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Sample records for parental genome dosage

  1. A System for Dosage-Based Functional Genomics in Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Isabelle M.; Zinkgraf, Matthew S.; Groover, Andrew T.

    Altering gene dosage through variation in gene copy number is a powerful approach to addressing questions regarding gene regulation, quantitative trait loci, and heterosis, but one that is not easily applied to sexually transmitted species. Elite poplar (Populus spp) varieties are created through interspecific hybridization, followed by clonal propagation. Altered gene dosage relationships are believed to contribute to hybrid performance. Clonal propagation allows for replication and maintenance of meiotically unstable ploidy or structural variants and provides an alternative approach to investigating gene dosage effects not possible in sexually propagated species. Here, we built a genome-wide structural variation system for dosage-basedmore » functional genomics and breeding of poplar. We pollinated Populus deltoides with gamma-irradiated Populus nigra pollen to produce >500 F1 seedlings containing dosage lesions in the form of deletions and insertions of chromosomal segments (indel mutations). Using high-precision dosage analysis, we detected indel mutations in ~55% of the progeny. These indels varied in length, position, and number per individual, cumulatively tiling >99% of the genome, with an average of 10 indels per gene. Combined with future phenotype and transcriptome data, this population will provide an excellent resource for creating and characterizing dosage-based variation in poplar, including the contribution of dosage to quantitative traits and heterosis.« less

  2. A System for Dosage-Based Functional Genomics in Poplar

    DOE PAGES

    Henry, Isabelle M.; Zinkgraf, Matthew S.; Groover, Andrew T.; ...

    2015-08-28

    Altering gene dosage through variation in gene copy number is a powerful approach to addressing questions regarding gene regulation, quantitative trait loci, and heterosis, but one that is not easily applied to sexually transmitted species. Elite poplar (Populus spp) varieties are created through interspecific hybridization, followed by clonal propagation. Altered gene dosage relationships are believed to contribute to hybrid performance. Clonal propagation allows for replication and maintenance of meiotically unstable ploidy or structural variants and provides an alternative approach to investigating gene dosage effects not possible in sexually propagated species. Here, we built a genome-wide structural variation system for dosage-basedmore » functional genomics and breeding of poplar. We pollinated Populus deltoides with gamma-irradiated Populus nigra pollen to produce >500 F1 seedlings containing dosage lesions in the form of deletions and insertions of chromosomal segments (indel mutations). Using high-precision dosage analysis, we detected indel mutations in ~55% of the progeny. These indels varied in length, position, and number per individual, cumulatively tiling >99% of the genome, with an average of 10 indels per gene. Combined with future phenotype and transcriptome data, this population will provide an excellent resource for creating and characterizing dosage-based variation in poplar, including the contribution of dosage to quantitative traits and heterosis.« less

  3. Increased Maternal Genome Dosage Bypasses the Requirement of the FIS Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Arabidopsis Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Kradolfer, David; Hennig, Lars; Köhler, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Seed development in flowering plants is initiated after a double fertilization event with two sperm cells fertilizing two female gametes, the egg cell and the central cell, leading to the formation of embryo and endosperm, respectively. In most species the endosperm is a polyploid tissue inheriting two maternal genomes and one paternal genome. As a consequence of this particular genomic configuration the endosperm is a dosage sensitive tissue, and changes in the ratio of maternal to paternal contributions strongly impact on endosperm development. The FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED (FIS) Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is essential for endosperm development; however, the underlying forces that led to the evolution of the FIS-PRC2 remained unknown. Here, we show that the functional requirement of the FIS-PRC2 can be bypassed by increasing the ratio of maternal to paternal genomes in the endosperm, suggesting that the main functional requirement of the FIS-PRC2 is to balance parental genome contributions and to reduce genetic conflict. We furthermore reveal that the AGAMOUS LIKE (AGL) gene AGL62 acts as a dosage-sensitive seed size regulator and that reduced expression of AGL62 might be responsible for reduced size of seeds with increased maternal genome dosage. PMID:23326241

  4. Optimizing timing and dosage: does parent type moderate the effects of variations of a parent-based intervention to reduce college student drinking?

    PubMed

    Varvil-Weld, Lindsey; Scaglione, Nichole; Cleveland, Michael J; Mallett, Kimberly A; Turrisi, Rob; Abar, Caitlin C

    2014-02-01

    Research on parent-based interventions (PBIs) to reduce college student drinking has explored the optimal timing of delivery and dosage. The present study extended this work by examining the effectiveness of three different PBI conditions on student drinking outcomes as a function of parenting types and students' pre-college drinking patterns. Four hypotheses were evaluated (early intervention, increased dosage, invariant, and treatment matching risk). A random sample of 1,900 college students and their parents was randomized to four conditions: (1) pre-college matriculation, (2) pre-college matriculation plus booster, (3) post-college matriculation, or (4) control, and was assessed at baseline (summer prior to college) and 5-month follow-up. Baseline parent type was assessed using latent profile analysis (positive, pro-alcohol, positive, anti-alcohol, negative mother, and negative father). Student drinking patterns were classified at baseline and follow-up and included: non-drinker, weekend light drinker, weekend heavy episodic drinker, and heavy drinker. Consistent with the treatment matching risk hypothesis, results indicated parent type moderated the effects of intervention condition such that receiving the intervention prior to college was associated with lower likelihood of being in a higher-risk drinking pattern at follow-up for students with positive, anti-alcohol, or negative father parent types. The findings are discussed with respect to optimal delivery and dosage of parent-based interventions for college student drinking.

  5. Optimizing Timing and Dosage: Does Parent Type Moderate the Effects of Variations of a Parent-Based Intervention to Reduce College Student Drinking?

    PubMed Central

    Varvil-Weld, Lindsey; Scaglione, Nichole; Cleveland, Michael J.; Mallett, Kimberly A.; Turrisi, Rob; Abar, Caitlin C.

    2013-01-01

    Research on parent-based interventions (PBIs) to reduce college student drinking has explored the optimal timing of delivery and dosage. The present study extended this work by examining the effectiveness of three different PBI conditions on student drinking outcomes as a function of parenting types and students' pre-college drinking patterns. Four hypotheses were evaluated (early intervention, increased dosage, invariant, and treatment matching risk). A random sample of 1900 college students and their parents was randomized to four conditions: 1) pre-college matriculation, 2) pre-college matriculation plus booster, 3) post-college matriculation, or 4) control, and was assessed at baseline (summer prior to college) and 5-month follow-up. Baseline parent type was assessed using latent profile analysis (positive, pro-alcohol, positive, anti-alcohol, negative mother and negative father). Student drinking patterns were classified at baseline and follow up and included: non-drinker, weekend light drinker, weekend heavy episodic drinker, and heavy drinker. Consistent with the treatment matching risk hypothesis, results indicated parent type moderated the effects of intervention condition such that receiving the intervention prior to college was associated with lower likelihood of being in a higher-risk drinking pattern at follow up for students with positive, anti-alcohol or negative father parent types. The findings are discussed with respect to optimal delivery and dosage of parent-based interventions for college student drinking. PMID:23404668

  6. Concerted copy number variation balances ribosomal DNA dosage in human and mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, John G.; Branco, Alan T.; Godinho, Susana A.; Yu, Shoukai; Lemos, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    Tandemly repeated ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are among the most evolutionary dynamic loci of eukaryotic genomes. The loci code for essential cellular components, yet exhibit extensive copy number (CN) variation within and between species. CN might be partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance between the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays. The arrays are nonhomologous, physically unlinked in mammals, and encode functionally interdependent RNA components of the ribosome. Here we show that the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays exhibit concerted CN variation (cCNV). Despite 5S and 45S rDNA elements residing on different chromosomes and lacking sequence similarity, cCNV between these loci is strong, evolutionarily conserved in humans and mice, and manifested across individual genotypes in natural populations and pedigrees. Finally, we observe that bisphenol A induces rapid and parallel modulation of 5S and 45S rDNA CN. Our observations reveal a novel mode of genome variation, indicate that natural selection contributed to the evolution and conservation of cCNV, and support the hypothesis that 5S CN is partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance with the 45S rDNA array. We suggest that human disease variation might be traced to disrupted rDNA dosage balance in the genome. PMID:25583482

  7. Parents' interest in whole-genome sequencing of newborns.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Aaron J; Dodson, Daniel S; Davis, Matthew M; Tarini, Beth A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess parents' interest in whole-genome sequencing for newborns. We conducted a survey of a nationally representative sample of 1,539 parents about their interest in whole-genome sequencing of newborns. Participants were randomly presented with one of two scenarios that differed in the venue of testing: one offered whole-genome sequencing through a state newborn screening program, whereas the other offered whole-genome sequencing in a pediatrician's office. Overall interest in having future newborns undergo whole-genome sequencing was generally high among parents. If whole-genome sequencing were offered through a state's newborn-screening program, 74% of parents were either definitely or somewhat interested in utilizing this technology. If offered in a pediatrician's office, 70% of parents were either definitely or somewhat interested. Parents in both groups most frequently identified test accuracy and the ability to prevent a child from developing a disease as "very important" in making a decision to have a newborn's whole genome sequenced. These data may help health departments and children's health-care providers anticipate parents' level of interest in genomic screening for newborns. As whole-genome sequencing is integrated into clinical and public health services, these findings may inform the development of educational strategies and outreach messages for parents.

  8. Dosage Compensation of the Sex Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Disteche, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated sex chromosomes evolved because of suppressed recombination once sex became genetically controlled. In XX/XY and ZZ/ZW systems, the heterogametic sex became partially aneuploid after degeneration of the Y or W. Often, aneuploidy causes abnormal levels of gene expression throughout the entire genome. Dosage compensation mechanisms evolved to restore balanced expression of the genome. These mechanisms include upregulation of the heterogametic chromosome as well as repression in the homogametic sex. Remarkably, strategies for dosage compensation differ between species. In organisms where more is known about molecular mechanisms of dosage compensation, specific protein complexes containing noncoding RNAs are targeted to the X chromosome. In addition, the dosage-regulated chromosome often occupies a specific nuclear compartment. Some genes escape dosage compensation, potentially resulting in sex-specific differences in gene expression. This review focuses on dosage compensation in mammals, with comparisons to fruit flies, nematodes, and birds. PMID:22974302

  9. From genetics to genomics: ethics, policy, and parental decision-making.

    PubMed

    Wilfond, Benjamin; Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2009-07-01

    Ethical evaluation of genetic testing in children is traditionally based on balancing clinical benefits and risks. However, this focus can be inconsistent with the general practice of respecting parental decision-making about their children's health care. We argue that respect for parental decision-making should play a larger role in shaping pediatric genetic testing practices, and play a similar role regarding decisions to use emerging genomic technologies. Genomic testing involves the examination of thousands of DNA markers spanning genes throughout the genome and their interrelationships, yielding virtually limitless interpretations. We presume that parents and providers should proceed cautiously in applying genomic testing in children, as we explore how genomic testing will stress the fault lines of the traditional ethical analysis. Empirical data about the psychosocial risks and benefits of genetic testing of children do not reveal serious harms, yet virtually no such data exist yet about genomic testing. Unless empirical social and behavioral data indicate that genomic testing is highly likely to cause serious harms to the children, parental decisions to obtain comprehensive genomic testing in their children should be respected. Once comprehensive genomic testing of children becomes routine, resultant information may be more easily integrated by families than anticipated. Research on the social and behavioral impact of comprehensive genomic testing on children and their families is needed to further inform parents, clinicians, and policy makers.

  10. Genome-Based Analysis and Gene Dosage Studies Provide New Insight into 3-Hydroxy-4-Methylvalerate Biosynthesis in Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Ushimaru, Kazunori; Mizuno, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant Ralstonia eutropha strain PHB−4 expressing the broad-substrate-specificity polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase 1 from Pseudomonas sp. strain 61-3 (PhaC1Ps) synthesizes a PHA copolymer containing the branched side-chain unit 3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate (3H4MV), which has a carbon backbone identical to that of leucine. Mutant strain 1F2 was derived from R. eutropha strain PHB−4 by chemical mutagenesis and shows higher levels of 3H4MV production than does the parent strain. In this study, to understand the mechanisms underlying the enhanced production of 3H4MV, whole-genome sequencing of strain 1F2 was performed, and the draft genome sequence was compared to that of parent strain PHB−4. This analysis uncovered four point mutations in the 1F2 genome. One point mutation was found in the ilvH gene at amino acid position 36 (A36T) of IlvH. ilvH encodes a subunit protein that regulates acetohydroxy acid synthase III (AHAS III). AHAS catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to 2-acetolactate, which is the first reaction in the biosynthesis of branched amino acids such as leucine and valine. Thus, the A36T IlvH mutation may show AHAS tolerance to feedback inhibition by branched amino acids, thereby increasing carbon flux toward branched amino acid and 3H4MV biosynthesis. Furthermore, a gene dosage study and an isotope tracer study were conducted to investigate the 3H4MV biosynthesis pathway. Based on the observations in these studies, we propose a 3H4MV biosynthesis pathway in R. eutropha that involves a condensation reaction between isobutyryl coenzyme A (isobutyryl-CoA) and acetyl-CoA to form the 3H4MV carbon backbone. PMID:25645560

  11. Genetic Variance Partitioning and Genome-Wide Prediction with Allele Dosage Information in Autotetraploid Potato.

    PubMed

    Endelman, Jeffrey B; Carley, Cari A Schmitz; Bethke, Paul C; Coombs, Joseph J; Clough, Mark E; da Silva, Washington L; De Jong, Walter S; Douches, David S; Frederick, Curtis M; Haynes, Kathleen G; Holm, David G; Miller, J Creighton; Muñoz, Patricio R; Navarro, Felix M; Novy, Richard G; Palta, Jiwan P; Porter, Gregory A; Rak, Kyle T; Sathuvalli, Vidyasagar R; Thompson, Asunta L; Yencho, G Craig

    2018-05-01

    As one of the world's most important food crops, the potato ( Solanum tuberosum L.) has spurred innovation in autotetraploid genetics, including in the use of SNP arrays to determine allele dosage at thousands of markers. By combining genotype and pedigree information with phenotype data for economically important traits, the objectives of this study were to (1) partition the genetic variance into additive vs. nonadditive components, and (2) determine the accuracy of genome-wide prediction. Between 2012 and 2017, a training population of 571 clones was evaluated for total yield, specific gravity, and chip fry color. Genomic covariance matrices for additive ( G ), digenic dominant ( D ), and additive × additive epistatic ( G # G ) effects were calculated using 3895 markers, and the numerator relationship matrix ( A ) was calculated from a 13-generation pedigree. Based on model fit and prediction accuracy, mixed model analysis with G was superior to A for yield and fry color but not specific gravity. The amount of additive genetic variance captured by markers was 20% of the total genetic variance for specific gravity, compared to 45% for yield and fry color. Within the training population, including nonadditive effects improved accuracy and/or bias for all three traits when predicting total genotypic value. When six F 1 populations were used for validation, prediction accuracy ranged from 0.06 to 0.63 and was consistently lower (0.13 on average) without allele dosage information. We conclude that genome-wide prediction is feasible in potato and that it will improve selection for breeding value given the substantial amount of nonadditive genetic variance in elite germplasm. Copyright © 2018 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. Mechanisms of X Chromosome Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Sevinç

    2015-01-01

    In many animals, males have one X and females have two X chromosomes. The difference in X chromosome dosage between the two sexes is compensated by mechanisms that regulate X chromosome transcription. Recent advances in genomic techniques have provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms of X chromosome dosage compensation. In this review, I summarize our current understanding of dosage imbalance in general, and then review the molecular mechanisms of X chromosome dosage compensation with an emphasis on the parallels and differences between the three well-studied model systems, M. musculus, D. melanogaster and C. elegans. PMID:25628761

  13. Parents are interested in newborn genomic testing during the early postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Waisbren, Susan E; Bäck, Danielle K; Liu, Christina; Kalia, Sarah S; Ringer, Steven A; Holm, Ingrid A; Green, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    We surveyed parents to ascertain interest in newborn genomic testing and determine whether these queries would provoke refusal of conventional state-mandated newborn screening. After a brief genetics orientation, parents rated their interest in receiving genomic testing for their healthy newborn on a 5-point Likert scale and answered questions about demographics and health history. We used logistic regression to explore factors associated with interest in genomic testing and tracked any subsequent rejection of newborn screening. We queried 514 parents within 48 hours after birth while still in hospital (mean age (SD) 32.7 (6.4) years, 65.2% female, 61.2% white, 79.3% married). Parents reported being not at all (6.4%), a little (10.9%), somewhat (36.6%), very (28.0%), or extremely (18.1%) interested in genomic testing for their newborns. None refused state-mandated newborn screening. Married participants and those with health concerns about their infant were less interested in newborn genomic testing (P = 0.012 and P = 0.030, respectively). Degree of interest for mothers and fathers was discordant (at least two categories different) for 24.4% of couples. Interest in newborn genomic testing was high among parents of healthy newborns, and the majority of couples had similar levels of interest. Surveying parents about genomic sequencing did not prompt rejection of newborn screening.Genet Med 17 6, 501-504.

  14. An imbalanced parental genome ratio affects the development of rice zygotes.

    PubMed

    Toda, Erika; Ohnishi, Yukinosuke; Okamoto, Takashi

    2018-04-27

    Upon double fertilization, one sperm cell fuses with the egg cell to form a zygote with a 1:1 maternal-to-paternal genome ratio (1m:1p), and another sperm cell fuses with the central cell to form a triploid primary endosperm cell with a 2m:1p ratio, resulting in formation of the embryo and the endosperm, respectively. The endosperm is known to be considerably sensitive to the ratio of the parental genomes. However, the effect of an imbalance of the parental genomes on zygotic development and embryogenesis has not been well studied, because it is difficult to reproduce the parental genome-imbalanced situation in zygotes and to monitor the developmental profile of zygotes without external effects from the endosperm. In this study, we produced polyploid zygotes with an imbalanced parental genome ratio by electro-fusion of isolated rice gametes and observed their developmental profiles. Polyploid zygotes with an excess maternal gamete/genome developed normally, whereas approximately half to three-quarters of polyploid zygotes with a paternal excess showed developmental arrests. These results indicate that paternal and maternal genomes synergistically serve zygote development with distinct functions, and that genes with monoallelic expression play important roles during zygotic development and embryogenesis.

  15. Selective gene dosage by CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing in hexaploid Camelina sativa.

    PubMed

    Morineau, Céline; Bellec, Yannick; Tellier, Frédérique; Gissot, Lionel; Kelemen, Zsolt; Nogué, Fabien; Faure, Jean-Denis

    2017-06-01

    In many plant species, gene dosage is an important cause of phenotype variation. Engineering gene dosage, particularly in polyploid genomes, would provide an efficient tool for plant breeding. The hexaploid oilseed crop Camelina sativa, which has three closely related expressed subgenomes, is an ideal species for investigation of the possibility of creating a large collection of combinatorial mutants. Selective, targeted mutagenesis of the three delta-12-desaturase (FAD2) genes was achieved by CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing, leading to reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and increased accumulation of oleic acid in the oil. Analysis of mutations over four generations demonstrated the presence of a large variety of heritable mutations in the three isologous CsFAD2 genes. The different combinations of single, double and triple mutants in the T3 generation were isolated, and the complete loss-of-function mutants revealed the importance of delta-12-desaturation for Camelina development. Combinatorial association of different alleles for the three FAD2 loci provided a large diversity of Camelina lines with various lipid profiles, ranging from 10% to 62% oleic acid accumulation in the oil. The different allelic combinations allowed an unbiased analysis of gene dosage and function in this hexaploid species, but also provided a unique source of genetic variability for plant breeding. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Parental genomes mix in mule and human cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Hepperger, Claudia; Mayer, Andreas; Merz, Julia; Vanderwall, Dirk K; Dietzel, Steffen

    2009-06-01

    Whether chromosome sets inherited from father and mother occupy separate spaces in the cell nucleus is a question first asked over 110 years ago. Recently, the nuclear organization of the genome has come increasingly into focus as an important level of epigenetic regulation. In this context, it is indispensable to know whether or not parental genomes are spatially separated. Genome separation had been demonstrated for plant hybrids and for the early mammalian embryo. Conclusive studies for somatic mammalian cell nuclei are lacking because homologous chromosomes from the two parents cannot be distinguished within a species. We circumvented this problem by investigating the three-dimensional distribution of chromosomes in mule lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Genomic DNA of horse and donkey was used as probes in fluorescence in situ hybridization under conditions where only tandem repetitive sequences were detected. We thus could determine the distribution of maternal and paternal chromosome sets in structurally preserved interphase nuclei for the first time. In addition, we investigated the distribution of several pairs of chromosomes in human bilobed granulocytes. Qualitative and quantitative image evaluation did not reveal any evidence for the separation of parental genomes. On the contrary, we observed mixing of maternal and paternal chromosome sets.

  17. Parent and Public Interest in Whole Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Daniel S.; Goldenberg, Aaron J.; Davis, Matthew M.; Singer, Dianne C.; Tarini, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the baseline interest of the public in whole genome sequencing (WGS) for themselves, parents’ interest in WGS for their youngest children, and factors associated with such interest. Methods A random sample of adults from a probability-based nationally representative online panel was surveyed. All participants were provided basic information about WGS and then asked their interest in WGS for themselves. Those participants who self-identified as parents were asked about their interest in WGS for their children. The order in which parents were asked about their interest in WGS for themselves and their child was randomized. The relationship between parent/child characteristics and interest in WGS was examined. Results Overall response rate was 62% (55% among parents). 58.6% of the total population (parents and non-parents) was interested in WGS for themselves. Similarly, 61.8% of parents were interested in WGS for themselves and 57.8% were interested in WGS for their youngest children. Of note, 84.7% of parents showed an identical interest level in WGS for themselves and their youngest children. Mothers as a whole, and parents whose youngest children had ≥2 health conditions had significantly more interest in WGS for themselves and their youngest children, while those with conservative political ideologies had considerably less. Conclusions While U.S. adults have varying interest levels in WGS, parents appear to have similar interests in genome testing for themselves and their youngest children. As WGS technology becomes available in the clinic and private market, clinicians should be prepared to discuss WGS risks and benefits with their patients. PMID:25765282

  18. Parent and public interest in whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Daniel S; Goldenberg, Aaron J; Davis, Matthew M; Singer, Dianne C; Tarini, Beth A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the baseline interest of the public in whole-genome sequencing (WGS) for oneself, parents' interest in WGS for their youngest children, and factors associated with such interest. A random sample of adults from a probability-based nationally representative online panel was surveyed. All participants were provided basic information about WGS and then asked about their interest in WGS for themselves. Those participants who were parents were additionally asked about their interest in WGS for their children. The order in which parents were asked about their interest in WGS for themselves and for their child was randomized. The relationship between parent/child characteristics and interest in WGS was examined. The overall response rate was 62% (55% among parents). 58.6% of the total population (parents and nonparents) was interested in WGS for themselves. Similarly, 61.8% of the parents were interested in WGS for themselves and 57.8% were interested in WGS for their youngest children. Of note, 84.7% of the parents showed an identical interest level in WGS for themselves and their youngest children. Mothers as a group and parents whose youngest children had ≥2 health conditions had significantly more interest in WGS for themselves and their youngest children, while those with conservative political ideologies had considerably less. While US adults have varying interest levels in WGS, parents appear to have similar interests in genome testing for themselves and their youngest children. As WGS technology becomes available in the clinic and private market, clinicians should be prepared to discuss WGS risks and benefits with their patients. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Parental antagonism, relatedness asymmetries, and genomic imprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Haig, D

    1997-01-01

    The theory of inclusive fitness can be modified to consider separate coefficients of relatedness for an individual's maternal and paternal alleles. A gene is said to have parentally antagonistic effects if it has an inclusive fitness benefit when maternally derived, but an inclusive fitness cost when paternally derived (or vice versa). Parental antagonism favours the evolution of alleles that are expressed only when maternally derived or only when paternally derived (genomic imprinting). PMID:9404029

  20. Quantitative and functional interrogation of parent-of-origin allelic expression biases in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Julio D; Rubinstein, Nimrod D; Fernandez, Daniel E; Santoro, Stephen W; Needleman, Leigh A; Ho-Shing, Olivia; Choi, John J; Zirlinger, Mariela; Chen, Shau-Kwaun; Liu, Jun S; Dulac, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The maternal and paternal genomes play different roles in mammalian brains as a result of genomic imprinting, an epigenetic regulation leading to differential expression of the parental alleles of some genes. Here we investigate genomic imprinting in the cerebellum using a newly developed Bayesian statistical model that provides unprecedented transcript-level resolution. We uncover 160 imprinted transcripts, including 41 novel and independently validated imprinted genes. Strikingly, many genes exhibit parentally biased—rather than monoallelic—expression, with different magnitudes according to age, organ, and brain region. Developmental changes in parental bias and overall gene expression are strongly correlated, suggesting combined roles in regulating gene dosage. Finally, brain-specific deletion of the paternal, but not maternal, allele of the paternally-biased Bcl-x, (Bcl2l1) results in loss of specific neuron types, supporting the functional significance of parental biases. These findings reveal the remarkable complexity of genomic imprinting, with important implications for understanding the normal and diseased brain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07860.001 PMID:26140685

  1. Parents perspectives on whole genome sequencing for their children: qualified enthusiasm?

    PubMed

    Anderson, J A; Meyn, M S; Shuman, C; Zlotnik Shaul, R; Mantella, L E; Szego, M J; Bowdin, S; Monfared, N; Hayeems, R Z

    2017-08-01

    To better understand the consequences of returning whole genome sequencing (WGS) results in paediatrics and facilitate its evidence-based clinical implementation, we studied parents' experiences with WGS and their preferences for the return of adult-onset secondary variants (SVs)-medically actionable genomic variants unrelated to their child's current medical condition that predict adult-onset disease. We conducted qualitative interviews with parents whose children were undergoing WGS as part of the SickKids Genome Clinic, a research project that studies the impact of clinical WGS on patients, families, and the healthcare system. Interviews probed parents' experience with and motivation for WGS as well as their preferences related to SVs. Interviews were analysed thematically. Of 83 invited, 23 parents from 18 families participated. These parents supported WGS as a diagnostic test, perceiving clear intrinsic and instrumental value. However, many parents were ambivalent about receiving SVs, conveying a sense of self-imposed obligation to take on the 'weight' of knowing their child's SVs, however unpleasant. Some parents chose to learn about adult-onset SVs for their child but not for themselves. Despite general enthusiasm for WGS as a diagnostic test, many parents felt a duty to learn adult-onset SVs. Analogous to 'inflicted insight', we call this phenomenon 'inflicted ought'. Importantly, not all parents of children undergoing WGS view the best interests of their child in relational terms, thereby challenging an underlying justification for current ACMG guidelines for reporting incidental secondary findings from whole exome and WGS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Dosage Transmission Disequilibrium Test (dTDT) for Linkage and Association Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhehao; Wang, Jen-Chyong; Howells, William; Lin, Peng; Agrawal, Arpana; Edenberg, Howard J.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Bierut, Laura J.; Goate, Alison; Rice, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Both linkage and association studies have been successfully applied to identify disease susceptibility genes with genetic markers such as microsatellites and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). As one of the traditional family-based studies, the Transmission/Disequilibrium Test (TDT) measures the over-transmission of an allele in a trio from its heterozygous parents to the affected offspring and can be potentially useful to identify genetic determinants for complex disorders. However, there is reduced information when complete trio information is unavailable. In this study, we developed a novel approach to “infer” the transmission of SNPs by combining both the linkage and association data, which uses microsatellite markers from families informative for linkage together with SNP markers from the offspring who are genotyped for both linkage and a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS). We generalized the traditional TDT to process these inferred dosage probabilities, which we name as the dosage-TDT (dTDT). For evaluation purpose, we developed a simulation procedure to assess its operating characteristics. We applied the dTDT to the simulated data and documented the power of the dTDT under a number of different realistic scenarios. Finally, we applied our methods to a family study of alcohol dependence (COGA) and performed individual genotyping on complete families for the top signals. One SNP (rs4903712 on chromosome 14) remained significant after correcting for multiple testing Methods developed in this study can be adapted to other platforms and will have widespread applicability in genomic research when case-control GWAS data are collected in families with existing linkage data. PMID:23691058

  3. Parents' Experience with Pediatric Microarray: Transferrable Lessons in the Era of Genomic Counseling.

    PubMed

    Hayeems, R Z; Babul-Hirji, R; Hoang, N; Weksberg, R; Shuman, C

    2016-04-01

    Advances in genome-based microarray and sequencing technologies hold tremendous promise for understanding, better-managing and/or preventing disease and disease-related risk. Chromosome microarray technology (array based comparative genomic hybridization [aCGH]) is widely utilized in pediatric care to inform diagnostic etiology and medical management. Less clear is how parents experience and perceive the value of this technology. This study explored parents' experiences with aCGH in the pediatric setting, focusing on how they make meaning of various types of test results. We conducted in-person or telephone-based semi-structured interviews with parents of 21 children who underwent aCGH testing in 2010. Transcripts were coded and analyzed thematically according to the principles of interpretive description. We learned that parents expect genomic tests to be of personal use; their experiences with aCGH results characterize this use as intrinsic in the test's ability to provide a much sought-after answer for their child's condition, and instrumental in its ability to guide care, access to services, and family planning. In addition, parents experience uncertainty regardless of whether aCGH results are of pathogenic, uncertain, or benign significance; this triggers frustration, fear, and hope. Findings reported herein better characterize the notion of personal utility and highlight the pervasive nature of uncertainty in the context of genomic testing. Empiric research that links pre-test counseling content and psychosocial outcomes is warranted to optimize patient care.

  4. The evolution of genomic imprinting: theories, predictions and empirical tests

    PubMed Central

    Patten, M M; Ross, L; Curley, J P; Queller, D C; Bonduriansky, R; Wolf, J B

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic phenomenon of genomic imprinting has motivated the development of numerous theories for its evolutionary origins and genomic distribution. In this review, we examine the three theories that have best withstood theoretical and empirical scrutiny. These are: Haig and colleagues' kinship theory; Day and Bonduriansky's sexual antagonism theory; and Wolf and Hager's maternal–offspring coadaptation theory. These theories have fundamentally different perspectives on the adaptive significance of imprinting. The kinship theory views imprinting as a mechanism to change gene dosage, with imprinting evolving because of the differential effect that gene dosage has on the fitness of matrilineal and patrilineal relatives. The sexual antagonism and maternal–offspring coadaptation theories view genomic imprinting as a mechanism to modify the resemblance of an individual to its two parents, with imprinting evolving to increase the probability of expressing the fitter of the two alleles at a locus. In an effort to stimulate further empirical work on the topic, we carefully detail the logic and assumptions of all three theories, clarify the specific predictions of each and suggest tests to discriminate between these alternative theories for why particular genes are imprinted. PMID:24755983

  5. Mammalian X Chromosome Dosage Compensation: Perspectives From the Germ Line.

    PubMed

    Sangrithi, Mahesh N; Turner, James M A

    2018-06-01

    Sex chromosomes are advantageous to mammals, allowing them to adopt a genetic rather than environmental sex determination system. However, sex chromosome evolution also carries a burden, because it results in an imbalance in gene dosage between females (XX) and males (XY). This imbalance is resolved by X dosage compensation, which comprises both X chromosome inactivation and X chromosome upregulation. X dosage compensation has been well characterized in the soma, but not in the germ line. Germ cells face a special challenge, because genome wide reprogramming erases epigenetic marks responsible for maintaining the X dosage compensated state. Here we explain how evolution has influenced the gene content and germ line specialization of the mammalian sex chromosomes. We discuss new research uncovering unusual X dosage compensation states in germ cells, which we postulate influence sexual dimorphisms in germ line development and cause infertility in individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidy. © 2018 The Authors. BioEssays Published by Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A system for dosage-based functional genomics in poplar

    Treesearch

    Isabelle M. Henry; Matthew S. Zinkgraf; Andrew T. Groover; Luca Comai

    2015-01-01

    Altering gene dosage through variation in gene copy number is a powerful approach to addressing questions regarding gene regulation, quantitative trait loci, and heterosis, but one that is not easily applied to sexually transmitted species. Elite poplar (Populus spp) varieties are created through interspecific hybridization, followed by...

  7. The Intolerance of Regulatory Sequence to Genetic Variation Predicts Gene Dosage Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanli; Halvorsen, Matt; Han, Yujun; Weir, William H.; Allen, Andrew S.; Goldstein, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Noncoding sequence contains pathogenic mutations. Yet, compared with mutations in protein-coding sequence, pathogenic regulatory mutations are notoriously difficult to recognize. Most fundamentally, we are not yet adept at recognizing the sequence stretches in the human genome that are most important in regulating the expression of genes. For this reason, it is difficult to apply to the regulatory regions the same kinds of analytical paradigms that are being successfully applied to identify mutations among protein-coding regions that influence risk. To determine whether dosage sensitive genes have distinct patterns among their noncoding sequence, we present two primary approaches that focus solely on a gene’s proximal noncoding regulatory sequence. The first approach is a regulatory sequence analogue of the recently introduced residual variation intolerance score (RVIS), termed noncoding RVIS, or ncRVIS. The ncRVIS compares observed and predicted levels of standing variation in the regulatory sequence of human genes. The second approach, termed ncGERP, reflects the phylogenetic conservation of a gene’s regulatory sequence using GERP++. We assess how well these two approaches correlate with four gene lists that use different ways to identify genes known or likely to cause disease through changes in expression: 1) genes that are known to cause disease through haploinsufficiency, 2) genes curated as dosage sensitive in ClinGen’s Genome Dosage Map, 3) genes judged likely to be under purifying selection for mutations that change expression levels because they are statistically depleted of loss-of-function variants in the general population, and 4) genes judged unlikely to cause disease based on the presence of copy number variants in the general population. We find that both noncoding scores are highly predictive of dosage sensitivity using any of these criteria. In a similar way to ncGERP, we assess two ensemble-based predictors of regional noncoding importance

  8. The shaping and functional consequences of the dosage effect landscape in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Samur, Mehmet K; Shah, Parantu K; Wang, Xujun; Minvielle, Stéphane; Magrangeas, Florence; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Munshi, Nikhil C; Li, Cheng

    2013-10-02

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant proliferation of plasma B cells. Based on recurrent aneuploidy such as copy number alterations (CNAs), myeloma is divided into two subtypes with different CNA patterns and patient survival outcomes. How aneuploidy events arise, and whether they contribute to cancer cell evolution are actively studied. The large amount of transcriptomic changes resultant of CNAs (dosage effect) pose big challenges for identifying functional consequences of CNAs in myeloma in terms of specific driver genes and pathways. In this study, we hypothesize that gene-wise dosage effect varies as a result from complex regulatory networks that translate the impact of CNAs to gene expression, and studying this variation can provide insights into functional effects of CNAs. We propose gene-wise dosage effect score and genome-wide karyotype plot as tools to measure and visualize concordant copy number and expression changes across cancer samples. We find that dosage effect in myeloma is widespread yet variable, and it is correlated with gene expression level and CNA frequencies in different chromosomes. Our analysis suggests that despite the enrichment of differentially expressed genes between hyperdiploid MM and non-hyperdiploid MM in the trisomy chromosomes, the chromosomal proportion of dosage sensitive genes is higher in the non-trisomy chromosomes. Dosage-sensitive genes are enriched by genes with protein translation and localization functions, and dosage resistant genes are enriched by apoptosis genes. These results point to future studies on differential dosage sensitivity and resistance of pro- and anti-proliferation pathways and their variation across patients as therapeutic targets and prognosis markers. Our findings support the hypothesis that recurrent CNAs in myeloma are selected by their functional consequences. The novel dosage effect score defined in this work will facilitate integration of copy number and expression data for identifying driver

  9. Genome editing and assisted reproduction: curing embryos, society or prospective parents?

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Giulia

    2018-06-01

    This paper explores the ethics of introducing genome-editing technologies as a new reproductive option. In particular, it focuses on whether genome editing can be considered a morally valuable alternative to preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Two arguments against the use of genome editing in reproduction are analysed, namely safety concerns and germline modification. These arguments are then contrasted with arguments in favour of genome editing, in particular with the argument of the child's welfare and the argument of parental reproductive autonomy. In addition to these two arguments, genome editing could be considered as a worthy alternative to PGD as it may not be subjected to some of the moral critiques moved against this technology. Even if these arguments offer sound reasons in favour of introducing genome editing as a new reproductive option, I conclude that these benefits should be balanced against other considerations. More specifically, I maintain that concerns regarding the equality of access to assisted reproduction and the allocation of scarce resources should be addressed prior to the adoption of genome editing as a new reproductive option.

  10. Incomplete sex chromosome dosage compensation in the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, based on de novo transcriptome assembly.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Peter W; Mank, Judith E; Wedell, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Males and females experience differences in gene dose for loci in the nonrecombining region of heteromorphic sex chromosomes. If not compensated, this leads to expression imbalances, with the homogametic sex on average exhibiting greater expression due to the doubled gene dose. Many organisms with heteromorphic sex chromosomes display global dosage compensation mechanisms, which equalize gene expression levels between the sexes. However, birds and Schistosoma have been previously shown to lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation mechanisms, and the status in other female heterogametic taxa including Lepidoptera remains unresolved. To further our understanding of dosage compensation in female heterogametic taxa and to resolve its status in the lepidopterans, we assessed the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. As P. interpunctella lacks a complete reference genome, we conducted de novo transcriptome assembly combined with orthologous genomic location prediction from the related silkworm genome, Bombyx mori, to compare Z-linked and autosomal gene expression levels for each sex. We demonstrate that P. interpunctella lacks complete Z chromosome dosage compensation, female Z-linked genes having just over half the expression level of males and autosomal genes. This finding suggests that the Lepidoptera and possibly all female heterogametic taxa lack global dosage compensation, although more species will need to be sampled to confirm this assertion.

  11. Incomplete Sex Chromosome Dosage Compensation in the Indian Meal Moth, Plodia interpunctella, Based on De Novo Transcriptome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Peter W.; Mank, Judith E.; Wedell, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Males and females experience differences in gene dose for loci in the nonrecombining region of heteromorphic sex chromosomes. If not compensated, this leads to expression imbalances, with the homogametic sex on average exhibiting greater expression due to the doubled gene dose. Many organisms with heteromorphic sex chromosomes display global dosage compensation mechanisms, which equalize gene expression levels between the sexes. However, birds and Schistosoma have been previously shown to lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation mechanisms, and the status in other female heterogametic taxa including Lepidoptera remains unresolved. To further our understanding of dosage compensation in female heterogametic taxa and to resolve its status in the lepidopterans, we assessed the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. As P. interpunctella lacks a complete reference genome, we conducted de novo transcriptome assembly combined with orthologous genomic location prediction from the related silkworm genome, Bombyx mori, to compare Z-linked and autosomal gene expression levels for each sex. We demonstrate that P. interpunctella lacks complete Z chromosome dosage compensation, female Z-linked genes having just over half the expression level of males and autosomal genes. This finding suggests that the Lepidoptera and possibly all female heterogametic taxa lack global dosage compensation, although more species will need to be sampled to confirm this assertion. PMID:23034217

  12. Recurrent parent genome recovery analysis in a marker-assisted backcrossing program of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad A

    2015-02-01

    Backcross breeding is the most commonly used method for incorporating a blast resistance gene into a rice cultivar. Linkage between the resistance gene and undesirable units can persist for many generations of backcrossing. Marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC) along with marker-assisted selection (MAS) contributes immensely to overcome the main limitation of the conventional breeding and accelerates recurrent parent genome (RPG) recovery. The MABC approach was employed to incorporate (a) blast resistance gene(s) from the donor parent Pongsu Seribu 1, the blast-resistant local variety in Malaysia, into the genetic background of MR219, a popular high-yielding rice variety that is blast susceptible, to develop a blast-resistant MR219 improved variety. In this perspective, the recurrent parent genome recovery was analyzed in early generations of backcrossing using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Out of 375 SSR markers, 70 markers were found polymorphic between the parents, and these markers were used to evaluate the plants in subsequent generations. Background analysis revealed that the extent of RPG recovery ranged from 75.40% to 91.3% and from 80.40% to 96.70% in BC1F1 and BC2F1 generations, respectively. In this study, the recurrent parent genome content in the selected BC2F2 lines ranged from 92.7% to 97.7%. The average proportion of the recurrent parent in the selected improved line was 95.98%. MAS allowed identification of the plants that are more similar to the recurrent parent for the loci evaluated in backcross generations. The application of MAS with the MABC breeding program accelerated the recovery of the RP genome, reducing the number of generations and the time for incorporating resistance against rice blast. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Mapping 22q11.2 Gene Dosage Effects on Brain Morphometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Amy; Ching, Christopher R K; Vajdi, Ariana; Sun, Daqiang; Jonas, Rachel K; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Kushan-Wells, Leila; Pacheco Hansen, Laura; Krikorian, Emma; Gutman, Boris; Dokoru, Deepika; Helleman, Gerhard; Thompson, Paul M; Bearden, Carrie E

    2017-06-28

    Reciprocal chromosomal rearrangements at the 22q11.2 locus are associated with elevated risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. The 22q11.2 deletion confers the highest known genetic risk for schizophrenia, but a duplication in the same region is strongly associated with autism and is less common in schizophrenia cases than in the general population. Here we conducted the first study of 22q11.2 gene dosage effects on brain structure in a sample of 143 human subjects: 66 with 22q11.2 deletions (22q-del; 32 males), 21 with 22q11.2 duplications (22q-dup; 14 males), and 56 age- and sex-matched controls (31 males). 22q11.2 gene dosage varied positively with intracranial volume, gray and white matter volume, and cortical surface area (deletion < control < duplication). In contrast, gene dosage varied negatively with mean cortical thickness (deletion > control > duplication). Widespread differences were observed for cortical surface area with more localized effects on cortical thickness. These diametric patterns extended into subcortical regions: 22q-dup carriers had a significantly larger right hippocampus, on average, but lower right caudate and corpus callosum volume, relative to 22q-del carriers. Novel subcortical shape analysis revealed greater radial distance (thickness) of the right amygdala and left thalamus, and localized increases and decreases in subregions of the caudate, putamen, and hippocampus in 22q-dup relative to 22q-del carriers. This study provides the first evidence that 22q11.2 is a genomic region associated with gene-dose-dependent brain phenotypes. Pervasive effects on cortical surface area imply that this copy number variant affects brain structure early in the course of development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Probing naturally occurring reciprocal copy number variation in the genome may help us understand mechanisms underlying deviations from typical brain and cognitive development. The 22q11.2 genomic region is particularly susceptible to chromosomal

  14. [Parental genome imprinting].

    PubMed

    Babinet, C

    1993-01-01

    Genetical as well as experimental embryology methods have permitted, in recent years, to uncover a very important feature of mammalian embryonic development: it has been shown that female and male genomic complements are differentially imprinted in such a way that contribution of both a maternally and a paternally derived genome are absolutely necessary for the embryo to complete its normal development. Differential genomic imprinting seems therefore to impose some new and essential kind of information to the one already contained in the genomic sequences. The differential imprinting should be imposed on the genetic material during gametogenesis and persist throughout somatic development after fertilization. It should then be erased in the germ cell line and be established again in sperm and egg genomes. The recent discovery of several mouse genes which are imprinted should permit to address the question of the molecular mechanisms of imprinting.

  15. The abundance of homoeologue transcripts is disrupted by hybridization and is partially restored by genome doubling in synthetic hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ming; Li, Aili; Shi, Tongwei; Luo, Jiangtao; Zhang, Lianquan; Zhang, Xuechuan; Ning, Shunzong; Yuan, Zhongwei; Zeng, Deying; Kong, Xingchen; Li, Xiaolong; Zheng, Hongkun; Lan, Xiujin; Zhang, Huaigang; Zheng, Youliang; Mao, Long; Liu, Dengcai

    2017-02-10

    The formation of an allopolyploid is a two step process, comprising an initial wide hybridization event, which is later followed by a whole genome doubling. Both processes can affect the transcription of homoeologues. Here, RNA-Seq was used to obtain the genome-wide leaf transcriptome of two independent Triticum turgidum × Aegilops tauschii allotriploids (F1), along with their spontaneous allohexaploids (S1) and their parental lines. The resulting sequence data were then used to characterize variation in homoeologue transcript abundance. The hybridization event strongly down-regulated D-subgenome homoeologues, but this effect was in many cases reversed by whole genome doubling. The suppression of D-subgenome homoeologue transcription resulted in a marked frequency of parental transcription level dominance, especially with respect to genes encoding proteins involved in photosynthesis. Singletons (genes where no homoeologues were present) were frequently transcribed at both the allotriploid and allohexaploid plants. The implication is that whole genome doubling helps to overcome the phenotypic weakness of the allotriploid, restoring a more favourable gene dosage in genes experiencing transcription level dominance in hexaploid wheat.

  16. The Gpr1/Zdbf2 locus provides new paradigms for transient and dynamic genomic imprinting in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Duffié, Rachel; Ajjan, Sophie; Greenberg, Maxim V.; Zamudio, Natasha; Escamilla del Arenal, Martin; Iranzo, Julian; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Barbaux, Sandrine; Fauque, Patricia; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2014-01-01

    Many loci maintain parent-of-origin DNA methylation only briefly after fertilization during mammalian development: Whether this form of transient genomic imprinting can impact the early embryonic transcriptome or even have life-long consequences on genome regulation and possibly phenotypes is currently unknown. Here, we report a maternal germline differentially methylated region (DMR) at the mouse Gpr1/Zdbf2 (DBF-type zinc finger-containing protein 2) locus, which controls the paternal-specific expression of long isoforms of Zdbf2 (Liz) in the early embryo. This DMR loses parental specificity by gain of DNA methylation at implantation in the embryo but is maintained in extraembryonic tissues. As a consequence of this transient, tissue-specific maternal imprinting, Liz expression is restricted to the pluripotent embryo, extraembryonic tissues, and pluripotent male germ cells. We found that Liz potentially functions as both Zdbf2-coding RNA and cis-regulatory RNA. Importantly, Liz-mediated events allow a switch from maternal to paternal imprinted DNA methylation and from Liz to canonical Zdbf2 promoter use during embryonic differentiation, which are stably maintained through somatic life and conserved in humans. The Gpr1/Zdbf2 locus lacks classical imprinting histone modifications, but analysis of mutant embryonic stem cells reveals fine-tuned regulation of Zdbf2 dosage through DNA and H3K27 methylation interplay. Together, our work underlines the developmental and evolutionary need to ensure proper Liz/Zdbf2 dosage as a driving force for dynamic genomic imprinting at the Gpr1/Zdbf2 locus. PMID:24589776

  17. Opposite effects on facial morphology due to gene dosage sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Peter; McKee, Shane; Suttie, Michael; Allanson, Judith; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Maas, Saskia M; Quarrell, Oliver; Smith, Ann C M; Lewis, Suzanne; Tassabehji, May; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Mattina, Teresa; Hennekam, Raoul

    2014-09-01

    Sequencing technology is increasingly demonstrating the impact of genomic copy number variation (CNV) on phenotypes. Opposing variation in growth, head size, cognition and behaviour is known to result from deletions and reciprocal duplications of some genomic regions. We propose normative inversion of face shape, opposing difference from a matched norm, as a basis for investigating the effects of gene dosage on craniofacial development. We use dense surface modelling techniques to match any face (or part of a face) to a facial norm of unaffected individuals of matched age, sex and ethnicity and then we reverse the individual's face shape differences from the matched norm to produce the normative inversion. We demonstrate for five genomic regions, 4p16.3, 7q11.23, 11p15, 16p13.3 and 17p11.2, that such inversion for individuals with a duplication or (epi)-mutation produces facial forms remarkably similar to those associated with a deletion or opposite (epi-)mutation of the same region, and vice versa. The ability to visualise and quantify face shape effects of gene dosage is of major benefit for determining whether a CNV is the cause of the phenotype of an individual and for predicting reciprocal consequences. It enables face shape to be used as a relatively simple and inexpensive functional analysis of the gene(s) involved.

  18. Hybrid incompatibilities are affected by dominance and dosage in the haplodiploid wasp Nasonia

    PubMed Central

    Beukeboom, Leo W.; Koevoets, Tosca; Morales, Hernán E.; Ferber, Steven; van de Zande, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Study of genome incompatibilities in species hybrids is important for understanding the genetic basis of reproductive isolation and speciation. According to Haldane's rule hybridization affects the heterogametic sex more than the homogametic sex. Several theories have been proposed that attribute asymmetry in hybridization effects to either phenotype (sex) or genotype (heterogamety). Here we investigate the genetic basis of hybrid genome incompatibility in the haplodiploid wasp Nasonia using the powerful features of haploid males and sex reversal. We separately investigate the effects of heterozygosity (ploidy level) and sex by generating sex reversed diploid hybrid males and comparing them to genotypically similar haploid hybrid males and diploid hybrid females. Hybrid effects of sterility were more pronounced than of inviability, and were particularly strong in haploid males, but weak to absent in diploid males and females, indicating a strong ploidy level but no sex specific effect. Molecular markers identified a number of genomic regions associated with hybrid inviability in haploid males that disappeared under diploidy in both hybrid males and females. Hybrid inviability was rescued by dominance effects at some genomic regions, but aggravated or alleviated by dosage effects at other regions, consistent with cytonuclear incompatibilities. Dosage effects underlying Bateson–Dobzhansky–Muller (BDM) incompatibilities need more consideration in explaining Haldane's rule in diploid systems. PMID:25926847

  19. Dosage compensation of the sex chromosomes and autosomes

    PubMed Central

    Disteche, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Males are XY and females are XX in most mammalian species. Other species such as birds have a different sex chromosome make-up: ZZ in males and ZW in females. In both types of organisms one of the sex chromosomes, Y or W, has degenerated due to lack of recombination with its respective homolog X or Z. Since autosomes are present in two copies in diploid organisms the heterogametic sex has become a natural "aneuploid" with haploinsufficiency for X- or Z-linked genes. Specific mechanisms have evolved to restore a balance between critical gene products throughout the genome and between males and females. Some of these mechanisms were co-opted from and/or added to compensatory processes that alleviate autosomal aneuploidy. Surprisingly, several modes of dosage compensation have evolved. In this review we will consider the evidence for dosage compensation and the molecular mechanisms implicated. PMID:27112542

  20. Comparative Sex Chromosome Genomics in Snakes: Differentiation, Evolutionary Strata, and Lack of Global Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Zektser, Yulia; Mahajan, Shivani; Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Snakes exhibit genetic sex determination, with female heterogametic sex chromosomes (ZZ males, ZW females). Extensive cytogenetic work has suggested that the level of sex chromosome heteromorphism varies among species, with Boidae having entirely homomorphic sex chromosomes, Viperidae having completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and Colubridae showing partial differentiation. Here, we take a genomic approach to compare sex chromosome differentiation in these three snake families. We identify homomorphic sex chromosomes in boas (Boidae), but completely heteromorphic sex chromosomes in both garter snakes (Colubridae) and pygmy rattlesnake (Viperidae). Detection of W-linked gametologs enables us to establish the presence of evolutionary strata on garter and pygmy rattlesnake sex chromosomes where recombination was abolished at different time points. Sequence analysis shows that all strata are shared between pygmy rattlesnake and garter snake, i.e., recombination was abolished between the sex chromosomes before the two lineages diverged. The sex-biased transmission of the Z and its hemizygosity in females can impact patterns of molecular evolution, and we show that rates of evolution for Z-linked genes are increased relative to their pseudoautosomal homologs, both at synonymous and amino acid sites (even after controlling for mutational biases). This demonstrates that mutation rates are male-biased in snakes (male-driven evolution), but also supports faster-Z evolution due to differential selective effects on the Z. Finally, we perform a transcriptome analysis in boa and pygmy rattlesnake to establish baseline levels of sex-biased expression in homomorphic sex chromosomes, and show that heteromorphic ZW chromosomes in rattlesnakes lack chromosome-wide dosage compensation. Our study provides the first full scale overview of the evolution of snake sex chromosomes at the genomic level, thus greatly expanding our knowledge of reptilian and vertebrate sex chromosomes

  1. Condensin-driven remodelling of X chromosome topology during dosage compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Emily; Bian, Qian; McCord, Rachel Patton; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Wheeler, Bayly S.; Ralston, Edward J.; Uzawa, Satoru; Dekker, Job; Meyer, Barbara J.

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional organization of a genome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, yet little is known about the machinery and mechanisms that determine higher-order chromosome structure. Here we perform genome-wide chromosome conformation capture analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and RNA-seq to obtain comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) maps of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome and to dissect X chromosome dosage compensation, which balances gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. The dosage compensation complex (DCC), a condensin complex, binds to both hermaphrodite X chromosomes via sequence-specific recruitment elements on X (rex sites) to reduce chromosome-wide gene expression by half. Most DCC condensin subunits also act in other condensin complexes to control the compaction and resolution of all mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. By comparing chromosome structure in wild-type and DCC-defective embryos, we show that the DCC remodels hermaphrodite X chromosomes into a sex-specific spatial conformation distinct from autosomes. Dosage-compensated X chromosomes consist of self-interacting domains (~1 Mb) resembling mammalian topologically associating domains (TADs). TADs on X chromosomes have stronger boundaries and more regular spacing than on autosomes. Many TAD boundaries on X chromosomes coincide with the highest-affinity rex sites and become diminished or lost in DCC-defective mutants, thereby converting the topology of X to a conformation resembling autosomes. rex sites engage in DCC-dependent long-range interactions, with the most frequent interactions occurring between rex sites at DCC-dependent TAD boundaries. These results imply that the DCC reshapes the topology of X chromosomes by forming new TAD boundaries and reinforcing weak boundaries through interactions between its highest-affinity binding sites. As this model predicts, deletion of an endogenous rex site at a DCC-dependent TAD boundary using

  2. Condensin-Driven Remodeling of X-Chromosome Topology during Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Emily; Bian, Qian; McCord, Rachel Patton; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Wheeler, Bayly S.; Ralston, Edward J.; Uzawa, Satoru; Dekker, Job; Meyer, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of a genome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, yet little is known about the machinery and mechanisms that determine higher-order chromosome structure1,2. Here we perform genome-wide chromosome conformation capture analysis, FISH, and RNA-seq to obtain comprehensive 3D maps of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome and to dissect X-chromosome dosage compensation, which balances gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. The dosage compensation complex (DCC), a condensin complex, binds to both hermaphrodite X chromosomes via sequence-specific recruitment elements on X (rex sites) to reduce chromosome-wide gene expression by half3–7. Most DCC condensin subunits also act in other condensin complexes to control the compaction and resolution of all mitotic and meiotic chromosomes5,6. By comparing chromosome structure in wild-type and DCC-defective embryos, we show that the DCC remodels hermaphrodite X chromosomes into a sex-specific spatial conformation distinct from autosomes. Dosage-compensated X chromosomes consist of self-interacting domains (~1 Mb) resembling mammalian Topologically Associating Domains (TADs)8,9. TADs on X have stronger boundaries and more regular spacing than on autosomes. Many TAD boundaries on X coincide with the highest-affinity rex sites and become diminished or lost in DCC-defective mutants, thereby converting the topology of X to a conformation resembling autosomes. rex sites engage in DCC-dependent long-range interactions, with the most frequent interactions occurring between rex sites at DCC-dependent TAD boundaries. These results imply that the DCC reshapes the topology of X by forming new TAD boundaries and reinforcing weak boundaries through interactions between its highest-affinity binding sites. As this model predicts, deletion of an endogenous rex site at a DCC-dependent TAD boundary using CRISPR/Cas9 greatly diminished the boundary. Thus, the DCC imposes a distinct

  3. Differential replication dynamics for large and small Vibrio chromosomes affect gene dosage, expression and location

    PubMed Central

    Dryselius, Rikard; Izutsu, Kaori; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    Background Replication of bacterial chromosomes increases copy numbers of genes located near origins of replication relative to genes located near termini. Such differential gene dosage depends on replication rate, doubling time and chromosome size. Although little explored, differential gene dosage may influence both gene expression and location. For vibrios, a diverse family of fast growing gammaproteobacteria, gene dosage may be particularly important as they harbor two chromosomes of different size. Results Here we examined replication dynamics and gene dosage effects for the separate chromosomes of three Vibrio species. We also investigated locations for specific gene types within the genome. The results showed consistently larger gene dosage differences for the large chromosome which also initiated replication long before the small. Accordingly, large chromosome gene expression levels were generally higher and showed an influence from gene dosage. This was reflected by a higher abundance of growth essential and growth contributing genes of which many locate near the origin of replication. In contrast, small chromosome gene expression levels were low and appeared independent of gene dosage. Also, species specific genes are highly abundant and an over-representation of genes involved in transcription could explain its gene dosage independent expression. Conclusion Here we establish a link between replication dynamics and differential gene dosage on one hand and gene expression levels and the location of specific gene types on the other. For vibrios, this relationship appears connected to a polarisation of genetic content between its chromosomes, which may both contribute to and be enhanced by an improved adaptive capacity. PMID:19032792

  4. Insight into the evolution of the Solanaceae from the parental genomes of Petunia hybrida.

    PubMed

    Bombarely, Aureliano; Moser, Michel; Amrad, Avichai; Bao, Manzhu; Bapaume, Laure; Barry, Cornelius S; Bliek, Mattijs; Boersma, Maaike R; Borghi, Lorenzo; Bruggmann, Rémy; Bucher, Marcel; D'Agostino, Nunzio; Davies, Kevin; Druege, Uwe; Dudareva, Natalia; Egea-Cortines, Marcos; Delledonne, Massimo; Fernandez-Pozo, Noe; Franken, Philipp; Grandont, Laurie; Heslop-Harrison, J S; Hintzsche, Jennifer; Johns, Mitrick; Koes, Ronald; Lv, Xiaodan; Lyons, Eric; Malla, Diwa; Martinoia, Enrico; Mattson, Neil S; Morel, Patrice; Mueller, Lukas A; Muhlemann, Joëlle; Nouri, Eva; Passeri, Valentina; Pezzotti, Mario; Qi, Qinzhou; Reinhardt, Didier; Rich, Melanie; Richert-Pöggeler, Katja R; Robbins, Tim P; Schatz, Michael C; Schranz, M Eric; Schuurink, Robert C; Schwarzacher, Trude; Spelt, Kees; Tang, Haibao; Urbanus, Susan L; Vandenbussche, Michiel; Vijverberg, Kitty; Villarino, Gonzalo H; Warner, Ryan M; Weiss, Julia; Yue, Zhen; Zethof, Jan; Quattrocchio, Francesca; Sims, Thomas L; Kuhlemeier, Cris

    2016-05-27

    Petunia hybrida is a popular bedding plant that has a long history as a genetic model system. We report the whole-genome sequencing and assembly of inbred derivatives of its two wild parents, P. axillaris N and P. inflata S6. The assemblies include 91.3% and 90.2% coverage of their diploid genomes (1.4 Gb; 2n = 14) containing 32,928 and 36,697 protein-coding genes, respectively. The genomes reveal that the Petunia lineage has experienced at least two rounds of hexaploidization: the older gamma event, which is shared with most Eudicots, and a more recent Solanaceae event that is shared with tomato and other solanaceous species. Transcription factors involved in the shift from bee to moth pollination reside in particularly dynamic regions of the genome, which may have been key to the remarkable diversity of floral colour patterns and pollination systems. The high-quality genome sequences will enhance the value of Petunia as a model system for research on unique biological phenomena such as small RNAs, symbiosis, self-incompatibility and circadian rhythms.

  5. Convergent origination of a Drosophila-like dosage compensation mechanism in a reptile lineage

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Ray; Cortez, Diego; Lamanna, Francesco; Pradeepa, Madapura M.; Leushkin, Evgeny; Julien, Philippe; Liechti, Angélica; Halbert, Jean; Brüning, Thoomke; Mössinger, Katharina; Trefzer, Timo; Conrad, Christian; Kerver, Halie N.; Wade, Juli; Tschopp, Patrick; Kaessmann, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Sex chromosomes differentiated from different ancestral autosomes in various vertebrate lineages. Here, we trace the functional evolution of the XY Chromosomes of the green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis), on the basis of extensive high-throughput genome, transcriptome and histone modification sequencing data and revisit dosage compensation evolution in representative mammals and birds with substantial new expression data. Our analyses show that Anolis sex chromosomes represent an ancient XY system that originated at least ≈160 million years ago in the ancestor of Iguania lizards, shortly after the separation from the snake lineage. The age of this system approximately coincides with the ages of the avian and two mammalian sex chromosomes systems. To compensate for the almost complete Y Chromosome degeneration, X-linked genes have become twofold up-regulated, restoring ancestral expression levels. The highly efficient dosage compensation mechanism of Anolis represents the only vertebrate case identified so far to fully support Ohno's original dosage compensation hypothesis. Further analyses reveal that X up-regulation occurs only in males and is mediated by a male-specific chromatin machinery that leads to global hyperacetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 specifically on the X Chromosome. The green anole dosage compensation mechanism is highly reminiscent of that of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Altogether, our work unveils the convergent emergence of a Drosophila-like dosage compensation mechanism in an ancient reptilian sex chromosome system and highlights that the evolutionary pressures imposed by sex chromosome dosage reductions in different amniotes were resolved in fundamentally different ways. PMID:29133310

  6. Genomic prediction in bi-parental tropical maize populations in water-stressed and well-watered environments using low density and GBS SNPs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the most important applications of genomic selection in maize breeding is to predict and identify the best-untested individuals from bi-parental populations, when the training and validation sets are derived from the same cross. Nineteen tropical maize bi-parental populations evaluated in mul...

