per day every 12 hours. After 1 month, the qRT-PCR control was undetectable. The patient completed 60 days of treatment and is currently asymptomatic. Trypanosoma cruzi qRT-PCR may become a useful diagnostic method for reactivation of Chagas disease. PMID:26180822

  12. Parasites in marine food webs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Most species interactions probably involve parasites. This review considers the extent to which marine ecologists should consider parasites to fully understand marine communities. Parasites are influential parts of food webs in estuaries, temperate reefs, and coral reefs, but their ecological importance is seldom recognized. Though difficult to observe, parasites can have substantial biomass, and they can be just as common as free-living consumers after controlling for body mass and trophic level. Parasites have direct impacts on the energetics of their hosts and some affect host behaviors, with ecosystem-level consequences. Although they cause disease, parasites are sensitive components of ecosystems. In particular, they suffer secondary extinctions due to biodiversity loss. Some parasites can also return to a system after habitat restoration. For these reasons, parasites can make good indicators of ecosystem integrity. Fishing can indirectly increase or decrease parasite populations and the effects of climate change on parasites are likely to be equally as complex.

  13. Myelin protein zero gene sequencing diagnoses Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1B disease

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.; Zhang, H.; Madrid, R.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common genetic neuropathy, affects about 1 in 2600 people in Norway and is found worldwide. CMT Type 1 (CMT1) has slow nerve conduction with demyelinated Schwann cells. Autosomal dominant CMT Type 1B (CMT1B) results from mutations in the myelin protein zero gene which directs the synthesis of more than half of all Schwann cell protein. This gene was mapped to the chromosome 1q22-1q23.1 borderline by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The first 7 of 7 reported CMT1B mutations are unique. Thus the most effective means to identify CMT1B mutations in at-risk family members and fetuses is to sequence the entire coding sequence in dominant or sporadic CMT patients without the CMT1A duplication. Of the 19 primers used in 16 pars to uniquely amplify the entire MPZ coding sequence, 6 primer pairs were used to amplify and sequence the 6 exons. The DyeDeoxy Terminator cycle sequencing method used with four different color fluorescent lables was superior to manual sequencing because it sequences more bases unambiguously from extracted genomic DNA samples within 24 hours. This protocol was used to test 28 CMT and Dejerine-Sottas patients without CMT1A gene duplication. Sequencing MPZ gene-specific amplified fragments identified 9 polymorphic sites within the 6 exons that encode the 248 amino acid MPZ protein. The large number of major CMT1B mutations identified by single strand sequencing are being verified by reverse strand sequencing and when possible, by restriction enzyme analysis. This protocol can be used to distringuish CMT1B patients from othre CMT phenotypes and to determine the CMT1B status of relatives both presymptomatically and prenatally.

  14. CSF β-Amyloid 1-42 Predicts Progression to Cognitive Impairment in Newly Diagnosed Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Terrelonge, Mark; Marder, Karen S; Weintraub, Daniel; Alcalay, Roy N

    2016-01-01

    Low CSF β-amyloid 1-42 has been associated with cognitive decline in advanced Parkinson's disease; data from a single cohort suggest β-amyloid 1-42 may be an early marker of cognitive impairment. Newly diagnosed Parkinson's participants (mean duration, 6.9 months) in the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (n = 341) were assessed at baseline (untreated state) and followed for 2 years. CSF β-amyloid 1-42, α-synuclein, total tau, and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 were collected at baseline. Participants were classified as having cognitive impairment (CI) if scores on two of six cognitive tests were 1.5 standard deviations below the standardized mean based on published norms in healthy controls. Multivariable regression analyses were used to determine the association between baseline CSF markers with cognitive impairment, defined by neuropsychological testing performance at 2-year follow-up. Fifty-five participants (16.1 %) had CI at baseline and were not included in further analyses. Thirty-seven of the 286 participants without CI at baseline (12.9 %) developed CI at 2 years. Participants with CI at 2 years had significantly lower mean baseline CSF β-amyloid 1-42 levels than non-CI participants (343.8 vs. 380.4 pg/mL, p < 0.01); no significant difference was seen for α-synuclein, T-tau, or P-tau 181. In a regression model of 286 participants without baseline CI adjusted for age, gender, disease duration, education, motor severity, and depression status, lower baseline β-amyloid 1-42 levels were associated with higher odds of CI at 2 years. (OR(10pg/mL) = 1.04, 95 % CI 1.01-1.08, p < 0.05). CSF β-amyloid 1-42 level at disease onset is an independent predictor of cognitive impairment in early Parkinson's disease.

  15. Chronic Chagas disease: presence of parasite DNA in the oesophagus of patients without megaoesophagus.

    PubMed

    Vago, Annamaria Ravara; Silva, Denise Marins; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; d'Avila Reis, Débora

    2003-01-01

    We have previously amplified Trypanosoma cruzi DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the oesophagus of chagasic patients with megaoesophagus, whilst immunohistochemical analysis failed to detect T. cruzi antigen in the oesophagus of chagasic patients without megaoesophagus. During 2000-01, we tested for the presence of T. cruzi DNA in oesophageal tissue from 9 chronic chagasic patients without megaoesophagus and 5 were positive by PCR, which suggests that other factors, besides simply the presence of the parasite, should be considered in the understanding of the pathogenesis of megaoesophagus.

  16. Data analysis of magnetocardiograms stored in the international database and their importance in diagnosing congenital heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grot, Przemyslaw; Dunajski, Zbigniew

    2003-10-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography - a modern method of measuring electroactivity of fetal's heart is gaining more popularity interest among scientists and doctor's. For the method to become a useful tool in diagnosing congenital heart disease there has been created an international database composed of data taken from various scientific centers in the world (e.g. Institute of Precision and Biomedical Engineering of Warsaw University of Technology). Cardiograms which are recorded during fMCG (fetal magnetocardiography) and fECG (fetal electrocardiography) examination can be used to classify if the fetal heart is developing in healthy or pathological way. Thus, it has been extremely vital to create the universal and univocal pattern of discrimination between healthy or pathological fetuses. In order to do this an international database with normal values of the parameters describing the cardiograms was needed. The database is a compilation of data measured at various centers using different but similar devices and different signal processing techniques. This work analyses helpfulness of the international database in establishing the universal pattern which in future could serve as the basis for the proper congenital heart disease diagnosis.

  17. Expression of the Bcl-2 apoptotic marker in cats diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease and gastrointestinal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Christine M; Smedley, Rebecca C; Saavedra, Paulo Vilar; Kiupel, Matti; Kitchell, Barbara E

    2012-10-01

    Immunolabeling for the critical lymphocyte survival factor, Bcl-2, of intestinal biopsies from cats with histologic evidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or gastrointestinal (GI) lymphoma was evaluated to determine if expression differed significantly between these two disease processes. Immunolabeling for Bcl-2 was performed on small intestinal endoscopic or full thickness biopsy sections from 55 cats. Diagnosis of IBD, T-cell lymphoma or B-cell lymphoma was established previously. The percentage of infiltrating lymphocytes that were positively labeled for Bcl-2 was subjectively determined for each case. Eight cats were diagnosed with IBD and 47 cats with lymphoma. A significantly higher percentage of cells were positively immunolabeled for Bcl-2 in cats with GI lymphoma [median (range); 90 (5-95)%] compared with cats with IBD [60 (15-95)%] (P = 0.029). However, the overall degree of positive immunolabeling in both groups tended to be high. This over-expression of Bcl-2 may prove useful as a therapeutic target for IBD and GI lymphoma in cats.

  18. Resolution of metabolic syndrome after following a gluten free diet in an adult woman diagnosed with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    García-Manzanares, Álvaro; Lucendo, Alfredo J; González-Castillo, Sonia; Moreno-Fernández, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Adult celiac disease (CD) presents with very diverse symptoms that are clearly different from those typically seen in pediatric patients, including ferropenic anemia, dyspepsia, endocrine alterations and elevated transaminase concentration. We present the case of a 51-year-old overweight woman with altered basal blood glucose, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and persisting elevated transaminase levels, who showed all the symptoms for a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Because she presented iron deficiency anemia, she was referred to the gastroenterology department and subsequently diagnosed with celiac disease after duodenal biopsies and detection of a compatible HLA haplotype. Gluten-free diet (GFD) was prescribed and after 6 mo the patient showed resolution of laboratory abnormalities (including recovering anemia and iron reserves, normalization of altered lipid and liver function parameters and decrease of glucose blood levels). No changes in weight or waist circumference were observed and no significant changes in diet were documented apart from the GFD. The present case study is the first reported description of an association between CD and metabolic syndrome, and invites investigation of the metabolic changes induced by gluten in celiac patients. PMID:21860836

  19. Comparison of Newly Diagnosed Ocular Hypertension and Open-Angle Glaucoma: Ocular Variables, Risk Factors, and Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Yvonne M.; Harasymowycz, Paul; Gaspo, Rania; Kwok, Kenneth; Hutnik, Cindy M. L.; Blondeau, Pierre; Birt, Catherine M.; Piemontesi, Robert L. G.; Gould, Lisa F.; Lesk, Mark R.; Ahmed, Iqbal K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the distribution of ocular variables, risk factors, and disease severity in newly diagnosed ocular hypertension (OH) or open-angle glaucoma (OAG). Methods. Eligible subjects underwent a complete history and examination. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) obtained from multiple logistic regression models were used to compare OAG to OH and advanced to early/moderate OAG. Results. 405 subjects were enrolled: 292 (72.1%) with OAG and 113 (27.9%) with OH. 51.7% had early, 27.1% moderate, and 20.9% advanced OAG. The OR for OAG versus OH was 8.19 (P < 0.0001) for disc notch, 5.36 (P < 0.0001) for abnormal visual field, 1.45 (P = 0.001) for worsening mean deviation, 1.91 (P < 0.0001) for increased cupping, 1.03 for increased age (P = 0.030), and 0.36 (P = 0.010) for smoking. Conclusions. Increased age was a risk for OAG, and smoking decreased the risk of OAG compared to OH. Almost half of the OAG subjects had moderate/advanced disease at diagnosis. PMID:21869921

  20. Evidence for emerging parasites and pathogens influencing outbreaks of stress-related diseases like chalkbrood.

    PubMed

    Hedtke, Kati; Jensen, Per Moestrup; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Genersch, Elke

    2011-11-01

    In agriculture, honey bees play a critical role as commercial pollinators of crop monocultures which depend on insect pollination. Hence, the demise of honey bee colonies in Europe, USA, and Asia caused much concern and initiated many studies and research programmes aiming at elucidating the factors negatively affecting honey bee health and survival. Most of these studies look at individual factors related to colony losses. In contrast, we here present our data on the interaction of pathogens and parasites in honey bee colonies. We performed a longitudinal cohort study over 6 years by closely monitoring 220 honey bee colonies kept in 22 apiaries (ten randomly selected colonies per apiary). Observed winter colony losses varied between 4.8% and 22.4%; lost colonies were replaced to ensure a constant number of monitored colonies over the study period. Data on mite infestation levels, infection with viruses, Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae, and recorded outbreaks of chalkbrood were continuously collected. We now provide statistical evidence (i) that Varroa destructor infestation in summer is related to DWV infections in autumn, (ii) that V. destructor infestation in autumn is related to N. apis infection in the following spring, and most importantly (iii) that chalkbrood outbreaks in summer are related to N. ceranae infection in the preceding spring and to V. destructor infestation in the same season. These highly significant links between emerging parasites/pathogens and established pathogens need further experimental proof but they already illustrate the complexity of the host-pathogen-interactions in honey bee colonies.

  1. How Is Raynaud's Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnose primary Raynaud's (Raynaud's disease) or secondary Raynaud's (Raynaud's phenomenon) based on your medical history, a physical exam, and test results. Specialists Involved Primary care doctors and internists often diagnose and treat Raynaud's. If you have the disorder, you also may ...

  2. Risk Stratification Model to Detect Early Pulmonary Disease in Infants With Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed by Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Lacrecia J.; Oates, Gabriela R.; Oster, Robert A.; Self, Staci T.; Troxler, Robert B.; Hoover, Wynton C.; Gutierrez, Hector H.; Harris, William T.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Objective The clinical benefit of newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) has been primarily nutritional, with less overt respiratory impact. Identification of risk factors for infant CF lung disease could facilitate targeted interventions to improve pulmonary outcomes. Methods This retrospective study evaluated socioeconomic information, clinical data, and results from routine infant pulmonary function testing (iPFT) of infants diagnosed with CF through NBS (N = 43) at a single CF center over a 4-year period (2008–2012). A five-item composite clinical score was developed and combined with socioeconomic indicators to facilitate identification of CF infants at increased risk of early-onset respiratory impairment. Results Paternal education was positively associated with lung function (P = 0.02). Clinical score <7 (on a scale of 0–10) predicted diminished pulmonary measure (P < 0.005). Retrospective risk stratification by clinical score and paternal education identified CF infants at low, intermediate, or high risk of pulmonary disease. Forced expiratory volume (FEV0.5%, mean ± SD) averaged 115 ± 19% in the low-risk group, 97 ± 17% in the intermediate-risk group, and 90 ± 8% in the high-risk group (P < 0.005). Results were similar for mid-expiratory flows (FEF25–75%). Multiple regression analysis confirmed the predictive value of this risk stratification model of CF infant pulmonary health. Conclusion We combined socioeconomic and clinical data to risk-stratify CF infants for early-onset lung disease as quantified by iPFT. Our model showed significant differences in infant pulmonary function across risk groups. The developed tool offers an easily available, inexpensive, and non-invasive way to assess risk of respiratory decline in CF infants and identify those meriting targeted therapeutic attention. PMID:27556254

  3. IgG4-related disease involving vital organs diagnosed with lip biopsy: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Mitsuhiro; Kaneko, Yuko; Hayashi, Yutaro; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently recognized new disease entity characterized by elevated serum IgG4 and infiltration of IgG4 plasma cells in affected tissues. Histological examination is essential for definitive diagnosis, as other pathological conditions can also present with serum IgG4 elevation. However, IgG4-RD frequently involves vital or internal organs that are difficult to perform biopsies. We herein report a unique case of IgG4-RD involving vital organs that could be successfully diagnosed by alternative lip biopsy, an accessible, little invasive procedure, despite no apparent manifestation demonstrating the involvement in labial salivary gland.A 60-year-old man with swelling of both submandibular glands and elevated serum creatinine level visited our hospital. His labial salivary glands appeared normal. His blood test showed high serum IgG4, and positron-emission computed tomography revealed abnormal uptake in submandibular glands, periaorta, and left kidney with hydronephrosis. We suspected him of IgG4-RD; however, the involved organs were difficult to approach for histological examination. Alternatively, we performed lip biopsy and proved massive infiltration of IgG4 plasma cells leading to the diagnosis with IgG4-RD. Treatment with prednisolone resulted in the remarkable improvement of organ involvements and the normalization of serum IgG4 level after 3 months. Prednisolone was gradually tapered without the relapse of disease.The early recognition and diagnosis of IgG4-RD is clinically important because delay in the treatment initiation leads to fibrosis with irreversible organ damage. Our case highlights the possibility that lip biopsy is a promising option for histological examination in patients with IgG4-RD in whom affected organs are difficult to access, leading to early diagnosis with appropriate treatment.

  4. Diagnostic challenges and the unwritten stories of dog and cat parasites.

    PubMed

    Otranto, Domenico

    2015-08-15

    Is it still possible to discover new parasites of dogs and cats? Do we really know enough about them? To what extent do limitations in the diagnosis of dog and cat parasites represent an obstacle for a deeper understanding of their biology? Diagnosis in parasitology has a profound impact on animal health and welfare and, in some cases, public health. Although, over the last few years, advances in the diagnosis of parasitic diseases have largely paralleled knowledge of their biology, gaps in the diagnosis of cat and dog parasites still exist. For instance, difficulties in obtaining samples for research purposes (due to ethical issues or to the invasive nature of the sampling procedures), inappropriate sample storage and poor sensitivity of the commonly used techniques, may represent major obstacles in diagnosing parasitic diseases. Other hurdles are often associated with the biology of parasites (e.g., the intermittent presence in blood of tick-borne pathogens) or, simply, through the fact that some parasites of pets are largely ignored by the scientific community. This article provides key examples of parasites of dogs and cats, which are currently considered of minor importance, also because of the limitations in their diagnosis. Among them, new or, in some cases, previously "misdiagnosed parasites" with overlapping morphological features, biology or ecology, represent a major challenge when trying to correctly diagnose "unknown parasites" (for which only occasional reports are available). Further research is needed in order to provide the scientific community with more reliable, cost-effective diagnostic tools, which ultimately, will assist our understanding of some mis- or less-diagnosed parasitoses.

