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Sample records for parenteral solutions supplemented

  1. Supplementation of total parenteral nutrition solutions with ferrous citrate.

    PubMed

    Sayers, M H; Johnson, D K; Schumann, L A; Ivey, M F; Young, J H; Finch, C A

    1983-01-01

    Daily infusion of a total parenteral nutrition (TPN) formulation containing 1 liter of 5.5% Travasol provides less than 0.1 milligrams of iron. By comparison, a formulation which includes a liter of 10% Travamin provides 2 milligrams of iron per day. To meet iron requirements in patients infusing formulations containing Travasol, iron was added as ferrous citrate. In in virto experiments, 74% of this iron was available to transferrin. In seven patients in whom in vivo availability was tested by red cell incorporation, the mean availability was 81%. Ferrous citrate is recommended as a safe, effective additive to TPN solutions for adult patients requiring iron supplements.

  2. Parenteral iron supplementation.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, V J

    1996-08-01

    Indications for the use of parenteral iron are limited to conditions in which the oral supplementation of iron is not possible or fails. An overview of iron balance and iron requirements is presented to describe situations in which iron supplementation may be required. When parenteral iron supplementation is required, careful attention to proper dosing and administration is necessary to optimize efficacy and safety. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding the clinical use of parenteral iron therapy and provide guidelines on dosing and administration. Methods of iron dextran administration, including the IV and intramuscular injection of undiluted drug and total dose infusion, are compared. Complications associated with the use of parenteral iron are also be reviewed. Finally, the use of iron supplementation in patients receiving parenteral nutrition care explored.

  3. Supplementation of parenteral nutrition with fish oil attenuates acute lung injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kohama, Keisuke; Nakao, Atsunori; Terashima, Mariko; Aoyama-Ishikawa, Michiko; Shimizu, Takayuki; Harada, Daisuke; Nakayama, Mitsuo; Yamashita, Hayato; Fujiwara, Mayu; Kotani, Joji

    2014-01-01

    Fish oil rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has diverse immunomodulatory properties and attenuates acute lung injury when administered in enternal nutrition. However, enteral nutrition is not always feasible. Therefore, we investigated the ability of parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil to ameliorate acute lung injury. Rats were infused with parenteral nutrition solutions (without lipids, with soybean oil, or with soybean oil and fish oil) for three days. Lipopolysaccharide (15 mg/kg) was then administered intratracheally to induce acute lung injury, characterized by impaired lung function, polymorphonuclear leukocyte recruitment, parenchymal tissue damage, and upregulation of mRNAs for inflammatory mediators. Administration of parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil prior to lung insult improved gas exchange and inhibited neutrophil recruitment and upregulation of mRNAs for inflammatory mediators. Parenteral nutrition supplemented with fish oil also prolonged survival. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, leukotriene B4 and leukotriene B5 secretion was measured in neutrophils from the peritoneal cavity. The neutrophils from rats treated with fish oil-rich parenteral nutrition released significantly more leukotriene B5, an anti-inflammatory eicosanoid, than neutrophils isolated from rats given standard parenteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition with fish oil significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury in rats in part by promoting the synthesis of anti-inflammatory eicosanoids. PMID:24688221

  4. Parenteral glutamine supplementation in critical illness: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The potential benefit of parenteral glutamine (GLN) supplementation has been one of the most commonly studied nutritional interventions in the critical care setting. The aim of this systematic review was to incorporate recent trials of traditional parenteral GLN supplementation in critical illness with previously existing data. Methods All randomized controlled trials of parenterally administered GLN in critically ill patients conducted from 1997 to 2013 were identified. Studies of enteral GLN only or combined enteral/parenteral GLN were excluded. Methodological quality of studies was scored and data was abstracted by independent reviewers. Results A total of 26 studies involving 2,484 patients examining only parenteral GLN supplementation of nutrition support were identified in ICU patients. Parenteral GLN supplementation was associated with a trend towards a reduction of overall mortality (relative risk (RR) 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75, 1.03, P = 0.10) and a significant reduction in hospital mortality (RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.51, 0.90, P = 0.008). In addition, parenteral GLN was associated with a strong trend towards a reduction in infectious complications (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.73, 1.02, P = 0.09) and ICU length of stay (LOS) (WMD –1.91, (95% CI -4.10, 0.28, P = 0.09) and significant reduction in hospital LOS (WMD -2.56, 95% CI -4.71, -0.42, P = 0.02). In the subset of studies examining patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN), parenteral GLN supplementation was associated with a trend towards reduced overall mortality (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.71, 1.01, P = 0.07). Conclusions Parenteral GLN supplementation given in conjunction with nutrition support continues to be associated with a significant reduction in hospital mortality and hospital LOS. Parenteral GLN supplementation as a component of nutrition support should continue to be considered to improve outcomes in critically ill patients. PMID:24745648

  5. Premixed Parenteral Nutrition Solution Use in Children

    PubMed Central

    Crill, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In response to national drug shortages, our institution established criteria for the use of commercial premixed parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions in select pediatric patients. Although these solutions have been marketed for use in children, there are no data in this patient population. The objective of this study was to review our use of commercial premixed PN solutions in children. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of patients ≤18 years of age who received a premixed PN solution from October 2010 to April 2012. All premixed PN courses were assessed for incidence of premixed PN discontinuation due to laboratory abnormalities. Estimated goal and actual protein and total caloric intake were evaluated for premixed PN courses that were continued for >48 hours. RESULTS: Sixty-nine patients received 74 courses of premixed PN solutions for a mean duration of 5.6 ± 6.2 (range, 1–31) days. Fifteen courses (20%) required discontinuation of premixed PN as a result of mild laboratory abnormalities. No changes in clinical status were observed in patients and all abnormalities were corrected after switching to individualized PN. In patients receiving PN for >48 hours, premixed PN solutions provided goal protein in 48/49 (98%) courses and goal calories in 33/49 (67%) courses. CONCLUSIONS: Premixed PN solutions were used in a wide range of pediatric patients and provide a potential option for PN support in pediatric patients when drug shortages limit PN product supply. Close monitoring for electrolyte abnormalities and protein and caloric intake is recommended when using premixed PN solutions in children. PMID:26472952

  6. Delivery of vitamins E and C from parenteral alimentation solution.

    PubMed

    Shenai, J P; Borum, P R; Duke, E A

    1982-01-01

    We have previously shown that substantial losses of fat-soluble (FS) vitamin A from parenteral alimentation solution occur due to adsorption in the intravenous tubing and photodegradation in the bottle. This study assessed the delivery of other vitamins, viz, FS vitamin E and water-soluble (WS) vitamin C, from parenteral alimentation solution. The solution containing 2.0 ml/L of an aqueous multivitamin infusion was infused at a constant rate of 10 ml/h using a standard intravenous administration set. Multiple aliquots of the solution from the bottle and the effluent obtained sequentially in a 24-h period were analyzed for concentrations of vitamins E and C. Both vitamins remained relatively stable in the bottle. A significant amount (12%) of vitamin E was lost in the intravenous tubing. No losses of vitamin C were incurred in the intravenous tubing. The data suggest that delivery of FS vitamin E from parenteral alimentation solutions is less than optimum because of adsorptive losses. Similar losses are not encountered with WS vitamin C.