  7. A Sex Chromosome piRNA Promotes Robust Dosage Compensation and Sex Determination in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen; Seth, Meetu; Tu, Shikui; Shen, En-Zhi; Li, Qian; Shirayama, Masaki; Weng, Zhiping; Mello, Craig C

    2018-03-26

    In metazoans, Piwi-related Argonaute proteins engage piRNAs (Piwi-interacting small RNAs) to defend the genome against invasive nucleic acids, such as transposable elements. Yet many organisms-including worms and humans-express thousands of piRNAs that do not target transposons, suggesting that piRNA function extends beyond genome defense. Here, we show that the X chromosome-derived piRNA 21ux-1 downregulates XOL-1 (XO Lethal), a master regulator of X chromosome dosage compensation and sex determination in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mutations in 21ux-1 and several Piwi-pathway components sensitize hermaphrodites to dosage compensation and sex determination defects. We show that the piRNA pathway also targets xol-1 in C. briggsae, a nematode species related to C. elegans. Our findings reveal physiologically important piRNA-mRNA interactions, raising the possibility that piRNAs function broadly to ensure robust gene expression and germline development. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Copy number variation profile in the placental and parental genomes of recurrent pregnancy loss families

    PubMed Central

    Kasak, Laura; Rull, Kristiina; Sõber, Siim; Laan, Maris

    2017-01-01

    We have previously shown an extensive load of somatic copy number variations (CNVs) in the human placental genome with the highest fraction detected in normal term pregnancies. Hereby, we hypothesized that insufficient promotion of CNVs may impair placental development and lead to recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). RPL affects ~3% of couples aiming at childbirth and idiopathic RPL represents ~50% of cases. We analysed placental and parental CNV profiles of idiopathic RPL trios (mother-father-placenta) and duos (mother-placenta). Consistent with the hypothesis, the placental genomes of RPL cases exhibited 2-fold less CNVs compared to uncomplicated 1st trimester pregnancies (P = 0.02). This difference mainly arose from lower number of duplications. Overall, 1st trimester control placentas shared only 5.3% of identified CNV regions with RPL cases, whereas the respective fraction with term placentas was 35.1% (P = 1.1 × 10−9). Disruption of the genes NUP98 (embryonic stem cell development) and MTRR (folate metabolism) was detected exclusively in RPL placentas, potentially indicative to novel loci implicated in RPL. Interestingly, genes with higher overall expression were prone to deletions (>3-fold higher median expression compared to genes unaffected by CNVs, P = 6.69 × 10−20). Additionally, large pericentromeric and subtelomeric CNVs in parental genomes emerged as a risk factor for RPL. PMID:28345611

  9. Convergent origination of a Drosophila-like dosage compensation mechanism in a reptile lineage.

    PubMed

    Marin, Ray; Cortez, Diego; Lamanna, Francesco; Pradeepa, Madapura M; Leushkin, Evgeny; Julien, Philippe; Liechti, Angélica; Halbert, Jean; Brüning, Thoomke; Mössinger, Katharina; Trefzer, Timo; Conrad, Christian; Kerver, Halie N; Wade, Juli; Tschopp, Patrick; Kaessmann, Henrik

    2017-12-01

    Sex chromosomes differentiated from different ancestral autosomes in various vertebrate lineages. Here, we trace the functional evolution of the XY Chromosomes of the green anole lizard ( Anolis carolinensis ), on the basis of extensive high-throughput genome, transcriptome and histone modification sequencing data and revisit dosage compensation evolution in representative mammals and birds with substantial new expression data. Our analyses show that Anolis sex chromosomes represent an ancient XY system that originated at least ≈160 million years ago in the ancestor of Iguania lizards, shortly after the separation from the snake lineage. The age of this system approximately coincides with the ages of the avian and two mammalian sex chromosomes systems. To compensate for the almost complete Y Chromosome degeneration, X-linked genes have become twofold up-regulated, restoring ancestral expression levels. The highly efficient dosage compensation mechanism of Anolis represents the only vertebrate case identified so far to fully support Ohno's original dosage compensation hypothesis. Further analyses reveal that X up-regulation occurs only in males and is mediated by a male-specific chromatin machinery that leads to global hyperacetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 specifically on the X Chromosome. The green anole dosage compensation mechanism is highly reminiscent of that of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster Altogether, our work unveils the convergent emergence of a Drosophila -like dosage compensation mechanism in an ancient reptilian sex chromosome system and highlights that the evolutionary pressures imposed by sex chromosome dosage reductions in different amniotes were resolved in fundamentally different ways. © 2017 Marin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. X-Chromosome Dosage and the Response to Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Turtzo, L. Christine; Siegel, Chad; McCullough, Louise D.

    2011-01-01

    Gonadal hormones contribute to ischemic neuroprotection, but cannot fully explain the observed sexual dimorphism in stroke outcomes seen during life stages with low sex steroid hormones. Sex chromosomal complement (XX in females; XY in males) may also contribute to ischemic sexual dimorphism. A transient middle cerebral artery occlusion model was used to investigate the role of X chromosome dosage in female XX and XO littermates of two mouse strains (Paf and EdaTa). Cohorts of XX and XO gonadally intact, ovariectomized, and ovariectomized females supplemented with estrogen were examined. Infarct sizes were equivalent between ovariectomized XX and XO mice, between intact XX and XO mice, and between estrogen-supplemented ovariectomized XX and XO mice. This is the first study to investigate the role of sex chromosome dosage in the response to cerebral ischemia. Neither the number of X chromosomes, nor the parent of origin of the remaining X chromosome, had a significant effect on the degree of cerebral infarction after experimental stroke in adult female mice. Estrogen was protective against cerebral ischemia in both XX and XO mice. PMID:21917808

  11. X chromosome dosage and the response to cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Turtzo, L Christine; Siegel, Chad; McCullough, Louise D

    2011-09-14

    Gonadal hormones contribute to ischemic neuroprotection, but cannot fully explain the observed sexual dimorphism in stroke outcomes seen during life stages with low sex steroid hormones. Sex chromosomal complement (XX in females; XY in males) may also contribute to ischemic sexual dimorphism. A transient middle cerebral artery occlusion model was used to investigate the role of X chromosome dosage in female XX and XO littermates of two mouse strains (Paf and Eda(Ta)). Cohorts of XX and XO gonadally intact, ovariectomized, and ovariectomized females supplemented with estrogen were examined. Infarct sizes were equivalent between ovariectomized XX and XO mice, between intact XX and XO mice, and between estrogen-supplemented ovariectomized XX and XO mice. This is the first study to investigate the role of sex chromosome dosage in the response to cerebral ischemia. Neither the number of X chromosomes nor the parent of origin of the remaining X chromosome had a significant effect on the degree of cerebral infarction after experimental stroke in adult female mice. Estrogen was protective against cerebral ischemia in both XX and XO mice.

  12. Efficient Breeding by Genomic Mating.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Deniz; Sánchez, Julio I

    2016-01-01

    Selection in breeding programs can be done by using phenotypes (phenotypic selection), pedigree relationship (breeding value selection) or molecular markers (marker assisted selection or genomic selection). All these methods are based on truncation selection, focusing on the best performance of parents before mating. In this article we proposed an approach to breeding, named genomic mating, which focuses on mating instead of truncation selection. Genomic mating uses information in a similar fashion to genomic selection but includes information on complementation of parents to be mated. Following the efficiency frontier surface, genomic mating uses concepts of estimated breeding values, risk (usefulness) and coefficient of ancestry to optimize mating between parents. We used a genetic algorithm to find solutions to this optimization problem and the results from our simulations comparing genomic selection, phenotypic selection and the mating approach indicate that current approach for breeding complex traits is more favorable than phenotypic and genomic selection. Genomic mating is similar to genomic selection in terms of estimating marker effects, but in genomic mating the genetic information and the estimated marker effects are used to decide which genotypes should be crossed to obtain the next breeding population.

  13. Microbicide dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Rohan, L C; Devlin, B; Yang, H

    2014-01-01

    Microbicides are topically applied, user controlled dosage forms that are being developed to prevent the transmission of HIV during coitus. Early candidates focused on coitally dependent dosage forms such as gels and creams. More recent development has focused on broadening the coitally dependent options through the introduction of films and fast dissolving tablets. Additionally, it has become important to have longer acting products to minimize the burden of user compliance and thus vaginal rings have been developed providing sustained delivery of antiretroviral drugs. This chapter discusses the history of microbicides along with a detailed description of coitally dependent products, gels, films, tablets diaphragms, as well as coitally independent dosage forms such as vaginal rings and the introduction of a new technology, electrospun fibers.

  14. DECIDE: a Decision Support Tool to Facilitate Parents' Choices Regarding Genome-Wide Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Birch, Patricia; Adam, S; Bansback, N; Coe, R R; Hicklin, J; Lehman, A; Li, K C; Friedman, J M

    2016-12-01

    We describe the rationale, development, and usability testing for an integrated e-learning tool and decision aid for parents facing decisions about genome-wide sequencing (GWS) for their children with a suspected genetic condition. The online tool, DECIDE, is designed to provide decision-support and to promote high quality decisions about undergoing GWS with or without return of optional incidental finding results. DECIDE works by integrating educational material with decision aids. Users may tailor their learning by controlling both the amount of information and its format - text and diagrams and/or short videos. The decision aid guides users to weigh the importance of various relevant factors in their own lives and circumstances. After considering the pros and cons of GWS and return of incidental findings, DECIDE summarizes the user's responses and apparent preferred choices. In a usability study of 16 parents who had already chosen GWS after conventional genetic counselling, all participants found DECIDE to be helpful. Many would have been satisfied to use it alone to guide their GWS decisions, but most would prefer to have the option of consulting a health care professional as well to aid their decision. Further testing is necessary to establish the effectiveness of using DECIDE as an adjunct to or instead of conventional pre-test genetic counselling for clinical genome-wide sequencing.

  15. Creation and genomic analysis of irradiation hybrids in Populus

    Treesearch

    Matthew S. Zinkgraf; K. Haiby; M.C. Lieberman; L. Comai; I.M. Henry; Andrew Groover

    2016-01-01

    Establishing efficient functional genomic systems for creating and characterizing genetic variation in forest trees is challenging. Here we describe protocols for creating novel gene-dosage variation in Populus through gamma-irradiation of pollen, followed by genomic analysis to identify chromosomal regions that have been deleted or inserted in...

  16. Renal cell carcinoma primary cultures maintain genomic and phenotypic profile of parental tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Cifola, Ingrid; Bianchi, Cristina; Mangano, Eleonora; Bombelli, Silvia; Frascati, Fabio; Fasoli, Ester; Ferrero, Stefano; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A; Magni, Fulvio; Signorini, Stefano; Battaglia, Cristina; Perego, Roberto A

    2011-06-13

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH), which may have potential diagnostic and prognostic applications. Here, we explored whether ccRCC primary cultures, established from surgical tumor specimens, maintain the DNA profile of parental tumor tissues allowing a more confident CNAs and LOH discrimination with respect to the original tissues. We established a collection of 9 phenotypically well-characterized ccRCC primary cell cultures. Using the Affymetrix SNP array technology, we performed the genome-wide copy number (CN) profiling of both cultures and corresponding tumor tissues. Global concordance for each culture/tissue pair was assayed evaluating the correlations between whole-genome CN profiles and SNP allelic calls. CN analysis was performed using the two CNAG v3.0 and Partek software, and comparing results returned by two different algorithms (Hidden Markov Model and Genomic Segmentation). A very good overlap between the CNAs of each culture and corresponding tissue was observed. The finding, reinforced by high whole-genome CN correlations and SNP call concordances, provided evidence that each culture was derived from its corresponding tissue and maintained the genomic alterations of parental tumor. In addition, primary culture DNA profile remained stable for at least 3 weeks, till to third passage. These cultures showed a greater cell homogeneity and enrichment in tumor component than original tissues, thus enabling a better discrimination of CNAs and LOH. Especially for hemizygous deletions, primary cultures presented more evident CN losses, typically accompanied by LOH; differently, in original tissues the intensity of these deletions was weaken by normal cell contamination and LOH calls were missed. ccRCC primary cultures are a reliable in vitro model, well-reproducing original tumor genetics and phenotype, potentially useful for future functional approaches

  17. Controlled release liquid dosage formulation

    DOEpatents

    Benton, Ben F.; Gardner, David L.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid dual coated dosage formulation sustained release pharmaceutic having substantial shelf life prior to ingestion is disclosed. A dual coating is applied over controlled release cores to form dosage forms and the coatings comprise fats melting at less than approximately 101.degree. F. overcoated with cellulose acetate phthalate or zein. The dual coated dosage forms are dispersed in a sugar based acidic liquid carrier such as high fructose corn syrup and display a shelf life of up to approximately at least 45 days while still retaining their release profiles following ingestion. Cellulose acetate phthalate coated dosage form cores can in addition be dispersed in aqueous liquids of pH <5.

  18. The layout of a bacterial genome.

    PubMed

    Képès, François; Jester, Brian C; Lepage, Thibaut; Rafiei, Nafiseh; Rosu, Bianca; Junier, Ivan

    2012-07-16

    Recently the mismatch between our newly acquired capacity to synthetize DNA at genome scale, and our low capacity to design ab initio a functional genome has become conspicuous. This essay gathers a variety of constraints that globally shape natural genomes, with a focus on eubacteria. These constraints originate from chromosome replication (leading/lagging strand asymmetry; gene dosage gradient from origin to terminus; collisions with the transcription complexes), from biased codon usage, from noise control in gene expression, and from genome layout for co-functional genes. On the basis of this analysis, lessons are drawn for full genome design. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-06-25

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  20. Genome-wide association analyses of child genotype effects and parent-of-origin effects in specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Nudel, R; Simpson, N H; Baird, G; O’Hare, A; Conti-Ramsden, G; Bolton, P F; Hennessy, E R; Ring, S M; Davey Smith, G; Francks, C; Paracchini, S; Monaco, A P; Fisher, S E; Newbury, D F

    2014-01-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects linguistic abilities when development is otherwise normal. We report the results of a genome-wide association study of SLI which included parent-of-origin effects and child genotype effects and used 278 families of language-impaired children. The child genotype effects analysis did not identify significant associations. We found genome-wide significant paternal parent-of-origin effects on chromosome 14q12 (P = 3.74 × 10−8) and suggestive maternal parent-of-origin effects on chromosome 5p13 (P = 1.16 × 10−7). A subsequent targeted association of six single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 5 in 313 language-impaired individuals and their mothers from the ALSPAC cohort replicated the maternal effects, albeit in the opposite direction (P = 0.001); as fathers’ genotypes were not available in the ALSPAC study, the replication analysis did not include paternal parent-of-origin effects. The paternally-associated SNP on chromosome 14 yields a non-synonymous coding change within the NOP9 gene. This gene encodes an RNA-binding protein that has been reported to be significantly dysregulated in individuals with schizophrenia. The region of maternal association on chromosome 5 falls between the PTGER4 and DAB2 genes, in a region previously implicated in autism and ADHD. The top SNP in this association locus is a potential expression QTL of ARHGEF19 (also called WGEF) on chromosome 1. Members of this protein family have been implicated in intellectual disability. In summary, this study implicates parent-of-origin effects in language impairment, and adds an interesting new dimension to the emerging picture of shared genetic etiology across various neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24571439

  1. Genome-wide association analyses of child genotype effects and parent-of-origin effects in specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Nudel, R; Simpson, N H; Baird, G; O'Hare, A; Conti-Ramsden, G; Bolton, P F; Hennessy, E R; Ring, S M; Davey Smith, G; Francks, C; Paracchini, S; Monaco, A P; Fisher, S E; Newbury, D F

    2014-04-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects linguistic abilities when development is otherwise normal. We report the results of a genome-wide association study of SLI which included parent-of-origin effects and child genotype effects and used 278 families of language-impaired children. The child genotype effects analysis did not identify significant associations. We found genome-wide significant paternal parent-of-origin effects on chromosome 14q12 (P = 3.74 × 10(-8)) and suggestive maternal parent-of-origin effects on chromosome 5p13 (P = 1.16 × 10(-7)). A subsequent targeted association of six single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 5 in 313 language-impaired individuals and their mothers from the ALSPAC cohort replicated the maternal effects, albeit in the opposite direction (P = 0.001); as fathers' genotypes were not available in the ALSPAC study, the replication analysis did not include paternal parent-of-origin effects. The paternally-associated SNP on chromosome 14 yields a non-synonymous coding change within the NOP9 gene. This gene encodes an RNA-binding protein that has been reported to be significantly dysregulated in individuals with schizophrenia. The region of maternal association on chromosome 5 falls between the PTGER4 and DAB2 genes, in a region previously implicated in autism and ADHD. The top SNP in this association locus is a potential expression QTL of ARHGEF19 (also called WGEF) on chromosome 1. Members of this protein family have been implicated in intellectual disability. In summary, this study implicates parent-of-origin effects in language impairment, and adds an interesting new dimension to the emerging picture of shared genetic etiology across various neurodevelopmental disorders. © 2014 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior published by International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Parent-Of-Origin Effects in Autism Identified through Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis of 16,000 SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Fradin, Delphine; Cheslack-Postava, Keely; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Newschaffer, Craig; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Arking, Dan E.; Feinberg, Andrew; Fallin, M. Daniele

    2010-01-01

    Background Autism is a common heritable neurodevelopmental disorder with complex etiology. Several genome-wide linkage and association scans have been carried out to identify regions harboring genes related to autism or autism spectrum disorders, with mixed results. Given the overlap in autism features with genetic abnormalities known to be associated with imprinting, one possible reason for lack of consistency would be the influence of parent-of-origin effects that may mask the ability to detect linkage and association. Methods and Findings We have performed a genome-wide linkage scan that accounts for potential parent-of-origin effects using 16,311 SNPs among families from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) autism repository. We report parametric (GH, Genehunter) and allele-sharing linkage (Aspex) results using a broad spectrum disorder case definition. Paternal-origin genome-wide statistically significant linkage was observed on chromosomes 4 (LODGH = 3.79, empirical p<0.005 and LODAspex = 2.96, p = 0.008), 15 (LODGH = 3.09, empirical p<0.005 and LODAspex = 3.62, empirical p = 0.003) and 20 (LODGH = 3.36, empirical p<0.005 and LODAspex = 3.38, empirical p = 0.006). Conclusions These regions may harbor imprinted sites associated with the development of autism and offer fruitful domains for molecular investigation into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in autism. PMID:20824079

  3. Dosage changes of a segment at 17p13.1 lead to intellectual disability and microcephaly as a result of complex genetic interaction of multiple genes.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Claudia M B; Vasanth, Shivakumar; Shinawi, Marwan; Russell, Chad; Ramocki, Melissa B; Brown, Chester W; Graakjaer, Jesper; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M; Krepischi, Ana C V; Patel, Gayle S; Immken, LaDonna; Aleck, Kyrieckos; Lim, Cynthia; Cheung, Sau Wai; Rosenberg, Carla; Katsanis, Nicholas; Lupski, James R

    2014-11-06

    The 17p13.1 microdeletion syndrome is a recently described genomic disorder with a core clinical phenotype of intellectual disability, poor to absent speech, dysmorphic features, and a constellation of more variable clinical features, most prominently microcephaly. We identified five subjects with copy-number variants (CNVs) on 17p13.1 for whom we performed detailed clinical and molecular studies. Breakpoint mapping and retrospective analysis of published cases refined the smallest region of overlap (SRO) for microcephaly to a genomic interval containing nine genes. Dissection of this phenotype in zebrafish embryos revealed a complex genetic architecture: dosage perturbation of four genes (ASGR1, ACADVL, DVL2, and GABARAP) impeded neurodevelopment and decreased dosage of the same loci caused a reduced mitotic index in vitro. Moreover, epistatic analyses in vivo showed that dosage perturbations of discrete gene pairings induce microcephaly. Taken together, these studies support a model in which concomitant dosage perturbation of multiple genes within the CNV drive the microcephaly and possibly other neurodevelopmental phenotypes associated with rearrangements in the 17p13.1 SRO. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Linking implementation of evidence-based parenting programs to outcomes in early intervention.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Janice E; Shapiro, Cheri J; Hardin, James W

    2017-11-01

    In the field of early intervention, only a few studies of parenting interventions include both participant and facilitator behaviors. Fidelity and supervision (facilitator characteristics) and dosage and satisfaction (participant characteristics) were tested on the outcome of improved parenting style in a sample of 36 parents of young children with disabilities. Results indicated that the facilitator behavior of fidelity was significantly and negatively related to the program outcome of parenting style; no effect was found for the facilitator behavior of supervision. For the participant behaviors, both dosage and satisfaction had non-significant relationships with the program outcome of parenting style at follow-up. The surprising negative relationship between content fidelity and parenting style was discussed.Two possible explanations were: (1) process or quality of intervention delivery is more influential than content fidelity, which considers only adherence to the intervention manual, and (2) the developmental stage of early intervention families calls for more focus on relationships between facilitators and parents and less on content of the specific intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Parent-of-origin specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J. Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coveillo, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D’adamo, Adamo Pio; Smith, George Davey; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco EJ; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul DP; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth JF; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild IA; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F

    2014-01-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality1. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation2,3, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P<5×10−8) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1/WDR25, MKRN3/MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signaling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition. PMID:25231870

  6. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Perry, John Rb; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E; Sulem, Patrick; Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coveillo, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Smith, George Davey; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco Ej; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul Dp; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce Hr; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth Jf; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K

    2014-10-02

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition.

  7. A Systematic Review of Fidelity of Implementation in Parent-Mediated Early Communication Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca G.

    2015-01-01

    This article examined the reporting of four elements of fidelity of implementation (FOI) in parent-mediated early communication treatment studies. Thirty-five studies were reviewed to extract information regarding reporting of dosage, adherence, quality, and participant responsiveness for both practitioners and parents involved in parent-delivered…

  8. Genome-scale transcriptional study of hybrid effects and regulatory divergence in an F1 hybrid Ruellia (Wild Petunias: Acanthaceae) and its parents.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yongbin; Tripp, Erin A

    2017-01-17

    New combinations of divergent genomes can give rise to novel genetic functions in resulting hybrid progeny. Such functions may yield opportunities for ecological divergence, contributing ultimately to reproductive isolation and evolutionary longevity of nascent hybrid lineages. In plants, the degree to which transgressive genotypes contribute to floral novelty remains a question of key interest. Here, we generated an F 1 hybrid plant between the red-flowered Ruellia elegans and yellow flowered R. speciosa. RNA-seq technology was used to explore differential gene expression between the hybrid and its two parents, with emphasis on genetic elements involved in the production of floral anthocyanin pigments. The hybrid was purple flowered and produced novel floral delphinidin pigments not manufactured by either parent. We found that nearly a fifth of all 86,475 unigenes expressed were unique to the hybrid. The majority of hybrid unigenes (80.97%) showed a pattern of complete dominance to one parent or the other although this ratio was uneven, suggesting asymmetrical influence of parental genomes on the progeny transcriptome. However, 8.87% of all transcripts within the hybrid were expressed at significantly higher or lower mean levels than observed for either parent. A total of 28 unigenes coding putatively for eight core enzymes in the anthocyanin pathway were recovered, along with three candidate MYBs involved in anthocyanin regulation. Our results suggest that models of gene evolution that explain phenotypic novelty and hybrid establishment in plants may need to include transgressive effects. Additionally, our results lend insight into the potential for floral novelty that derives from unions of divergent genomes. These findings serve as a starting point to further investigate molecular mechanisms involved in flower color transitions in Ruellia.

  9. Phenytoin dosage in ambulant epileptic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Terrence, C; Alberts, M

    1978-01-01

    Ambulant patients with recently diagnosed generalised or psychomotor seizure disorders or both were randomly assigned to two dosage regimens of phenytoin. Drug compliance was evaluated with subsequent blood phenytoin levels four to eight weeks after initial enrollment into the study. Although the two groups had similar mg-kg daily dosages of phenytoin, the mean blood levels were statistically different between the two groups, favoring the simplified dosage regimen. Once or twice a day dosage regimens of phenytoin had a beneficial effect on drug compliance when compared to more frequent regimens as measured by phenytoin blood levels. PMID:660211

  10. Coaching with Parents in Early Intervention: An Interdisciplinary Research Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Peggy; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to synthesize intervention studies using coaching with parents in early intervention with a focus on (a) definitions and descriptions of coaching with parents; (b) characteristics of families and coaches; (c) parameters such as settings, contexts, dosage, and professional development related to coaching; and (d)…

  11. Comparative genomic and proteomic analyses of Clostridium acetobutylicum Rh8 and its parent strain DSM 1731 revealed new understandings on butanol tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Guanhui; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Dong, Hongjun

    Highlights: • Genomes of a butanol tolerant strain and its parent strain were deciphered. • Comparative genomic and proteomic was applied to understand butanol tolerance. • None differentially expressed proteins have mutations in its corresponding genes. • Mutations in ribosome might be responsible for the global difference of proteomics. - Abstract: Clostridium acetobutylicum strain Rh8 is a butanol-tolerant mutant which can tolerate up to 19 g/L butanol, 46% higher than that of its parent strain DSM 1731. We previously performed comparative cytoplasm- and membrane-proteomic analyses to understand the mechanism underlying the improved butanol tolerance of strain Rh8. In this work,more » we further extended this comparison to the genomic level. Compared with the genome of the parent strain DSM 1731, two insertion sites, four deletion sites, and 67 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) are distributed throughout the genome of strain Rh8. Among the 67 SNVs, 16 SNVs are located in the predicted promoters and intergenic regions; while 29 SNVs are located in the coding sequence, affecting a total of 21 proteins involved in transport, cell structure, DNA replication, and protein translation. The remaining 22 SNVs are located in the ribosomal genes, affecting a total of 12 rRNA genes in different operons. Analysis of previous comparative proteomic data indicated that none of the differentially expressed proteins have mutations in its corresponding genes. Rchange Algorithms analysis indicated that the mutations occurred in the ribosomal genes might change the ribosome RNA thermodynamic characteristics, thus affect the translation strength of these proteins. Take together, the improved butanol tolerance of C. acetobutylicum strain Rh8 might be acquired through regulating the translational process to achieve different expression strength of genes involved in butanol tolerance.« less

  12. Purifying Selection Maintains Dosage-Sensitive Genes during Degeneration of the Threespine Stickleback Y Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael A.; Kitano, Jun; Peichel, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are subject to unique evolutionary forces that cause suppression of recombination, leading to sequence degeneration and the formation of heteromorphic chromosome pairs (i.e., XY or ZW). Although progress has been made in characterizing the outcomes of these evolutionary processes on vertebrate sex chromosomes, it is still unclear how recombination suppression and sequence divergence typically occur and how gene dosage imbalances are resolved in the heterogametic sex. The threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) is a powerful model system to explore vertebrate sex chromosome evolution, as it possesses an XY sex chromosome pair at relatively early stages of differentiation. Using a combination of whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing, we characterized sequence evolution and gene expression across the sex chromosomes. We uncovered two distinct evolutionary strata that correspond with known structural rearrangements on the Y chromosome. In the oldest stratum, only a handful of genes remain, and these genes are under strong purifying selection. By comparing sex-linked gene expression with expression of autosomal orthologs in an outgroup, we show that dosage compensation has not evolved in threespine sticklebacks through upregulation of the X chromosome in males. Instead, in the oldest stratum, the genes that still possess a Y chromosome allele are enriched for genes predicted to be dosage sensitive in mammals and yeast. Our results suggest that dosage imbalances may have been avoided at haploinsufficient genes by retaining function of the Y chromosome allele through strong purifying selection. PMID:25818858

  13. Enhancing genomic laboratory reports from the patients' view: A qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Heather; Williams, Janet L; Fan, Audrey L; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Green, Jamie; Feldman, Lynn; Bonhag, Michele; Zallen, Doris T; Segal, Michael M; Williams, Marc S

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a family genomic laboratory report designed to communicate genome sequencing results to parents of children who were participating in a whole genome sequencing clinical research study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents of children who participated in a whole genome sequencing clinical research study to address the elements, language and format of a sample family-directed genome laboratory report. The qualitative interviews were followed by two focus groups aimed at evaluating example presentations of information about prognosis and next steps related to the whole genome sequencing result. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data: (i) Parents described a continual search for valid information and resources regarding their child's condition, a need that prior reports did not meet for parents; (ii) Parents believed that the Family Report would help facilitate communication with physicians and family members; and (iii) Parents identified specific items they appreciated in a genomics Family Report: simplicity of language, logical flow, visual appeal, information on what to expect in the future and recommended next steps. Parents affirmed their desire for a family genomic results report designed for their use and reference. They articulated the need for clear, easy to understand language that provided information with temporal detail and specific recommendations regarding relevant findings consistent with that available to clinicians. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Enhancing genomic laboratory reports from the patients' view: A qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stuckey, Heather; Fan, Audrey L.; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Green, Jamie; Feldman, Lynn; Bonhag, Michele; Zallen, Doris T.; Segal, Michael M.; Williams, Marc S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a family genomic laboratory report designed to communicate genome sequencing results to parents of children who were participating in a whole genome sequencing clinical research study. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with parents of children who participated in a whole genome sequencing clinical research study to address the elements, language and format of a sample family‐directed genome laboratory report. The qualitative interviews were followed by two focus groups aimed at evaluating example presentations of information about prognosis and next steps related to the whole genome sequencing result. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data: (i) Parents described a continual search for valid information and resources regarding their child's condition, a need that prior reports did not meet for parents; (ii) Parents believed that the Family Report would help facilitate communication with physicians and family members; and (iii) Parents identified specific items they appreciated in a genomics Family Report: simplicity of language, logical flow, visual appeal, information on what to expect in the future and recommended next steps. Parents affirmed their desire for a family genomic results report designed for their use and reference. They articulated the need for clear, easy to understand language that provided information with temporal detail and specific recommendations regarding relevant findings consistent with that available to clinicians. PMID:26086630

  15. GeneCount: genome-wide calculation of absolute tumor DNA copy numbers from array comparative genomic hybridization data

    PubMed Central

    Lyng, Heidi; Lando, Malin; Brøvig, Runar S; Svendsrud, Debbie H; Johansen, Morten; Galteland, Eivind; Brustugun, Odd T; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Myklebost, Ola; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Hovig, Eivind; Stokke, Trond

    2008-01-01

    Absolute tumor DNA copy numbers can currently be achieved only on a single gene basis by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We present GeneCount, a method for genome-wide calculation of absolute copy numbers from clinical array comparative genomic hybridization data. The tumor cell fraction is reliably estimated in the model. Data consistent with FISH results are achieved. We demonstrate significant improvements over existing methods for exploring gene dosages and intratumor copy number heterogeneity in cancers. PMID:18500990

  16. GENOMIC IMPRINTING, DISRUPTED PLACENTAL EXPRESSION, AND SPECIATION

    PubMed Central

    Brekke, Thomas D.; Henry, Lindy A.; Good, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of regulatory incompatibilities to the early stages of speciation remains unclear. Hybrid mammals often show extreme parent-of-origin growth effects that are thought to be a consequence of disrupted genetic imprinting (parent-specific epigenetic gene silencing) during early development. Here we test the long-standing hypothesis that abnormal hybrid growth reflects disrupted gene expression due to loss of imprinting (LOI) in hybrid placentas, resulting in dosage imbalances between paternal growth factors and maternal growth repressors. We analyzed placental gene expression in reciprocal dwarf hamster hybrids that show extreme parent-of-origin growth effects relative to their parental species. In massively enlarged hybrid placentas, we observed both extensive transgressive expression of growth-related genes and bi-allelic expression of many genes that were paternally silenced in normal sized hybrids. However, the apparent widespread disruption of paternal silencing was coupled with reduced gene expression levels overall. These patterns are contrary to the predictions of the LOI model and indicate that hybrid misexpression of dosage sensitive genes is caused by other regulatory mechanisms in this system. Collectively, our results support a central role for disrupted gene expression and imprinting in the evolution of mammalian hybrid inviability, but call into question the generality of the widely invoked LOI model. PMID:27714796

  17. The detection of large deletions or duplications in genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Armour, J A L; Barton, D E; Cockburn, D J; Taylor, G R

    2002-11-01

    While methods for the detection of point mutations and small insertions or deletions in genomic DNA are well established, the detection of larger (>100 bp) genomic duplications or deletions can be more difficult. Most mutation scanning methods use PCR as a first step, but the subsequent analyses are usually qualitative rather than quantitative. Gene dosage methods based on PCR need to be quantitative (i.e., they should report molar quantities of starting material) or semi-quantitative (i.e., they should report gene dosage relative to an internal standard). Without some sort of quantitation, heterozygous deletions and duplications may be overlooked and therefore be under-ascertained. Gene dosage methods provide the additional benefit of reporting allele drop-out in the PCR. This could impact on SNP surveys, where large-scale genotyping may miss null alleles. Here we review recent developments in techniques for the detection of this type of mutation and compare their relative strengths and weaknesses. We emphasize that comprehensive mutation analysis should include scanning for large insertions and deletions and duplications. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Complete sequence of the first chimera genome constructed by cloning the whole genome of Synechocystis strain PCC6803 into the Bacillus subtilis 168 genome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoru; Shiwa, Yuh; Itaya, Mitsuhiro; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2012-12-01

    Genome synthesis of existing or designed genomes is made feasible by the first successful cloning of a cyanobacterium, Synechocystis PCC6803, in Gram-positive, endospore-forming Bacillus subtilis. Whole-genome sequence analysis of the isolate and parental B. subtilis strains provides clues for identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 2 complete bacterial genomes in one cell.

  19. Genomic Imprinting in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Denise P.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting affects a subset of genes in mammals and results in a monoallelic, parental-specific expression pattern. Most of these genes are located in clusters that are regulated through the use of insulators or long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). To distinguish the parental alleles, imprinted genes are epigenetically marked in gametes at imprinting control elements through the use of DNA methylation at the very least. Imprinted gene expression is subsequently conferred through lncRNAs, histone modifications, insulators, and higher-order chromatin structure. Such imprints are maintained after fertilization through these mechanisms despite extensive reprogramming of the mammalian genome. Genomic imprinting is an excellent model for understanding mammalian epigenetic regulation. PMID:24492710

  20. A benefit/risk approach towards selecting appropriate pharmaceutical dosage forms - an application for paediatric dosage form selection.

    PubMed

    Sam, Tom; Ernest, Terry B; Walsh, Jennifer; Williams, Julie L

    2012-10-05

    The design and selection of new pharmaceutical dosage forms involves the careful consideration and balancing of a quality target product profile against technical challenges and development feasibility. Paediatric dosage forms present particular complexity due to the diverse patient population, patient compliance challenges and safety considerations of this vulnerable population. This paper presents a structured framework for assessing the comparative benefits and risks of different pharmaceutical design options against pre-determined criteria relating to (1) efficacy, (2) safety and (3) patient access. This benefit/risk framework has then been applied to three hypothetical, but realistic, scenarios for paediatric dosage forms in order to explore its utility in guiding dosage form design and formulation selection. The approach allows a rigorous, systematic and qualitative assessment of the merits and disadvantages of each dosage form option and helps identify mitigating strategies to modify risk. The application of a weighting and scoring system to the criteria depending on the specific case could further refine the analysis and aid decision-making. In this paper, one case study is scored for illustrative purposes. However, it is acknowledged that in real development scenarios, the generation of actual data considering the very specific situation for the patient/product/developer would come into play to drive decisions on the most appropriate dosage form strategy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Physicochemical interactions in solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Desai, Divyakant; Badawy, Sherif

    2012-10-01

    Complete characterization and mechanistic understanding of physicochemical interactions in solid dosage forms are not only important for consistent manufacturability, stability, and bioavailability of the drug product, but are also expected under the quality-by-design paradigm of drug development. Lack of this understanding can impact successful and timely development, scale-up, and commercial manufacture of dosage forms. This article highlights the stability and bioavailability implications of physicochemical interactions in dosage forms citing a couple of examples where such interactions necessitated the recall of commercial drug products.

  2. Genome-wide haploinsufficiency screen reveals a novel role for γ-TuSC in spindle organization and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Choy, John S.; O'Toole, Eileen; Schuster, Breanna M.; Crisp, Matthew J.; Karpova, Tatiana S.; McNally, James G.; Winey, Mark; Gardner, Melissa K.; Basrai, Munira A.

    2013-01-01

    How subunit dosage contributes to the assembly and function of multimeric complexes is an important question with implications in understanding biochemical, evolutionary, and disease mechanisms. Toward identifying pathways that are susceptible to decreased gene dosage, we performed a genome-wide screen for haploinsufficient (HI) genes that guard against genome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This led to the identification of all three genes (SPC97, SPC98, and TUB4) encoding the evolutionarily conserved γ-tubulin small complex (γ-TuSC), which nucleates microtubule assembly. We found that hemizygous γ-TuSC mutants exhibit higher rates of chromosome loss and increases in anaphase spindle length and elongation velocities. Fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, electron tomography, and model convolution simulation of spc98/+ mutants revealed improper regulation of interpolar (iMT) and kinetochore (kMT) microtubules in anaphase. The underlying cause is likely due to reduced levels of Tub4, as overexpression of TUB4 suppressed the spindle and chromosome segregation defects in spc98/+ mutants. We propose that γ-TuSC is crucial for balanced assembly between iMTs and kMTs for spindle organization and accurate chromosome segregation. Taken together, the results show how gene dosage studies provide critical insights into the assembly and function of multisubunit complexes that may not be revealed by using traditional studies with haploid gene deletion or conditional alleles. PMID:23825022

  3. Genome-wide haploinsufficiency screen reveals a novel role for γ-TuSC in spindle organization and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Choy, John S; O'Toole, Eileen; Schuster, Breanna M; Crisp, Matthew J; Karpova, Tatiana S; McNally, James G; Winey, Mark; Gardner, Melissa K; Basrai, Munira A

    2013-09-01

    How subunit dosage contributes to the assembly and function of multimeric complexes is an important question with implications in understanding biochemical, evolutionary, and disease mechanisms. Toward identifying pathways that are susceptible to decreased gene dosage, we performed a genome-wide screen for haploinsufficient (HI) genes that guard against genome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This led to the identification of all three genes (SPC97, SPC98, and TUB4) encoding the evolutionarily conserved γ-tubulin small complex (γ-TuSC), which nucleates microtubule assembly. We found that hemizygous γ-TuSC mutants exhibit higher rates of chromosome loss and increases in anaphase spindle length and elongation velocities. Fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, electron tomography, and model convolution simulation of spc98/+ mutants revealed improper regulation of interpolar (iMT) and kinetochore (kMT) microtubules in anaphase. The underlying cause is likely due to reduced levels of Tub4, as overexpression of TUB4 suppressed the spindle and chromosome segregation defects in spc98/+ mutants. We propose that γ-TuSC is crucial for balanced assembly between iMTs and kMTs for spindle organization and accurate chromosome segregation. Taken together, the results show how gene dosage studies provide critical insights into the assembly and function of multisubunit complexes that may not be revealed by using traditional studies with haploid gene deletion or conditional alleles.

  4. Ethnic or racial differences revisited: impact of dosage regimen and dosage form on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Ling

    2006-01-01

    Ethnic or racial differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have been attributed to the distinctions in the genetic, physiological and pathological factors between ethnic/racial groups. These pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic differences are also known to be influenced by several extrinsic factors such as socioeconomic background, culture, diet and environment. However, it is noted that other factors related to dosage regimen and dosage form have largely been ignored or overlooked when conducting or analysing pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies in relation to ethnicity/race. Potential interactions can arise between the characteristics of ethnicity/race and a unique feature of dosage regimen or dosage form used in the study, which may partly account for the observed pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic differences between ethnic/racial groups. Ethnic/racial differences in pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics can occur from drug administration through a specific route that imparts distinct pattern of absorption, distribution, transport, metabolism or excretion. For example, racial differences in the first-pass metabolism of a drug following oral administration may not be relevant when the drug is applied to the skin. On the other hand, ethnic/racial difference in pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics can also happen via two different routes of drug delivery, with varying levels of dissimilarity between routes. For example, greater ethnic/racial differences were observed in oral clearance than in systemic clearance of some drugs, which might be explained by the pre-systemic factors involved in the oral administration as opposed to the intravenous administration. Similarly, changes in the dose frequency and/or duration may have profound impact on the ethnic/racial differences in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic outcome. Saturation of enzymes, transporters or receptors at high drug concentrations is a possible reason for many observed ethnic/racial discrepancies between

  5. Sexual dimorphism in parental imprint ontogeny and contribution to embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Bourc'his, Déborah; Proudhon, Charlotte

    2008-01-30

    Genomic imprinting refers to the functional non-equivalence of parental genomes in mammals that results from the parent-of-origin allelic expression of a subset of genes. Parent-specific expression is dependent on the germ line acquisition of DNA methylation marks at imprinting control regions (ICRs), coordinated by the DNA-methyltransferase homolog DNMT3L. We discuss here how the gender-specific stages of DNMT3L expression may have influenced the various sexually dimorphic aspects of genomic imprinting: (1) the differential developmental timing of methylation establishment at paternally and maternally imprinted genes in each parental germ line, (2) the differential dependence on DNMT3L of parental methylation imprint establishment, (3) the unequal duration of paternal versus maternal methylation imprints during germ cell development, (4) the biased distribution of methylation-dependent ICRs towards the maternal genome, (5) the different genomic organization of paternal versus maternal ICRs, and finally (6) the overwhelming contribution of maternal germ line imprints to development compared to their paternal counterparts.

  6. Iraqi parents' views of barriers to childhood immunization.

    PubMed

    Al-Lela, O Q B; Bahari, M B; Al-Abbassi, M G; Salih, M R M; Basher, A Y

    2013-03-01

    Deficiencies in knowledge about immunization among parents often leads to poor utake or errors in immunization dosage and timing. The aims of this study were to determine Iraqi parents' views of barriers to immunization and beliefs about ways to promote immunization. A questionnaire survey was carried out among 528 Iraqi parents with children who had incomplete immunization status. The main barriers to immunization agreed by the parents were lack of vaccine availability (51.5% of parents) and parents' lack of education (42.4%), while 88.4% of parents thought that lack of funding was not an important barrier. More than 60% of the parents suggested promoting childhood immunization via the media, and 77.5% thought that an increase in funding would not remove barriers to childhood immunization. Better vaccine availability in public health clinics and improving parents' literacy might enhance immunization uptake in Iraq.

  7. Genomic imprinting, growth control and the allocation of nutritional resources: consequences for postnatal life.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Marika; da Rocha, Simão Teixeira; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C

    2007-02-01

    Genes subject to genomic imprinting are predominantly expressed from one of the two parental chromosomes, are often clustered in the genome, and their activity and repression are epigenetically regulated. The role of imprinted genes in growth control has been apparent since the discovery of imprinting in the early 1980s. Drawing from studies in the mouse, we propose three distinct classes of imprinted genes - those expressed, imprinted and acting predominantly within the placenta, those with no associated foetal growth effects that act postnatally to regulate metabolic processes, and those expressed in the embryo and placenta that programme the development of organs participating in metabolic processes. Members of this latter class may interact in functional networks regulating the interaction between the mother and the foetus, affecting generalized foetal well-being, growth and organ development; they may also coordinately regulate the development of particular organ systems. The mono-allelic behaviour and sensitivity to changes in regional epigenetic states renders imprinted genes adaptable and vulnerable; in all cases, their perturbed dosage can compromise prenatal and/or postnatal control of nutritional resources. This finding has implications for understanding the relationships between prenatal events and diseases later in life.

  8. Characterization and formulation into solid dosage forms of a novel bacteriophage lytic against Klebsiella oxytoca.

    PubMed

    Brown, Teagan L; Petrovski, Steve; Hoyle, Dannielle; Chan, Hiu Tat; Lock, Peter; Tucci, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    To isolate and characterize bacteriophage lytic for the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella oxytoca and their formulation into a range of solid dosage forms for in-vitro testing. We report the isolation, genomic and functional characterization of a novel bacteriophage lytic for Klebsiella oxytoca, which does not infect the closely related Klebsiella pneumoniae. This bacteriophage was formulated into suppositories and troches and shown to be released and lyse underlying Klebsiella oxytoca bacteria in an in-vitro model. These bacteriophage formulations were stable for at least 49 days at 4°C. The successful in-vitro assay of these formulations here suggests that they could potentially be tested in-vivo to determine whether such a therapeutic approach could modulate the gut microbiome, and control Klebsiella oxytoca overgrowth, during antibiotic therapy regimes. This study reports a novel bacteriophage specific for Klebsiella oxytoca which can be formulated into solid dosage forms appropriate for potential delivery in testing as a therapy to modulate gut microbiome during antibiotic therapies.

  9. Cooperation between a hierarchical set of recruitment sites targets the X chromosome for dosage compensation

    PubMed Central

    Albritton, Sarah Elizabeth; Kranz, Anna-Lena; Winterkorn, Lara Heermans; Street, Lena Annika; Ercan, Sevinc

    2017-01-01

    In many organisms, it remains unclear how X chromosomes are specified for dosage compensation, since DNA sequence motifs shown to be important for dosage compensation complex (DCC) recruitment are themselves not X-specific. Here, we addressed this problem in C. elegans. We found that the DCC recruiter, SDC-2, is required to maintain open chromatin at a small number of primary DCC recruitment sites, whose sequence and genomic context are X-specific. Along the X, primary recruitment sites are interspersed with secondary sites, whose function is X-dependent. A secondary site can ectopically recruit the DCC when additional recruitment sites are inserted either in tandem or at a distance (>30 kb). Deletion of a recruitment site on the X results in reduced DCC binding across several megabases surrounded by topologically associating domain (TAD) boundaries. Our work elucidates that hierarchy and long-distance cooperativity between gene-regulatory elements target a single chromosome for regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23645.001 PMID:28562241

  10. Sex bias and dosage compensation in the zebra finch versus chicken genomes: General and specialized patterns among birds

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Yuichiro; Replogle, Kirstin; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Wade, Juli; Clayton, David F.; Arnold, Arthur P.

    2010-01-01

    We compared global patterns of gene expression between two bird species, the chicken and zebra finch, with regard to sex bias of autosomal versus Z chromosome genes, dosage compensation, and evolution of sex bias. Both species appear to lack a Z chromosome–wide mechanism of dosage compensation, because both have a similar pattern of significantly higher expression of Z genes in males relative to females. Unlike the chicken Z chromosome, which has female-specific expression of the noncoding RNA MHM (male hypermethylated) and acetylation of histone 4 lysine 16 (H4K16) near MHM, the zebra finch Z chromosome appears to lack the MHM sequence and acetylation of H4K16. The zebra finch also does not show the reduced male-to-female (M:F) ratio of gene expression near MHM similar to that found in the chicken. Although the M:F ratios of Z chromosome gene expression are similar across tissues and ages within each species, they differ between the two species. Z genes showing the greatest species difference in M:F ratio were concentrated near the MHM region of the chicken Z chromosome. This study shows that the zebra finch differs from the chicken because it lacks a specialized region of greater dosage compensation along the Z chromosome, and shows other differences in sex bias. These patterns suggest that different avian taxa may have evolved specific compensatory mechanisms. PMID:20357053

  11. Prescribing Errors Involving Medication Dosage Forms

    PubMed Central

    Lesar, Timothy S

    2002-01-01

    CONTEXT Prescribing errors involving medication dose formulations have been reported to occur frequently in hospitals. No systematic evaluations of the characteristics of errors related to medication dosage formulation have been performed. OBJECTIVE To quantify the characteristics, frequency, and potential adverse patient effects of prescribing errors involving medication dosage forms . DESIGN Evaluation of all detected medication prescribing errors involving or related to medication dosage forms in a 631-bed tertiary care teaching hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Type, frequency, and potential for adverse effects of prescribing errors involving or related to medication dosage forms. RESULTS A total of 1,115 clinically significant prescribing errors involving medication dosage forms were detected during the 60-month study period. The annual number of detected errors increased throughout the study period. Detailed analysis of the 402 errors detected during the last 16 months of the study demonstrated the most common errors to be: failure to specify controlled release formulation (total of 280 cases; 69.7%) both when prescribing using the brand name (148 cases; 36.8%) and when prescribing using the generic name (132 cases; 32.8%); and prescribing controlled delivery formulations to be administered per tube (48 cases; 11.9%). The potential for adverse patient outcome was rated as potentially “fatal or severe” in 3 cases (0.7%), and “serious” in 49 cases (12.2%). Errors most commonly involved cardiovascular agents (208 cases; 51.7%). CONCLUSIONS Hospitalized patients are at risk for adverse outcomes due to prescribing errors related to inappropriate use of medication dosage forms. This information should be considered in the development of strategies to prevent adverse patient outcomes resulting from such errors. PMID:12213138

  12. Maintenance and Loss of Duplicated Genes by Dosage Subfunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Gout, Jean-Francois; Lynch, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Whole-genome duplications (WGDs) have contributed to gene-repertoire enrichment in many eukaryotic lineages. However, most duplicated genes are eventually lost and it is still unclear why some duplicated genes are evolutionary successful whereas others quickly turn to pseudogenes. Here, we show that dosage constraints are major factors opposing post-WGD gene loss in several Paramecium species that share a common ancestral WGD. We propose a model where a majority of WGD-derived duplicates preserve their ancestral function and are retained to produce enough of the proteins performing this same ancestral function. Under this model, the expression level of individual duplicated genes can evolve neutrally as long as they maintain a roughly constant summed expression, and this allows random genetic drift toward uneven contributions of the two copies to total expression. Our analysis suggests that once a high level of imbalance is reached, which can require substantial lengths of time, the copy with the lowest expression level contributes a small enough fraction of the total expression that selection no longer opposes its loss. Extension of our analysis to yeast species sharing a common ancestral WGD yields similar results, suggesting that duplicated-gene retention for dosage constraints followed by divergence in expression level and eventual deterministic gene loss might be a universal feature of post-WGD evolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. An examination of marketing techniques used to promote children's vitamins in parenting magazines.

    PubMed

    Basch, Corey Hannah; Roberts, Katherine J; Ethan, Danna; Samayoa-Kozlowsky, Sandra

    2014-11-26

    More than a third of children and adolescents in the United States take vitamins even though professional medical organizations do not endorse their use in healthy children. Regardless of their efficacy, children's vitamin products are aggressively promoted. Therefore, the goal of this study was to describe and analyze advertisements related to vitamins in the following three popular parenting magazines, Parents, Parenting Early Years, and Parenting School Years. A total of 135 magazines across four years were reviewed.  There were 207 advertisements for children's vitamins, all in the form of chewy or gummy.  None of these advertisements included a dosage or a warning.  Almost all (92.3%) included a cartoon in the advertisement.  Almost a quarter (23.2%) of the advertisements promoted their product with the theme of prevention and more than half (51.2%) included the theme of peace of mind.  Parenting magazines are a popular medium for providing exposure to products geared towards children.  Companies that market children's vitamins in these magazines can increase awareness among parents of the risks by providing warning and dosage information in their advertisements.  Magazines can also play a role by encouraging responsible marketing and providing editorial content on children's vitamins and potential consequences of pediatric overdose.

  14. [Oral controlled release dosage forms].

    PubMed

    Mehuys, Els; Vervaet, Chris

    2010-06-01

    Several technologies to control drug release from oral dosage forms have been developed. Drug release can be regulated in several ways: sustained release, whereby the drug is released slowly over a prolonged period of time, postponed release, whereby drug release is delayed until passage from the stomach into the intestine (via enteric coating), and targeted release, whereby the drug is targeted to a specific location of the gastrointestinal tract. This article reviews the various oral controlled release dosage forms on the market.

  15. Genomic effects on advertisement call structure in diploid and triploid hybrid waterfrogs (Anura, Pelophylax esculentus).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Alexandra; Reyer, Heinz-Ulrich

    2013-12-04

    In anurans, differences in male mating calls have intensively been studied with respect to taxonomic classification, phylogeographic comparisons among different populations and sexual selection. Although overall successful, there is often much unexplained variation in these studies. Potential causes for such variation include differences among genotypes and breeding systems, as well as differences between populations. We investigated how these three factors affect call properties in male water frogs of Pelophylax lessonae (genotype LL), P. ridibundus (RR) and their interspecific hybrid P. esculentus which comes in diploid (LR) and triploid types (LLR, LRR). We investigated five call parameters that all showed a genomic dosage effect, i.e. they either decreased or increased with the L/R ratio in the order LL-LLR-LR-LRR-RR. Not all parameters differentiated equally well between the five genotypes, but combined they provided a good separation. Two of the five call parameters were also affected by the breeding system. Calls of diploid LR males varied, depending on whether these males mated with one or both of the parental species (diploid systems) or triploid hybrids (mixed ploidy systems). With the exception of the northernmost mixed-ploidy population, call differences were not related to the geographic location of the population and they were not correlated with genetic distances in the R and L genomes. We found an influence of all three tested factors on call parameters, with the effect size decreasing from genotype through breeding system to geographic location of the population. Overall, results were in line with predictions from a dosage effect in L/R ratios, but in three call parameters all three hybrid types were more similar to one or the other parental species. Also calls of diploid hybrids varied between breeding systems in agreement with the sexual host required for successful reproduction. The lack of hybrid call differences in a mixed-ploidy population at

  16. Genomic effects on advertisement call structure in diploid and triploid hybrid waterfrogs (Anura, Pelophylax esculentus)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In anurans, differences in male mating calls have intensively been studied with respect to taxonomic classification, phylogeographic comparisons among different populations and sexual selection. Although overall successful, there is often much unexplained variation in these studies. Potential causes for such variation include differences among genotypes and breeding systems, as well as differences between populations. We investigated how these three factors affect call properties in male water frogs of Pelophylax lessonae (genotype LL), P. ridibundus (RR) and their interspecific hybrid P. esculentus which comes in diploid (LR) and triploid types (LLR, LRR). Results We investigated five call parameters that all showed a genomic dosage effect, i.e. they either decreased or increased with the L/R ratio in the order LL-LLR-LR-LRR-RR. Not all parameters differentiated equally well between the five genotypes, but combined they provided a good separation. Two of the five call parameters were also affected by the breeding system. Calls of diploid LR males varied, depending on whether these males mated with one or both of the parental species (diploid systems) or triploid hybrids (mixed ploidy systems). With the exception of the northernmost mixed-ploidy population, call differences were not related to the geographic location of the population and they were not correlated with genetic distances in the R and L genomes. Conclusions We found an influence of all three tested factors on call parameters, with the effect size decreasing from genotype through breeding system to geographic location of the population. Overall, results were in line with predictions from a dosage effect in L/R ratios, but in three call parameters all three hybrid types were more similar to one or the other parental species. Also calls of diploid hybrids varied between breeding systems in agreement with the sexual host required for successful reproduction. The lack of hybrid call differences

  17. Plastome-Genome Interactions Affect Plastid Transmission in Oenothera

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, W. L.; Sears, B. B.

    1993-01-01

    Plastids of Oenothera, the evening primrose, can be transmitted to the progeny from both parents. In a constant nuclear background, the frequency of biparental plastid transmission is determined by the types of plastid genomes (plastomes) involved in the crosses. In this study, the impact of nuclear genomes on plastid inheritance was analyzed. In general, the transmission efficiency of each plastome correlated strongly with its compatibility with the nuclear genome of the progeny, suggesting that plastome-genome interactions can influence plastid transmission by affecting the efficiency of plastid multiplication after fertilization. Lower frequencies of plastid transmission from the paternal side were observed when the pollen had poor vigor due to an incompatible plastome-genome combination, indicating that plastome-genome interactions may also affect the input of plastids at fertilization. Parental traits that affect the process of fertilization can also have an impact on plastid transmission. Crosses using maternal parents with long styles or pollen with relatively low growth capacity resulted in reduced frequencies of paternal plastid transmission. These observations suggest that degeneration of pollen plastids may occur as the time interval between pollination and fertilization is lengthened. PMID:8462856

  18. [Formulation and special investigations of innovative intraoral solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Kristo, K; kATONA, B; Piukovics, P; Olah, I; Sipos, B; Sipos, S E; Sovany, T; Hodi, K; Ifi Regdon, G

    During our work, we summarized the types of solid dosage forms which were in the focus of attention in the last years because of their innovative pharmaceutical technology solution and simple use. The biopharmaceutics of solid dosage forms for intraoral use and the advantages of the use of these dosages forms were presented in general. However, these dosage forms cannot always be prepared with conventional pharmaceutical processes, therefore the special pharmaceutical solutions which can be applied for their preparation were presented. In addition to testing the European Pharmacopoeia dosage forms, the special tests which can be applied for the characterization of innovative solid dosage forms were highlighted.

  19. [Pharmaceutical advice concerning different pharmaceutical dosage forms].

    PubMed

    Szakonyi, Gergely; Zelkó, Romána

    2010-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the commonly applied types of drug uptake and the pharmacists' advice concerning a certain dosage form. The manuscript also deals with the modified release dosage forms and their abbreviations in the name of the marketing authorized products.

  20. Second generation noninvasive fetal genome analysis reveals de novo mutations, single-base parental inheritance, and preferred DNA ends

    PubMed Central

    Chan, K. C. Allen; Jiang, Peiyong; Sun, Kun; Cheng, Yvonne K. Y.; Tong, Yu K.; Cheng, Suk Hang; Wong, Ada I. C.; Hudecova, Irena; Leung, Tak Y.; Chiu, Rossa W. K.; Lo, Yuk Ming Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Plasma DNA obtained from a pregnant woman was sequenced to a depth of 270× haploid genome coverage. Comparing the maternal plasma DNA sequencing data with the parental genomic DNA data and using a series of bioinformatics filters, fetal de novo mutations were detected at a sensitivity of 85% and a positive predictive value of 74%. These results represent a 169-fold improvement in the positive predictive value over previous attempts. Improvements in the interpretation of the sequence information of every base position in the genome allowed us to interrogate the maternal inheritance of the fetus for 618,271 of 656,676 (94.2%) heterozygous SNPs within the maternal genome. The fetal genotype at each of these sites was deduced individually, unlike previously, where the inheritance was determined for a collection of sites within a haplotype. These results represent a 90-fold enhancement in the resolution in determining the fetus’s maternal inheritance. Selected genomic locations were more likely to be found at the ends of plasma DNA molecules. We found that a subset of such preferred ends exhibited selectivity for fetal- or maternal-derived DNA in maternal plasma. The ratio of the number of maternal plasma DNA molecules with fetal preferred ends to those with maternal preferred ends showed a correlation with the fetal DNA fraction. Finally, this second generation approach for noninvasive fetal whole-genome analysis was validated in a pregnancy diagnosed with cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome with maternal plasma DNA sequenced to 195× coverage. The causative de novo BRAF mutation was successfully detected through the maternal plasma DNA analysis. PMID:27799561

  1. Anchoring of Heterochromatin to the Nuclear Lamina Reinforces Dosage Compensation-Mediated Gene Repression.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Martha J; Lau, Alyssa C; Brouhard, Elizabeth A; Davis, Michael B; Jiang, Jianhao; Sifuentes, Margarita H; Csankovszki, Györgyi

    2016-09-01

    Higher order chromosome structure and nuclear architecture can have profound effects on gene regulation. We analyzed how compartmentalizing the genome by tethering heterochromatic regions to the nuclear lamina affects dosage compensation in the nematode C. elegans. In this organism, the dosage compensation complex (DCC) binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to repress transcription two-fold, thus balancing gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. X chromosome structure is disrupted by mutations in DCC subunits. Using X chromosome paint fluorescence microscopy, we found that X chromosome structure and subnuclear localization are also disrupted when the mechanisms that anchor heterochromatin to the nuclear lamina are defective. Strikingly, the heterochromatic left end of the X chromosome is less affected than the gene-rich middle region, which lacks heterochromatic anchors. These changes in X chromosome structure and subnuclear localization are accompanied by small, but significant levels of derepression of X-linked genes as measured by RNA-seq, without any observable defects in DCC localization and DCC-mediated changes in histone modifications. We propose a model in which heterochromatic tethers on the left arm of the X cooperate with the DCC to compact and peripherally relocate the X chromosomes, contributing to gene repression.

  2. An Examination of Marketing Techniques used to Promote Children’s Vitamins in Parenting Magazines

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Corey H.; Roberts, Katherine J.; Ethan, Danna; Samayoa-Kozlowsky, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    More than a third of children and adolescents in the United States take vitamins even though professional medical organizations do not endorse their use in healthy children. Regardless of their efficacy, children’s vitamin products are aggressively promoted. Therefore, the goal of this study was to describe and analyze advertisements related to vitamins in the following three popular parenting magazines, Parents, Parenting Early Years, and Parenting School Years. A total of 135 magazines across four years were reviewed. There were 207 advertisements for children’s vitamins, all in the form of chewy or gummy. None of these advertisements included a dosage or a warning. Almost all (92.3%) included a cartoon in the advertisement. Almost a quarter (23.2%) of the advertisements promoted their product with the theme of prevention and more than half (51.2%) included the theme of peace of mind. Parenting magazines are a popular medium for providing exposure to products geared towards children. Companies that market children’s vitamins in these magazines can increase awareness among parents of the risks by providing warning and dosage information in their advertisements. Magazines can also play a role by encouraging responsible marketing and providing editorial content on children’s vitamins and potential consequences of pediatric overdose. PMID:25948456

  3. "We don't know her history, her background": adoptive parents' perspectives on whole genome sequencing results.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho; Shankar, Aditi G; Tabor, Holly K

    2015-02-01

    Exome sequencing and whole genome sequencing (ES/WGS) can provide parents with a wide range of genetic information about their children, and adoptive parents may have unique issues to consider regarding possible access to this information. The few papers published on adoption and genetics have focused on targeted genetic testing of children in the pre-adoption context. There are no data on adoptive parents' perspectives about pediatric ES/WGS, including their preferences about different kinds of results, and the potential benefits and risks of receiving results. To explore these issues, we conducted four exploratory focus groups with adoptive parents (N = 26). The majority lacked information about their children's biological family health history and ancestry, and many viewed WGS results as a way to fill in these gaps in knowledge. Some expressed concerns about protecting their children's future privacy and autonomy, but at the same time stated that WGS results could possibly help them be proactive about their children's health. A few parents expressed concerns about the risks of WGS in a pre-adoption context, specifically about decreasing a child's chance of adoption. These results suggest that issues surrounding genetic information in the post-adoption and ES/WGS contexts need to be considered, as well as concerns about risks in the pre-adoption context. A critical challenge for ES/WGS in the context of adoption will be balancing the right to know different kinds of genetic information with the right not to know. Specific guidance for geneticists and genetic counselors may be needed to maximize benefits of WGS while minimizing harms and prohibiting misuse of the information in the adoption process.