  5. Wild Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) as Sentinels of Parasitic Diseases in the Province of Soria, Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Lledó, Lourdes; Giménez-Pardo, Consuelo; Saz, José Vicente; Serrano, José Luis

    2015-12-01

    Four hundred red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) were examined for ecto- (arthropods) and endoparasites (Leishmania spp., Trichinella spp., and intestinal parasites). Different species of flea (total prevalence, 40.50%), tick (16.25%), mite (7.25%), and fly (1.50%) were identified. The most prevalent flea was Pulex irritans (found on 29% of the foxes); the most prevalent tick, mite, and fly were Ixodes canisuga (on 5%), Sarcoptes scabiei (on 5.25%), and Hippobosca equina (on 1%), respectively. The endoparasites identified included Leishmania spp. (found in 12% of the foxes), Trichinella spp. (in 15.5%, with T. britovi the most prevalent species in 15.25%), Cestoda (in 72.75%, with Mesocestoides spp. the most prevalent in 69.50%), and intestinal ascarids (in 73.25%, with Ancylostoma caninum the most prevalent in 12.50%). No animal was free of parasites. The present results suggest that foxes can act as sentinels of diseases transmitted by ecto- and endoparasites.

  6. Nonradioactive Screening Method for Isolation of Disease-Specific Probes To Diagnose Plant Diseases Caused by Mycoplasmalike Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ing-Ming; Davis, Robert E.; DeWitt, Natalie D.

    1990-01-01

    DNA fragments of tomato big bud (BB) mycoplasmalike organism (MLO) in diseased periwinkle plants (Catharanthus roseus L.) were cloned to pSP6 plasmid vectors and amplified in Escherichia coli JM83. A nonradioactive method was developed and used to screen for MLO-specific recombinants. Cloned DNA probes were prepared by nick translation of the MLO recombinant plasmids by using biotinylated nucleotides. The probes all hybridized with nucleic acid from BB MLO-infected, but not healthy, plants. Results from dot hybridization analyses indicated that several MLOs, e.g., those of Italian tomato big bud, periwinkle little leaf, and clover phyllody, are closely related to BB MLO. The Maryland strain of aster yellows and maize bushy stunt MLOs are also related to BB MLO. Among the remaining MLOs used in this study, Vinca virescence and elm yellows MLOs may be very distantly related, if at all, to BB MLO. Potato witches' broom, clover proliferation, ash yellows, western X, and Canada X MLOs are distantly related to BB MLO. Southern hybridization analyses revealed that BB MLO contains extrachromosomal DNA that shares sequence homologies with extrachromosomal DNAs from aster yellows and periwinkle little leaf MLOs. Images PMID:16348195

  7. The AGE-RAGE Axis and Its Relationship to Markers of Cardiovascular Disease in Newly Diagnosed Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Villegas-Rodríguez, Ma. Etzabel; Uribarri, Jaime; Solorio-Meza, Sergio E.; Fajardo-Araujo, Martha E.; Cai, Weijing; Torres-Graciano, Sofía; Rangel-Salazar, Rubén; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Garay-Sevilla, Ma. Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the study was the simultaneous measurement of all the different components of the AGE-RAGE axis as well as several non-invasive markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a cohort of newly diagnosed diabetic patients. Materials and Methods In 80 newly diagnosed diabetic patients we measured serum carboxymethyllysine (CML), soluble RAGE (sRAGE) and peripheral mononuclear (PMNC) RAGE and AGER1 mRNA together with ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and malondialdehyde (MDA). We also assessed cardiovascular function by measurement of flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), intima-media thickness (IMT) and arterial stiffness. Univariant correlation analysis was used to determine correlation between the variables in the study and multiple regression analysis was used to examine the association between the AGE-RAGE axis components and FMD, IMT and arterial stiffness. Results Serum CML correlated positively with sRAGE, PMNC RAGE, HOMA-IR, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MDA, but inversely with PMNC AGER1. sRAGE and RAGE was positively correlated with AGER; IMT was positively correlated with HOMA-IR, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, MDA, and sRAGE and arterial stiffness had correlation with HOMA-IR, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, MDA, CML, sRAGE, AGER1 and RAGE. In multivariate analysis we found a significant relationship between CML with PMNC RAGE, HOMA-IR; sRAGE with VCAM-1 and MDA; PMNC RAGE with PMNC AGER1and CML; PMNC AGER1 with PMNC RAGE; FMD with sRAGE, CML and HbA1c; IMT with sRAGE, and arterial stiffness with sRAGE, sCML and AGER1 Conclusions We found significant and strong associations between the different components of the AGE-RAGE axis and also found significant association between AGE-RAGE axis markers, especially sRAGE with several noninvasive markers of cardiovascular disease risk. sRAGE, an easily measured parameter in blood, may potentially be used as a surrogate marker of AGEs-RAGE in patients with diabetes. PMID:27434539

  8. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed? If you or your child appears to ... have bleeding problems. However, some people who have hemophilia have no recent family history of the disease. ...

  9. How Is Lymphocytopenia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of lymphocytes—T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells. The test can help diagnose the underlying ... cause low levels of B cells or natural killer cells. Tests for Underlying Conditions Many diseases and ...

  10. Publications on fish parasites and diseases, 330 B.C.-A.D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGregor, E.A.

    1963-01-01

    These references were collected in 1924, but until now this collection has been available only in manuscript form. Because of the current increased interest in this field, this bibliography is being issued to make it more generally accessible. They include the earliest known references to fish parasites (330 B.C.) as well as a nearly complete collection up to 1924. In some instances only one or two works of a more prolific researcher are cited, therefore it is recommended that the student use the Index-Catalogue of Medical and Veterinary Zoology (U. S. Department of Agriculture) freely. For more current work consult the following, of which Dogiel et al.(1958), Hoffman and Sindermann (1962), Schaperclaus (1954), and Snieszko et aL(in press) have extensive bibliographies:

  11. Publications on fish parasites and diseases, 330 B.C.-A.D. 1923

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGregor, E.A.

    1963-01-01

    These references were collected in 1924, but until now this collection has been available only in manuscript:fbrm. Because of the current increased interest in this field, this bibliography is being issued to make it more generally accessible. They include the earliest known references to fish parasites (330 B. C.) as well as a nearly complete collection up to 1924. In some instances only one or two works of a more prolific re"searcher are cited, therefore it is recommended that the student use the Index-Catalogue of Medical and Veterinary Zoology (U. S. Department of Agriculture) freely. For more current work consult the following, of which Dogiel et al.(1958), Hoffman and Sindermann (1962), Scha'perclaus (1954), and Snieszko et aL(in press) have extensive bibliographies

  12. Use of information on disease diagnoses from databases for animal health economic, welfare and food safety purposes: strengths and limitations of recordings.

    PubMed

    Houe, Hans; Gardner, Ian Andrew; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum

    2011-01-01

    Many animal health, welfare and food safety databases include data on clinical and test-based disease diagnoses. However, the circumstances and constraints for establishing the diagnoses vary considerably among databases. Therefore results based on different databases are difficult to compare and compilation of data in order to perform meta-analysis is almost impossible. Nevertheless, diagnostic information collected either routinely or in research projects is valuable in cross comparisons between databases, but there is a need for improved transparency and documentation of the data and the performance characteristics of tests used to establish diagnoses. The objective of this paper is to outline the circumstances and constraints for recording of disease diagnoses in different types of databases, and to discuss these in the context of disease diagnoses when using them for additional purposes, including research. Finally some limitations and recommendations for use of data and for recording of diagnostic information in the future are given. It is concluded that many research questions have such a specific objective that investigators need to collect their own data. However, there are also examples, where a minimal amount of extra information or continued validation could make sufficient improvement of secondary data to be used for other purposes. Regardless, researchers should always carefully evaluate the opportunities and constraints when they decide to use secondary data. If the data in the existing databases are not sufficiently valid, researchers may have to collect their own data, but improved recording of diagnostic data may improve the usefulness of secondary diagnostic data in the future.

  13. Diagnosing Dementia--Positive Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of ... easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even before symptoms began to show? Researchers ...

  14. A Single US Center Experience of Transbronchial Lung Cryobiopsy for Diagnosing Interstitial Lung Disease With a 2-Scope Technique

    PubMed Central

    Aragaki, Alejandro; Baughman, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn; Khanna, Gaurav; Tanase, Daniel; Kirschner, Michelle; Benzaquen, Sadia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transbronchial lung cryobiopsy (TBLC) has been used to establish the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in recent years. The technique and diagnostic yield vary among institutions. We report a new 2-scope technique and the results of TBLC in our institution. Methods: This is a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent TBLC for evaluation of ILD. Bronchoscopy with TBLC was performed by a board-certified interventional pulmonologist with a 2-scope technique under general anesthesia. Results: A total of 74 patients underwent TBLC with a 2-scope technique. Their mean age was 54±14 years. The mean tissue surface area was 63.54±6.76 mm2. The average anesthesia time was 80.66 minutes. The diagnostic yield was 87.84%. The most common diagnosis was sarcoidosis pneumothorax, which occurred in 5 cases (7%). There was 1 case with bronchoscopic-related respiratory failure associated with significant bleeding. Death occurred in 3 cases (4%), which is comparable to recent mortality data for “elective” surgical lung biopsy for ILD (1.7% to 4.2%). Conclusion: TBLC with a 2-scope technique could be an alternative method for diagnosing various types of ILD in patients unfit for surgical lung biopsy. Further prospective studies should clarify its role in the diagnostic armamentarium for undiagnosed ILDs. PMID:28323726

  15. Deletion 5q is frequent in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients diagnosed with interstitial lung diseases (ILD): Mayo Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Nanah, Rama; Zblewski, Darci; Patnaik, Mrinal S; Begna, Kebede; Ketterling, Rhett; Iyer, Vivek N; Hogan, William J; Litzow, Mark R; Al-Kali, Aref

    2016-11-01

    A variety of interstitial Lung Diseases (ILD) have been described in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with possible etiologies including autoimmunity, drug related toxicity, and recurrent infections. A comprehensive study of ILD in MDS patients has not been previously performed. Out of 827 consecutive biopsy proven MDS patients seen at our institution from June 1970-May 2010, 18 (2%) were found to have ILD. There was no statistical significance in baseline characteristics between patients with ILD (ILD +) vs those without ILD (ILD-). Cytogenetic studies were reported in 14 ILD+patients out of whom 43% had 5q- abnormalities (21% isolated and 22% part of complex karyotype). Prevalence of high risk MDS was similar between both groups (22% vs 29% in ILD-) with similar overall survival. ILD was diagnosed prior to MDS in the majority of cases (72%) with a median time to MDS diagnosis of 22.3 months. Our study suggests that ILD are present in a higher percentage than anticipated in the MDS population. Deletion 5q was frequent in ILD+ cases and this requires further study. Prior MDS treatment and autoimmunity seemed to play no significant role in ILD development.

  16. White matter microstructural characteristics in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease: An unbiased whole-brain study

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming-Ching; Heng, Hannah S. E.; Ng, Samuel Y. E.; Tan, Louis C. S.; Chan, Ling Ling; Tan, Eng King

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder. Findings on specific white matter (WM) alterations in PD have been inconsistent. We hypothesized that WM changes occur in early PD patients and unbiased whole-brain analysis may provide additional evidence of pathological WM changes in PD. In this study, we examined various indexes of WM microstructure in newly diagnosed PD patients at the whole-brain level. 64 PDs with Hoehn & Yahr stage 1 (HY1PDs), 87 PDs with Hoehn & Yahr stage 2 (HYPD2s), and 60 controls (HCs) were recruited. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and diffusion connectometry were used to identify changes of WM pathways associated with PD. There were no significant differences in axial diffusivity, but HY1PDs exhibited greater fractional anisotropy (FA) and decreased mean and radial diffusivities (MD and RD) in callosal, projection, and association fibres than HCs and HY2PDs. Motor severity was inversely correlated with FA, but positively correlated with MD and RD in PD patients. Connectometry analysis also revealed increased WM density in the aforementioned tracts in PD patients, compared with HCs. Our study reveals WM enhancement, suggesting neural compensations in early PD. Longitudinal follow-up studies are warranted to identify the trajectory of WM changes alongside the progression of PD. PMID:27762307

  17. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  18. [Detection of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: A study on patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary health care].

    PubMed

    García-Palenzuela, R; Timiraos Carrasco, R; Gómez-Besteiro, M I; Lavia, G; Lago Pose, M; Lara, B

    2016-06-25

    The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Spain is 10.2%. Although tobacco is the main aetiological factor, biomass smoke exposure and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) have also been related to its development. AATD is a genetic condition which could be causing 2-3% of COPD cases. The aim of this cross-sectional descriptive study was to exclude the existence of AATD in a population of COPD patients from CS Culleredo, A Coruña. The thick blood drop test on blotting paper, as well as the analysis of the mutations PI*S and PI*Z of the gene SERPINA 1 by the analysis of denaturing gradients after simultaneous amplification related to PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The study population included 80 patients between 40-80 years old, of whom 30% were carriers of a deficient allele (heterozygous), and 80% of them were the allele PiS. Only one PiSZ (1.25%) individual and no PiZZ was detected. This represents an allelic frequency of 3.1% (PiZ), and 13.1% (PiS). The detected allelic frequencies are higher than previously reported in the Spanish population. Severe AATD has been excluded in 98.75% of the study population. The Pi*SZ patient has been diagnosed in an early stage of the disease. We have also achieved one of the quality indicators recommended by GesEPOC. Our area has shown a high PiS and PiZ frequency, thus our study could be used as a reference for further research in the Galician population.

  19. Are clinical diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias affected by education and self-reported race?

    PubMed

    Teresi, Jeanne A; Grober, Ellen; Eimicke, Joseph P; Ehrlich, Amy R

    2012-09-01

    A randomized controlled trial examined whether the diagnostic process for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias may be influenced by knowledge of the patient's education and/or self-reported race. Four conditions were implemented: diagnostic team knows (a) race and education, (b) education only, (c) race only, or (d) neither. Diagnosis and clinical staging was established at baseline, at Wave 2, and for a random sample of Wave 3 respondents by a consensus panel. At study end, a longitudinal, "gold standard" diagnosis was made for patients with follow-up data (71%). Group differences in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnosis were estimated using logistic regression and generalized estimating equations. Sensitivity and specificity were examined for baseline diagnosis in relation to the gold standard, longitudinal diagnosis. Despite equivalent status on all measured variables across waves, members of the "knows race only" group were less likely than those of other groups to receive a diagnosis of dementia. At final diagnosis, 19% of the "knows race only" group was diagnosed with dementia versus 38% to 40% in the other 3 conditions (p = .038). Examination of sensitivities and specificities of baseline diagnosis in relation to the gold standard diagnosis showed a nonsignificant trend for lower sensitivities in the knowing race conditions (0.3846), as contrasted with knowing education only (0.480) or neither (0.600). The finding that knowledge of race may influence the diagnostic process in some unknown way is timely, given the recent State-of-the-Science conference on Alzheimer's disease prevention, the authors of which called for information about and standardization of the diagnostic process.

  20. The Gothenburg MCI study: Design and distribution of Alzheimer’s disease and subcortical vascular disease diagnoses from baseline to 6-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Nordlund, Arto; Jonsson, Michael; Lind, Karin; Edman, Åke; Göthlin, Mattias; Stålhammar, Jacob; Eckerström, Marie; Kern, Silke; Börjesson-Hanson, Anne; Carlsson, Mårten; Olsson, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Svensson, Johan; Öhrfelt, Annika; Bjerke, Maria; Rolstad, Sindre; Eckerström, Carl

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for increased nosological knowledge to enable rational trials in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related disorders. The ongoing Gothenburg mild cognitive impairment (MCI) study is an attempt to conduct longitudinal in-depth phenotyping of patients with different forms and degrees of cognitive impairment using neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and neurochemical tools. Particular attention is paid to the interplay between AD and subcortical vascular disease, the latter representing a disease entity that may cause or contribute to cognitive impairment with an effect size that may be comparable to AD. Of 664 patients enrolled between 1999 and 2013, 195 were diagnosed with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), 274 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 195 with dementia, at baseline. Of the 195 (29%) patients with dementia at baseline, 81 (42%) had AD, 27 (14%) SVD, 41 (21%) mixed type dementia (=AD + SVD = MixD), and 46 (23%) other etiologies. After 6 years, 292 SCI/MCI patients were eligible for follow-up. Of these 292, 69 (24%) had converted to dementia (29 (42%) AD, 16 (23%) SVD, 15 (22%) MixD, 9 (13%) other etiologies). The study has shown that it is possible to identify not only AD but also incipient and manifest MixD/SVD in a memory clinic setting. These conditions should be taken into account in clinical trials. PMID:26174331

  1. Potential impact and acceptability of Internet partner notification for men who have sex with men and transgender women recently diagnosed as having sexually transmitted disease in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jesse L; Segura, Eddy R; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G; Reisner, Sari L; Peinado, Jesus; Salvatierra, Hector J; Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the potential impact of Internet partner notification among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Peru recently diagnosed as having sexually transmitted disease. Use of Internet partner notification was anticipated for 55.9% of recent partners, including 43.0% of partners not currently expected to be notified, a 20.6% increase in anticipated notification outcomes.

  2. Paleoparasitology: the origin of human parasites.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Adauto; Reinhard, Karl; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando; Pucu, Elisa; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2013-09-01

    Parasitism is composed by three subsystems: the parasite, the host, and the environment. There are no organisms that cannot be parasitized. The relationship between a parasite and its host species most of the time do not result in damage or disease to the host. However, in a parasitic disease the presence of a given parasite is always necessary, at least in a given moment of the infection. Some parasite species that infect humans were inherited from pre-hominids, and were shared with other phylogenetically close host species, but other parasite species were acquired from the environment as humans evolved. Human migration spread inherited parasites throughout the globe. To recover and trace the origin and evolution of infectious diseases, paleoparasitology was created. Paleoparasitology is the study of parasites in ancient material, which provided new information on the evolution, paleoepidemiology, ecology and phylogenetics of infectious diseases.