  7. [Parenteral iron therapy: problems and possible solutions].

    PubMed

    Hoigné, R; Breymann, C; Künzi, U P; Brunner, F

    1998-04-04

    To investigate whether there are differences in the frequency of ADRs (adverse drug reactions) to parenteral iron preparations, we compared the results of 4 different data collections which contain observations in particular on i.m. or i.v. iron dextran and i.v. iron hydroxide sucrose complex, primarily in relation to anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions and common exanthemas. 1. In 206 patients of the department of general internal medicine in a city/teaching hospital (in association with the Swiss Foundation for Comprehensive Hospital Drug Monitoring--CHDM), 4 probably allergic reactions to i.m. iron dextran were found, one with acute severe dyspnea, cyanosis and flush, 3 with slight generalized, probably allergic reactions. Data from the USA on i.v. iron dextran do not show marked differences in the frequency of ADRs as compared with our data with i.m. administration. 2. A group of 400 otherwise healthy patients of the obstetric department of Zurich University Hospital were treated with i.v. iron sucrose for anemia due to iron loss during pregnancy or following childbirth. Seven generalized skin reactions, 4 in the form of flush and 3 of common exanthema, occurred. 3. In a retrospective study on patients on maintenance hemodialysis with chronic renal insufficiency and anemia, a questionnaire was answered by the medical heads of 17 selected hemodialysis units in Switzerland. Response was 100%. During around 8100 patient-years with approximately 160,000 ampoules of iron sucrose (with 100 mg elementary iron), not a single life threatening reaction was observed; only 5-7 situations of rapidly reversible blood pressure fall occurred, some 10 with flush, and one each with urticaria and vomiting/diarrhea. 4. The relatively good tolerance of i.v. iron sucrose in patients with chronic renal failure may be due either to reduced immune competence in patients with chronic renal insufficiency and/or to the use of the preparation itself, or probably both. 5. In ADRs of

  8. Adding Biotin to Parenteral Nutrition Solutions Without Lipid Accelerates the Growth of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Kaneda, Shinya; Shimono, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have previously demonstrated that Candida albicans requires multivitamins (MVs) or lipid to increase rapidly in parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions. In this study, in detail, the effects of vitamins on the growth of C. albicans in PN solutions without lipid were investigated. Methods: In the 1st experiment, a commercial PN solution without lipid was supplemented with water-soluble vitamins (SVs: vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12 and C, folic acid, nicotinamide, biotin and panthenol), water-insoluble vitamins (IVs: vitamins A, D, E and K) or both (MVs). In the 2nd experiment, the test solutions were prepared by supplementing the PN solution with one of each or all of the SVs. In the 3rd experiment, another commercial peripheral PN (PPN) solution without lipid was supplemented with SVs, nicotinic acid, biotin or both nicotinic acid and biotin. In each of the experiments, a specified number of C. albicans organisms was added to each test solution, and all of the test solutions were allowed to stand at room temperature (23-26ºC). The number of C. albicans was counted at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours after the addition of the organism. Results: In the 1st experiment, the C. albicans increased rapidly in the PN solution supplemented with the SVs, but increased slowly without the SVs, regardless of the addition of the IVs. In the 2nd experiment, the C. albicans increased rapidly in the PN solution supplemented with the SVs or biotin, but increased slowly with each of the other water-soluble vitamins. In the 3rd experiment, the C. albicans increased rapidly in the PPN solution supplemented with the SVs or biotin, but increased slowly with the addition of nicotinic acid. Conclusions: These results suggested that adding MVs or SVs to PN solutions without lipid promotes the growth of C. albicans, and that this effect is mostly attributable to biotin. PMID:27648003

  9. Effects of oral and parenteral selenium supplements on residues in meat, milk and eggs.

    PubMed

    Beale, A M; Fasulo, D A; Craigmill, A L

    1990-01-01

    Oral and parenteral preparations of Se are used worldwide to prevent and treat nutritional muscular dystrophy and other Se deficiency syndromes. There are extensive published data on the effects of oral supplementation on Se residues in food animal products. Very little published data exist on the effects of parenteral administration on Se residues, even for cattle and swine in which parenteral preparations are used extensively. The distribution of Se into kidney and liver appears to be equivalent for both forms of supplementation. Elimination of Se in milk is greater after parenteral administration and correlates with high plasma Se levels, however the milk excretion drops quickly and after 4 d returns to control levels (Little et al. 1979). Of particular interest is the finding that up to 18% of Se in an oral diet may be excreted in milk (Maus et al. 1980). Use of Se supplements in poultry results in increased levels of Se in liver, kidney, and eggs. Distribution of Se into liver and kidney is much greater than into breast muscle indicating a greater capacity of these organs to accumulate Se. Excretion of Se into eggs results in Se levels equivalent to those in liver and kidney, indicating that eggs are an important route of Se excretion in laying hens (Ort and Latshaw 1978). When Se supplementation stops, the liver, kidney, and egg white and yolk residues decline quickly to control values within 1-2 wk. Breast muscle Se content changes little during supplementation and after withdrawal of supplementation. Oral and parenteral selenium supplementation in swine result in greater accumulation of Se in liver and kidney than in muscle. Oral selenium supplementation also increases the excretion of Se into milk. This method has been used to prevent Se deficiency disease in piglets (Mahan et al. 1975). Oral supplementation with 0.1 ppm Se, as sodium selenate, did not result in levels of Se in blood, meat, or viscera at slaughter (Jenkins and Winter 1973). Despite the

  10. Selected ultratrace elements in total parenteral nutrition solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Berner, Y.N.; Shuler, T.R.; Nielsen, F.H.; Flombaum, C.; Farkouh, S.A.; Shike, M. )

    1989-11-01

    Ultratrace elements are potentially essential (eg. boron, molybdenum, nickel, and vanadium) or toxic (eg, aluminum and cadmium) in humans. Long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN) patients can inadvertently receive significant amounts of ultratrace elements present as contaminants in TPN solutions. We determined the intake of selected ultratrace elements from a standard TPN solution and compared it with the amount reported to be absorbed from food in normal subjects. Contamination of TPN solutions with ultratrace elements was widespread and variable. The daily intakes of Mo, Ni, V. and Cd from this contamination were comparable to the amounts reported to be absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract in normal subjects. Al intake was high; B intake was low, approximately 10% of the amount absorbed by normal subjects. Thus, TPN solutions are contaminated with significant amounts of ultratrace elements. The biological significance of the intravenous infusion of these ultratrace elements is unclear and requires further investigation, particularly in home TPN patients.

  11. [Safety aspects of parenteral iron supplementation therapies in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Potthoff, S A; Münch, H G

    2013-06-01

    Iron deficiency often occurs in patients with chronic kidney disease and can be effectively treated with parenteral supplementation of iron. In these patients, prompt application of iron therapy can help to reduce the dependence of erythropoietin-stimulating agents and effectively treat anemia. Correct evaluation of iron metabolism in CKD patients can be difficult. Duration of and response to therapy should always be considered while planning parenteral supplementation of iron. The main safety aspects of parenteral iron preparations relate to their possible anaphylactic potential and the potential induction of oxidative stress due to the release of free iron. However, parenteral iron supplementation is usually safe and without major side effects. Regarding current data, none of the iron preparations is showing definitive superiority. Although uncommon, iron preparations containing dextran can lead to severe side effects, therefore these preparations appear to have an inferior safety profile. Due to limited data, a comparison of third-generation iron preparations with previous preparations is not possible. Recently, for the first time, the third generation iron preparation ferumoxytol has been directly compared to iron sucrose. From this data and others, it remains unclear whether third generation iron preparations show safety-relevant superiority.