  4. Conclusive evidence for hexasomic inheritance in chrysanthemum based on analysis of a 183 k SNP array.

    PubMed

    van Geest, Geert; Voorrips, Roeland E; Esselink, Danny; Post, Aike; Visser, Richard Gf; Arens, Paul

    2017-08-07

    Cultivated chrysanthemum is an outcrossing hexaploid (2n = 6× = 54) with a disputed mode of inheritance. In this paper, we present a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) selection pipeline that was used to design an Affymetrix Axiom array with 183 k SNPs from RNA sequencing data (1). With this array, we genotyped four bi-parental populations (with sizes of 405, 53, 76 and 37 offspring plants respectively), and a cultivar panel of 63 genotypes. Further, we present a method for dosage scoring in hexaploids from signal intensities of the array based on mixture models (2) and validation of selection steps in the SNP selection pipeline (3). The resulting genotypic data is used to draw conclusions on the mode of inheritance in chrysanthemum (4), and to make an inference on allelic expression bias (5). With use of the mixture model approach, we successfully called the dosage of 73,936 out of 183,130 SNPs (40.4%) that segregated in any of the bi-parental populations. To investigate the mode of inheritance, we analysed markers that segregated in the large bi-parental population (n = 405). Analysis of segregation of duplex x nulliplex SNPs resulted in evidence for genome-wide hexasomic inheritance. This evidence was substantiated by the absence of strong linkage between markers in repulsion, which indicated absence of full disomic inheritance. We present the success rate of SNP discovery out of RNA sequencing data as affected by different selection steps, among which SNP coverage over genotypes and use of different types of sequence read mapping software. Genomic dosage highly correlated with relative allele coverage from the RNA sequencing data, indicating that most alleles are expressed according to their genomic dosage. The large population, genotyped with a very large number of markers, is a unique framework for extensive genetic analyses in hexaploid chrysanthemum. As starting point, we show conclusive evidence for genome-wide hexasomic inheritance.

  5. Genome Comparison of Candida orthopsilosis Clinical Strains Reveals the Existence of Hybrids between Two Distinct Subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Pryszcz, Leszek P.; Németh, Tibor; Gácser, Attila; Gabaldón, Toni

    2014-01-01

    The Candida parapsilosis species complex comprises a group of emerging human pathogens of varying virulence. This complex was recently subdivided into three different species: C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis. Within the latter, at least two clearly distinct subspecies seem to be present among clinical isolates (Type 1 and Type 2). To gain insight into the genomic differences between these subspecies, we undertook the sequencing of a clinical isolate classified as Type 1 and compared it with the available sequence of a Type 2 clinical strain. Unexpectedly, the analysis of the newly sequenced strain revealed a highly heterozygous genome, which we show to be the consequence of a hybridization event between both identified subspecies. This implicitly suggests that C. orthopsilosis is able to mate, a so-far unanswered question. The resulting hybrid shows a chimeric genome that maintains a similar gene dosage from both parental lineages and displays ongoing loss of heterozygosity. Several of the differences found between the gene content in both strains relate to virulent-related families, with the hybrid strain presenting a higher copy number of genes coding for efflux pumps or secreted lipases. Remarkably, two clinical strains isolated from distant geographical locations (Texas and Singapore) are descendants of the same hybrid line, raising the intriguing possibility of a relationship between the hybridization event and the global spread of a virulent clone. PMID:24747362

  6. Understanding of Information about Medicines Use among Parents of Pre-School Children in Serbia: Parental Pharmacotherapy Literacy Questionnaire (PTHL-SR).

    PubMed

    Ubavić, Stana; Bogavac-Stanojević, Nataša; Jović-Vraneš, Aleksandra; Krajnović, Dušanka

    2018-05-14

    Parental health literacy plays an important role in children’s health, Experiences from pharmacy practice show that is necessary to check if parents understand instructions about use of medicines for children. This study aimed to assess pharmacotherapy literacy of parents of pre-school children and to examine association of parental pharmacotherapy literacy level with parent’s socio-demographic characteristics. The study was cross-sectional, conducted among parents of pre-school children (1⁻7 years of age), in kindergartens in several municipalities of Belgrade, Serbia, during regular parents meetings, from May to October 2016. Functional health literacy was measured by the Serbian version of the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA). Parental pharmacotherapy literacy was assessed with newly constructed PTHL-SR questionnaire with good psychometric characteristics (Parental pharmacotherapy literacy questionnaire—Serbian). Overall, 813 parents participated in the study, mostly females (81.30%), between 30 to 40 years of age (70.85%) with two children (56.70%). Almost all of our study participants (99%) had adequate health literacy as assessed by S-TOFHLA. Mean score on PTHL-SR was 72.83% (standard deviation was 13.37), with better results among females than males (72% of women were in the group of highest PTHL-SR results). Our study showed that many parents (76.5%) knew the appropriate usage of non-prescription medicine for children, 57.2% parents were able to correctly calculate the dose of oral syrup for a child, and only 43.3% were able to interpret non-prescription dosage information written on the package. The majority of parents (61.3%) would make a dosage to child based on age and not on their weight. Every fifth parent with adequate functional health literacy measured by S-TOFHLA test, achieved the lowest results measured by PTHL-SR. Higher performance of the PTHL-SR was significantly correlated with education ( p

  7. Does parental expressed emotion moderate genetic effects in ADHD? An exploration using a genome wide association scan.

    PubMed

    Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Neale, Benjamin M; Oades, Robert; Chen, Wai; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan; Banaschewski, Tobias; Ebstein, Richard; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Sergeant, Joseph; Steinhausen, Hans Christoph; Thompson, Margaret; Asherson, Philip; Faraone, Stephen V

    2008-12-05

    Studies of gene x environment (G x E) interaction in ADHD have previously focused on known risk genes for ADHD and environmentally mediated biological risk. Here we use G x E analysis in the context of a genome-wide association scan to identify novel genes whose effects on ADHD symptoms and comorbid conduct disorder are moderated by high maternal expressed emotion (EE). SNPs (600,000) were genotyped in 958 ADHD proband-parent trios. After applying data cleaning procedures we examined 429,981 autosomal SNPs in 909 family trios. ADHD symptom severity and comorbid conduct disorder was measured using the Parental Account of Childhood Symptoms interview. Maternal criticism and warmth (i.e., EE) were coded by independent observers on comments made during the interview. No G x E interactions reached genome-wide significance. Nominal effects were found both with and without genetic main effects. For those with genetic main effects 36 uncorrected interaction P-values were <10(-5) implicating both novel genes as well as some previously supported candidates. These were found equally often for all of the interactions being investigated. The observed interactions in SLC1A1 and NRG3 SNPs represent reasonable candidate genes for further investigation given their previous association with several psychiatric illnesses. We find evidence for the role of EE in moderating the effects of genes on ADHD severity and comorbid conduct disorder, implicating both novel and established candidates. These findings need replicating in larger independent samples. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Evaluation of students' knowledge about paediatric dosage calculations.

    PubMed

    Özyazıcıoğlu, Nurcan; Aydın, Ayla İrem; Sürenler, Semra; Çinar, Hava Gökdere; Yılmaz, Dilek; Arkan, Burcu; Tunç, Gülseren Çıtak

    2018-01-01

    Medication errors are common and may jeopardize the patient safety. As paediatric dosages are calculated based on the child's age and weight, risk of error in dosage calculations is increasing. In paediatric patients, overdose drug prescribed regardless of the child's weight, age and clinical picture may lead to excessive toxicity and mortalities while low doses may delay the treatment. This study was carried out to evaluate the knowledge of nursing students about paediatric dosage calculations. This research, which is of retrospective type, covers a population consisting of all the 3rd grade students at the bachelor's degree in May, 2015 (148 students). Drug dose calculation questions in exam papers including 3 open ended questions on dosage calculation problems, addressing 5 variables were distributed to the students and their responses were evaluated by the researchers. In the evaluation of the data, figures and percentage distribution were calculated and Spearman correlation analysis was applied. Exam question on the dosage calculation based on child's age, which is the most common method in paediatrics, and which ensures right dosages and drug dilution was answered correctly by 87.1% of the students while 9.5% answered it wrong and 3.4% left it blank. 69.6% of the students was successful in finding the safe dose range, and 79.1% in finding the right ratio/proportion. 65.5% of the answers with regard to Ml/dzy calculation were correct. Moreover, student's four operation skills were assessed and 68.2% of the students were determined to have found the correct answer. When the relation among the questions on medication was examined, a significant relation (correlation) was determined between them. It is seen that in dosage calculations, the students failed mostly in calculating ml/dzy (decimal). This result means that as dosage calculations are based on decimal values, calculations may be ten times erroneous when the decimal point is placed wrongly. Moreover, it

  9. Advances in solid dosage form manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Gavin P

    2007-12-15

    Currently, the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries are moving through a period of unparalleled change. Major multinational pharmaceutical companies are restructuring, consolidating, merging and more importantly critically assessing their competitiveness to ensure constant growth in an ever-more demanding market where the cost of developing novel products is continuously increasing. The pharmaceutical manufacturing processes currently in existence for the production of solid oral dosage forms are associated with significant disadvantages and in many instances provide many processing problems. Therefore, it is well accepted that there is an increasing need for alternative processes to dramatically improve powder processing, and more importantly to ensure that acceptable, reproducible solid dosage forms can be manufactured. Consequently, pharmaceutical companies are beginning to invest in innovative processes capable of producing solid dosage forms that better meet the needs of the patient while providing efficient manufacturing operations. This article discusses two emerging solid dosage form manufacturing technologies, namely hot-melt extrusion and fluidized hot-melt granulation.

  10. Characterization and formulation into solid dosage forms of a novel bacteriophage lytic against Klebsiella oxytoca

    PubMed Central

    Petrovski, Steve; Hoyle, Dannielle; Chan, Hiu Tat; Lock, Peter; Tucci, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Aim To isolate and characterize bacteriophage lytic for the opportunistic pathogen Klebsiella oxytoca and their formulation into a range of solid dosage forms for in-vitro testing. Methods and results We report the isolation, genomic and functional characterization of a novel bacteriophage lytic for Klebsiella oxytoca, which does not infect the closely related Klebsiella pneumoniae. This bacteriophage was formulated into suppositories and troches and shown to be released and lyse underlying Klebsiella oxytoca bacteria in an in-vitro model. These bacteriophage formulations were stable for at least 49 days at 4°C. Conclusions The successful in-vitro assay of these formulations here suggests that they could potentially be tested in-vivo to determine whether such a therapeutic approach could modulate the gut microbiome, and control Klebsiella oxytoca overgrowth, during antibiotic therapy regimes. Significance and impact of the study This study reports a novel bacteriophage specific for Klebsiella oxytoca which can be formulated into solid dosage forms appropriate for potential delivery in testing as a therapy to modulate gut microbiome during antibiotic therapies. PMID:28817689

  11. Attitudes of stakeholders in psychiatry towards the inclusion of children in genomic research.

    PubMed

    Sundby, Anna; Boolsen, Merete Watt; Burgdorf, Kristoffer Sølvsten; Ullum, Henrik; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Mors, Ole

    2018-03-05

    Genomic sequencing of children in research raises complex ethical issues. This study aims to gain more knowledge on the attitudes towards the inclusion of children as research subjects in genomic research and towards the disclosure of pertinent and incidental findings to the parents and the child. Qualitative data were collected from interviews with a wide range of informants: experts engaged in genomic research, clinical geneticists, persons with mental disorders, relatives, and blood donors. Quantitative data were collected from a cross-sectional web-based survey among 1227 parents and 1406 non-parents who were potential stakeholders in psychiatric genomic research. Participants generally expressed positive views on children's participation in genomic research. The informants in the qualitative interviews highlighted the age of the child as a critical aspect when disclosing genetic information. Other important aspects were the child's right to an autonomous choice, the emotional burden of knowing imposed on both the child and the parents, and the possibility of receiving beneficial clinical information regarding the future health of the child. Nevertheless, there was no consensus whether the parent or the child should receive the findings. A majority of survey stakeholders agreed that children should be able to participate in genomic research. The majority agreed that both pertinent and incidental findings should be returned to the parents and to the child when of legal age. Having children does not affect the stakeholder's attitudes towards the inclusion of children as research subjects in genomic research. Our findings illustrate that both the child's right to autonomy and the parents' interest to be informed are important factors that are found valuable by the participants. In future guidelines governing children as subjects in genomic research, it would thus be essential to incorporate the child's right to an open future, including the right to receive

  12. A comprehensive crop genome research project: the Superhybrid Rice Genome Project in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Liu, Siqi; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming

    2007-06-29

    In May 2000, the Beijing Institute of Genomics formally announced the launch of a comprehensive crop genome research project on rice genomics, the Chinese Superhybrid Rice Genome Project. SRGP is not simply a sequencing project targeted to a single rice (Oryza sativa L.) genome, but a full-swing research effort with an ultimate goal of providing inclusive basic genomic information and molecular tools not only to understand biology of the rice, both as an important crop species and a model organism of cereals, but also to focus on a popular superhybrid rice landrace, LYP9. We have completed the first phase of SRGP and provide the rice research community with a finished genome sequence of an indica variety, 93-11 (the paternal cultivar of LYP9), together with ample data on subspecific (between subspecies) polymorphisms, transcriptomes and proteomes, useful for within-species comparative studies. In the second phase, we have acquired the genome sequence of the maternal cultivar, PA64S, together with the detailed catalogues of genes uniquely expressed in the parental cultivars and the hybrid as well as allele-specific markers that distinguish parental alleles. Although SRGP in China is not an open-ended research programme, it has been designed to pave a way for future plant genomics research and application, such as to interrogate fundamentals of plant biology, including genome duplication, polyploidy and hybrid vigour, as well as to provide genetic tools for crop breeding and to carry along a social burden-leading a fight against the world's hunger. It began with genomics, the newly developed and industry-scale research field, and from the world's most populous country. In this review, we summarize our scientific goals and noteworthy discoveries that exploit new territories of systematic investigations on basic and applied biology of rice and other major cereal crops.

  13. 21 CFR 201.55 - Statement of dosage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Statement of dosage. 201.55 Section 201.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Prescription Drugs and/or Insulin § 201.55 Statement of dosage...

  14. 21 CFR 201.55 - Statement of dosage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Statement of dosage. 201.55 Section 201.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Prescription Drugs and/or Insulin § 201.55 Statement of dosage...

  15. 21 CFR 201.55 - Statement of dosage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Statement of dosage. 201.55 Section 201.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Prescription Drugs and/or Insulin § 201.55 Statement of dosage...

  16. 21 CFR 201.55 - Statement of dosage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Statement of dosage. 201.55 Section 201.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Prescription Drugs and/or Insulin § 201.55 Statement of dosage...

  17. 21 CFR 201.55 - Statement of dosage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Statement of dosage. 201.55 Section 201.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Prescription Drugs and/or Insulin § 201.55 Statement of dosage...

  18. Genomic architecture of biomass heterosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Wang, Xuncheng; Ren, Diqiu; Huang, Hao; Xu, Miqi; He, Guangming; Deng, Xing Wang

    2017-07-25

    Heterosis is most frequently manifested by the substantially increased vigorous growth of hybrids compared with their parents. Investigating genomic variations in natural populations is essential to understand the initial molecular mechanisms underlying heterosis in plants. Here, we characterized the genomic architecture associated with biomass heterosis in 200 Arabidopsis hybrids. The genome-wide heterozygosity of hybrids makes a limited contribution to biomass heterosis, and no locus shows an obvious overdominance effect in hybrids. However, the accumulation of significant genetic loci identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in hybrids strongly correlates with better-parent heterosis (BPH). Candidate genes for biomass BPH fall into diverse biological functions, including cellular, metabolic, and developmental processes and stimulus-responsive pathways. Important heterosis candidates include WUSCHEL , ARGOS , and some genes that encode key factors involved in cell cycle regulation. Interestingly, transcriptomic analyses in representative Arabidopsis hybrid combinations reveal that heterosis candidate genes are functionally enriched in stimulus-responsive pathways, including responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli and immune responses. In addition, stimulus-responsive genes are repressed to low-parent levels in hybrids with high BPH, whereas middle-parent expression patterns are exhibited in hybrids with no BPH. Our study reveals a genomic architecture for understanding the molecular mechanisms of biomass heterosis in Arabidopsis , in which the accumulation of the superior alleles of genes involved in metabolic and cellular processes improve the development and growth of hybrids, whereas the overall repressed expression of stimulus-responsive genes prioritizes growth over responding to environmental stimuli in hybrids under normal conditions.

  19. Genome Sequencing of Steroid Producing Bacteria Using Ion Torrent Technology and a Reference Genome.

    PubMed

    Sola-Landa, Alberto; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Barreiro, Carlos; Pérez-Redondo, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    The Next-Generation Sequencing technology has enormously eased the bacterial genome sequencing and several tens of thousands of genomes have been sequenced during the last 10 years. Most of the genome projects are published as draft version, however, for certain applications the complete genome sequence is required.In this chapter, we describe the strategy that allowed the complete genome sequencing of Mycobacterium neoaurum NRRL B-3805, an industrial strain exploited for steroid production, using Ion Torrent sequencing reads and the genome of a close strain as the reference. This protocol can be applied to analyze the genetic variations between closely related strains; for example, to elucidate the point mutations between a parental strain and a random mutagenesis-derived mutant.

  20. Condensin controls recruitment of RNA polymerase II to achieve nematode X-chromosome dosage compensation

    PubMed Central

    Kruesi, William S; Core, Leighton J; Waters, Colin T; Lis, John T; Meyer, Barbara J

    2013-01-01

    The X-chromosome gene regulatory process called dosage compensation ensures that males (1X) and females (2X) express equal levels of X-chromosome transcripts. The mechanism in Caenorhabditis elegans has been elusive due to improperly annotated transcription start sites (TSSs). Here we define TSSs and the distribution of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) genome-wide in wild-type and dosage-compensation-defective animals to dissect this regulatory mechanism. Our TSS-mapping strategy integrates GRO-seq, which tracks nascent transcription, with a new derivative of this method, called GRO-cap, which recovers nascent RNAs with 5′ caps prior to their removal by co-transcriptional processing. Our analyses reveal that promoter-proximal pausing is rare, unlike in other metazoans, and promoters are unexpectedly far upstream from the 5′ ends of mature mRNAs. We find that C. elegans equalizes X-chromosome expression between the sexes, to a level equivalent to autosomes, by reducing Pol II recruitment to promoters of hermaphrodite X-linked genes using a chromosome-restructuring condensin complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00808.001 PMID:23795297

  1. Genome Properties and Prospects of Genomic Prediction of Hybrid Performance in a Breeding Program of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Technow, Frank; Schrag, Tobias A.; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Bauer, Eva; Simianer, Henner; Melchinger, Albrecht E.

    2014-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) serves as model plant for heterosis research and is the crop where hybrid breeding was pioneered. We analyzed genomic and phenotypic data of 1254 hybrids of a typical maize hybrid breeding program based on the important Dent × Flint heterotic pattern. Our main objectives were to investigate genome properties of the parental lines (e.g., allele frequencies, linkage disequilibrium, and phases) and examine the prospects of genomic prediction of hybrid performance. We found high consistency of linkage phases and large differences in allele frequencies between the Dent and Flint heterotic groups in pericentromeric regions. These results can be explained by the Hill–Robertson effect and support the hypothesis of differential fixation of alleles due to pseudo-overdominance in these regions. In pericentromeric regions we also found indications for consistent marker–QTL linkage between heterotic groups. With prediction methods GBLUP and BayesB, the cross-validation prediction accuracy ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 for grain yield and from 0.59 to 0.95 for grain moisture. The prediction accuracy of untested hybrids was highest, if both parents were parents of other hybrids in the training set, and lowest, if none of them were involved in any training set hybrid. Optimizing the composition of the training set in terms of number of lines and hybrids per line could further increase prediction accuracy. We conclude that genomic prediction facilitates a paradigm shift in hybrid breeding by focusing on the performance of experimental hybrids rather than the performance of parental lines in testcrosses. PMID:24850820

  2. Genome-Wide Structural Variation Detection by Genome Mapping on Nanochannel Arrays.

    PubMed

    Mak, Angel C Y; Lai, Yvonne Y Y; Lam, Ernest T; Kwok, Tsz-Piu; Leung, Alden K Y; Poon, Annie; Mostovoy, Yulia; Hastie, Alex R; Stedman, William; Anantharaman, Thomas; Andrews, Warren; Zhou, Xiang; Pang, Andy W C; Dai, Heng; Chu, Catherine; Lin, Chin; Wu, Jacob J K; Li, Catherine M L; Li, Jing-Woei; Yim, Aldrin K Y; Chan, Saki; Sibert, Justin; Džakula, Željko; Cao, Han; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Chan, Ting-Fung; Yip, Kevin Y; Xiao, Ming; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive whole-genome structural variation detection is challenging with current approaches. With diploid cells as DNA source and the presence of numerous repetitive elements, short-read DNA sequencing cannot be used to detect structural variation efficiently. In this report, we show that genome mapping with long, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules imaged on nanochannel arrays can be used for whole-genome structural variation detection without sequencing. While whole-genome haplotyping is not achieved, local phasing (across >150-kb regions) is routine, as molecules from the parental chromosomes are examined separately. In one experiment, we generated genome maps from a trio from the 1000 Genomes Project, compared the maps against that derived from the reference human genome, and identified structural variations that are >5 kb in size. We find that these individuals have many more structural variants than those published, including some with the potential of disrupting gene function or regulation. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Bioavailability of intranasal promethazine dosage forms in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanathan, R.; Geary, R. S.; Bourne, D. W.; Putcha, L.

    1998-01-01

    Intramuscular promethazine (PMZ) is used aboard the US Space Shuttle to ameliorate symptoms of space motion sickness. Bioavailability after an oral dose of PMZ during space flight is thought to be impaired because of gastrointestinal disturbances associated with weightlessness and space motion sickness. In an attempt to find an alternative dosage form for use in space, we evaluated two intranasal (i.n.) dosage forms of PMZ in dogs for absorption and bioavailability relative to that of an equivalent intramuscular dose. Promethazine (5 mg kg-1) was administered as two intranasal dosage forms and as an intramuscular (i.m.) dose to three dogs in a randomised cross-over design. Serial blood samples were taken and analysed for PMZ concentrations and the absorption and bioavailability of PMZ were calculated for the three dosage forms. PMZ absorption from the carboxymethyl cellulose microsphere i.n. dosage form was more rapid and complete than from the myverol cubic gel formulation or from an i.m. injection. Bioavailability of the microsphere formulation was also greater than that of the gel formulation (AUC 3009 vs 1727 ng h ml-1). The bioavailability of the two i.n. dosage forms (relative to that of the i.m. injection) were 94% (microsphere) and 54% (gel). The i.n. microsphere formulation of PMZ offers great promise as an effective non-invasive alternative for treating space motion sickness due to its rapid absorption and bioavailability equivalent to the i.m. dose.

  4. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905 Section 520.905 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. ...

  5. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. ...

  6. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. ...

  7. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. ...

  8. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. ...

  9. Comparative genome analysis identifies two large deletions in the genome of highly-passaged attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae strain YM001 compared to the parental pathogenic strain HN016.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Li, Liping; Huang, Yan; Luo, Fuguang; Liang, Wanwen; Gan, Xi; Huang, Ting; Lei, Aiying; Chen, Ming; Chen, Lianfu

    2015-11-04

    Streptococcus agalactiae (S. agalactiae), also known as group B Streptococcus (GBS), is an important pathogen for neonatal pneumonia, meningitis, bovine mastitis, and fish meningoencephalitis. The global outbreaks of Streptococcus disease in tilapia cause huge economic losses and threaten human food hygiene safety as well. To investigate the mechanism of S. agalactiae pathogenesis in tilapia and develop attenuated S. agalactiae vaccine, this study sequenced and comparatively analyzed the whole genomes of virulent wild-type S. agalactiae strain HN016 and its highly-passaged attenuated strain YM001 derived from tilapia. We performed Illumina sequencing of DNA prepared from strain HN016 and YM001. Sequencedreads were assembled and nucleotide comparisons, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) , indels were analyzed between the draft genomes of HN016 and YM001. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and prophage were detected and analyzed in different S. agalactiae strains. The genome of S. agalactiae YM001 was 2,047,957 bp with a GC content of 35.61 %; it contained 2044 genes and 88 RNAs. Meanwhile, the genome of S. agalactiae HN016 was 2,064,722 bp with a GC content of 35.66 %; it had 2063 genes and 101 RNAs. Comparative genome analysis indicated that compared with HN016, YM001 genome had two significant large deletions, at the sizes of 5832 and 11,116 bp respectively, resulting in the deletion of three rRNA and ten tRNA genes, as well as the deletion and functional damage of ten genes related to metabolism, transport, growth, anti-stress, etc. Besides these two large deletions, other ten deletions and 28 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) were also identified, mainly affecting the metabolism- and growth-related genes. The genome of attenuated S. agalactiae YM001 showed significant variations, resulting in the deletion of 10 functional genes, compared to the parental pathogenic strain HN016. The deleted and mutated functional genes all

  10. Buccal Dosage Forms: General Considerations for Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Montero-Padilla, Soledad; Velaga, Sitaram; Morales, Javier O

    2017-02-01

    The development of an appropriate dosage form for pediatric patients needs to take into account several aspects, since adult drug biodistribution differs from that of pediatrics. In recent years, buccal administration has become an attractive route, having different dosage forms under development including tablets, lozenges, films, and solutions among others. Furthermore, the buccal epithelium can allow quick access to systemic circulation, which could be used for a rapid onset of action. For pediatric patients, dosage forms to be placed in the oral cavity have higher requirements for palatability to increase acceptance and therapy compliance. Therefore, an understanding of the excipients required and their functions and properties needs to be particularly addressed. This review is focused on the differences and requirements relevant to buccal administration for pediatric patients (compared to adults) and how novel dosage forms can be less invasive and more acceptable alternatives.

  11. Anchoring of Heterochromatin to the Nuclear Lamina Reinforces Dosage Compensation-Mediated Gene Repression

    PubMed Central

    Brouhard, Elizabeth A.; Jiang, Jianhao; Sifuentes, Margarita H.

    2016-01-01

    Higher order chromosome structure and nuclear architecture can have profound effects on gene regulation. We analyzed how compartmentalizing the genome by tethering heterochromatic regions to the nuclear lamina affects dosage compensation in the nematode C. elegans. In this organism, the dosage compensation complex (DCC) binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to repress transcription two-fold, thus balancing gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. X chromosome structure is disrupted by mutations in DCC subunits. Using X chromosome paint fluorescence microscopy, we found that X chromosome structure and subnuclear localization are also disrupted when the mechanisms that anchor heterochromatin to the nuclear lamina are defective. Strikingly, the heterochromatic left end of the X chromosome is less affected than the gene-rich middle region, which lacks heterochromatic anchors. These changes in X chromosome structure and subnuclear localization are accompanied by small, but significant levels of derepression of X-linked genes as measured by RNA-seq, without any observable defects in DCC localization and DCC-mediated changes in histone modifications. We propose a model in which heterochromatic tethers on the left arm of the X cooperate with the DCC to compact and peripherally relocate the X chromosomes, contributing to gene repression. PMID:27690361

  12. Advances in combination therapy of lung cancer: Rationales, delivery technologies and dosage regimens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lan; Leng, Donglei; Cun, Dongmei; Foged, Camilla; Yang, Mingshi

    2017-08-28

    Lung cancer is a complex disease caused by a multitude of genetic and environmental factors. The progression of lung cancer involves dynamic changes in the genome and a complex network of interactions between cancer cells with multiple, distinct cell types that form tumors. Combination therapy using different pharmaceuticals has been proven highly effective due to the ability to affect multiple cellular pathways involved in the disease progression. However, the currently used drug combination designs are primarily based on empirical clinical studies, and little attention has been given to dosage regimens, i.e. how administration routes, onsets, and durations of the combinations influence the therapeutic outcome. This is partly because combination therapy is challenged by distinct physicochemical properties and in vivo pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of the individual pharmaceuticals, including small molecule drugs and biopharmaceuticals, which make the optimization of dosing and administration schedule challenging. This article reviews the recent advances in the design and development of combinations of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of lung cancer. Focus is primarily on rationales for the selection of specific combination therapies for lung cancer treatment, and state of the art of delivery technologies and dosage regimens for the combinations, tested in preclinical and clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 21 CFR 522.1660 - Oxytetracycline injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxytetracycline injectable dosage forms. 522.1660 Section 522.1660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 522.1660 Oxytetracycline injectable dosage forms. ...

  14. Family genome browser: visualizing genomes with pedigree information.

    PubMed

    Juan, Liran; Liu, Yongzhuang; Wang, Yongtian; Teng, Mingxiang; Zang, Tianyi; Wang, Yadong

    2015-07-15

    Families with inherited diseases are widely used in Mendelian/complex disease studies. Owing to the advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies, family genome sequencing becomes more and more prevalent. Visualizing family genomes can greatly facilitate human genetics studies and personalized medicine. However, due to the complex genetic relationships and high similarities among genomes of consanguineous family members, family genomes are difficult to be visualized in traditional genome visualization framework. How to visualize the family genome variants and their functions with integrated pedigree information remains a critical challenge. We developed the Family Genome Browser (FGB) to provide comprehensive analysis and visualization for family genomes. The FGB can visualize family genomes in both individual level and variant level effectively, through integrating genome data with pedigree information. Family genome analysis, including determination of parental origin of the variants, detection of de novo mutations, identification of potential recombination events and identical-by-decent segments, etc., can be performed flexibly. Diverse annotations for the family genome variants, such as dbSNP memberships, linkage disequilibriums, genes, variant effects, potential phenotypes, etc., are illustrated as well. Moreover, the FGB can automatically search de novo mutations and compound heterozygous variants for a selected individual, and guide investigators to find high-risk genes with flexible navigation options. These features enable users to investigate and understand family genomes intuitively and systematically. The FGB is available at http://mlg.hit.edu.cn/FGB/. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Comprehensive review on additives of topical dosage forms for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2015-12-01

    Skin is the largest organ of the human body and plays the most important role in protecting against pathogen and foreign matter. Three important modes such as topical, regional and transdermal are widely used for delivery of various dosage forms. Among these modes, the topical dosage forms are preferred because it provides local therapeutic activity when applied to the skin or mucous membranes. Additives or pharmaceutical excipients (non-drug component of dosage form) are used as inactive ingredients in dosage form or tools for structuring dosage forms. The main use of topical dosage form additives are controling the extent of absorption, maintaining the viscosity, improving the stability as well as organoleptic property and increasing the bulk of the formulation. The overall goal of this article is to provide the clinician with information related to the topical dosage form additives and their current major applications against various diseases.

  16. Genomic Location of the Major Ribosomal Protein Gene Locus Determines Vibrio cholerae Global Growth and Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Soler-Bistué, Alfonso; Mondotte, Juan A.; Bland, Michael Jason; Val, Marie-Eve; Saleh, María-Carla; Mazel, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The effects on cell physiology of gene order within the bacterial chromosome are poorly understood. In silico approaches have shown that genes involved in transcription and translation processes, in particular ribosomal protein (RP) genes, localize near the replication origin (oriC) in fast-growing bacteria suggesting that such a positional bias is an evolutionarily conserved growth-optimization strategy. Such genomic localization could either provide a higher dosage of these genes during fast growth or facilitate the assembly of ribosomes and transcription foci by keeping physically close the many components of these macromolecular machines. To explore this, we used novel recombineering tools to create a set of Vibrio cholerae strains in which S10-spec-α (S10), a locus bearing half of the ribosomal protein genes, was systematically relocated to alternative genomic positions. We show that the relative distance of S10 to the origin of replication tightly correlated with a reduction of S10 dosage, mRNA abundance and growth rate within these otherwise isogenic strains. Furthermore, this was accompanied by a significant reduction in the host-invasion capacity in Drosophila melanogaster. Both phenotypes were rescued in strains bearing two S10 copies highly distal to oriC, demonstrating that replication-dependent gene dosage reduction is the main mechanism behind these alterations. Hence, S10 positioning connects genome structure to cell physiology in Vibrio cholerae. Our results show experimentally for the first time that genomic positioning of genes involved in the flux of genetic information conditions global growth control and hence bacterial physiology and potentially its evolution. PMID:25875621

  17. The transit of dosage forms through the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Kah-Hay

    2010-08-16

    The human small intestine, with its enormous absorptive surface area, is invariably the principal site of drug absorption. Hence, the residence time of a dosage form in this part of the gut can have a great influence on the absorption of the contained drug. Various methods have been employed to monitor the gastrointestinal transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but the use of gamma-scintigraphy has superceded all the other methods. However, careful consideration of the time interval for image acquisition and proper analysis of the scintigraphic data are important for obtaining reliable results. Most studies reported the mean small intestinal transit time of various dosage forms to be about 3-4h, being closely similar to that of food and water. The value does not appear to be influenced by their physical state nor the presence of food, but the timing of food intake following administration of the dosage forms can influence the small intestinal transit time. While the mean small intestinal transit time is quite consistent among dosage forms and studies, individual values can vary widely. There are differing opinions regarding the effect of density and size of dosage forms on their small intestinal transit properties. Some common excipients employed in pharmaceutical formulations can affect the small intestinal transit and drug absorption. There is currently a lack of studies regarding the effects of excipients, as well as the timing of food intake on the small intestinal transit of dosage forms and drug absorption. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genome properties and prospects of genomic prediction of hybrid performance in a breeding program of maize.

    PubMed

    Technow, Frank; Schrag, Tobias A; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Bauer, Eva; Simianer, Henner; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2014-08-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) serves as model plant for heterosis research and is the crop where hybrid breeding was pioneered. We analyzed genomic and phenotypic data of 1254 hybrids of a typical maize hybrid breeding program based on the important Dent × Flint heterotic pattern. Our main objectives were to investigate genome properties of the parental lines (e.g., allele frequencies, linkage disequilibrium, and phases) and examine the prospects of genomic prediction of hybrid performance. We found high consistency of linkage phases and large differences in allele frequencies between the Dent and Flint heterotic groups in pericentromeric regions. These results can be explained by the Hill-Robertson effect and support the hypothesis of differential fixation of alleles due to pseudo-overdominance in these regions. In pericentromeric regions we also found indications for consistent marker-QTL linkage between heterotic groups. With prediction methods GBLUP and BayesB, the cross-validation prediction accuracy ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 for grain yield and from 0.59 to 0.95 for grain moisture. The prediction accuracy of untested hybrids was highest, if both parents were parents of other hybrids in the training set, and lowest, if none of them were involved in any training set hybrid. Optimizing the composition of the training set in terms of number of lines and hybrids per line could further increase prediction accuracy. We conclude that genomic prediction facilitates a paradigm shift in hybrid breeding by focusing on the performance of experimental hybrids rather than the performance of parental lines in test crosses. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. Evaluation of buprenorphine dosage adequacy in opioid receptor agonist substitution therapy for heroin dependence: first use of the BUprenorphine-naloxone Dosage Adequacy eVAluation (BUDAVA) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    D'Amore, Antonio; Romano, Filomena; Biancolillo, Vincenzo; Lauro, Guglielmo; Armenante, Ciro; Pizzirusso, Anna; Del Tufo, Salvatore; Ruoppolo, Ciro; Auriemma, Francesco; Cassese, Francesco; Oliva, Patrizia; Amato, Patrizia

    2012-07-01

    The dosing of opioid receptor agonist medications adequately and on an individual basis is crucial in the pharmacotherapy of opioid dependence. Clinical tools that are able to measure dose appropriateness are sorely needed. The recently developed and validated Opiate Dosage Adequacy Scale (ODAS) comprehensively evaluates the main outcomes relevant for methadone dose optimization, namely relapse, cross-tolerance, objective and subjective withdrawal symptoms, craving and overdose. Based on the ODAS, we developed a new assessment tool (BUprenorphine-naloxone Dosage Adequacy eVAluation [BUDAVA]) for evaluating dosage adequacy in patients in treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone. The main goal of this observational study was to explore whether the BUDAVA questionnaire could be used to assess buprenorphine-based, long-term substitution therapy for heroin addiction. The study included heroin-dependent patients who had been in treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone for at least 3 months. Patients (n = 196) were recruited from 11 drug abuse treatment centres in Italy. Dosage adequacy was assessed with the BUDAVA questionnaire. Patients classified as inadequately treated had their dosage modified. After 1 week, they were again administered the questionnaire to assess the adequacy of the new dosage. The buprenorphine-naloxone dosage was found to be inadequate in 61 of the 196 patients. In 13 patients, the treatment scored as inadequate only in the subjective withdrawal symptoms item of the questionnaire and therefore no dosage adjustment was made in the 2 weeks that have characterized this work. The remaining 48 inadequately treated patients had their dosage modified (42 dose increases and six dose decreases). After 1 week on the modified dosage, in 24 of these patients the new regimen was found by the assessment with the questionnaire to be adequate. These preliminary results suggest that the BUDAVA questionnaire may be useful for guiding buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance

  20. 21 CFR 526.1696 - Penicillin intramammary dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin intramammary dosage forms. 526.1696 Section 526.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS INTRAMAMMARY DOSAGE FORMS § 526.1696 Penicillin...

  1. [Research advance of dosage compensation and MSL complex].

    PubMed

    Sun, Min-Qiu; Lin, Peng; Chen, Yun; Wang, Yi-Lei; Zhang, Zi-Ping

    2012-05-01

    Dosage compensation effect, which exists widely in eukaryotes with sexual reproduction, is an essential biological process that equalizes the level of gene expression between genders based on sex determination. In Drosophila, the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex mediates dosage compensation by acetylating histone H4 lysine K16 on nucleosome of some specific sites on the male X chromosome, globally upregulates twofold expression of active X-linked genes from the single X chromosome, and makes up for the shortage that the male has only one single X chromosome in male Drosophila. Up to date, the structure of basic components of MSL complex, which consists of at least five protein subunits and two non-coding RNAs, has already been revealed, and the interaction sites among these components have also been generally identified. Furthermore, abundant researches on recognition mechanism of the complex have been published. In contrast, many studies have revealed that mammalian dosage compensation functions by silencing gene expression from one of the two X chromosomes in females. The main components of mammalian MSL complex have already been identified, but the knowledge of their function is limited. Up to now, research of MSLs in teleosts is scarcely studied. This review summarizes the similarities and differences among dosage compensation mechanisms of nematodes, fruit flies and mammals, introduces the recent research advances in MSL complex, as well as molecular mechanism of dosage compensation in fruit fly, and finally addresses some problems to be resolved. Meanwhile, the diversity of msl3 gene in fishes is found by synteny analysis. This information might provide insightful directions for future research on the mechanisms of dosage compensation in various species.

  2. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390 Section 520.390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390...

  3. 21 CFR 520.445 - Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.445 Section 520.445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.445...

  4. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540 Section 520.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540...

  5. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540 Section 520.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540...

  6. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300 Section 520.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300...

  7. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300 Section 520.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300...

  8. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540 Section 520.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540...

  9. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390 Section 520.390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390...

  10. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540 Section 520.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540...

  11. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620 Section 520.620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620...

  12. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390 Section 520.390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390...

  13. 21 CFR 520.540 - Dexamethasone oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dexamethasone oral dosage forms. 520.540 Section 520.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.540...

  14. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620 Section 520.620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620...

  15. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620 Section 520.620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620...

  16. 21 CFR 520.390 - Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chloramphenicol oral dosage forms. 520.390 Section 520.390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.390...

  17. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620 Section 520.620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620...

  18. 21 CFR 520.445 - Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chlortetracycline oral dosage forms. 520.445 Section 520.445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.445...

  19. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300 Section 520.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300...

  20. 21 CFR 520.620 - Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine oral dosage forms. 520.620 Section 520.620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.620...

  1. 21 CFR 520.300 - Cambendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cambendazole oral dosage forms. 520.300 Section 520.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.300...

  2. 21 CFR 520.905 - Fenbendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fenbendazole oral dosage forms. 520.905 Section 520.905 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.905...

  3. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 Section 520.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin oral...

  4. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 Section 520.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin oral...

  5. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154 Section 520.154 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin oral...

  6. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 Section 520.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole oral...

  7. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 Section 520.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin oral...

  8. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 Section 520.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole oral...

  9. 21 CFR 520.45 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.45 Section 520.45 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.45 Albendazole oral...

  10. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 Section 520.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin oral...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1120 - Haloxon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Haloxon oral dosage forms. 520.1120 Section 520.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1120 Haloxon oral...

  12. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 Section 520.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin oral...

  13. 21 CFR 520.903 - Febantel oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Febantel oral dosage forms. 520.903 Section 520.903 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.903 Febantel oral...

  14. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 Section 520.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin oral...

  15. 21 CFR 520.38 - Albendazole oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Albendazole oral dosage forms. 520.38 Section 520.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.38 Albendazole oral...

  16. 21 CFR 520.90 - Ampicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ampicillin oral dosage forms. 520.90 Section 520.90 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.90 Ampicillin oral...

  17. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154 Section 520.154 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin oral...

  18. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154 Section 520.154 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin oral...

  19. 21 CFR 520.154 - Bacitracin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bacitracin oral dosage forms. 520.154 Section 520.154 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154 Bacitracin oral...

  20. 21 CFR 520.88 - Amoxicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amoxicillin oral dosage forms. 520.88 Section 520.88 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.88 Amoxicillin oral...

  1. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696 Section 520.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin oral...

  2. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696 Section 520.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin oral...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1696 - Penicillin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin oral dosage forms. 520.1696 Section 520.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696 Penicillin oral...

  4. Sex Chromosome Dosage Compensation in Heliconius Butterflies: Global yet Still Incomplete?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, James R.; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of heterogametic sex chromosomes is often—but not always—accompanied by the evolution of dosage compensating mechanisms that mitigate the impact of sex-specific gene dosage on levels of gene expression. One emerging view of this process is that such mechanisms may only evolve in male-heterogametic (XY) species but not in female-heterogametic (ZW) species, which will consequently exhibit “incomplete” sex chromosome dosage compensation. However, recent results suggest that at least some Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) may prove to be an exception to this prediction. Studies in bombycoid moths indicate the presence of a chromosome-wide epigenetic mechanism that effectively balances Z chromosome gene expression between the sexes by reducing Z-linked expression in males. In contrast, strong sex chromosome dosage effects without any reduction in male Z-linked expression were previously reported in a pyralid moth, suggesting a lack of any such dosage compensating mechanism. Here we report an analysis of sex chromosome dosage compensation in Heliconius butterflies, sampling multiple individuals for several different adult tissues (head, abdomen, leg, mouth, and antennae). Methodologically, we introduce a novel application of linear mixed-effects models to assess dosage compensation, offering a unified statistical framework that can estimate effects specific to chromosome, to sex, and their interactions (i.e., a dosage effect). Our results show substantially reduced Z-linked expression relative to autosomes in both sexes, as previously observed in bombycoid moths. This observation is consistent with an increasing body of evidence that some lepidopteran species possess an epigenetic dosage compensating mechanism that reduces Z chromosome expression in males to levels comparable with females. However, this mechanism appears to be imperfect in Heliconius, resulting in a modest dosage effect that produces an average 5–20% increase in male expression

  5. 21 CFR 500.26 - Timed-release dosage form drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 201(v) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (b) Timed-release dosage form animal drugs that... using procedures and controls to ensure release of the total dosage at a safe and effective rate. Data...

  6. 21 CFR 500.26 - Timed-release dosage form drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 201(v) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (b) Timed-release dosage form animal drugs that... using procedures and controls to ensure release of the total dosage at a safe and effective rate. Data...

  7. 21 CFR 500.26 - Timed-release dosage form drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 201(v) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (b) Timed-release dosage form animal drugs that... using procedures and controls to ensure release of the total dosage at a safe and effective rate. Data...

  8. 21 CFR 500.26 - Timed-release dosage form drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 201(v) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (b) Timed-release dosage form animal drugs that... using procedures and controls to ensure release of the total dosage at a safe and effective rate. Data...

  9. 21 CFR 500.26 - Timed-release dosage form drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 201(v) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. (b) Timed-release dosage form animal drugs that... using procedures and controls to ensure release of the total dosage at a safe and effective rate. Data...

  10. Genomic adaptation of admixed dairy cattle in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eui-Soo; Rothschild, Max F.

    2014-01-01

    Dairy cattle in East Africa imported from the U.S. and Europe have been adapted to new environments. In small local farms, cattle have generally been maintained by crossbreeding that could increase survivability under a severe environment. Eventually, genomic ancestry of a specific breed will be nearly fixed in genomic regions of local breeds or crossbreds when it is advantageous for survival or production in harsh environments. To examine this situation, 25 Friesians and 162 local cattle produced by crossbreeding of dairy breeds in Kenya were sampled and genotyped using 50K SNPs. Using principal component analysis (PCA), the admixed local cattle were found to consist of several imported breeds, including Guernsey, Norwegian Red, and Holstein. To infer the influence of parental breeds on genomic regions, local ancestry mapping was performed based on the similarity of haplotypes. As a consequence, it appears that no genomic region has been under the complete influence of a specific parental breed. Nonetheless, the ancestry of Holstein-Friesians was substantial in most genomic regions (>80%). Furthermore, we examined the frequency of the most common haplotypes from parental breeds that have changed substantially in Kenyan crossbreds during admixture. The frequency of these haplotypes from parental breeds, which were likely to be selected in temperate regions, has deviated considerably from expected frequency in 11 genomic regions. Additionally, extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH) based methods were applied to identify the regions responding to recent selection in crossbreds, called candidate regions, resulting in seven regions that appeared to be affected by Holstein-Friesians. However, some signatures of selection were less dependent on Holsteins-Friesians, suggesting evidence of adaptation in East Africa. The analysis of local ancestry is a useful approach to understand the detailed genomic structure and may reveal regions of the genome required for specialized

  11. Maintenance of Xist Imprinting Depends on Chromatin Condensation State and Rnf12 Dosage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Mitani, Atsushi; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Sado, Takashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2016-10-01

    In female mammals, activation of Xist (X-inactive specific transcript) is essential for establishment of X chromosome inactivation. During early embryonic development in mice, paternal Xist is preferentially expressed whereas maternal Xist (Xm-Xist) is silenced. Unlike autosomal imprinted genes, Xist imprinting for Xm-Xist silencing was erased in cloned or parthenogenetic but not fertilized embryos. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the variable nature of Xm-Xist imprinting is poorly understood. Here, we revealed that Xm-Xist silencing depends on chromatin condensation states at the Xist/Tsix genomic region and on Rnf12 expression levels. In early preimplantation, chromatin decondensation via H3K9me3 loss and histone acetylation gain caused Xm-Xist derepression irrespective of embryo type. Although the presence of the paternal genome during pronuclear formation impeded Xm-Xist derepression, Xm-Xist was robustly derepressed when the maternal genome was decondensed before fertilization. Once Xm-Xist was derepressed by chromatin alterations, the derepression was stably maintained and rescued XmXpΔ lethality, indicating that loss of Xm-Xist imprinting was irreversible. In late preimplantation, Oct4 served as a chromatin opener to create transcriptional permissive states at Xm-Xist/Tsix genomic loci. In parthenogenetic embryos, Rnf12 overdose caused Xm-Xist derepression via Xm-Tsix repression; physiological Rnf12 levels were essential for Xm-Xist silencing maintenance in fertilized embryos. Thus, chromatin condensation and fine-tuning of Rnf12 dosage were crucial for Xist imprint maintenance by silencing Xm-Xist.

  12. Chromosomes in a genome-wise order: evidence for metaphase architecture.

    PubMed

    Weise, Anja; Bhatt, Samarth; Piaszinski, Katja; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Fan, Xiaobo; Altendorf-Hofmann, Annelore; Tanomtong, Alongklod; Chaveerach, Arunrat; de Cioffi, Marcelo Bello; de Oliveira, Edivaldo; Walther, Joachim-U; Liehr, Thomas; Chaudhuri, Jyoti P

    2016-01-01

    One fundamental finding of the last decade is that, besides the primary DNA sequence information there are several epigenetic "information-layers" like DNA-and histone modifications, chromatin packaging and, last but not least, the position of genes in the nucleus. We postulate that the functional genomic architecture is not restricted to the interphase of the cell cycle but can also be observed in the metaphase stage, when chromosomes are most condensed and microscopically visible. If so, it offers the unique opportunity to directly analyze the functional aspects of genomic architecture in different cells, species and diseases. Another aspect not directly accessible by molecular techniques is the genome merged from two different haploid parental genomes represented by the homologous chromosome sets. Our results show that there is not only a well-known and defined nuclear architecture in interphase but also in metaphase leading to a bilateral organization of the two haploid sets of chromosomes. Moreover, evidence is provided for the parental origin of the haploid grouping. From our findings we postulate an additional epigenetic information layer within the genome including the organization of homologous chromosomes and their parental origin which may now substantially change the landscape of genetics.

  13. Comparative genomic de-convolution of the cotton genome revealed a decaploid ancestor and widespread chromosomal fractionation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiyin; Guo, Hui; Wang, Jinpeng; Lei, Tianyu; Liu, Tao; Wang, Zhenyi; Li, Yuxian; Lee, Tae-Ho; Li, Jingping; Tang, Haibao; Jin, Dianchuan; Paterson, Andrew H

    2016-02-01

    The 'apparently' simple genomes of many angiosperms mask complex evolutionary histories. The reference genome sequence for cotton (Gossypium spp.) revealed a ploidy change of a complexity unprecedented to date, indeed that could not be distinguished as to its exact dosage. Herein, by developing several comparative, computational and statistical approaches, we revealed a 5× multiplication in the cotton lineage of an ancestral genome common to cotton and cacao, and proposed evolutionary models to show how such a decaploid ancestor formed. The c. 70% gene loss necessary to bring the ancestral decaploid to its current gene count appears to fit an approximate geometrical model; that is, although many genes may be lost by single-gene deletion events, some may be lost in groups of consecutive genes. Gene loss following cotton decaploidy has largely just reduced gene copy numbers of some homologous groups. We designed a novel approach to deconvolute layers of chromosome homology, providing definitive information on gene orthology and paralogy across broad evolutionary distances, both of fundamental value and serving as an important platform to support further studies in and beyond cotton and genomics communities. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Effect of dosage increments on blood phenytoin concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, F.; Hooper, W. D.; Tyrer, J. H.; Eadie, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Blood phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin) concentrations were measured after each dosage change in 12 epileptic patients who were given increasing oral doses of phenytoin. In each of these patients a dosage increment beyond the dosage that produced a blood phenytoin level of 6-9 μg/ml. caused a disproportionately great increase in the blood concentration of drug. This effect might be expected if the limit of the body's capacity to metabolize phenytoin were being reached. As oral dosages were increased in one patient, measurements of the rate of urinary excretion of phenytoin metabolite showed that the phase of rapid rise in blood phenytoin concentration coincided with a failure to increase the rate of phenytoin metabolite excretion. Awareness of the non-linear relation between oral dose and blood concentration of phenytoin in the individual patient, and realization that the phase of rapid rise in blood phenytoin concentration occurs through the `therapeutic' range of 10-20 μg/ml., is of importance to those who use blood phenytoin levels as a guide to the adequacy of anticonvulsant therapy. PMID:4647859

  15. Contrasting behavior of heterochromatic and euchromatic chromosome portions and pericentric genome separation in pre-bouquet spermatocytes of hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Scherthan, Harry; Schöfisch, Karina; Dell, Thomas; Illner, Doris

    2014-12-01

    The spatial distribution of parental genomes has attracted much interest because intranuclear chromosome distribution can modulate the transcriptome of cells and influence the efficacy of meiotic homologue pairing. Pairing of parental chromosomes is imperative to sexual reproduction as it translates into homologue segregation and genome haploidization to counteract the genome doubling at fertilization. Differential FISH tagging of parental pericentromeric genome portions and specific painting of euchromatic chromosome arms in Mus musculus (MMU) × Mus spretus (MSP) hybrid spermatogenesis disclosed a phase of homotypic non-homologous pericentromere clustering that led to parental pericentric genome separation from the pre-leptoteneup to zygotene stages. Preferential clustering of MMU pericentromeres correlated with particular enrichment of epigenetic marks (H3K9me3), HP1-γ and structural maintenance of chromosomes SMC6 complex proteins at the MMU major satellite DNA repeats. In contrast to the separation of heterochromatic pericentric genome portions, the euchromatic arms of homeologous chromosomes showed considerable presynaptic pairing already during leptotene stage of all mice investigated. Pericentric genome separation was eventually disbanded by telomere clustering that concentrated both parental pericentric genome portions in a limited nuclear sector of the bouquet nucleus. Our data disclose the differential behavior of pericentromeric heterochromatin and the euchromatic portions of the parental genomes during homologue search. Homotypic pericentromere clustering early in prophase I may contribute to the exclusion of large repetitive DNA domains from homology search, while the telomere bouquet congregates and registers spatially separated portions of the genome to fuel synapsis initiation and high levels of homologue pairing, thus contributing to the fidelity of meiosis and reproduction.

  16. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044 Section 520.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... sulfate oral dosage forms. ...

  17. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044 Section 520.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... sulfate oral dosage forms. ...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044 Section 520.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... sulfate oral dosage forms. ...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044 Section 520.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... sulfate oral dosage forms. ...

  20. Parent-Child Interaction Using a Mobile and Wireless System for Blood Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Årsand, Eirik; Walseth, Ole Anders; Andersson, Niklas; Jenssen, Martin; Taylor, Ted

    2005-01-01

    Background Children with type 1 diabetes and their parents face rigorous procedures for blood glucose monitoring and regulation. Mobile telecommunication systems show potential as an aid for families’ self-management of diabetes. Objective A prototype designed to automatically transfer readings from a child’s blood glucose monitor to their parent’s mobile phone was tested. In this formative stage of development, we sought insights into the appropriateness of the concept, feasibility of use, and ideas for further development and research. Methods During four months, a self-selected sample of 15 children (aged 9 to 15 years) with type 1 diabetes and their parents (n = 30) used the prototype approximately three times daily. Parent and child experiences were collected through questionnaires and through interviews with 9 of the parents. Results System use was easily integrated into everyday life, and parents valued the sense of reassurance offered by the system. Parents’ ongoing struggle to balance control of their children with allowing independence was evident. For children who measured regularly, use appeared to reduce parental intrusions. For those who measured irregularly, however, parental reminders (eg, “nagging”) appeared to increase. Although increased reminders could be considered a positive outcome, they can potentially increase parent-child conflict and thus also undermine proper metabolic control. Parents felt that system appropriateness tapered off with the onset of adolescence, partly due to a potential sense of surveillance from the child’s perspective that could fuel oppositional behavior. Parental suggestions for further developments included similar alerts of irregular insulin dosages and automatically generated dietary and insulin dosage advice. Conclusions User enthusiasm suggests that such systems might find a consumer market regardless of whether or not they ultimately improve health outcomes. Thus, more rigorous studies are

  1. 21 CFR 524.1662 - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxytetracycline hydrochloride ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1662 Section 524.1662 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1662 Oxytetracycline hydrochloride ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. ...

  2. Melt-processed polymeric cellular dosage forms for immediate drug release.

    PubMed

    Blaesi, Aron H; Saka, Nannaji

    2015-12-28

    The present immediate-release solid dosage forms, such as the oral tablets and capsules, comprise granular matrices. While effective in releasing the drug rapidly, they are fraught with difficulties inherent in processing particulate matter. By contrast, liquid-based processes would be far more predictable; but the standard cast microstructures are unsuited for immediate-release because they resist fluid percolation and penetration. In this article, we introduce cellular dosage forms that can be readily prepared from polymeric melts by incorporating the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of microscopic gas bubbles in a molding process. We show that the cell topology and formulation of such cellular structures can be engineered to reduce the length-scale of the mass-transfer step, which determines the time of drug release, from as large as the dosage form itself to as small as the thickness of the cell wall. This allows the cellular dosage forms to achieve drug release rates over an order of magnitude faster compared with those of cast matrices, spanning the entire spectrum of immediate-release and beyond. The melt-processed polymeric cellular dosage forms enable predictive design of immediate-release solid dosage forms by tailoring microstructures, and could be manufactured efficiently in a single step.

  3. Estimated Radiation Dosage on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-01

    This global map of Mars, based on data from NASA Mars Odyssey, shows the estimated radiation dosages from cosmic rays reaching the surface, a serious health concern for any future human exploration of the planet.

  4. Transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms through the small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S S; Hardy, J G; Fara, J W

    1986-01-01

    The gastrointestinal transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms has been measured in 201 studies in normal subjects using gamma scintigraphy. Solutions, small pellets, and single units (matrix tablets and osmotic pumps) were administered with different amounts of food in the stomach, ranging from fasted state to heavy breakfast. Gastric emptying was affected by the nature of the dosage form and the presence of food in the stomach. Solutions and pellets were emptied even when the stomach was in the digestive mode, while single units were retained for long periods of time, depending on the size of the meal. In contrast, measured intestinal transit times were independent of the dosage form and fed state. The small intestinal transit time of about three hours (mean +/- 1 h SEM) has implications for the design of dosage forms for the sustained release of drugs in specific positions in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:3732895

  5. Genome shuffling of Lactobacillus plantarum C88 improves adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yujuan; Duan, Cuicui; Gao, Lei; Yu, Xue; Niu, Chunhua; Li, Shengyu

    2017-01-01

    Genome shuffling is an important method for rapid improvement in microbial strains for desired phenotypes. In this study, ultraviolet irradiation and nitrosoguanidine were used as mutagens to enhance the adhesion of the wild-type Lactobacillus plantarum C88. Four strains with better property were screened after mutagenesis to develop a library of parent strains for three rounds of genome shuffling. Fusants F3-1, F3-2, F3-3, and F3-4 were screened as the improved strains. The in vivo and in vitro tests results indicated that the population after three rounds of genome shuffling exhibited improved adhesive property. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA results showed significant differences between the parent strain and recombinant strains at DNA level. These results suggest that the adhesive property of L. plantarum C88 can be significantly improved by genome shuffling. Improvement in the adhesive property of bacterial cells by genome shuffling enhances the colonization of probiotic strains which further benefits to exist probiotic function.

  6. Individualizing drug dosage with longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolu; Qu, Annie

    2016-10-30

    We propose a two-step procedure to personalize drug dosage over time under the framework of a log-linear mixed-effect model. We model patients' heterogeneity using subject-specific random effects, which are treated as the realizations of an unspecified stochastic process. We extend the conditional quadratic inference function to estimate both fixed-effect coefficients and individual random effects on a longitudinal training data sample in the first step and propose an adaptive procedure to estimate new patients' random effects and provide dosage recommendations for new patients in the second step. An advantage of our approach is that we do not impose any distribution assumption on estimating random effects. Moreover, the new approach can accommodate more general time-varying covariates corresponding to random effects. We show in theory and numerical studies that the proposed method is more efficient compared with existing approaches, especially when covariates are time varying. In addition, a real data example of a clozapine study confirms that our two-step procedure leads to more accurate drug dosage recommendations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Sex chromosome-specific regulation in the Drosophila male germline but little evidence for chromosomal dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation.

    PubMed

    Meiklejohn, Colin D; Landeen, Emily L; Cook, Jodi M; Kingan, Sarah B; Presgraves, Daven C

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes (e.g., XY in males or ZW in females) has repeatedly elicited the evolution of two kinds of chromosome-specific regulation: dosage compensation--the equalization of X chromosome gene expression in males and females--and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI)--the transcriptional silencing and heterochromatinization of the X during meiosis in the male (or Z in the female) germline. How the X chromosome is regulated in the Drosophila melanogaster male germline is unclear. Here we report three new findings concerning gene expression from the X in Drosophila testes. First, X chromosome-wide dosage compensation appears to be absent from most of the Drosophila male germline. Second, microarray analysis provides no evidence for X chromosome-specific inactivation during meiosis. Third, we confirm the previous discovery that the expression of transgene reporters driven by autosomal spermatogenesis-specific promoters is strongly reduced when inserted on the X chromosome versus the autosomes; but we show that this chromosomal difference in expression is established in premeiotic cells and persists in meiotic cells. The magnitude of the X-autosome difference in transgene expression cannot be explained by the absence of dosage compensation, suggesting that a previously unrecognized mechanism limits expression from the X during spermatogenesis in Drosophila. These findings help to resolve several previously conflicting reports and have implications for patterns of genome evolution and speciation in Drosophila.

  8. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. ...

  9. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. ...

  10. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. ...

  11. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. ...

  12. School-based early childhood education and age-28 well-being: effects by timing, dosage, and subgroups.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Arthur J; Temple, Judy A; Ou, Suh-Ruu; Arteaga, Irma A; White, Barry A B

    2011-07-15

    Advances in understanding the effects of early education have benefited public policy and developmental science. Although preschool has demonstrated positive effects on life-course outcomes, limitations in knowledge on program scale, subgroup differences, and dosage levels have hindered understanding. We report the effects of the Child-Parent Center Education Program on indicators of well-being up to 25 years later for more than 1400 participants. This established, publicly funded intervention begins in preschool and provides up to 6 years of service in inner-city Chicago schools. Relative to the comparison group receiving the usual services, program participation was independently linked to higher educational attainment, income, socioeconomic status (SES), and health insurance coverage, as well as lower rates of justice-system involvement and substance abuse. Evidence of enduring effects was strongest for preschool, especially for males and children of high school dropouts. The positive influence of four or more years of service was limited primarily to education and SES. Dosage within program components was mostly unrelated to outcomes. Findings demonstrate support for the enduring effects of sustained school-based early education to the end of the third decade of life.