  3. Demodectic Mange, Dermatophilosis, and other parasitic and bacterial dermatologic diseases in free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the United States from 1975-2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is a common and widespread North American game species. To evaluate the incidence, clinical manifestations, demography, and pathology of bacterial and parasitic dermatologic diseases in white-tailed deer in the southeastern United States, we retrospecti...

  4. Biology Today: Parasites and Human Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1984-01-01

    Offers various reasons why the study of parasites and the diseases they cause should be incorporated into classroom biology discussions. Examples of several parasitic diseases and their ecological significance are provided. (JN)

  5. Review of the diseases, parasites and miscellaneous pathological conditions of North American bison

    PubMed Central

    Tessaro, Stacy V.

    1989-01-01

    The involvement of veterinarians in the health management of North American bison will continue to increase, particularly in regard to the development of the bison ranching industry. More intensive management of bison will lead to greater recognition of diseases, and will raise concerns about the transmission of diseases between bison and other livestock species. This review of the infectious and noninfectious diseases of free-ranging and captive bison populations indicates that bison are susceptible to a wide range of indigenous and foreign diseases that occur in cattle and other livestock species. Most of the available information is based on necropsy results or serological surveys, and there is much less information on clinical, diagnostic and preventive medicine, or on the evaluation of conventional diagnostic tests, therapeutic regimens, or vaccines in bison. PMID:17423322

  6. Newly Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... start this journey: Get a copy of your pathology report. We can help you understand the report ...

  7. Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... of transmitting HIV to others. Do I Have AIDS? Being HIV-positive does NOT necessarily mean you ... Children Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults Related Topics on AIDS.gov Stages of HIV Infection Immune System 101 ...

  8. The predictive value of transcranial sonography in clinically diagnosed patients with early stage Parkinson's disease: comparison with DAT PET scans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Li, Xin; Li, Fang-Fei; Ou-Yang, Qiao-Hong; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Feng, Tao

    2014-10-17

    Early and correct diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is critical for patient counseling and therapeutic management. The diagnostic accuracy of transcranial sonography of substantia nigra (SN-TCS) for early stage PD patients remains controversial. Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging is sensitive to detect presynaptic dopamine neuronal dysfunction, and has been studied as a diagnostic tool for degenerative Parkinsonism. To investigate the predictive value of SN-TCS for the DAT PET scans in clinically diagnosed early stage PD patients, we performed the SN-TCS and DAT Positron Emission Computed Tomography (PET) imaging examinations on 53 patients. Using the DAT PET results as clinical gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of TCS was 68.75% and 40% respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) of an abnormal TCS for an abnormal PET scan was 91.67%. However, the negative predictive value (NPV) for a normal PET scan was only 11.76%. The false negative rate was 31.25%. In 35 patients, the result of the SN-TCD was in accordance with the result of the DAT PET scan (Kappa=0.042, P>0.05). The consistency between SN-TCS and PET scans was poor. We conclude that SN-TCS would not be used as a diagnostic tool for early stage PD patients. Negative result of TCS could not exclude the diagnosis of PD. Further tests like DAT-PET is needed for validation. On the other hand, positive SN-TCS will reduce the added diagnostic value of a presynaptic neuronimaging scan.

  9. Red blood cell count has an independent contribution to the prediction of ultrasonography-diagnosed fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shang-ling; Liao, Gong-cheng; Fang, Ai-ping; Zhu, Ming-fan; Zhu, Hui-lian

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims Red blood cell (RBC) indices have been demonstrated to be associated with fatty liver disease (FLD) and metabolic syndrome. However, controversy exists regarding the relationship of RBC indices with FLD to date and few has focused on RBC count. This study aimed to explore the association between RBC count and risk of FLD in Southern Chinese adults. Methods A hospital-based cross-sectional study was performed in two hospital health examination centers, including information on ultrasonography-diagnosed FLD, anthropometric indices and biochemical measurements. Covariance analysis was used to evaluate group differences. After quintile classification of RBC counts, logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the odds ratios (ORs) of FLD. Results This study consisted of 8618 subjects (4137 men and 4481 women) aged between 20 and 89 years. FLD cases had higher RBC counts than non-FLD cases in both genders (P<0.001). The prevalence rates of FLD increased with the RBC quintiles in both genders (all P trend<0.001), and were higher in men than women. Binary logistic regression analysis showed positive association between RBC count and FLD, and the OR (95% confidence interval (CI)) were 2.56 (2.06–3.18) in men and 3.69 (2.74–4.98) in women, respectively, when comparing Q5 with Q1. Stratified analyses showed similar trends among subjects with and without FLD risk factors. Gender independent results were similar to gender dependent results. Conclusions Elevated RBC count is independently associated with high risk of FLD, suggesting that the RBC count may be a potential risk predictor for FLD. PMID:28187211

  10. Relationship between grip strength and newly diagnosed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in a large-scale adult population

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ge; Wu, Hongmei; Fang, Liyun; Li, Chunlei; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Li; Du, Huanmin; Shi, Hongbin; Xia, Yang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xing; Bao, Xue; Su, Qian; Gu, Yeqing; Yang, Huijun; Bin Yu; Wu, Yuntang; Sun, Zhong; Niu, Kaijun

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced muscle strength is often related to improved insulin sensitivity and secretion, control of lipid metabolism, and increased secretion of myokines. These factors have emerged as important mechanisms involved in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), implying that muscle strength may be a useful predictor for NAFLD. We aimed to assess the relationship between grip strength (GS) and NAFLD in a large-scale adult population. GS was assessed using an electronic hand-grip dynamometer, and NAFLD was diagnosed by the liver ultrasonography. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between the quartiles of GS per body weight and the prevalence of NAFLD. After adjusting for potentially confounding factors, the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for overall NAFLD, NAFLD with normal alanine aminotransferase levels, and NAFLD with elevated alanine aminotransferase levels across the quartiles of GS were 1.00 (reference), 0.89 (0.78, 1.01), 0.77 (0.67, 0.89), and 0.67 (0.57, 0.79); 1.00 (reference), 0.91 (0.80, 1.04), 0.79 (0.68, 0.92), and 0.72 (0.61, 0.85); 1.00 (reference), 0.77 (0.61, 0.98), 0.67 (0.51, 0.86), and 0.53 (0.40, 0.71) (all P for trend < 0.01), respectively. This is the first study shows that increased GS is independently associated with lower prevalence of NAFLD. PMID:27616599

  11. Regional changes in psychotropic use among Finnish persons with newly diagnosed Alzheimer’s disease in 2005-2011

    PubMed Central

    Voutilainen, Ari; Taipale, Heidi; Tanskanen, Antti; Lavikainen, Piia; Koponen, Marjaana; Tiihonen, Jari; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To describe and compare temporal changes in prevalence and incidence of psychotropic use (antipsychotics, antidepressants and benzodiazepines and related drugs; BZDRs) in persons with newly diagnosed Alzheimer’s disease (AD) between university hospital districts of Finland during 2005–2011. Methods The MEDALZ study includes all community-dwellers of Finland who received a clinically verified AD diagnosis in 2005–2011 (N = 70,718). Prevalent and incident use of psychotropics among those who had received AD diagnosis less than one year ago were compared in 2005–2011. Results Regional differences in psychotropic use between university hospital districts were more evident in 2005 than 2011 for prevalent use of any psychotropic, antipsychotic and BZDRs and incident use of any psychotropic and antipsychotics. Regional differences in prevalent antidepressant use and incident BZDR use remained similar during the follow-up, while differences in incident antidepressant use increased during the follow-up. The prevalence of any psychotropic use in 2005 varied between 44.7–50.7% and between 45.0–47.9% in 2011. Incidence of any psychotropic use in 2005 was between 8.6–12.1% and 6.2–8.2% in 2011. In 2005, the distribution of incident psychotropic use followed a large scale spatial variation that, however, did not correspond to university hospital districts. During the study period from 2005 to 2011 the cyclic spatial variation disappeared. No sign of adjacent hospital districts being more or less closely related to each other compared to hospital districts in general was detected. Conclusions Except for antidepressants, regional differences in psychotropic use have mainly diminished between 2005 and 2011. Our findings highlight the importance of acknowledging regional differences in a country with relatively homogeneous healthcare system and conducting future studies assessing the reasons behind these differences. PMID:28278245

  12. Mass screening for celiac disease from the perspective of newly diagnosed adolescents and their parents: A mixed-method study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mass screening for celiac disease (CD) as a public health intervention is controversial. Prior to implementation, acceptability to the targeted population should be addressed. We aimed at exploring adolescents' and parents' experiences of having the adolescents' CD detected through mass screening, and their attitudes towards possible future mass screening. Methods All adolescents (n = 145) with screening-detected CD found in a Swedish school-based screening study, and their parents, were invited to this study about one year after diagnosis. In all, 14 focus group discussions were conducted with 31 adolescents and 43 parents. Written narrative was completed by 91 adolescents (63%) and 105 parents (72%), and questionnaires returned by 114 parents (79%). Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. In addition, narratives and questionnaire data allowed for quantified measures. Results Adolescents and parents described how they agreed to participate "for the good of others," without considering consequences for themselves. However, since the screening also introduced a potential risk of having the disease, the invitation was regarded as "an offer hard to resist." For the majority, receiving the diagnosis was described as "a bolt of lightning," but for some it provided an explanation for previous health problems, and "suddenly everything made sense." Looking back at the screening, the predominant attitude was "feeling grateful for being made aware," but some adolescents and parents also expressed "ambivalent feelings about personal benefits." Among parents, 92% supported future CD screening. The most common opinion among both adolescents and parents was that future CD mass screening should be "a right for everyone" and should be offered as early as possible. However, some argued that it should be "only for sufferers" with symptoms, whereas others were "questioning the benefits" of CD mass screening. Conclusions Although the incentives to participate

  13. Epidemiological and clinical description of the top three reportable parasitic diseases in a Canadian community.

    PubMed

    Ravel, A; Nesbitt, A; Pintar, K; Macarthur, A; Wang, H-L; Marshall, B; Pollari, F

    2013-02-01

    This study provides a comprehensive epidemio-clinical picture of sporadic, domestically acquired cases of amoebiasis, cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis in one Canadian community based on patient symptom, outcome and exposure data from an enhanced surveillance system. It yields valuable data for estimating the burden of those diseases including the proportion of bloody diarrhoea, hospitalization, and disease duration. Age differences were observed by incidence rate and for some clinical information and exposures to risk factors. For each of the three diseases, the animal/environment-to-person route was the most common possible main transmission route according to the exposure reported, whereas the person-to-person route was the least common. Exposure was higher for the 10-24 years age group of giardiasis cases for swimming in recreational waters (79%) and attending a barbeque (50%). Therefore, comparisons between groups of cases or extrapolation of results when estimating the burden of illness should be adjusted for age.

  14. Recent developments in the diagnosis of ectoparasite infections and disease through a better understanding of parasite biology and host responses.

    PubMed

    Wells, Beth; Burgess, Stewart T G; McNeilly, Tom N; Huntley, John F; Nisbet, Alasdair J

    2012-02-01

    Some conventional methods of diagnosis of ectoparasite infections can have low sensitivity and/or specificity. In addition, early infestations, sub-clinical and carrier hosts often go un-diagnosed, allowing infestations to spread. This review focuses on the important ectoparasites of human, livestock and companion animals for which improved diagnostic tools are either already in use, or in development. These advances in diagnostic technologies have resulted in improved treatment, control and preventative strategies for many ectoparasitic diseases. Immunodiagnostic methods have had a large impact, with the emergence of highly sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for sarcoptic and psoroptic mange, with further improved tests in development. In the present review, the advantages and limitations of such tests are discussed and the potential for future development explored. The increasing use of molecular tools, for example, PCR and other molecular methods, has improved our understanding of the epidemiology of ectoparasitic diseases, with practical consequences for community-based control programmes. Recently, the identification of specific signalling pathways during the host response to ectoparasites has led to the identification of disease biomarkers which, along with new technologies, such as multiplexed assays and microfluidic platforms, could lead to more cost-effective, rapid and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases.

  15. Parasite age-intensity relationships in red-spotted newts: does immune memory influence salamander disease dynamics?

    PubMed

    Raffel, Thomas R; LeGros, Robert P; Love, Brenda C; Rohr, Jason R; Hudson, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Acquired immune memory in vertebrates influences transmission and persistence of infections, with consequences for parasite dynamics at both the individual and population levels. The potential impact of acquired immunity is of particular interest for salamanders, whose acquired immune systems are thought to be less effective than those of frogs and other tetrapods. One way to examine the importance of acquired immunity to parasite dynamics at the population level is by examining the relationship between host age and parasite infection intensity. Acquired immunity reduces infection rates in older animals, causing decreased parasite intensity in older age classes and leading to curvilinear age-intensity relationships for persistent parasites and convex age-intensity relationships for transient parasites. We used age-intensity relationships to look for the signature of acquired immunity for 12 parasite taxa of red-spotted newts (Notophthalmus viridescens), using data from a 2-year parasitological survey of six newt populations. We estimated ages from snout-vent length (SVL) based on the relationship between SVL and skeletochronologically-derived ages in a subset of newts. We found evidence of acquired immunity to two parasite taxa, bacterial pathogens and the protist Amphibiocystidium viridescens, whose convex age-intensity relationships could not be easily explained by alternative mechanisms. Our results suggest that the acquired immune response of newts is sufficient to influence the dynamics of at least some parasites.

  16. Together in the fight against neglected public health problems: worldwide network cooperation on waterborne diseases and emerging parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoying; Song, Langui; Liang, Jinyi; Luo, Shiqi; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Wu, Zhongdao

    2015-05-01

    A symposium held in Guangzhou, China, aimed to become starting point of an international cooperation in the fight against waterborne diseases, which obtain more and more importance in times of global warming and globalization.

  17. High Accuracy of Common HIV-Related Oral Disease Diagnoses by Non-Oral Health Specialists in the AIDS Clinical Trial Group

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Chen, Huichao; Secours, Rode; Lee, Anthony; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Evans, Scott; Bernard, Daphné; Reznik, David; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Hosey, Lara; Sévère, Patrice; Aberg, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many studies include oral HIV-related endpoints that may be diagnosed by non-oral-health specialists (non-OHS) like nurses or physicians. Our objective was to assess the accuracy of clinical diagnoses of HIV-related oral lesions made by non-OHS compared to diagnoses made by OHS. Methods A5254, a cross-sectional study conducted by the Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance within the AIDS Clinical Trial Group, enrolled HIV-1-infected adults participants from six clinical trial units (CTU) in the US (San Francisco, New York, Chapel Hill, Cleveland, Atlanta) and Haiti. CTU examiners (non-OHS) received standardized training on how to perform an oral examination and make clinical diagnoses of specific oral disease endpoints. Diagnoses by calibrated non-OHS were compared to those made by calibrated OHS, and sensitivity and specificity computed. Results Among 324 participants, the majority were black (73%), men (66%), and the median CD4+ cell count 138 cells/mm3. The overall frequency of oral mucosal disease diagnosed by OHS was 43% in US sites, and 90% in Haiti. Oral candidiasis (OC) was detected in 153 (47%) by OHS, with erythematous candidiasis (EC) the most common type (39%) followed by pseudomembranous candidiasis (PC; 26%). The highest prevalence of OC (79%) was among participants in Haiti, and among those with CD4+ cell count ≤ 200 cells/mm3 and HIV-1 RNA > 1000 copies/mL (71%). The sensitivity and specificity of OC diagnoses by non-OHS were 90% and 92% (for EC: 81% and 94%; PC: 82% and 95%). Sensitivity and specificity were also high for KS (87% and 94%, respectively), but sensitivity was < 60% for HL and oral warts in all sites combined. The Candida culture confirmation of OC clinical diagnoses (as defined by ≥ 1 colony forming unit per mL of oral/throat rinse) was ≥ 93% for both PC and EC. Conclusion Trained non-OHS showed high accuracy of clinical diagnoses of OC in comparison with OHS, suggesting their usefulness in studies in resource-poor settings

  18. [Experiences of comprehensive control of parasitic diseases in demonstration plot of Xiangyun County, Yunnan Province].

    PubMed

    Li-Bo, Wang; Yan-Hong, Li; Wen-Juan, Li; Du, Zun-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Yong

    2011-10-01

    We established and perfected the system of control work, achieved the expected targets, and explored the advisable pattern for prevention and control on soil-transmitted nematode diseases. To perform the prevention and control on soil-transmitted nematodiasis, there should be the guidance of government, the multi-sectoral cooperation, community participation, paying attention to the organization and management, and highlighting the key points including education and deworming.