  12. Carnitine deficiency in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition: effect of L-carnitine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Sommerfeld, E; Penn, D; Wolf, H

    1983-06-01

    To investigate whether L-carnitine supplementation may correct nutritional carnitine deficiency and associated metabolic disturbances in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition, an intravenous fat tolerance test (1 gm/kg Intralipid over four hours) was performed in 29 premature infants 6 to 10 days of age (15 receiving carnitine supplement 10 mg/kg . day L-carnitine IV, and 14 receiving no supplement). Total carnitine plasma values were normal or slightly elevated in supplemented but decreased in nonsupplemented infants. In both groups, fat infusion resulted in an increase in plasma concentrations of triglycerides, free fatty acids, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, and short-chain and long-chain acylcarnitine, but total carnitine values did not change. After fat infusion, the free fatty acids/D-beta-hydroxybutyrate ratios were lower and the increase of acylcarnitine greater in supplemented infants of 29 to 33 weeks' gestation than in nonsupplemented infants of the same gestational age. This study provides evidence that premature infants of less than 34 weeks' gestation requiring total parenteral nutrition develop nutritional carnitine deficiency with impaired fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis. Carnitine supplementation improves this metabolic disturbance.

  13. Timing of (supplemental) parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bost, Rianne Bc; Tjan, Dave Ht; van Zanten, Arthur Rh

    2014-01-01

    Supplemental parenteral nutrition (SPN) is used in a step-up approach when full enteral support is contraindicated or fails to reach caloric targets. Recent nutrition guidelines present divergent advices regarding timing of SPN in critically ill patients ranging from early SPN (<48 h after admission; EPN) to postponing initiation of SPN until day 8 after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission (LPN). This systematic review summarizes results of prospective studies among adult ICU patients addressing the best timing of (supplemental) parenteral nutrition (S)PN. A structured PubMed search was conducted to identify eligible articles. Articles were screened and selected using predetermined criteria and appraised for relevance and validity. After critical appraisal, four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and two prospective observational studies remained. One RCT found a higher percentage of alive discharge from the ICU at day 8 in the LPN group compared to EPN group (p = 0.007) but no differences in ICU and in-hospital mortality. None of the other RCTs found differences in ICU or in-hospital mortality rates. Contradicting or divergent results on other secondary outcomes were found for ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay, infection rates, nutrition targets, duration of mechanical ventilation, glucose control, duration of renal replacement therapy, muscle wasting and fat loss. Although the heterogeneity in quality and design of relevant studies precludes firm conclusions, it is reasonable to assume that in adult critically ill patients, there are no clinically relevant benefits of EPN compared with LPN with respect to morbidity or mortality end points, when full enteral support is contraindicated or fails to reach caloric targets. However, considering that infectious morbidity and resolution of organ failure may be negatively affected through mechanisms not yet clearly understood and acquisition costs of parenteral nutrition are higher, the early

  14. Alanyl-glutamine dipeptide-supplemented parenteral nutrition improves intestinal metabolism and prevents increased permeability in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Haque, S M; Chen, K; Usui, N; Iiboshi, Y; Okuyama, H; Masunari, A; Cui, L; Nezu, R; Takagi, Y; Okada, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors determined the effects of alanyl-glutamine-supplemented total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on mucosal metabolism, integrity, and permeability of the small intestine in rats. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive TPN supplemented with a conventional amino acids mixture (STD group) or the same solution supplemented with alanyl-glutamine; both solutions were isocaloric and isonitrogenous. On the seventh day of TPN, D-xylose and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran were administered orally. One hour later, superior mesenteric vein (SMV) D-xylose and plasma FITC-dextran concentration were measured. Intestinal blood flow and calculated intestinal substrates flux were measured with ultrasonic transit time flowmetery. RESULTS: Plasma FITC-dextran increased significantly in the STD group. Intestinal blood flow and SMV D-xylose concentration did not differ between the groups. Mucosa weight, villus height, mucosal wall thickness, mucosal protein, and DNA and RNA content in jejunal mucosa were significantly increased in the alanyl-glutamine group. Jejunal mucosal glutaminase activity and net intestinal uptake of glutamine (glutamine flux) were significantly higher in the alanyl-glutamine group as compared with the STD group. CONCLUSION: Addition of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide to the TPN solution improves intestinal glutamine metabolism and prevents mucosal atrophy and deterioration of permeability. PMID:8604914

  15. Updated cost-effectiveness analysis of supplemental glutamine for parenteral nutrition of intensive-care patients

    PubMed Central

    Pradelli, L; Povero, M; Muscaritoli, M; Eandi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Intravenous (i.v.) glutamine supplementation of parenteral nutrition (PN) can improve clinical outcomes, reduce mortality and infection rates and shorten the length of hospital and/or intensive care unit (ICU) stays compared with standard PN. This study is a pharmacoeconomic analysis to determine whether i.v. glutamine supplementation of PN remains both a highly favourable and cost-effective option for Italian ICU patients. Subjects/Methods: A previously published discrete event simulation model was updated by incorporating the most up-to-date and clinically relevant efficacy data (a clinically realistic subgroup analysis from a published meta-analysis), recent cost data from the Italian health-care system and the latest epidemiology data from a large Italian ICU database (covering 230 Italian ICUs and more than 77 000 patients). Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the results. Results: Parenteral glutamine supplementation can significantly improve ICU efficiency in Italy, as the additional cost of supplemented treatment is more than completely offset by cost savings in hospital care. Supplementation was more cost-effective (cost-effectiveness ratio (CER)=€35 165 per patient discharged alive) than standard, non-supplemented PN (CER=€40 156 per patient discharged alive), and it resulted in mean cost savings of €4991 per patient discharged alive or €1047 per patient admitted to the hospital. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these results. Conclusions: Alanyl-glutamine supplementation of PN is a clinically and economically attractive strategy for ICU patients in Italy and may be applicable to selected ICU patient populations in other countries. PMID:25469466