  13. School-Based Early Childhood Education and Age-28 Well-Being: Effects by Timing, Dosage, and Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Arthur J.; Temple, Judy A.; Ou, Suh-Ruu; Arteaga, Irma A.; White, Barry A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in understanding the effects of early education have benefited public policy and developmental science. Although preschool has demonstrated positive effects on life-course outcomes, limitations in knowledge on program scale, subgroup differences, and dosage levels have hindered progress. We report the effects of the Child-Parent Center Education Program on indicators of well-being up to 25 years later for over 1,400 participants. This established, publicly-funded intervention begins in preschool and provides up to 6 years of service in inner-city Chicago schools. Relative to the comparison group receiving the usual services, program participation was independently linked to higher educational attainment, socioeconomic status (SES) including income, health insurance coverage as well as lower rates of justice-system involvement and substance abuse. Evidence of enduring effects was strongest for preschool, especially for males and children of high school dropouts. The positive influence of 4 or more years of service was limited primarily to education and SES. Dosage within program components was mostly unrelated to outcomes. Findings demonstrate support for the enduring effects of sustained school-based early education to the end of the third decade of life. PMID:21659565

  14. Alternative dominance of the parental genomes in hybrid cells generated through the fusion of mouse embryonic stem cells with fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Matveeva, Natalia M; Fishman, Veniamin S; Zakharova, Irina S; Shevchenko, Alexander I; Pristyazhnyuk, Inna E; Menzorov, Aleksei G; Serov, Oleg L

    2017-12-22

    For the first time, two types of hybrid cells with embryonic stem (ES) cell-like and fibroblast-like phenotypes were produced through the fusion of mouse ES cells with fibroblasts. Transcriptome analysis of 2,848 genes differentially expressed in the parental cells demonstrated that 34-43% of these genes are expressed in hybrid cells, consistent with their phenotypes; 25-29% of these genes display intermediate levels of expression, and 12-16% of these genes maintained expression at the parental cell level, inconsistent with the phenotype of the hybrid cell. Approximately 20% of the analyzed genes displayed unexpected expression patterns that differ from both parents. An unusual phenomenon was observed, namely, the illegitimate activation of Xist expression and the inactivation of one of two X-chromosomes in the near-tetraploid fibroblast-like hybrid cells, whereas both Xs were active before and after in vitro differentiation of the ES cell-like hybrid cells. These results and previous data obtained on heterokaryons suggest that the appearance of hybrid cells with a fibroblast-like phenotype reflects the reprogramming, rather than the induced differentiation, of the ES cell genome under the influence of a somatic partner.

  15. [Detection of the introgression of genome elements of Aegilops cylindrica Host. into Triticum aestivum L. genome with ISSR-analysis].

    PubMed

    Galaev, A V; Babaiants, L T; Sivolap, Iu M

    2003-01-01

    Comparative analysis of introgressive and parental forms of wheat was carried out to reveal the sites of donor genome with new loci of resistance to fungal diseases. By ISSR-method 124 ISSR-loci were detected in the genomes of 18 individual plants of introgressive line 5/20-91; 17 of them have been related to introgressive fragments of Ae. cylindrica genome in T. aestivum. It was shown that ISSR-method is effective for detection of the variability caused by introgression of alien genetic material to T. aestivum genome.

  16. Widespread differential maternal and paternal genome effects on fetal bone phenotype at mid-gestation.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ruidong; Lee, Alice M C; Eindorf, Tanja; Javadmanesh, Ali; Ghanipoor-Samami, Mani; Gugger, Madeleine; Fitzsimmons, Carolyn J; Kruk, Zbigniew A; Pitchford, Wayne S; Leviton, Alison J; Thomsen, Dana A; Beckman, Ian; Anderson, Gail I; Burns, Brian M; Rutley, David L; Xian, Cory J; Hiendleder, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Parent-of-origin-dependent (epi)genetic factors are important determinants of prenatal development that program adult phenotype. However, data on magnitude and specificity of maternal and paternal genome effects on fetal bone are lacking. We used an outbred bovine model to dissect and quantify effects of parental genomes, fetal sex, and nongenetic maternal effects on the fetal skeleton and analyzed phenotypic and molecular relationships between fetal muscle and bone. Analysis of 51 bone morphometric and weight parameters from 72 fetuses recovered at day 153 gestation (54% term) identified six principal components (PC1-6) that explained 80% of the variation in skeletal parameters. Parental genomes accounted for most of the variation in bone wet weight (PC1, 72.1%), limb ossification (PC2, 99.8%), flat bone size (PC4, 99.7%), and axial skeletal growth (PC5, 96.9%). Limb length showed lesser effects of parental genomes (PC3, 40.8%) and a significant nongenetic maternal effect (gestational weight gain, 29%). Fetal sex affected bone wet weight (PC1, p < 0.0001) and limb length (PC3, p < 0.05). Partitioning of variation explained by parental genomes revealed strong maternal genome effects on bone wet weight (74.1%, p < 0.0001) and axial skeletal growth (93.5%, p < 0.001), whereas paternal genome controlled limb ossification (95.1%, p < 0.0001). Histomorphometric data revealed strong maternal genome effects on growth plate height (98.6%, p < 0.0001) and trabecular thickness (85.5%, p < 0.0001) in distal femur. Parental genome effects on fetal bone were mirrored by maternal genome effects on fetal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (96.9%, p < 0.001) and paternal genome effects on alkaline phosphatase (90.0%, p < 0.001) and their correlations with maternally controlled bone wet weight and paternally controlled limb ossification, respectively. Bone wet weight and flat bone size correlated positively with muscle weight (r = 0.84 and 0.77, p

  17. Potential assessment of genome-wide association study and genomic selection in Japanese pear Pyrus pyrifolia

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Hayashi, Takeshi; Terakami, Shingo; Takada, Norio; Sawamura, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2013-01-01

    Although the potential of marker-assisted selection (MAS) in fruit tree breeding has been reported, bi-parental QTL mapping before MAS has hindered the introduction of MAS to fruit tree breeding programs. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are an alternative to bi-parental QTL mapping in long-lived perennials. Selection based on genomic predictions of breeding values (genomic selection: GS) is another alternative for MAS. This study examined the potential of GWAS and GS in pear breeding with 76 Japanese pear cultivars to detect significant associations of 162 markers with nine agronomic traits. We applied multilocus Bayesian models accounting for ordinal categorical phenotypes for GWAS and GS model training. Significant associations were detected at harvest time, black spot resistance and the number of spurs and two of the associations were closely linked to known loci. Genome-wide predictions for GS were accurate at the highest level (0.75) in harvest time, at medium levels (0.38–0.61) in resistance to black spot, firmness of flesh, fruit shape in longitudinal section, fruit size, acid content and number of spurs and at low levels (<0.2) in all soluble solid content and vigor of tree. Results suggest the potential of GWAS and GS for use in future breeding programs in Japanese pear. PMID:23641189

  18. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622 Section 520.622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.622...

  19. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622 Section 520.622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.622...

  20. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763 Section 520.763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763...

  1. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82 Section 520.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.82...

  2. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622 Section 520.622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.622...

  3. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763 Section 520.763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763...

  4. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82 Section 520.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.82...

  5. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763 Section 520.763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763...

  6. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622 Section 520.622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.622...

  7. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82 Section 520.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.82...

  8. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763 Section 520.763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763...

  9. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763 Section 520.763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1242 - Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms. 520.1242 Section 520.1242 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1242...

  11. 21 CFR 520.622 - Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate oral dosage forms. 520.622 Section 520.622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.622...

  12. 21 CFR 520.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aminopropazine fumarate oral dosage forms. 520.82 Section 520.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.82...

  13. Genetic variance partitioning and genome-wide prediction with allele dosage information in autotetraploid potato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato breeding cycles typically last 6-7 years because of the modest seed multiplication rate and large number of traits required of new varieties. Genomic selection has the potential to increase genetic gain per unit of time, through higher accuracy and/or a shorter cycle. Both possibilities were ...

  14. Measuring genomic pre-selection in theory and in practice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potential biases from genomic pre-selection were estimated from actual selection and mating patterns of US Holsteins. Traditional models using only phenotypes and pedigrees do not adjust for average genomic merit of an animal’s parents, progeny, mates, or contemporaries. Positive assortative mating ...

  15. Estimated Maximal Safe Dosages of Tumescent Lidocaine

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumescent lidocaine anesthesia consists of subcutaneous injection of relatively large volumes (up to 4 L or more) of dilute lidocaine (≤1 g/L) and epinephrine (≤1 mg/L). Although tumescent lidocaine anesthesia is used for an increasing variety of surgical procedures, the maximum safe dosage is unknown. Our primary aim in this study was to measure serum lidocaine concentrations after subcutaneous administration of tumescent lidocaine with and without liposuction. Our hypotheses were that even with large doses (i.e., >30 mg/kg), serum lidocaine concentrations would be below levels associated with mild toxicity and that the concentration-time profile would be lower after liposuction than without liposuction. METHODS: Volunteers participated in 1 to 2 infiltration studies without liposuction and then one study with tumescent liposuction totally by local anesthesia. Serum lidocaine concentrations were measured at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, and 24 hours after each tumescent lidocaine infiltration. Area under the curve (AUC∞) of the serum lidocaine concentration-time profiles and peak serum lidocaine concentrations (Cmax) were determined with and without liposuction. For any given milligram per kilogram dosage, the probability that Cmax >6 μg/mL, the threshold for mild lidocaine toxicity was estimated using tolerance interval analysis. RESULTS: In 41 tumescent infiltration procedures among 14 volunteer subjects, tumescent lidocaine dosages ranged from 19.2 to 52 mg/kg. Measured serum lidocaine concentrations were all <6 μg/mL over the 24-hour study period. AUC∞s with liposuction were significantly less than those without liposuction (P = 0.001). The estimated risk of lidocaine toxicity without liposuction at a dose of 28 mg/kg and with liposuction at a dose of 45 mg/kg was ≤1 per 2000. CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary estimates for maximum safe dosages of tumescent lidocaine are 28 mg/kg without liposuction and 45 mg/kg with liposuction. As a

  16. Estimated Maximal Safe Dosages of Tumescent Lidocaine.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jeffrey A; Jeske, Daniel R

    2016-05-01

    Tumescent lidocaine anesthesia consists of subcutaneous injection of relatively large volumes (up to 4 L or more) of dilute lidocaine (≤1 g/L) and epinephrine (≤1 mg/L). Although tumescent lidocaine anesthesia is used for an increasing variety of surgical procedures, the maximum safe dosage is unknown. Our primary aim in this study was to measure serum lidocaine concentrations after subcutaneous administration of tumescent lidocaine with and without liposuction. Our hypotheses were that even with large doses (i.e., >30 mg/kg), serum lidocaine concentrations would be below levels associated with mild toxicity and that the concentration-time profile would be lower after liposuction than without liposuction. Volunteers participated in 1 to 2 infiltration studies without liposuction and then one study with tumescent liposuction totally by local anesthesia. Serum lidocaine concentrations were measured at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, and 24 hours after each tumescent lidocaine infiltration. Area under the curve (AUC∞) of the serum lidocaine concentration-time profiles and peak serum lidocaine concentrations (Cmax) were determined with and without liposuction. For any given milligram per kilogram dosage, the probability that Cmax >6 μg/mL, the threshold for mild lidocaine toxicity was estimated using tolerance interval analysis. In 41 tumescent infiltration procedures among 14 volunteer subjects, tumescent lidocaine dosages ranged from 19.2 to 52 mg/kg. Measured serum lidocaine concentrations were all <6 μg/mL over the 24-hour study period. AUC∞s with liposuction were significantly less than those without liposuction (P = 0.001). The estimated risk of lidocaine toxicity without liposuction at a dose of 28 mg/kg and with liposuction at a dose of 45 mg/kg was ≤1 per 2000. Preliminary estimates for maximum safe dosages of tumescent lidocaine are 28 mg/kg without liposuction and 45 mg/kg with liposuction. As a result of delayed systemic absorption, these

  17. 21 CFR 520.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate oral dosage forms. 520.1044 Section 520.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1044 Gentamicin...

  18. Evolution of vertebrate sex chromosomes and dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated sex chromosomes in mammals and other vertebrates evolved independently but in strikingly similar ways. Vertebrates with differentiated sex chromosomes share the problems of the unequal expression of the genes borne on sex chromosomes, both between the sexes and with respect to autosomes. Dosage compensation of genes on sex chromosomes is surprisingly variable - and can even be absent - in different vertebrate groups. Systems that compensate for different gene dosages include a wide range of global, regional and gene-by-gene processes that differ in their extent and their molecular mechanisms. However, many elements of these control systems are similar across distant phylogenetic divisions and show parallels to other gene silencing systems. These dosage systems cannot be identical by descent but were probably constructed from elements of ancient silencing mechanisms that are ubiquitous among vertebrates and shared throughout eukaryotes.

  19. Semi-solid dosage form of clonazepam for rapid oral mucosal absorption.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Osamu; Machida, Yoshiharu; Onishi, Hiraku

    2011-07-01

    In order to obtain an alternative to the intravenous (i.v.) dosage form of clonazepam (CZ), an oral droplet formulation of CZ was developed previously; however, the droplet was physically unstable. Therefore, in the present study, it was attempted to develop an easily-handled dosage form, which was more physically stable and allowed rapid drug absorption from oral mucosa. A semi-solid dosage form, composed of polyethylene glycol 1500 (PEG), CZ, and oleic acid (OA) at 37/1/2 (w/w) and named PEG/CZ/OA, and a semi-solid dosage form containing PEG and CZ at 39/1 (w/w), called PEG/CZ, were prepared. Their physical stability in air at room temperature and oral mucosal absorption in rats were investigated. The semi-solid dosage forms were much more stable physically than the droplet, that is, no recrystallization of CZ was observed for at least 8 days. The effective concentration for humans and rats (20 ng/mL or more) was achieved within 30 min after buccal administration for both PEG/CZ/OA and PEG/CZ. The plasma concentration increased gradually and less varied at each time point for PEG/CZ/OA. PEG/CZ/OA was found to show more rapid and higher absorption of CZ in buccal administration than in sublingual administration. Buccal administration with the semi-solid dosage PEG/CZ with or without OA was suggested to be a possibly useful novel dosage form as an alternative to i.v. injection.

  20. Genetic Dosage Compensation in a Family with Velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alkalay, Avishai A.; Guo, Tingwei; Montagna, Cristina; Digilio, M. Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Morrow, Bernice

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies of a male child carrying the 22q11.2 deletion common in patients with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome revealed an unexpected rearrangement of the 22q11.2 region in his normal appearing mother. The mother carries a 3 Mb deletion on one copy and a reciprocal, similar sized duplication on the other copy of chromosome 22q11.2 as revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array comparative genome hybridization analysis. The most parsimonious mechanism for the rearrangement is a mitotic non-allelic homologous recombination event in a cell in the early embryo soon after fertilization. The normal phenotype of the mother can be explained by the theory of genetic dosage compensation. This is the second documented case of such an event for this or any genomic disorder. This finding helps to reinforce this phenomenon in a human model, and has significant implications for genetic counseling of future children. PMID:21337693

  1. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. ...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. ...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. ...

  4. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine implantation and injectable dosage forms. ...

  5. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form drug...

  6. 21 CFR 330.3 - Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products... AS SAFE AND EFFECTIVE AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.3 Imprinting of solid oral dosage form drug products. A requirement to imprint an identification code on solid oral dosage form drug...

  7. Modeling Effective Dosages in Hormetic Dose-Response Studies

    PubMed Central

    Belz, Regina G.; Piepho, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Two hormetic modifications of a monotonically decreasing log-logistic dose-response function are most often used to model stimulatory effects of low dosages of a toxicant in plant biology. As just one of these empirical models is yet properly parameterized to allow inference about quantities of interest, this study contributes the parameterized functions for the second hormetic model and compares the estimates of effective dosages between both models based on 23 hormetic data sets. Based on this, the impact on effective dosage estimations was evaluated, especially in case of a substantially inferior fit by one of the two models. Methodology/Principal Findings The data sets evaluated described the hormetic responses of four different test plant species exposed to 15 different chemical stressors in two different experimental dose-response test designs. Out of the 23 data sets, one could not be described by any of the two models, 14 could be better described by one of the two models, and eight could be equally described by both models. In cases of misspecification by any of the two models, the differences between effective dosages estimates (0–1768%) greatly exceeded the differences observed when both models provided a satisfactory fit (0–26%). This suggests that the conclusions drawn depending on the model used may diverge considerably when using an improper hormetic model especially regarding effective dosages quantifying hormesis. Conclusions/Significance The study showed that hormetic dose responses can take on many shapes and that this diversity can not be captured by a single model without risking considerable misinterpretation. However, the two empirical models considered in this paper together provide a powerful means to model, prove, and now also to quantify a wide range of hormetic responses by reparameterization. Despite this, they should not be applied uncritically, but after statistical and graphical assessment of their adequacy. PMID

  8. Automatic identification and normalization of dosage forms in drug monographs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Each day, millions of health consumers seek drug-related information on the Web. Despite some efforts in linking related resources, drug information is largely scattered in a wide variety of websites of different quality and credibility. Methods As a step toward providing users with integrated access to multiple trustworthy drug resources, we aim to develop a method capable of identifying drug's dosage form information in addition to drug name recognition. We developed rules and patterns for identifying dosage forms from different sections of full-text drug monographs, and subsequently normalized them to standardized RxNorm dosage forms. Results Our method represents a significant improvement compared with a baseline lookup approach, achieving overall macro-averaged Precision of 80%, Recall of 98%, and F-Measure of 85%. Conclusions We successfully developed an automatic approach for drug dosage form identification, which is critical for building links between different drug-related resources. PMID:22336431

  9. Recreating Stable Brachypodium hybridum Allotetraploids by Uniting the Divergent Genomes of B. distachyon and B. stacei

    PubMed Central

    Dinh Thi, Vinh Ha; Coriton, Olivier; Le Clainche, Isabelle; Arnaud, Dominique; Gordon, Sean P.; Linc, Gabriella; Catalan, Pilar; Hasterok, Robert; Vogel, John P.; Jahier, Joseph; Chalhoub, Boulos

    2016-01-01

    Brachypodium hybridum (2n = 30) is a natural allopolyploid with highly divergent sub-genomes derived from two extant diploid species, B. distachyon (2n = 10) and B. stacei (2n = 20) that differ in chromosome evolution and number. We created synthetic B. hybridum allotetraploids by hybridizing various lines of B. distachyon and B. stacei. The initial amphihaploid F1 interspecific hybrids were obtained at low frequencies when B. distachyon was used as the maternal parent (0.15% or 0.245% depending on the line used) and were sterile. No hybrids were obtained from reciprocal crosses or when autotetraploids of the parental species were crossed. Colchicine treatment was used to double the genome of the F1 amphihaploid lines leading to allotetraploids. The genome-doubled F1 plants produced a few S1 (first selfed generation) seeds after self-pollination. S1 plants from one parental combination (Bd3-1×Bsta5) were fertile and gave rise to further generations whereas those of another parental combination (Bd21×ABR114) were sterile, illustrating the importance of the parental lineages crossed. The synthetic allotetraploids were stable and resembled the natural B. hybridum at the phenotypic, cytogenetic and genomic levels. The successful creation of synthetic B. hybridum offers the possibility to study changes in genome structure and regulation at the earliest stages of allopolyploid formation in comparison with the parental species and natural B. hybridum. PMID:27936041

  10. The complex hybrid origins of the root knot nematodes revealed through comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sujai; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Blaxter, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Root knot nematodes (RKN) can infect most of the world’s agricultural crop species and are among the most important of all plant pathogens. As yet however we have little understanding of their origins or the genomic basis of their extreme polyphagy. The most damaging pathogens reproduce by obligatory mitotic parthenogenesis and it has been suggested that these species originated from interspecific hybridizations between unknown parental taxa. We have sequenced the genome of the diploid meiotic parthenogen Meloidogyne floridensis, and use a comparative genomic approach to test the hypothesis that this species was involved in the hybrid origin of the tropical mitotic parthenogen Meloidogyne incognita. Phylogenomic analysis of gene families from M. floridensis, M. incognita and an outgroup species Meloidogyne hapla was carried out to trace the evolutionary history of these species’ genomes, and we demonstrate that M. floridensis was one of the parental species in the hybrid origins of M. incognita. Analysis of the M. floridensis genome itself revealed many gene loci present in divergent copies, as they are in M. incognita, indicating that it too had a hybrid origin. The triploid M. incognita is shown to be a complex double-hybrid between M. floridensis and a third, unidentified, parent. The agriculturally important RKN have very complex origins involving the mixing of several parental genomes by hybridization and their extreme polyphagy and success in agricultural environments may be related to this hybridization, producing transgressive variation on which natural selection can act. It is now clear that studying RKN variation via individual marker loci may fail due to the species’ convoluted origins, and multi-species population genomics is essential to understand the hybrid diversity and adaptive variation of this important species complex. This comparative genomic analysis provides a compelling example of the importance and complexity of hybridization in

  11. Evaluation of the effect of torsemide on warfarin dosage requirements.

    PubMed

    Lai, Sophia; Momper, Jeremiah D; Yam, Felix K

    2017-08-01

    Background According to drug interaction databases, torsemide may potentiate the effects of warfarin. Evidence for this drug-drug interaction, however, is conflicting and the clinical significance is unknown. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of torsemide initiation on warfarin dosage requirements. Setting This study was conducted at the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System in San Diego, California. Method A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Veterans Affairs data from patients who were converted from bumetanide to torsemide between March 2014 and July 2014. Patients were also prescribed and taking warfarin during the observation period. Warfarin dosage requirements were evaluated to determine if any changes occurred within the first 3 months of starting torsemide. Main outcome measure The primary outcome was the average weekly warfarin dose before and after torsemide initiation. Results Eighteen patients met study inclusion criteria. The weekly warfarin dose before and after initiation of torsemide was not significantly different (34 ± 15 and 34 ± 13 mg, p > 0.05). Of those eighteen patients, only two experienced elevations in INR that required a decrease in warfarin dosage after torsemide initiation. Between those two patients, dosage reductions ranged from 5.3 to 18%. Conclusion These results indicated that most patients did not require any warfarin dosage adjustments after torsemide was initiated. The potential for interaction, however, still exists. While empiric warfarin dosage adjustments are not recommended when initiating torsemide, increased monitoring is warranted to minimize the risk of adverse effects.

  12. Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, the World’s First Pure Culture Lager Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Andrea; Hesselbart, Ana; Wendland, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Lager yeast beer production was revolutionized by the introduction of pure culture strains. The first established lager yeast strain is known as the bottom fermenting Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, which was originally termed Unterhefe No. 1 by Emil Chr. Hansen and has been used in production in since 1883. S. carlsbergensis belongs to group I/Saaz-type lager yeast strains and is better adapted to cold growth conditions than group II/Frohberg-type lager yeasts, e.g., the Weihenstephan strain WS34/70. Here, we sequenced S. carlsbergensis using next generation sequencing technologies. Lager yeasts are descendants from hybrids formed between a S. cerevisiae parent and a parent similar to S. eubayanus. Accordingly, the S. carlsbergensis 19.5-Mb genome is substantially larger than the 12-Mb S. cerevisiae genome. Based on the sequence scaffolds, synteny to the S. cerevisae genome, and by using directed polymerase chain reaction for gap closure, we generated a chromosomal map of S. carlsbergensis consisting of 29 unique chromosomes. We present evidence for genome and chromosome evolution within S. carlsbergensis via chromosome loss and loss of heterozygosity specifically of parts derived from the S. cerevisiae parent. Based on our sequence data and via fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis, we determined the ploidy of S. carlsbergensis. This inferred that this strain is basically triploid with a diploid S. eubayanus and haploid S. cerevisiae genome content. In contrast the Weihenstephan strain, which we resequenced, is essentially tetraploid composed of two diploid S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus genomes. Based on conserved translocations between the parental genomes in S. carlsbergensis and the Weihenstephan strain we propose a joint evolutionary ancestry for lager yeast strains. PMID:24578374

  13. Dosage optimization in positron emission tomography: state-of-the-art methods and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Fokou, Eleni; Tsoumpas, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used nowadays for tumor staging and therapy response in the clinic. However, average PET radiation exposure has increased due to higher PET utilization. This study aims to review state-of-the-art PET tracer dosage optimization methods after accounting for the effects of human body attenuation and scan protocol parameters on the counting rate. In particular, the relationship between the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and the dosage (NECR-dosage curve) for a range of clinical PET systems and body attenuation sizes will be systematically studied to prospectively estimate the minimum dosage required for sufficiently high NECR. The optimization criterion can be determined either as a function of the peak of the NECR-dosage curve or as a fixed NECR score when NECR uniformity across a patient population is important. In addition, the systematic NECR assessments within a controllable environment of realistic simulations and phantom experiments can lead to a NECR-dosage response model, capable of predicting the optimal dosage for every individual PET scan. Unlike conventional guidelines suggesting considerably large dosage levels for obese patients, NECR-based optimization recommends: i) moderate dosage to achieve 90% of peak NECR for obese patients, ii) considerable dosage reduction for slimmer patients such that uniform NECR is attained across the patient population, and iii) prolongation of scans for PET/MR protocols, where longer PET acquisitions are affordable due to lengthy MR sequences, with motion compensation becoming important then. Finally, the need for continuous adaptation of dosage optimization to emerging technologies will be discussed. PMID:26550543

  14. The impact of space travel on dosage form design and use.

    PubMed

    Aronsohn, A; Brazeau, G; Hughes, J

    1999-07-01

    The author speculates on potential factors that may influence the utilization of dosage forms in space. A key assumption is that most of the arguments will be based on current understanding of how dosage forms work on earth. Factors discussed include dosage form stability; and administration of drugs, particularly inhalation and aerosols. A sample experiment used a tissue culture model of drug transfer for passively absorbed drugs to address how alterations in hydrostatic pressure would change paracellular transport.

  15. Dosage of salicylates for children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, A L; Tryänä, T; Haapasaari, J

    1975-01-01

    The daily dosage of salicylates is traditionally very high for patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. In order to achieve the optimal therapeutic effect, serum salicylate levels are kept at 30-35 mg/100 ml (2175-2540 mumol/l). The recommended daily dosage in the textbooks is about 100 mg/kg of body weight, and the reported dosage/m2 of body surface area has been 3.2 g/m2/day. These dosages are, however, too high in clinical routine. In the present investigation, 19 children were treated with salicylates for 15 days with daily check-ups of the serum salicylate levels. Seven of these children had symptoms of salicylate intoxication which corresponded closely to the serum salicylate levels. If the daily dosage of salicylates exceeds 3 g/m2 of body surface area, intoxication can be expected.

  16. 21 CFR 522.1696 - Penicillin G procaine injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penicillin G procaine injectable dosage forms. 522.1696 Section 522.1696 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1696 Penicillin G procaine injectable dosage forms. ...

  17. Teacher factors contributing to dosage of the KiVa anti-bullying program.

    PubMed

    Swift, Lauren E; Hubbard, Julie A; Bookhout, Megan K; Grassetti, Stevie N; Smith, Marissa A; Morrow, Michael T

    2017-12-01

    The KiVa Anti-Bullying Program (KiVa) seeks to meet the growing need for anti-bullying programming through a school-based, teacher-led intervention for elementary school children. The goals of this study were to examine how intervention dosage impacts outcomes of KiVa and how teacher factors influence dosage. Participants included 74 teachers and 1409 4th- and 5th-grade students in nine elementary schools. Teachers and students completed data collection at the beginning and end of the school year, including measures of bullying and victimization, correlates of victimization (depression, anxiety, peer rejection, withdrawal, and school avoidance), intervention cognitions/emotions (anti-bullying attitudes, and empathy toward victims), bystander behaviors, and teacher factors thought to relate to dosage (self-efficacy for teaching, professional burnout, perceived principal support, expected effectiveness of KiVa, perceived feasibility of KiVa). The dosage of KiVa delivered to classrooms was measured throughout the school year. Results highlight dosage as an important predictor of change in bullying, victimization, correlates of victimization, bystander behavior, and intervention cognitions/emotions. Of the teacher factors, professional burnout uniquely predicted intervention dosage. A comprehensive structural equation model linking professional burnout to dosage and then to child-level outcomes demonstrated good fit. Implications for intervention design and implementation are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparable Efficacy With Varying Dosages of Glucarpidase in Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jeffrey R.; Zhou, Yinmei; Cheng, Cheng; Ward, Deborah A.; Swanson, Hope D.; Molinelli, Alejandro R.; Stewart, Clinton F.; Navid, Fariba; Jeha, Sima; Relling, Mary V.; Crews, Kristine R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucarpidase rapidly reduces methotrexate plasma concentrations in patients experiencing methotrexate-induced renal dysfunction. Debate exists regarding the role of glucarpidase in therapy given its high cost. The use of reduced-dose glucarpidase has been reported, and may allow more institutions to supply this drug to their patients. This report explores the relationship between glucarpidase dosage and patient outcomes in pediatric oncology patients. Methods The authors evaluated data from 26 patients who received glucarpidase after high-dose methotrexate. Decrease in plasma methotrexate concentrations and time to renal recovery were evaluated for an association with glucarpidase dosage, which ranged from 13 to 90 units/kg. Results No significant relationship was found between glucarpidase dosage (units/kg) and percent decrease in methotrexate plasma concentrations measured by TDx (P >0.1) or HPLC (P >0.5). Patients who received glucarpidase dosages <50 units/kg had a median percent reduction in methotrexate plasma concentration of 99.4% (range, 98–100) measured by HPLC compared to a median percent reduction of 99.4% (range, 77.2–100) in patients who received ≥50 units/kg. Time to SCr recovery was not related to glucarpidase dosage (P >0.8). Conclusions The efficacy of glucarpidase in the treatment of HDMTX-induced kidney injury was not dosage-dependent in this retrospective analysis of pediatric oncology patients. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:1518–1522. PMID:25631103

  19. Simultaneous visualization of different genomes (J, JSt and St) in a Thinopyrum intermedium × Thinopyrum ponticum synthetic hybrid (Poaceae) and in its parental species by multicolour genomic in situ hybridization (mcGISH)

    PubMed Central

    Kruppa, Klaudia; Molnár-Láng, Márta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Multicolour genomic in situ hybridization (mcGISH) using total genomic DNA probes from Thinopyrum bessarabicum (Săvulescu & Rayss, 1923) Á. Löve, 1984 (genome Jb or Eb, 2n = 14), and Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh, 1814) Á. Löve, 1980 (genome St, 2n = 14) was used to characterize the mitotic metaphase chromosomes of a synthetic hybrid of Thinopyrum intermedium (Host, 1805) Barkworth & D.R. Dewey, 1985 and Thinopyrum ponticum (Podpěra, 1902) Z.-W. Liu et R.-C.Wang, 1993 named „Agropyron glael” and produced by N.V. Tsitsin in the former Soviet Union. The mcGISH pattern of this synthetic hybrid was compared to its parental wheatgrass species. Hexaploid Thinopyrum intermedium contained 19 J, 9 JSt and 14 St chromosomes. The three analysed Thinopyrum ponticum accessions had different chromosome compositions: 43 J + 27 JSt (PI531737), 40 J + 30 JSt (VIR-44486) and 38 J + 32 JSt (D-3494). The synthetic hybrid carried 18 J, 28 JSt and 8 St chromosomes, including one pair of J-St translocation and/or decreased fluorescent intensity, resulting in unique hybridization patterns. Wheat line Mv9kr1 was crossed with the Thinopyrum intermedium × Thinopyrum ponticum synthetic hybrid in Hungary in order to transfer its advantageous agronomic traits (leaf rust and yellow rust resistance) into wheat. The chromosome composition of a wheat/A.glael F1 hybrid was 21 wheat + 28 wheatgrass (11 J + 14 JSt+ 3 S). In the present study, mcGISH involving the simultaneous use of St and J genomic DNA as probes provided information about the type of Thinopyrum chromosomes in a Thinopyrum intermedium/Thinopyrum ponticum synthetic hybrid called A. glael. PMID:27551349

  20. Carbaryl applied at reduced dosage rates for control of western spruce budworm

    Treesearch

    George P. Markin; David R. Johnson

    1983-01-01

    Carbaryl is registered for control of the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman), at the dosage rate of 1.12 kg per hectare. That rate and two lower ones were field tested in western Montana in July 1979 to determine if a lower rate would be as effective as the registered dosage. Each dosage was applied to five randomly selected...

  1. Parenting from before conception.

    PubMed

    Lane, Michelle; Robker, Rebecca L; Robertson, Sarah A

    2014-08-15

    At fertilization, the gametes endow the embryo with a genomic blueprint, the integrity of which is affected by the age and environmental exposures of both parents. Recent studies reveal that parental history and experiences also exert effects through epigenomic information not contained in the DNA sequence, including variations in sperm and oocyte cytosine methylation and chromatin patterning, noncoding RNAs, and mitochondria. Transgenerational epigenetic effects interact with conditions at conception to program the developmental trajectory of the embryo and fetus, ultimately affecting the lifetime health of the child. These insights compel us to revise generally held notions to accommodate the prospect that biological parenting commences well before birth, even prior to conception. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Mating programs including genomic relationships

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Computer mating programs have helped breeders minimize pedigree inbreeding and avoid recessive defects by mating animals with parents that have fewer common ancestors. With genomic selection, breed associations, AI organizations, and on-farm software providers could use new programs to minimize geno...

  3. Baclofen dosage after traumatic spinal cord injury: a multi-decade retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Veerakumar, Ashan; Cheng, Jennifer J; Sunshine, Abraham; Ye, Xiaobu; Zorowitz, Richard D; Anderson, William S

    2015-02-01

    To perform an analysis of oral baclofen dosage in patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries over time and to ascertain the clinical determinants of long-term baclofen dosage trends. Retrospective cohort study of patient records from the PM&R units at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and the Johns Hopkins Hospital. A total of 115 PM&R patients suffering spinal cord injury due to trauma leading to either complete or incomplete paralysis. The modes of injury included were motor vehicle accidents (MVA) (n=39), gunshot wounds (GSW) (n=55), falls (n=17), diving (n=2), workplace (n=1) and swimming (n=1) accidents. The location of injury in the spinal cord was categorized into either cervical (n=52), thoracic (n=59), lumbar (n=2), or unspecified (n=2). From time of injury, an aggregate of all dosage assignments for each patient demonstrated a significant yearly increase in baclofen dosage (1.26 mg/year, p<0.01). Baclofen dosage for MVA cases were seen to rise at 4.99 mg/year (p<0.0001). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that GSW patients received their first baclofen dosage earlier than MVA patients (log-rank p<0.05, unadjusted). We observed a marginal increase in baclofen dosage over nearly 25 years in a single provider's patient database and observed different timings of first dose between two causes of traumatic SCI. These results provide an estimate of baclofen dosage trends over time after spinal cord injury and may be useful for patient counseling or as a method to assess costs of providing SCI patient care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Extending the market exclusivity of therapeutic antibodies through dosage patents

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dosage patents are one way to extend the market exclusivity of an approved drug beyond the lifetime of the patent that protects the drug as such. Dosage patents may help to compensate the applicant for the long period where the active pharmaceutical ingredient as such is already under patent prosecution, but not on the market yet, due to lengthy development and approval procedures. This situation erodes part of the time the drug is marketed under patent protection. Dosage patents filed at a later date can provide remedy for this problem. Examples of successful and unsuccesful attempts, and the reasons for the respective outcomes, are provided in this article. PMID:27115842

  5. Adaptive response to chronic mild ethanol stress involves ROS, sirtuins and changes in chromosome dosage in wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Potocki, Leszek; Rawska, Ewa; Pabian, Sylwia; Kaplan, Jakub; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-05-24

    Industrial yeast strains of economic importance used in winemaking and beer production are genomically diverse and subjected to harsh environmental conditions during fermentation. In the present study, we investigated wine yeast adaptation to chronic mild alcohol stress when cells were cultured for 100 generations in the presence of non-cytotoxic ethanol concentration. Ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide signals promoted growth rate during passages that was accompanied by increased expression of sirtuin proteins, Sir1, Sir2 and Sir3, and DNA-binding transcription regulator Rap1. Genome-wide array-CGH analysis revealed that yeast genome was shaped during passages. The gains of chromosomes I, III and VI and significant changes in the gene copy number in nine functional gene categories involved in metabolic processes and stress responses were observed. Ethanol-mediated gains of YRF1 and CUP1 genes were the most accented. Ethanol also induced nucleolus fragmentation that confirms that nucleolus is a stress sensor in yeasts. Taken together, we postulate that wine yeasts of different origin may adapt to mild alcohol stress by shifts in intracellular redox state promoting growth capacity, upregulation of key regulators of longevity, namely sirtuins and changes in the dosage of genes involved in the telomere maintenance and ion detoxification.

  6. Avian sex, sex chromosomes, and dosage compensation in the age of genomics.

    PubMed

    Graves, Jennifer A Marshall

    2014-04-01

    Comparisons of the sex chromosome systems in birds and mammals are widening our view and deepening our understanding of vertebrate sex chromosome organization, function, and evolution. Birds have a very conserved ZW system of sex determination in which males have two copies of a large, gene-rich Z chromosome, and females have a single Z and a female-specific W chromosome. The avian ZW system is quite the reverse of the well-studied mammalian XY chromosome system, and evolved independently from different autosomal blocs. Despite the different gene content of mammal and bird sex chromosomes, there are many parallels. Genes on the bird Z and the mammal X have both undergone selection for male-advantage functions, and there has been amplification of male-advantage genes and accumulation of LINEs. The bird W and mammal Y have both undergone extensive degradation, but some birds retain early stages and some mammals terminal stages of the process, suggesting that the process is more advanced in mammals. Different sex-determining genes, DMRT1 and SRY, define the ZW and XY systems, but DMRT1 is involved in downstream events in mammals. Birds show strong cell autonomous specification of somatic sex differences in ZZ and ZW tissue, but there is growing evidence for direct X chromosome effects on sexual phenotype in mammals. Dosage compensation in birds appears to be phenotypically and molecularly quite different from X inactivation, being partial and gene-specific, but both systems use tools from the same molecular toolbox and there are some signs that galliform birds represent an early stage in the evolution of a coordinated system.

  7. Metabolism and elimination of methyl, iso- and n-butyl paraben in human urine after single oral dosage.

    PubMed

    Moos, Rebecca K; Angerer, Jürgen; Dierkes, Georg; Brüning, Thomas; Koch, Holger M

    2016-11-01

    Parabens are used as preservatives in personal care and consumer products, food and pharmaceuticals. Their use is controversial because of possible endocrine disrupting properties. In this study, we investigated metabolism and urinary excretion of methyl paraben (MeP), iso-butyl paraben (iso-BuP) and n-butyl paraben (n-BuP) after oral dosage of deuterium-labeled analogs (10 mg). Each volunteer received one dosage per investigated paraben separately and at least 2 weeks apart. Consecutive urine samples were collected over 48 h. In addition to the parent parabens (free and conjugated) which are already used as biomarkers of internal exposure and the known but non-specific metabolites, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA) and p-hydroxyhippuric acid (PHHA), we identified new, oxidized metabolites with hydroxy groups on the alkyl side chain (3OH-n-BuP and 2OH-iso-BuP) and species with oxidative modifications on the aromatic ring. MeP represented 17.4 % of the dose excreted in urine, while iso-BuP represented only 6.8 % and n-BuP 5.6 %. Additionally, for iso-BuP, about 16 % was excreted as 2OH-iso-BuP and for n-BuP about 6 % as 3OH-n-BuP. Less than 1 % was excreted as ring-hydroxylated metabolites. In all cases, PHHA was identified as the major but non-specific metabolite (57.2-63.8 %). PHBA represented 3.0-7.2 %. For all parabens, the majority of the oral dose captured by the above metabolites was excreted in the first 24 h (80.5-85.3 %). Complementary to the parent parabens excreted in urine, alkyl-chain-oxidized metabolites of the butyl parabens are introduced as valuable and contamination-free biomarkers of exposure.

  8. A Genome-Wide Landscape of Retrocopies in Primate Genomes.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Fábio C P; Galante, Pedro A F

    2015-07-29

    Gene duplication is a key factor contributing to phenotype diversity across and within species. Although the availability of complete genomes has led to the extensive study of genomic duplications, the dynamics and variability of gene duplications mediated by retrotransposition are not well understood. Here, we predict mRNA retrotransposition and use comparative genomics to investigate their origin and variability across primates. Analyzing seven anthropoid primate genomes, we found a similar number of mRNA retrotranspositions (∼7,500 retrocopies) in Catarrhini (Old Word Monkeys, including humans), but a surprising large number of retrocopies (∼10,000) in Platyrrhini (New World Monkeys), which may be a by-product of higher long interspersed nuclear element 1 activity in these genomes. By inferring retrocopy orthology, we dated most of the primate retrocopy origins, and estimated a decrease in the fixation rate in recent primate history, implying a smaller number of species-specific retrocopies. Moreover, using RNA-Seq data, we identified approximately 3,600 expressed retrocopies. As expected, most of these retrocopies are located near or within known genes, present tissue-specific and even species-specific expression patterns, and no expression correlation to their parental genes. Taken together, our results provide further evidence that mRNA retrotransposition is an active mechanism in primate evolution and suggest that retrocopies may not only introduce great genetic variability between lineages but also create a large reservoir of potentially functional new genomic loci in primate genomes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. A genome-wide survey of transgenerational genetic effects in autism.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kathryn M; Croen, Lisa A; Torres, Anthony R; Kharrazi, Martin; Delorenze, Gerald N; Windham, Gayle C; Yoshida, Cathleen K; Zerbo, Ousseny; Weiss, Lauren A

    2013-01-01

    Effects of parental genotype or parent-offspring genetic interaction are well established in model organisms for a variety of traits. However, these transgenerational genetic models are rarely studied in humans. We have utilized an autism case-control study with 735 mother-child pairs to perform genome-wide screening for maternal genetic effects and maternal-offspring genetic interaction. We used simple models of single locus parent-child interaction and identified suggestive results (P<10(-4)) that cannot be explained by main effects, but no genome-wide significant signals. Some of these maternal and maternal-child associations were in or adjacent to autism candidate genes including: PCDH9, FOXP1, GABRB3, NRXN1, RELN, MACROD2, FHIT, RORA, CNTN4, CNTNAP2, FAM135B, LAMA1, NFIA, NLGN4X, RAPGEF4, and SDK1. We attempted validation of potential autism association under maternal-specific models using maternal-paternal comparison in family-based GWAS datasets. Our results suggest that further study of parental genetic effects and parent-child interaction in autism is warranted.

  10. Professionally Responsible Disclosure of Genomic Sequencing Results in Pediatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Kyle B.; Chung, Wendy K.; Joffe, Steven; Koenig, Barbara A.; Wilfond, Benjamin; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Genomic sequencing is being rapidly introduced into pediatric clinical practice. The results of sequencing are distinctive for their complexity and subsequent challenges of interpretation for generalist and specialist pediatricians, parents, and patients. Pediatricians therefore need to prepare for the professionally responsible disclosure of sequencing results to parents and patients and guidance of parents and patients in the interpretation and use of these results, including managing uncertain data. This article provides an ethical framework to guide and evaluate the professionally responsible disclosure of the results of genomic sequencing in pediatric practice. The ethical framework comprises 3 core concepts of pediatric ethics: the best interests of the child standard, parental surrogate decision-making, and pediatric assent. When recommending sequencing, pediatricians should explain the nature of the proposed test, its scope and complexity, the categories of results, and the concept of a secondary or incidental finding. Pediatricians should obtain the informed permission of parents and the assent of mature adolescents about the scope of sequencing to be performed and the return of results. PMID:26371191

  11. 3D-micro-patterned fibrous dosage forms for immediate drug release.

    PubMed

    Blaesi, Aron H; Saka, Nannaji

    2018-03-01

    At present, the most prevalent pharmaceutical dosage forms, the orally-delivered immediate-release tablets and capsules, are porous, granular solids. They disintegrate into their constituent particulates upon ingestion to release drug rapidly. The design, development, and manufacture of such granular solids, however, is inefficient due to difficulties associated with the unpredictable inter-particle interactions. Therefore, to achieve more predictable dosage form properties and processing, we have recently introduced melt-processed polymeric cellular dosage forms. The cellular forms disintegrated and released drug rapidly if the cells were predominantly interconnected. Preparation of interconnected cells, however, relies on the coalescence of gas bubbles in the melt, which is unpredictable. In the present work, therefore, new melt-processed fibrous dosage forms with contiguous void space are presented. The dosage forms are prepared by melt extrusion of the drug-excipient mixture followed by patterning the fibrous extrudate on a moving surface. It is demonstrated that the resulting fibrous structures are fully predictable by the extruder nozzle diameter and the motion of the surface. Furthermore, drug release experiments show that the disintegration time of the fibrous forms prepared in this work is of the order of that of the corresponding single fibers. The thin fibers of polyethylene glycol (excipient) and acetaminophen (drug) in turn disintegrate in a time proportional to the fiber radius and well within immediate-release specification. Finally, models of dosage form disintegration and drug release by single fibers and fibrous dosage forms are developed. It is found that drug release from fibrous forms is predictable by the physico-chemical properties of the excipient and such microstructural parameters as the fiber radius, the inter-fiber spacing, and the volume fraction of water-soluble excipient in the fibers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  12. Biopharmaceutical considerations and characterizations in development of colon targeted dosage forms for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Malayandi, Rajkumar; Kondamudi, Phani Krishna; Ruby, P K; Aggarwal, Deepika

    2014-04-01

    Colon targeted dosage forms have been extensively studied for the localized treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. These dosage forms not only improve the therapeutic efficacy but also reduce the incidence of adverse drug reactions and hence improve the patient compliance. However, complex and highly variable gastro intestinal physiology limits the clinical success of these dosage forms. Biopharmaceutical characteristics of these dosage forms play a key role in rapid formulation development and ensure the clinical success. The complexity in product development and clinical success of colon targeted dosage forms are based on the biopharmaceutical characteristics such as physicochemical properties of drug substances, pharmaceutical characteristics of dosage form, physiological conditions and pharmacokinetic properties of drug substances as well as drug products. Various in vitro and in vivo techniques have been employed in past to characterize the biopharmaceutical properties of colon targeted dosage forms. This review focuses on the factors influencing the biopharmaceutical performances of the dosage forms, in vitro characterization techniques and in vivo studies.

  13. Exon dosage analysis of parkin gene in Chinese sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ji-Feng; Dong, Xiao-Li; Xu, Qian; Li, Nan; Yan, Xin-Xiang; Xia, Kun; Tang, Bei-Sha

    2015-09-14

    Parkin gene mutations are by far the most common mutations in both familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and sporadic PD. Approximately, 50% of parkin mutations is exon dosage mutations (i.e., deletions and duplications of entire exons). Here, we first established a MLPA assay for quick detection of parkin exon rearrangements. Then, we studied parkin exon dosage mutations in 755 Chinese sporadic PDdisease patients using the established MLPA assay. We found that there were 25 (3.3%) patients with exon dosage alterations including deletions and duplications, 20 (11.4%) patients with exon rearrangements in 178 early-onset patients, and 5 (0.86%) patients with exon rearrangement mutations in 579 later-onset patients. The percentage of individuals with parkin dosage mutations is more than 33% when the age at onset is less than 30 years old, but less than 7% when the age at onset is more than 30. In these mutations, deletion is the main mutational style, especially in exon 2-5. Our results indicated that exon dosage mutations in parkin gene might be the main cause for sporadic PD, especially in EOP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemical and pharmacological comparison of modern and traditional dosage forms of Joshanda.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Sajida; Irfan Bukhari, Nadeem; Shehzadi, Naureen; Qamar, Shaista; Ali, Ejaz; Naheed, Surriya; Latif, Abida; Yuchi, Alamgeer; Hussain, Khalid

    2017-12-11

    Recently, a traditional remedy (Joshanda) has been replaced largely by modern ready-to-use dosage forms, which have not been compared to the original remedy. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare a number of modern dosage forms with traditional remedy. Seven brands, 3 batches each, were compared with a Lab-made formulation with reference to analytical (proximate analyses, spectroscopic and chromatographic metabolomes) and pharmacological profiles (anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities). Chemical and pharmacological differences were found between Lab-made Joshanda and modern dosage forms. Such variations were also found within the brands and batches of modern formulations (p < 0.05). The Lab-made Joshanda showed significantly higher pharmacological activities as compared to modern brands (p ). The results of the present study indicate that modern dosage forms are unstandardised and less effective than the traditional remedy. Characteristic profiles obtained from Lab-made Joshanda may be used as reference to produce comparable dosage forms.

  15. Allele-specific control of replication timing and genome organization during development.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Mulia, Juan Carlos; Dimond, Andrew; Vera, Daniel; Trevilla-Garcia, Claudia; Sasaki, Takayo; Zimmerman, Jared; Dupont, Catherine; Gribnau, Joost; Fraser, Peter; Gilbert, David M

    2018-05-07

    DNA replication occurs in a defined temporal order known as the replication-timing (RT) program. RT is regulated during development in discrete chromosomal units, coordinated with transcriptional activity and 3D genome organization. Here, we derived distinct cell types from F1 hybrid musculus X castaneus mouse crosses and exploited the high single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density to characterize allelic differences in RT (Repli-seq), genome organization (Hi-C and promoter-capture Hi-C), gene expression (total nuclear RNA-seq) and chromatin accessibility (ATAC-seq). We also present HARP: a new computational tool for sorting SNPs in phased genomes to efficiently measure allele-specific genome-wide data. Analysis of six different hybrid mESC clones with different genomes (C57BL/6, 129/sv and CAST/Ei), parental configurations and gender revealed significant RT asynchrony between alleles across ~12% of the autosomal genome linked to sub-species genomes but not to parental origin, growth conditions or gender. RT asynchrony in mESCs strongly correlated with changes in Hi-C compartments between alleles but not SNP density, gene expression, imprinting or chromatin accessibility. We then tracked mESC RT asynchronous regions during development by analyzing differentiated cell types including extraembryonic endoderm stem (XEN) cells, 4 male and female primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and neural precursor cells (NPCs) differentiated in vitro from mESCs with opposite parental configurations. We found that RT asynchrony and allelic discordance in Hi-C compartments seen in mESCs was largely lost in all differentiated cell types, coordinated with a more uniform Hi-C compartment arrangement, suggesting that genome organization of homologues converges to similar folding patterns during cell fate commitment. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Biorelevant in-vitro performance testing of orally administered dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Reppas, Christos; Vertzoni, Maria

    2012-07-01

    This review focuses on the evolution and current status of biorelevant media and hydrodynamics, and discusses the usefulness of biorelevant performance testing in the evaluation of specific dosage form related lumenal processes. During the last 15 years our knowledge of the gastrointestinal environment (including the lower gut) has improved dramatically and biorelevant media composition and, to a lesser extent, biorelevant hydrodynamics, have been refined. Biorelevant dissolution/release testing is useful for the evaluation of formulation and food effects on plasma levels after administration of immediate release dosage forms containing low solubility compounds and after administration of extended release products. Lumenal disintegration times of immediate release dosage forms and the bile acid sequestering activity of resins in the lumen can also be successfully forecasted with biorelevant in vitro testing. Biorelevant in-vitro performance testing is an important tool for evaluating intralumenal dosage form performance. Since the formulation of new active pharmaceutical ingredients for oral delivery is more challenging than ever before, efforts to improve the predictability of biorelevant tests are expected to continue. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. Transcriptome-wide investigation of genomic imprinting in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Gourichon, David; Dehais, Patrice; Cristobal, Magali San; Marsaud, Nathalie; Vignoles, Florence; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Coville, Jean-Luc; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Beaumont, Catherine; Zerjal, Tatiana; Vignal, Alain; Morisson, Mireille; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Pitel, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism by which alleles of some specific genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner. It has been observed in mammals and marsupials, but not in birds. Until now, only a few genes orthologous to mammalian imprinted ones have been analyzed in chicken and did not demonstrate any evidence of imprinting in this species. However, several published observations such as imprinted-like QTL in poultry or reciprocal effects keep the question open. Our main objective was thus to screen the entire chicken genome for parental-allele-specific differential expression on whole embryonic transcriptomes, using high-throughput sequencing. To identify the parental origin of each observed haplotype, two chicken experimental populations were used, as inbred and as genetically distant as possible. Two families were produced from two reciprocal crosses. Transcripts from 20 embryos were sequenced using NGS technology, producing ∼200 Gb of sequences. This allowed the detection of 79 potentially imprinted SNPs, through an analysis method that we validated by detecting imprinting from mouse data already published. However, out of 23 candidates tested by pyrosequencing, none could be confirmed. These results come together, without a priori, with previous statements and phylogenetic considerations assessing the absence of genomic imprinting in chicken. PMID:24452801

  18. Transcriptome-wide investigation of genomic imprinting in chicken.

    PubMed

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Gourichon, David; Dehais, Patrice; Cristobal, Magali San; Marsaud, Nathalie; Vignoles, Florence; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Coville, Jean-Luc; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Beaumont, Catherine; Zerjal, Tatiana; Vignal, Alain; Morisson, Mireille; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Pitel, Frédérique

    2014-04-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism by which alleles of some specific genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner. It has been observed in mammals and marsupials, but not in birds. Until now, only a few genes orthologous to mammalian imprinted ones have been analyzed in chicken and did not demonstrate any evidence of imprinting in this species. However, several published observations such as imprinted-like QTL in poultry or reciprocal effects keep the question open. Our main objective was thus to screen the entire chicken genome for parental-allele-specific differential expression on whole embryonic transcriptomes, using high-throughput sequencing. To identify the parental origin of each observed haplotype, two chicken experimental populations were used, as inbred and as genetically distant as possible. Two families were produced from two reciprocal crosses. Transcripts from 20 embryos were sequenced using NGS technology, producing ∼200 Gb of sequences. This allowed the detection of 79 potentially imprinted SNPs, through an analysis method that we validated by detecting imprinting from mouse data already published. However, out of 23 candidates tested by pyrosequencing, none could be confirmed. These results come together, without a priori, with previous statements and phylogenetic considerations assessing the absence of genomic imprinting in chicken.

  19. Gastric emptying of multi-particulate dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Newton, J Michael

    2010-08-16

    The evidence in the literature for the concept that multi-particulate dosage forms below a specific size empty from the stomach as if they were liquids and hence have the potential to provide the best solution to the formulation of controlled release oral dosage forms, has been considered. There is some evidence that particles less than 1.0mm provide a more rapid response than larger size particles but there is also evidence that this is not always the case and that rapid and reproducible gastric emptying of small particles does not always occur when they are administered. There is strong evidence that food can delay the gastric emptying of multi-particulate systems. Some of the misconception for gastric emptying performance of multi-particulate system is shown to be related to the limitation of the study design and limitation of the way the data is processed. Nevertheless, there is clear evidence that multi-particulate systems can provide effective oral controlled release dosage forms. There is still some way to go with experimental techniques which would allow a definitive answer to the issue of how the variability of the gastric emptying of multi-particulate systems of less than 2.0mm arises. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Complete genome sequence of an attenuated Sparfloxacin resistant Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Through selection of resistance to sparfloxacin, an attenuated Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar was obtained from its virulent parent strain S. agalactiae 138P. The full genome of S. agalactiae 138spar is 1,838,126 bp. The availability of this genome will allow comparative genomics to identi...

  1. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for young children with cerebral palsy: effects of therapeutic dosage.

    PubMed

    DeLuca, Stephanie C; Case-Smith, Jane; Stevenson, Richard; Ramey, Sharon Landesman

    2012-01-01

    To compare effects of 2 dosage levels of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). We hypothesized that high-dosage CIMT would produce larger benefits than moderate-dosage. Three sites enrolled a total of 18 children (6 children per site from 3-6 years) with unilateral CP. Children were randomly assigned to CIMT for 21 days for either 6 hours/day (high-dosage=126 hours) or 3 hours/day (moderate-dosage=63 hours); both groups wore a long-arm cast. Evaluators (blind to dosage) assessed children 1-week prior, then 1-week and 1-month after treatment with the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA), The Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) Dissociated Movement and Grasp sections, the Shriners Hospital Upper Extremity Evaluation (SHUEE), and the Pediatric Motor Activity Log (PMAL). All children responded well to casting and received the full intended dosage. Both groups showed statistically significant gains on the AHA, QUEST, SHUEE, and PMAL. Effect sizes ranged from 0.36-0.79. Overall, both groups showed comparable improvements at 1-week and 1-month post-treatment. Pediatric CIMT at both moderate and high dosages produced positive effects across multiple reliable, valid outcome measures. The findings refuted the hypothesis of differential dosage benefits. Future research should address long-term effects, enroll larger and more diverse samples, and assess lower dosages to ascertain a minimal-efficacy threshold.

  2. Simultaneous visualization of different genomes (J, JSt and St) in a Thinopyrum intermedium × Thinopyrum ponticum synthetic hybrid (Poaceae) and in its parental species by multicolour genomic in situ hybridization (mcGISH).

    PubMed

    Kruppa, Klaudia; Molnár-Láng, Márta

    2016-01-01

    Multicolour genomic in situ hybridization (mcGISH) using total genomic DNA probes from Thinopyrum bessarabicum (Săvulescu & Rayss, 1923) Á. Löve, 1984 (genome J(b) or E(b), 2n = 14), and Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh, 1814) Á. Löve, 1980 (genome St, 2n = 14) was used to characterize the mitotic metaphase chromosomes of a synthetic hybrid of Thinopyrum intermedium (Host, 1805) Barkworth & D.R. Dewey, 1985 and Thinopyrum ponticum (Podpěra, 1902) Z.-W. Liu et R.-C.Wang, 1993 named "Agropyron glael" and produced by N.V. Tsitsin in the former Soviet Union. The mcGISH pattern of this synthetic hybrid was compared to its parental wheatgrass species. Hexaploid Thinopyrum intermedium contained 19 J, 9 J(St) and 14 St chromosomes. The three analysed Thinopyrum ponticum accessions had different chromosome compositions: 43 J + 27 J(St) (PI531737), 40 J + 30 J(St) (VIR-44486) and 38 J + 32 J(St) (D-3494). The synthetic hybrid carried 18 J, 28 J(St) and 8 St chromosomes, including one pair of J-St translocation and/or decreased fluorescent intensity, resulting in unique hybridization patterns. Wheat line Mv9kr1 was crossed with the Thinopyrum intermedium × Thinopyrum ponticum synthetic hybrid in Hungary in order to transfer its advantageous agronomic traits (leaf rust and yellow rust resistance) into wheat. The chromosome composition of a wheat/A.glael F1 hybrid was 21 wheat + 28 wheatgrass (11 J + 14 J(St)+ 3 S). In the present study, mcGISH involving the simultaneous use of St and J genomic DNA as probes provided information about the type of Thinopyrum chromosomes in a Thinopyrum intermedium/Thinopyrum ponticum synthetic hybrid called A. glael.

  3. Insights into three whole-genome duplications gleaned from the Paramecium caudatum genome sequence.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Casey L; Gout, Jean-Francois; Doak, Thomas G; Yanagi, Akira; Lynch, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Paramecium has long been a model eukaryote. The sequence of the Paramecium tetraurelia genome reveals a history of three successive whole-genome duplications (WGDs), and the sequences of P. biaurelia and P. sexaurelia suggest that these WGDs are shared by all members of the aurelia species complex. Here, we present the genome sequence of P. caudatum, a species closely related to the P. aurelia species group. P. caudatum shares only the most ancient of the three WGDs with the aurelia complex. We found that P. caudatum maintains twice as many paralogs from this early event as the P. aurelia species, suggesting that post-WGD gene retention is influenced by subsequent WGDs and supporting the importance of selection for dosage in gene retention. The availability of P. caudatum as an outgroup allows an expanded analysis of the aurelia intermediate and recent WGD events. Both the Guanine+Cytosine (GC) content and the expression level of preduplication genes are significant predictors of duplicate retention. We find widespread asymmetrical evolution among aurelia paralogs, which is likely caused by gradual pseudogenization rather than by neofunctionalization. Finally, cases of divergent resolution of intermediate WGD duplicates between aurelia species implicate this process acts as an ongoing reinforcement mechanism of reproductive isolation long after a WGD event. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Complexity of Gene Expression Evolution after Duplication: Protein Dosage Rebalancing

    PubMed Central

    Rogozin, Igor B.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing debates about functional importance of gene duplications have been recently intensified by a heated discussion of the “ortholog conjecture” (OC). Under the OC, which is central to functional annotation of genomes, orthologous genes are functionally more similar than paralogous genes at the same level of sequence divergence. However, a recent study challenged the OC by reporting a greater functional similarity, in terms of gene ontology (GO) annotations and expression profiles, among within-species paralogs compared to orthologs. These findings were taken to indicate that functional similarity of homologous genes is primarily determined by the cellular context of the genes, rather than evolutionary history. Subsequent studies suggested that the OC appears to be generally valid when applied to mammalian evolution but the complete picture of evolution of gene expression also has to incorporate lineage-specific aspects of paralogy. The observed complexity of gene expression evolution after duplication can be explained through selection for gene dosage effect combined with the duplication-degeneration-complementation model. This paper discusses expression divergence of recent duplications occurring before functional divergence of proteins encoded by duplicate genes. PMID:25197576

  5. Complete Dosage Compensation and Sex-Biased Gene Expression in the Moth Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gilbert; Chen, Yun-Ru; Blissard, Gary W.; Briscoe, Adriana D.