  19. Coordinating research on neglected parasitic diseases in Southeast Asia through networking.

    PubMed

    Olveda, Remigio; Leonardo, Lydia; Zheng, Feng; Sripa, Banchob; Bergquist, Robert; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2010-01-01

    The new dialogue between stakeholders, that is, scientists, research administrators and donors as well as the populations victimized by endemic infections, is initiating a virtuous circle leading to lower disease-burdens, improved public health and the mitigation of poverty. There is now general agreement that control activities need research collaboration to advance, while surveillance plays an increasingly important role in sustaining long-term relief. On the part of the Regional Network on Asian Schistosomiasis and Other Helminth Zoonoses (RNAS(+)), this has led to a new vision not only focused on general strengthening of research capabilities but also on furthering efforts to close the gap between research and control and bridge different branches of science. From its original, exclusive focus on schistosomiasis, RNAS(+) has expanded to include food-borne and soil-transmitted helminth infections as well. Its current repository of data on the distribution, prevalence and severity of these diseases is increasingly utilised by decision makers charged with epidemiological control in the endemic countries. Thanks to a more rapid translation of research results into control applications and the dissemination of data and new technology through networking, the overall situation is improving. Working as a virtual organisation of researchers and control officers in the endemic countries of Southeast Asia, RNAS(+) is playing an important role in this conversion. Its responsibilities are divided along disease lines into five main areas, but no serious, endemic disease is considered to be outside the network's sphere of interest. This chapter recounts some of the more important RNAS(+) accomplishments, pinpoints potential directions for future operations and highlights areas where research is most needed.

  20. Protozoan Parasites.

    PubMed

    Custodio, Haidee

    2016-02-01

    • Stool antigen detection for Cryptosporidium sp, Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica are now commercially available, have better sensitivity and specificity than the traditional stool microscopy, and are less dependent on personnel skill. Tests employing newer techniques with faster turnaround time are also available for diagnosing trichomoniasis.• Nitazoxanide, the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved medication for therapy of cryptosporidiosis, is effective among immunocompetent patients. However, on the basis of strong evidence from multiple clinical trials, nitazoxanide is considered ineffective among immunocompromised patients. (14) • Giardiasis can be asymptomatic or have a chronic course leading to malabsorption and failure to thrive. It can be treated with metronidazole, tinidazole, or nitazoxanide. On the basis of growing observational studies, postinfectious and extraintestinal manifestations of giardiasis occur, but the mechanisms are unclear. Given the high prevalence of giardiasis, public health implications need to be defined. (16) • Eradicating E histolytica from the gastrointestinal tract requires only intraluminal agent therapy. Therapy for invasive illnesses requires use of imidazole followed by intraluminal agents to eliminate persistent intraluminal parasites. • Malaria is considered the most lethal parasitic infection, with Plasmodium falciparum as the predominant cause of mortality. P vivax and P ovale can be dormant in the liver, and primaquine is necessary to resolve infection by P vivax and P ovale. • Among immunocompetent patients, infection with Toxoplasma gondii may be asymptomatic, involve localized lymphadenopathy, or cause ocular infection. In immunocompromised patients, reactivation or severe infection is not uncommon. On the basis of limited observational studies (there are no well-controlled randomized trials), therapy is recommended for acute infection during pregnancy to prevent transmission to the

  1. Parasite prolyl oligopeptidases and the challenge of designing chemotherapeuticals for Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, I M D; Motta, F N; Grellier, P; Santana, J M

    2013-01-01

    The trypanosomatids Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and human African trypanosomiasis, respectively. It is estimated that over 10 million people worldwide suffer from these neglected diseases, posing enormous social and economic problems in endemic areas. There are no vaccines to prevent these infections and chemotherapies are not adequate. This picture indicates that new chemotherapeutic agents must be developed to treat these illnesses. For this purpose, understanding the biology of the pathogenic trypanosomatid- host cell interface is fundamental for molecular and functional characterization of virulence factors that may be used as targets for the development of inhibitors to be used for effective chemotherapy. In this context, it is well known that proteases have crucial functions for both metabolism and infectivity of pathogens and are thus potential drug targets. In this regard, prolyl oligopeptidase and oligopeptidase B, both members of the S9 serine protease family, have been shown to play important roles in the interactions of pathogenic protozoa with their mammalian hosts and may thus be considered targets for drug design. This review aims to discuss structural and functional properties of these intriguing enzymes and their potential as targets for the development of drugs against Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis.

  2. Impact of water supply, domiciliary water reservoirs and sewage on faeco-orally transmitted parasitic diseases in children residing in poor areas in Juiz de Fora, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, J C; Heller, L

    2006-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize faeco-orally transmitted parasitic diseases and to identify the factors associated with these diseases, with emphasis on environmental factors, in children ranging from 1 up to 5 years old residing in substandard settlement areas. A population-based cross-sectional epidemiological design was used in a non-random selection of 29 out of the 78 substandard settlement areas in the municipality of Juiz de Fora, Brazil. A sample of 753 children were assessed from the target population consisting of all children of the appropriate age range residing in the selected areas. Data were collected by means of domiciliary interviews with their mothers or with the person responsible for them. The Hoffmann-Pons-Janer method was used in the parasitological examination of faeces. Binary logistic regression models were used to identify the factors associated with the diseases. A total of 319 sample children presented faeco-orally transmitted parasitic diseases. The factors associated with these parasitic diseases included the children's age, family income, number of dwellers in the domicile, consumption of water from shallow wells, consumption of water from natural sources, absence of covered domiciliary water reservoirs, and the presence of sewage flowing in the street.

  3. Lineage Analysis of Circulating Trypanosoma cruzi Parasites and Their Association with Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    del Puerto, Ramona; Nishizawa, Juan Eiki; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Iihoshi, Naomi; Roca, Yelin; Avilas, Cinthia; Gianella, Alberto; Lora, Javier; Gutierrez Velarde, Freddy Udalrico; Renjel, Luis Alberto; Miura, Sachio; Higo, Hiroo; Komiya, Norihiro; Maemura, Koji; Hirayama, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Background The causative agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, is divided into 6 Discrete Typing Units (DTU): Tc I, IIa, IIb, IIc, IId and IIe. In order to assess the relative pathogenicities of different DTUs, blood samples from three different clinical groups of chronic Chagas disease patients (indeterminate, cardiac, megacolon) from Bolivia were analyzed for their circulating parasites lineages using minicircle kinetoplast DNA polymorphism. Methods and Findings Between 2000 and 2007, patients sent to the Centro Nacional de Enfermedades Tropicales for diagnosis of Chagas from clinics and hospitals in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, were assessed by serology, cardiology and gastro-intestinal examinations. Additionally, patients who underwent colonectomies due to Chagasic magacolon at the Hospital Universitario Japonés were also included. A total of 306 chronic Chagas patients were defined by their clinical types (81 with cardiopathy, 150 without cardiopathy, 100 with megacolon, 144 without megacolon, 164 with cardiopathy or megacolon, 73 indeterminate and 17 cases with both cardiopathy and megacolon). DNA was extracted from 10 ml of peripheral venous blood for PCR analysis. The kinetoplast minicircle DNA (kDNA) was amplified from 196 out of 306 samples (64.1%), of which 104 (53.3%) were Tc IId, 4 (2.0%) Tc I, 7 (3.6%) Tc IIb, 1 (0.5%) Tc IIe, 26 (13.3%) Tc I/IId, 1 (0.5%) Tc I/IIb/IId, 2 (1.0%) Tc IIb/d and 51 (25.9%) were unidentified. Of the 133 Tc IId samples, three different kDNA hypervariable region patterns were detected; Mn (49.6%), TPK like (48.9%) and Bug-like (1.5%). There was no significant association between Tc types and clinical manifestations of disease. Conclusions None of the identified lineages or sublineages was significantly associated with any particular clinical manifestations in the chronic Chagas patients in Bolivia. PMID:20502516

  4. [Why can it be difficult for clinicians to diagnose acute lyme disease? From physiopathology to diagnosis, via abductive reasoning and Bayes theorem].

    PubMed

    Godefroid, C; Buttafuoco, F; Richard, T; Goubella, A; Vanhaeverbeek, M

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of acute neuroborreliosis may be difficult if it's regarded as a "classical" infectious disease. Through a clinical case, we illustrate the difficulties met and we suggest two ways of reflexion to assist in the diagnosis:--firstly, we explain how the comprehension of the behavior of the pathogen agent, which is similar to a parasitic behavior, can help to choose and interpret the results of additional tests;--secondly, we develop practically the clinical form of Bayes's theorem to demonstrate the interest of a rational Bayesian and abductive approach which should be preferred to the classical hypothetical and deductive reasoning.

  5. Application of Radar Altimetry Methods to Monitoring of Parasitic Disease Transmission: Schistosomiasis in Poyang Lake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandless, M.; Ibaraki, M.; Shum, C.; Lee, H.; Liang, S.

    2008-12-01

    Schistosomiasis is the second-most prevalent tropical disease after malaria affecting two-hundred million people annually world-wide; it shortens lifespan on average by ten years in endemic areas and no vaccine exists. The current control methods of human host chemotherapy and application of molluscicides to the environment do not break the disease transmission cycle. Schistosomiasis transmission in southern China involves an amphibious intermediate host snail for which hydrology is a key factor because the adults need moist vegetation while the juveniles are fully aquatic. Thus, hydrology is a key factor in schistosomiasis transmission and understanding its role can inform control measures. Our objective is to integrate hydrologic, ecologic, and other environmental factors to determine the changes in available snail habitat through space and time. We use radar altimetry measurements to determine water level every 35 days when the Envisat (Environmental Satellite) passes over the lake. The radar altimetry readings have been calibrated to levels from in-situ gauging stations and will support remote analysis of disease transmission potential without the need for gauging station data. A geographic information system was used to combine key factors including water level, topography, and air temperature data to identify areas of available snail habitat. In order to accomplish this, we conducted three steps including: delineating the watershed, specifying potential snail habitat areas through topography and air temperature classification, and calculating the intersection between potential snail habitat and non-flooded areas in the watershed. Statistical analyses of total available habitat area are also conducted. These maps and statistics analyses can be used by public health agencies to monitor snail habitat trends over time. Coupling remote sensing of water levels with a geographic information system model will continue to be important as the hydrology of the lake

  6. A suspected parasite spill-back of two novel Myxidium spp. (Myxosporea) causing disease in Australian endemic frogs found in the invasive Cane toad.

    PubMed

    Hartigan, Ashlie; Fiala, Ivan; Dyková, Iva; Jirků, Miloslav; Okimoto, Ben; Rose, Karrie; Phalen, David N; Šlapeta, Jan

    2011-04-25

    Infectious diseases are contributing to the decline of endangered amphibians. We identified myxosporean parasites, Myxidium spp. (Myxosporea: Myxozoa), in the brain and liver of declining native frogs, the Green and Golden Bell frog (Litoria aurea) and the Southern Bell frog (Litoria raniformis). We unequivocally identified two Myxidium spp. (both generalist) affecting Australian native frogs and the invasive Cane toad (Bufo marinus, syn. Rhinella marina) and demonstrated their association with disease. Our study tested the identity of Myxidium spp. within native frogs and the invasive Cane toad (brought to Australia in 1935, via Hawaii) to resolve the question whether the Cane toad introduced them to Australia. We showed that the Australian brain and liver Myxidium spp. differed 9%, 7%, 34% and 37% at the small subunit rDNA, large subunit rDNA, internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, but were distinct from Myxidium cf. immersum from Cane toads in Brazil. Plotting minimum within-group distance against maximum intra-group distance confirmed their independent evolutionary trajectory. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the brain stages localize inside axons. Myxospores were morphologically indistinguishable, therefore genetic characterisation was necessary to recognise these cryptic species. It is unlikely that the Cane toad brought the myxosporean parasites to Australia, because the parasites were not found in 261 Hawaiian Cane toads. Instead, these data support the enemy-release hypothesis predicting that not all parasites are translocated with their hosts and suggest that the Cane toad may have played an important spill-back role in their emergence and facilitated their dissemination. This work emphasizes the importance of accurate species identification of pathogens relevant to wildlife management and disease control. In our case it is paving the road for the spill-back role of the Cane toad and the parasite emergence.

  7. [How to fight parasitic infectious diseases with bacteria. The case of Wolbachia pipientis].

    PubMed

    March-Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Eiros-Bouza, José María

    2014-01-01

    In Nature, no individual can live in isolation; hence, living organisms are forced to interact with each other. This necessity has led many organisms to establish heterogeneous relations to enhance their ability to adapt to the environment, thus acquiring evolutionary advantages. These relationships are sometimes so intense, that on the long term the organisms may lose their individual identity. An example of these associations is the endosymbiotic ones, where eukaryote organisms generally harbor different prokaryote organisms. The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia pipientis is a species described by Hertig and Wolbach in 1924. This microorganism can be isolated in a large variety of eukaryote organisms, with which it maintains different links. Until now, this species has only been described with 11 serogroups numbered from A to K within the Wolbachia genus. This work is intended to illustrate the relationship of Wolbachia pipientis with human pathogenic filaria and with arthropods, as well as to describe the implications of this bacterium in the treatment of filariasis. Finally, this work tries to describe recent studies that have targeted the use of artificially-created Wolbachia pipientis virulent strains that, once inoculated in infectious diseases-transmitting vectors, develop negative effects within them in order to, in this way, erradicate mosquito-transmitted infectious diseases for which no treatment is available at the moment or the prevention of its transmissibility has not been achieved.

  8. Preventive chemotherapy as a strategy for elimination of neglected tropical parasitic diseases: endgame challenges.

    PubMed

    Bockarie, Moses J; Kelly-Hope, Louise A; Rebollo, Maria; Molyneux, David H

    2013-08-05

    Global efforts to address neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) were stimulated in January 2012 by the London declaration at which 22 partners, including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, World Bank, World Health Organization (WHO) and major pharmaceutical companies committed to sustaining and expanding NTD programmes to eliminate or eradicate 11 NTDs by 2020 to achieve the goals outlined in the recently published WHO road map. Here, we present the current context of preventive chemotherapy for some NTDs, and discuss the problems faced by programmes as they consider the 'endgame', such as difficulties of access to populations in post-conflict settings, limited human and financial resources, and the need to expand access to clean water and improved sanitation for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis. In the case of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, ivermectin treatment carries a significant risk owing to serious adverse effects in some patients co-infected with the tropical eye worm Loa loa filariasis. We discuss the challenges of managing complex partnerships, and maintain advocacy messages for the continued support for elimination of these preventable diseases.

  9. Diagnosing Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms and their clinical judgment. Will my health care provider test me for flu if I have flu-like ... flu symptoms do not require testing because the test results usually do not change how you are treated. Your health care provider may diagnose you with flu based on ...

  10. [An analysis on funded theses in the Chinese Journal of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases in 2009-2012].

    PubMed

    Yi, Feng-yun; Zhang, Zheng-yan; Sheng, Hui-feng

    2014-12-01

    The published articles of the Chinese Journal of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases in 2009-2012 (including original articles, experimental researches, field researches and clinical researches) were statistically analyzed. Together 258 research papers were published in the 4 years, and funded papers occupied 82.2% (212/258). The number of papers funded by 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 foundations projects was 116, 58, 29, 7 and 2, respectively. 61.8% (131/212) of the foundations projects were at the national level; 28.3% (60/212) were at provincial and ministerial level. The papers supported by academy and international agencies accounted for 7.1% (15/212), 2.8% (6/212), respectively. The funded thesis mainly referred to schistosomiasis (35, 16.5%), cystic echinococcosis (29, 13.7%), malaria (24, 11.3%), toxoplasmosis (22, 10.4%), and cysticercosis (9, 4.2%). Five fields covered in these papers were as follows: epidemiology (29, 13.7%), immunology and diagnosis (53, 25%), molecular biology (75, 35.4%), etiology (28,13.2%), and pharmacology (24, 11.3%). The ratio of founded paper was 0.70, 0.67, 0.74, and 0.65 during 2009-2012, respectively. The high ratio of founded paper indicated that this journal is with domestic and abroad importance in the field of parasitology.

  11. De-politicizing parasites: reflections on attempts to control the control of neglected tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Parker, Melissa; Allen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of funding are being allocated to the control of neglected tropical diseases. Strategies primarily rely on the mass distribution of drugs to adults and children living in endemic areas. The approach is presented as morally appropriate, technically effective, and context-free. Drawing on research undertaken in East Africa, we discuss ways in which normative ideas about global health programs are used to set aside social and biological evidence. In particular, there is a tendency to ignore local details, including information about actual drug take up. Ferguson's 'anti-politics' thesis is a useful starting point for analyzing why this happens, but is overly deterministic. Anti-politics discourse about healing the suffering poor may shape thinking and help explain cognitive dissonance. However, use of such discourse is also a means of strategically promoting vested interests and securing funding. Whatever the underlying motivations, rhetoric and realities are conflated, with potentially counterproductive consequences.

  12. De-Politicizing Parasites: Reflections on Attempts to Control the Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Melissa; Allen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Large amounts of funding are being allocated to the control of neglected tropical diseases. Strategies primarily rely on the mass distribution of drugs to adults and children living in endemic areas. The approach is presented as morally appropriate, technically effective, and context-free. Drawing on research undertaken in East Africa, we discuss ways in which normative ideas about global health programs are used to set aside social and biological evidence. In particular, there is a tendency to ignore local details, including information about actual drug take up. Ferguson’s ‘anti-politics’ thesis is a useful starting point for analyzing why this happens, but is overly deterministic. Anti-politics discourse about healing the suffering poor may shape thinking and help explain cognitive dissonance. However, use of such discourse is also a means of strategically promoting vested interests and securing funding. Whatever the underlying motivations, rhetoric and realities are conflated, with potentially counterproductive consequences. PMID:24761976

  13. microRNAs in parasites and parasite infection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yadong; Cai, Xuepeng; Bradley, Janette E.