  16. Impact of glutathione supplementation of parenteral nutrition on hepatic methionine adenosyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Elremaly, Wesam; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Rouleau, Thérèse; Lavoie, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Background The oxidation of the methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) by the combined impact of peroxides contaminating parenteral nutrition (PN) and oxidized redox potential of glutathione is suspected to explain its inhibition observed in animals. A modification of MAT activity is suspected to be at origin of the PN-associated liver disease as observed in newborns. We hypothesized that the correction of redox potential of glutathione by adding glutathione in PN protects the MAT activity. Aim To investigate whether the addition of glutathione to PN can reverse the inhibition of MAT observed in animal on PN. Methods Three days old guinea pigs received through a jugular vein catheter 2 series of solutions. First with methionine supplement, (1) Sham (no infusion); (2) PN: amino acids, dextrose, lipids and vitamins; (3) PN-GSSG: PN+10 μM GSSG. Second without methionine, (4) D: dextrose; (5) D+180 μM ascorbylperoxide; (6) D+350 μM H2O2. Four days later, liver was sampled for determination of redox potential of glutathione and MAT activity in the presence or absence of 1 mM DTT. Data were compared by ANOVA, p<0.05. Results MAT activity was 45±4% lower in animal infused with PN and 23±7% with peroxides generated in PN. The inhibition by peroxides was associated with oxidized redox potential and was reversible by DTT. Correction of redox potential (PN+GSSG) or DTT was without effect on the inhibition of MAT by PN. The slope of the linear relation between MAT activity and redox potential was two fold lower in animal infused with PN than in others groups. Conclusion The present study suggests that prevention of peroxide generation in PN and/or correction of the redox potential by adding glutathione in PN are not sufficient, at least in newborn guinea pigs, to restore normal MAT activity. PMID:26722840

  17. [Supplemental parenteral nutrition for intensive care patients: a logical combination with enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Thibault, Ronan; Berger, Mette M; Pichard, Claude

    2009-12-09

    Undernutrition is a widespread problem in the intensive care and is associated with a worse clinical outcome. Enteral nutrition is the recommended nutritional support in ICU patients. However, enteral nutrition is frequently insufficient to cover protein-energy needs. The initiation of supplemental parenteral nutrition, when enteral nutrition is insufficient, could optimize the nutritional therapy. Such a combination could allow reducing morbidity, length of stay and recovery, as well as improving quality of life and health care costs. Prospective studies are currently underway to test this hypothesis.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide generation in a model paediatric parenteral amino acid solution.

    PubMed

    Brawley, V; Bhatia, J; Karp, W B

    1993-12-01

    1. Parenteral amino acid solutions undergo photooxidation, which may be an important factor in total parenteral nutrition-associated hepatic dysfunction. Light-exposed parenteral solutions containing amino acids, in addition to vitamins and trace minerals, generate free radicals, which, in turn, may contribute to this type of injury. This study examined the characteristics of H2O2 production in a parenteral amino acid solution modelled on a commercially available paediatric parenteral amino acid solution. 2. The solution was exposed to light in the presence of riboflavin-5'-monophosphate (riboflavin), and peroxide formation in the presence and absence of catalase (H2O2 formation) was assayed using potassium iodide/molybdate. 3. Peak H2O2 production occurred at a light intensity of 8 microW cm-2 nm-1 in the 425-475 nm waveband and was linear to 2 h of light exposure. H2O2 production reached 500 mumol/l at 24 h. 4. H2O2 was directly related to a riboflavin concentration of up to 20 mumol/l and was maximal at 30 mumol/l. 5. H2O2 production was greatest in the amino acid/riboflavin solution at a pH of between 5 and 6. 6. Under the conditions of light exposure intensity, light exposure time, riboflavin concentration and pH found during the administration of parenteral nutrition in neonatal intensive care units, net H2O2 production occurs in solutions modelled on a paediatric parenteral amino acid preparation.

  19. Managing an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy team: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Halilovic, Jenana; Christensen, Cinda L; Nguyen, Hien H

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs should strive to deliver safe, cost effective, and high quality care. One of the keys to developing and sustaining a high quality OPAT program is to understand the common challenges or barriers to OPAT delivery. We review the most common challenges to starting and managing an OPAT program and give practical advice on addressing these issues. PMID:24971015

  20. Supplemental Parenteral Nutrition Is the Key to Prevent Energy Deficits in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Taku; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Pichard, Claude

    2016-08-01

    This review emphasizes the role of a timely supplemental parenteral nutrition (PN) for critically ill patients. It contradicts the recommendations of current guidelines to avoid the use of PN, as it is associated with risk. Critical illness results in severe metabolic stress. During the early phase, inflammatory cytokines and mediators induce catabolism to meet the increased body energy demands by endogenous sources. This response is not suppressed by exogenous energy administration, and the early use of PN to reach the energy target leads to overfeeding. On the other hand, early and progressive enteral nutrition (EN) is less likely to cause overfeeding because of variable gastrointestinal tolerance, a factor frequently associated with significant energy deficit. Recent studies demonstrate that adequate feeding is beneficial during and after the intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Supplemental PN allows for timely adequate feeding, if sufficient precautions are taken to avoid overfeeding. Indirect calorimetry can precisely define the adequate energy prescription. Our pragmatic approach is to start early EN to progressively test the gut tolerance and add supplemental PN on day 3 or 4 after ICU admission, only if EN does not meet the measured energy target. We believe that supplemental PN plays a pivotal role in the achievement of adequate feeding in critically ill patients with intolerance to EN and does not cause harm if overfeeding is avoided by careful prescription, ideally based on energy expenditure measured by indirect calorimetry.

  1. Aluminum contamination of parenteral nutrition additives, amino acid solutions, and lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Popińska, K; Kierkuś, J; Lyszkowska, M; Socha, J; Pietraszek, E; Kmiotek, W; Ksiazyk, J

    1999-09-01

    Contamination of parenteral nutrition solutions with aluminum may result in accumulation of this element in bones and, in premature infants, may inhibit bone calcium uptake and induce cholestasis. We measured the aluminum concentration of small-volume parenterals, amino acid solutions, lipid emulsions, and special solutions containing glucose, amino acids, electrolytes, and trace elements (standard I for children with a body weight of 3-5 kg, standard II for children with a body weight of 5-10 kg). The method used was graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry GTA-AAS (SpectrAA-400 Plus, Varian, PtY Ltd., Mulgrave, Australia). Quality control was run with the use of control serum (Seronorm, Nycomed, Oslo, Norway). The aluminum contents of parenterally administered solutions were: pediatric trace elements, 130 micrograms/L, and pediatric trace elements, 3000 micrograms/L; phosphorus salts: K-phosphates, 9800 micrograms/L, and Na/K phosphates, 13,000 micrograms/L; 10% calcium gluconate, 4400 micrograms/L; 6.5% amino acids, 30 micrograms/L; 10% amino acids, 120 micrograms/L; 12.5% amino acids, 121 micrograms/L; 20% lipid emulsion, 30 micrograms/L; 20% lipid emulsion, 180 micrograms/L; water-soluble vitamins, 12 micrograms/L; lipid soluble vitamins, 360 micrograms/L; standard I, 55 micrograms/L; standard II, 90 micrograms/L; The aluminum intake from parenteral nutrition was 6.6-10.8 micrograms.kg-1.d-1--a dose exceeding the safety limit of 2 micrograms.kg-1.d-1. The possible association of aluminum not only with metabolic bone disease, but also with encephalopathy, dictates caution when dealing with the pediatric population on long-term parenteral nutrition. In the absence of reliable label information, it seems proper to monitor the aluminum concentration in parenteral nutrition products and to report it in professional journals.