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosome dosage compensation balances homogametic sex chromosome expression with autosomal expression in the heterogametic sex, leading to sex chromosome expression parity between the sexes. If compensation is incomplete, this can lead to expression imbalance and sex-biased gene expression. Recent work has uncovered an intriguing and variable pattern of dosage compensation across species that includes a lack of complete dosage compensation in ZW species compared with XY species. This has led to the hypothesis that ZW species do not require complete compensation or that complete compensation would negatively affect their fitness. To date, only one study, a study of the moth Bombyx mori, has discovered evidence for complete dosage compensation in a ZW species. We examined another moth species, Manduca sexta, using high-throughput sequencing to survey gene expression in the head tissue of males and females. We found dosage compensation to be complete in M. sexta with average expression between the Z chromosome in males and females being equal. When genes expressed at very low levels are removed by filtering, we found that average autosome expression was highly similar to average Z expression, suggesting that the majority of genes in M. sexta are completely dosage compensated. Further, this compensation was accompanied by sex-specific gene expression associated with important sexually dimorphic traits. We suggest that complete dosage compensation in ZW species might be more common than previously appreciated and linked to additional selective processes, such as sexual selection. More ZW and lepidopteran species should now be examined in a phylogenetic framework, to understand the evolution of dosage compensation. PMID:24558255

  6. Genomic architecture of heterosis for yield traits in rice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuehui; Yang, Shihua; Gong, Junyi; Zhao, Qiang; Feng, Qi; Zhan, Qilin; Zhao, Yan; Li, Wenjun; Cheng, Benyi; Xia, Junhui; Chen, Neng; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Danlin; Chen, Jiaying; Zhou, Congcong; Lu, Yiqi; Weng, Qijun; Han, Bin

    2016-09-29

    Increasing grain yield is a long-term goal in crop breeding to meet the demand for global food security. Heterosis, when a hybrid shows higher performance for a trait than both parents, offers an important strategy for crop breeding. To examine the genetic basis of heterosis for yield in rice, here we generate, sequence and record the phenotypes of 10,074 F 2 lines from 17 representative hybrid rice crosses. We classify modern hybrid rice varieties into three groups, representing different hybrid breeding systems. Although we do not find any heterosis-associated loci shared across all lines, within each group, a small number of genomic loci from female parents explain a large proportion of the yield advantage of hybrids over their male parents. For some of these loci, we find support for partial dominance of heterozygous locus for yield-related traits and better-parent heterosis for overall performance when all of the grain-yield traits are considered together. These results inform on the genomic architecture of heterosis and rice hybrid breeding.

  7. Detecting effects of the indicated prevention Programme for Externalizing Problem behaviour (PEP) on child symptoms, parenting, and parental quality of life in a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Charlotte; Freund-Braier, Inez; Hautmann, Christopher; Jänen, Nicola; Plück, Julia; Brix, Gabriele; Eichelberger, Ilka; Döpfner, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    Behavioural parent training is effective in improving child disruptive behavioural problems in preschool children by increasing parenting competence. The indicated Prevention Programme for Externalizing Problem behaviour (PEP) is a group training programme for parents and kindergarten teachers of children aged 3-6 years with externalizing behavioural problems. To evaluate the effects of PEP on child problem behaviour, parenting practices, parent-child interactions, and parental quality of life. Parents and kindergarten teachers of 155 children were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 91) and a nontreated control group (n = 64). They rated children's problem behaviour before and after PEP training; parents also reported on their parenting practices and quality of life. Standardized play situations were video-taped and rated for parent-child interactions, e.g. parental warmth. In the intention to treat analysis, mothers of the intervention group described less disruptive child behaviour and better parenting strategies, and showed more parental warmth during a standardized parent-child interaction. Dosage analyses confirmed these results for parents who attended at least five training sessions. Children were also rated to show less behaviour problems by their kindergarten teachers. Training effects were especially positive for parents who attended at least half of the training sessions. CBCL: Child Behaviour Checklist; CII: Coder Impressions Inventory; DASS: Depression anxiety Stress Scale; HSQ: Home-situation Questionnaire; LSS: Life Satisfaction Scale; OBDT: observed behaviour during the test; PCL: Problem Checklist; PEP: prevention programme for externalizing problem behaviour; PPC: Parent Problem Checklist; PPS: Parent Practices Scale; PS: Parenting Scale; PSBC: Problem Setting and Behaviour checklist; QJPS: Questionnaire on Judging Parental Strains; SEFS: Self-Efficacy Scale; SSC: Social Support Scale; TRF: Caregiver-Teacher Report Form.

  8. Chromatin-associated RNA sequencing (ChAR-seq) maps genome-wide RNA-to-DNA contacts

    PubMed Central

    Jukam, David; Teran, Nicole A; Risca, Viviana I; Smith, Owen K; Johnson, Whitney L; Skotheim, Jan M; Greenleaf, William James

    2018-01-01

    RNA is a critical component of chromatin in eukaryotes, both as a product of transcription, and as an essential constituent of ribonucleoprotein complexes that regulate both local and global chromatin states. Here, we present a proximity ligation and sequencing method called Chromatin-Associated RNA sequencing (ChAR-seq) that maps all RNA-to-DNA contacts across the genome. Using Drosophila cells, we show that ChAR-seq provides unbiased, de novo identification of targets of chromatin-bound RNAs including nascent transcripts, chromosome-specific dosage compensation ncRNAs, and genome-wide trans-associated RNAs involved in co-transcriptional RNA processing. PMID:29648534

  9. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. ...

  10. Pavor nocturnus: a complication of single daily tricyclic or neuroleptic dosage.

    PubMed

    Flemenbaum, A

    1976-05-01

    The author tested the hypothesis that a single bedtime dosage schedule of tricyclic or neuroleptic medication produces increased frequency of night terrors by administering a questionnaire to 30 medical patients who were not receiving such medications and 100 psychiatric patients on either multiple- or single-dosage schedules. Psychiatric patients on multiple-dosage schedules reported no more frightening dreams than the medical patients, whereas almost three-fourths of those receiving single bedtime doses had frightening dreams, a significant difference from the medical sample. This preliminary report is presented to call attention to the possible undesirable effects of a single dose schedule.

  11. Genome-wide association study of maternal genetic effects and parent-of-origin effects on food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Hong, Xiumei; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Mestan, Karen K.; Shi, Min; Kefi, Amira; Hao, Ke; Chen, Qi; Wang, Guoying; Caruso, Deanna; Geng, Hua; Gao, Yufeng; He, Jianlin; Kumar, Rajesh; Wang, Hongjian; Yu, Yunxian; Bartell, Tami; Tan, Xiao-Di; Schleimer, Robert P.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Pongracic, Jacqueline A.; Wang, Xiaobin

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Previous genetic studies of food allergy (FA) have mainly focused on inherited genotypic effects. The role of parental genotypic effects remains largely unexplored. Leveraging existing genome-wide association study (GWAS) data generated from the Chicago Food Allergy Study, we examined maternal genotypic and parent-of-origin (PO) effects using multinomial likelihood ratio tests in 588 complete and incomplete Caucasian FA trios. We identified 1 single nucleotide polymorphism with significant (P < 5×10−8) maternal effect on any FA (rs4235235), which is located in a noncoding RNA (LOC101927947) with unknown function. We also identified 3 suggestive (P < 5×10−7) loci with maternal genetic effects: 1 for any FA (rs976078, in a gene desert region on 13q31.1) and 2 for egg allergy (rs1343795 and rs4572450, in the ZNF652 gene, where genetic variants have been associated with atopic dermatitis). Three suggestive loci with PO effect were observed: 1 for peanut allergy (rs4896888 in the ADGB gene) and 2 for any FA in boys only (rs1036504 and rs2917750 in the IQCE gene). Findings from this family-based GWAS of FA provided some preliminary evidence on maternal genotypic or PO effects on FA. Additional family-based studies are needed to confirm our findings and gain new insight into maternal and paternal genetic contribution to FA. PMID:29489655

  12. The beliefs, motivations, and expectations of parents who have enrolled their children in a genetic biorepository.

    PubMed

    Harris, Erin D; Ziniel, Sonja I; Amatruda, Jonathan G; Clinton, Catherine M; Savage, Sarah K; Taylor, Patrick L; Huntington, Noelle L; Green, Robert C; Holm, Ingrid A

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about parental attitudes toward return of individual research results (IRRs) in pediatric genomic research. The aim of this study was to understand the views of the parents who enrolled their children in a genomic repository in which IRRs will be returned. We conducted focus groups with parents of children with developmental disorders enrolled in the Gene Partnership (GP), a genomic research repository that offers to return IRRs, to learn about their understanding of the GP, motivations for enrolling their children, and expectations regarding the return of IRRs. Parents hoped to receive IRRs that would help them better understand their children's condition(s). They understood that this outcome was unlikely, but hoped that their children's participation in the GP would contribute to scientific knowledge. Most parents wanted to receive all IRRs about their child, even for diseases that were severe and untreatable, citing reasons of personal utility. Parents preferred electronic delivery of the results and wanted to designate their preferences regarding what information they would receive. It is important for researchers to understand participant expectations in enrolling in a research repository that offers to disclose children's IRRs in order to effectively communicate the implications to parents during the consenting process.

  13. Nuclear fusion and genome encounter during yeast zygote formation.

    PubMed

    Tartakoff, Alan Michael; Jaiswal, Purnima

    2009-06-01

    When haploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are crossed, parental nuclei congress and fuse with each other. To investigate underlying mechanisms, we have developed assays that evaluate the impact of drugs and mutations. Nuclear congression is inhibited by drugs that perturb the actin and tubulin cytoskeletons. Nuclear envelope (NE) fusion consists of at least five steps in which preliminary modifications are followed by controlled flux of first outer and then inner membrane proteins, all before visible dilation of the waist of the nucleus or coalescence of the parental spindle pole bodies. Flux of nuclear pore complexes occurs after dilation. Karyogamy requires both the Sec18p/NSF ATPase and ER/NE luminal homeostasis. After fusion, chromosome tethering keeps tagged parental genomes separate from each other. The process of NE fusion and evidence of genome independence in yeast provide a prototype for understanding related events in higher eukaryotes.

  14. Applications of Natural Polymeric Materials in Solid Oral Modified-Release Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Zhang, Xin; Gu, Xiangqin; Mao, Shirui

    2015-01-01

    Solid oral modified-release dosage forms provide numerous advantages for drug delivery compared to dosage forms where the drugs are released and absorbed rapidly following ingestion. Natural polymers are of particular interest as drug carriers due to their good safety profile, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and rich sources. This review described the current applications of important natural polymers, such as chitosan, alginate, pectin, guar gum, and xanthan gum, in solid oral modified-release dosage forms. It was shown that natural polymers have been widely used to fabricate solid oral modified-release dosage forms such as matrix tablets, pellets and beads, and especially oral drug delivery systems such as gastroretentive and colon drug delivery systems. Moreover, chemical modifications could overcome the shortcomings associated with the use of natural polymers, and the combination of two or more polymers presented further advantages compared with that of single polymer. In conclusion, natural polymers and modified natural polymers have promising applications in solid oral modified-release dosage forms. However, commercial products based on them are still limited. To accelerate the application of natural polymers in commercial products, in vivo behavior of natural polymers-based solid oral modified-release dosage forms should be deeply investigated, and meanwhile quality of the natural polymers should be controlled strictly, and the influence of formulation and process parameters need to be understood intensively.

  15. A step toward development of printable dosage forms for poorly soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Raijada, Dhara; Genina, Natalja; Fors, Daniela; Wisaeus, Erik; Peltonen, Jouko; Rantanen, Jukka; Sandler, Niklas

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate printable dosage forms for a poorly soluble drug (piroxicam; PRX) and to gain understanding of critical parameters to be considered during development of such dosage forms. Liquid formulations of PRX were printed on edible paper using piezoelectric inkjet printing (PIJ) and impression printing (flexography). The printed dosage forms were characterized using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and the amount of drug was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Solutions of PRX in polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG-400):ethanol (40:60) and in PEG-400 were found to be optimal formulations for PIJ and flexography, respectively. SEM-EDX analysis revealed no visible solid particles on the printed dosage forms indicating the drug most likely remained in solution after printing. More accurate drug deposition was obtained by PIJ as compared with flexography. More than 90% drug release was achieved within 5 min regardless of printing method used. The solubility of drug in solvents/cosolvents, rheological properties of formulations, properties of substrate, feasibility and accuracy of the printing methods, and detection limit of analytical techniques for characterization of printed dosage forms are some of the concerns that need to be addressed for development of printable dosage forms of poorly soluble drugs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. 21 CFR 529.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms. 529.1044 Section 529.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 529.1044 Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms. ...

  17. 21 CFR 529.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms. 529.1044 Section 529.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 529.1044 Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms. ...

  18. 21 CFR 529.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms. 529.1044 Section 529.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 529.1044 Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms. ...

  19. 21 CFR 529.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms. 529.1044 Section 529.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 529.1044 Gentamicin sulfate in certain other dosage forms. ...

  20. 21 CFR 522.1662 - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride implantation or injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxytetracycline hydrochloride implantation or injectable dosage forms. 522.1662 Section 522.1662 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1662 Oxytetracycline hydrochloride implantation or injectable...

  1. Dosage and Distribution in Morphosyntax Intervention: Current Evidence and Future Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor-Williams, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the effectiveness of dose forms and the efficacy of dosage and distribution in morphosyntax intervention for children. Dose forms include the commonly used techniques, procedures, and intervention contexts that constitute teaching episodes; dosage includes the quantitative measures of dose, dose frequency, total intervention…

  2. Distribution and evolution of cotton fiber development genes in the fibreless Gossypium raimondii genome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhanyou; Yu, Jing; Kohel, Russell J; Percy, Richard G; Beavis, William D; Main, Dorrie; Yu, John Z

    2015-07-01

    Cotton fiber represents the largest single cell in plants and they serve as models to study cell development. This study investigated the distribution and evolution of fiber Unigenes anchored to recombination hotspots between tetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) At and Dt subgenomes, and within a parental diploid cotton (Gossypium raimondii) D genome. Comparative analysis of At vs D and Dt vs D showed that 1) the D genome provides many fiber genes after its merger with another parental diploid cotton (Gossypium arboreum) A genome although the D genome itself does not produce any spinnable fiber; 2) similarity of fiber genes is higher between At vs D than between Dt vs D genomic hotspots. This is the first report that fiber genes have higher similarity between At and D than between Dt and D. The finding provides new insights into cotton genomic regions that would facilitate genetic improvement of natural fiber properties. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. 21 CFR 524.1484 - Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1484 Section 524.1484 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484 Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. ...

  4. 21 CFR 524.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1044 Section 524.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1044 Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. ...

  5. 21 CFR 524.1484 - Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1484 Section 524.1484 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484 Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. ...

  6. 21 CFR 524.1484 - Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1484 Section 524.1484 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484 Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. ...

  7. 21 CFR 524.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1044 Section 524.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1044 Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. ...

  8. 21 CFR 524.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1044 Section 524.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1044 Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. ...

  9. 21 CFR 524.1044 - Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1044 Section 524.1044 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1044 Gentamicin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. ...

  10. 21 CFR 524.1484 - Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. 524.1484 Section 524.1484 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.1484 Neomycin sulfate ophthalmic and topical dosage forms. ...

  11. Genomic Imprinting Was Evolutionarily Conserved during Wheat Polyploidization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanghui; Liu, Zhenshan; Gao, Lulu; Yu, Kuohai; Feng, Man; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Hu, Zhaorong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu; Xin, Mingming

    2018-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon that causes genes to be differentially expressed depending on their parent of origin. To evaluate the evolutionary conservation of genomic imprinting and the effects of ploidy on this process, we investigated parent-of-origin-specific gene expression patterns in the endosperm of diploid ( Aegilops spp), tetraploid, and hexaploid wheat ( Triticum spp) at various stages of development via high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. We identified 91, 135, and 146 maternally or paternally expressed genes (MEGs or PEGs, respectively) in diploid, tetraploid, and hexaploid wheat, respectively, 52.7% of which exhibited dynamic expression patterns at different developmental stages. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis suggested that MEGs and PEGs were involved in metabolic processes and DNA-dependent transcription, respectively. Nearly half of the imprinted genes exhibited conserved expression patterns during wheat hexaploidization. In addition, 40% of the homoeolog pairs originating from whole-genome duplication were consistently maternally or paternally biased in the different subgenomes of hexaploid wheat. Furthermore, imprinted expression was found for 41.2% and 50.0% of homolog pairs that evolved by tandem duplication after genome duplication in tetraploid and hexaploid wheat, respectively. These results suggest that genomic imprinting was evolutionarily conserved between closely related Triticum and Aegilops species and in the face of polyploid hybridization between species in these genera. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  12. On the exfoliating polymeric cellular dosage forms for immediate drug release.

    PubMed

    Blaesi, Aron H; Saka, Nannaji

    2016-06-01

    The most prevalent pharmaceutical dosage forms at present-the oral immediate-release tablets and capsules-are granular solids. Though effective in releasing drug rapidly, development and manufacture of such dosage forms are fraught with difficulties inherent to particulate processing. Predictable dosage form manufacture could be achieved by liquid-based processing, but cast solid dosage forms are not suitable for immediate drug release due to their resistance to fluid percolation. To overcome this limitation, we have recently introduced cellular dosage forms that can be readily prepared from polymeric melts. It has been shown that open-cell structures comprising polyethylene glycol 8000 (PEG 8k) excipient and a drug exfoliate upon immersion in a dissolution medium. The drug is then released rapidly due to the large specific surface area of the exfoliations. In this work, we vary the molecular weight of the PEG excipient and investigate its effect on the drug release kinetics of structures with predominantly open-cell topology. We demonstrate that the exfoliation rate decreases substantially if the excipient molecular weight is increased from 12 to 100kg/mol, which causes the drug dissolution time to increase by more than a factor of ten. A model is then developed to elucidate the exfoliation behavior of cellular structures. Diverse transport processes are considered: percolation due to capillarity, diffusion of dissolution medium through the cell walls, and viscous flow of the saturated excipient. It is found that the lower exfoliation rate and the longer dissolution time of the dosage forms with higher excipient molecular weight are primarily due to the greater viscosity of the cell walls after fluid penetration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Phylogenetic relationships and intraspecific variation of D-genome Aegilops L. as revealed by RAPD analysis].

    PubMed

    Goriunova, S V; Kochieva, E Z; Chikida, N N; Pukhal'skiĭ, V A

    2004-05-01

    RAPD analysis was carried out to study the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Aegilops species, which contain the D genome as a component of the alloploid genome, and diploid Aegilops tauschii, which is a putative donor of the D genome for common wheat. In total, 74 accessions of six D-genome Aegilops species were examined. The highest intraspecific variation (0.03-0.21) was observed for Ae. tauschii. Intraspecific distances between accessions ranged 0.007-0.067 in Ae. cylindrica, 0.017-0.047 in Ae. vavilovii, and 0.00-0.053 in Ae. juvenalis. Likewise, Ae. ventricosa and Ae. crassa showed low intraspecific polymorphism. The among-accession difference in alloploid Ae. ventricosa (genome DvNv) was similar to that of one parental species, Ae. uniaristata (N), and substantially lower than in the other parent, Ae. tauschii (D). The among-accession difference in Ae. cylindrica (CcDc) was considerably lower than in either parent, Ae. tauschii (D) or Ae. caudata (C). With the exception of Ae. cylindrica, all D-genome species--Ae. tauschii (D), Ae. ventricosa (DvNv), Ae. crassa (XcrDcrl and XcrDcrlDcr2), Ae. juvenalis (XjDjUj), and Ae. vavilovii (XvaDvaSva)--formed a single polymorphic cluster, which was distinct from clusters of other species. The only exception, Ae. cylindrica, did not group with the other D-genome species, but clustered with Ae. caudata (C), a donor of the C genome. The cluster of these two species was clearly distinct from the cluster of the other D-genome species and close to a cluster of Ae. umbellulata (genome U) and Ae. ovata (genome UgMg). Thus, RAPD analysis for the first time was used to estimate and to compare the interpopulation polymorphism and to establish the phylogenetic relationships of all diploid and alloploid D-genome Aegilops species.

  14. Novel mechanism of conjoined gene formation in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Aeri; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Kim, Dae-Soo; Nam, Seong-Hyeuk; Kim, Dae-Won; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kang, Aram; Kim, Min-Young; Park, Kun-Hyang; Yoon, Byoung-Ha; Lee, Kang Seon; Park, Hong-Seog

    2012-03-01

    Recently, conjoined genes (CGs) have emerged as important genetic factors necessary for understanding the human genome. However, their formation mechanism and precise structures have remained mysterious. Based on a detailed structural analysis of 57 human CG transcript variants (CGTVs, discovered in this study) and all (833) known CGs in the human genome, we discovered that the poly(A) signal site from the upstream parent gene region is completely removed via the skipping or truncation of the final exon; consequently, CG transcription is terminated at the poly(A) signal site of the downstream parent gene. This result led us to propose a novel mechanism of CG formation: the complete removal of the poly(A) signal site from the upstream parent gene is a prerequisite for the CG transcriptional machinery to continue transcribing uninterrupted into the intergenic region and downstream parent gene. The removal of the poly(A) signal sequence from the upstream gene region appears to be caused by a deletion or truncation mutation in the human genome rather than post-transcriptional trans-splicing events. With respect to the characteristics of CG sequence structures, we found that intergenic regions are hot spots for novel exon creation during CGTV formation and that exons farther from the intergenic regions are more highly conserved in the CGTVs. Interestingly, many novel exons newly created within the intergenic and intragenic regions originated from transposable element sequences. Additionally, the CGTVs showed tumor tissue-biased expression. In conclusion, our study provides novel insights into the CG formation mechanism and expands the present concepts of the genetic structural landscape, gene regulation, and gene formation mechanisms in the human genome.

  15. The Development of Teaching Efficacy for Drug-Dosage Calculation Instruction: A Nursing Faculty Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitale, Gail A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how nursing efficacy for drug-dosage calculation instruction is determined. Medication administration is a critical function of nurses in healthcare settings. An essential component of safe medication administration is accurate drug-dosage calculation, but instruction in drug-dosage calculation methods…

  16. Reorganization of wheat and rye genomes in octoploid triticale (× Triticosecale).

    PubMed

    Kalinka, Anna; Achrem, Magdalena

    2018-04-01

    The analysis of early generations of triticale showed numerous rearrangements of the genome. Complexed transformation included loss of chromosomes, t-heterochromatin content changes and the emergence of retrotransposons in new locations. This study investigated certain aspects of genomic transformations in the early generations (F5 and F8) of the primary octoploid triticale derived from the cross of hexaploid wheat with the diploid rye. Most of the plants tested were hypoploid; among eliminated chromosomes were rye chromosomes 4R and 5R and variable number of wheat chromosomes. Wheat chromosomes were eliminated to a higher extent. The lower content of telomeric heterochromatin was also found in rye chromosomes in comparison with parental rye. Studying the location of selected retrotransposons from Ty1-copia and Ty3-gypsy families using fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed additional locations of these retrotransposons that were not present in chromosomes of parental species. ISSR, IRAP and REMAP analyses showed significant changes at the level of specific DNA nucleotide sequences. In most cases, the disappearance of certain types of bands was observed, less frequently new types of bands appeared, not present in parental species. This demonstrates the scale of genome rearrangement and, above all, the elimination of wheat and rye sequences, largely due to the reduction of chromosome number. With regard to the proportion of wheat to rye genome, the rye genome was more affected by the changes, thus this study was focused more on the rye genome. Observations suggest that genome reorganization is not finished in the F5 generation but is still ongoing in the F8 generation.

  17. ABCB1 genetic variability and methadone dosage requirements in opioid-dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Coller, Janet K; Barratt, Daniel T; Dahlen, Karianne; Loennechen, Morten H; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2006-12-01

    The most common treatment for opioid dependence is substitution therapy with another opioid such as methadone. The methadone dosage is individualized but highly variable, and program retention rates are low due in part to nonoptimal dosing resulting in withdrawal symptoms and further heroin craving and use. Methadone is a substrate for the P-glycoprotein transporter, encoded by the ABCB1 gene, which regulates central nervous system exposure. This retrospective study aimed to investigate the influence of ABCB1 genetic variability on methadone dose requirements. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid was isolated from opioid-dependent subjects (n = 60) and non-opioid-dependent control subjects (n = 60), and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction were used to determine the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms at positions 61, 1199, 1236, 2677, and 3435. ABCB1 haplotypes were inferred with PHASE software (version 2.1). There were no significant differences in the allele or genotype frequencies of the individual single nucleotide polymorphisms or haplotypes between the 2 populations. ABCB1 genetic variability influenced daily methadone dose requirements, such that subjects carrying 2 copies of the wild-type haplotype required higher doses compared with those with 1 copy and those with no copies (98.3 +/- 10.4, 58.6 +/- 20.9, and 55.4 +/- 26.1 mg/d, respectively; P = .029). In addition, carriers of the AGCTT haplotype required significantly lower doses than noncarriers (38.0 +/- 16.8 and 61.3 +/- 24.6 mg/d, respectively; P = .04). Although ABCB1 genetic variability is not related to the development of opioid dependence, identification of variant haplotypes may, after larger prospective studies have been performed, provide clinicians with a tool for methadone dosage individualization.

  18. Evolution of dosage compensation under sexual selection differs between X and Z chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Mullon, Charles; Wright, Alison E.; Reuter, Max; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Mank, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Complete sex chromosome dosage compensation has more often been observed in XY than ZW species. In this study, using a population genetic model and the chicken transcriptome, we assess whether sexual conflict can account for this difference. Sexual conflict over expression is inevitable when mutation effects are correlated across the sexes, as compensatory mutations in the heterogametic sex lead to hyperexpression in the homogametic sex. Coupled with stronger selection and greater reproductive variance in males, this results in slower and less complete evolution of Z compared with X dosage compensation. Using expression variance as a measure of selection strength, we find that, as predicted by the model, dosage compensation in the chicken is most pronounced in genes that are under strong selection biased towards females. Our study explains the pattern of weak dosage compensation in ZW systems, and suggests that sexual selection plays a major role in shaping sex chromosome dosage compensation. PMID:26212613

  19. Manufacturing Solid Dosage Forms from Bulk Liquids Using the Fluid-bed Drying Technology.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianping; Lu, Y I; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Solid dosage forms are better than liquid dosage forms in many ways, such as improved physical and chemical stability, ease of storage and transportation, improved handling properties, and patient compliance. Therefore, it is required to transform dosage forms of liquid origins into solid dosage forms. The functional approaches are to absorb the liquids by solid excipients or through drying. The conventional drying technologies for this purpose include drying by heating, vacuum-, freeze- and spray-drying, etc. Among these drying technologies, fluidbed drying emerges as a new technology that possesses unique advantages. Fluid-bed drying or coating is highly efficient in solvent removal, can be performed at relatively low temperatures, and is a one-step process to manufacture formulations in pellet forms. In this article, the status of the art of manufacturing solid dosage forms from bulk liquids by fluid-bed drying technology was reviewed emphasizing on its application in solid dispersion, inclusion complexes, self-microemulsifying systems, and various nanoscale drug delivery systems.

  20. 27nt-RNAs guide histone variant deposition via 'RNA-induced DNA replication interference' and thus transmit parental genome partitioning in Stylonychia.

    PubMed

    Postberg, Jan; Jönsson, Franziska; Weil, Patrick Philipp; Bulic, Aneta; Juranek, Stefan Andreas; Lipps, Hans-Joachim

    2018-06-12

    During sexual reproduction in the unicellular ciliate Stylonychia somatic macronuclei differentiate from germline micronuclei. Thereby, programmed sequence reduction takes place, leading to the elimination of > 95% of germline sequences, which priorly adopt heterochromatin structure via H3K27me3. Simultaneously, 27nt-ncRNAs become synthesized from parental transcripts and are bound by the Argonaute protein PIWI1. These 27nt-ncRNAs cover sequences destined to the developing macronucleus and are thought to protect them from degradation. We provide evidence and propose that RNA/DNA base-pairing guides PIWI1/27nt-RNA complexes to complementary macronucleus-destined DNA target sequences, hence transiently causing locally stalled replication during polytene chromosome formation. This spatiotemporal delay enables the selective deposition of temporarily available histone H3.4K27me3 nucleosomes at all other sequences being continuously replicated, thus dictating their prospective heterochromatin structure before becoming developmentally eliminated. Concomitantly, 27nt-RNA-covered sites remain protected. We introduce the concept of 'RNA-induced DNA replication interference' and explain how the parental functional genome partition could become transmitted to the progeny.

  1. Novel delivery device for monolithical solid oral dosage forms for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Wening, Klaus; Breitkreutz, Jörg

    2010-08-16

    There is an evident need for solid oral dosage forms allowing patients' tailor-made dosing due to variations in metabolization or small therapeutic indexes of drug substances. The objective of this work is the development of a device equipped with a novel solid dosage form, containing carvedilol as model drug, for the delivery of monolithical drug carriers in individual doses. The device was developed and constructed enabling an exact feed rate and dose adjustment by a cutting mechanism. A twin-screw extruder was used for producing cylindrical solid dosage forms. Divided doses were characterized by mass variation, cutting behavior and drug dissolution in order to investigate their applicability for practical use. Different formulations could be extruded obtaining straight cylindrical rods, which are divisible in exact slices by using the novel device. Forces below 20 N were needed to divide doses which comply with pharmacopoeial specification "conformity of mass". The developed formulations exhibit a sustained release of carvedilol within a range from 7 up to 16 h. A novel system consisting of a device and a cylindrical dosage form was developed. Patients' individual doses can be applied as monolithical solid dosage forms for oral use.

  2. Software for Dosage Individualization of Voriconazole for Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    VanGuilder, Michael; Donnelly, J. Peter; Blijlevens, Nicole M. A.; Brüggemann, Roger J. M.; Jelliffe, Roger W.; Neely, Michael N.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of voriconazole is potentially compromised by considerable pharmacokinetic variability. There are increasing insights into voriconazole concentrations that are safe and effective for treatment of invasive fungal infections. Therapeutic drug monitoring is increasingly advocated. Software to aid in the individualization of dosing would be an extremely useful clinical tool. We developed software to enable the individualization of voriconazole dosing to attain predefined serum concentration targets. The process of individualized voriconazole therapy was based on concepts of Bayesian stochastic adaptive control. Multiple-model dosage design with feedback control was used to calculate dosages that achieved desired concentration targets with maximum precision. The performance of the software program was assessed using the data from 10 recipients of an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) receiving intravenous (i.v.) voriconazole. The program was able to model the plasma concentrations with a high level of precision, despite the wide range of concentration trajectories and interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. The voriconazole concentrations predicted after the last dosages were largely concordant with those actually measured. Simulations provided an illustration of the way in which the software can be used to adjust dosages of patients falling outside desired concentration targets. This software appears to be an extremely useful tool to further optimize voriconazole therapy and aid in therapeutic drug monitoring. Further prospective studies are now required to define the utility of the controller in daily clinical practice. PMID:23380734

  3. Exploring the Yeast Acetylome Using Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Supipi Kaluarachchi; Friesen, Helena; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Chong, Yolanda T.; Figeys, Daniel; Andrews, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine acetylation is a dynamic posttranslational modification with a well-defined role in regulating histones. The impact of acetylation on other cellular functions remains relatively uncharacterized. We explored the budding yeast acetylome with a functional genomics approach, assessing the effects of gene overexpression in the absence of lysine deacetylases (KDACs). We generated a network of 463 synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) interactions involving class I and II KDACs, revealing many cellular pathways regulated by different KDACs. A biochemical survey of genes interacting with the KDAC RPD3 identified 72 proteins acetylated in vivo. In-depth analysis of one of these proteins, Swi4, revealed a role for acetylation in G1-specific gene expression. Acetylation of Swi4 regulates interaction with its partner Swi6, both components of the SBF transcription factor. This study expands our view of the yeast acetylome, demonstrates the utility of functional genomic screens for exploring enzymatic pathways, and provides functional information that can be mined for future studies. PMID:22579291

  4. [Oral disintegrating tablets. A new, modern, solid dosage form].

    PubMed

    Popa, Graţiela; Gafiţanu, Eliza

    2003-01-01

    The pharmaceutical market shows lately an increasing interest in orally disintegrating tablets, due to their good acceptability among certain age categories (ex. elderly, children), and other patients with difficulties in swallowing classic solid dosage forms. Some of the methods of preparing such tablets have gained industrial applicability: molding, lyophilization, direct compression with highly soluble excipients, super disintegrants and/or effervescent systems. Some of the patients have had a good impact on the pharmaceutical market and more improvements are expected in the next few years, with new drugs to be formulated as fast dissolving dosage formulations.

  5. Dosage variability of topical ocular hypotensive products: a densitometric assessment.

    PubMed

    Gaynes, Bruce I; Singa, Ramesh M; Cao, Ying

    2009-02-01

    To ascertain consequence of variability in drop volume obtained from multiuse topical ocular hypotensive products in terms of uniformity of product dosage. Densitometric assessment of drop volume dispensed from 2 alternative bottle positions. All except one product demonstrated a statistically significant difference in drop volume when administered at either a 45-degree or 90-degree bottle angle (Student t test, P<0.001). Product-specific drop volume ranged from a nadir of 22.36 microL to a high of 53.54 microL depending on bottle angle of administration. Deviation in drop dose was directly proportional to variability in drop volume. Variability in per drop dosage was conspicuous among products with a coefficient of variation from 1.49% to 15.91%. In accordance with drop volume, all products demonstrated a statistically significant difference in drop dose at 45-degree versus 90-degree administration angles. Drop volume was found unrelated to drop uniformity (Spearman r=0.01987 and P=0.9463). Variability and lack of uniformity in drop dosage is clearly evident among select ocular hypotensive products and is related to angle of drop administration. Erratic dosage of topical ocular hypotensive therapy may contribute in part to therapeutic failure and/or toxicity.

  6. Saccharomyces pastorianus: genomic insights inspiring innovation for industry.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Brian; Liti, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    A combination of biological and non-biological factors has led to the interspecific hybrid yeast species Saccharomyces pastorianus becoming one of the world's most important industrial organisms. This yeast is used in the production of lager-style beers, the fermentation of which requires very low temperatures compared to other industrial fermentation processes. This group of organisms has benefited from both the whole-genome duplication in its ancestral lineage and the subsequent hybridization event between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus, resulting in strong fermentative ability. The hybrid has key traits, such as cold tolerance and good maltose- and maltotriose-utilizing ability, inherited either from the parental species or originating from genetic interactions between the parent genomes. Instability in the nascent allopolyploid hybrid genome may have contributed to rapid evolution of the yeast to tolerate conditions prevalent in the brewing environment. The recent discovery of S. eubayanus has provided new insights into the evolutionary history of S. pastorianus and may offer new opportunities for generating novel industrially-beneficial lager yeast strains. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Parental origin of sequence variants associated with complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Kong, Augustine; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Masson, Gisli; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Sulem, Patrick; Besenbacher, Soren; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kristinsson, Kari Th; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Frigge, Michael L; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Olason, Pall I; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Sverrisson, Sverrir; Stacey, Simon N; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Sigurdsson, Helgi; Jonsson, Thorvaldur; Benediktsson, Rafn; Olafsson, Jon H; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Hreidarsson, Astradur B; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-12-17

    Effects of susceptibility variants may depend on from which parent they are inherited. Although many associations between sequence variants and human traits have been discovered through genome-wide associations, the impact of parental origin has largely been ignored. Here we show that for 38,167 Icelanders genotyped using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips, the parental origin of most alleles can be determined. For this we used a combination of genealogy and long-range phasing. We then focused on SNPs that associate with diseases and are within 500 kilobases of known imprinted genes. Seven independent SNP associations were examined. Five-one with breast cancer, one with basal-cell carcinoma and three with type 2 diabetes-have parental-origin-specific associations. These variants are located in two genomic regions, 11p15 and 7q32, each harbouring a cluster of imprinted genes. Furthermore, we observed a novel association between the SNP rs2334499 at 11p15 and type 2 diabetes. Here the allele that confers risk when paternally inherited is protective when maternally transmitted. We identified a differentially methylated CTCF-binding site at 11p15 and demonstrated correlation of rs2334499 with decreased methylation of that site.

  8. Dosage-Sensitive Function of RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED and Convergent Epigenetic Control Are Required during the Arabidopsis Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Amal J.; Kirioukhova, Olga; Barrell, Philippa J.; Rutten, Twan; Moore, James M.; Baskar, Ramamurthy; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The plant life cycle alternates between two distinct multi-cellular generations, the reduced gametophytes and the dominant sporophyte. Little is known about how generation-specific cell fate, differentiation, and development are controlled by the core regulators of the cell cycle. In Arabidopsis, RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED (RBR), an evolutionarily ancient cell cycle regulator, controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and regulation of a subset of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) genes and METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1) in the male and female gametophytes, as well as cell fate establishment in the male gametophyte. Here we demonstrate that RBR is also essential for cell fate determination in the female gametophyte, as revealed by loss of cell-specific marker expression in all the gametophytic cells that lack RBR. Maintenance of genome integrity also requires RBR, because diploid plants heterozygous for rbr (rbr/RBR) produce an abnormal portion of triploid offspring, likely due to gametic genome duplication. While the sporophyte of the diploid mutant plants phenocopied wild type due to the haplosufficiency of RBR, genetic analysis of tetraploid plants triplex for rbr (rbr/rbr/rbr/RBR) revealed that RBR has a dosage-dependent pleiotropic effect on sporophytic development, trichome differentiation, and regulation of PRC2 subunit genes CURLY LEAF (CLF) and VERNALIZATION 2 (VRN2), and MET1 in leaves. There were, however, no obvious cell cycle and cell proliferation defects in these plant tissues, suggesting that a single functional RBR copy in tetraploids is capable of maintaining normal cell division but is not sufficient for distinct differentiation and developmental processes. Conversely, in leaves of mutants in sporophytic PRC2 subunits, trichome differentiation was also affected and expression of RBR and MET1 was reduced, providing evidence for a RBR-PRC2-MET1 regulatory feedback loop involved in sporophyte development. Together, dosage-sensitive RBR function and

  9. The genomic mosaicism of hybrid speciation

    PubMed Central

    Elgvin, Tore O.; Trier, Cassandra N.; Tørresen, Ole K.; Hagen, Ingerid J.; Lien, Sigbjørn; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Ravinet, Mark; Jensen, Henrik; Sætre, Glenn-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Hybridization is widespread in nature and, in some instances, can result in the formation of a new hybrid species. We investigate the genetic foundation of this poorly understood process through whole-genome analysis of the hybrid Italian sparrow and its progenitors. We find overall balanced yet heterogeneous levels of contribution from each parent species throughout the hybrid genome and identify areas of novel divergence in the hybrid species exhibiting signals consistent with balancing selection. High-divergence areas are disproportionately located on the Z chromosome and overrepresented in gene networks relating to key traits separating the focal species, which are likely involved in reproductive barriers and/or species-specific adaptations. Of special interest are genes and functional groups known to affect body patterning, beak morphology, and the immune system, which are important features of diversification and fitness. We show that a combination of mosaic parental inheritance and novel divergence within the hybrid lineage has facilitated the origin and maintenance of an avian hybrid species. PMID:28630911

  10. 21 CFR 520.1802 - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex oral dosage forms. 520.1802 Section 520.1802 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1802 Piperazine-carbon disulfide comple...

  11. The Use of Drugs to Modify Behavior in Retarded Persons: A Practical Guide for Parents and Advocates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Roger D.

    The guide presents information for parents, advocates, residential counselors, or retarded persons on the use of drugs in behavior modification. Reasons for concern over the use of drugs are noted, and general principles regarding such factors as individual differences in metabolism and reaction, dosage level, and changes over time are discussed.…

  12. Dosage compensation proteins targeted to X chromosomes by a determinant of hermaphrodite fate.

    PubMed

    Dawes, H E; Berlin, D S; Lapidus, D M; Nusbaum, C; Davis, T L; Meyer, B J

    1999-06-11

    In many organisms, master control genes coordinately regulate sex-specific aspects of development. SDC-2 was shown to induce hermaphrodite sexual differentiation and activate X chromosome dosage compensation in Caenorhabditis elegans. To control these distinct processes, SDC-2 acts as a strong gene-specific repressor and a weaker chromosome-wide repressor. To initiate hermaphrodite development, SDC-2 associates with the promoter of the male sex-determining gene her-1 to repress its transcription. To activate dosage compensation, SDC-2 triggers assembly of a specialized protein complex exclusively on hermaphrodite X chromosomes to reduce gene expression by half. SDC-2 can localize to X chromosomes without other components of the dosage compensation complex, suggesting that SDC-2 targets dosage compensation machinery to X chromosomes.

  13. Regions flanking ori sequences affect the replication efficiency of the mitochondrial genome of ori+ petite mutants from yeast.

    PubMed

    Rayko, E; Goursot, R; Cherif-Zahar, B; Melis, R; Bernardi, G

    1988-03-31

    The mitochondrial genomes of progenies from 26 crosses between 17 cytoplasmic, spontaneous, suppressive, ori+ petite mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied by electrophoresis of restriction fragments. Only parental genomes (or occasionally, genomes derived from them by secondary excisions) were found in the progenies of the almost 500 diploids investigated; no evidence for illegitimate, site-specific mitochondrial recombination was detected. One of the parental genomes was always found to be predominate over the other one, although to different extents in different crosses. This predominance appears to be due to a higher replication efficiency, which is correlated with a greater density of ori sequences on the mitochondrial genome (and with a shorter repeat unit size of the latter). Exceptions to the 'repeat-unit-size rule' were found, however, even when the parental mitochondrial genomes carried the same ori sequence. This indicates that noncoding, intergenic sequences outside ori sequences also play a role in modulating replication efficiency. Since in different petites such sequences differ in primary structure, size, and position relative to ori sequences, this modulation is likely to take place through an indirect effect on DNA and nucleoid structure.

  14. The genome of melon (Cucumis melo L.)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Benjak, Andrej; Sanseverino, Walter; Bourgeois, Michael; Mir, Gisela; González, Víctor M.; Hénaff, Elizabeth; Câmara, Francisco; Cozzuto, Luca; Lowy, Ernesto; Alioto, Tyler; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Blanca, Jose; Cañizares, Joaquín; Ziarsolo, Pello; Gonzalez-Ibeas, Daniel; Rodríguez-Moreno, Luis; Droege, Marcus; Du, Lei; Alvarez-Tejado, Miguel; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Melé, Marta; Yang, Luming; Weng, Yiqun; Navarro, Arcadi; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Aranda, Miguel A.; Nuez, Fernando; Picó, Belén; Gabaldón, Toni; Roma, Guglielmo; Guigó, Roderic; Casacuberta, Josep M.; Arús, Pere; Puigdomènech, Pere

    2012-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of melon, an important horticultural crop worldwide. We assembled 375 Mb of the double-haploid line DHL92, representing 83.3% of the estimated melon genome. We predicted 27,427 protein-coding genes, which we analyzed by reconstructing 22,218 phylogenetic trees, allowing mapping of the orthology and paralogy relationships of sequenced plant genomes. We observed the absence of recent whole-genome duplications in the melon lineage since the ancient eudicot triplication, and our data suggest that transposon amplification may in part explain the increased size of the melon genome compared with the close relative cucumber. A low number of nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat disease resistance genes were annotated, suggesting the existence of specific defense mechanisms in this species. The DHL92 genome was compared with that of its parental lines allowing the quantification of sequence variability in the species. The use of the genome sequence in future investigations will facilitate the understanding of evolution of cucurbits and the improvement of breeding strategies. PMID:22753475

  15. Genomic Runs of Homozygosity Record Population History and Consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Kirin, Mirna; McQuillan, Ruth; Franklin, Christopher S.; Campbell, Harry; McKeigue, Paul M.; Wilson, James F.

    2010-01-01

    The human genome is characterised by many runs of homozygous genotypes, where identical haplotypes were inherited from each parent. The length of each run is determined partly by the number of generations since the common ancestor: offspring of cousin marriages have long runs of homozygosity (ROH), while the numerous shorter tracts relate to shared ancestry tens and hundreds of generations ago. Human populations have experienced a wide range of demographic histories and hold diverse cultural attitudes to consanguinity. In a global population dataset, genome-wide analysis of long and shorter ROH allows categorisation of the mainly indigenous populations sampled here into four major groups in which the majority of the population are inferred to have: (a) recent parental relatedness (south and west Asians); (b) shared parental ancestry arising hundreds to thousands of years ago through long term isolation and restricted effective population size (Ne), but little recent inbreeding (Oceanians); (c) both ancient and recent parental relatedness (Native Americans); and (d) only the background level of shared ancestry relating to continental Ne (predominantly urban Europeans and East Asians; lowest of all in sub-Saharan African agriculturalists), and the occasional cryptically inbred individual. Moreover, individuals can be positioned along axes representing this demographic historic space. Long runs of homozygosity are therefore a globally widespread and under-appreciated characteristic of our genomes, which record past consanguinity and population isolation and provide a distinctive record of the demographic history of an individual's ancestors. Individual ROH measures will also allow quantification of the disease risk arising from polygenic recessive effects. PMID:21085596

  16. Frequency of dosage prescribing medication errors associated with manual prescriptions for very preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Horri, J; Cransac, A; Quantin, C; Abrahamowicz, M; Ferdynus, C; Sgro, C; Robillard, P-Y; Iacobelli, S; Gouyon, J-B

    2014-12-01

    The risk of dosage Prescription Medication Error (PME) among manually written prescriptions within 'mixed' prescribing system (computerized physician order entry (CPOE) + manual prescriptions) has not been previously assessed in neonatology. This study aimed to evaluate the rate of dosage PME related to manual prescriptions in the high-risk population of very preterm infants (GA < 33 weeks) in a mixed prescription system. The study was based on a retrospective review of a random sample of manual daily prescriptions in two neonatal intensive care units (NICU) A and B, located in different French University hospitals (Dijon and La Reunion island). Daily prescription was defined as the set of all drugs manually prescribed on a single day for one patient. Dosage error was defined as a deviation of at least ±10% from the weight-appropriate recommended dose. The analyses were based on the assessment of 676 manually prescribed drugs from NICU A (58 different drugs from 93 newborns and 240 daily prescriptions) and 354 manually prescribed drugs from NICU B (73 different drugs from 131 newborns and 241 daily prescriptions). The dosage error rate per 100 manually prescribed drugs was similar in both NICU: 3·8% (95% CI: 2·5-5·6%) in NICU A and 3·1% (95% CI: 1·6-5·5%) in NICU B (P = 0·54). Among all the 37 identified dosage errors, the over-dosing was almost as frequent as the under-dosing (17 and 20 errors, respectively). Potentially severe dosage errors occurred in a total of seven drug prescriptions. None of the dosage PME was recorded in the corresponding medical files and information on clinical outcome was not sufficient to identify clinical conditions related to dosage PME. Overall, 46·8% of manually prescribed drugs were off label or unlicensed, with no significant differences between prescriptions with or without dosage error. The risk of a dosage PME increased significantly if the drug was included in the CPOE system but was manually prescribed (OR

  17. Pharmaceutical approaches to preparing pelletized dosage forms using the extrusion-spheronization process.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Namrata R; Rajan, Maria Gerald; Johnson, James R; Shukla, Atul J

    2007-01-01

    Pelletized dosage forms date back to the 1950s, when the first product was introduced to the market. Since then, these dosage forms have gained considerable popularity because of their distinct advantages, such as ease of capsule filling because of better flow properties of the spherical pellets; enhancement of drug dissolution; ease of coating; sustained, controlled, or site-specific delivery of the drug from coated pellets; uniform packing; even distribution in the GI tract; and less GI irritation. Pelletized dosage forms can be prepared by a number of techniques, including drug layering on nonpareil sugar or microcrystalline cellulose beads, spray drying, spray congealing, rotogranulation, hot-melt extrusion, and spheronization of low melting materials or extrusion-spheronization of a wet mass. This review discusses recent developments in the pharmaceutical approaches that have been used to prepare pelletized dosage forms using the extrusion-spheronization process over the last decade. The review is divided into three parts: the first part discusses the extrusion-spheronization process, the second part discusses the effect of varying formulation and process parameters on the properties of the pellets, and the last part discusses the different approaches that have been used to prepare pelletized dosage forms using the extrusion-spheronization process.

  18. Genomic Imprinting Was Evolutionarily Conserved during Wheat Polyploidization[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guanghui; Liu, Zhenshan; Gao, Lulu; Yu, Kuohai; Feng, Man; Peng, Huiru; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2018-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon that causes genes to be differentially expressed depending on their parent of origin. To evaluate the evolutionary conservation of genomic imprinting and the effects of ploidy on this process, we investigated parent-of-origin-specific gene expression patterns in the endosperm of diploid (Aegilops spp), tetraploid, and hexaploid wheat (Triticum spp) at various stages of development via high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. We identified 91, 135, and 146 maternally or paternally expressed genes (MEGs or PEGs, respectively) in diploid, tetraploid, and hexaploid wheat, respectively, 52.7% of which exhibited dynamic expression patterns at different developmental stages. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis suggested that MEGs and PEGs were involved in metabolic processes and DNA-dependent transcription, respectively. Nearly half of the imprinted genes exhibited conserved expression patterns during wheat hexaploidization. In addition, 40% of the homoeolog pairs originating from whole-genome duplication were consistently maternally or paternally biased in the different subgenomes of hexaploid wheat. Furthermore, imprinted expression was found for 41.2% and 50.0% of homolog pairs that evolved by tandem duplication after genome duplication in tetraploid and hexaploid wheat, respectively. These results suggest that genomic imprinting was evolutionarily conserved between closely related Triticum and Aegilops species and in the face of polyploid hybridization between species in these genera. PMID:29298834

  19. Maths anxiety and medication dosage calculation errors: A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brett; Davis, Samantha

    2016-09-01

    A student's accuracy on drug calculation tests may be influenced by maths anxiety, which can impede one's ability to understand and complete mathematic problems. It is important for healthcare students to overcome this barrier when calculating drug dosages in order to avoid administering the incorrect dose to a patient when in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of maths anxiety on healthcare students' ability to accurately calculate drug dosages by performing a scoping review of the existing literature. This review utilised a six-stage methodology using the following databases; CINAHL, Embase, Medline, Scopus, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, Trip database (http://www.tripdatabase.com/) and Grey Literature report (http://www.greylit.org/). After an initial title/abstract review of relevant papers, and then full text review of the remaining papers, six articles were selected for inclusion in this study. Of the six articles included, there were three experimental studies, two quantitative studies and one mixed method study. All studies addressed nursing students and the presence of maths anxiety. No relevant studies from other disciplines were identified in the existing literature. Three studies took place in the U.S, the remainder in Canada, Australia and United Kingdom. Upon analysis of these studies, four factors including maths anxiety were identified as having an influence on a student's drug dosage calculation abilities. Ultimately, the results from this review suggest more research is required in nursing and other relevant healthcare disciplines regarding the effects of maths anxiety on drug dosage calculations. This additional knowledge will be important to further inform development of strategies to decrease the potentially serious effects of errors in drug dosage calculation to patient safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mouse Models of Genomic Syndromes as Tools for Understanding the Basis of Complex Traits: An Example with the Smith-Magenis and the Potocki-Lupski Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Mora, P; Molina, J; Encina, C.A; Walz, K

    2009-01-01

    Each human's genome is distinguished by extra and missing DNA that can be “benign” or powerfully impact everything from development to disease. In the case of genomic disorders DNA rearrangements, such as deletions or duplications, correlate with a clinical specific phenotype. The clinical presentations of genomic disorders were thought to result from altered gene copy number of physically linked dosage sensitive genes. Genomic disorders are frequent diseases (~1 per 1,000 births). Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS) are genomic disorders, associated with a deletion and a duplication, of 3.7 Mb respectively, within chromosome 17 band p11.2. This region includes 23 genes. Both syndromes have complex and distinctive phenotypes including multiple congenital and neurobehavioral abnormalities. Human chromosome 17p11.2 is syntenic to the 32-34 cM region of murine chromosome 11. The number and order of the genes are highly conserved. In this review, we will exemplify how genomic disorders can be modeled in mice and the advantages that such models can give in the study of genomic disorders in particular and gene copy number variation (CNV) in general. The contributions of the SMS and PTLS animal models in several aspects ranging from more specific ones, as the definition of the clinical aspects of the human clinical spectrum, the identification of dosage sensitive genes related to the human syndromes, to the more general contributions as the definition of genetic locus impacting obesity and behavior and the elucidation of general mechanisms related to the pathogenesis of gene CNV are discussed. PMID:19949547

  1. Whole-genome sequencing of cultivated and wild peppers provides insights into Capsicum domestication and specialization

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Cheng; Yu, Changshui; Shen, Yaou; Fang, Xiaodong; Chen, Lang; Min, Jiumeng; Cheng, Jiaowen; Zhao, Shancen; Xu, Meng; Luo, Yong; Yang, Yulan; Wu, Zhiming; Mao, Likai; Wu, Haiyang; Ling-Hu, Changying; Zhou, Huangkai; Lin, Haijian; González-Morales, Sandra; Trejo-Saavedra, Diana L.; Tian, Hao; Tang, Xin; Zhao, Maojun; Huang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Anwei; Yao, Xiaoming; Cui, Junjie; Li, Wenqi; Chen, Zhe; Feng, Yongqiang; Niu, Yongchao; Bi, Shimin; Yang, Xiuwei; Li, Weipeng; Cai, Huimin; Luo, Xirong; Montes-Hernández, Salvador; Leyva-González, Marco A.; Xiong, Zhiqiang; He, Xiujing; Bai, Lijun; Tan, Shu; Tang, Xiangqun; Liu, Dan; Liu, Jinwen; Zhang, Shangxing; Chen, Maoshan; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yinchao; Liao, Weiqin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Min; Lv, Xiaodan; Wen, Bo; Liu, Hongjun; Luan, Hemi; Zhang, Yonggang; Yang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaodian; Xu, Jiaohui; Li, Xueqin; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Junyi; Palloix, Alain; Bosland, Paul W.; Li, Yingrui; Krogh, Anders; Rivera-Bustamante, Rafael F.; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Yin, Ye; Yu, Jiping; Hu, Kailin; Zhang, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    As an economic crop, pepper satisfies people’s spicy taste and has medicinal uses worldwide. To gain a better understanding of Capsicum evolution, domestication, and specialization, we present here the genome sequence of the cultivated pepper Zunla-1 (C. annuum L.) and its wild progenitor Chiltepin (C. annuum var. glabriusculum). We estimate that the pepper genome expanded ∼0.3 Mya (with respect to the genome of other Solanaceae) by a rapid amplification of retrotransposons elements, resulting in a genome comprised of ∼81% repetitive sequences. Approximately 79% of 3.48-Gb scaffolds containing 34,476 protein-coding genes were anchored to chromosomes by a high-density genetic map. Comparison of cultivated and wild pepper genomes with 20 resequencing accessions revealed molecular footprints of artificial selection, providing us with a list of candidate domestication genes. We also found that dosage compensation effect of tandem duplication genes probably contributed to the pungent diversification in pepper. The Capsicum reference genome provides crucial information for the study of not only the evolution of the pepper genome but also, the Solanaceae family, and it will facilitate the establishment of more effective pepper breeding programs. PMID:24591624

  2. Application of Genomic In Situ Hybridization in Horticultural Science

    PubMed Central

    Ramzan, Fahad; Lim, Ki-Byung

    2017-01-01

    Molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as in situ hybridization methods, are admirable tools to analyze the genomic structure and function, chromosome constituents, recombination patterns, alien gene introgression, genome evolution, aneuploidy, and polyploidy and also genome constitution visualization and chromosome discrimination from different genomes in allopolyploids of various horticultural crops. Using GISH advancement as multicolor detection is a significant approach to analyze the small and numerous chromosomes in fruit species, for example, Diospyros hybrids. This analytical technique has proved to be the most exact and effective way for hybrid status confirmation and helps remarkably to distinguish donor parental genomes in hybrids such as Clivia, Rhododendron, and Lycoris ornamental hybrids. The genome characterization facilitates in hybrid selection having potential desirable characteristics during the early hybridization breeding, as this technique expedites to detect introgressed sequence chromosomes. This review study epitomizes applications and advancements of genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) techniques in horticultural plants. PMID:28459054

  3. The origin and evolution of vertebrate sex chromosomes and dosage compensation

    PubMed Central

    Livernois, A M; Graves, J A M; Waters, P D

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, birds, snakes and many lizards and fish, sex is determined genetically (either male XY heterogamy or female ZW heterogamy), whereas in alligators, and in many reptiles and turtles, the temperature at which eggs are incubated determines sex. Evidently, different sex-determining systems (and sex chromosome pairs) have evolved independently in different vertebrate lineages. Homology shared by Xs and Ys (and Zs and Ws) within species demonstrates that differentiated sex chromosomes were once homologous, and that the sex-specific non-recombining Y (or W) was progressively degraded. Consequently, genes are left in single copy in the heterogametic sex, which results in an imbalance of the dosage of genes on the sex chromosomes between the sexes, and also relative to the autosomes. Dosage compensation has evolved in diverse species to compensate for these dose differences, with the stringency of compensation apparently differing greatly between lineages, perhaps reflecting the concentration of genes on the original autosome pair that required dosage compensation. We discuss the organization and evolution of amniote sex chromosomes, and hypothesize that dosage insensitivity might predispose an autosome to evolving function as a sex chromosome. PMID:22086077

  4. Haploid plants produced by centromere-mediated genome elimination.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Chan, Simon W L

    2010-03-25

    Production of haploid plants that inherit chromosomes from only one parent can greatly accelerate plant breeding. Haploids generated from a heterozygous individual and converted to diploid create instant homozygous lines, bypassing generations of inbreeding. Two methods are generally used to produce haploids. First, cultured gametophyte cells may be regenerated into haploid plants, but many species and genotypes are recalcitrant to this process. Second, haploids can be induced from rare interspecific crosses, in which one parental genome is eliminated after fertilization. The molecular basis for genome elimination is not understood, but one theory posits that centromeres from the two parent species interact unequally with the mitotic spindle, causing selective chromosome loss. Here we show that haploid Arabidopsis thaliana plants can be easily generated through seeds by manipulating a single centromere protein, the centromere-specific histone CENH3 (called CENP-A in human). When cenh3 null mutants expressing altered CENH3 proteins are crossed to wild type, chromosomes from the mutant are eliminated, producing haploid progeny. Haploids are spontaneously converted into fertile diploids through meiotic non-reduction, allowing their genotype to be perpetuated. Maternal and paternal haploids can be generated through reciprocal crosses. We have also exploited centromere-mediated genome elimination to convert a natural tetraploid Arabidopsis into a diploid, reducing its ploidy to simplify breeding. As CENH3 is universal in eukaryotes, our method may be extended to produce haploids in any plant species.

  5. Genome Sequence of Novosphingobium lindaniclasticum LE124T, Isolated from a Hexachlorocyclohexane Dumpsite

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Anjali; Nayyar, Namita; Sangwan, Naseer; Kumari, Rashmi; Khurana, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Novosphingobium lindaniclasticum LE124T is a hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-degrading bacterium isolated from a high-dosage-point HCH dumpsite (450 mg HCH/g soil) located in Lucknow, India (27°00′N and 81°09′E). Here, we present the annotated draft genome sequence of strain LE124T, which has an estimated size of 4.86 Mb and is comprised of 4,566 coding sequences. PMID:24029761

  6. Ensemble Simulations with Coupled Atmospheric Dynamic and Dispersion Models: Illustrating Uncertainties in Dosage Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Thomas T.; Sheu, Rong-Shyang; Bowers, James F.; Sykes, R. Ian; Dodd, Gregory C.; Henn, Douglas S.

    2002-05-01

    Ensemble simulations made using a coupled atmospheric dynamic model and a probabilistic Lagrangian puff dispersion model were employed in a forensic analysis of the transport and dispersion of a toxic gas that may have been released near Al Muthanna, Iraq, during the Gulf War. The ensemble study had two objectives, the first of which was to determine the sensitivity of the calculated dosage fields to the choices that must be made about the configuration of the atmospheric dynamic model. In this test, various choices were used for model physics representations and for the large-scale analyses that were used to construct the model initial and boundary conditions. The second study objective was to examine the dispersion model's ability to use ensemble inputs to predict dosage probability distributions. Here, the dispersion model was used with the ensemble mean fields from the individual atmospheric dynamic model runs, including the variability in the individual wind fields, to generate dosage probabilities. These are compared with the explicit dosage probabilities derived from the individual runs of the coupled modeling system. The results demonstrate that the specific choices made about the dynamic-model configuration and the large-scale analyses can have a large impact on the simulated dosages. For example, the area near the source that is exposed to a selected dosage threshold varies by up to a factor of 4 among members of the ensemble. The agreement between the explicit and ensemble dosage probabilities is relatively good for both low and high dosage levels. Although only one ensemble was considered in this study, the encouraging results suggest that a probabilistic dispersion model may be of value in quantifying the effects of uncertainties in a dynamic-model ensemble on dispersion model predictions of atmospheric transport and dispersion.

  7. Overexpression screens identify conserved dosage chromosome instability genes in yeast and human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Supipi; Fam, Hok Khim; Wang, Yi Kan; Styles, Erin B.; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Ang, J. Sidney; Singh, Tejomayee; Larionov, Vladimir; Shah, Sohrab P.; Andrews, Brenda; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Hieter, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number amplification and gene overexpression are common features of many cancers. To determine the role of gene overexpression on chromosome instability (CIN), we performed genome-wide screens in the budding yeast for yeast genes that cause CIN when overexpressed, a phenotype we refer to as dosage CIN (dCIN), and identified 245 dCIN genes. This catalog of genes reveals human orthologs known to be recurrently overexpressed and/or amplified in tumors. We show that two genes, TDP1, a tyrosyl-DNA-phosphdiesterase, and TAF12, an RNA polymerase II TATA-box binding factor, cause CIN when overexpressed in human cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma lines with elevated human Tdp1 levels also exhibit CIN that can be partially rescued by siRNA-mediated knockdown of TDP1. Overexpression of dCIN genes represents a genetic vulnerability that could be leveraged for selective killing of cancer cells through targeting of an unlinked synthetic dosage lethal (SDL) partner. Using SDL screens in yeast, we identified a set of genes that when deleted specifically kill cells with high levels of Tdp1. One gene was the histone deacetylase RPD3, for which there are known inhibitors. Both HT1080 cells overexpressing hTDP1 and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with elevated levels of hTdp1 were more sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA), recapitulating the SDL interaction in human cells and suggesting VPA and TSA as potential therapeutic agents for tumors with elevated levels of hTdp1. The catalog of dCIN genes presented here provides a candidate list to identify genes that cause CIN when overexpressed in cancer, which can then be leveraged through SDL to selectively target tumors. PMID:27551064

  8. Imputation-Based Genomic Coverage Assessments of Current Human Genotyping Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Sarah C.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Romm, Jane M.; Ling, Hua; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Browning, Sharon R.; Weir, Bruce S.; Laurie, Cathy C.