    2013-01-01

    miRNAs, a subclass of small regulatory RNAs, are present from ancient unicellular protozoans to parasitic helminths and parasitic arthropods. The miRNA-silencing mechanism appears, however, to be absent in a number of protozoan parasites. Protozoan miRNAs and components of their silencing machinery possess features different from other eukaryotes, providing some clues on the evolution of the RNA-induced silencing machinery. miRNA functions possibly associate with neoblast biology, development, physiology, infection and immunity of parasites. Parasite infection can alter host miRNA expression that can favor both parasite clearance and infection. miRNA pathways are, thus, a potential target for the therapeutic control of parasitic diseases. PMID:23392243

  14. microRNAs in parasites and parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yadong; Cai, Xuepeng; Bradley, Janette E

    2013-03-01

    miRNAs, a subclass of small regulatory RNAs, are present from ancient unicellular protozoans to parasitic helminths and parasitic arthropods. The miRNA-silencing mechanism appears, however, to be absent in a number of protozoan parasites. Protozoan miRNAs and components of their silencing machinery possess features different from other eukaryotes, providing some clues on the evolution of the RNA-induced silencing machinery. miRNA functions possibly associate with neoblast biology, development, physiology, infection and immunity of parasites. Parasite infection can alter host miRNA expression that can favor both parasite clearance and infection. miRNA pathways are, thus, a potential target for the therapeutic control of parasitic diseases.

  15. The Integration of Cellular and Humoral Responses to Protozoan Parasites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    IMMUNOLOGY, *PARASITES, * LEISHMANIA , *PLASMODIUM, *PROTOZOA, ISRAEL, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, RATS, MICE, MALARIA, IMMUNITY, CELLS(BIOLOGY), SEROLOGY, CULTURES(BIOLOGY), PARASITIC DISEASES, SPLEEN, HYPERSENSITIVITY.

  16. Parasites and vector-borne diseases in client-owned dogs in Albania. Intestinal and pulmonary endoparasite infections.

    PubMed

    Shukullari, Enstela; Hamel, Dietmar; Rapti, Dhimitër; Pfister, Kurt; Visser, Martin; Winter, Renate; Rehbein, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    From March 2010 to April 2011 inclusive, feces from 602 client-owned dogs visiting four small animal clinics in Tirana, Albania, were examined using standard coproscopical techniques including Giardia coproantigen ELISA and immunofluorescent staining of Giardia cysts. Overall, samples of 245 dogs (40.7 %, 95 % CI 36.6-45.6) tested positive for at least one type of fecal endoparasite (protozoan and/or helminth and/or pentastomid) stage, of which 180 (29.9 %, 95 % CI 26.3-33.7) and 129 (21.9 %, 95 % CI 18.2-24.9) tested positive for protozoan or nematode endoparasites, respectively. Fecal forms of at least 14 endoparasites were identified. The most frequently identified stages were those of Giardia (26.4 %), Trichuris (9.5 %), Toxocara (8.0 %), hookworms (7.1 %), Cystoisospora ohioensis (4.3 %), and Cystoisospora canis (3 %). For the first time for dogs in Albania, fecal examination indicated the occurrence of Hammondia/Neospora-like (0.2 %), Angiostrongylus lungworm (0.3 %), capillariid (2.8 %), and Linguatula (0.2 %) infections. Single and multiple infections with up to seven parasites concurrently were found in 152 (25.2 %, 95 % CI 21.8-28.9) and 93 dogs (15.4 %, 95 % CI 12.7-18.6), respectively. On univariate analysis, the dog's age, the dog's purpose (pet, hunting dog, working dog), the dog's habitat (city, suburban, rural), and environment (mainly indoors, indoors with regular outside walking, yard, kennel/run), presence/absence of other dogs and/or cats, history of anthelmintic use, and season of examination were identified as significant (p < 0.05) factors predisposing dogs to various types of endoparasitism while the variables breed (pure breed dogs vs. mixed-breed dogs), gender, and type of food were not significant predictors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis for factors associated with overall endoparasitism revealed that dogs >1 year of age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.64), dogs dewormed at least once per year (OR = 0

  17. Infection with arginase deficient Leishmania major reveals a parasite number-dependent and cytokine-independent regulation of host cellular arginase activity and disease pathogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Muleme, Helen M; Reguera, Rosa M; Berard, Alicia; Azinwi, Richard; Jia, Ping; Okwor, Ifeoma B; Beverley, Stephen; Uzonna, Jude E

    2009-01-01

    The balance between the products of L-arginine metabolism in macrophages regulates the outcome of Leishmania major infection. L-arginine can be oxidized by host inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to produce nitric oxide (NO), which contributes to parasite killing. In contrast, L-arginine hydrolysis by host arginase blocks NO generation and provides polyamines, which can support parasite proliferation. Additionally, Leishmania encode their own arginase which has considereable potential to modulate infectivity and disease pathogenesis. Here, we compare the infectivity and impact on host cellular immune response in vitro and in vivo of wild-type (WT) L. major with that of a parasite arginase null mutant (arg-). We found that arg- L. major are impaired in their macrophage infectivity in vitro independent of host iNOS activities. As with in vitro results, the proliferation of arg- L. major in animal infections was also significantly impaired in vivo resulting in delayed onset of lesion development, attenuated pathology and low parasite burden. Despite this attenuated pathology, the production of cytokines by cells from the draining lymph node of mice infected with WT and arg- L. major was similar at all times tested. Interestingly, in vitro and in vivo arginase levels were significantly lower in arg- than in WT infected cases and were directly correlated with parasite numbers inside infected cells. These results suggest that Leishmania-encoded arginase enhances disease pathogenesis by augmenting host cellular arginase activities leading and that contrary to previous in vitro studies, the host cytokine response does not influence host arginase activity. PMID:19923451

  18. The level of knowledge about parasitic diseases and the threats resulting from their presence in the environment evaluated in a group of parents of preschool children.

    PubMed

    Gniadek, Agnieszka; Cepuch, Grażyna; Ochender, Katarzyna; Salamon, Dominika

    2015-01-01

    Despite a significant civilization advancement, parasitic diseases still pose a serious diagnostic and therapeutic problem. Children's susceptibility to these infections stems from their immature immune system and lack of basic hygiene routines. The objective of the study was to evaluate the level of knowledge which parents of preschool children's possess about parasitic diseases in their children's environment. The study was carried out in the group of 151 parents of preschool children living both in the city and in the country. The survey was carried out by means of a diagnostic poll with the application of a self-designed research questionnaire. To make the evaluation even more objective, a special scale was created in which parents could score points for their answers (0 - wrong answer, 1 - correct answer). The total number of points ranging from 0 to 9 indicated an unsatisfactory level of knowledge, from 10 to 13 - satisfactory level, from 14 to 16 - good level and from 17 to 20 - very good level of parents' awareness. The results of the study reveal that the level of parents' knowledge about parasitic diseases is only satisfactory. A statistically significant relationship was observed between the variables such as education and sex. The higher education, the higher level of knowledge. Moreover, women were more knowledgeable in the field of parasitic diseases than men were. Financial status of the family did not influence the level of parents' awareness. Well-planned educational programmes might have a positive influence on developing proper hygiene routines in families, which, in turn, will limit the risk of spreading parasitoses in the population of children.

  19. Spectrum of Sickle Cell Diseases in Patients Diagnosed at a Tertiary Care Centre in Karnataka with Special Emphasis on their Clinicohaematological Profile

    PubMed Central

    Lokanatha, Hemalata; Ramachandrappa, Rajashekar Murthy G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell disease is a monogenic disorder with considerable clinical diversity and Sickle haemoglobin is responsible for wide spectrum of disorders which vary with respect to severity of anaemia, frequency of crises and duration of survival. As they are confused with many other clinically aggressive disorders, precision in diagnosis is essential both to proper clinical management and subsequent genetic counselling. Hence, this study was taken up in order to diagnose these conditions and administer suitable counselling measures to minimise the incidence of sickle cell disease in the future. Aim The aim of this study was to identify the spectrum of all Sickle cell diseases diagnosed at a tertiary care centre in Bangalore, Karnataka, India who presented over a period of five years from 2009 to 2013 and also to screen the parents and siblings of the patients for their carrier status. Materials and Methods We reviewed 26 cases of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) and also 38 parents & 10 siblings of these children for their carrier status. Haemoglobin electrophoreses was performed by using alkaline gel method, followed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography when needed. Results A total of 26 children diagnosed with SCD were enrolled in the study. Most common entity was Sickle Cell Anaemia (SCA), followed by sickle thalassaemia and Sickle Cell Trait (SCT). Commonest clinical presentation was fever and pallor. Amongst the parents and siblings, sickle cell trait was the most common entity followed by thalassaemia trait. One interesting case of HbSE disease was encountered, which is a rare entity in India. Conclusion This study brings out the total spectrum of SCDs in a tertiary care centre in Karnataka, with more emphasis on screening of the parents and siblings for their carrier status. PMID:27042470

  20. Parasites in the brain? The search for sleeping sickness biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Burchmore, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Evaluation of: Tiberti N, Hainard A, Lejon V et al. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin as marker of the meningo-encephalitic stage of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense sleeping sickness. PLoS ONE 7(7), e40909 (2012). Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a fatal parasitic disease that progresses from an early stage (stage 1), where parasites multiply in the hemolymphatic system, to a late stage (stage 2) disease, where parasites have become manifest within the CNS. Patients with stage 1 disease are treated with relatively safe drugs, but stage 2 disease requires treatment with drugs that are very toxic or difficult to administer. Thus, it is important to determine the stage of HAT infection before treating. HAT staging currently involves microscopic examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), looking for the presence of parasites, or for more than five white blood cells per microliter CSF. This article tested the specificity and selectivity of eight potential CSF markers for stage 2 HAT, by analysis of levels in 400 CSF samples from patients diagnosed with stage 1 or stage 2 HAT by WHO protocols. Two of these markers gave results that were comparable with those obtained by conventional diagnosis. The potential for and challenges of developing improved staging for HAT are discussed.

  1. Navigating parasite webs and parasite flow: emerging and re-emerging parasitic zoonoses of wildlife origin.

    PubMed

    Polley, Lydden

    2005-10-01

    Wildlife are now recognised as an important source of emerging human pathogens, including parasites. This paper discusses the linkages between wildlife, people, zoonotic parasites and the ecosystems in which they co-exist, revisits definitions for 'emerging' and 're-emerging', and lists zoonotic parasites that can be acquired from wildlife including, for some, estimates of the associated global human health burdens. The paper also introduces the concepts of 'parasite webs' and 'parasite flow', provides a context for parasites, relative to other infectious agents, as causes of emerging human disease, and discusses drivers of disease emergence and re-emergence, especially changes in biodiversity and climate. Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the Caribbean and the southern United States, Baylisascaris procyonis in California and Georgia, Plasmodium knowlesi in Sarawak, Malaysia, Human African Trypanosomiasis, Sarcoptes scabiei in carnivores, and Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Toxoplasma in marine ecosystems are presented as examples of wildlife-derived zoonotic parasites of particular recent interest. An ecological approach to disease is promoted, as is a need for an increased profile for this approach in undergraduate and graduate education in the health sciences. Synergy among scientists and disciplines is identified as critical for the study of parasites and parasitic disease in wildlife populations. Recent advances in techniques for the investigation of parasite fauna of wildlife are presented and monitoring and surveillance systems for wildlife disease are discussed. Some of the limitations inherent in predictions for the emergence and re-emergence of infection and disease associated with zoonotic parasites of wildlife are identified. The importance of public awareness and public education in the prevention and control of emerging and re-emerging zoonotic infection and disease are emphasised. Finally, some thoughts for the future are presented.

  2. Malaria, photomicrograph of cellular parasites (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Malaria is a disease caused by parasites. This picture shows dark orange-stained malaria parasites inside red blood cells (a) and outside the cells (b). Note the large cells that look like targets; ...

  3. Parasitic Manipulation of Host Behaviour: Baculovirus SeMNPV EGT Facilitates Tree-Top Disease in Spodoptera exigua Larvae by Extending the Time to Death.

    PubMed

    Han, Yue; van Houte, Stineke; Drees, Gerben F; van Oers, Monique M; Ros, Vera I D

    2015-07-31

    Many parasites enhance their dispersal and transmission by manipulating host behaviour. One intriguing example concerns baculoviruses that induce hyperactivity and tree-top disease (i.e., climbing to elevated positions prior to death) in their caterpillar hosts. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of such parasite-induced behavioural changes. Here, we studied the role of the ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt) gene of Spodoptera exigua multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) in tree-top disease in S. exigua larvae. Larvae infected with a mutant virus lacking the egt gene exhibited a shorter time to death and died before the induction of tree-top disease. Moreover, deletion of either the open reading frame or the ATG start codon of the egt gene prevented tree-top disease, indicating that the EGT protein is involved in this process. We hypothesize that SeMNPV EGT facilitates tree-top disease in S. exigua larvae by prolonging the larval time to death. Additionally, we discuss the role of egt in baculovirus-induced tree-top disease.

  4. [EXTERNAL QUALITY ASSESSMENT FOR THE LABORATORY IDENTIFICATION OF THE PATHOGENS OF PARASITIC DISEASES AS AN ELEMENT FOR IMPROVING THE POSTGRADUATE TRAINING OF SPECIALISTS].

    PubMed

    Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Yu; Malakhov, V N; Serdyuk, A P; Imamkuliev, K D; Gorbunova, Yu P; Pautova, E A; Prodeus, T V; Semenova, T A; Fedyanina, L V

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the Federal External Quality Assessment (EQA) System and in the context of postgraduate training improvement for health workers in 2010-2014, specialists from the laboratories of the therapeutic-prophylactic organizations and institutions of the Russian Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare were examined for their professional competence in microscopically identifying the pathogens of parasitic diseases in feces. The virtual remote educational computer technology tools that included different combinations of 16 helminthic species, 5 intestinal protozoan species, and a number of artefacts, were used. The specialists from 984 laboratories of multidisciplinary therapeutic-prophylactic organizations and hygiene and epidemiology centers in all Federal Districts of the Russian Federation were covered. A total of 8245 replies were analyzed. The detection rate for helminths was 64.0%, including those by a taxonomic group (nematodes, 65.0%; cestodes, 72.0%; trematodes, 55.1%). There was a dynamic decrease in the above indicators. There were low detection rates for trematodes parasitizing the small intestine (Metagonimus, 10.2%; Nanophyetus, 26.2%) and hepatobiliary organs (Fasciola, 59.6%; Clonorchis, 34.9%). The similar trend was seen in the detection rates for the pathogens of geohelminthisms (ascariasis, trichocephaliasis, etc.) and contagious helminthisms (enterobiasis, hymenolepiasis). The level of competence in detecting and identifying intestinal protozoa was much lower than the similar rates for helminthism pathogens. EQA for the laboratory diagnosis of the pathogens of parasitic diseases, by using the virtual tools is a leading element of the postgraduate training system for laboratory specialists. The results of EQA for the laboratory diagnosis of the pathogens of parasitic diseases are a basic material for the development, and improvement of training modernization programs, by applying a modular

  5. Consideration of the Pathological Features of Pediatric Congenital Heart Diseases Which Are Ideally Suitable for Diagnosing With Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    Hayabuchi, Yasunobu; Inoue, Miki; Watanabe, Noriko; Sakata, Miho; Ohnishi, Tatsuya; Kagami, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Background A lots of articles published regarding the usefulness of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) mostly describe that it can be an alternative to the invasive catheterization and angiography. The unique diagnostic features of this imaging modality have been largely ignored or disregarded. We described the pathological conditions that cannot be diagnosed by conventional angiography with cardiac catheterization but can be accurately diagnosed by MDCT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed non-ECG-gated MDCT images acquired from 452 children and young adults with CHD between 2005 and 2010 in our institute. In this article, we focused on the diagnostic advantages of MDCT, and indicated five pathological conditions. (1) When Blalock-Taussig shunt total occlusion prevents catheter insertion into the artificial vessel and angiography is ruled out, the peripheral pulmonary artery during the peripheral pulmonary artery can be imaged and diagnosed using MDCT based on blood flow supplied from many small collateral vessels originating from the aorta. (2) The location and protrusion of the device in the vessel after coil embolization to treat patent ductus arteriosus can be accurately visualized by virtual endoscopy using MDCT. (3) Calcification of patches, synthetic blood vessels, and other prostheses that is indistinct on conventional angiograms is clear on MDCT. (4) Simultaneous MDCT observations of the anatomical relationships between arterial and venous systems on the same image can clarify the detail diagnosis for surgical treatment. (5) Compression of the airways by the great vessels and pulmonary segmental emphysematous change can be diagnosed by MDCT. Results and Conclusions Among patients with CHD, MDCT is useful not only as a non-invasive alternative to conventional angiography, but also as a tool for specific morphological diagnoses. In the future, it will be necessary to accumulate experience in the

  6. [Analysis on Research Projects Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China at the National Institute of Parasitic Diseases during 2003-2013].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-jun; Zheng, Bin; Yi, Feng-yun; Xiong, Yan-hong; Zhang, Min-qi

    2015-04-01

    The data of the National Natural Science Foundation (NSFC) projests obtained by the National Institute of Parasitic Diseases (NIPD), Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC) during 2003-2013 were collected from internet-based science information system of NSFC, and NSFC search tool of Dingxiang Garden (http://nsfc.biomart.cn/). The number of funded projects, their subject classification and approved amount were analyzed, and compared with the other institutes of China CDC. Furthermore, the rationalization proposals were given in order to enhance the level of foundation management in the future.