  2. System for creating on site, remote from a sterile environment, parenteral solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Mike (Inventor); Scharf, Mike (Inventor); Packard, Jeff (Inventor); Kipp, Jim (Inventor); Dudar, Tom (Inventor); Owens, Jim (Inventor); Bindokas, Al (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a system and method for creating on site, remote from a sterile environment, parenteral solutions in large volume parenteral containers for intravenous administration to a patient. In an embodiment, this system comprises an empty large volume container including at least one port for accessing an interior of the container. The port includes a sterilizing filter for sterilizing a fluid fed through the port into the container. A second container is provided including a solute and having means for coupling the second container to the large volume container and thereby providing fluid communication therebetween allowing the solute to be received within the interior of the container. A sterile water source is also provided including means for placing the sterile water source in fluid communication with the port and allowing water to flow from the sterile water source into the interior of the container. This allows the solute, and sterile water that has been fed through the filter, to create a parenteral solution in the large volume parenteral container.

  3. System for creating at a site, remote from a sterile environment, a parenteral solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Mike (Inventor); Finley, Mike (Inventor); Veillon, Joe (Inventor); Kipp, Jim (Inventor); Dudar, Tom (Inventor); Owens, Jim (Inventor); Ogle, Jim (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to a container, system, and method for creating parenteral solutions at a site, remote from sterile environments. The system includes a flexible container that is empty except for a prepackaged amount of a solute that is housed in the interior of the container. The container includes at least one port and a sterilizing filter in communication with an interior of the port. The container is so constructed and arranged that a fluid flow path is created from the port through the filter and into the interior of the container. A sterile water source including means for establishing fluid flow from the sterile water source into the port is provided. Accordingly, sterile water can flow from the sterile water source through the filter into the container where it is mixed with the solute to create a parenteral solution that can then be infused into a patient. A method and container are also provided.

  4. Effects of short-chain fatty acid-supplemented total parenteral nutrition on intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokine abundance.

    PubMed

    Milo, L A; Reardon, K A; Tappenden, K A

    2002-09-01

    We examined the effect of short-chain fatty acid-supplemented total parenteral nutrition on proinflammatory cytokine levels in piglets. Piglets (N = 22) received either standard total parenteral nutrition or total parenteral nutrition supplemented with short-chain fatty acids. After seven days of continuous nutrient infusion, proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6) abundance in plasma, jejunal, and ileal samples and small intestinal myeloperoxidase was determined using western blotting. No differences were seen in TNF-alpha small intestinal abundance. IL-1beta was higher in the small intestine of the short-chain fatty acid group (P < 0.05). IL-6 was higher in intestinal samples of the short-chain fatty acid group (P = 0.05), with the ileum having a greater abundance of IL-6 than the jejunum (P < 0.005). No differences in proinflammatory cytokine abundance in the plasma or tissue myeloperoxidase were seen. These results indicate short-chain fatty acids beneficially increase small intestinal abundance of IL-1beta and IL-6 during total parenteral nutrition administration, while not affecting systemic production of these cytokines or intestinal inflammation.

  5. Evaluation of Serum Carnitine Levels for Pediatric Patients Receiving Carnitine-Free and Carnitine-Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Daniel; Mulroy, Cecilia; MacKay, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Carnitine is a carrier molecule transporting long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into the mitochondria for fatty acid β-oxidation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of carnitine supplementation in parenteral nutrition (PN) within the pediatric population. Our goal was to determine a weight range for which empiric carnitine supplementation is justified and to determine a weight range at which a carnitine level should first be drawn to confirm a deficiency prior to supplementation. Secondarily, we tried to determine a relationship among carnitine deficiency, hypoglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study to evaluate 2 groups of pediatric patients (weighing 0.68 kg to 60 kg) who were NPO and receiving PN. The first group of patients (n = 454) received carnitine supplementation (15 mg/kg/day) upon initiation of PN. The second group (n = 299) did not receive carnitine supplementation until they were determined to have a carnitine deficiency. Results: The data indicated that 82% of the patients weighing less than 5 kg were deficient. Patients weighing more than 5 kg had serum carnitine levels within the normal range. Therefore, patients receiving PN and weighing less than 5 kg should be supplemented with carnitine. Comparison of triglyceride, glucose, and carnitine showed no statistically significant difference (P = .1936). Conclusion: Patients weighing more than 5 kg should have serum carnitine levels drawn within 7 days to determine whether supplementation is needed. There is no statistical correlation among carnitine deficiency, hypoglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:24958973

  6. The indicator amino acid oxidation method identified limiting amino acids in two parenteral nutrition solutions in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Janet A; Shoveller, Anna K; Pencharz, Paul B; Ball, Ronald O

    2007-05-01

    Recent studies using the indicator amino acid oxidation (IAAO) technique in TPN-fed piglets and infants have been instrumental in defining parenteral amino acid requirements. None of the commercial products in use are ideal when assessed against these new data. Our objectives were to determine whether the oxidation of an indicator amino acid would decline with the addition of amino acids that were limiting in the diets of TPN-fed piglets, and to use this technique to identify limiting amino acids in a new amino acid profile. Piglets (n = 26) were randomized to receive TPN with amino acids provided by Vaminolact (VM) or by a new profile (NP). After 5 d of TPN administration, lysine oxidation was measured using a constant infusion of L- [1-(14)C]-lysine. Immediately following the first IAAO study, the piglets were further randomized within diet group to receive either 1) supplemental aromatic amino acids (AAA), 2) sulfur amino acids (SAA) or 3) both (AAA+SAA) (n = 4-5 per treatment group). A second IAAO study was carried out 18 h later. In the first IAAO study, lysine oxidation was high for both groups (18 vs. 21% for VM and NP, respectively, P = 0.055). The addition of AAA to VM induced a 30% decline in lysine oxidation compared with baseline (P < 0.01). Similarly, SAA added to NP lowered lysine oxidation by approximately 30% (P < 0.01). The application of the IAAO technique facilitates rapid evaluation of the amino acids that are limiting to protein synthesis in parenteral solutions.

  7. Assessment of vitamin and trace element supplementation in severely burned patients undergoing long-term parenteral and enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Perro, G; Bourdarias, B; Cutillas, M; Higueret, D; Sanchez, R; Iron, A

    1995-10-01

    The efficacy of an oral supplement of vitamins and trace elements during a longterm artificial parenteral and enteral nutrition was investigated for 3 months in patients with extensive burns. Thirty severely burned patients (22 male, 8 female, age 41 +/- 18 years, range 23-59 years, 33 +/- 12% total body surface area burn, 22% +/- 8 full thickness burn surface area) were included. Every 10 days, from day 10 until day 90, we determined serum levels of: *vitamins B1, B12, A, E, *folic acid, *copper, zinc, iron, *transferrin, albumin, prealbumin, total proteins, *fibronectin, retinol binding protein (RBP), *calcium, *phosphorus, *triglycerides, *total cholesterol, *C reactive protein (CRP), *erythrocyte folic acid. The mean daily nutritional support was 60 Kcals and 0.4 g N per kg of body weight, 70% enterally and 30% parenterally administered, with enteral vitamin and trace element supplementation. On day 10, there was a decrease of the serum level of 19/20 parameters. For 8 parameters (vitamin A, total cholesterol, iron, transferrin, fibronectin, phosphorus, RBP, total proteins), the level was lower than usual. Between day 10 and day 20, a significant normalization of 6 of them was noted, the average levels of transferrin and iron remaining below normal values until day 50. There was a significant decrease in C-reactive protein levels, however above normal limits. No deficiency in vitamins or trace elements was found. Cyclic variations of serum levels occurred which may be more related to volemic, hydroelectrolytic, endocrine and inflammatory disorders than to nutritional problems.