    2013-01-01

    Microarray single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, combined with imputation of untyped variants, has been widely adopted as an efficient means to interrogate variation across the human genome. “Genomic coverage” is the total proportion of genomic variation captured by an array, either by direct observation or through an indirect means such as linkage disequilibrium or imputation. We have performed imputation-based genomic coverage assessments of eight current genotyping arrays that assay from ~0.3 to ~5 million variants. Coverage was determined separately in each of the four continental ancestry groups in the 1000 Genomes Project phase 1 release. We used the subset of 1000 Genomes variants present on each array to impute the remaining variants and assessed coverage based on correlation between imputed and observed allelic dosages. More than 75% of common variants (minor allele frequency > 0.05) are covered by all arrays in all groups except for African ancestry, and up to ~90% in all ancestries for the highest density arrays. In contrast, less than 40% of less common variants (0.01 < minor allele frequency < 0.05) are covered by low density arrays in all ancestries and 50–80% in high density arrays, depending on ancestry. We also calculated genome-wide power to detect variant-trait association in a case-control design, across varying sample sizes, effect sizes, and minor allele frequency ranges, and compare these array-based power estimates with a hypothetical array that would type all variants in 1000 Genomes. These imputation-based genomic coverage and power analyses are intended as a practical guide to researchers planning genetic studies. PMID:23979933

  9. Definition of variables required for comprehensive description of drug dosage and clinical pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Medem, Anna V; Seidling, Hanna M; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Metzner, Michael; Hubert, Carina M; Czock, David; Haefeli, Walter E

    2017-05-01

    Electronic clinical decision support systems (CDSS) require drug information that can be processed by computers. The goal of this project was to determine and evaluate a compilation of variables that comprehensively capture the information contained in the summary of product characteristic (SmPC) and unequivocally describe the drug, its dosage options, and clinical pharmacokinetics. An expert panel defined and structured a set of variables and drafted a guideline to extract and enter information on dosage and clinical pharmacokinetics from textual SmPCs as published by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The set of variables was iteratively revised and evaluated by data extraction and variable allocation of roughly 7% of all centrally approved drugs. The information contained in the SmPC was allocated to three information clusters consisting of 260 variables. The cluster "drug characterization" specifies the nature of the drug. The cluster "dosage" provides information on approved drug dosages and defines corresponding specific conditions. The cluster "clinical pharmacokinetics" includes pharmacokinetic parameters of relevance for dosing in clinical practice. A first evaluation demonstrated that, despite the complexity of the current free text SmPCs, dosage and pharmacokinetic information can be reliably extracted from the SmPCs and comprehensively described by a limited set of variables. By proposing a compilation of variables well describing drug dosage and clinical pharmacokinetics, the project represents a step forward towards the development of a comprehensive database system serving as information source for sophisticated CDSS.

  10. Canonical wnt signaling regulates hematopoiesis in a dosage-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Luis, Tiago C; Naber, Brigitta A E; Roozen, Paul P C; Brugman, Martijn H; de Haas, Edwin F E; Ghazvini, Mehrnaz; Fibbe, Willem E; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Fodde, Riccardo; Staal, Frank J T

    2011-10-04

    Canonical Wnt signaling has been implicated in the regulation of hematopoiesis. By employing a Wnt-reporter mouse, we observed that Wnt signaling is differentially activated during hematopoiesis, suggesting an important regulatory role for specific Wnt signaling levels. To investigate whether canonical Wnt signaling regulates hematopoiesis in a dosage-dependent fashion, we analyzed the effect of different mutations in the Adenomatous polyposis coli gene (Apc), a negative modulator of the canonical Wnt pathway. By combining different targeted hypomorphic alleles and a conditional deletion allele of Apc, a gradient of five different Wnt signaling levels was obtained in vivo. We here show that different, lineage-specific Wnt dosages regulate hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), myeloid precursors, and T lymphoid precursors during hematopoiesis. Differential, lineage-specific optimal Wnt dosages provide a unifying concept that explains the differences reported among inducible gain-of-function approaches, leading to either HSC expansion or depletion of the HSC pool. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genome-wide SNP identification and QTL mapping for black rot resistance in cabbage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghoon; Izzah, Nur Kholilatul; Jayakodi, Murukarthick; Perumal, Sampath; Joh, Ho Jun; Lee, Hyeon Ju; Lee, Sang-Choon; Park, Jee Young; Yang, Ki-Woung; Nou, Il-Sup; Seo, Joodeok; Yoo, Jaeheung; Suh, Youngdeok; Ahn, Kyounggu; Lee, Ji Hyun; Choi, Gyung Ja; Yu, Yeisoo; Kim, Heebal; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2015-02-03

    Black rot is a destructive bacterial disease causing large yield and quality losses in Brassica oleracea. To detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for black rot resistance, we performed whole-genome resequencing of two cabbage parental lines and genome-wide SNP identification using the recently published B. oleracea genome sequences as reference. Approximately 11.5 Gb of sequencing data was produced from each parental line. Reference genome-guided mapping and SNP calling revealed 674,521 SNPs between the two cabbage lines, with an average of one SNP per 662.5 bp. Among 167 dCAPS markers derived from candidate SNPs, 117 (70.1%) were validated as bona fide SNPs showing polymorphism between the parental lines. We then improved the resolution of a previous genetic map by adding 103 markers including 87 SNP-based dCAPS markers. The new map composed of 368 markers and covers 1467.3 cM with an average interval of 3.88 cM between adjacent markers. We evaluated black rot resistance in the mapping population in three independent inoculation tests using F2:3 progenies and identified one major QTL and three minor QTLs. We report successful utilization of whole-genome resequencing for large-scale SNP identification and development of molecular markers for genetic map construction. In addition, we identified novel QTLs for black rot resistance. The high-density genetic map will promote QTL analysis for other important agricultural traits and marker-assisted breeding of B. oleracea.

  12. Parental attitudes toward new dosage forms of desloratadine in an online survey: results from four European countries.

    PubMed

    Valovirta, Erkka; Scadding, Glenis

    2009-08-01

    Allergic disease affects an estimated 50% of children worldwide and causes considerable impairment in academic performance and daily activities. Pediatric formulations for allergy treatment are often highly sugared or contain ingredients to improve palatability, appearance, and patient acceptance/adherence. These excipients, however, are associated with dental caries, gastrointestinal intolerance, and dermatologic reactions. To assess the appeal of new sugar-free/dye-free syrup and orodispersible formulations of the second-generation antihistamine desloratadine to parents of children with allergy in four European countries. In an online survey of households with children aged < or =12 years with allergies in France, Italy, the Netherlands, and Spain, respondents were asked to consider one of two desloratadine product concepts: a sugar-free, dye-free oral solution or an orodispersible tablet. Eligible households had to have at least one child aged < or =12 years with symptomatic seasonal, pet, or indoor allergies or hives for > or =1 week/year. Respondents had to be the decision makers regarding their child's allergy medication and to be likely to treat symptoms with prescription medication some of the time. There were 627 eligible households. Most (88%) parents in Spain were likely to ask their physician about and to consider trying sugar-free, dye-free desloratadine syrup, followed by 76% of those in France, 68% in Italy, and 56% in the Netherlands. About three-quarters of parents in France, Spain, and Italy and more than half of those in the Netherlands were likely to ask their physician about and to consider trying the orodispersible formulation. There is no control group for comparisons between the study's online responses and those that would have resulted from another survey methodology. Further, response biases do exist across countries based on cultural norms. Survey respondents were generally receptive to the new sugar-free, dye-free syrup and

  13. Over-the-counter pharmaceuticals: exploratory research of consumer preference toward solid oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Reisenwitz, T H; Wimbish, G J

    1996-01-01

    The capsule dosage form in nonprescription pharmaceuticals persists as being one of the most vulnerable to product tampering. This study examines consumer preference toward three solid oral dosage forms (capsules, caplets, and tablets) in nonprescription products. Thirteen independent variables representing dosage form attributes are measured on semantic differential scales. The data are analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and factor analysis. Implications for the pharmaceutical marketer are noted. Future directions for research are also outlined.

  14. QR encoded smart oral dosage forms by inkjet printing.

    PubMed

    Edinger, Magnus; Bar-Shalom, Daniel; Sandler, Niklas; Rantanen, Jukka; Genina, Natalja

    2018-01-30

    The use of inkjet printing (IJP) technology enables the flexible manufacturing of personalized medicine with the doses tailored for each patient. In this study we demonstrate, for the first time, the applicability of IJP in the production of edible dosage forms in the pattern of a quick response (QR) code. This printed pattern contains the drug itself and encoded information relevant to the patient and/or healthcare professionals. IJP of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API)-containing ink in the pattern of QR code was performed onto a newly developed porous and flexible, but mechanically stable substrate with a good absorption capacity. The printing did not affect the mechanical properties of the substrate. The actual drug content of the printed dosage forms was in accordance with the encoded drug content. The QR encoded dosage forms had a good print definition without significant edge bleeding. They were readable by a smartphone even after storage in harsh conditions. This approach of efficient data incorporation and data storage combined with the use of smart devices can lead to safer and more patient-friendly drug products in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Jujube Genome Provides Insights into Genome Evolution and the Domestication of Sweetness/Acidity Taste in Fruit Trees.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Chunmei; Zhao, Xing; Fei, Zhangjun; Wan, KangKang; Zhang, Zhong; Pang, Xiaoming; Yin, Xiao; Bai, Yang; Sun, Xiaoqing; Gao, Lizhi; Li, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Jinbo; Li, Xingang

    2016-12-01

    Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) belongs to the Rhamnaceae family and is a popular fruit tree species with immense economic and nutritional value. Here, we report a draft genome of the dry jujube cultivar 'Junzao' and the genome resequencing of 31 geographically diverse accessions of cultivated and wild jujubes (Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa). Comparative analysis revealed that the genome of 'Dongzao', a fresh jujube, was ~86.5 Mb larger than that of the 'Junzao', partially due to the recent insertions of transposable elements in the 'Dongzao' genome. We constructed eight proto-chromosomes of the common ancestor of Rhamnaceae and Rosaceae, two sister families in the order Rosales, and elucidated the evolutionary processes that have shaped the genome structures of modern jujubes. Population structure analysis revealed the complex genetic background of jujubes resulting from extensive hybridizations between jujube and its wild relatives. Notably, several key genes that control fruit organic acid metabolism and sugar content were identified in the selective sweep regions. We also identified S-locus genes controlling gametophytic self-incompatibility and investigated haplotype patterns of the S locus in the jujube genomes, which would provide a guideline for parent selection for jujube crossbreeding. This study provides valuable genomic resources for jujube improvement, and offers insights into jujube genome evolution and its population structure and domestication.

  16. Dosage-based parameters for characterization of puff dispersion results.

    PubMed

    Berbekar, Eva; Harms, Frank; Leitl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    A set of parameters is introduced to characterize the dispersion of puff releases based on the measured dosage. These parameters are the dosage, peak concentration, arrival time, peak time, leaving time, ascent time, descent time and duration. Dimensionless numbers for the scaling of the parameters are derived from dimensional analysis. The dimensionless numbers are tested and confirmed based on a statistically representative wind tunnel dataset. The measurements were carried out in a 1:300 scale model of the Central Business District in Oklahoma City. Additionally, the effect of the release duration on the puff parameters is investigated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Biorelevant in vitro performance testing of orally administered dosage forms-workshop report.

    PubMed

    Reppas, Christos; Friedel, Horst-Dieter; Barker, Amy R; Buhse, Lucinda F; Cecil, Todd L; Keitel, Susanne; Kraemer, Johannes; Morris, J Michael; Shah, Vinod P; Stickelmeyer, Mary P; Yomota, Chikako; Brown, Cynthia K

    2014-07-01

    Biorelevant in vitro performance testing of orally administered dosage forms has become an important tool for the assessment of drug product in vivo behavior. An in vitro performance test which mimics the intraluminal performance of an oral dosage form is termed biorelevant. Biorelevant tests have been utilized to decrease the number of in vivo studies required during the drug development process and to mitigate the risk related to in vivo bioequivalence studies. This report reviews the ability of current in vitro performance tests to predict in vivo performance and generate successful in vitro and in vivo correlations for oral dosage forms. It also summarizes efforts to improve the predictability of biorelevant tests. The report is based on the presentations at the 2013 workshop, Biorelevant In Vitro Performance Testing of Orally Administered Dosage Forms, in Washington, DC, sponsored by the FIP Dissolution/Drug Release Focus Group in partnership with the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) and a symposium at the AAPS 2012 Annual meeting on the same topic.

  18. Idiosyncratic Genome Degradation in a Bacterial Endosymbiont of Periodical Cicadas.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew A; Łukasik, Piotr; Simon, Chris; McCutcheon, John P

    2017-11-20

    When a free-living bacterium transitions to a host-beneficial endosymbiotic lifestyle, it almost invariably loses a large fraction of its genome [1, 2]. The resulting small genomes often become stable in size, structure, and coding capacity [3-5], as exemplified by Sulcia muelleri, a nutritional endosymbiont of cicadas. Sulcia's partner endosymbiont, Hodgkinia cicadicola, similarly remains co-linear in some cicadas diverged by millions of years [6, 7]. But in the long-lived periodical cicada Magicicada tredecim, the Hodgkinia genome has split into dozens of tiny, gene-sparse circles that sometimes reside in distinct Hodgkinia cells [8]. Previous data suggested that all other Magicicada species harbor complex Hodgkinia populations, but the timing, number of origins, and outcomes of the splitting process were unknown. Here, by sequencing Hodgkinia metagenomes from the remaining six Magicicada and two sister species, we show that each Magicicada species harbors Hodgkinia populations of at least 20 genomic circles. We find little synteny among the 256 Hodgkinia circles analyzed except between the most closely related cicada species. Gene phylogenies show multiple Hodgkinia lineages in the common ancestor of Magicicada and its closest known relatives but that most splitting has occurred within Magicicada and has given rise to highly variable Hodgkinia gene dosages among species. These data show that Hodgkinia genome degradation has proceeded down different paths in different Magicicada species and support a model of genomic degradation that is stochastic in outcome and nonadaptive for the host. These patterns mirror the genomic instability seen in some mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. "Orphan" retrogenes in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Ciomborowska, Joanna; Rosikiewicz, Wojciech; Szklarczyk, Damian; Makałowski, Wojciech; Makałowska, Izabela

    2013-02-01

    Gene duplicates generated via retroposition were long thought to be pseudogenized and consequently decayed. However, a significant number of these genes escaped their evolutionary destiny and evolved into functional genes. Despite multiple studies, the number of functional retrogenes in human and other genomes remains unclear. We performed a comparative analysis of human, chicken, and worm genomes to identify "orphan" retrogenes, that is, retrogenes that have replaced their progenitors. We located 25 such candidates in the human genome. All of these genes were previously known, and the majority has been intensively studied. Despite this, they have never been recognized as retrogenes. Analysis revealed that the phenomenon of replacing parental genes with their retrocopies has been taking place over the entire span of animal evolution. This process was often species specific and contributed to interspecies differences. Surprisingly, these retrogenes, which should evolve in a more relaxed mode, are subject to a very strong purifying selection, which is, on average, two and a half times stronger than other human genes. Also, for retrogenes, they do not show a typical overall tendency for a testis-specific expression. Notably, seven of them are associated with human diseases. Recognizing them as "orphan" retrocopies, which have different regulatory machinery than their parents, is important for any disease studies in model organisms, especially when discoveries made in one species are transferred to humans.

  20. Multiple Origins of the Pathogenic Yeast Candida orthopsilosis by Separate Hybridizations between Two Parental Species.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Markus S; Martinez de San Vicente, Kontxi; Prandini, Tâmara H R; Hammel, Stephen; Higgins, Desmond G; Bagagli, Eduardo; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Butler, Geraldine

    2016-11-01

    Mating between different species produces hybrids that are usually asexual and stuck as diploids, but can also lead to the formation of new species. Here, we report the genome sequences of 27 isolates of the pathogenic yeast Candida orthopsilosis. We find that most isolates are diploid hybrids, products of mating between two unknown parental species (A and B) that are 5% divergent in sequence. Isolates vary greatly in the extent of homogenization between A and B, making their genomes a mosaic of highly heterozygous regions interspersed with homozygous regions. Separate phylogenetic analyses of SNPs in the A- and B-derived portions of the genome produces almost identical trees of the isolates with four major clades. However, the presence of two mutually exclusive genotype combinations at the mating type locus, and recombinant mitochondrial genomes diagnostic of inter-clade mating, shows that the species C. orthopsilosis does not have a single evolutionary origin but was created at least four times by separate interspecies hybridizations between parents A and B. Older hybrids have lost more heterozygosity. We also identify two isolates with homozygous genomes derived exclusively from parent A, which are pure non-hybrid strains. The parallel emergence of the same hybrid species from multiple independent hybridization events is common in plant evolution, but is much less documented in pathogenic fungi.

  1. Mitigation of inbreeding while preserving genetic gain in genomic breeding programs for outbred plants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zibei; Shi, Fan; Hayes, Ben J; Daetwyler, Hans D

    2017-05-01

    Heuristic genomic inbreeding controls reduce inbreeding in genomic breeding schemes without reducing genetic gain. Genomic selection is increasingly being implemented in plant breeding programs to accelerate genetic gain of economically important traits. However, it may cause significant loss of genetic diversity when compared with traditional schemes using phenotypic selection. We propose heuristic strategies to control the rate of inbreeding in outbred plants, which can be categorised into three types: controls during mate allocation, during selection, and simultaneous selection and mate allocation. The proposed mate allocation measure GminF allocates two or more parents for mating in mating groups that minimise coancestry using a genomic relationship matrix. Two types of relationship-adjusted genomic breeding values for parent selection candidates ([Formula: see text]) and potential offspring ([Formula: see text]) are devised to control inbreeding during selection and even enabling simultaneous selection and mate allocation. These strategies were tested in a case study using a simulated perennial ryegrass breeding scheme. As compared to the genomic selection scheme without controls, all proposed strategies could significantly decrease inbreeding while achieving comparable genetic gain. In particular, the scenario using [Formula: see text] in simultaneous selection and mate allocation reduced inbreeding to one-third of the original genomic selection scheme. The proposed strategies are readily applicable in any outbred plant breeding program.

  2. Dosage-dependent non-linear effect of L-dopa on human motor cortex plasticity.

    PubMed

    Monte-Silva, Katia; Liebetanz, David; Grundey, Jessica; Paulus, Walter; Nitsche, Michael A

    2010-09-15

    The neuromodulator dopamine affects learning and memory formation and their likely physiological correlates, long-term depression and potentiation, in animals and humans. It is known from animal experiments that dopamine exerts a dosage-dependent, inverted U-shaped effect on these functions. However, this has not been explored in humans so far. In order to reveal a non-linear dose-dependent effect of dopamine on cortical plasticity in humans, we explored the impact of 25, 100 and 200 mg of L-dopa on transcranial direct current (tDCS)-induced plasticity in twelve healthy human subjects. The primary motor cortex served as a model system, and plasticity was monitored by motor evoked potential amplitudes elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation. As compared to placebo medication, low and high dosages of L-dopa abolished facilitatory as well as inhibitory plasticity, whereas the medium dosage prolonged inhibitory plasticity, and turned facilitatory plasticity into inhibition. Thus the results show clear non-linear, dosage-dependent effects of dopamine on both facilitatory and inhibitory plasticity, and support the assumption of the importance of a specific dosage of dopamine optimally suited to improve plasticity. This might be important for the therapeutic application of dopaminergic agents, especially for rehabilitative purposes, and explain some opposing results in former studies.

  3. Mating programs including genomic relationships and dominance effects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Computer mating programs have helped breeders minimize pedigree inbreeding and avoid recessive defects by mating animals with parents that have fewer common ancestors. With genomic selection, breed associations, AI organizations, and on-farm software providers could use new programs to minimize geno...

  4. Dosage Compensation in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Brockdorff, Neil; Turner, Bryan M.

    2015-01-01

    Many organisms show major chromosomal differences between sexes. In mammals, females have two copies of a large, gene-rich chromosome, the X, whereas males have one X and a small, gene-poor Y. The imbalance in expression of several hundred genes is lethal if not dealt with by dosage compensation. The male–female difference is addressed by silencing of genes on one female X early in development. However, both males and females now have only one active X chromosome. This is compensated by twofold up-regulation of genes on the active X. This complex system continues to provide important insights into mechanisms of epigenetic regulation. PMID:25731764

  5. Genomic structural variation contributes to phenotypic change of industrial bioethanol yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Li-Jie; Fang, Ya-Hong; Jin, Xin-Na; Qi, Lei; Wu, Xue-Chang; Zheng, Dao-Qiong

    2016-03-01

    Genomic structural variation (GSV) is a ubiquitous phenomenon observed in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different genetic backgrounds; however, the physiological and phenotypic effects of GSV are not well understood. Here, we first revealed the genetic characteristics of a widely used industrial S. cerevisiae strain, ZTW1, by whole genome sequencing. ZTW1 was identified as an aneuploidy strain and a large-scale GSV was observed in the ZTW1 genome compared with the genome of a diploid strain YJS329. These GSV events led to copy number variations (CNVs) in many chromosomal segments as well as one whole chromosome in the ZTW1 genome. Changes in the DNA dosage of certain functional genes directly affected their expression levels and the resultant ZTW1 phenotypes. Moreover, CNVs of large chromosomal regions triggered an aneuploidy stress in ZTW1. This stress decreased the proliferation ability and tolerance of ZTW1 to various stresses, while aneuploidy response stress may also provide some benefits to the fermentation performance of the yeast, including increased fermentation rates and decreased byproduct generation. This work reveals genomic characters of the bioethanol S. cerevisiae strain ZTW1 and suggests that GSV is an important kind of mutation that changes the traits of industrial S. cerevisiae strains. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Essential Dosage-Dependent Functions of the Transcription Factor Yin Yang 1 in Late Embryonic Development and Cell Cycle Progression†

    PubMed Central

    Affar, El Bachir; Gay, Frédérique; Shi, Yujiang; Liu, Huifei; Huarte, Maite; Wu, Su; Collins, Tucker; Li, En; Shi, Yang

    2006-01-01

    Constitutive ablation of the Yin Yang 1 (YY1) transcription factor in mice results in peri-implantation lethality. In this study, we used homologous recombination to generate knockout mice carrying yy1 alleles expressing various amounts of YY1. Phenotypic analysis of yy1 mutant embryos expressing ∼75%, ∼50%, and ∼25% of the normal complement of YY1 identified a dosage-dependent requirement for YY1 during late embryogenesis. Indeed, reduction of YY1 levels impairs embryonic growth and viability in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of the corresponding mouse embryonic fibroblast cells also revealed a tight correlation between YY1 dosage and cell proliferation, with a complete ablation of YY1 inducing cytokinesis failure and cell cycle arrest. Consistently, RNA interference-mediated inhibition of YY1 in HeLa cells prevents cytokinesis, causes proliferative arrest, and increases cellular sensitivity to various apoptotic agents. Genome-wide expression profiling identified a plethora of YY1 target genes that have been implicated in cell growth, proliferation, cytokinesis, apoptosis, development, and differentiation, suggesting that YY1 coordinates multiple essential biological processes through a complex transcriptional network. These data not only shed new light on the molecular basis for YY1 developmental roles and cellular functions, but also provide insight into the general mechanisms controlling eukaryotic cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. PMID:16611997

  7. Widespread of horizontal gene transfer in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenze; Tsai, Lillian; Li, Yulong; Hua, Nan; Sun, Chen; Wei, Chaochun

    2017-04-04

    A fundamental concept in biology is that heritable material is passed from parents to offspring, a process called vertical gene transfer. An alternative mechanism of gene acquisition is through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), which involves movement of genetic materials between different species. Horizontal gene transfer has been found prevalent in prokaryotes but very rare in eukaryote. In this paper, we investigate horizontal gene transfer in the human genome. From the pair-wise alignments between human genome and 53 vertebrate genomes, 1,467 human genome regions (2.6 M bases) from all chromosomes were found to be more conserved with non-mammals than with most mammals. These human genome regions involve 642 known genes, which are enriched with ion binding. Compared to known horizontal gene transfer regions in the human genome, there were few overlapping regions, which indicated horizontal gene transfer is more common than we expected in the human genome. Horizontal gene transfer impacts hundreds of human genes and this study provided insight into potential mechanisms of HGT in the human genome.

  8. MRI as a tool for evaluation of oral controlled release dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Dorożyński, Przemysław P; Kulinowski, Piotr; Młynarczyk, Anna; Stanisz, Greg J

    2012-02-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of controlled-release (CR) dosage forms can be roughly divided into two groups. The first comprises studies performed in static conditions (small solvent volumes and ambient temperature). Such studies have provided insight into molecular phenomena in hydrating polymeric matrices. The second group covers research performed in dynamic conditions (medium flow or stirring) related to drug dissolution. An important issue is supplementation of the MRI results with data obtained by complementary techniques, such as X-ray microtomography (μCT). As we discuss here, an understanding of the mechanism underlying the release of the drug from the dosage form will lead to the development of detailed, molecularly defined, CR dosage forms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Genome-scale transcriptional analyses of first-generation interspecific sunflower hybrids reveals broad regulatory compatibility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interspecific hybridization creates individuals harboring diverged genomes. The interaction of these genomes can generate successful evolutionary novelty or disadvantageous genomic conflict. Annual sunflowers Helianthus annuus and H. petiolaris have a rich history of hybridization in natural populations. Although first-generation hybrids generally have low fertility, hybrid swarms that include later generation and fully fertile backcross plants have been identified, as well as at least three independently-originated stable hybrid taxa. We examine patterns of transcript accumulation in the earliest stages of hybridization of these species via analyses of transcriptome sequences from laboratory-derived F1 offspring of an inbred H. annuus cultivar and a wild H. petiolaris accession. Results While nearly 14% of the reference transcriptome showed significant accumulation differences between parental accessions, total F1 transcript levels showed little evidence of dominance, as midparent transcript levels were highly predictive of transcript accumulation in F1 plants. Allelic bias in F1 transcript accumulation was detected in 20% of transcripts containing sufficient polymorphism to distinguish parental alleles; however the magnitude of these biases were generally smaller than differences among parental accessions. Conclusions While analyses of allelic bias suggest that cis regulatory differences between H. annuus and H. petiolaris are common, their effect on transcript levels may be more subtle than trans-acting regulatory differences. Overall, these analyses found little evidence of regulatory incompatibility or dominance interactions between parental genomes within F1 hybrid individuals, although it is unclear whether this is a legacy or an enabler of introgression between species. PMID:23701699

  10. Gene Expression Profiling Confirms the Dosage-Dependent Additive Neuroprotective Effects of Jasminoidin in a Mouse Model of Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixia; Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Pengqian; Zhang, Yingying; Liu, Jun; Yu, Yanan; Li, Bing; Wang, Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that a double dose of Jasminoidin (2·JA) is more effective than Jasminoidin (JA) in cerebral ischemia therapy, but its dosage-effect mechanisms are unclear. In this study, the software GeneGo MetaCore was used to perform pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes obtained in microarrays of mice belonging to four groups (Sham, Vehicle, JA, and 2·JA), aiming to elucidate differences in JA and 2·JA's dose-dependent pharmacological mechanism from a system's perspective. The top 10 enriched pathways in the 2·JA condition were mainly involved in neuroprotection (70% of the pathways), apoptosis and survival (40%), and anti-inflammation (20%), while JA induced pathways were mainly involved in apoptosis and survival (60%), anti-inflammation (20%), and lipid metabolism (20%). Regarding shared pathways and processes, 3, 1, and 3 pathways overlapped between the Vehicle and JA, Vehicle and 2·JA, and JA and 2·JA conditions, respectively; for the top ten overlapped processes these numbers were 3, 0, and 4, respectively. The common pathways and processes in the 2·JA condition included differentially expressed genes significantly different from those in JA. Seven representative pathways were only activated by 2·JA, such as Gamma-Secretase regulation of neuronal cell development. Process network comparison indicated that significant nodes, such as alpha-MSH , ACTH , PKR1 , and WNT , were involved in the pharmacological mechanism of 2·JA. Function distribution was different between JA and 2·JA groups, indicating a dosage additive mechanism in cerebral ischemia treatment. Such systemic approach based on whole-genome multiple pathways and networks may provide an effective and alternative approach to identify alterations underlining dosage-dependent therapeutic benefits of pharmacological compounds on complex disease processes.

  11. Comparison of phasing strategies for whole human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kirkness, Ewen; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2018-01-01

    Humans are a diploid species that inherit one set of chromosomes paternally and one homologous set of chromosomes maternally. Unfortunately, most human sequencing initiatives ignore this fact in that they do not directly delineate the nucleotide content of the maternal and paternal copies of the 23 chromosomes individuals possess (i.e., they do not ‘phase’ the genome) often because of the costs and complexities of doing so. We compared 11 different widely-used approaches to phasing human genomes using the publicly available ‘Genome-In-A-Bottle’ (GIAB) phased version of the NA12878 genome as a gold standard. The phasing strategies we compared included laboratory-based assays that prepare DNA in unique ways to facilitate phasing as well as purely computational approaches that seek to reconstruct phase information from general sequencing reads and constructs or population-level haplotype frequency information obtained through a reference panel of haplotypes. To assess the performance of the 11 approaches, we used metrics that included, among others, switch error rates, haplotype block lengths, the proportion of fully phase-resolved genes, phasing accuracy and yield between pairs of SNVs. Our comparisons suggest that a hybrid or combined approach that leverages: 1. population-based phasing using the SHAPEIT software suite, 2. either genome-wide sequencing read data or parental genotypes, and 3. a large reference panel of variant and haplotype frequencies, provides a fast and efficient way to produce highly accurate phase-resolved individual human genomes. We found that for population-based approaches, phasing performance is enhanced with the addition of genome-wide read data; e.g., whole genome shotgun and/or RNA sequencing reads. Further, we found that the inclusion of parental genotype data within a population-based phasing strategy can provide as much as a ten-fold reduction in phasing errors. We also considered a majority voting scheme for the construction

  12. Biowaiver monograph for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms: fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Charoo, Naseem; Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Graham, Alexandra; Lartey, Paul; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Groot, D W; Kopp, Sabine; Langguth, Peter; Polli, James; Shah, Vinod P; Dressman, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    Literature data pertaining to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing requirements for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing fluconazole as the only active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are reviewed. The decision is based on solubility, dissolution, permeability, therapeutic index, pharmacokinetic parameters, pharmacodynamic properties, and other relevant data. BE/bioavailability (BA) problems and drug-excipients interaction data were also reviewed and taken into consideration. According to the biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS), fluconazole in polymorphic forms II and III is a BCS class I drug and has a wide therapeutic index. BE of test formulations from many different manufacturers containing different excipients confirmed that the risk of bioinequivalence because of formulation and manufacturing factors is low. It was inferred that risk can be further reduced if in vitro studies are performed according to biowaiver guidelines. Thus, it is concluded that a biowaiver can be recommended for fluconazole IR dosage forms if (a) fluconazole is present as polymorphic form II or III or any other form/mixture showing high solubility, (b) the selection of excipients be limited to those found in IR drug products approved in International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) countries for the same dosage form and used in their usual amounts, and (c) both the test and comparator dosage form are very rapidly dissolving, or, rapidly dissolving throughout the shelf life with similar dissolution profiles at pH 1.2, 4.5, and 6.8. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  13. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods for extended-release parenteral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J

    2012-07-01

    This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in-vitro drug release testing of extended-release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in-situ depot-forming systems and implants. Extended-release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, 'real-time' in-vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in-vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in-vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended-release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in-vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended-release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in-vitro-in-vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable; however, for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Time-dependent analysis of dosage delivery information for patient-controlled analgesia services.

    PubMed

    Kuo, I-Ting; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Juan, De-Fong; Hsu, Steen J; Chan, Chia-Tai; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2018-01-01

    Pain relief always plays the essential part of perioperative care and an important role of medical quality improvement. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is a method that allows a patient to self-administer small boluses of analgesic to relieve the subjective pain. PCA logs from the infusion pump consisted of a lot of text messages which record all events during the therapies. The dosage information can be extracted from PCA logs to provide easily understanding features. The analysis of dosage information with time has great help to figure out the variance of a patient's pain relief condition. To explore the trend of pain relief requirement, we developed a PCA dosage information generator (PCA DIG) to extract meaningful messages from PCA logs during the first 48 hours of therapies. PCA dosage information including consumption, delivery, infusion rate, and the ratio between demand and delivery is presented with corresponding values in 4 successive time frames. Time-dependent statistical analysis demonstrated the trends of analgesia requirements decreased gradually along with time. These findings are compatible with clinical observations and further provide valuable information about the strategy to customize postoperative pain management.

  15. Accelerated in vitro release testing methods for extended release parenteral dosage forms

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in vitro drug release testing of extended release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in situ depot-forming systems, and implants. Key findings Extended release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, “real-time” in vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Conclusions Accelerated in vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable, however for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. PMID:22686344

  16. Biowaiver monograph for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms: bisoprolol fumarate.

    PubMed

    Charoo, Naseem A; Shamsher, Areeg A A; Lian, Lai Y; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Groot, D W; Kopp, Sabine; Langguth, Peter; Polli, James; Shah, Vinod P; Dressman, Jennifer

    2014-02-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate-release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing bisoprolol as the sole active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are reviewed. Bisoprolol is classified as a Class I API according to the current Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). In addition to the BCS class, its therapeutic index, pharmacokinetic properties, data related to the possibility of excipient interactions, and reported BE/bioavailability problems are taken into consideration. Qualitative compositions of IR tablet dosage forms of bisoprolol with a marketing authorization (MA) in ICH (International Conference on Harmonisation) countries are tabulated. It was inferred that these tablets had been demonstrated to be bioequivalent to the innovator product. No reports of failure to meet BE standards have been made in the open literature. On the basis of all these pieces of evidence, a biowaiver can currently be recommended for bisoprolol fumarate IR dosage forms if (1) the test product contains only excipients that are well known, and used in normal amounts, for example, those tabulated for products with MA in ICH countries and (2) both the test and comparator dosage form are very rapidly dissolving, or, rapidly dissolving with similarity of the dissolution profiles demonstrated at pH 1.2, 4.5, and 6.8. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Presence and Accuracy of Drug Dosage Recommendations for Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy in Tertiary Drug Information References

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Sean K; Slavik, Richard S; Lam, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Clinicians commonly rely on tertiary drug information references to guide drug dosages for patients who are receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). It is unknown whether the dosage recommendations in these frequently used references reflect the most current evidence. Objective: To determine the presence and accuracy of drug dosage recommendations for patients undergoing CRRT in 4 drug information references. Methods: Medications commonly prescribed during CRRT were identified from an institutional medication inventory database, and evidence-based dosage recommendations for this setting were developed from the primary and secondary literature. The American Hospital Formulary System—Drug Information (AHFS–DI), Micromedex 2.0 (specifically the DRUGDEX and Martindale databases), and the 5th edition of Drug Prescribing in Renal Failure (DPRF5) were assessed for the presence of drug dosage recommendations in the CRRT setting. The dosage recommendations in these tertiary references were compared with the recommendations derived from the primary and secondary literature to determine concordance. Results: Evidence-based drug dosage recommendations were developed for 33 medications administered in patients undergoing CRRT. The AHFS–DI provided no dosage recommendations specific to CRRT, whereas the DPRF5 provided recommendations for 27 (82%) of the medications and the Micromedex 2.0 application for 20 (61%) (13 [39%] in the DRUGDEX database and 16 [48%] in the Martindale database, with 9 medications covered by both). The dosage recommendations were in concordance with evidence-based recommendations for 12 (92%) of the 13 medications in the DRUGDEX database, 26 (96%) of the 27 in the DPRF5, and all 16 (100%) of those in the Martindale database. Conclusions: One prominent tertiary drug information resource provided no drug dosage recommendations for patients undergoing CRRT. However, 2 of the databases in an Internet-based medical information

  18. A criticism of the value of midparent in polyploidization.

    PubMed

    Gianinetti, A

    2013-11-01

    The hypothesis of genetic additivity states that the effects of different alleles, or different genes, add up to produce the phenotype. When considering the F1 progeny of a cross, the hypothesis of additivity of the genetic dosages provided by the parents is tested against the mid-parent value (MPV), which is the average of parental phenotypes and represents the reference value for genetic additivity. Non-additive effects (genetic interactions) are typically measured as deviations from MPV. Recently, however, the use of MPV has been directly transposed to the study of genetic additivity in newly synthesized plant polyploids, assuming that they should as well display mid-parent expression patterns for additive traits. It is shown here that this direct transposition is incorrect. It is suggested that, in neo-polyploids, mid-parent expression has to be reconsidered in terms of reduced genetic additivity. Homeostatic mechanisms are deemed to be the obvious ones responsible for this effect. Genomes are therefore ruled by negative epistasis, and heterosis in allopolyploids is due to a decreased interaction of the parental repressive systems. It is contended that focalizing on the right perspective has relevant theoretical consequences and makes the studies of neo-polyploids very important for our understanding of how genomes work.

  19. The Jujube Genome Provides Insights into Genome Evolution and the Domestication of Sweetness/Acidity Taste in Fruit Trees

    PubMed Central

    Wan, KangKang; Zhang, Zhong; Pang, Xiaoming; Yin, Xiao; Bai, Yang; Sun, Xiaoqing; Gao, Lizhi; Li, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) belongs to the Rhamnaceae family and is a popular fruit tree species with immense economic and nutritional value. Here, we report a draft genome of the dry jujube cultivar ‘Junzao’ and the genome resequencing of 31 geographically diverse accessions of cultivated and wild jujubes (Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa). Comparative analysis revealed that the genome of ‘Dongzao’, a fresh jujube, was ~86.5 Mb larger than that of the ‘Junzao’, partially due to the recent insertions of transposable elements in the ‘Dongzao’ genome. We constructed eight proto-chromosomes of the common ancestor of Rhamnaceae and Rosaceae, two sister families in the order Rosales, and elucidated the evolutionary processes that have shaped the genome structures of modern jujubes. Population structure analysis revealed the complex genetic background of jujubes resulting from extensive hybridizations between jujube and its wild relatives. Notably, several key genes that control fruit organic acid metabolism and sugar content were identified in the selective sweep regions. We also identified S-locus genes controlling gametophytic self-incompatibility and investigated haplotype patterns of the S locus in the jujube genomes, which would provide a guideline for parent selection for jujube crossbreeding. This study provides valuable genomic resources for jujube improvement, and offers insights into jujube genome evolution and its population structure and domestication. PMID:28005948

  20. Biowaiver Monographs for Immediate Release Solid Oral Dosage Forms: Proguanil Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Plöger, Gerlinde F; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Groot, Dirk W; Langguth, Peter; Mehta, Mehul U; Parr, Alan; Polli, James E; Shah, Vinod P; Tajiri, Tomokazu; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2018-07-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to waive in vivo bioequivalence testing for the approval of generic immediate release solid oral dosage forms of proguanil hydrochloride are reviewed. To elucidate the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) classification, experimental solubility and dissolution studies were also carried out. The antimalarial proguanil hydrochloride, effective via the parent compound proguanil and the metabolite cycloguanil, is not considered to be a narrow therapeutic index drug. Proguanil hydrochloride salt was shown to be highly soluble according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, World Health Organization, and European Medicines Agency guidelines, but data for permeability are inconclusive. Therefore, proguanil hydrochloride is conservatively classified as a BCS class 3 substance. In view of this information and the assessment of risks associated with a false positive decision, a BCS-based biowaiver approval procedure can be recommended for orally administered solid immediate release products containing proguanil hydrochloride, provided well-known excipients are used in usual amounts and provided the in vitro dissolution of the test and reference products is very rapid (85% or more are dissolved in 15 min at pH 1.2, 4.5, and 6.8) and is performed according to the current requirements for BCS-based biowaivers. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. All rights reserved.

  1. Portero versus portador: Spanish interpretation of genomic terminology during whole exome sequencing results disclosure.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Amanda M; Robinson, Jill O; Statham, Emily E; Scollon, Sarah; Bergstrom, Katie L; Slashinski, Melody J; Parsons, Donald W; Plon, Sharon E; McGuire, Amy L; Street, Richard L

    2017-11-01

    Describe modifications to technical genomic terminology made by interpreters during disclosure of whole exome sequencing (WES) results. Using discourse analysis, we identified and categorized interpretations of genomic terminology in 42 disclosure sessions where Spanish-speaking parents received their child's WES results either from a clinician using a medical interpreter, or directly from a bilingual physician. Overall, 76% of genomic terms were interpreted accordantly, 11% were misinterpreted and 13% were omitted. Misinterpretations made by interpreters and bilingual physicians included using literal and nonmedical terminology to interpret genomic concepts. Modifications to genomic terminology made during interpretation highlight the need to standardize bilingual genomic lexicons. We recommend Spanish terms that can be used to refer to genomic concepts.

  2. An experimental validation of genomic selection in octoploid strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Gezan, Salvador A; Osorio, Luis F; Verma, Sujeet; Whitaker, Vance M

    2017-01-01

    The primary goal of genomic selection is to increase genetic gains for complex traits by predicting performance of individuals for which phenotypic data are not available. The objective of this study was to experimentally evaluate the potential of genomic selection in strawberry breeding and to define a strategy for its implementation. Four clonally replicated field trials, two in each of 2 years comprised of a total of 1628 individuals, were established in 2013–2014 and 2014–2015. Five complex yield and fruit quality traits with moderate to low heritability were assessed in each trial. High-density genotyping was performed with the Affymetrix Axiom IStraw90 single-nucleotide polymorphism array, and 17 479 polymorphic markers were chosen for analysis. Several methods were compared, including Genomic BLUP, Bayes B, Bayes C, Bayesian LASSO Regression, Bayesian Ridge Regression and Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces. Cross-validation within training populations resulted in higher values than for true validations across trials. For true validations, Bayes B gave the highest predictive abilities on average and also the highest selection efficiencies, particularly for yield traits that were the lowest heritability traits. Selection efficiencies using Bayes B for parent selection ranged from 74% for average fruit weight to 34% for early marketable yield. A breeding strategy is proposed in which advanced selection trials are utilized as training populations and in which genomic selection can reduce the breeding cycle from 3 to 2 years for a subset of untested parents based on their predicted genomic breeding values. PMID:28090334

  3. Genomic and transcriptomic alterations following intergeneric hybridization and polyploidization in the Chrysanthemum nankingense×Tanacetum vulgare hybrid and allopolyploid (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiangyu; Wang, Haibin; Song, Aiping; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi

    2018-01-01

    Allopolyploid formation involves two major events: interspecific hybridization and polyploidization. A number of species in the Asteraceae family are polyploids because of frequent hybridization. The effects of hybridization on genomics and transcriptomics in Chrysanthemum nankingense×Tanacetum vulgare hybrids have been reported. In this study, we obtained allopolyploids by applying a colchicine treatment to a synthesized C. nankingense × T. vulgare hybrid. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP), methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP), and high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technologies were used to investigate the genomic, epigenetic, and transcriptomic alterations in both the hybrid and allopolyploids. The genomic alterations in the hybrid and allopolyploids mainly involved the loss of parental fragments and the gain of novel fragments. The DNA methylation level of the hybrid was reduced by hybridization but was restored somewhat after polyploidization. There were more significant differences in gene expression between the hybrid/allopolyploid and the paternal parent than between the hybrid/allopolyploid and the maternal parent. Most differentially expressed genes (DEGs) showed down-regulation in the hybrid/allopolyploid relative to the parents. Among the non-additive genes, transgressive patterns appeared to be dominant, especially repression patterns. Maternal expression dominance was observed specifically for down-regulated genes. Many methylase and methyltransferase genes showed differential expression between the hybrid and parents and between the allopolyploid and parents. Our data indicate that hybridization may be a major factor affecting genomic and transcriptomic changes in newly formed allopolyploids. The formation of allopolyploids may not simply be the sum of hybridization and polyploidization changes but also may be influenced by the interaction between these processes.

  4. Genome-Wide Survey and Characterization of Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene Family in Brassica napus and Its Parental Species.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yufei; Chen, Baojun; Wang, Rui; Win, Aung Naing; Li, Jiana; Chai, Yourong

    2018-02-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus) is an important oilseed crop worldwide, and fatty acid (FA) compositions determine the nutritional and economic value of its seed oil. Fatty acid desaturases (FADs) play a pivotal role in regulating FA compositions, but to date, no comprehensive genome-wide analysis of FAD gene family in rapeseed and its parent species has been reported. In this study, using homology searches, 84, 45, and 44 FAD genes were identified in rapeseed, Brassica rapa, and Brassica oleracea genomes, respectively. These FAD genes were unevenly located in 17 chromosomes and 2 scaffolds of rapeseed, 9 chromosomes and 1 scaffold of B. rapa, and all the chromosomes of B. oleracea. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the soluble and membrane-bound FADs in the three Brassica species were divided into four and six subfamilies, respectively. Generally, the soluble FADs contained two conserved histidine boxes, while three highly conserved histidine boxes were harbored in membrane-bound FADs. Exon-intron structure, intron phase, and motif composition and position were highly conserved in each FAD subfamily. Putative subcellular locations of FAD proteins in three Brassica species were consistent with those of corresponding known FADs. In total, 25 of simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were found in FAD genes of the three Brassica species. Transcripts of selected FAD genes in the three species were examined in various organs/tissues or stress treatments from NCBI expressed sequence tag (EST) database. This study provides a critical molecular basis for quality improvement of rapeseed oil and facilitates our understanding of key roles of FAD genes in plant growth and development and stress response.

  5. Analysis of cytoplasmic genomes in somatic hybrids between navel orange (Citrus sinensis Osb.) and 'Murcott' tangor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Ohgawara, T; Fujiwara, K; Oiyama, I

    1991-07-01

    Somatic hybrid plants were produced by protoplast fusion of navel orange and 'Murcott' tangor. Hybridity of the plants was confirmed by the restriction endonuclease analysis of nuclear ribosomal DNA. All of the plants (16 clones) were normal, uniform, and had the amphidiploid chromosome number of 36 (2n=2x=18 for each parent). The cpDNA analysis showed that each of the 16 somatic hybrids contained either one parental chloroplast genome or the other. In all cases, the mitochondrial genomes of the regenerated somatic hybrids were of the navel orange type.

  6. The genetic basis of parental care evolution in monogamous mice

    PubMed Central

    Bendesky, Andres; Kwon, Young-Mi; Lassance, Jean-Marc; Lewarch, Caitlin L; Yao, Shenqin; Peterson, Brant K; He, Meng Xiao; Dulac, Catherine; Hoekstra, Hopi E

    2017-01-01

    Summary Parental care is essential for the survival of mammals, yet the mechanisms underlying its evolution remain largely unknown. Here we show that two sister species of mice, Peromyscus polionotus and P. maniculatus, have large and heritable differences in parental behaviour. Using quantitative genetics, we identify 12 genomic regions that affect parental care, eight of which have sex-specific effects, suggesting that parental care can evolve independently in males and females. Furthermore, some regions affect parental care broadly, whereas others affect specific behaviours, such as nest building. Of the genes linked to differences in nest-building behaviour, vasopressin is differentially expressed in the hypothalamus of the two species, with increased levels associated with less nest building. Using pharmacology in Peromyscus and chemogenetics in Mus, we show that vasopressin inhibits nest building but not other parental behaviours. Together, our results indicate that variation in an ancient neuropeptide contributes to interspecific differences in parental care. PMID:28424518

  7. Genome scan of hybridizing sunflowers from Texas (Helianthus annuus and H. debilis) reveals asymmetric patterns of introgression and small islands of genomic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Scascitelli, M; Whitney, K D; Randell, R A; King, Matthew; Buerkle, C A; Rieseberg, L H

    2010-02-01

    Although the sexual transfer of genetic material between species (i.e. introgression) has been documented in many groups of plants and animals, genome-wide patterns of introgression are poorly understood. Is most of the genome permeable to interspecific gene flow, or is introgression typically restricted to a handful of genomic regions? Here, we assess the genomic extent and direction of introgression between three sunflowers from the south-central USA: the common sunflower, Helianthus annuus ssp. annuus; a near-endemic to Texas, Helianthus debilis ssp. cucumerifolius; and their putative hybrid derivative, thought to have recently colonized Texas, H. annuus ssp. texanus. Analyses of variation at 88 genetically mapped microsatellite loci revealed that long-term migration rates were high, genome-wide and asymmetric, with higher migration rates from H. annuus texanus into the two parental taxa than vice versa. These results imply a longer history of intermittent contact between H. debilis and H. annuus than previously believed, and that H. annuus texanus may serve as a bridge for the transfer of alleles between its parental taxa. They also contradict recent theory suggesting that introgression should predominantly be in the direction of the colonizing species. As in previous studies of hybridizing sunflower species, regions of genetic differentiation appear small, whether estimated in terms of FST or unidirectional migration rates. Estimates of recent immigration and admixture were inconsistent, depending on the type of analysis. At the individual locus level, one marker showed striking asymmetry in migration rates, a pattern consistent with tight linkage to a Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibility.

  8. Methotrexate Dosage Reduction Upon Adalimumab Initiation: Clinical and Ultrasonographic Outcomes from the Randomized Noninferiority MUSICA Trial.

    PubMed

    Kaeley, Gurjit S; Evangelisto, Amy M; Nishio, Midori J; Goss, Sandra L; Liu, Shufang; Kalabic, Jasmina; Kupper, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    To examine the clinical and ultrasonographic (US) outcomes of reducing methotrexate (MTX) dosage upon initiating adalimumab (ADA) in MTX-inadequate responders with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MUSICA (NCT01185288) was a double-blind, randomized, parallel-arm study of 309 patients with RA receiving MTX ≥ 15 mg/week for ≥ 12 weeks before screening. Patients were randomized to high dosage (20 mg/week) or low dosage (7.5 mg/week) MTX; all patients received 40 mg open-label ADA every other week for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was Week 24 mean 28-joint Disease Activity Score based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) to test for noninferiority of low-dosage MTX using a 15% margin. US images were scored using a 10-joint semiquantitative system incorporating OMERACT definitions for pathology, assessing synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and bony erosions. Rapid improvement in clinical indices was observed in both groups after addition of ADA. The difference in mean DAS28-CRP (0.37, 95% CI 0.07-0.66) comparing low-dosage (4.12, 95% CI 3.88-4.34) versus high-dosage MTX (3.75, 95% CI 3.52-3.97) was statistically significant and non-inferiority was not met. Statistically significant differences were not detected for most clinical, functional, and US outcomes. Pharmacokinetic and safety profiles were similar. In MUSICA, Week 24 mean DAS28-CRP, the primary endpoint, did not meet non-inferiority for the low-dosage MTX group. Although the differences between the 2 MTX dosage groups were small, our study findings did not support routine MTX reduction in MTX inadequate responders initiating ADA.

  9. Measurement of the lowest dosage of phenobarbital that can produce drug discrimination in rats

    PubMed Central

    Overton, Donald A.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Patel, Bhavesh N.; Pragada, Sreenivasa R.; Gordon, M. Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Accurate measurement of the threshold dosage of phenobarbital that can produce drug discrimination (DD) may improve our understanding of the mechanisms and properties of such discrimination. Objectives Compare three methods for determining the threshold dosage for phenobarbital (D) versus no drug (N) DD. Methods Rats learned a D versus N DD in 2-lever operant training chambers. A titration scheme was employed to increase or decrease dosage at the end of each 18-day block of sessions depending on whether the rat had achieved criterion accuracy during the sessions just completed. Three criterion rules were employed, all based on average percent drug lever responses during initial links of the last 6 D and 6 N sessions of a block. The criteria were: D%>66 and N%<33; D%>50 and N%<50; (D%-N%)>33. Two squads of rats were trained, one immediately after the other. Results All rats discriminated drug versus no drug. In most rats, dosage decreased to low levels and then oscillated near the minimum level required to maintain criterion performance. The lowest discriminated dosage significantly differed under the three criterion rules. The squad that was trained 2nd may have benefited by partially duplicating the lever choices of the previous squad. Conclusions The lowest discriminated dosage is influenced by the criterion of discriminative control that is employed, and is higher than the absolute threshold at which discrimination entirely disappears. Threshold estimations closer to absolute threshold can be obtained when criteria are employed that are permissive, and that allow rats to maintain lever preferences. PMID:19082992

  10. [Post-marketing re-evaluation about usage and dosage of Chinese medicine based on human population pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junjie; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    The usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine are determined by rigorous evaluation which include four clinical trail stages: I, II, III. But the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine are lacked re-evaluation after marketing. And this lead to unchanging or fixed of the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine instead of different quantity based on different situations in individual patients. The situation of Chinese patent medicine used in clinical application is far away from the idea of the "Treatment based on syndrome differentiation" in traditional Chinese medicine and personalized therapy. Human population pharmacokinetics provides data support to the personalized therapy in clinical application, and achieved the postmarking reevaluating of the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine. This paper briefly introduced the present situation, significance and the application of human population pharmacokinetics about re-evaluation of the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine after marketing.

  11. Genetic epidemiology of pharmacogenetic variants in South East Asian Malays using whole-genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Sivadas, A; Salleh, M Z; Teh, L K; Scaria, V

    2017-10-01

    Expanding the scope of pharmacogenomic research by including multiple global populations is integral to building robust evidence for its clinical translation. Deep whole-genome sequencing of diverse ethnic populations provides a unique opportunity to study rare and common pharmacogenomic markers that often vary in frequency across populations. In this study, we aim to build a diverse map of pharmacogenetic variants in South East Asian (SEA) Malay population using deep whole-genome sequences of 100 healthy SEA Malay individuals. We investigated the allelic diversity of potentially deleterious pharmacogenomic variants in SEA Malay population. Our analysis revealed 227 common and 466 rare potentially functional single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in 437 pharmacogenomic genes involved in drug metabolism, transport and target genes, including 74 novel variants. This study has created one of the most comprehensive maps of pharmacogenetic markers in any population from whole genomes and will hugely benefit pharmacogenomic investigations and drug dosage recommendations in SEA Malays.

  12. Determination of the mechanical properties of solid and cellular polymeric dosage forms by diametral compression.

    PubMed

    Blaesi, Aron H; Saka, Nannaji

    2016-07-25

    At present, the immediate-release solid dosage forms, such as the oral tablets and capsules, are granular solids. They release drug rapidly and have adequate mechanical properties, but their manufacture is fraught with difficulties inherent in processing particulate matter. Such difficulties, however, could be overcome by liquid-based processing. Therefore, we have recently introduced polymeric cellular (i.e., highly porous) dosage forms prepared from a melt process. Experiments have shown that upon immersion in a dissolution medium, the cellular dosage forms with polyethylene glycol (PEG) as excipient and with predominantly open-cell topology disintegrate by exfoliation, thus enabling rapid drug release. If the volume fraction of voids of the open-cell structures is too large, however, their mechanical strength is adversely affected. At present, the common method for determining the tensile strength of brittle, solid dosage forms (such as select granular forms) is the diametral compression test. In this study, the theory of diametral compression is first refined to demonstrate that the relevant mechanical properties of ductile and cellular solids (i.e., the elastic modulus and the yield strength) can also be extracted from this test. Diametral compression experiments are then conducted on PEG-based solid and cellular dosage forms. It is found that the elastic modulus and yield strength of the open-cell structures are about an order of magnitude smaller than those of the non-porous solids, but still are substantially greater than the stiffness and strength requirements for handling the dosage forms manually. This work thus demonstrates that melt-processed polymeric cellular dosage forms that release drug rapidly can be designed and manufactured to have adequate mechanical properties. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Development and evaluation of a monolithic floating dosage form for furosemide.

    PubMed

    Menon, A; Ritschel, W A; Sakr, A

    1994-02-01

    The poor bioavailability of orally dosed furosemide (60%), a weakly acidic drug, is due to the presence of a biological window comprised of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The purpose of the present study was to develop and optimize in vitro a monolithic modified-release dosage form (MMR) for furosemide with increased gastric residence time and to evaluate the in vivo performance of the dosage form. The principle of floatation was used to restrict the MMR to the stomach. A two-factor three-level full factorial experimental design was employed for formulation development. A flow-through cell was designed to evaluate in vitro dissolution parameters. Quadratic regression models indicated the polymer viscosity and polymer:drug ratio to be significant (p < 0.05) formulation factors in determining the duration of buoyancy and the release profile. Statistical optimization using response surface methodology with certain physiological constraints relating to gastric emptying time predicted an optimal MMR. In vivo evaluation of the optimized MMR in beagle dogs resulted in a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the absolute bioavailability for the MMR dosage form (42.9%) as compared to the commercially available tablet (33.4%) and enteric product (29.5%). Significant in vitro/in vivo correlations (p < 0.05) were obtained for the MMR using deconvolution analysis normalized for bioavailability. The floating dosage form was found to be a feasible approach in delivering furosemide to the upper gastrointestinal tract to maximize drug absorption.

  14. [Development and effectiveness of a drug dosage calculation training program using cognitive loading theory based on smartphone application].

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Soo; Park, Jung Ha; Park, Kyung Yeon

    2012-10-01

    This study was done to develop and evaluate a drug dosage calculation training program using cognitive loading theory based on a smartphone application. Calculation ability, dosage calculation related self-efficacy and anxiety were measured. A nonequivalent control group design was used. Smartphone application and a handout for self-study were developed and administered to the experimental group and only a handout was provided for control group. Intervention period was 4 weeks. Data were analyzed using descriptive analysis, χ²-test, t-test, and ANCOVA with the SPSS 18.0. The experimental group showed more 'self-efficacy for drug dosage calculation' than the control group (t=3.82, p<.001). Experimental group students had higher ability to perform drug dosage calculations than control group students (t=3.98, p<.001), with regard to 'metric conversion' (t=2.25, p=.027), 'table dosage calculation' (t=2.20, p=.031) and 'drop rate calculation' (t=4.60, p<.001). There was no difference in improvement in 'anxiety for drug dosage calculation'. Mean satisfaction score for the program was 86.1. These results indicate that this drug dosage calculation training program using smartphone application is effective in improving dosage calculation related self-efficacy and calculation ability. Further study should be done to develop additional interventions for reducing anxiety.

  15. Low dosages: new chemotherapeutic weapons on the battlefield of immune-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Jie; Hu, Liang; Cao, Yuchun; Huang, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs eliminate tumor cells at relatively high doses and are considered weapons against tumors in clinics and hospitals. However, despite their ability to induce cellular apoptosis, chemotherapeutic drugs should probably be regarded more as a class of cell regulators than cell killers, if the dosage used and the fact that their targets are involved in basic molecular events are considered. Unfortunately, the regulatory properties of chemotherapeutic drugs are usually hidden or masked by the massive cell death induced by high doses. Recent evidence has begun to suggest that low dosages of chemotherapeutic drugs might profoundly regulate various intracellular aspects of normal cells, especially immune cells. Here, we discuss the immune regulatory roles of three kinds of chemotherapeutic drugs under low-dose conditions and propose low dosages as potential new chemotherapeutic weapons on the battlefield of immune-related disease. PMID:21423201

  16. Boxing and mixed martial arts: preliminary traumatic neuromechanical injury risk analyses from laboratory impact dosage data.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Adam J; Benzel, Edward C; Miele, Vincent J; Morr, Douglas R; Prakash, Vikas

    2012-05-01

    In spite of ample literature pointing to rotational and combined impact dosage being key contributors to head and neck injury, boxing and mixed martial arts (MMA) padding is still designed to primarily reduce cranium linear acceleration. The objects of this study were to quantify preliminary linear and rotational head impact dosage for selected boxing and MMA padding in response to hook punches; compute theoretical skull, brain, and neck injury risk metrics; and statistically compare the protective effect of various glove and head padding conditions. An instrumented Hybrid III 50th percentile anthropomorphic test device (ATD) was struck in 54 pendulum impacts replicating hook punches at low (27-29 J) and high (54-58 J) energy. Five padding combinations were examined: unpadded (control), MMA glove-unpadded head, boxing glove-unpadded head, unpadded pendulum-boxing headgear, and boxing glove-boxing headgear. A total of 17 injury risk parameters were measured or calculated. All padding conditions reduced linear impact dosage. Other parameters significantly decreased, significantly increased, or were unaffected depending on padding condition. Of real-world conditions (MMA glove-bare head, boxing glove-bare head, and boxing glove-headgear), the boxing glove-headgear condition showed the most meaningful reduction in most of the parameters. In equivalent impacts, the MMA glove-bare head condition induced higher rotational dosage than the boxing glove-bare head condition. Finite element analysis indicated a risk of brain strain injury in spite of significant reduction of linear impact dosage. In the replicated hook punch impacts, all padding conditions reduced linear but not rotational impact dosage. Head and neck dosage theoretically accumulates fastest in MMA and boxing bouts without use of protective headgear. The boxing glove-headgear condition provided the best overall reduction in impact dosage. More work is needed to develop improved protective padding to minimize

  17. Magnetic marker monitoring: high resolution real-time tracking of oral solid dosage forms in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Weitschies, Werner; Blume, Henning; Mönnikes, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge about the performance of dosage forms in the gastrointestinal tract is essential for the development of new oral delivery systems, as well as for the choice of the optimal formulation technology. Magnetic Marker Monitoring (MMM) is an imaging technology for the investigation of the behaviour of solid oral dosage forms within the gastrointestinal tract, which is based on the labelling of solid dosage forms as a magnetic dipole and determination of the location, orientation and strength of the dipole after oral administration using measurement equipment and localization methods that are established in biomagnetism. MMM enables the investigation of the performance of solid dosage forms in the gastrointestinal tract with a temporal resolution in the range of a few milliseconds and a spatial resolution in 3D in the range of some millimetres. Thereby, MMM provides real-time tracking of dosage forms in the gastrointestinal tract. MMM is also suitable for the determination of dosage form disintegration and for quantitative measurement of in vivo drug release in case of appropriate extended release dosage forms like hydrogel-forming matrix tablets. The combination of MMM with pharmacokinetic measurements (pharmacomagnetography) enables the determination of in vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIC) and the delineation of absorption sites in the gastrointestinal tract. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genomic Prediction of Single Crosses in the Early Stages of a Maize Hybrid Breeding Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Dnyaneshwar C; Potts, Sarah M; Bohn, Martin O; Lipka, Alexander E; Lorenz, Aaron J

    2016-09-19

    Prediction of single-cross performance has been a major goal of plant breeders since the beginning of hybrid breeding. Recently, genomic prediction has shown to be a promising approach, but only limited studies have examined the accuracy of predicting single-cross performance. Moreover, no studies have examined the potential of predicting single crosses among random inbreds derived from a series of biparental families, which resembles the structure of germplasm comprising the initial stages of a hybrid maize breeding pipeline. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the potential of genomic prediction for identifying superior single crosses early in the hybrid breeding pipeline and optimize its application. To accomplish these objectives, we designed and analyzed a novel population of single crosses representing the Iowa Stiff Stalk Synthetic/Non-Stiff Stalk heterotic pattern commonly used in the development of North American commercial maize hybrids. The performance of single crosses was predicted using parental combining ability and covariance among single crosses. Prediction accuracies were estimated using cross-validation and ranged from 0.28 to 0.77 for grain yield, 0.53 to 0.91 for plant height, and 0.49 to 0.94 for staygreen, depending on the number of tested parents of the single cross and genomic prediction method used. The genomic estimated general and specific combining abilities showed an advantage over genomic covariances among single crosses when one or both parents of the single cross were untested. Overall, our results suggest that genomic prediction of single crosses in the early stages of a hybrid breeding pipeline holds great potential to re-design hybrid breeding and increase its efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Author et al.