  7. Challenges in the chemotherapy of Chagas disease: Looking for possibilities related to the differences and similarities between the parasite and host

    PubMed Central

    Sueth-Santiago, Vitor; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Morrot, Alexandre; Freire-de-Lima, Celio Geraldo; Lima, Marco Edilson Freire

    2017-01-01

    Almost 110 years after the first studies by Dr. Carlos Chagas describing an infectious disease that was named for him, Chagas disease remains a neglected illness and a death sentence for infected people in poor countries. This short review highlights the enormous need for new studies aimed at the development of novel and more specific drugs to treat chagasic patients. The primary tool for facing this challenge is deep knowledge about the similarities and differences between the parasite and its human host. PMID:28289519

  8. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in an urban environment in Sahel. A study in a district of Niamey, Niger].

    PubMed

    Julvez, J; Badé, M A; Lamotte, M; Campagne, G; Garba, A; Gragnic, G; Bui, A; Kehren, S; Cluzel, F; Chippaux, J P

    1998-01-01

    Health and environment in Niamey, a capital in Sahel, are particularly linked owing to population growth, promiscuity and large pollution induced by human and animal excreta. One district, located in the centre of the town, was surveyed for drinking water quality (ammoniac and bacterial count) and use, as well as for the prevalence of parasites through both a random sample (fixed tools with methiolate-iodine-formaldehyde) and a systematic one (scotch-test). Water consumption was 16.5 litres/day/man from fresh water supplies (87%) and private wells (13%). Ammoniac measures were low in the wells but high in running water (pool and river). It was the same for faecal coliform bacteria. These results give evidence of biotope faecal pollution. The random sample (322 persons, male/female sex ratio 0,85, average age 20,6 years) showed a 42.1% parasitic prevalence. Amoeba was the most frequent parasite (53.6%); and Giardia (14.9%) was the most frequent pathogenic parasite. In the second sample (161 children under 10 years), 24.2% were carriers of oxyuris. This large intestinal parasitism, without any change in connection with previous data in Niger, points to an important fecal contamination of the people more by the way of "dirty hands" than consumption of drinking water. The parasites observed have a short biological cycle, not necessitating long-term maturation in the environment. Those whose ova or larvae must complete their cycle outside have no possibility of surviving in Sahel, thanks to the beneficial effect of sunlight (heat and ultraviolet light). The inhabitants of this district seem to have adapted to intestinal parasitism. But the occurrence of malnutrition linked to a new drought could lead rapidly to a very serious adverse result.

  9. [Main parasitic skin disorders].

    PubMed

    Bernigaud, C; Monsel, G; Delaunay, P; Do-Pham, G; Foulet, F; Botterel, F; Chosidow, O

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous parasitic skin diseases are frequent in human pathology. There are few reliable epidemiological data on the prevalence and/or incidence of such diseases. Skin parasites are cosmopolitan but their global distribution is heterogenous; prevalence is especially high in subtropical and tropical countries. They are mainly due to arthropods (insects and mites). Many species of parasites are involved, explaining the diversity of their clinical signs. The most common are caused by ectoparasites such as scabies or pediculosis (head lice, body lice and pubic lice). Clinical signs may be related to the penetration of the parasite under the skin, its development, the inoculation of venom or allergic symptoms. Diagnosis can be easy when clinical signs are pathognomonic (e.g. burrows in the interdigital web spaces in scabies) or sometimes more difficult. Some epidemiological characteristics (diurnal or nocturnal bite, seasonality) and specific clinical presentation (single or multiple bites, linear or grouped lesions) can be a great diagnostic help. Modern non-invasive tools (dermoscopy or confocal microscopy) will play an important role in the future but the eye and experience of the specialist (dermatologist, parasitologist, infectious disease specialist or entomologist) remains for the time the best way to guide or establish a diagnosis. For most skin parasites, therapeutic proposals are rarely based on studies of high level of evidence or randomized trials but more on expert recommendations or personal experience.

  10. Molecular diagnosis of infections and resistance in veterinary and human parasites.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Peter W

    2011-08-04

    Since 1977, >2000 research papers described attempts to detect, identify and/or quantify parasites, or disease organisms carried by ecto-parasites, using DNA-based tests and 148 reviews of the topic were published. Despite this, only a few DNA-based tests for parasitic diseases are routinely available, and most of these are optional tests used occasionally in disease diagnosis. Malaria, trypanosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, leishmaniasis and cryptosporidiosis diagnosis may be assisted by DNA-based testing in some countries, but there are very few cases where the detection of veterinary parasites is assisted by DNA-based tests. The diagnoses of some bacterial (e.g. lyme disease) and viral diseases (e.g. tick borne encephalitis) which are transmitted by ecto-parasites more commonly use DNA-based tests, and research developing tests for these species makes up almost 20% of the literature. Other important uses of DNA-based tests are for epidemiological and risk assessment, quality control for food and water, forensic diagnosis and in parasite biology research. Some DNA-based tests for water-borne parasites, including Cryptosporidium and Giardia, are used in routine checks of water treatment, but forensic and food-testing applications have not been adopted in routine practice. Biological research, including epidemiological research, makes the widest use of DNA-based diagnostics, delivering enhanced understanding of parasites and guidelines for managing parasitic diseases. Despite the limited uptake of DNA-based tests to date, there is little doubt that they offer great potential to not only detect, identify and quantify parasites, but also to provide further information important for the implementation of parasite control strategies. For example, variant sequences within species of parasites and other organisms can be differentiated by tests in a manner similar to genetic testing in medicine or livestock breeding. If an association between DNA sequence and phenotype has been

  11. Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause diarrhea, loose or watery stools, cramping, flatulence (gas) and other abdominal illness. CDC recommends that ... that cause diarrhea, loose or watery stools, cramping, flatulence (gas) and other abdominal illness. This test is ...

  12. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... a helminth that spends part of its life cycle in certain types of snail and penetrates the skin of people when they stand or swim in water where the snails live. The helminth causing onchocerciasis (" ...

  13. A new species of Henneguya, a gill parasite of a freshwater fish Anabas testudineus (Bloch) affected with ulcerative disease syndrome from Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Hemanand, Th; Meitei, N Mohilal; Bandyopadhyay, Probir K; Mitra, Amlan K

    2008-01-01

    A new species of Henneguya parasitizing tissues affected by the ulcerative disease syndrome of a freshwater fish Anabas testudineus (Bloch) from Khiodum and Pumlen lakes of Manipur state is described. Of the fishes examined 75% were found to be infested with this myxozoan parasite. Mature spores of the new species are elongated, biconvex, and oval with bluntly rounded anterior end and gradually tapering posterior end with a caudal prolongation, measuring 12.6-15.4 (14.0+/- 1.1) microm in length. Length of the caudal prolongation is 11.2-12.6 (11.7+/- 0.6) microm. The width of the spores is 5.6-7.0 (6.3+/- 0.5) microm. The length of the polar capsules is 5.6-6.3 (5.5+/- 0.3) microm.

  14. The syntaxin 31-induced gene, LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1), functions in Glycine max defense to the root parasite Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Pant, Shankar R; Krishnavajhala, Aparna; McNeece, Brant T; Lawrence, Gary W; Klink, Vincent P

    2015-01-01

    Experiments show the membrane fusion genes α soluble NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP) and syntaxin 31 (Gm-SYP38) contribute to the ability of Glycine max to defend itself from infection by the plant parasitic nematode Heterodera glycines. Accompanying their expression is the transcriptional activation of the defense genes ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) and NONEXPRESSOR OF PR1 (NPR1) that function in salicylic acid (SA) signaling. These results implicate the added involvement of the antiapoptotic, environmental response gene LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (LSD1) in defense. Roots engineered to overexpress the G. max defense genes Gm-α-SNAP, SYP38, EDS1, NPR1, BOTRYTIS INDUCED KINASE1 (BIK1) and xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) in the susceptible genotype G. max[Williams 82/PI 518671] have induced Gm-LSD1 (Gm-LSD1-2) transcriptional activity. In reciprocal experiments, roots engineered to overexpress Gm-LSD1-2 in the susceptible genotype G. max[Williams 82/PI 518671] have induced levels of SYP38, EDS1, NPR1, BIK1 and XTH, but not α-SNAP prior to infection. In tests examining the role of Gm-LSD1-2 in defense, its overexpression results in ∼52 to 68% reduction in nematode parasitism. In contrast, RNA interference (RNAi) of Gm-LSD1-2 in the resistant genotype G. max[Peking/PI 548402] results in an 3.24-10.42 fold increased ability of H. glycines to parasitize. The results identify that Gm-LSD1-2 functions in the defense response of G. max to H. glycines parasitism. It is proposed that LSD1, as an antiapoptotic protein, may establish an environment whereby the protected, living plant cell could secrete materials in the vicinity of the parasitizing nematode to disarm it. After the targeted incapacitation of the nematode the parasitized cell succumbs to its targeted demise as the infected root region is becoming fortified.

  15. Prevalence of Cognitive Impairment in Recently Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Are Chronic Inflammatory Diseases Responsible for Cognitive Decline?

    PubMed Central

    Lavielle, Pilar; Talavera, Juan O.; Reynoso, Nancy; González, Marissa; Gómez-Díaz, Rita A.; Cruz, Miguel; Vázquez, Felipe; Wacher, Niels H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of cognitive impairment (CI) among patients recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (RDD) and to identify any relationships between CI and RDD comorbidities. Methods: One thousand seven hundred twelve patients with RDD participated in a cross-sectional study. The patients’ sociodemographic and clinical data were registered. Results The sample population had an average age of 51 ± 11 years, and 63.26% of the patients were female. CI was diagnosed in 38 patients (2.2%) and was more common among both females (2.8% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.063) and the elderly (0% at an age ≤ 30 years vs. 10.4% at an age > 70 years, p = 0.0001). Rheumatoid arthritis (present in 15.8% vs. absent in 2.1%) and asthma (13% vs. 2.1%) correlated significantly with CI based on the results of our logistic regression analysis. Conclusion Age, female gender, rheumatoid arthritis and asthma are risk factors for CI in the setting of RDD. PMID:26517541

  16. Body composition as an indicator of the nutritional status in children with newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease – a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Binkowska-Bury, Monika; Korczowski, Bartosz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of nutritional status disorders in children with ulcerative colitis (UC) is much lower than in the case of Crohn’s disease (CD). The largest variability in the components of body composition occurs at the time of a new diagnosis and in periods of disease exacerbation. Aim Assessment of body composition in children with UC and CD. Material and methods The preliminary study included 59 children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (34 children with UC vs. 25 children with CD) aged 4–18 years. The final analysis included 26 newly diagnosed children (16 children with UC vs. 10 children with CD). The evaluation of body composition was conducted by means of BIA-101 bioimpedance analyser. Results Decreased values of lean mass were found in children with newly diagnosed IBD (UC: 41.13 kg vs. control group: 42.06 kg; CD: 35.50 kg vs. control group: 45.50 kg). After a year interval, an increase in fat (UC 1: 7.67 kg vs. UC 2: 10.33 kg; CD 1: 7.36 kg vs. CD 2: 9.47 kg) as well as lean body mass (UC 1: 35.22 kg vs. UC 2: 39.00 kg; CD 1: 35.99 kg vs. CD 2: 42.41 kg) was found in children. Conclusions Children with newly diagnosed IBD were highly vulnerable to nutritional status disturbances. The increase in fat and lean body mass in an annual interval may be due to the treatment regime and control of the children.

  17. Diagnosing and Managing Carcinoid Heart Disease in Patients With Neuroendocrine Tumors: An Expert Statement.

    PubMed

    Davar, Joseph; Connolly, Heidi M; Caplin, Martyn E; Pavel, Marianne; Zacks, Jerome; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Dobson, Rebecca; Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona; Steeds, Richard P; Dreyfus, Giles; Pellikka, Patricia A; Toumpanakis, Christos

    2017-03-14

    Carcinoid heart disease is a frequent occurrence in patients with carcinoid syndrome and is responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of carcinoid heart disease is poorly understood; however, chronic exposure to excessive circulating serotonin is considered one of the most important contributing factors. Despite recognition, international consensus guidelines specifically addressing the diagnosis and management of carcinoid heart disease are lacking. Furthermore, there is considerable variation in multiple aspects of screening and management of the disease. The aim of these guidelines was to provide succinct, practical advice on the diagnosis and management of carcinoid heart disease as well as its surveillance. Recommendations and proposed algorithms for the investigation, screening, and management have been developed based on an evidence-based review of the published data and on the expert opinion of a multidisciplinary consensus panel consisting of neuroendocrine tumor experts, including oncologists, gastroenterologists, and endocrinologists, in conjunction with cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons.

  18. Host selection and parasite infection in Aedes taeniorhynchus, endemic disease vector in the Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Arnaud; Fournié, Guillaume; Cruz, Marilyn; Cedeño, Virna; Parker, Patricia G; Cunningham, Andrew A; Goodman, Simon J

    2012-12-01

    Host selection in blood-sucking arthropods has important evolutionary and ecological implications for the transmission dynamics, distribution and host-specificity of the parasites they transmit. The black salt-marsh mosquito (Aedes taeniorhynchus Wiedemann) is distributed throughout tropical to temperate coastal zones in the Americas, and continental populations are primarily mammalphilic. It is the only indigenous mosquito in the Galápagos Islands, having colonised the archipelago around 200,000 years ago, potentially adapting its host selection, and in the process, altering the dynamics of vector mediated pathogen interactions in the archipelago. Here, we use blood-meal analysis and PCR-based parasite screening approach to determine the blood-feeding patterns of A. taeniorhynchus in the Galápagos Islands and identify potential parasite transmission with which this mosquito could be involved. Our results show that A. taeniorhynchus feeds equally on mammals and reptiles, and only one avian sample was observed in 190 successful PCR amplifications from blood meals. However, we detected endemic filarial worms and Haemoproteus parasites known to infect various Galápagos bird species in mosquito thoraces, suggesting that feeding on birds must occur at low frequency, and that A. taeniorhynchus may play a role in maintaining some avian vector-borne pathogens, although more work is needed to explore this possibility. We also isolated three different DNA sequences corresponding to hemogregarine parasites of the genus Hepatozoon from mosquito and iguana blood samples, suggesting that more than one species of Hepatozoon parasites are present in Galápagos. Phylogenetic analysis of Hepatozoon 18sRNA sequences indicates that A. taeniorhynchus may have facilitated a recent breakdown in host-species association of formerly isolated Hepatozoon spp. infecting the reptile populations in the Galápagos Islands.

  19. [Parasitic dead-end: update].

    PubMed

    Magnaval, J F

    2006-08-01

    Parasitic dead-ends occur when a parasite is unable to establish a permanent interaction in an unnatural host. Although the likelihood of successful reproduction by the pathogenic agent is nul, parasitic dead-end heralds capture of new parasites and therefore expansion of the host range. Angiostrongyliasis due to A. cantonensis or A. costaricensis, anisakiasis, Ancylostoma caninum infection, gnathostomiasis and sparganosis are undoubtedly emerging zoonoses of particular medical interest. Prevention of these diseases relies on abstinence from eating raw meat from invertebrates or cold-blooded (poikilotherm) vertebrates (e.g. used in exotic dishes). These guidelines must be included in recommendations to travelers.

  20. Differential modulation of eastern oyster ( Crassostrea virginica) disease parasites by the El-Niño-Southern Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soniat, Thomas M.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Klinck, John M.; Powell, Eric N.