  8. Use of quantitative microbiological analyses to trace origin of contamination of parenteral nutrition solutions.

    PubMed

    Bhakdi, Sucharit; Krämer, Irene; Siegel, Ekkehard; Jansen, Bernd; Exner, Martin

    2012-05-01

    In the summer of 2010, parenteral nutrition (PN) admixtures were administered to neonates in the Pediatric Department of the University Medical Center Mainz that provoked severe clinical sequelae. Contamination of a dummy infusion with Enterobacter cloacae and Escherichia hermannii was detected on the day of the incident, and the same isolates were subsequently grown from all PN admixtures as well as from the parent amino acid solution from which the admixtures had been prepared. Quantitative microbiological analyses paired with the determination of endotoxin concentrations enabled the conclusion to be reached that the amino acid solution had represented the primary source of contamination, which must have occurred in the distant past and may have derived from passage of the bacteria through a crack in the glass container. The findings have large implications, and the approaches employed should become of value when similar incidents occur again in the future.

  9. Effect of retrograde aminophylline administration on calcium and phosphate solubility in neonatal total parenteral nutrient solutions.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, A E; Holcombe, B J; Sawyer, W T

    1989-12-01

    The effect of retrograde administration of aminophylline injection on calcium and phosphate solubility in neonatal total parenteral nutrient (TPN) solutions was studied. Neonatal TPN solutions containing two amino acids solutions in three concentrations (Travasol 1% and 2% and TrophAmine 2%) were formulated. Calcium and phosphate salts were added to achieve calcium concentrations of 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, or 40 meq/L and phosphorus concentrations of 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, or 40 mmol/L. Samples were inspected visually after 18-24 hours; solutions free of precipitation were then infused through two parallel syringe-pump systems designed to simulate clinical conditions for TPN solution administration to a 1-kg neonate. To one system, a 7.5-mg aminophylline dose was added as a manual retrograde injection; sterile water for injection was added as a manual retrograde injection to the other system. The solutions were inspected throughout a one-hour infusion period for precipitate formation in the i.v. apparatus, and the pH of the effluents was determined. Concurrent aminophylline administration resulted in visible precipitate in all but a few of the solutions tested. The solution containing Travasol 2%, calcium 10 meq/L, and phosphorus 10 mmol/L remained clear, as did the solutions containing TrophAmine 2% and the following concentrations of calcium and phosphorus: calcium 10 meq/L and phosphorus 10, 15, or 20 mmol/L; calcium 15 meq/L and phosphorus 10 or 15 mmol/L; and calcium 20 meq/L and phosphorus 10 or 15 mmol/L. An average increase in pH of 0.63 unit was noted in all solutions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Effects of Lipid Emulsion and Multivitamins on the Growth of Microorganisms in Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Takashi; Kaneda, Shinya; Shimono, Kazuyuki; Inoue, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Blood stream infections caused by Bacillus cereus or Serratia marcescens in patients receiving peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) have occasionally been reported in Japan, but these microorganisms are not major causes of blood stream infections in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition via a central venous catheter. In Japan, commercially available PPN solutions contain amino acids, glucose, and electrolytes, but not contain lipid emulsion (LE) and multivitamins (MV). In this study, the effects of LE and MV on the growth of microorganisms such as Bacillus cereus, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans in PPN solutions were investigated. Methods: A commercial 3% amino acid and 7.5% glucose solution with electrolytes (AF) was used as the base solution to prepare test solutions (LAF, AFV, and LAFV) containing LE, MV, or both. Specifically, 20% LE was added to AF in a ratio of 1:9 to prepare LAF. MV was added to AF and LAF to prepare AFV and LAFV, respectively. A specified number of each microorganism was added to each 100 mL of AF, LAF, AFV, and LAFV in sterile plastic flasks, and all flasks were allowed to stand at room temperature. The number of colony forming units per mL of each microorganism was counted at 0, 24, and 48 hours after the addition of each microorganism. Results: Both Bacillus cereus and Serratia marcescens increased rapidly in AF as well as in LAF, AFV, and LAFV. Staphylococcus aureus did not increased in AF, but increased slightly in LAF and increased rapidly in AFV and LAFV. Candida albicans increased slightly in AF and increased rapidly in LAF, AFV, and LAFV. Conclusions: The results suggest the followings: if microbial contamination occurs, 1) Bacillus cereus and Serratia marcescens can grow rapidly in PPN solutions consisting of amino acids, glucose and electrolytes; 2) Staphylococcus aureus cannot grow without LE and MV, but can grow rapidly with MV; 3) Candida albicans can grow slowly without LE

  11. Aluminum Exposure in Neonatal Patients Using the Least Contaminated Parenteral Nutrition Solution Products

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Robert L.; Pieroni, Kevin P.; Gaskari, Shabnam; Dixon, Tessa; Kerner, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a contaminant in all parenteral nutrition (PN) solution component products. Manufacturers currently label these products with the maximum Al content at the time of expiry. We recently published data to establish the actual measured concentration of Al in PN solution products prior to being compounded in the clinical setting [1]. The investigation assessed quantitative Al content of all available products used in the formulation of PN solutions. The objective of this study was to assess the Al exposure in neonatal patients using the least contaminated PN solutions and determine if it is possible to meet the FDA “safe limit” of less than 5 μg/kg/day of Al. The measured concentrations from our previous study were analyzed and the least contaminated products were identified. These concentrations were entered into our PN software and the least possible Al exposure was determined. A significant decrease (41%–44%) in the Al exposure in neonatal patients can be achieved using the least contaminated products, but the FDA “safe limit” of less than 5 μg/kg/day of Al was not met. However, minimizing the Al exposure may decrease the likelihood of developing Al toxicity from PN. PMID:23201834

  12. Effect of parenteral nutrition supplemented with short-chain fatty acids on adaptation to massive small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Koruda, M J; Rolandelli, R H; Settle, R G; Zimmaro, D M; Rombeau, J L

    1988-09-01

    After massive small bowel resection, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is prescribed to maintain nutritional status. However, TPN reduces the mass of the remaining intestinal mucosa, whereas adaptation to small bowel resection is associated with increased mucosal mass. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have been shown to stimulate mucosal cell mitotic activity. This study determined whether the addition of SCFAs to TPN following small bowel resection would prevent intestinal mucosal atrophy produced by TPN. Adult rats underwent an 80% small bowel resection and then received either standard TPN or TPN supplemented with SCFAs (sodium acetate, propionate, and butyrate). After 1 wk, jejunal and ileal mucosal weights, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein contents were measured and compared with the parameters obtained at the time of resection. Animals receiving TPN showed significant loss of jejunal mucosal weight, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein and ileal mucosal weight and deoxyribonucleic acid after small bowel resection, whereas animals receiving SCFA-supplemented TPN showed no significant change in the jejunal mucosal parameters and a significant increase in ileal mucosal protein. These data demonstrate that SCFA-supplemented TPN reduces the mucosal atrophy associated with TPN after massive bowel resection and thys may facilitate adaptation to small bowel resection.