  19. Genome-wide analyses of four major histone modifications in Arabidopsis hybrids at the germinating seed stage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Anyu; Greaves, Ian K; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Peacock, W James

    2017-02-07

    Hybrid vigour (heterosis) has been used for decades in cropping agriculture, especially in the production of maize and rice, because hybrid varieties exceed their parents in plant biomass and seed yield. The molecular basis of hybrid vigour is not fully understood. Previous studies have suggested that epigenetic systems could play a role in heterosis. In this project, we investigated genome-wide patterns of four histone modifications in Arabidopsis hybrids in germinating seeds. We found that although hybrids have similar histone modification patterns to the parents in most regions of the genome, they have altered patterns at specific loci. A small subset of genes show changes in histone modifications in the hybrids that correlate with changes in gene expression. Our results also show that genome-wide patterns of histone modifications in geminating seeds parallel those at later developmental stages of seedlings. Ler/C24 hybrids showed similar genome-wide patterns of histone modifications as the parents at an early germination stage. However, a small subset of genes, such as FLC, showed correlated changes in histone modification and in gene expression in the hybrids. The altered patterns of histone modifications for those genes in hybrids could be related to some heterotic traits in Arabidopsis, such as flowering time, and could play a role in hybrid vigour establishment.

  20. Understandings of genomic research in developing countries: a qualitative study of the views of MalariaGEN participants in Mali.

    PubMed

    Traore, Karim; Bull, Susan; Niare, Alassane; Konate, Salimata; Thera, Mahamadou A; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Parker, Michael; Doumbo, Ogobara K

    2015-06-16

    Obtaining informed consent for participation in genomic research in low-income settings presents specific ethical issues requiring attention. These include the challenges that arise when providing information about unfamiliar and technical research methods, the implications of complicated infrastructure and data sharing requirements, and the potential consequences of future research with samples and data. This study investigated researchers' and participants' parents' experiences of a consent process and understandings of a genome-wide association study of malaria involving children aged five and under in Mali. It aimed to inform best practices in recruiting participants into genomic research. A qualitative rapid ethical assessment was undertaken. Fifty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted with the parents of research participants. An additional nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with senior research scientists, research assistants and with a member of an ethics committee. A focus group with five parents of research participants and direct observations of four consent processes were also conducted. French and translated English transcripts were descriptively and thematically coded using OpenCode software. Participants' parents in the MalariaGEN study had differing understandings of the causes of malaria, the rationale for collecting blood samples, the purposes of the study and the kinds of information the study would generate. Genomic aspects of the research, including the gene/environment interaction underlying susceptibility or resistance to severe malaria, proved particularly challenging to explain and understand. This study identifies a number of areas to be addressed in the design of consent processes for genomic research, some of which require careful ethical analysis. These include determining how much information should be provided about differing aspects of the research and how best to promote understandings of genomic research. We

  1. Joint assembly and genetic mapping of the Atlantic horseshoe crab genome reveals ancient whole genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Horseshoe crabs are marine arthropods with a fossil record extending back approximately 450 million years. They exhibit remarkable morphological stability over their long evolutionary history, retaining a number of ancestral arthropod traits, and are often cited as examples of “living fossils.” As arthropods, they belong to the Ecdysozoa, an ancient super-phylum whose sequenced genomes (including insects and nematodes) have thus far shown more divergence from the ancestral pattern of eumetazoan genome organization than cnidarians, deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans. However, much of ecdysozoan diversity remains unrepresented in comparative genomic analyses. Results Here we apply a new strategy of combined de novo assembly and genetic mapping to examine the chromosome-scale genome organization of the Atlantic horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. We constructed a genetic linkage map of this 2.7 Gbp genome by sequencing the nuclear DNA of 34 wild-collected, full-sibling embryos and their parents at a mean redundancy of 1.1x per sample. The map includes 84,307 sequence markers grouped into 1,876 distinct genetic intervals and 5,775 candidate conserved protein coding genes. Conclusions Comparison with other metazoan genomes shows that the L. polyphemus genome preserves ancestral bilaterian linkage groups, and that a common ancestor of modern horseshoe crabs underwent one or more ancient whole genome duplications 300 million years ago, followed by extensive chromosome fusion. These results provide a counter-example to the often noted correlation between whole genome duplication and evolutionary radiations. The new, low-cost genetic mapping method for obtaining a chromosome-scale view of non-model organism genomes that we demonstrate here does not require laboratory culture, and is potentially applicable to a broad range of other species. PMID:24987520

  2. Volcanic ash dosage calculator: A proof-of-concept tool to support aviation stakeholders during ash events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacre, H.; Prata, A.; Shine, K. P.; Irvine, E.

    2017-12-01

    The volcanic ash clouds produced by Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in April/May 2010 resulted in `no fly zones' which paralysed European aircraft activity and cost the airline industry an estimated £1.1 billion. In response to the crisis, the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), in collaboration with Rolls Royce, produced the `safe-to-fly' chart. As ash concentrations are the primary output of dispersion model forecasts, the chart was designed to illustrate how engine damage progresses as a function of ash concentration. Concentration thresholds were subsequently derived based on previous ash encounters. Research scientists and aircraft manufactures have since recognised the importance of volcanic ash dosages; the accumulated concentration over time. Dosages are an improvement to concentrations as they can be used to identify pernicious situations where ash concentrations are acceptably low but the exposure time is long enough to cause damage to aircraft engines. Here we present a proof-of-concept volcanic ash dosage calculator; an innovative, web-based research tool, developed in close collaboration with operators and regulators, which utilises interactive data visualisation to communicate the uncertainty inherent in dispersion model simulations and subsequent dosage calculations. To calculate dosages, we use NAME (Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment) to simulate several Icelandic eruption scenarios, which result in tephra dispersal across the North Atlantic, UK and Europe. Ash encounters are simulated based on flight-optimal routes derived from aircraft routing software. Key outputs of the calculator include: the along-flight dosage, exposure time and peak concentration. The design of the tool allows users to explore the key areas of uncertainty in the dosage calculation and to visualise how this changes as the planned flight path is varied. We expect that this research will result in better informed decisions from key stakeholders during

  3. The Role of Xist in X-Chromosome Dosage Compensation.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Anna; Yang, Yihao; Plath, Kathrin

    2018-06-14

    In each somatic cell of a female mammal one X chromosome is transcriptionally silenced via X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), initiating early in development. Although XCI events are conserved in mouse and human postimplantation development, regulation of X-chromosome dosage in preimplantation development occurs differently. In preimplantation development, mouse embryos undergo imprinted form of XCI, yet humans lack imprinted XCI and instead regulate gene expression of both X chromosomes by dampening transcription. The long non-coding RNA Xist/XIST is expressed in mouse and human preimplantation and postimplantation development to orchestrate XCI, but its role in dampening is unclear. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the role of Xist in X chromosome dosage compensation in mouse and human. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. X-chromosome dosage as a modulator of pluripotency, signalling and differentiation?

    PubMed

    Schulz, Edda G

    2017-11-05

    Already during early embryogenesis, before sex-specific hormone production is initiated, sex differences in embryonic development have been observed in several mammalian species. Typically, female embryos develop more slowly than their male siblings. A similar phenotype has recently been described in differentiating murine embryonic stem cells, where a double dose of the X-chromosome halts differentiation until dosage-compensation has been achieved through X-chromosome inactivation. On the molecular level, several processes associated with early differentiation of embryonic stem cells have been found to be affected by X-chromosome dosage, such as the transcriptional state of the pluripotency network, the activity pattern of several signal transduction pathways and global levels of DNA-methylation. This review provides an overview of the sex differences described in embryonic stem cells from mice and discusses a series of X-linked genes that are associated with pluripotency, signalling and differentiation and their potential involvement in mediating the observed X-dosage-dependent effects.This article is part of the themed issue 'X-chromosome inactivation: a tribute to Mary Lyon'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Health Instruction Packages: Drug Dosage, Classification, and Mixing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracchi, Dorothy P.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in a set of seven learning modules to instruct nursing students in the fundamentals of drug classification, dosage, and mixing. The first module, by Dorothy Bracchi, teaches the student to identify six classifications of medication often administered to orthopedic patients: anti-neurospasmolytic…

  6. Kidney function monitoring and nonvitamin K oral anticoagulant dosage in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Andreu Cayuelas, Jose Manuel; Caro Martínez, Cesar; Flores Blanco, Pedro Jose; Elvira Ruiz, Gines; Albendin Iglesias, Helena; Cerezo Manchado, Juan Jose; Bailen Lorenzo, Jose Luis; Januzzi, James L; García Alberola, Arcadio; Manzano-Fernández, Sergio

    2018-06-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend regular kidney function monitoring in atrial fibrillation patients on nonvitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOAC); however, information regarding compliance with these recommendations in daily life conditions is scarce. We sought to determine the compliance with kidney function monitoring recommendations in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients starting NOAC and its implication on the appropriateness of NOAC dosage. This study involves the retrospective analysis of a multicentre registry including consecutive NVAF patients who started NOAC (n = 692). Drug dosage changes and serum creatinine determinations were recorded during 1-year follow-up. European Heart Rhythm Association criteria were used to define the appropriateness of kidney function monitoring as well as adequate NOAC dosage. During the follow-up (334 ± 89 days), the compliance with kidney function monitoring recommendations was 61% (n = 425). After multivariate adjustment, age (OR × year: 0.92 (CI 95%: 0.89-0.95) P < .001), creatinine clearance (OR × mL/min: 1.02 (CI 95%: 1.01-1.03) P < .001) and adequate NOAC dosage at baseline (OR: 1.54 (CI 95%: 1.06-2.23), P = .024) were independent predictors of appropriate kidney function monitoring. Compliance with kidney function monitoring recommendations was independently associated with change to appropriate NOAC dose after 1 year (OR: 2.80 (CI 95%: 1.01-7.80), P = .049). Noncompliance with kidney function monitoring recommendations is common in NVAF patients starting NOAC, especially in elderly patients with kidney dysfunction. Compliance with kidney function monitoring recommendations was associated with adequate NOAC dosage at 1-year follow-up. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the implication of kidney function monitoring on prognosis. © 2018 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  7. Minimum effective dosages of anti-TNF in rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Inmaculada; Valor, Lara; Nieto, Juan Carlos; Montoro, María; Carreño, Luis

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the modified dosages of anti-TNF in controlling disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) measured by DAS28-ESR. Cross-sectional study: RA patients treated with etanercept (ETN), adalimumab (ADA) or infliximab (IFX), at standard or modified doses. dosage, concomitant disease modifying drugs (DMARDs), DAS28-ESR. 195 RA patients included (79% women, mean age 58.1 years): ETN=81, ADA=56, IFX=58. Mean disease duration and time to first biological treatment was higher in IFX group (P=.01). Patients distribution by dosage: standard: ETN (72.8%), ADA (69.6%), IFX (27.6%); escalated: IFX (69%), ADA (5.4%), ETN (0%); reduced: ETN (27.1%), ADA (25%), IFX (3.4%). Concomitant DMARDs use was lower in ETN (58.2%) than ADA (66.07%) and IFX (79.31%). Higher proportion of responders (DAS28 ≤3.2) in ADA (65.3%) and ETN (61.7%) than IFX (48.3%). RA clinical control can be preserved with modified anti-TNF dosages. Controlled prospective studies should be performed to define when therapy can be tailored and for which patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. A Surrogate Approach to Study the Evolution of Noncoding DNA Elements That Organize Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Vermaak, Danielle; Bayes, Joshua J.

    2009-01-01

    Comparative genomics provides a facile way to address issues of evolutionary constraint acting on different elements of the genome. However, several important DNA elements have not reaped the benefits of this new approach. Some have proved intractable to current day sequencing technology. These include centromeric and heterochromatic DNA, which are essential for chromosome segregation as well as gene regulation, but the highly repetitive nature of the DNA sequences in these regions make them difficult to assemble into longer contigs. Other sequences, like dosage compensation X chromosomal sites, origins of DNA replication, or heterochromatic sequences that encode piwi-associated RNAs, have proved difficult to study because they do not have recognizable DNA features that allow them to be described functionally or computationally. We have employed an alternate approach to the direct study of these DNA elements. By using proteins that specifically bind these noncoding DNAs as surrogates, we can indirectly assay the evolutionary constraints acting on these important DNA elements. We review the impact that such “surrogate strategies” have had on our understanding of the evolutionary constraints shaping centromeres, origins of DNA replication, and dosage compensation X chromosomal sites. These have begun to reveal that in contrast to the view that such structural DNA elements are either highly constrained (under purifying selection) or free to drift (under neutral evolution), some of them may instead be shaped by adaptive evolution and genetic conflicts (these are not mutually exclusive). These insights also help to explain why the same elements (e.g., centromeres and replication origins), which are so complex in some eukaryotic genomes, can be simple and well defined in other where similar conflicts do not exist. PMID:19635763

  9. Expansion of signal transduction pathways in fungi by extensive genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    Corrochano, Luis M.; Kuo, Alan; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Polaino, Silvia; Salamov, Asaf; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M.; Grimwood, Jane; Álvarez, M. Isabel; Avalos, Javier; Bauer, Diane; Benito, Ernesto P.; Benoit, Isabelle; Burger, Gertraud; Camino, Lola P.; Cánovas, David; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Domínguez, Angel; Eliáš, Marek; Eslava, Arturo P.; Glaser, Fabian; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Heitman, Joseph; Henrissat, Bernard; Iturriaga, Enrique A.; Lang, B. Franz; Lavín, José L.; Lee, Soo Chan; Li, Wenjun; Lindquist, Erika; López-García, Sergio; Luque, Eva M.; Marcos, Ana T.; Martin, Joel; McCluskey, Kevin; Medina, Humberto R.; Miralles-Durán, Alejandro; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Muñoz-Torres, Elisa; Oguiza, José A.; Ohm, Robin A.; Orejas, Margarita; Ortiz-Castellanos, Lucila; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa; Sanz, Catalina; Schackwitz, Wendy; Shahriari, Mahdi; Shelest, Ekaterina; Silva-Franco, Fátima; Soanes, Darren; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tagua, Víctor G.; Talbot, Nicholas J.; Thon, Michael R.; Tice, Hope; de Vries, Ronald P.; Wiebenga, Ad; Yadav, Jagjit S.; Braun, Edward L.; Baker, Scott E.; Garre, Victoriano; Schmutz, Jeremy; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Idnurm, Alexander; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Gabaldón, Toni; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Plants and fungi use light and other signals to regulate development, growth, and metabolism. The fruiting bodies of the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus are single cells that react to environmental cues, including light, but the mechanisms are largely unknown [1]. The related fungus Mucor circinelloides is an opportunistic human pathogen that changes its mode of growth upon receipt of signals from the environment to facilitate pathogenesis [2]. Understanding how these organisms respond to environmental cues should provide insights into the mechanisms of sensory perception and signal transduction by a single eukaryotic cell, and their role in pathogenesis. We sequenced the genomes of P. blakesleeanus and M. circinelloides, and show that they have been shaped by an extensive genome duplication or, most likely, a whole genome duplication (WGD), which is rarely observed in fungi [3-6]. We show that the genome duplication has expanded gene families, including those involved in signal transduction, and that duplicated genes have specialized, as evidenced by differences in their regulation by light. The transcriptional response to light varies with the developmental stage and is still observed in a photoreceptor mutant of P. blakesleeanus. A phototropic mutant of P. blakesleeanus with a heterozygous mutation in the photoreceptor gene madA demonstrates that photosensor dosage is important for the magnitude of signal transduction. We conclude that the genome duplication provided the means to improve signal transduction for enhanced perception of environmental signals. Our results will help to understand the role of genome dynamics in the evolution of sensory perception in eukaryotes. PMID:27238284

  10. Effects of pharmaceutical processing on pepsin activity during the formulation of solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Kristó, Katalin; Pintye-Hódi, Klára

    2013-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pharmaceutical technological methods on pepsin activity during the formulation of solid dosage forms. The circumstances of direct compression and wet granulation were modeled. During direct compression, the heat and the compression force must be taken into consideration. The effects of these parameters were investigated in three materials (pure pepsin, and 1:1 (w/w) pepsin-tartaric acid and 1:1 (w/w) pepsin-citric acid powder mixtures). It was concluded that direct compression is appropriate for the formulation of solid dosage forms containing pepsin through application without acids or with acids at low compression force. The effects of wet granulation were investigated with a factorial design for the same three materials. The factors were time, temperature and moisture content. There was no significant effect of the factors when acids were not applied. Temperature was a significant factor when acids were applied. The negative effect was significantly higher for citric acid than for tartaric acid. It was found that wet granulation can be utilized for the processing of pepsin into solid dosage forms under well-controlled circumstances. The application of citric acid is not recommended during the formulation of solid dosage forms through wet granulation. A mathematically based optimization may be necessary for preformulation studies of the preparation of dosage forms containing sensitive enzymes.

  11. 3D printing of high drug loaded dosage forms using thermoplastic polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, G; Samaro, A; Grymonpré, W; Vanhoorne, V; Van Snick, B; Boone, M N; Hellemans, T; Van Hoorebeke, L; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2018-01-30

    It was the aim of this study to develop high drug loaded (>30%, w/w), thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)-based dosage forms via fused deposition modelling (FDM). Model drugs with different particle size and aqueous solubility were pre-processed in combination with diverse TPU grades via hot melt extrusion (HME) into filaments with a diameter of 1.75 ± 0.05 mm. Subsequently, TPU-based filaments which featured acceptable quality attributes (i.e. consistent filament diameter, smooth surface morphology and good mechanical properties) were printed into tablets. The sustained release potential of the 3D printed dosage forms was tested in vitro. Moreover, the impact of printing parameters on the in vitro drug release was investigated. TPU-based filaments could be loaded with 60% (w/w) fine drug powder without observing severe shark skinning or inconsistent filament diameter. During 3D printing experiments, HME filaments based on hard TPU grades were successfully converted into personalized dosage forms containing a high concentration of crystalline drug (up to 60%, w/w). In vitro release kinetics were mainly affected by the matrix composition and tablet infill degree. Therefore, this study clearly demonstrated that TPU-based FDM feedstock material offers a lot of formulation freedom for the development of personalized dosage forms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Population-genetic models of sex-limited genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Kelly, S Thomas; Spencer, Hamish G

    2017-06-01

    Genomic imprinting is a form of epigenetic modification involving parent-of-origin-dependent gene expression, usually the inactivation of one gene copy in some tissues, at least, for some part of the diploid life cycle. Occurring at a number of loci in mammals and flowering plants, this mode of non-Mendelian expression can be viewed more generally as parentally-specific differential gene expression. The effects of natural selection on genetic variation at imprinted loci have previously been examined in a several population-genetic models. Here we expand the existing one-locus, two-allele population-genetic models of viability selection with genomic imprinting to include sex-limited imprinting, i.e., imprinted expression occurring only in one sex, and differential viability between the sexes. We first consider models of complete inactivation of either parental allele and these models are subsequently generalized to incorporate differential expression. Stable polymorphic equilibrium was possible without heterozygote advantage as observed in some prior models of imprinting in both sexes. In contrast to these latter models, in the sex-limited case it was critical whether the paternally inherited or maternally inherited allele was inactivated. The parental origin of inactivated alleles had a different impact on how the population responded to the different selection pressures between the sexes. Under the same fitness parameters, imprinting in the other sex altered the number of possible equilibrium states and their stability. When the parental origin of imprinted alleles and the sex in which they are inactive differ, an allele cannot be inactivated in consecutive generations. The system dynamics became more complex with more equilibrium points emerging. Our results show that selection can interact with epigenetic factors to maintain genetic variation in previously unanticipated ways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biowaiver Monographs for Immediate Release Solid Oral Dosage Forms: Levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Petruševska, Marija; Berglez, Sandra; Krisch, Igor; Legen, Igor; Megušar, Klara; Peternel, Luka; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Groot, D W; Kopp, Sabine; Langguth, Peter; Mehta, Mehul; Polli, James E; Shah, Vinod P; Dressman, Jennifer

    2015-09-01

    Literature and experimental data relevant for the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing levetiracetam are reviewed. Data on solubility and permeability suggest that levetiracetam belongs to class I of the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS). Levetiracetam's therapeutic use, its wide therapeutic index, and its favorable pharmacokinetic properties make levetiracetam a valid candidate for the BCS-based biowaiver approach. Further, no BE studies with levetiracetam IR formulations in which the test formulation failed to show BE with the comparator have been reported in the open literature. On the basis of the overall evidence, it appears unlikely that a BCS-based biowaiver approach for levetiracetam IR solid oral dosage forms formulated with established excipients would expose patients to undue risks. Thus, the BCS-based biowaiver approach procedure is recommended for IR solid oral dosage form containing levetiracetam, provided the excipients in the formulation are also present in products that have been approved in countries belonging to or associated with the International Committee on Harmonization and are used in their usual quantities, and provided the dissolution profiles of the test and reference product comply with the current requirements for BCS-based biowaivers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Prevalence and trends of cellulosics in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Mastropietro, David J; Omidian, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Many studies have shown that cellulose derivatives (cellulosics) can provide various benefits when used in virtually all types of dosage forms. Nevertheless, the popularity of their use in approved drug products is rather unknown. This research reports the current prevalence and trends of use for 15 common cellulosics in prescription drug products. The cellulosics were powdered and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), ethyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC), hypromellose (HPMC), HPMC phthalate, HPMC acetate succinate, cellulose acetate (CA), CA phthalate, sodium (Na) and calcium (Ca) carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), croscarmellose sodium (XCMCNa), methyl cellulose, and low substituted HPC. The number of brand drug products utilizing each cellulosics was determined using the online drug index Rxlist. A total of 607 brand products were identified having one or more of the cellulosics as an active or inactive ingredient. An array of various dosage forms was identified and revealed HPMC and MCC to be the most utilized cellulosics in all products followed by XCMCNa and HPC. Many products contained two or more cellulosics in the formulation (42% containing two, 23% containing three, and 4% containing 4-5). The largest combination occurrence was HPMC with MCC. The use of certain cellulosics within different dosage form types was found to contain specific trends. All injectables utilized only CMCNa, and the same with all ophthalmic solutions utilizing HPMC, and otic suspensions utilizing HEC. Popularity and trends regarding cellulosics use may occur based on many factors including functionality, safety, availability, stability, and ease of manufacturing.

  15. Genome-Wide Prediction of the Performance of Three-Way Hybrids in Barley.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuo; Philipp, Norman; Spiller, Monika; Stiewe, Gunther; Reif, Jochen C; Zhao, Yusheng

    2017-03-01

    Predicting the grain yield performance of three-way hybrids is challenging. Three-way crosses are relevant for hybrid breeding in barley ( L.) and maize ( L.) adapted to East Africa. The main goal of our study was to implement and evaluate genome-wide prediction approaches of the performance of three-way hybrids using data of single-cross hybrids for a scenario in which parental lines of the three-way hybrids originate from three genetically distinct subpopulations. We extended the ridge regression best linear unbiased prediction (RRBLUP) and devised a genomic selection model allowing for subpopulation-specific marker effects (GSA-RRBLUP: general and subpopulation-specific additive RRBLUP). Using an empirical barley data set, we showed that applying GSA-RRBLUP tripled the prediction ability of three-way hybrids from 0.095 to 0.308 compared with RRBLUP, modeling one additive effect for all three subpopulations. The experimental findings were further substantiated with computer simulations. Our results emphasize the potential of GSA-RRBLUP to improve genome-wide hybrid prediction of three-way hybrids for scenarios of genetically diverse parental populations. Because of the advantages of the GSA-RRBLUP model in dealing with hybrids from different parental populations, it may also be a promising approach to boost the prediction ability for hybrid breeding programs based on genetically diverse heterotic groups. Copyright © 2017 Crop Science Society of America.

  16. Effect of Calcium Ions on the Disintegration of Enteric-Coated Solid Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Al-Gousous, Jozef; Langguth, Peter

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effect of calcium ions on the disintegration of enteric-coated dosage forms, disintegration testing was performed on enteric-coated aspirin tablets in the presence and absence of calcium in the test media. The results show that the presence of calcium ions retards the disintegration of enteric-coated dosage forms. This finding, which has not been reported in scientific literature, sheds light on the importance of conducting well-designed detailed investigations into the potential of calcium from dietary sources, calcium supplements, antacids, and/or phosphate binders affecting the absorption of drugs formulated into enteric-coated dosage forms. Moreover, it shows the necessity to investigate the potential of the occurrence of additional nutrient-excipient interactions. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Does genomic imprinting play a role in autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Camprubí, Cristina; Monk, David

    2011-01-01

    In the 19th century Gregor Mendel defined the laws of genetic inheritance by crossing different types of peas. From these results arose his principle of equivalence: the gene will have the same behaviour whether it is inherited from the mother or the father. Today, several key exceptions to this principle are known, for example sex-linked traits and genes in the mitochondrial genome, whose inheritance patterns are referred to as 'non mendelian'. A third, important exception in mammals is that of genomic imprinting, where transcripts are expressed in a monoallelic fashion from only the maternal or the paternal chromosome. In this chapter, we discuss how parent-of-origin effects and genomic imprinting may play a role in autoimmunity and speculate how imprinted miRNAs may influence the expression of many target autoimmune associated genes.

  18. The effect of dosages of microbial consortia formulation and synthetic fertilizer on the growth and yield of field-grown chili

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istifadah, N.; Sapta, D.; Krestini, H.; Natalie, B.; Suryatmana, P.; Nurbaity, A.; Hidersah, R.

    2018-03-01

    Chili (Capsicum annuum, L) is one of important horticultural crop in Indonesia. Formulation of microbial consortia containing Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas sp., Azotobacter chroococcum and Trichoderma harzianum has been developed. This study evaluated the effects of dosage of the microbial formulation combined with NPK fertilizer on growth and yield of chili plants in the field experiment. The experiment was arranged in completely randomized design of factorial, in which the first factor was dosage of formulation (0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10 g per plant) and the second factor was NPK fertilizer dosage (0, 25, 50 and 75% of the standard dosage). The treatments were replicated three times. For application, the formulation was mixed with chicken manure 1:10 (w/v). The results showed that application of microbial formulation solely improved the chili growth. There was interaction between dosages of the microbial formulation and NPK fertilizer in improving plant height, nitrogen availability and the chili yield, while there was no interaction between those dosages in improving the root length. Combination between microbial formulation at the dosage of 5.0-7.5 g per plant combined with NPK fertilizer with the dosage 50 or 75% of the standard dosage support relatively better growth and the chili yield.

  19. Comparative proteomic study on Brassica hexaploid and its parents provides new insights into the effects of polyploidization.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanyue; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Jun; Meng, Jinling; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy has played an important role in promoting plant evolution through genomic merging and doubling. Although genomic and transcriptomic changes have been observed in polyploids, the effects of polyploidization on proteomic divergence are poorly understood. In this study, we reported quantitative analysis of proteomic changes in leaves of Brassica hexaploid and its parents using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 2044 reproducible proteins were quantified by at least two unique peptides. We detected 452 proteins differentially expressed between Brassica hexaploid and its parents, and 100 proteins were non-additively expressed in Brassica hexaploid, which suggested a trend of non-additive protein regulation following genomic merger and doubling. Functional categories of cellular component biogenesis, immune system process, and response to stimulus, were significantly enriched in non-additive proteins, probably providing a driving force for variation and adaptation in allopolyploids. In particular, majority of the total 452 differentially expressed proteins showed expression level dominance of one parental expression, and there was an expression level dominance bias toward the tetraploid progenitor. In addition, the percentage of differentially expressed proteins that matched previously reported differentially genes were relatively low. This study aimed to get new insights into the effects of polyploidization on proteomic divergence. Using iTRAQ LC-MS/MS technology, we identified 452 differentially expressed proteins between allopolyploid and its parents which involved in response to stimulus, multi-organism process, and immune system process, much more than previous studies using 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry technology. Therefore, our manuscript represents the most comprehensive analysis of protein profiles in allopolyploid and its parents, which will lead to a better understanding of

  20. Dosage calculations for nurses June L Olsen Dosage calculations for nurses et al Pearson Education £14.99 312pp 9780132068840 0132068842 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2011-05-10

    A COMPREHENSIVE review of dosage calculation for nursing staff, this covers accurate calculation skills and interpretation of units of measurement in the context of safe medication-administration practice.

  1. Comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Pinkel, Daniel; Albertson, Donna G

    2005-01-01

    Altering DNA copy number is one of the many ways that gene expression and function may be modified. Some variations are found among normal individuals ( 14, 35, 103 ), others occur in the course of normal processes in some species ( 33 ), and still others participate in causing various disease states. For example, many defects in human development are due to gains and losses of chromosomes and chromosomal segments that occur prior to or shortly after fertilization, whereas DNA dosage alterations that occur in somatic cells are frequent contributors to cancer. Detecting these aberrations, and interpreting them within the context of broader knowledge, facilitates identification of critical genes and pathways involved in biological processes and diseases, and provides clinically relevant information. Over the past several years array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) has demonstrated its value for analyzing DNA copy number variations. In this review we discuss the state of the art of array CGH and its applications in medical genetics and cancer, emphasizing general concepts rather than specific results.

  2. Parent of origin effects on age at colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lindor, Noralane M; Rabe, Kari G; Petersen, Gloria M; Chen, Helen; Bapat, Bharati; Hopper, John; Young, Joanne; Jenkins, Mark; Potter, John; Newcomb, Polly; Templeton, Allyson; Lemarchand, Loic; Grove, John; Burgio, Michael R; Haile, Robert; Green, Jane; Woods, Michael O; Seminara, Daniela; Limburg, Paul J; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2010-07-15

    Genomic imprinting refers to a parent-of-origin specific effect on gene expression. At least 1% of genes in the human genome are modulated in this manner. We sought evidence for genomic imprinting in colorectal cancer by studying the ages at diagnosis in the offspring of 2,061 parent-child pairs in which both parent and child were affected by nonsyndromic colorectal cancer. Families were ascertained through the colon Cancer Family Registry [http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/CFR/] from both population-based and clinic-based sources. We found that the affected offspring of affected fathers were on average younger than offspring of affected mothers (55.8 vs. 53.7 years; p = 0.0003), but when divided into sons and daughters, this difference was driven entirely by younger age at diagnosis in daughters of affected fathers compared to sons (52.3 years vs. 55.1 years; p = 0.0004). A younger age at diagnosis in affected daughters of affected fathers was also observable in various subsets including families that met Amsterdam II Criteria, families that did not meet Amsterdam Criteria, and in families with documented normal DNA mismatch repair in tumors. Imprinting effects are not expected to be affected by the sex of the offspring. Possible explanations for these unexpected findings include: (i) an imprinted gene on the pseudoautosomal regions of the X chromosome; (ii) an imprinted autosomal gene that affects a sex-specific pathway; or (iii) an X-linked gene unmasked because of colonic tissue-specific preferential inactivation of the maternal X chromosome.

  3. Parental DNA Methylation States Are Associated with Heterosis in Epigenetic Hybrids1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lauss, Kathrin; Wardenaar, René; van Hulten, Marieke H. A.; Guryev, Victor; Johannes, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Despite the importance and wide exploitation of heterosis in commercial crop breeding, the molecular mechanisms behind this phenomenon are not completely understood. Recent studies have implicated changes in DNA methylation and small RNAs in hybrid performance; however, it remains unclear whether epigenetic changes are a cause or a consequence of heterosis. Here, we analyze a large panel of over 500 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) epigenetic hybrid plants (epiHybrids), which we derived from near-isogenic but epigenetically divergent parents. This proof-of-principle experimental system allowed us to quantify the contribution of parental methylation differences to heterosis. We measured traits such as leaf area, growth rate, flowering time, main stem branching, rosette branching, and final plant height and observed several strong positive and negative heterotic phenotypes among the epiHybrids. Using an epigenetic quantitative trait locus mapping approach, we were able to identify specific differentially methylated regions in the parental genomes that are associated with hybrid performance. Sequencing of methylomes, transcriptomes, and genomes of selected parent-epiHybrid combinations further showed that these parental differentially methylated regions most likely mediate the remodeling of methylation and transcriptional states at specific loci in the hybrids. Taken together, our data suggest that locus-specific epigenetic divergence between the parental lines can directly or indirectly trigger heterosis in Arabidopsis hybrids independent of genetic changes. These results add to a growing body of evidence that points to epigenetic factors as one of the key determinants of hybrid performance. PMID:29196538

  4. Dosage Parameters in Pediatric Outcome Studies Reported in 9 Peer-Reviewed Occupational Therapy Journals from 2008 to 2014: A Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Bryan M.; Lloyd, Kimberly; Devine, Nancy; Tyrrell, Erin; Evans, Trisha; Hill, Rebekah; Dineen, Stacee; Magalogo, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapists determine the dosage when establishing the plan of care for their pediatric clients. A content analysis was conducted using 123 pediatric occupational therapy outcomes studies from 9 scholarly international occupational therapy journals. The parameters of dosage were calculated using descriptive statistics in order to obtain a representation of dosage available within the current collage of pediatric occupational therapy outcomes studies. The results revealed that most studies reported portions of dosage parameters within the published studies. The average findings for the subcomponents related to dosage were session length (minutes) M = 58.7, duration of plan of care (weeks) M = 12.1, session frequency (per week) M = 3.4, and total hours of therapy (hours) M = 18.1. This first attempt at describing and calculating dosage related to pediatric occupational therapy practice indicates that evidence is lacking within the published literature to adequately guide OT dosage decisions. Further research related to dosage in pediatric occupational therapy practice is needed. PMID:26949547

  5. Regulatory perspectives on acceptability testing of dosage forms in children.

    PubMed

    Kozarewicz, Piotr

    2014-08-05

    Current knowledge about the age-appropriateness of different dosage forms is still fragmented or limited. Applicants are asked to demonstrate that the target age group(s) can manage the dosage form or propose an alternative strategy. However, questions remain about how far the applicant must go and what percentage of patients must find the strategy 'acceptable'. The aim of this overview is to provide an update on current thinking and understanding of the problem, and discuss issues relating to the acceptability testing. This overview should be considered as means to start a wider discussion which hopefully will result in a harmonised, globally acceptable approach for confirmation of the acceptability in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 21 CFR 520.1448 - Monensin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monensin oral dosage forms. 520.1448 Section 520.1448 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... layer chromatography, the R f value must be comparable to a reference standard (the R f value is the...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1448 - Monensin oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monensin oral dosage forms. 520.1448 Section 520.1448 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... layer chromatography, the R f value must be comparable to a reference standard (the R f value is the...

  8. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis Reveals Similar Types of NBS Genes in Hybrid Citrus sinensis Genome and Original Citrus clementine Genome and Provides New Insights into Non-TIR NBS Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunsheng; Zhou, Lijuan; Li, Dazhi; Dai, Liangying; Lawton-Rauh, Amy; Srimani, Pradip K.; Duan, Yongping; Luo, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we identified and compared nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain-containing genes from three Citrus genomes (C. clementina, C. sinensis from USA and C. sinensis from China). Phylogenetic analysis of all Citrus NBS genes across these three genomes revealed that there are three approximately evenly numbered groups: one group contains the Toll-Interleukin receptor (TIR) domain and two different Non-TIR groups in which most of proteins contain the Coiled Coil (CC) domain. Motif analysis confirmed that the two groups of CC-containing NBS genes are from different evolutionary origins. We partitioned NBS genes into clades using NBS domain sequence distances and found most clades include NBS genes from all three Citrus genomes. This suggests that three Citrus genomes have similar numbers and types of NBS genes. We also mapped the re-sequenced reads of three pomelo and three mandarin genomes onto the C. sinensis genome. We found that most NBS genes of the hybrid C. sinensis genome have corresponding homologous genes in both pomelo and mandarin genomes. The homologous NBS genes in pomelo and mandarin suggest that the parental species of C. sinensis may contain similar types of NBS genes. This explains why the hybrid C. sinensis and original C. clementina have similar types of NBS genes in this study. Furthermore, we found that sequence variation amongst Citrus NBS genes were shaped by multiple independent and shared accelerated mutation accumulation events among different groups of NBS genes and in different Citrus genomes. Our comparative analyses yield valuable insight into the structure, organization and evolution of NBS genes in Citrus genomes. Furthermore, our comprehensive analysis showed that the non-TIR NBS genes can be divided into two groups that come from different evolutionary origins. This provides new insights into non-TIR genes, which have not received much attention. PMID:25811466

  9. Genome-wide comparative analysis reveals similar types of NBS genes in hybrid Citrus sinensis genome and original Citrus clementine genome and provides new insights into non-TIR NBS genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunsheng; Zhou, Lijuan; Li, Dazhi; Dai, Liangying; Lawton-Rauh, Amy; Srimani, Pradip K; Duan, Yongping; Luo, Feng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we identified and compared nucleotide-binding site (NBS) domain-containing genes from three Citrus genomes (C. clementina, C. sinensis from USA and C. sinensis from China). Phylogenetic analysis of all Citrus NBS genes across these three genomes revealed that there are three approximately evenly numbered groups: one group contains the Toll-Interleukin receptor (TIR) domain and two different Non-TIR groups in which most of proteins contain the Coiled Coil (CC) domain. Motif analysis confirmed that the two groups of CC-containing NBS genes are from different evolutionary origins. We partitioned NBS genes into clades using NBS domain sequence distances and found most clades include NBS genes from all three Citrus genomes. This suggests that three Citrus genomes have similar numbers and types of NBS genes. We also mapped the re-sequenced reads of three pomelo and three mandarin genomes onto the C. sinensis genome. We found that most NBS genes of the hybrid C. sinensis genome have corresponding homologous genes in both pomelo and mandarin genomes. The homologous NBS genes in pomelo and mandarin suggest that the parental species of C. sinensis may contain similar types of NBS genes. This explains why the hybrid C. sinensis and original C. clementina have similar types of NBS genes in this study. Furthermore, we found that sequence variation amongst Citrus NBS genes were shaped by multiple independent and shared accelerated mutation accumulation events among different groups of NBS genes and in different Citrus genomes. Our comparative analyses yield valuable insight into the structure, organization and evolution of NBS genes in Citrus genomes. Furthermore, our comprehensive analysis showed that the non-TIR NBS genes can be divided into two groups that come from different evolutionary origins. This provides new insights into non-TIR genes, which have not received much attention.

  10. Comparison of cost, dosage and clinical preference for risperidone and olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, J; Lichtenberg, P; Kaplan, Z

    2000-12-15

    Because risperidone and olanzapine have similar efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of schizophrenia, costs, physician experience, and preference become relevant considerations in making treatment decisions. The purpose of this paper is to compare daily treatment costs of risperidone and olanzapine, and to examine psychiatrists' clinical preferences. Dosage information was obtained from a national Ministry of Health registry and a national survey of psychiatrists. In addition, psychiatrists' clinical preference of antipsychotic medication and dosage for patient subtypes were examined by the national survey. Data from the registry and national survey estimated the mean daily dose of risperidone to be one-third that of olanzapine, irrespective of patient subtype. Taking into account drug costs and dosage requirements, the average daily retail price was US $6.85 for risperidone and US $13.60 for olanzapine. Psychiatrists preferred risperidone for first-episode psychosis and elderly psychosis, and olanzapine for patients sensitive to EPS. They rated the drugs equally effective on positive and negative symptoms, for chronic patients, for treatment-refractory patients and relapse prevention. Risperidone has a substantial cost advantage over olanzapine, and was preferred by psychiatrists for more indications.

  11. Effective Parenting Interventions to Reduce Youth Substance Use: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Huidobro, Diego; Porta, Carolyn; Curran, Dorothy; Patel, Roma; Miller, Jonathan; Borowsky, Iris

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Parenting interventions may prevent adolescent substance use; however, questions remain regarding the effectiveness of interventions across substances and delivery qualities contributing to successful intervention outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To describe the effectiveness of parent-focused interventions in reducing or preventing adolescent tobacco, alcohol, and illicit substance use and to identify optimal intervention targeted participants, dosage, settings, and delivery methods. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, and CINAHL. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials reporting adolescent substance use outcomes, focusing on imparting parenting knowledge, skills, practices, or behaviors. DATA EXTRACTION: Trained researchers extracted data from each article using a standardized, prepiloted form. Because of study heterogeneity, a qualitative technique known as harvest plots was used to summarize findings. RESULTS: A total of 42 studies represented by 66 articles met inclusion criteria. Results indicate that parenting interventions are effective at preventing and decreasing adolescent tobacco, alcohol, and illicit substance use over the short and long term. The majority of effective interventions required ≤12 contact hours and were implemented through in-person sessions including parents and youth. Evidence for computer-based delivery was strong only for alcohol use prevention. Few interventions were delivered outside of school or home settings. LIMITATIONS: Overall risk of bias is high. CONCLUSIONS: This review suggests that relatively low-intensity group parenting interventions are effective at reducing or preventing adolescent substance use and that protection may persist for multiple years. There is a need for additional evidence in clinical and other community settings using an expanded set of delivery methods. PMID:27443357

  12. The battle of the sexes over seed size: support for both kinship genomic imprinting and interlocus contest evolution.

    PubMed

    Willi, Yvonne

    2013-06-01

    Outcrossing creates a venue for parental conflict. When one sex provides parental care to offspring fertilized by several partners, the nonproviding sex is under selection to maximally exploit the caring sex. The caring sex may counteradapt, and a coevolutionary arms race ensues. Genetic models of this conflict include the kinship theory of genomic imprinting (parent-of-origin-specific expression of maternal-care effectors) and interlocus conflict evolution (interaction between male selfish signals and female abatement). Predictions were tested by measuring the sizes of seeds produced by within-population crosses (diallel design) and between-population crosses in outcrossing and selfing populations of Arabidopsis lyrata. Within-population diallel crosses revealed substantial maternal variance in seed size in most populations. The comparison of between- and within-population crosses showed that seeds were larger when pollen came from another outcrossing population than when pollen came from a selfing or the same population, supporting interlocus contest evolution between male selfish genes and female recognition genes. Evidence for kinship genomic imprinting came from complementary trait means of seed size in reciprocal between-population crosses independent of whether populations were predominantly selfing or outcrossing. Hence, both kinship genomic imprinting and interlocus contest are supported in outcrossing Arabidopsis, whereas only kinship genomic imprinting is important in selfing populations.

  13. Rapid cycling genomic selection in a multiparental tropical maize population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomic selection (GS) increases genetic gain by reducing the length of the selection cycle, as has been exemplified in maize using rapid cycling recombination of biparental populations. However, no results of GS applied to maize multi-parental populations have been reported so far. This study is th...

  14. The complete genome sequence of a Neandertal from the Altai Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Prüfer, Kay; Racimo, Fernando; Patterson, Nick; Jay, Flora; Sankararaman, Sriram; Sawyer, Susanna; Heinze, Anja; Renaud, Gabriel; Sudmant, Peter H.; de Filippo, Cesare; Li, Heng; Mallick, Swapan; Dannemann, Michael; Fu, Qiaomei; Kircher, Martin; Kuhlwilm, Martin; Lachmann, Michael; Meyer, Matthias; Ongyerth, Matthias; Siebauer, Michael; Theunert, Christoph; Tandon, Arti; Moorjani, Priya; Pickrell, Joseph; Mullikin, James C.; Vohr, Samuel H.; Green, Richard E.; Hellmann, Ines; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Blanche, Hélène; Cann, Howard; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Shendure, Jay; Eichler, Evan E.; Lein, Ed S.; Bakken, Trygve E.; Golovanova, Liubov V.; Doronichev, Vladimir B.; Shunkov, Michael V.; Derevianko, Anatoli P.; Viola, Bence; Slatkin, Montgomery; Reich, David; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante

    2014-01-01

    We present a high-quality genome sequence of a Neandertal woman from Siberia. We show that her parents were related at the level of half siblings and that mating among close relatives was common among her recent ancestors. We also sequenced the genome of a Neandertal from the Caucasus to low coverage. An analysis of the relationships and population history of available archaic genomes and 25 present-day human genomes shows that several gene flow events occurred among Neandertals, Denisovans and early modern humans, possibly including gene flow into Denisovans from an unknown archaic group. Thus, interbreeding, albeit of low magnitude, occurred among many hominin groups in the Late Pleistocene. In addition, the high quality Neandertal genome allows us to establish a definitive list of substitutions that became fixed in modern humans after their separation from the ancestors of Neandertals and Denisovans. PMID:24352235

  15. Pricing of multiple dosage prescription medications: an analysis of the Ontario Drug Benefit Formulary.

    PubMed

    Lexchin, Joel

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigates the pricing strategy (perfect flat pricing, perfect monotonic pricing, intermediate) used for multiple dosage medications listed in the Ontario Drug Benefit Formulary. All multiple dosage solid medications containing a single active ingredient newly listed in the Ontario Drug Benefit Formulary between 1996 and 2005 were identified. The relationship between price and dosage was calculated using a previously developed method. Seventy-three multiple dosage medications were introduced. Where medications were equivalent to existing ones in most cases companies followed the pricing strategy used by therapeutically equivalent drugs already in the formulary. Where there were no equivalent products companies did not adopt any particular pricing strategy. There was no difference in the way that companies priced scored tablets versus unscored tablets and capsules or in the way that they priced drugs that had objective measurements of efficacy/effectiveness, for example blood pressure, versus those that did not have these measurements. When Monotonic pricing is used it leads to higher expenditures whereas flat pricing results in lower expenditures and offers more predictability in expenditures. Provincial governments should consider requiring flat pricing in return for formulary listing.

  16. Ease of opening of blistered solid dosage forms in a senior citizens target group.

    PubMed

    Braun-Münker, Myriam; Ecker, Felix

    2016-10-30

    Blisters differing in design and handling are established as packaging material for solid dosage forms. The ease of opening of blisters influences application and patient's compliance. In this study the influence of visibility and movability of solid dosage forms in blister packaging on both, easy opening and patient's satisfaction, were investigated by target group testing according to ONR CEN/TS 15945. For each testing 20 participants in the age of 65-80 years were recruited randomly. They opened the blisters on realistic terms without any auxiliary devices. Video documentation of the hands' movements was recorded to analyze the opening procedure. To show the influence of visibility of the dosage form in the blister, capsules size 1 were packed in transparent and opaque blisters. A moderate influence of the visibility on both, the ease of opening and patient satisfaction, was observed. A second study dealt with the movability of solid dosage forms in blisters. Therefore, three different sizes of tablets with similar shapes were packed in identical cavities. Limited movability was found as major criterion on effectiveness and effectivity of opening as well as on satisfaction with the opening procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 76 FR 63304 - Guidance for Industry on Incorporation of Physical-Chemical Identifiers Into Solid Oral Dosage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ...] Guidance for Industry on Incorporation of Physical-Chemical Identifiers Into Solid Oral Dosage Form Drug... entitled ``Incorporation of Physical-Chemical Identifiers Into Solid Oral Dosage Form Drug Products for Anticounterfeiting.'' This guidance provides recommendations on design considerations for incorporating physical...

  18. Parkin dosage mutations have greater pathogenicity in familial PD than simple sequence mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, N; Kissell, D K.; Pauciulo, M W.; Halter, C A.; Rudolph, A; Pfeiffer, R F.; Marder, K S.; Foroud, T; Nichols, W C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Mutations in both alleles of parkin have been shown to result in Parkinson disease (PD). However, it is unclear whether haploinsufficiency (presence of a mutation in only 1 of the 2 parkin alleles) increases the risk for PD. Methods: We performed comprehensive dosage and sequence analysis of all 12 exons of parkin in a sample of 520 independent patients with familial PD and 263 controls. We evaluated whether presence of a single parkin mutation, either a sequence (point mutation or small insertion/deletion) or dosage (whole exon deletion or duplication) mutation, was found at increased frequency in cases as compared with controls. We then compared the clinical characteristics of cases with 0, 1, or 2 parkin mutations. Results: We identified 55 independent patients with PD with at least 1 parkin mutation and 9 controls with a single sequence mutation. Cases and controls had a similar frequency of single sequence mutations (3.1% vs 3.4%, p = 0.83); however, the cases had a significantly higher rate of dosage mutations (2.6% vs 0%, p = 0.009). Cases with a single dosage mutation were more likely to have an earlier age at onset (50% with onset at ≤45 years) compared with those with no parkin mutations (10%, p = 0.00002); this was not true for cases with only a single sequence mutation (25% with onset at ≤45 years, p = 0.06). Conclusions: Parkin haploinsufficiency, specifically for a dosage mutation rather than a point mutation or small insertion/deletion, is a risk factor for familial PD and may be associated with earlier age at onset. GLOSSARY ADL = Activities of Daily Living; GDS = Geriatric Depression Scale; MLPA = multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification; MMSE = Mini-Mental State Examination; PD = Parkinson disease; UPDRS = Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale. PMID:19636047

  19. [The most effective dosage in the administration of PGF2-alpha for interruption of pregnancy during the 2d trimester].

    PubMed

    Herczeg, J; Szontágh, F

    1974-06-23

    Artificial interruption of pregnancy contains too many risks from the 12th week of pregnancy. The authors have been working at finding the most suitable and effective dosage of prostaglandin for the interruption of pregnancy during the 2nd trimester. The new dosage experimented was 25 mg of prostaglandin F2alpha, followed by another 25 mg 6 hours later. The clinical efficiency of this dosage was tested. This procedures was used in 45 cases. The efficiency of the method was compared to the efficiency of the previously used dosage, which was 25 mg of prostaglandin F2alpha, followed by 25 mg 24 hours later. The new dosage was evaluated 91% efficient, while the previous dosage was found to be 75% efficient. The side effects were rated as acceptable by the patients. There was no case of infection. Two undeniable advantages were found with this new dosage: the duration of the actual procedure is considerably reduced, and the method appears to be much safer. The authors conclude that this new procedure offers numerous clinical advantages.

  20. Practical issues of hyperspectral imaging analysis of solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Amigo, José Manuel

    2010-09-01

    Hyperspectral imaging techniques have widely demonstrated their usefulness in different areas of interest in pharmaceutical research during the last decade. In particular, middle infrared, near infrared, and Raman methods have gained special relevance. This rapid increase has been promoted by the capability of hyperspectral techniques to provide robust and reliable chemical and spatial information on the distribution of components in pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. Furthermore, the valuable combination of hyperspectral imaging devices with adequate data processing techniques offers the perfect landscape for developing new methods for scanning and analyzing surfaces. Nevertheless, the instrumentation and subsequent data analysis are not exempt from issues that must be thoughtfully considered. This paper describes and discusses the main advantages and drawbacks of the measurements and data analysis of hyperspectral imaging techniques in the development of solid dosage forms.

  1. [Detection of the introgression of genome elements of the Aegilops cylindrica host. into the Triticum aestivum L. genome by ISSR and SSR analysis].

    PubMed

    Galaev, A V; Babaiants, L T; Sivolap, Iu M

    2004-12-01

    To reveal sites of the donor genome in wheat crossed with Aegilops cylindrica, which acquired conferred resistance to fungal diseases, a comparative analysis of introgressive and parental forms was conducted. Two systems of PCR analysis, ISSR and SSR-PCR, were employed. Upon use of 7 ISSR primers in genotypes of 30 individual plants BC1 F9 belonging to lines 5/55-91 and 5/20-91, 19 ISSR loci were revealed and assigned to introgressive fragments of Aegilops cylindrica genome in Triticum aestivum. The 40 pairs of SSR primers allowed the detection of seven introgressive alleles; three of these alleles were located on common wheat chromosomes in the B genome, while four alleles, in the D genome. Based on data of microsatellite analysis, it was assumed that the telomeric region of the long arm of common wheat chromosome 6A also changed. ISSR and SSR methods were shown to be effective for detecting variability caused by introgression of foreign genetic material into the genome of common wheat.

  2. Evolution of Sex Chromosome Dosage Compensation in Animals: A Beautiful Theory, Undermined by Facts and Bedeviled by Details

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Luiqi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Many animals with genetic sex determination harbor heteromorphic sex chromosomes, where the heterogametic sex has half the gene dose of the homogametic sex. This imbalance, if reflected in the abundance of transcripts or proteins, has the potential to deleteriously disrupt interactions between X-linked and autosomal loci in the heterogametic sex. Classical theory predicts that molecular mechanisms will evolve to provide dosage compensation that recovers expression levels comparable to ancestral expression prior to sex chromosome divergence. Such dosage compensating mechanisms may also, secondarily, result in balanced sex-linked gene expression between males and females. However, numerous recent studies addressing sex chromosome dosage compensation (SCDC) in a diversity of animals have yielded a surprising array of patterns concerning dosage compensation in the heterogametic sex, as well as dosage balance between sexes. These results substantially contradict longstanding theory, catalyzing both novel perspectives and new approaches in dosage compensation research. In this review, we summarize the theory, analytical approaches, and recent results concerning evolutionary patterns of SCDC in animals. We also discuss methodological challenges and discrepancies encountered in this research, which often underlie conflicting results. Finally, we discuss what outstanding questions and opportunities exist for future research on SCDC. PMID:28961969

  3. Optimal Antibiotic Dosage for Chronic Kidney Disease Patient: A Pharmacological Manual for Oral Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Chidambaram, Ramasamy

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, (CKD) a gradual and inevitable deterioration in renal function, is the disease with the most associations in dentistry. Dosage adjustment is one amongst the vital elements to be familiar with during their oral care. CKD patients take extended duration to filter out medications, therefore dosage must always be tailored under the supervision of nephrologist. The relished benefits from antibiotic could transform as anti-microbial resistance on their abuse and nephrotoxic when contraindicated drugs are encouraged. New patented drug belonging to oxazoliodine group has driven the researchers to handle the emerging AMR. The present communication discusses the pharmacological factors influencing in prescribing the antibiotics for CKD patient from the dentist's point of view. The formulas destined for calculating the optimal dosage of antibiotics have been documented to aid oral physicians.

  4. Influence of Postprandial Intragastric Pressures on Drug Release from Gastroretentive Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Felix; Hoppe, Melanie; Koziolek, Mirko; Weitschies, Werner

    2018-05-29

    Despite extensive research in the field of gastroretentive dosage forms, this "holy grail" of oral drug delivery yet remained an unmet goal. Especially under fasting conditions, the reproducible retention of dosage forms in the stomach seems to be an impossible task. This is why such systems are often advised to be taken together with food. But also the postprandial motility can contribute significantly to the failure of gastroretentive dosage forms. To investigate the influence of postprandial pressure conditions on drug release from such systems, we used a novel in vitro dissolution tool, the dissolution stress test device. With the aid of this device, we simulated three different intragastric pressure profiles that may occur after postprandial intake. These transit scenarios were based on recently obtained, postprandial SmartPill® data. The tested systems, Glumetza® 1000 and Madopar® HBS 125, are marketed dosage forms that are based on different approaches to achieve proper gastric retention. All three transit scenarios revealed a highly pressure-sensitive drug release behavior, for both drugs. For Madopar® HBS 125, nearly complete drug release was observed even after early occurring pressures. Glumetza® 1000 seemed to be more resistant to these, most likely due to incomplete wetting of the system. On the contrary to these findings, data from standard dissolution tests using the paddle apparatus displayed controlled drug release for both systems for about 6 h. Based on these results, it can be doubted that established gastroretentive systems stay intact over a longer period of time, even under postprandial conditions.

  5. Characterization of hemizygous deletions in Citrus using array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization and microsynteny comparisons with the poplar genome

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Gabino; Naranjo, Miguel A; Iglesias, Domingo J; Ruiz-Rivero, Omar; Geraud, Marion; Usach, Antonio; Talón, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Background Many fruit-tree species, including relevant Citrus spp varieties exhibit a reproductive biology that impairs breeding and strongly constrains genetic improvements. In citrus, juvenility increases the generation time while sexual sterility, inbreeding depression and self-incompatibility prevent the production of homozygous cultivars. Genomic technology may provide citrus researchers with a new set of tools to address these various restrictions. In this work, we report a valuable genomics-based protocol for the structural analysis of deletion mutations on an heterozygous background. Results Two independent fast neutron mutants of self-incompatible clementine (Citrus clementina Hort. Ex Tan. cv. Clemenules) were the subject of the study. Both mutants, named 39B3 and 39E7, were expected to carry DNA deletions in hemizygous dosage. Array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH) using a Citrus cDNA microarray allowed the identification of underrepresented genes in these two mutants. Subsequent comparison of citrus deleted genes with annotated plant genomes, especially poplar, made possible to predict the presence of a large deletion in 39B3 of about 700 kb and at least two deletions of approximately 100 and 500 kb in 39E7. The deletion in 39B3 was further characterized by PCR on available Citrus BACs, which helped us to build a partial physical map of the deletion. Among the deleted genes, ClpC-like gene coding for a putative subunit of a multifunctional chloroplastic protease involved in the regulation of chlorophyll b synthesis was directly related to the mutated phenotype since the mutant showed a reduced chlorophyll a/b ratio in green tissues. Conclusion In this work, we report the use of array-CGH for the successful identification of genes included in a hemizygous deletion induced by fast neutron irradiation on Citrus clementina. The study of gene content and order into the 39B3 deletion also led to the unexpected conclusion that microsynteny

  6. Impact of release characteristics of sinomenine hydrochloride dosage forms on its pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Shi, Jie-Ming; Zhang, Tian-Hong; Gao, Kun; Mao, Jing-Jing; Li, Bing; Sun, Ying-Hua; He, Zhong-Gui

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of release behavior of sustained-release dosage forms of sinomenine hydrochloride (SM•HCl) on its pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs. METHODS: The in vitro release behavior of two SM•HCl dosage forms, including commercial 12-h sustained-release tablets and 24-h sustained-release pellets prepared in our laboratory, was examined. The two dosage forms were orally administrated to beagle dogs, and then the in vivo SM•HCl pharmacokinetics was investigated and compared. RESULTS: The optimal SM•HCl sustained-release formulation was achieved by mixing slow- and rapid-release pellets (9:1, w/w). The SM•HCl release profiles of the sustained-release pellets were scarcely influenced by the pH of the dissolution medium. Release from the 12-h sustained-release tablets was markedly quicker than that from the 24-h sustained-release pellets, the cumulative release up to 12-h was 99.9% vs 68.7%. From a pharmacokinetic standpoint, the 24-h SM•HCl sustained-release pellets had longer tmax and lower Cmax compared to the 12-h sustained-release tablets, the tmax being 2.67×0.52 h vs 9.83×0.98 h and the Cmax being 1 334.45±368.76 ng/mL vs 893.12±292.55 ng/mL, respectively. However, the AUC0-tn of two SM•HCl dosage forms was comparable and both preparations were statistically bioequivalent. Furthermore, the two preparations had good correlations between SM•HCl percentage absorption in vivo and the cumulative percentage release in vitro. CONCLUSION: The in vitro release properties of the dosage forms strongly affect their pharmacokinetic behavior in vivo. Therefore, managing the in vitro release behavior of dosage forms is a promising strategy for obtaining the optimal in vivo pharmacokinetic characteristics and safe therapeutic drug concentration-time curves. PMID:16052686

  7. Gentamicin tissue concentration in various avian species following recommended dosage therapy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bush, M.; Locke, D.; Neal, L.A.; Carpenter, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma and tissue drug concentrations were compared in eastern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus virginianus) and pigeons (Columba livia) given gentamicin by IM administration at the dosage of 10 mg/kg, and in greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) and hybrid rosybill ducks (Netta sp) given the same antibiotic at a dosage of 5 mg/kg. Quail and cranes had significantly higher liver concentrations of gentamicin at 6 hours after injection than did pigeons and ducks. Cranes had significantly higher plasma concentrations than did ducks at 6 hours after injection. Compared with plasma values, gentamicin concentrations were significantly higher in the liver of cranes at 12 hours after injection, and in the kidneys at 18 hours.

  8. Comparison of the live attenuated yellow fever vaccine 17D-204 strain to its virulent parental strain Asibi by deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B; Wood, Thomas G; Widen, Steven G; Ryman, Kate D; Barrett, Alan D T

    2014-02-01

    The first comparison of a live RNA viral vaccine strain to its wild-type parental strain by deep sequencing is presented using as a model the yellow fever virus (YFV) live vaccine strain 17D-204 and its wild-type parental strain, Asibi. The YFV 17D-204 vaccine genome was compared to that of the parental strain Asibi by massively parallel methods. Variability was compared on multiple scales of the viral genomes. A modeled exploration of small-frequency variants was performed to reconstruct plausible regions of mutational plasticity. Overt quasispecies diversity is a feature of the parental strain, whereas the live vaccine strain lacks diversity according to multiple independent measurements. A lack of attenuating mutations in the Asibi population relative to that of 17D-204 was observed, demonstrating that the vaccine strain was derived by discrete mutation of Asibi and not by selection of genomes in the wild-type population. Relative quasispecies structure is a plausible correlate of attenuation for live viral vaccines. Analyses such as these of attenuated viruses improve our understanding of the molecular basis of vaccine attenuation and provide critical information on the stability of live vaccines and the risk of reversion to virulence.