    2009-02-01

    The eastern oyster ( Crassostrea virginica) is affected by two protozoan parasites, Perkinsus marinus which causes Dermo disease and Haplosporidium nelsoni which causes MSX (Multinucleated Sphere Unknown) disease. Both diseases are largely controlled by water temperature and salinity and thus are potentially sensitive to climate variations resulting from the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which influences climate along the Gulf of Mexico coast, and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), which influences climate along the Atlantic coast of the United States. In this study, a 10-year time series of temperature and salinity and P. marinus infection intensity for a site in Louisiana on the Gulf of Mexico coast and a 52-year time series of air temperature and freshwater inflow and oyster mortality from Delaware Bay on the Atlantic coast of the United States were analyzed to determine patterns in disease and disease-induced mortality in C. virginica populations that resulted from ENSO and NAO climate variations. Wavelet analysis was used to decompose the environmental, disease infection intensity and oyster mortality time series into a time-frequency space to determine the dominant modes of variability and the time variability of the modes. For the Louisiana site, salinity and Dermo disease infection intensity are correlated at a periodicity of 4 years, which corresponds to ENSO. The influence of ENSO on Dermo disease along the Gulf of Mexico is through its effect on salinity, with high salinity, which occurs during the La Niña phase of ENSO at this location, favoring parasite proliferation. For the Delaware Bay site, the primary correlation was between temperature and oyster mortality, with a periodicity of 8 years, which corresponds to the NAO. Warmer temperatures, which occur during the positive phase of the NAO, favor the parasites causing increased oyster mortality. Thus, disease prevalence and intensity in C. virginica populations along the Gulf of Mexico

  1. Circulating microRNAs for the prediction of metastasis in breast cancer patients diagnosed with early stage disease.

    PubMed

    Inns, Joseph; James, Victoria

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common malignancy diagnosed in women worldwide. The greatest cause of breast cancer mortality is development of metastasis. For many women metastasis is an early event in breast cancer which goes undetected until its presentation, thus there is an urgent need for the development of biomarkers to predict those patients at greatest risk. The expression of a group of small non-coding RNAs, termed microRNAs, has been shown to be altered in tumours. Furthermore, microRNAs identified as being highly expressed in breast cancer tumours can also be detected in the circulation. Circulating microRNAs are an emerging field of biomarker research which have the benefit of being able to be obtained non-invasively and analysed rapidly and relatively cheaply. Here the potential use of circulating miRNAs to detect metastasis in discussed and the current barriers to their progression to the clinic.

  2. Evaluation of the response to vaccination with hepatitis B vaccine in pediatric patients diagnosed with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Egberg, Matthew; Nelson, Catherine; Eickoff, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background: A gap exists in the literature on celiac disease populations and the response to hepatitis B vaccination. Objective: To identify pediatric patients with celiac disease who received the primary hepatitis B vaccination and investigate their response to vaccine. Design/Methods: Patients underwent blood draw for hepatitis B surface antibody titers. Patients with undetectable or non-protective HBsAb titers were contacted. Study outcome measures and patient characteristics variables were summarized by means, standard deviations, medians, and ranges. A two-sample t-test was used to compare normally distributed continuous variables between responders and non-responders. Results: In all, 58% of patients did not meet the threshold for “protective” antibody titers. The mean time between completion of hepatitis B vaccination and diagnosis of celiac disease was 8.1 years for responders versus 10.5 years for non-responders. In a multivariate analysis, time between completion of vaccine and diagnosis of celiac disease was statistically significant predictor of response with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.69 (95% confidence interval: 0.50–0.95; p = 0.021). Conclusion: Our celiac disease population shows a high hepatitis B vaccine failure. The time between completion of vaccine series and diagnosis of celiac disease is an independent predictor for response. PMID:26770758

  3. [Autopsy case of a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and suspected chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, which was later diagnosed as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Sakiyama, Yusuke; Nishihira, Yasushi; Endo, Kazuhiro; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    We report an autopsy case of a 74-year-old man with late onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) diagnosed by genetic screening, later associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). At the age of 70 years, the patient was admitted to our hospital because of progressive weakness and dysesthesia in the right upper limb. In the early stages of the illness, he was diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), and transient improvement was achieved with intravenous immunoglobulin. However, the symptoms progressively worsened and became refractory. Gene analysis revealed PMP22 gene duplication, which confirmed CMT1A. On sural nerve biopsy, severe demyelinating neuropathy and abundant onion-bulb formations with endoneurial infiltration of inflammatory cells were observed. Thereafter, pseudo-bulbar palsy and respiratory muscle weakness developed insidiously and progressed rapidly along with muscle weakness in the limbs and trunk. The patient died about four years after the onset of this disease. Postmortem examination showed moderate neuronal cell loss, Bunina bodies, and TDP-43-positive inclusions in the anterior horn cells. The spinal cord revealed axonal loss and extensive macrophage permeation in the corticospinal tracts. On the basis of these findings, the final neuropathological diagnosis was ALS. This is the first report of an autopsy case of CMT1A complicated with ALS. We here discuss the significant clinical and neuropathological findings of this case.

  4. Microarray in parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Rakesh; Misra, Shubham; Anand, Namrata; Sharma, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Modern biology and genomic sciences are rooted in parasitic disease research. Genome sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of new biological information that promises to have a major impact on our understanding of parasites. Microarrays provide one of the major high-throughput platforms by which this information can be exploited in the laboratory. Many excellent reviews and technique articles have recently been published on applying microarrays to organisms for which fully annotated genomes are at hand. However, many parasitologists work on organisms whose genomes have been only partially sequenced. This review is mainly focused on how to use microarray in these situations. PMID:23508469

  5. Something Old, Something New: Using Family History and Genetic Testing to Diagnose and Manage Athletes with Inherited Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Matthew J; Battle, Robert W

    2015-07-01

    A primary objective of the preparticipation physical examination is to identify athletes at increased risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Review of an athlete's family history may identify those at risk for SCA. Genetic testing for inherited cardiovascular disease has emerged as a valuable addition to the repertoire of cardiologists facing the decision of clearing athletes with concerning clinical signs and/or family histories. Genetic testing may lead to various outcomes for an athlete including: reassurance, diagnosis in those with borderline clinical features, finding disease predisposition prior to the onset of clinical signs (ie, genotype-positive/phenotype-negative), or continued uncertainty.

  6. Prevalence of ultrasound diagnosed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease among rural indigenous community of Sarawak and its association with biochemical and anthropometric measures.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Whye Lian; Lee, Ping Yein; Chang, Ching Thon; Mohamed, Hamid Jan; Wong, Siong Long

    2013-03-01

    Although the association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic syndrome has been previously firmly established, the prevalence of NAFLD and its risk factors in rural communities remains incompletely defined. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and factors associated with ultrasound-diagnosed NAFLD amongst a rural community in Sarawak. An indigenous village was randomly selected where all adults aged 21 years and above underwent an abdominal ultrasound, biochemical tests and an anthropometric assessment. Respondents with a score > or =8 on an alcohol-use disorders-identification test (AUDIT) indicating harmful or hazardous drinking were excluded. Seventy-seven respondents (46.8% male, mean age 48.4 SD 16.64), met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of ultrasound diagnosed NAFLD was 44.2% (n=34), among them 52.9% had moderate NAFLD. There were no significant age or gender differences between respondents with and without NAFLD, although those with NAFLD were older. Respondents with NAFLD had a significantly higher BMI t,han those without NAFLD (p<0.001). Both male and female respondents with NAFLD had a significantly higher waist circumference than those without NAFLD (p<0.001). Prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia were significantly higher among those with NAFLD. However, there were no significant differences in terms of percentage of unhealthy body fat and muscle, and serum HDL levels. Risk factors independently associated with NAFLD included male gender (odd ratio 0.06; 95% CI 0.008-0.523) and waist circumference (odd ratio 1.2; 95% CI 1.036-1.421). There was a high prevalence of NAFLD and the presence of more severe stages of disease in this indigenous population. Life-style related diseases, such as fatty liver disease, can occur in rural as well as urban populations.

  7. Increase in linkage information by stratification of pedigree data into gold-standard and standard diagnoses: application to the NIMH Alzheimer Disease Genetics Initiative Dataset.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Derek; Haynes, Chad; Finch, Stephen J; Brown, Abraham M

    2006-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with a standard clinical method (subject to misclassification error) are often combined with patients diagnosed with a gold-standard method (with zero or very small misclassification error) in family-based studies of complex disease. For example, non-autopsied patients (NAP) are often included along with autopsy-proven (AP) patients in family-based studies of complex diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Theoretical and simulation studies suggest that certain misclassification errors can result in severe reduction of power in genetic linkage and association analyses and that phenotype (or diagnostic) error can produce misleading results. Morton's test for heterogeneity can identify genomic regions where error may have led to loss in power. We applied this test to pedigree data from the NIMH Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Initiative Database separated into AP and NAP pedigrees. Morton's test identified one highly significant region of heterogeneity on chromosome 2. The source of the heterogeneity was due to significant indication of linkage in the AP pedigrees at position 109 cM (p value = 6.68 x 10(-5)) with no indication in the NAP pedigrees. Furthermore, Morton's test showed no evidence for heterogeneity on chromosome 19 in early-onset pedigrees that showed highly significant evidence for linkage in other published reports. These results suggest that supplementing linkage analysis with Morton's test can be usefully applied to genetic data sets that have AP and NAP samples, or other sample mixtures that include a 'gold standard' subgroup with reduced error rate, to increase power to detect linkage in the presence of diagnostic misclassification.

  8. Parasitic infections of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Brandt, L J

    1999-08-01

    Parasitic infections of the gastrointestinal tract are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Increased international travel means that gastroenterologists are now more likely to care for patients with parasitic diseases. This article reviews various aspects of the more common intestinal parasites and their infections, including epidemiology, life cycle, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  9. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among patients with major depressive disorder--differences between newly diagnosed first episode and recurrent disease.

    PubMed

    Ljubicic, Rudolf; Jakovac, Hrvoje; Bistrović, Ivana Ljubicić; Franceski, Tanja; Mufić, Ana Kovak; Karlović, Dalibor

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess differences in prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among depressed patients in regard to the duration of the illness (first episode versus recurrent episodes). A total of 190 patients suffering from major depressive disorder were included in the study, diagnosed according to International classification of disorders, 10th revision. The same criteria were used to divide participants into two groups: first episode major depressive disorder and major depressive disorder with recurrent episodes. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of the American National Cholesterol Education Program-Treatment Panel III. Results showed that metabolic syndrome is significantly more prevalent in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (45.2%) compared to patients with first episode of major depressive disorder (27.3%), mainly due to differences in plasma glucose, triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol levels. These findings indicate the importance of the duration of depression and the number of recurring episodes as factors involved in etiopathogenesis of the associated metabolic syndrome.

  10. Exposure of free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) to infectious and parasitic disease agents in the Noël Kempff Mercado National Park, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Deem, Sharon L; Emmons, Louise H

    2005-06-01

    Maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) are neotropic mammals, listed as a CITES Appendix II species, with a distribution south of the Amazon forest from Bolivia, through northern Argentina and Paraguay and into eastern Brazil and northern Uruguay. Primary threats to the survival of free-ranging maned wolves include habitat loss, road kills, and shooting by farmers. An additional threat to the conservation of maned wolves is the risk of morbidity and mortality due to infectious and parasitic diseases. Captive maned wolves are susceptible to, and die from, common infectious diseases of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) including canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), rabies virus, and canine adenovirus (CAV). Results from this study show that free-ranging maned wolves in a remote area of Bolivia have been exposed to multiple infectious and parasitic agents of domestic carnivores, including CAV, CDV, CPV, canine coronavirus, rabies virus, Leptospira interrogans spp., Toxoplasma gondii, and Dirofilaria immitis, and may be at increased risk for disease due to these agents.

  11. Integration of Multiplex Bead Assays for Parasitic Diseases into a National, Population-Based Serosurvey of Women 15-39 Years of Age in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Jeffrey W.; Jenks, M. Harley; Moss, Delynn M.; Mao, Bunsoth; Buth, Sokhal; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Soeung, Sann Chan; Lucchi, Naomi W.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Gregory, Christopher J.; Huy, Rekol; Muth, Sinuon; Lammie, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Collection of surveillance data is essential for monitoring and evaluation of public health programs. Integrated collection of household-based health data, now routinely carried out in many countries through demographic health surveys and multiple indicator surveys, provides critical measures of progress in health delivery. In contrast, biomarker surveys typically focus on single or related measures of malaria infection, HIV status, vaccination coverage, or immunity status for vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD). Here we describe an integrated biomarker survey based on use of a multiplex bead assay (MBA) to simultaneously measure antibody responses to multiple parasitic diseases of public health importance as part of a VPD serological survey in Cambodia. A nationally-representative cluster-based survey was used to collect serum samples from women of child-bearing age. Samples were tested by MBA for immunoglobulin G antibodies recognizing recombinant antigens from Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax, Wuchereria bancrofti, Toxoplasma gondii, Taenia solium, and Strongyloides stercoralis. Serologic IgG antibody results were useful both for generating national prevalence estimates for the parasitic diseases of interest and for confirming the highly focal distributions of some of these infections. Integrated surveys offer an opportunity to systematically assess the status of multiple public health programs and measure progress toward Millennium Development Goals. PMID:27136913

  12. Leveraging Rural Energy Investment for Parasitic Disease Control: Schistosome Ova Inactivation and Energy Co-Benefits of Anaerobic Digesters in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Remais, Justin; Chen, Lin; Seto, Edmund

    2009-01-01

    Background Cooking and heating remain the most energy intensive activities among the world's poor, and thus improved access to clean energies for these tasks has been highlighted as a key requirement of attaining the major objectives of the UN Millennium Development Goals. A move towards clean energy technologies such as biogas systems (which produce methane from human and animal waste) has the potential to provide immediate benefits for the control of neglected tropical diseases. Here, an assessment of the parasitic disease and energy benefits of biogas systems in Sichuan Province, China, is presented, highlighting how the public health sector can leverage the proliferation of rural energy projects for infectious disease control. Methodology/Findings First, the effectiveness of biogas systems at inactivating and removing ova of the human parasite Schistosoma japonicum is experimentally evaluated. Second, the impact of biogas infrastructure on energy use and environmental quality as reported by surveyed village populations is assessed, as is the community acceptance of the technology. No viable eggs were recovered in the effluent collected weekly from biogas systems for two months following seeding with infected stool. Less than 1% of ova were recovered viable from a series of nylon bags seeded with ova, a 2-log removal attributable to biochemical inactivation. More than 90% of Ascaris lumbricoides ova (used as a proxy for S. japonicum ova) counted at the influent of two biogas systems were removed in the systems when adjusted for system residence time, an approximate 1-log removal attributable to sedimentation. Combined, these inactivation/removal processes underscore the promise of biogas infrastructure for reducing parasite contamination resulting from nightsoil use. When interviewed an average of 4 years after construction, villagers attributed large changes in fuel usage to the installation of biogas systems. Household coal usage decreased by 68%, wood by 74

  13. Are Clinical Diagnoses of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias Affected by Education and Self-Reported Race?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teresi, Jeanne A.; Grober, Ellen; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Ehrlich, Amy R.

    2012-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial examined whether the diagnostic process for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias may be influenced by knowledge of the patient's education and/or self-reported race. Four conditions were implemented: diagnostic team knows (a) race and education, (b) education only, (c) race only, or (d) neither. Diagnosis and…

  14. Diagnoses and Management of Drug Hypersensitivity and Anaphylaxis in Cancer and Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Reactions to Taxanes and Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bonamichi-Santos, Rafael; Castells, Mariana

    2016-06-08

    Due to the increase in utilization of chemotherapies and antibodies, drug hypersensitivity reactions have increased dramatically worldwide, preventing the use of first-line therapies and impacting patients' survival and quality of life. Some of the more frequently used medications in cancer include taxanes for ovarian, lung, breast, and prostate cancers. Monoclonal antibodies are used in the treatment of neoplastic, autoimmune, and inflammatory diseases, and their clinical applications are becoming broader. Monoclonal antibody targets include CD20, HER-2, EGFR, IL-6 receptor, TNF-α, CD30, VEGF-A, IgE, and more, and examples of immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases that respond to monoclonal antibodies include rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, ankylosing spondylitis, plaque psoriasis, and asthma. Neoplastic diseases include non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and colorectal, breast, gastric, and lung cancer. The clinical presentation of drug hypersensitivity reactions ranges from mild cutaneous reactions to life-threatening symptoms including anaphylaxis. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) has become a groundbreaking approach to the management of immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions IgE and non-IgE mediated. It is the only effective procedure that enables sensitized patients to receive the full treatment dose safely, thus representing an important advance in the patients' treatment and prognosis. The aim of this review is to provide an update on hypersensitivity reactions to commonly used monoclonal and taxanes, their clinical presentations, diagnosis, and the use of RDD for their management.

  15. Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis: An Updated Consensus Statement with a Focus on Parasite Biology, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Reed, S M; Furr, M; Howe, D K; Johnson, A L; MacKay, R J; Morrow, J K; Pusterla, N; Witonsky, S

    2016-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) remains an important neurologic disease of horses. There are no pathognomonic clinical signs for the disease. Affected horses can have focal or multifocal central nervous system (CNS) disease. EPM can be difficult to diagnose antemortem. It is caused by either of 2 parasites, Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi, with much less known about N. hughesi. Although risk factors such as transport stress and breed and age correlations have been identified, biologic factors such as genetic predispositions of individual animals, and parasite-specific factors such as strain differences in virulence, remain largely undetermined. This consensus statement update presents current published knowledge of the parasite biology, host immune response, disease pathogenesis, epidemiology, and risk factors. Importantly, the statement provides recommendations for EPM diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  16. Glomerulopathy Associated with Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    van Velthuysen, M.-L. F.; Florquin, S.