  13. Finding new solutions in pediatric parenteral admixtures: how to improve quality and to deal with shortages.

    PubMed

    Watrobska-Swietlikowska, Dorota; Kwidzynska, Anna; Szlagatys-Sidorkiewicz, Agnieszka; Sznitowska, Malgorzata; Klek, Stanislaw

    2014-07-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: La nutrición parenteral pediátrica permite un crecimiento normal incluso en lactantes pretérmino. Sin embargo, estos niños requieren una nutrición parenteral a medida y la formulación de tal nutrición puede suponer un reto por el riesgo de inestabilidad y el desabastecimiento.

  14. Glutamine Supplementation of Parenteral Nutrition Does Not Improve Intestinal Permeability, Nitrogen Balance, or Outcome in Newborns and Infants Undergoing Digestive-Tract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Hazebroek, Frans W. J.; Mourik, Marjan; Borsboom, Gerard J. J. M.; Rietveld, Trinet; Huijmans, Jan G. M.; Tibboel, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of isocaloric isonitrogenous parenteral glutamine supplementation on intestinal permeability and nitrogen loss in newborns and infants after major digestive-tract surgery. Summary Background Data: Glutamine supplementation in critically ill and surgical adults may normalize intestinal permeability, attenuate nitrogen loss, improve survival, and lower the incidence of nosocomial infections. Previous studies in critically ill children were limited to very-low-birthweight infants and had equivocal results. Methods: Eighty newborns and infants were included in a double-blind, randomized trial comparing standard parenteral nutrition (sPN; n = 39) to glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition (GlnPN; glutamine target intake, 0.4 g kg−1 day−1; n = 41), starting on day 2 after major digestive-tract surgery. Primary endpoints were intestinal permeability, as assessed by the urinary excretion ratio of lactulose and rhamnose (weeks 1 through 4); nitrogen balance (days 4 through 6), and urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion (day 5). Secondary endpoints were mortality, length of stay in the ICU and the hospital, number of septic episodes, and usage of antibiotics and ICU resources. Results: Glutamine intake plateaued at 90% of the target on day 4. No differences were found between patients assigned sPN and patients assigned GlnPN regarding any of the endpoints. Glutamine supplementation was not associated with adverse effects. Conclusions: In newborns and infants after major digestive-tract surgery, we did not identify beneficial effects of isonitrogenous, isocaloric glutamine supplementation of parenteral nutrition. Glutamine supplementation in these patients therefore is not warranted until further research proves otherwise. PMID:15798461

  15. Chromium and zinc contamination of parenteral nutrient solution components commonly used in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Hak, E B; Storm, M C; Helms, R A

    1998-01-15

    Chromium and zinc contamination of components of parenteral nutrient (PN) solutions used in infants and children was studied. Solutions of amino acids, L-cysteine hydrochloride, dextrose, electrolytes, minerals, vitamins, multiple trace elements, and individual trace elements were obtained. A variety of manufacturers, lots, and expiration dates were represented when possible. The solutions were analyzed for chromium and zinc by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In all amino acid products, chromium concentration was below the limit of detection and zinc concentration ranged from 0.06 to 4.97 mg/L. In the L-cysteine hydrochloride products, chromium was measurable in only two lots (0.11 and 0.23 mg/L); zinc was measurable in all lots (32-86 mg/L). Sodium and potassium salts of chloride and acetate had chromium concentrations of 0.02-0.23 mg/L and zinc concentrations of 0.35-0.56 mg/L. Phosphate salts contained chromium 0.39-0.44 mg/L and zinc 0.91-2.33 mg/L. In calcium gluconate, zinc concentration was 0.28-2.38 mg/L. In four lots of multiple trace elements, chromium was 92-104% and zinc was 100-113.5% of the labeled amount. A PN solution for a < 10-kg infant compounded from the components assayed would provide up to an additional 0.7 microgram of chromium per kilogram and 200 micrograms of zinc per kilogram. Zinc and chromium contaminants were detected in many of the products that are common components of PN solutions for infants and children; the contamination may be sufficient to result in the administration of zinc and chromium in amounts exceeding current recommendations.

  16. Separation and preconcentration of aluminum in parenteral solutions and bottled mineral water using different analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem G; Khan, Sumaira; Baig, Jameel A; Kolachi, Nida F; Afridi, Hassan I; Kandhro, Ghulam A; Kumar, Sham; Shah, Abdul Q

    2009-12-30

    A new method is reported for the separation of aluminum ions [Al(III)] from interfering elements in parenteral and pharmaceutical solutions (PS) and bottled mineral water (BMW) samples, through solid-phase extraction with 2-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline (quinaldine) adsorbed onto activated silica gel. While the enrichment step of separated Al(III) was carried out by cloud point extraction (CPE) using 8-hydroxyquinoline as complexing reagent, the resulted complex was entrapped in a non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114). The enriched Al(III) in sample solutions were determined by spectrofluorometry (SPF) at lambda(excitation) 370 nm and lambda(emission) 510 nm, and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for comparative purpose. The variables affecting the complexation and extraction steps were studied and optimized. The validity of methodology was checked with certified reference material of water and standard addition method. The enrichment factor and detection limit of Al(III) for the preconcentration of 50 ml of PS and BMW were found to be 100 and 0.25 microg/L, respectively. The proposed method has been applied for the determination of trace amount of Al(III) in PS and BMW samples with satisfactory results. In PS the levels of Al(III) are above than permissible limit (25 microg/L).

  17. Calcium glycerophosphate as a source of calcium and phosphorus in total parenteral nutrition solutions.

    PubMed

    Draper, H H; Yuen, D E; Whyte, R K

    1991-01-01

    Calcium glycerophosphate (CaGP) was tested as an alternative to calcium gluconate (CaGluc) and potassium mono- and dibasic phosphate (KPhos) as a source of Ca and P in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions for piglets. Four-day-old piglets were infused for 7 days with a TPN solution that provided either 4.2 mmol Ca and 2.1 mmol P/kg/24 h as CaGluc and KPhos (the maximum quantities that can be provided using these sources), or 15.0 mmol Ca and 15.0 mmol P/kg/24 h as CaGP. Ca and P retentions were more than six times greater (p less than 0.01) in the piglets receiving CaGP (14.5 +/- 0.2 vs 2.2 +/- 0.3 mmol Ca/kg/24 h and 13.3 +/- 0.4 vs 2.4 +/- 0.1 mmol P/kg/24 h) (Mean +/- SEM). The ratio of Ca to fat-free dry weight, an indicator of bone mineralization, was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) in the humerus (174.8 +/- 2.2 vs 147.2 +/- 6.7) and femur (158.3 +/- 4.8 vs 130.1 +/- 7.8) in the CaGP group. This study showed that CaGP is efficiently used as a source of Ca and P in TPN solutions for piglets. The results suggest that the use of CaGP as the source of Ca and P in TPN solutions may prevent the development of the undermineralized bone seen in low-birth weight infants nourished intravenously.