  9. Fibrous dosage forms by wet 3D-micro-patterning: process design, manufacture, and drug release rate.

    PubMed

    Blaesi, Aron H; Saka, Nannaji

    2018-06-19

    Recently, we have introduced fibrous dosage forms prepared by 3D-micro-patterning of drug-laden viscous melts. Such dosage forms enable predictable microstructures and increased drug release rates, and they can be manufactured continuously. However, melt processing is not applicable if the melting temperature of the formulation is greater than the degradation temperature of the drug or of the excipient. In this work, therefore, a continuous wet micro-patterning process that operates at ambient temperature is presented. The excipient is plasticized by a solvent and the patterned dosage form is solidified by air drying. Process models show that the micro-patterning time is the ratio of the fiber length in the dosage form and the velocity of the fiber stream. It was 1.3 minutes in the experiments, but can be reduced further. The drying time is limited by the diffusive flux of solvent through the fibers: it was about 3 minutes for the experimental conditions. Furthermore, models are developed to illustrate the effects of fiber radius, inter-fiber spacing, viscosity of the drug-excipient-solvent mixture, and drying conditions on the microstructure of the dosage form. Models and experimental results show that for a viscosity of the wet fibers of the order 10 3 Pa·s, both the patterned microstructure is well preserved and the crossed fibers are well bonded. Finally, the drug release rate by the dosage forms is experimentally determined and theoretically modeled. The results of the experiments validate the models fairly. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Delayed release film coating applications on oral solid dosage forms of proton pump inhibitors: case studies.

    PubMed

    Missaghi, Shahrzad; Young, Cara; Fegely, Kurt; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R

    2010-02-01

    Formulation of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) into oral solid dosage forms is challenging because the drug molecules are acid-labile. The aim of this study is to evaluate different formulation strategies (monolithic and multiparticulates) for three PPI drugs, that is, rabeprazole sodium, lansoprazole, and esomeprazole magnesium, using delayed release film coating applications. The core tablets of rabeprazole sodium were prepared using organic wet granulation method. Multiparticulates of lansoprazole and esomeprazole magnesium were prepared through drug layering of sugar spheres, using powder layering and suspension layering methods, respectively. Tablets and drug-layered multiparticulates were seal-coated, followed by delayed release film coating application, using Acryl-EZE(R), aqueous acrylic enteric system. Multiparticulates were then filled into capsules. The final dosage forms were evaluated for physical properties, as well as in vitro dissolution testing in both compendial acid phase, 0.1N HCl (pH 1.2), and intermediate pH, acetate buffer (pH 4.5), followed by phosphate buffer, pH 6.8. The stability of the delayed release dosage forms was evaluated upon storage in accelerated conditions [40 degrees C/75% relative humidity] for 3 months. All dosage forms demonstrated excellent enteric protection in the acid phase, followed by rapid release in their respective buffer media. Moreover, the delayed release dosage forms remained stable under accelerated stability conditions for 3 months. Results showed that Acryl-EZE enteric coating systems provide excellent performance in both media (0.1N HCl and acetate buffer pH 4.5) for monolithic and multiparticulate dosage forms.

  11. A Synergism between Adaptive Effects and Evolvability Drives Whole Genome Duplication to Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, Thomas D.; Hogeweg, Paulien

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome duplication has shaped eukaryotic evolutionary history and has been associated with drastic environmental change and species radiation. While the most common fate of WGD duplicates is a return to single copy, retained duplicates have been found enriched for highly interacting genes. This pattern has been explained by a neutral process of subfunctionalization and more recently, dosage balance selection. However, much about the relationship between environmental change, WGD and adaptation remains unknown. Here, we study the duplicate retention pattern postWGD, by letting virtual cells adapt to environmental changes. The virtual cells have structured genomes that encode a regulatory network and simple metabolism. Populations are under selection for homeostasis and evolve by point mutations, small indels and WGD. After populations had initially adapted fully to fluctuating resource conditions re-adaptation to a broad range of novel environments was studied by tracking mutations in the line of descent. WGD was established in a minority (≈30%) of lineages, yet, these were significantly more successful at re-adaptation. Unexpectedly, WGD lineages conserved more seemingly redundant genes, yet had higher per gene mutation rates. While WGD duplicates of all functional classes were significantly over-retained compared to a model of neutral losses, duplicate retention was clearly biased towards highly connected TFs. Importantly, no subfunctionalization occurred in conserved pairs, strongly suggesting that dosage balance shaped retention. Meanwhile, singles diverged significantly. WGD, therefore, is a powerful mechanism to cope with environmental change, allowing conservation of a core machinery, while adapting the peripheral network to accommodate change. PMID:24743268

  12. A synergism between adaptive effects and evolvability drives whole genome duplication to fixation.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Thomas D; Hogeweg, Paulien

    2014-04-01

    Whole genome duplication has shaped eukaryotic evolutionary history and has been associated with drastic environmental change and species radiation. While the most common fate of WGD duplicates is a return to single copy, retained duplicates have been found enriched for highly interacting genes. This pattern has been explained by a neutral process of subfunctionalization and more recently, dosage balance selection. However, much about the relationship between environmental change, WGD and adaptation remains unknown. Here, we study the duplicate retention pattern postWGD, by letting virtual cells adapt to environmental changes. The virtual cells have structured genomes that encode a regulatory network and simple metabolism. Populations are under selection for homeostasis and evolve by point mutations, small indels and WGD. After populations had initially adapted fully to fluctuating resource conditions re-adaptation to a broad range of novel environments was studied by tracking mutations in the line of descent. WGD was established in a minority (≈30%) of lineages, yet, these were significantly more successful at re-adaptation. Unexpectedly, WGD lineages conserved more seemingly redundant genes, yet had higher per gene mutation rates. While WGD duplicates of all functional classes were significantly over-retained compared to a model of neutral losses, duplicate retention was clearly biased towards highly connected TFs. Importantly, no subfunctionalization occurred in conserved pairs, strongly suggesting that dosage balance shaped retention. Meanwhile, singles diverged significantly. WGD, therefore, is a powerful mechanism to cope with environmental change, allowing conservation of a core machinery, while adapting the peripheral network to accommodate change.

  13. A Genome-Wide Survey of Genetic Instability by Transposition in Drosophila Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Doris; Fontdevila, Antonio; Vieira, Cristina; García Guerreiro, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization between species is a genomic instability factor involved in increasing mutation rate and new chromosomal rearrangements. Evidence of a relationship between interspecific hybridization and transposable element mobilization has been reported in different organisms, but most studies are usually performed with particular TEs and do not discuss the real effect of hybridization on the whole genome. We have therefore studied whole genome instability of Drosophila interspecific hybrids, looking for the presence of new AFLP markers in hybrids. A high percentage (27–90%) of the instability markers detected corresponds to TEs belonging to classes I and II. Moreover, three transposable elements (Osvaldo, Helena and Galileo) representative of different families, showed an overall increase of transposition rate in hybrids compared to parental species. This research confirms the hypothesis that hybridization induces genomic instability by transposition bursts and suggests that genomic stress by transposition could contribute to a relaxation of mechanisms controlling TEs in the Drosophila genome. PMID:24586475

  14. Dropwise additive manufacturing of pharmaceutical products for solvent-based dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Hirshfield, Laura; Giridhar, Arun; Taylor, Lynne S; Harris, Michael T; Reklaitis, Gintaras V

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, the US Food and Drug Administration has encouraged pharmaceutical companies to develop more innovative and efficient manufacturing methods with improved online monitoring and control. Mini-manufacturing of medicine is one such method enabling the creation of individualized product forms for each patient. This work presents dropwise additive manufacturing of pharmaceutical products (DAMPP), an automated, controlled mini-manufacturing method that deposits active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) directly onto edible substrates using drop-on-demand (DoD) inkjet printing technology. The use of DoD technology allows for precise control over the material properties, drug solid state form, drop size, and drop dynamics and can be beneficial in the creation of high-potency drug forms, combination drugs with multiple APIs or individualized medicine products tailored to a specific patient. In this work, DAMPP was used to create dosage forms from solvent-based formulations consisting of API, polymer, and solvent carrier. The forms were then analyzed to determine the reproducibility of creating an on-target dosage form, the morphology of the API of the final form and the dissolution behavior of the drug over time. DAMPP is found to be a viable alternative to traditional mass-manufacturing methods for solvent-based oral dosage forms. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  15. The genome sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the role of genome evolution in cold adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michele A; Lauro, Federico M; Williams, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five-tiered evidence rating (ER) system that ranked annotations from ER1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea, which aremore » subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino-acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall, membrane, envelope biogenesis COG genes are overrepresented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are overrepresented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two overrepresented COG categories appear to have been acquired from - and -Proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they have an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have occurred over the last several thousand years

  16. Beyond Genomic Prediction: Combining Different Types of omics Data Can Improve Prediction of Hybrid Performance in Maize.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Tobias A; Westhues, Matthias; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Seifert, Felix; Thiemann, Alexander; Scholten, Stefan; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2018-04-01

    The ability to predict the agronomic performance of single-crosses with high precision is essential for selecting superior candidates for hybrid breeding. With recent technological advances, thousands of new parent lines, and, consequently, millions of new hybrid combinations are possible in each breeding cycle, yet only a few hundred can be produced and phenotyped in multi-environment yield trials. Well established prediction approaches such as best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) using pedigree data and whole-genome prediction using genomic data are limited in capturing epistasis and interactions occurring within and among downstream biological strata such as transcriptome and metabolome. Because mRNA and small RNA (sRNA) sequences are involved in transcriptional, translational and post-translational processes, we expect them to provide information influencing several biological strata. However, using sRNA data of parent lines to predict hybrid performance has not yet been addressed. Here, we gathered genomic, transcriptomic (mRNA and sRNA) and metabolomic data of parent lines to evaluate the ability of the data to predict the performance of untested hybrids for important agronomic traits in grain maize. We found a considerable interaction for predictive ability between predictor and trait, with mRNA data being a superior predictor for grain yield and genomic data for grain dry matter content, while sRNA performed relatively poorly for both traits. Combining mRNA and genomic data as predictors resulted in high predictive abilities across both traits and combining other predictors improved prediction over that of the individual predictors alone. We conclude that downstream "omics" can complement genomics for hybrid prediction, and, thereby, contribute to more efficient selection of hybrid candidates. Copyright © 2018 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Translating dosages from animal models to human clinical trials--revisiting body surface area scaling.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Otis L; Smoliga, James M

    2015-05-01

    Body surface area (BSA) scaling has been used for prescribing individualized dosages of various drugs and has also been recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as one method for using data from animal model species to establish safe starting dosages for first-in-human clinical trials. Although BSA conversion equations have been used in certain clinical applications for decades, recent recommendations to use BSA to derive interspecies equivalents for therapeutic dosages of drug and natural products are inappropriate. A thorough review of the literature reveals that BSA conversions are based on antiquated science and have little justification in current translational medicine compared to more advanced allometric and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. Misunderstood and misinterpreted use of BSA conversions may have disastrous consequences, including underdosing leading to abandonment of potentially efficacious investigational drugs, and unexpected deadly adverse events. We aim to demonstrate that recent recommendations for BSA are not appropriate for animal-to-human dosage conversions and use pharmacokinetic data from resveratrol studies to demonstrate how confusion between the "human equivalent dose" and "pharmacologically active dose" can lead to inappropriate dose recommendations. To optimize drug development, future recommendations for interspecies scaling must be scientifically justified using physiologic, pharmacokinetic, and toxicology data rather than simple BSA conversion. © FASEB.

  18. Is Whole-Exome Sequencing an Ethically Disruptive Technology? Perspectives of Pediatric Oncologists and Parents of Pediatric Patients With Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Laurence B; Slashinski, Melody J; McGuire, Amy L; Street, Richard L; Eng, Christine M; Gibbs, Richard A; Parsons, D William; Plon, Sharon E

    2016-03-01

    It has been anticipated that physician and parents will be ill prepared or unprepared for the clinical introduction of genome sequencing, making it ethically disruptive. As a part of the Baylor Advancing Sequencing in Childhood Cancer Care study, we conducted semistructured interviews with 16 pediatric oncologists and 40 parents of pediatric patients with cancer prior to the return of sequencing results. We elicited expectations and attitudes concerning the impact of sequencing on clinical decision making, clinical utility, and treatment expectations from both groups. Using accepted methods of qualitative research to analyze interview transcripts, we completed a thematic analysis to provide inductive insights into their views of sequencing. Our major findings reveal that neither pediatric oncologists nor parents anticipate sequencing to be an ethically disruptive technology, because they expect to be prepared to integrate sequencing results into their existing approaches to learning and using new clinical information for care. Pediatric oncologists do not expect sequencing results to be more complex than other diagnostic information and plan simply to incorporate these data into their evidence-based approach to clinical practice, although they were concerned about impact on parents. For parents, there is an urgency to protect their child's health and in this context they expect genomic information to better prepare them to participate in decisions about their child's care. Our data do not support the concern that introducing genome sequencing into childhood cancer care will be ethically disruptive, that is, leave physicians or parents ill prepared or unprepared to make responsible decisions about patient care. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Is Whole Exome Sequencing an Ethically Disruptive Technology? Perspectives of Pediatric Oncologists and Parents of Pediatric Patients with Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Laurence B.; Slashinski, Melody J.; McGuire, Amy L.; Street, Richard L.; Eng, Christine M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Parsons, D. Williams; Plon, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Some anticipate that physician and parents will be ill-prepared or unprepared for the clinical introduction of genome sequencing, making it ethically disruptive. Procedure As part of the Baylor Advancing Sequencing in Childhood Cancer Care (BASIC3) study, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 16 pediatric oncologists and 40 parents of pediatric patients with cancer prior to the return of sequencing results. We elicited expectations and attitudes concerning the impact of sequencing on clinical decision-making, clinical utility, and treatment expectations from both groups. Using accepted methods of qualitative research to analyze interview transcripts, we completed a thematic analysis to provide inductive insights into their views of sequencing. Results Our major findings reveal that neither pediatric oncologists nor parents anticipate sequencing to be an ethically disruptive technology, because they expect to be prepared to integrate sequencing results into their existing approaches to learning and using new clinical information for care. Pediatric oncologists do not expect sequencing results to be more complex than other diagnostic information and plan simply to incorporate these data into their evidence-based approach to clinical practice although they were concerned about impact on parents. For parents, there is an urgency to protect their chil's health and in this context they expect genomic information to better prepare them to participate in decisions about their chil's care. Conclusion Our data do not support concern that introducing genome sequencing into childhood cancer care will be ethically disruptive, i.e., leave physicians or parents ill-prepared or unprepared to make responsible decisions about patient care. PMID:26505993

  20. A linkage map for the B-genome of Arachis (Fabaceae) and its synteny to the A-genome

    PubMed Central

    Moretzsohn, Márcio C; Barbosa, Andrea VG; Alves-Freitas, Dione MT; Teixeira, Cristiane; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya CM; Guimarães, Patrícia M; Pereira, Rinaldo W; Lopes, Catalina R; Cavallari, Marcelo M; Valls, José FM; Bertioli, David J; Gimenes, Marcos A

    2009-01-01

    Background Arachis hypogaea (peanut) is an important crop worldwide, being mostly used for edible oil production, direct consumption and animal feed. Cultivated peanut is an allotetraploid species with two different genome components, A and B. Genetic linkage maps can greatly assist molecular breeding and genomic studies. However, the development of linkage maps for A. hypogaea is difficult because it has very low levels of polymorphism. This can be overcome by the utilization of wild species of Arachis, which present the A- and B-genomes in the diploid state, and show high levels of genetic variability. Results In this work, we constructed a B-genome linkage map, which will complement the previously published map for the A-genome of Arachis, and produced an entire framework for the tetraploid genome. This map is based on an F2 population of 93 individuals obtained from the cross between the diploid A. ipaënsis (K30076) and the closely related A. magna (K30097), the former species being the most probable B genome donor to cultivated peanut. In spite of being classified as different species, the parents showed high crossability and relatively low polymorphism (22.3%), compared to other interspecific crosses. The map has 10 linkage groups, with 149 loci spanning a total map distance of 1,294 cM. The microsatellite markers utilized, developed for other Arachis species, showed high transferability (81.7%). Segregation distortion was 21.5%. This B-genome map was compared to the A-genome map using 51 common markers, revealing a high degree of synteny between both genomes. Conclusion The development of genetic maps for Arachis diploid wild species with A- and B-genomes effectively provides a genetic map for the tetraploid cultivated peanut in two separate diploid components and is a significant advance towards the construction of a transferable reference map for Arachis. Additionally, we were able to identify affinities of some Arachis linkage groups with Medicago

  1. The effect of decreasing computed tomography dosage on radiostereometric analysis (RSA) accuracy at the glenohumeral joint.

    PubMed

    Fox, Anne-Marie V; Kedgley, Angela E; Lalone, Emily A; Johnson, James A; Athwal, George S; Jenkyn, Thomas R

    2011-11-10

    Standard, beaded radiostereometric analysis (RSA) and markerless RSA often use computed tomography (CT) scans to create three-dimensional (3D) bone models. However, ethical concerns exist due to risks associated with CT radiation exposure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of decreasing CT dosage on RSA accuracy. Four cadaveric shoulder specimens were scanned using a normal-dose CT protocol and two low-dose protocols, where the dosage was decreased by 89% and 98%. 3D computer models of the humerus and scapula were created using each CT protocol. Bi-planar fluoroscopy was used to image five different static glenohumeral positions and two dynamic glenohumeral movements, of which a total of five static and four dynamic poses were selected for analysis. For standard RSA, negligible differences were found in bead (0.21±0.31mm) and bony landmark (2.31±1.90mm) locations when the CT dosage was decreased by 98% (p-values>0.167). For markerless RSA kinematic results, excellent agreement was found between the normal-dose and lowest-dose protocol, with all Spearman rank correlation coefficients greater than 0.95. Average root mean squared errors of 1.04±0.68mm and 2.42±0.81° were also found at this reduced dosage for static positions. In summary, CT dosage can be markedly reduced when performing shoulder RSA to minimize the risks of radiation exposure. Standard RSA accuracy was negligibly affected by the 98% CT dose reduction and for markerless RSA, the benefits of decreasing CT dosage to the subject outweigh the introduced errors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genomic analysis reveals major determinants of cis-regulatory variation in Capsella grandiflora

    PubMed Central

    Steige, Kim A.; Laenen, Benjamin; Reimegård, Johan; Slotte, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the causes of cis-regulatory variation is a long-standing aim in evolutionary biology. Although cis-regulatory variation has long been considered important for adaptation, we still have a limited understanding of the selective importance and genomic determinants of standing cis-regulatory variation. To address these questions, we studied the prevalence, genomic determinants, and selective forces shaping cis-regulatory variation in the outcrossing plant Capsella grandiflora. We first identified a set of 1,010 genes with common cis-regulatory variation using analyses of allele-specific expression (ASE). Population genomic analyses of whole-genome sequences from 32 individuals showed that genes with common cis-regulatory variation (i) are under weaker purifying selection and (ii) undergo less frequent positive selection than other genes. We further identified genomic determinants of cis-regulatory variation. Gene body methylation (gbM) was a major factor constraining cis-regulatory variation, whereas presence of nearby transposable elements (TEs) and tissue specificity of expression increased the odds of ASE. Our results suggest that most common cis-regulatory variation in C. grandiflora is under weak purifying selection, and that gene-specific functional constraints are more important for the maintenance of cis-regulatory variation than genome-scale variation in the intensity of selection. Our results agree with previous findings that suggest TE silencing affects nearby gene expression, and provide evidence for a link between gbM and cis-regulatory constraint, possibly reflecting greater dosage sensitivity of body-methylated genes. Given the extensive conservation of gbM in flowering plants, this suggests that gbM could be an important predictor of cis-regulatory variation in a wide range of plant species. PMID:28096395

  3. Linkage maps of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) genome derived from RAD sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic linkage maps are useful tools for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing variation in traits of interest in a population. Genotyping-by-sequencing approaches such as Restriction-site Associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) now enable the rapid discovery and genotyping of genome-wide SNP markers suitable for the development of dense SNP linkage maps, including in non-model organisms such as Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). This paper describes the development and characterisation of a high density SNP linkage map based on SbfI RAD-Seq SNP markers from two Atlantic salmon reference families. Results Approximately 6,000 SNPs were assigned to 29 linkage groups, utilising markers from known genomic locations as anchors. Linkage maps were then constructed for the four mapping parents separately. Overall map lengths were comparable between male and female parents, but the distribution of the SNPs showed sex-specific patterns with a greater degree of clustering of sire-segregating SNPs to single chromosome regions. The maps were integrated with the Atlantic salmon draft reference genome contigs, allowing the unique assignment of ~4,000 contigs to a linkage group. 112 genome contigs mapped to two or more linkage groups, highlighting regions of putative homeology within the salmon genome. A comparative genomics analysis with the stickleback reference genome identified putative genes closely linked to approximately half of the ordered SNPs and demonstrated blocks of orthology between the Atlantic salmon and stickleback genomes. A subset of 47 RAD-Seq SNPs were successfully validated using a high-throughput genotyping assay, with a correspondence of 97% between the two assays. Conclusions This Atlantic salmon RAD-Seq linkage map is a resource for salmonid genomics research as genotyping-by-sequencing becomes increasingly common. This is aided by the integration of the SbfI RAD-Seq SNPs with existing reference maps and the draft reference genome, as well

  4. Individual and combined effects of dosages of azoxystrobin and epoxiconazole in wheat.

    PubMed

    Moreau, M; Bodson, B; Maraite, H; Vancutsem, F

    2005-01-01

    The effects of single fungicide applications on Mycosphaerella graminicola (septoria leaf blotch) control and winter wheat yield were evaluated in field trials conducted in central Belgium between 2000 and 2004. Individual applications of 25, 50, 75 and 100% of the manufacturer's recommended dose rates of azoxystrobin and epoxiconazole, and all the combinations of these treatments, were made at GS 39 in 2001 to 2004 and at GS 59 in 2000. Disease assessments were made at growth stage 75, some 7-8 weeks after the last applications. Between 2000 and 2003, no significant difference was observed for disease control between the products when applied alone. With regard to the dose responses, the differences between the recommended dose rates and the 50% reduced dosages were not important. In 2004, azoxystrobin was less effective than epoxiconazole. This was probably the result of strobilurin-resistant isolates of M. graminicola reaching an occurrence of 32% before fungicide application. The combination of different dosages of azoxystrobin and epoxiconazole revealed that there was very little synergy between these products when applied in a single application. The combinations of these products were better than individual applications only when high dosages of both compounds were used.

  5. Conserved Patterns of Sex Chromosome Dosage Compensation in the Lepidoptera (WZ/ZZ): Insights from a Moth Neo-Z Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Walters, James R.; Knipple, Douglas C.

    2017-01-01

    Where previously described, patterns of sex chromosome dosage compensation in the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) have several unusual characteristics. Other female-heterogametic (ZW/ZZ) species exhibit female Z-linked expression that is reduced compared with autosomal expression and male Z expression. In the Lepidoptera, however, Z expression typically appears balanced between sexes but overall reduced relative to autosomal expression, that is Z ≈ ZZ < AA. This pattern is not easily reconciled with theoretical expectations for the evolution of sex chromosome dosage compensation. Moreover, conflicting results linger due to discrepancies in data analyses and tissues sampled among lepidopterans. To address these issues, we performed RNA-seq to analyze sex chromosome dosage compensation in the codling moth, Cydia pomonella, which is a species from the earliest diverging lepidopteran lineage yet examined for dosage compensation and has a neo-Z chromosome resulting from an ancient Z:autosome fusion. While supported by intraspecific analyses, the Z ≈ ZZ < AA pattern was further evidenced by comparative study using autosomal orthologs of C. pomonella neo-Z genes in outgroup species. In contrast, dosage compensation appears to be absent in reproductive tissues. We thus argue that inclusion of reproductive tissues may explain the incongruence from a prior study on another moth species and that patterns of dosage compensation are likely conserved in the Lepidoptera. Notably, this pattern appears convergent with patterns in eutherian mammals (X ≈ XX < AA). Overall, our results contribute to the notion that the Lepidoptera present challenges both to classical theories regarding the evolution of sex chromosome dosage compensation and the emerging view of the association of dosage compensation with sexual heterogamety. PMID:28338816

  6. Analysis of molecular interactions in solid dosage forms; challenge to molecular pharmaceutics.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Keiji; Limwikrant, Waree; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2011-01-01

    The molecular states of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in pharmaceutical dosage forms strongly affect the properties and quality of a drug. Various important fundamental physicochemical studies were reviewed from the standpoint of molecular pharmaceutics. Mechanochemical effects were evaluated in mixtures of APIs and pharmaceutical additives. Amorphization, complex formation and nanoparticle formation are observed after grinding process depending on the combination of APIs and pharmaceutical additives. Sealed-heating method and mesoporous materials have been used to investigate drug molecular interactions in dosage forms. Molecular states have been investigated using powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, IR, solid state fluorometry, and NMR. © 2011 Pharmaceutical Society of Japan

  7. Switch between life history strategies due to changes in glycolytic enzyme gene dosage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoxiao; Spor, Aymé; Nidelet, Thibault; Montalent, Pierre; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Sicard, Delphine

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation is the process whereby a population or species becomes better fitted to its habitat through modifications of various life history traits which can be positively or negatively correlated. The molecular factors underlying these covariations remain to be elucidated. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we have investigated the effects on life history traits of varying the dosage of genes involved in the transformation of resources into energy. Changing gene dosage for each of three glycolytic enzyme genes (hexokinase 2, phosphoglucose isomerase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase) resulted in variation in enzyme activities, glucose consumption rate, and life history traits (growth rate, carrying capacity, and cell size). However, the range of effects depended on which enzyme was expressed differently. Most interestingly, these changes revealed a genetic trade-off between carrying capacity and cell size, supporting the discovery of two extreme life history strategies already described in yeast populations: the "ants," which have lower glycolytic gene dosage, take up glucose slowly, and have a small cell size but reach a high carrying capacity, and the "grasshoppers," which have higher glycolytic gene dosage, consume glucose more rapidly, and allocate it to a larger cell size but reach a lower carrying capacity. These results demonstrate antagonist pleiotropy for glycolytic genes and show that altered dosage of a single gene drives a switch between two life history strategies in yeast.

  8. Large Dosage of Chishao in Formulae for Cholestatic Hepatitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao; Wang, Ji; He, Xuan; Zhao, Yanling; Wang, Jiabo; Zhang, Ping; Zhu, Yun; Zhong, Lin; Zheng, Quanfu; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of large dosage of Chishao in formulae for treatment of cholestatic hepatitis. Methods. The major databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedical Database Wanfang, VIP medicine information system, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure) were searched until January 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of large dosage of Chishao in formulae that reported on publications in treatment of cholestatic hepatitis with total efficacy rate, together with the biochemical indices including alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin (TBIL), and direct bilirubin (DBIL), were extracted by two reviewers. The Cochrane tool was used for the assessment of risk of bias included trials. Data were analyzed with RevMan 5.2.7 software. Results. 11 RCTs involving 1275 subjects with cholestatic hepatitis were included. Compared with essential therapy, large dosage of Chishao in formulae demonstrated more efficiently with down regulation of serum ALT, AST, TBIL, DBIL. Meanwhile, there were no obvious adverse events. Conclusion. As a promising novel treatment approach, widely using large dosage of Chishao in formulae may enhance the curative efficacy for cholestatic hepatitis. Considering being accepted by more and more practitioners, further rigorously designed clinical studies are required. PMID:24987427

  9. Determination of methadone hydrochloride in a maintenance dosage formulation.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, T J; Thompson, R D

    1975-07-01

    A colorimetric method for direct quantitative assay of methadone hydrochloride in liquid oral dosage forms is presented. The procedure involves the formation of a dye complex with bromothymol blue buffer solution. The resultant complex is extracted with benzene and measured spectrophotometrically. Duplicate tests on the formulation showed 99.2% of the labeled amount of methadone.

  10. Development of Oromucosal Dosage Forms by Combining Electrospinning and Inkjet Printing.

    PubMed

    Palo, Mirja; Kogermann, Karin; Laidmäe, Ivo; Meos, Andres; Preis, Maren; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Sandler, Niklas

    2017-03-06

    Printing technology has been shown to enable flexible fabrication of solid dosage forms for personalized drug therapy. Several methods can be applied for tailoring the properties of the printed pharmaceuticals. In this study, the use of electrospun fibrous substrates in the fabrication of inkjet-printed dosage forms was investigated. A single-drug formulation with lidocaine hydrochloride (LH) and a combination drug system containing LH and piroxicam (PRX) for oromucosal administration were prepared. The LH was deposited on the electrospun and cross-linked gelatin substrates by inkjet printing, whereas PRX was incorporated within the substrate fibers during electrospinning. The solid state analysis of the electrospun substrates showed that PRX was in an amorphous state within the fibers. Furthermore, the results indicated the entrapment and solidification of the dissolved LH within the fibrous gelatin matrix. The printed drug amount (2-3 mg) was in good correlation with the theoretical dose calculated based on the printing parameters. However, a noticeable degradation of the printed LH was detected after a few months. An immediate release (over 85% drug release after 8 min) of both drugs from the printed dosage forms was observed. In conclusion, the prepared electrospun gelatin scaffolds were shown to be suitable substrates for inkjet printing of oromucosal formulations. The combination of electrospinning and inkjet printing allowed the preparation of a dual drug system.

  11. Blue light dosage affects carotenoids and tocopherols in microgreens.

    PubMed

    Samuolienė, Giedrė; Viršilė, Akvilė; Brazaitytė, Aušra; Jankauskienė, Julė; Sakalauskienė, Sandra; Vaštakaitė, Viktorija; Novičkovas, Algirdas; Viškelienė, Alina; Sasnauskas, Audrius; Duchovskis, Pavelas

    2017-08-01

    Mustard, beet and parsley were grown to harvest time under selected LEDs: 638+660+731+0% 445nm; 638+660+731+8% 445nm; 638+660+731+16% 445nm; 638+660+731+25% 445nm; 638+660+731+33% 445nm. From 1.2 to 4.3 times higher concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, carotenoids, α- and β-carotenes, lutein, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin was found under blue 33% treatment in comparison to lower blue light dosages. Meanwhile, the accumulation of metabolites, which were not directly connected with light reactions, such as tocopherols, was more influenced by lower (16%) blue light dosage, increasing about 1.3 times. Thus, microgreen enrichment of carotenoid and xanthophyll pigments may be achieved using higher (16-33%) blue light intensities. Changes in metabolite quantities were not the result of changes of other carotenoid concentration, but were more influenced by light treatment and depended on the species. Significant quantitative changes in response to blue light percentage were obtained for both directly and not directly light-dependent metabolite groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stability of pharmaceutical salts in solid oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Nie, Haichen; Byrn, Stephen R; Zhou, Qi Tony

    2017-08-01

    Using pharmaceutical salts in solid dosage forms can raise stability concerns, especially salt dissociation which can adversely affect the product performance. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the salt instability encountered in solid-state formulations is imperative to ensure the product quality. The present article uses the fundamental theory of acid base, ionic equilibrium, relationship of pH and solubility as a starting point to illustrate and interpret the salt formation and salt disproportionation in pharmaceutical systems. The criteria of selecting the optimal salt form and the underlying theory of salt formation and disproportionation are reviewed in detail. Factors influencing salt stability in solid dosage forms are scrutinized and discussed with the case studies. In addition, both commonly used and innovative strategies for preventing salt dissociations in formulation, on storage and during manufacturing will be suggested herein. This article will provide formulation scientists and manufacturing engineers an insight into the mechanisms of salt disproportionation and salt formation, which can help them to avoid and solve the instability issues of pharmaceutical salts in the product design.

  13. Impact of excipient interactions on solid dosage form stability.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Desai, Divyakant; Badawy, Sherif

    2012-10-01

    Drug-excipient interactions in solid dosage forms can affect drug product stability in physical aspects such as organoleptic changes and dissolution slowdown, or chemically by causing drug degradation. Recent research has allowed the distinction in chemical instability resulting from direct drug-excipient interactions and from drug interactions with excipient impurities. A review of chemical instability in solid dosage forms highlights common mechanistic themes applicable to multiple degradation pathways. These common themes include the role of water and microenvironmental pH. In addition, special aspects of solid-state reactions with excipients and/or excipient impurities add to the complexity in understanding and modeling reaction pathways. This paper discusses mechanistic basis of known drug-excipient interactions with case studies and provides an overview of common underlying themes. Recent developments in the understanding of degradation pathways further impact methodologies used in the pharmaceutical industry for prospective stability assessment. This paper discusses these emerging aspects in terms of limitations of drug-excipient compatibility studies, emerging paradigms in accelerated stability testing, and application of mathematical modeling for prediction of drug product stability.

  14. Simultaneous in vivo visualization and localization of solid oral dosage forms in the rat gastrointestinal tract by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Christmann, V; Rosenberg, J; Seega, J; Lehr, C M

    1997-08-01

    Bioavailability of orally administered drugs is much influenced by the behavior, performance and fate of the dosage form within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Therefore, MRI in vivo methods that allow for the simultaneous visualization of solid oral dosage forms and anatomical structures of the GI tract have been investigated. Oral contrast agents containing Gd-DTPA were used to depict the lumen of the digestive organs. Solid oral dosage forms were visualized in a rat model by a 1H-MRI double contrast technique (magnetite-labelled microtablets) and a combination of 1H- and 19F-MRI (fluorine-labelled minicapsules). Simultaneous visualization of solid oral dosage forms and the GI environment in the rat was possible using MRI. Microtablets could reproducibly be monitored in the rat stomach and in the intestines using a 1H-MRI double contrast technique. Fluorine-labelled minicapsules were detectable in the rat stomach by a combination of 1H- and 19F-MRI in vivo. The in vivo 1H-MRI double contrast technique described allows solid oral dosage forms in the rat GI tract to be depicted. Solid dosage forms can easily be labelled by incorporating trace amounts of non-toxic iron oxide (magnetite) particles. 1H-MRI is a promising tool for observing such pharmaceutical dosage forms in humans. Combined 1H- and 19F-MRI offer a means of unambiguously localizing solid oral dosage forms in more distal parts of the GI tract. Studies correlating MRI examinations with drug plasma levels could provide valuable information for the development of pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  15. Merging genomic and phenomic data for research and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Shublaq, Nour W; Coveney, Peter V

    2012-01-01

    Driven primarily by advances in genomics, pharmacogenomics and systems biology technologies, large amounts of genomic and phenomic data are today being collected on individuals worldwide. Integrative analysis, mining, and computer modeling of these data, facilitated by information technology, have led to the development of predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine. This transformative approach holds the potential inter alia to enable future general practitioners and physicians to prescribe the right drug to the right patient at the right dosage. For such patient-specific medicine to be adopted as standard clinical practice, publicly accumulated knowledge of genes, proteins, molecular functional annotations, and interactions need to be unified and with electronic health records including phenotypic information, most of which still reside as paper-based records in hospitals. We review the state-of-the-art in terms of electronic data capture and medical data standards. Some of these activities are drawn from research projects currently being performed within the European Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) initiative; all are being monitored by the VPH INBIOMEDvision Consortium. Various ethical, legal and societal issues linked with privacy will increasingly arise in the post-genomic era. This will require a closer interaction between the bioinformatics/systems biology and medical informatics/healthcare communities. Planning for how individuals will own their personal health records is urgently needed, as the cost of sequencing a whole human genome will soon be less than U.S. $100. We discuss some of the issues that will need to be addressed by society as a result of this revolution in healthcare.

  16. Sequencing and assembly of the 22-gb loblolly pine genome.

    PubMed

    Zimin, Aleksey; Stevens, Kristian A; Crepeau, Marc W; Holtz-Morris, Ann; Koriabine, Maxim; Marçais, Guillaume; Puiu, Daniela; Roberts, Michael; Wegrzyn, Jill L; de Jong, Pieter J; Neale, David B; Salzberg, Steven L; Yorke, James A; Langley, Charles H

    2014-03-01

    Conifers are the predominant gymnosperm. The size and complexity of their genomes has presented formidable technical challenges for whole-genome shotgun sequencing and assembly. We employed novel strategies that allowed us to determine the loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) reference genome sequence, the largest genome assembled to date. Most of the sequence data were derived from whole-genome shotgun sequencing of a single megagametophyte, the haploid tissue of a single pine seed. Although that constrained the quantity of available DNA, the resulting haploid sequence data were well-suited for assembly. The haploid sequence was augmented with multiple linking long-fragment mate pair libraries from the parental diploid DNA. For the longest fragments, we used novel fosmid DiTag libraries. Sequences from the linking libraries that did not match the megagametophyte were identified and removed. Assembly of the sequence data were aided by condensing the enormous number of paired-end reads into a much smaller set of longer "super-reads," rendering subsequent assembly with an overlap-based assembly algorithm computationally feasible. To further improve the contiguity and biological utility of the genome sequence, additional scaffolding methods utilizing independent genome and transcriptome assemblies were implemented. The combination of these strategies resulted in a draft genome sequence of 20.15 billion bases, with an N50 scaffold size of 66.9 kbp.

  17. Inversion of the Williams syndrome region is a common polymorphism found more frequently in parents of children with Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hobart, Holly H; Morris, Colleen A; Mervis, Carolyn B; Pani, Ariel M; Kistler, Doris J; Rios, Cecilia M; Kimberley, Kendra W; Gregg, Ronald G; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2010-05-15

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a multisystem disorder caused by deletion of about 1.55 Mb of DNA (including 26 genes) on chromosome 7q11.23, a region predisposed to recombination due to its genomic structure. Deletion of the Williams syndrome chromosome region (WSCR) occurs sporadically. To better define chance for familial recurrence and to investigate the prevalence of genomic rearrangements of the region, 257 children with WS and their parents were studied. We determined deletion size in probands by metaphase FISH, parent-of-origin of the deleted chromosome by molecular genetic methods, and inversion status of the WSCR in both parents by interphase FISH. The frequency of WSCR inversion in the transmitting parent group was 24.9%. In contrast, the rate of inversion in the non-transmitting parent group (a reasonable estimate of the rate in the general population) was 5.8%. There were no significant gender differences with respect to parent-of-origin for the deleted chromosome or the incidence of the inversion polymorphism. There was no difference in the rate of spontaneous abortion for mothers heterozygous for the WSCR inversion relative to mothers without the inversion. We calculate that for a parent heterozygous for a WSCR inversion, the chance to have a child with WS is about 1 in 1,750, in contrast to the 1 in 9,500 chance for a parent without an inversion.

  18. Dosage-Dependent Antifungal Efficacy of V-Echinocandin (LY303366) against Experimental Fluconazole-Resistant Oropharyngeal and Esophageal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Groll, Andreas H.; Sein, Tin; Schaufele, Robert L.; Lyman, Caron A.; Francesconi, Andrea; Bacher, John; Piscitelli, Stephen C.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    V-echinocandin (VER-002; LY303366) is a semisynthetic derivative of echinocandin B and a potent inhibitor of fungal (1, 3)-β-d-glucan synthase. We studied the antifungal efficacy, the concentrations in saliva and tissue, and the safety of VER-002 at escalating dosages against experimental oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis caused by fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans in immunocompromised rabbits. Study groups consisted of untreated controls, animals treated with VER-002 at 1, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg of body weight/day intravenously (i.v.), animals treated with fluconazole at 2 mg/kg/day i.v., or animals treated with amphotericin B at 0.3 mg/kg/day. VER-002-treated animals showed a significant dosage-dependent clearance of C. albicans from the tongue, oropharynx, esophagus, stomach, and duodenum in comparison to that for untreated controls. VER-002 also was superior to amphotericin B and fluconazole in clearing the organism from all sites studied. These in vivo findings are consistent with the results of in vitro time-kill assays, which demonstrated that VER-002 has concentration-dependent fungicidal activity. Esophageal tissue VER-002 concentrations were dosage proportional and exceeded the MIC at all dosages. Echinocandin concentrations in saliva were greater than or equal to the MICs at all dosages. There was no elevation of serum hepatic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, potassium, or creatinine levels in VER-002-treated rabbits. In summary, the echinocandin VER-002 was well tolerated, penetrated the esophagus and salivary glands, and demonstrated dosage-dependent antifungal activity against fluconazole-resistant esophageal candidiasis in immunocompromised rabbits. PMID:11158743

  19. Proposal of a pharmacokinetically optimized dosage regimen of antibiotics in patients receiving continuous hemodiafiltration.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takehito; Yasuno, Nobuhiro; Katada, Shoichi; Hisaka, Akihiro; Hanafusa, Norio; Noiri, Eisei; Yahagi, Naoki; Fujita, Toshiro; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the study was to quantitatively predict the clearance of three antibiotics, amikacin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin, during continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) and to propose their optimal dosage in patients receiving CHDF. For this goal, in vitro CHDF experiments with a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membrane were first performed using these antibiotics, and then the clearances were compared with in vivo CHDF situations determined in 16 critically ill patients. The in vitro CHDF clearances were described as the product of the outflow rate of a drain (Q(outflow)) and the drug unbound fraction in artificial plasma, indicating that drug adsorption to the PAN membrane has minor effect on drug clearance in our settings. The observed in vivo clearances also agreed very well with the predicted values, with a product of Q(outflow) and plasma unbound fraction, when residual creatinine clearance (CL(CR)) was taken into account (within a range of 0.67- to 1.5-fold for 15 of 16 patients). Based on these results, a nomogram of the optimized dosages of amikacin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin was proposed, and it was evident that Q(outflow) and residual CL(CR) are major determinants of the dosage and dosing interval for these antibiotics. Although the applicability needs to be confirmed with another type of membrane or higher Q(outflow), our nomogram can help determine the dosage setting in critically ill patients receiving CHDF.

  20. Epigenetics, Media Coverage, and Parent Responsibilities in the Post-Genomic Era

    PubMed Central

    Lappé, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Environmental epigenetics is the study of how exposures and experiences can turn genes “on” or “off” without changing DNA sequence. By examining the influence that environmental conditions including diet, stress, trauma, toxins, and care can have on gene expression, this science suggests molecular connections between the environment, genetics, and how acquired characteristics may be inherited across generations. The rapid expansion of research in this area has attracted growing media attention. This coverage has implications for how parents and prospective parents understand health and their perceived responsibilities for children’s wellbeing. This review provides insight into epigenetic research, its coverage in the media, and the social and ethical implications of this science for patients and clinicians. As epigenetic findings continue to elucidate the complex relationships between nature and nurture, it becomes critical to examine how representations of this science may influence patient experiences of risk and responsibility. This review describes some of the social and ethical implications of epigenetic research today. PMID:27867757

  1. Epigenetics, Media Coverage, and Parent Responsibilities in the Post-Genomic Era.

    PubMed

    Lappé, Martine

    2016-09-01

    Environmental epigenetics is the study of how exposures and experiences can turn genes "on" or "off" without changing DNA sequence. By examining the influence that environmental conditions including diet, stress, trauma, toxins, and care can have on gene expression, this science suggests molecular connections between the environment, genetics, and how acquired characteristics may be inherited across generations. The rapid expansion of research in this area has attracted growing media attention. This coverage has implications for how parents and prospective parents understand health and their perceived responsibilities for children's wellbeing. This review provides insight into epigenetic research, its coverage in the media, and the social and ethical implications of this science for patients and clinicians. As epigenetic findings continue to elucidate the complex relationships between nature and nurture, it becomes critical to examine how representations of this science may influence patient experiences of risk and responsibility. This review describes some of the social and ethical implications of epigenetic research today.

  2. Comparison of the Live Attenuated Yellow Fever Vaccine 17D-204 Strain to Its Virulent Parental Strain Asibi by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B.; Wood, Thomas G.; Widen, Steven G.; Ryman, Kate D.; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The first comparison of a live RNA viral vaccine strain to its wild-type parental strain by deep sequencing is presented using as a model the yellow fever virus (YFV) live vaccine strain 17D-204 and its wild-type parental strain, Asibi. Methods. The YFV 17D-204 vaccine genome was compared to that of the parental strain Asibi by massively parallel methods. Variability was compared on multiple scales of the viral genomes. A modeled exploration of small-frequency variants was performed to reconstruct plausible regions of mutational plasticity. Results. Overt quasispecies diversity is a feature of the parental strain, whereas the live vaccine strain lacks diversity according to multiple independent measurements. A lack of attenuating mutations in the Asibi population relative to that of 17D-204 was observed, demonstrating that the vaccine strain was derived by discrete mutation of Asibi and not by selection of genomes in the wild-type population. Conclusions. Relative quasispecies structure is a plausible correlate of attenuation for live viral vaccines. Analyses such as these of attenuated viruses improve our understanding of the molecular basis of vaccine attenuation and provide critical information on the stability of live vaccines and the risk of reversion to virulence. PMID:24141982

  3. Dry coating, a novel coating technology for solid pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanfeng; Zhu, Jesse; Ma, Yingliang; Zhang, Hui

    2008-06-24

    Dry coating is a coating technology for solid pharmaceutical dosage forms derived from powder coating of metals. In this technology, powdered coating materials are directly coated onto solid dosage forms without using any solvent, and then heated and cured to form a coat. As a result, this technology can overcome such disadvantages caused by solvents in conventional liquid coating as serious air pollution, high time- and energy-consumption and expensive operation cost encountered by liquid coating. Several dry coating technologies, including plasticizer-dry-coating, electrostatic-dry-coating, heat-dry-coating and plasticizer-electrostatic-heat-dry-coating have been developed and extensively reported. This mini-review summarized the fundamental principles and coating processes of various dry coating technologies, and thoroughly analyzed their advantages and disadvantages as well as commercialization potentials.

  4. Exploration of sequence space as the basis of viral RNA genome segmentation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Elena; Ojosnegros, Samuel; García-Arriaza, Juan; Escarmís, Cristina; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2014-05-06

    The mechanisms of viral RNA genome segmentation are unknown. On extensive passage of foot-and-mouth disease virus in baby hamster kidney-21 cells, the virus accumulated multiple point mutations and underwent a transition akin to genome segmentation. The standard single RNA genome molecule was replaced by genomes harboring internal in-frame deletions affecting the L- or capsid-coding region. These genomes were infectious and killed cells by complementation. Here we show that the point mutations in the nonstructural protein-coding region (P2, P3) that accumulated in the standard genome before segmentation increased the relative fitness of the segmented version relative to the standard genome. Fitness increase was documented by intracellular expression of virus-coded proteins and infectious progeny production by RNAs with the internal deletions placed in the sequence context of the parental and evolved genome. The complementation activity involved several viral proteins, one of them being the leader proteinase L. Thus, a history of genetic drift with accumulation of point mutations was needed to allow a major variation in the structure of a viral genome. Thus, exploration of sequence space by a viral genome (in this case an unsegmented RNA) can reach a point of the space in which a totally different genome structure (in this case, a segmented RNA) is favored over the form that performed the exploration.

  5. 77 FR 15961 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Phenylpropanolamine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0003] Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Phenylpropanolamine AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal...

  6. 75 FR 76259 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Tylosin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    .... FDA-2010-N-0002] Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Tylosin AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval of an original abbreviated new animal drug application (ANADA) filed by...

  7. The nature of nurture: Effects of parental genotypes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Augustine; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Frigge, Michael L; Vilhjalmsson, Bjarni J; Young, Alexander I; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E; Benonisdottir, Stefania; Oddsson, Asmundur; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Masson, Gisli; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Helgason, Agnar; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

    2018-01-26

    Sequence variants in the parental genomes that are not transmitted to a child (the proband) are often ignored in genetic studies. Here we show that nontransmitted alleles can affect a child through their impacts on the parents and other relatives, a phenomenon we call "genetic nurture." Using results from a meta-analysis of educational attainment, we find that the polygenic score computed for the nontransmitted alleles of 21,637 probands with at least one parent genotyped has an estimated effect on the educational attainment of the proband that is 29.9% ( P = 1.6 × 10 -14 ) of that of the transmitted polygenic score. Genetic nurturing effects of this polygenic score extend to other traits. Paternal and maternal polygenic scores have similar effects on educational attainment, but mothers contribute more than fathers to nutrition- and heath-related traits. Copyright © 2018, The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  8. Investigation of air-entraining admixture dosage in fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, M.T.; Harris, N.J.; Folliard, K.J.

    The amount of air-entraining admixture (AEA) needed to achieve a target air content in fresh concrete can vary significantly with differences in the fly ash used in the concrete. The work presented in this paper evaluates the ability to predict the AEA dosage on the basis of tests on the fly ash alone. All results were compared with the dosage of AEA required to produce an air content of 6% in fresh concrete. Fly ash was sampled from six separate sources. For four of these sources, samples were obtained both before and after the introduction of 'low-NOx burners'. Lack ofmore » definitive data about the coal itself or the specifics of the burning processes prevents the ability to draw specific conclusions about the impact of low-NOx burners on AEA demand. Nevertheless, the data suggest that modification of the burning process to meet environmental quality standards may affect the fly ash-AEA interaction.« less

  9. Terminology challenges: defining modified release dosage forms in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marilyn N; Lindquist, Danielle; Modric, Sanja

    2010-08-01

    Terminologies for describing dosage form release characteristics for human pharmaceuticals have been addressed by bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH), and the US Pharmacopeia (USP). While the definition for terms such as "immediate release," "modified release," "extended release," and "delayed release" are now well accepted for human pharmaceuticals, confusion still exists within the veterinary community. In part, this confusion is attributable to differences between human and veterinary dosage forms (such as the preponderance of parenteral vs. oral extended release products for use in animals vs. the focus on oral extended release formulations for human use) which reflect interspecies differences in physiology and conditions of use. It also simply reflects a lack of attention to existing definitions. In an effort to remedy this problem, this manuscript reflects an initial effort to suggest definitions that may be appropriate for describing formulation effects in veterinary medicine. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  10. Dosage compensation, the origin and the afterlife of sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jan; Meller, Victoria H

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 100 years Drosophila has been developed into an outstanding model system for the study of evolutionary processes. A fascinating aspect of evolution is the differentiation of sex chromosomes. Organisms with highly differentiated sex chromosomes, such as the mammalian X and Y, must compensate for the imbalance in gene dosage that this creates. The need to adjust the expression of sex-linked genes is a potent force driving the rise of regulatory mechanisms that act on an entire chromosome. This review will contrast the process of dosage compensation in Drosophila with the divergent strategies adopted by other model organisms. While the machinery of sex chromosome compensation is different in each instance, all share the ability to direct chromatin modifications to an entire chromosome. This review will also explore the idea that chromosome-targeting systems are sometimes adapted for other purposes. This appears the likely source of a chromosome-wide targeting system displayed by the Drosophila fourth chromosome.

  11. Genome Variation Within Triticale in Comparison to its Wheat and Rye Progenitors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome variation in the intergeneric wheat-rye hybrid triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack) has been a puzzle to scientists and plant breeders since the first triticale was synthesized. The existence of unexplained genetic variation in triticale as compared to the parents has been a hindrance to bre...

  12. Resequencing of Capsicum annuum parental lines (YCM334 and Taean) for the genetic analysis of bacterial wilt resistance.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Jae; Ahn, Yul-Kyun; Kim, Ki-Taek; Jun, Tae-Hwan

    2016-10-28

    Bacterial wilt (BW) is a widespread plant disease that affects a broad range of dicot and monocot hosts and is particularly harmful for solanaceous plants, such as pepper, tomato, and eggplant. The pathogen responsible for BW is the soil-borne bacterium, Ralstonia solanacearum, which can adapt to diverse temperature conditions and is found in climates ranging from tropical to temperate. Resistance to BW has been detected in some pepper plant lines; however, the genomic loci and alleles that mediate this are poorly studied in this species. We resequenced the pepper cultivars YCM344 and Taean, which are parental recombinant inbred lines (RIL) that display differential resistance phenotypes against BW, with YCM344 being highly resistant to infection with this pathogen. We identified novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertions/deletions (Indels) that are only present in both parental lines, as compared to the reference genome and further determined variations that distinguish these two cultivars from one another. We then identified potentially informative SNPs that were found in genes related to those that have been previously associated with disease resistance, such as the R genes and stress response genes. Moreover, via comparative analysis, we identified SNPs located in genomic regions that have homology to known resistance genes in the tomato genomes. From our SNP profiling in both parental lines, we could identify SNPs that are potentially responsible for BW resistance, and practically, these may be used as markers for assisted breeding schemes using these populations. We predict that our analyses will be valuable for both better understanding the YCM334/Taean-derived populations, as well as for enhancing our knowledge of critical SNPs present in the pepper genome.

  13. Development of extended release dosage forms using non-uniform drug distribution techniques.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Kuang; Wang, Da-Peng; Meng, Chung-Ling

    2002-05-01

    Development of an extended release oral dosage form for nifedipine using the non-uniform drug distribution matrix method was conducted. The process conducted in a fluid bed processing unit was optimized by controlling the concentration gradient of nifedipine in the coating solution and the spray rate applied to the non-pareil beads. The concentration of nifedipine in the coating was controlled by instantaneous dilutions of coating solution with polymer dispersion transported from another reservoir into the coating solution at a controlled rate. The USP dissolution method equipped with paddles at 100 rpm in 0.1 N hydrochloric acid solution maintained at 37 degrees C was used for the evaluation of release rate characteristics. Results indicated that (1) an increase in the ethyl cellulose content in the coated beads decreased the nifedipine release rate, (2) incorporation of water-soluble sucrose into the formulation increased the release rate of nifedipine, and (3) adjustment of the spray coating solution and the transport rate of polymer dispersion could achieve a dosage form with a zero-order release rate. Since zero-order release rate and constant plasma concentration were achieved in this study using the non-uniform drug distribution technique, further studies to determine in vivo/in vitro correlation with various non-uniform drug distribution dosage forms will be conducted.

  14. Assembling networks of microbial genomes using linear programming.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Catherine; Beiko, Robert G

    2010-11-20

    Microbial genomes exhibit complex sets of genetic affinities due to lateral genetic transfer. Assessing the relative contributions of parent-to-offspring inheritance and gene sharing is a vital step in understanding the evolutionary origins and modern-day function of an organism, but recovering and showing these relationships is a challenging problem. We have developed a new approach that uses linear programming to find between-genome relationships, by treating tables of genetic affinities (here, represented by transformed BLAST e-values) as an optimization problem. Validation trials on simulated data demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in recovering and representing vertical and lateral relationships among genomes. Application of the technique to a set comprising Aquifex aeolicus and 75 other thermophiles showed an important role for large genomes as 'hubs' in the gene sharing network, and suggested that genes are preferentially shared between organisms with similar optimal growth temperatures. We were also able to discover distinct and common genetic contributors to each sequenced representative of genus Pseudomonas. The linear programming approach we have developed can serve as an effective inference tool in its own right, and can be an efficient first step in a more-intensive phylogenomic analysis.

  15. Characterization of Potocki-Lupski Syndrome (dup(17)(p11.2p11.2)) and Delineation of a Dosage-Sensitive Critical Interval That Can Convey an Autism Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Potocki, Lorraine; Bi, Weimin; Treadwell-Deering, Diane; Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Eifert, Anna; Friedman, Ellen M.; Glaze, Daniel; Krull, Kevin; Lee, Jennifer A.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Robbins-Furman, Patricia; Shaw, Chad; Shi, Xin; Weissenberger, George; Withers, Marjorie; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Lupski, James R.

    2007-01-01

    The duplication 17p11.2 syndrome, associated with dup(17)(p11.2p11.2), is a recently recognized syndrome of multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation and is the first predicted reciprocal microduplication syndrome described—the homologous recombination reciprocal of the Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) microdeletion (del(17)(p11.2p11.2)). We previously described seven subjects with dup(17)(p11.2p11.2) and noted their relatively mild phenotype compared with that of individuals with SMS. Here, we molecularly analyzed 28 additional patients, using multiple independent assays, and also report the phenotypic characteristics obtained from extensive multidisciplinary clinical study of a subset of these patients. Whereas the majority of subjects (22 of 35) harbor the homologous recombination reciprocal product of the common SMS microdeletion (∼3.7 Mb), 13 subjects (∼37%) have nonrecurrent duplications ranging in size from 1.3 to 15.2 Mb. Molecular studies suggest potential mechanistic differences between nonrecurrent duplications and nonrecurrent genomic deletions. Clinical features observed in patients with the common dup(17)(p11.2p11.2) are distinct from those seen with SMS and include infantile hypotonia, failure to thrive, mental retardation, autistic features, sleep apnea, and structural cardiovascular anomalies. We narrow the critical region to a 1.3-Mb genomic interval that contains the dosage-sensitive RAI1 gene. Our results refine the critical region for Potocki-Lupski syndrome, provide information to assist in clinical diagnosis and management, and lend further support for the concept that genomic architecture incites genomic instability. PMID:17357070

  16. Seed development and genomic imprinting in plants.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Claudia; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2005-01-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to an epigenetic phenomenon where the activity of an allele depends on its parental origin. Imprinting at individual genes has only been described in mammals and seed plants. We will discuss the role imprinted genes play in seed development and compare the situation in plants with that in mammals. Interestingly, many imprinted genes appear to control cell proliferation and growth in both groups of organisms although imprinting in plants may also be involved in the cellular differentiation of the two pairs of gametes involved in double fertilization. DNA methylation plays some role in the control of parent-of-origin-specific expression in both mammals and plants. Thus, although imprinting evolved independently in mammals and plants, there are striking similarities at the phenotypic and possibly also mechanistic level.

  17. Trisomy 21 Alters DNA Methylation in Parent-of-Origin-Dependent and -Independent Manners

    PubMed Central

    Alves da Silva, Antônio Francisco; Machado, Filipe Brum; Pavarino, Érika Cristina; Biselli-Périco, Joice Matos; Zampieri, Bruna Lancia; da Silva Francisco Junior, Ronaldo; Mozer Rodrigues, Pedro Thyago; Terra Machado, Douglas; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia Barros; Gomes Fernandes, Maria; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana Marina; Lopes Rios, Álvaro Fabricio

    2016-01-01

    The supernumerary chromosome 21 in Down syndrome differentially affects the methylation statuses at CpG dinucleotide sites and creates genome-wide transcriptional dysregulation of parental alleles, ultimately causing diverse pathologies. At present, it is unknown whether those effects are dependent or independent of the parental origin of the nondisjoined chromosome 21. Linkage analysis is a standard method for the determination of the parental origin of this aneuploidy, although it is inadequate in cases with deficiency of samples from the progenitors. Here, we assessed the reliability of the epigenetic 5mCpG imprints resulting in the maternally (oocyte)-derived allele methylation at a differentially methylated region (DMR) of the candidate imprinted WRB gene for asserting the parental origin of chromosome 21. We developed a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme-specific PCR assay, based on the WRB DMR, across single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to examine the methylation statuses in the parental alleles. In genomic DNA from blood cells of either disomic or trisomic subjects, the maternal alleles were consistently methylated, while the paternal alleles were unmethylated. However, the supernumerary chromosome 21 did alter the methylation patterns at the RUNX1 (chromosome 21) and TMEM131 (chromosome 2) CpG sites in a parent-of-origin-independent manner. To evaluate the 5mCpG imprints, we conducted a computational comparative epigenomic analysis of transcriptome RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and histone modification expression patterns. We found allele fractions consistent with the transcriptional biallelic expression of WRB and ten neighboring genes, despite the similarities in the confluence of both a 17-histone modification activation backbone module and a 5-histone modification repressive module between the WRB DMR and the DMRs of six imprinted genes. We concluded that the maternally inherited 5mCpG imprints at the WRB DMR are uncoupled from the parental allele

  18. The Architecture of Parent-of-Origin Effects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Richard; Yuan, Wei; Kaisaki, Pamela; Gan, Xiangchao; Cleak, James; Edwards, Andrew; Baud, Amelie; Flint, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Summary The number of imprinted genes in the mammalian genome is predicted to be small, yet we show here, in a survey of 97 traits measured in outbred mice, that most phenotypes display parent-of-origin effects that are partially confounded with family structure. To address this contradiction, using reciprocal F1 crosses, we investigated the effects of knocking out two nonimprinted candidate genes, Man1a2 and H2-ab1, that reside at nonimprinted loci but that show parent-of-origin effects. We show that expression of multiple genes becomes dysregulated in a sex-, tissue-, and parent-of-origin-dependent manner. We provide evidence that nonimprinted genes can generate parent-of-origin effects by interaction with imprinted loci and deduce that the importance of the number of imprinted genes is secondary to their interactions. We propose that this gene network effect may account for some of the missing heritability seen when comparing sibling-based to population-based studies of the phenotypic effects of genetic variants. PMID:24439386

  19. The prednisone dosage in the CHOP chemotherapy regimen for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL): is there a standard?

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Colon-Otero, G; Solberg, L A

    2000-01-01

    Discrepancies in the quoted prednisone dosages in the regimens reported as the only standard CHOP regimen stimulated our interest in reviewing the medical literature regarding this issue and to assess whether practicing hematologists and oncologists in the U.S. are aware of the different dose schedules of prednisone in the published CHOP programs. Sixteen textbooks and chemotherapy reference books were reviewed. A MEDLINE search of English-language articles published between January 1970 and December 1998 was performed. An eight-point questionnaire was sent via e-mail with responses obtained from 421 hematology/oncology physicians in the U.S. Sixteen textbooks and chemotherapy reference books reviewed quoted only one prednisone dosage as part of the standard CHOP regimen; the prednisone dosages quoted as standard varied between publications. More than 4,000 eligible non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients have been treated with the CHOP chemotherapy as part of 43 different clinical trials reviewed. The dosages of prednisone and prednisolone used varied among six different levels. Thirty percent (127/421) of practicing U.S. physicians were not aware of the existence of more than one prednisone dose schedule as part of the CHOP regimen. The three mo