    2000-01-01

    Although parasitic infections do not usually present with disturbance in renal function, glomerular lesions can be seen in most of these infections. The glomerular lesions observed in parasitic infections cover the whole range of glomerular lesions known, but most of them are proliferative. Little is known of the exact pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we try to explain the glomerular lesions associated with parasitic infections in terms of the specific immunologic events observed during these diseases against the background of recent developments in the general knowledge of the pathogenesis of glomerular disease. PMID:10627491

  17. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance with light-chain deposition disease diagnosed postrenal transplant: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Nambirajan, Aruna; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Singh, Geetika; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Dinda, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Patients with light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) frequently do not meet criteria for myeloma. In such cases, despite low tumor burden, the circulating monoclonal immunoglobulins cause renal damage, are responsible for post-transplant recurrence, and are rightly categorized as monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) requiring chemotherapy. A 65-year male with uncharacterized nodular glomerulopathy presented with proteinuria 3 years postrenal transplant. His allograft biopsies were diagnostic of light-chain deposition disease (likely recurrent), and in the absence of myeloma, he was labeled as MGRS. Based on the limited literature available, he was treated with bortezomib which resulted in normalization of serum-free light-chain ratios and resolution of proteinuria. He, however, later succumbed to complications of chemotherapy. This case highlights the diagnostic difficulties in LCDD, the importance of an accurate pretransplant diagnosis, and treatment of the malignant clone, in the absence of which post-transplant management of recurrence is challenging with poor outcomes.

  18. Morphological changes and parasite load of the adrenal from dogs with visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Momo, Claudia; Rocha, Nathália Alves de Souza; Moreira, Pamela Rodrigues Reina; Munari, Danísio Prado; Bomfim, Suely Regina Mogami; Rozza, Daniela Bernadete; Vasconcelos, Rosemeri de Oliveira

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze morphological changes and parasite loads in the adrenal gland from 45 dogs with visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The animals were from the Zoonosis Control Center of Araçatuba, state of São Paulo, which is an endemic region for the disease. These animals were euthanized due to positive diagnoses of VL. The dogs were classified into asymptomatic, oligosymptomatic and symptomatic groups. The parasite load was determined by immunohistochemistry, using VL-positive dog hyperimmune serum. Nine dogs showed an inflammatory infiltrate composed, predominantly, of plasma cells and macrophages. However, only eight dogs showed macrophages with amastigote forms of the parasite, immunolabeled in the cytoplasm. The medullary and reticular layers were the most affected areas, possibly due to a favorable microenvironment created by hormones in these regions. The density of parasites in the glandular tissue was not associated with clinical signs of VL (P > 0.05). However, the presence of the parasite was always associated with the presence of a granulomatous inflammatory infiltrate. This gland may not be an ideal place for the parasite's multiplication, but the presence of injuries to the glandular tissue could influence the dog's immune system, thus favoring the parasite's survival in the host's different organs.

  19. Medical Expenditure for Chronic Diseases in Mexico: The Case of Selected Diagnoses Treated by the Largest Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Block, Miguel Angel; Alarcon-Irigoyen, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases (CD) are a public health emergency in Mexico. Despite concern regarding the financial burden of CDs in the country, economic studies have focused only on diabetes, hypertension, and cancer. Furthermore, these estimated financial burdens were based on hypothetical epidemiology models or ideal healthcare scenarios. The present study estimates the annual expenditure per patient and the financial burden for the nine most prevalent CDs, excluding cancer, for each of the two largest public health providers in the country: the Ministry of Health (MoH) and the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS). Methods Using the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012 (ENSANUT) as the main source of data, health services consumption related to CDs was obtained from patient reports. Unit costs for each provided health service (e.g. consultation, drugs, hospitalization) were obtained from official reports. Prevalence data was obtained from the published literature. Annual expenditure due to health services consumption was calculated by multiplying the quantity of services consumed by the unit cost of each health service. Results The most expensive CD in both health institutions was chronic kidney disease (CKD), with an annual unit cost for MoH per patient of US$ 8,966 while for IMSS the expenditure was US$ 9,091. Four CDs (CKD, arterial hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and chronic ischemic heart disease) accounted for 88% of the total CDs financial burden (US$ 1.42 billion) in MoH and 85% (US$ 3.96 billion) in IMSS. The financial burden of the nine CDs analyzed represents 8% and 25% of the total annual MoH and IMSS health expenditure, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The financial burden from the nine most prevalent CDs, excluding cancer, is already high in Mexico. This finding by itself argues for the need to improve health promotion and disease detection, diagnosis, and treatment to ensure CD primary and secondary prevention. If the

  20. Asymmetrical Dimethylarginine - More Sensitive than NT-proBNP to Diagnose Heart Failure in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bode-Böger, Stefanie M.; Martens-Lobenhoffer, Jens; Lovric, Svjetlana; Bauersachs, Johann; Schieffer, Bernhard; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Kielstein, Jan T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure is an important cause for morbidity and mortality in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). While NT-proBNP is an established biomarker for heart failure of non-congenital origin, its value in ACHD has limitations. Asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) correlates with disease severity and independently predicts adverse clinical events in heart failure of non-congenital origin. Its role in ACHD has not been investigated. Methods In 102 patients ADMA and NT-proBNP were measured and related to NYHA class, systemic ventricular function and parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Results In contrast to NT-proBNP ADMA differentiated between NYHA classes I-III. Both, ADMA and NT-proBNP showed a good correlation with parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing with comparable receiver-operating characteristic curves for identifying patients with severely limited cardiopulmonary exercise capacity. Conclusion ADMA seems to be a better biomarker than NT-proBNP for the assessment of NYHA class and as a good as NT-proBNP for the estimation of maximum exercise capacity in adults with congenital heart disease. Its use in clinical routine should be evaluated. PMID:22470476

  1. Gut bacterial profile in patients newly diagnosed with treatment-naïve Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ricanek, Petr; Lothe, Sheba M; Frye, Stephan A; Rydning, Andreas; Vatn, Morten H; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to define the composition of the gut bacterial flora in Norwegian patients with early stage Crohn’s disease (CD). Methods: By using a nonselective metagenomics approach, the general bacterial composition in mucosal biopsies from the ileum and the colon of five subjects, four patients with different phenotypes of CD, and one noninflammatory bowel disease control, was characterized. After partial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing, BLAST homology searches for species identification and phylogenetic analysis were performed. Results: An overall biodiversity of 106 different bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was detected in the cloned libraries. Nearly all OTUs belonged to the phylae Bacteroidetes (42% in CD, 71% in the control) or Firmicutes (42% in CD, 28% in the control), except for some OTUs that belonged to the phylum Proteobacteria (15% in CD, 0% in the control) and a few OTUs that could not be assigned to a phylum (2% in CD, 1% in the control). Conclusion: Based on the high incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Norway, this pilot study represents a relevant determination of the gut microbiota in Norwegian patients compared to previous findings in other countries. The bacterial profile of Norwegian CD patients was found to be similar to that of CD patients in other countries. The findings do not support a particular bacterial composition as a predominant causative factor for the high incidence of IBD that exists in some countries. PMID:23049264

  2. Respiratory pharmacotherapy use in patients newly diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a primary care setting in the UK: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wurst, Keele E; Shukla, Amit; Muellerova, Hana; Davis, Kourtney J

    2014-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study aimed to analyze the prescribing practices of general practitioners treating patients with newly diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and to assess characteristics associated with initial pharmacotherapy. Patients were identified in the General Practice Research Database, a population-based UK electronic medical record (EMR) with data from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2009. Patient characteristics, prescribed COPD pharmacotherapies (≤12 months before diagnosis and within 3 months following diagnosis), co-morbidities, hospitalizations, and events indicative of a possible COPD exacerbation (≤12 months before diagnosis) were analyzed in 7881 patients with newly diagnosed COPD. Most patients (64.4%) were prescribed COPD pharmacotherapy in the 12 months before diagnosis. Following diagnosis, COPD pharmacotherapy was prescribed within 3 months in 85.0% of patients. Short-acting bronchodilators alone (22.9%) or inhaled corticosteroids + long-acting beta-2 agonists (ICS+LABA, 22.1%) were prescribed most frequently. Compared with other pharmacotherapies, the prevalence of severe airflow limitation was highest in patients prescribed ICS+LABA+long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMA). Moderate-to-severe dyspnea was identified most frequently in patients prescribed a LAMA-containing regimen. Patients prescribed an ICS-containing regimen had a higher prevalence of asthma or possible exacerbations recorded in the EMR than those not prescribed ICS. In conclusion, pharmacotherapy prescribed at initial COPD diagnosis varied by disease severity indicators as assessed by airflow limitation, dyspnea, history of asthma, and possible exacerbations. Frequent prescription of COPD pharmacotherapies before the first-recorded COPD diagnosis indicates a delay between obstructive lung disease presentation in primary care practice and assignment of a medical diagnosis.

  3. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-07-22

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose.

  4. Influenza-Like-Illness and Clinically Diagnosed Flu: Disease Burden, Costs and Quality of Life for Patients Seeking Ambulatory Care or No Professional Care at All

    PubMed Central

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011–2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5–6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86–91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51–€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries. PMID:25032688

  5. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    PubMed

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  6. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  7. Infectious diseases specialist management improves outcomes for outpatients diagnosed with cellulitis in the emergency department: a double cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shilpa R; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M; Dwek, Philip; Gupta, Kaveri; Elsayed, Sameer; Thompson, Guy W; Dagnone, Robert; Hutt, Kelly; Silverman, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Three hospital emergency rooms (ERs) routinely referred all cases of cellulitis requiring outpatient intravenous antibiotics, to a central ER-staffed cellulitis clinic. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all patients seen by the ER clinic in the last 4months preceding a policy change (ER management cohort [ERMC]) (n=149) and all those seen in the first 3months of a new policy of automatic referral to an infectious disease (ID) specialist-supervised cellulitis clinic (ID management cohort [IDMC]) (n=136). Fifty-four (40%) of 136 patients in the IDMC were given an alternative diagnosis (noncellulitis), compared to 16 (11%) of 149 in the ERMC (P<0.0001). Logistic regression-demonstrated rates of disease recurrence were lower in the IDMC than the ERMC (hazard ratio [HR], 0.06; P=0.003), as were rates of hospitalization (HR, 0.11; P=0.01). There was no significant difference in mortality. Automatic ID consultation for cellulitis was beneficial in differentiating mimickers from true cellulitis, reducing recurrence, and preventing hospital admissions.

  8. Operational modelling to guide implementation and scale-up of diagnostic tests within the health system: exploring opportunities for parasitic disease diagnostics based on example application for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Langley, Ivor; Adams, Emily; Doulla, Basra; Squire, S Bertel

    2014-12-01

    Research and innovation in the diagnosis of infectious and parasitic diseases has led to the development of several promising diagnostic tools, for example in malaria there is extensive literature concerning the use of rapid diagnostic tests. This means policymakers in many low and middle income countries need to make difficult decisions about which of the recommended tools and approaches to implement and scale-up. The test characteristics (e.g. sensitivity and specificity) of the tools alone are not a sufficient basis on which to make these decisions as policymakers need to also consider the best combination of tools, whether the new tools should complement or replace existing diagnostics and who should be tested. Diagnostic strategies need dovetailing to different epidemiology and structural resource constraints (e.g. existing diagnostic pathways, human resources and laboratory capacity). We propose operational modelling to assist with these complex decisions. Projections of patient, health system and cost impacts are essential and operational modelling of the relevant elements of the health system could provide these projections and support rational decisions. We demonstrate how the technique of operational modelling applied in the developing world to support decisions on diagnostics for tuberculosis, could in a parallel way, provide useful insights to support implementation of appropriate diagnostic innovations for parasitic diseases.

  9. [Assessment of the quality of laboratory diagnosis of intestinal parasitic diseases by the laboratories participating in the Federal System of External Quality Assessment of Clinical Laboratory Testing].

    PubMed

    Malakhov, V N; Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Iu; Serdiuk, A P

    2014-01-01

    In 2010-2013, the quality of microscopic detection of the causative agents ofparasitic diseases in the feces has been assessed by the specialists of the laboratories of the therapeutic-and-prophylactic institutions (TPIs) and Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers, Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, which are participants of the Federal System of External Quality Assessment of Clinical Laboratory Testing. Thirty-two specimens containing 16 species of human helminths and 4 species of enteric protozoa in different combinations were examined. The findings suggest that the quality of microscopic detection of the causative agents of parasitic diseases is low in the laboratories of health care facilities and that the specialists of the laboratories of TPIs and Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers, Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, do not not possess the knowledge and skills necessary to make a laboratory diagnosis of helminths and enteric protozoa. The average detection rates of helminths and protozoa were at a level of 64 and 36%, respectively. The correct results showed that the proportion of helminths and protozoa were 94.5 and 5.5%, respectively. According to the biological and epidemiological classification of helminths, there were higher detection rates for contact group parasites (Enterobius vermicularis and Hymenolepis nana) and geohelminths (Ascaris, Trichuris trichiura, and others). Biohelminths (Opisthorchis, tapeworms, and others) Were detectable slightly worse.

  10. Reduced CA2–CA3 Hippocampal Subfield Volume Is Related to Depression and Normalized by l-DOPA in Newly Diagnosed Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Györfi, Orsolya; Nagy, Helga; Bokor, Magdolna; Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Rosenzweig, Ivana; Kelemen, Oguz; Kéri, Szabolcs

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal dysfunctions may play an important role in the non-motor aspects of Parkinson’s disease (PD), including depressive and cognitive symptoms. Fine structural alterations of the hippocampus and their relationship with symptoms and medication effects are unknown in newly diagnosed PD. We measured the volume of hippocampal subfields in 35 drug-naïve, newly diagnosed PD patients without cognitive impairment and 30 matched healthy control individuals. Assessments were performed when the patients did not receive medications and after a 24-week period of l-DOPA treatment. We obtained a T1-weighted 3D magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo image at each assessment. FreeSurfer v6.0 was used for image analysis. Results revealed a selectively decreased CA2–CA3 volume in non-medicated PD patients, which was normalized after the 24-week treatment period. Higher depressive symptoms were associated with smaller CA2–CA3 volumes. These results indicate that the CA2–CA3 subfield is structurally affected in the earliest stage of PD in the absence of cognitive impairment. This structural anomaly, normalized by l-DOPA, is related to depressive non-motor symptoms. PMID:28367136

  11. Parasitic Apologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galatolo, Renata; Ursi, Biagio; Bongelli, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    The action of apologizing can be accomplished as the main business of the interaction or incidentally while participants are doing something else. We refer to these apologies as "parasitic apologies," because they are produced "en passant" (Schegloff, 2007), and focus our analysis on this type of apology occurring at the…

  12. Light Chain Deposition Disease Diagnosed with Laser Micro-dissection, Liquid Chromatography, and Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Nodular Glomerular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kasagi, Tomomichi; Nobata, Hironobu; Suzuki, Keisuke; Miura, Naoto; Banno, Shogo; Takami, Akiyoshi; Yamashita, Taro; Ando, Yukio; Imai, Hirokazu

    2017-01-01

    A 42-year-old man developed nephrotic syndrome and rapidly progressive renal failure. Kidney biopsy demonstrated nodular glomerulosclerosis, negative Congo red staining, and no deposition of light or heavy chains. Laser micro-dissection and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry of nodular lesions revealed the presence of a kappa chain constant region and kappa III variable region, which signified light chain deposition disease. Dexamethasone and thalidomide were effective in decreasing the serum levels of free kappa light chain from 147.0 to 38.0 mg/L, eliminating proteinuria, and halting the worsening of the kidney dysfunction, with serum creatinine levels stable around 4.0 mg/dL for 3 years. PMID:28050001

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the Context of Earlier Diagnoses of Alzheimer's Disease: Opening the Conversation to Prepare Ethical Responses.

    PubMed

    Racine, Eric; Forlini, Cynthia; Aspler, John; Chandler, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD), a newly proposed, actively researched, and hotly debated research-only diagnostic category, raises the prospect of an ethical dilemma: whether, and possibly how, to treat a disorder with no target symptoms. This proposed category rests on the detection of a number of biomarkers thought to provide evidence of AD pathophysiology years before any behavioral symptoms manifest. Faced with limited treatment options, patients and their relatives may come to consider complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) a viable option, albeit one with minimal supporting evidence. Accordingly, the hopes and needs of some preclinical patients and their relatives could further fuel market-oriented entrepreneurship for CAM. In this ethics review, we provide background and reflect on some ethical questions related to the roles of key stakeholders arising from the potential for CAM use in the context of a possible preclinical AD diagnosis.

  14. Spatial epidemiology in zoonotic parasitic diseases: insights gained at the 1st International Symposium on Geospatial Health in Lijiang, China, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Lv, Shan; Yang, Guo-Jing; Kristensen, Thomas K; Bergquist, N Robert; Utzinger, Jürg; Malone, John B

    2009-01-01

    The 1st International Symposium on Geospatial Health was convened in Lijiang, Yunnan province, People's Republic of China from 8 to 9 September, 2007. The objective was to review progress made with the application of spatial techniques on zoonotic parasitic diseases, particularly in Southeast Asia. The symposium featured 71 presentations covering soil-transmitted and water-borne helminth infections, as well as arthropod-borne diseases such as leishmaniasis, malaria and lymphatic filariasis. The work made public at this occasion is briefly summarized here to highlight the advances made and to put forth research priorities in this area. Approaches such as geographical information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS) and remote sensing (RS), including spatial statistics, web-based GIS and map visualization of field investigations, figured prominently in the presentation. PMID:19193214

  15. Web GIS in practice II: interactive SVG maps of