  18. Cost and effectiveness of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in Chinese ICU patients receiving parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guo Hao; Gao, Jian; Ji, Chun Yan; Pradelli, Lorenzo; Xi, Qiu Lei; Zhuang, Qiu Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Clinical evidence supports the use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-enriched lipid emulsions in place of standard lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition (PN) for intensive care unit (ICU) patients, but uptake may be limited by higher costs. We compared clinical and economic outcomes for these two types of lipid emulsion in the Chinese ICU setting. Methods We developed a pharmacoeconomic discrete event simulation model, based on efficacy data from an international meta-analysis and patient characteristics, resource consumption, and unit costs from a Chinese institutional setting. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess the effects of uncertainty around input parameters. Model predictive validity was assessed by comparing results with data observed in a patient subset not used in the modeling. Results The model predicted that omega-3 PUFA-enriched emulsion (Omegaven® 10% fish oil emulsion) would dominate standard lipid emulsions, with better clinical outcomes and lower overall health care costs (mean savings ~10,000 RMB), mainly as a result of faster recovery and shorter hospital stay (by ~6.5 days). The external validation process confirmed the reliability of the model predictions. Conclusion Omega-3 PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions improved clinical outcome and decreased overall costs in Chinese ICU patients requiring PN. PMID:26170701

  19. Effect of sodium metabisulfite on hydrogen peroxide production in light-exposed pediatric parenteral amino acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Brawley, V; Bhatia, J; Karp, W B

    1998-06-15

    The effect of sodium metabisulfite (MBS) on hydrogen peroxide (HP) production in model and commercial amino acid solutions exposed to phototherapy light was studied. Model and commercial pediatric amino acid solutions were prepared such that the amino acid concentration was 1%. MBS concentration, riboflavin concentration, and duration of exposure to phototherapy light were varied to determine the effect on HP production. Control solutions were kept in the dark. HP production was assayed in the model amino acid solutions by using potassium iodide in the presence of ammonium molybdate. In all experiments, HP production was measured at 360 nm in the presence and absence of catalase. In light-exposed solutions, HP production increased linearly for several hours and reached a plateau by eight hours. A mean maximum of 940 microM was produced (data pooled for all solutions). No detectable HP was generated in the solutions kept in the dark. After two hours of light exposure, it was necessary to add at least 10 times more MBS than is typically found in commercial total parenteral nutrient solutions to scavenge all the HP produced. An average of up to 940 microM of HP was produced in model and commercial pediatric parenteral 1% amino acid solutions in the presence of phototherapy light and clinically relevant concentrations of riboflavin and MBS. Light exposure decreased the antioxidant effect of MBS.

  20. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-03-10

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness.

  1. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness. PMID:28287411

  2. Total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Cherit, Guillermo; Borunda, Delia; Rivero-Sigarroa, Eduardo

    2002-08-01

    In recent months, numerous reports concerning total parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients have been published, including the guidelines and recommendations of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. The old controversy regarding the use of the enteral versus parenteral route still exists. Although the enteral route is indicated in those patients with normal gastrointestinal function, the parenteral route is obviously beneficial in several clinical conditions and appears to be associated with few procedure-related complications when performed by experienced clinicians. There is also continued interest in the supplementation of parenteral formulas with nutrients that were previously considered nonessential, such as arginine, glutamine, and omega-3 fatty acids, but that may become essential in the setting of critical illness.

  3. Composition optimization and stability testing of a parenteral antifungal solution based on a ternary solvent system.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Kristóf; Antal, István; Stampf, György; Klebovich, Imre; Ludányi, Krisztina

    2010-03-01

    An intravenous solution is a dosage forms intended for administration into the bloodstream. This route is the most rapid and the most bioavailable method of getting drugs into systemic circulation, and therefore it is also the most liable to cause adverse effects. In order to reduce the possibility of side effects and to ensure adequate clinical dosage of the formulation, the primarily formulated composition should be optimized. It is also important that the composition should retain its therapeutic effectiveness and safety throughout the shelf-life of the product. This paper focuses on the optimization and stability testing of a parenteral solution containing miconazole and ketoconazole solubilized with a ternary solvent system as model drugs. Optimization of the solvent system was performed based on assessing the risk/benefit ratio of the composition and its properties upon dilution. Stability tests were conducted based on the EMEA (European Medicines Agency) "guideline on stability testing: stability testing of existing active substances and related finished products". Experiments show that both the amount of co-solvent and surface active agent of the solvent system could substantially be reduced, while still maintaining adequate solubilizing power. It is also shown that the choice of various containers affects the stability of the compositions. It was concluded that by assessing the risk/benefit ratio of solubilizing power versus toxicity, the concentration of excipients could be considerably decreased while still showing a powerful solubilizing effect. It was also shown that a pharmaceutically acceptable shelf-life could be assigned to the composition, indicating good long-term stability.

  4. Evaluation of a taurine containing amino acid solution in parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, L; Griffin, E

    1991-01-01

    Vaminolact, an amino acid solution containing taurine, was given to 15 sick newborn babies. They were compared with a group of 10 babies who received a solution that did not contain taurine (Vamin glucose). Efficacy and safety were evaluated by monitoring plasma amino acid patterns, growth patterns, nitrogen balance, and biochemical and haematological profiles. No serious abnormalities in amino acid concentrations were found. After an initial fall the taurine concentration recovered more rapidly in those receiving the taurine supplement, though this difference was not significant. Phenylalanine concentrations were within the reference range in the group receiving Vaminolact, and were significantly lower than in the group receiving Vamin glucose. Metabolic acidosis, which occurred in several subjects in each group, was not a serious problem. Liver function tests remained satisfactory. Nitrogen retention was greater among those receiving Vaminolact than in the control group. Vaminolact is a safe and effective amino acid solution for use in critically ill babies. PMID:1899989

  5. Comparison of oral versus parenteral iron supplementation on the health and productivity of piglets.

    PubMed

    Maes, D; Steyaert, M; Vanderhaeghe, C; López Rodríguez, A; de Jong, E; Del Pozo Sacristán, R; Vangroenweghe, F; Dewulf, J

    2011-02-19

    The aim of this study was to compare oral iron supplementation in feed with a standard iron injection and assess the impact on the health and productivity of pigs. The reliability of a quick test (HemoCue) for the measurement of blood haemoglobin concentration was also investigated. Three pig herds, with a total of 88 sows and their piglets, were included in the study. Piglets in treatment group O were fed a special iron-rich feed on days 2 to 4, 5 to 7 and 8 to 12 of lactation using a specially designed feeding device. Piglets in group IM received 200 mg of an iron dextran complex intramuscularly at three days of age. Haemoglobin concentrations and performance of the piglets were compared between groups. The mean haemoglobin concentrations in pigs at weaning were 131.4 and 116.4 g/l for pigs in groups O and IM, respectively (P<0.01). Daily weight gain (253.9 v 248.8 g/day) and piglet mortality (11.4 v 12.2 per cent) were slightly better in group O than in group IM (P>0.05).

  6. Parenteral iron dextran therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, V J; Holland, E G

    1990-02-01

    Parenteral iron therapy is indicated in patients with iron-deficiency anemia associated with conditions that interfere with the ingestion or absorption of oral iron. Replacement doses of iron required to replenish iron stores are based on body weight and the observed hemoglobin value. Methods of administering iron dextran are reviewed, including intramuscular and intravenous injections of the undiluted drug, intravenous infusion of a diluted preparation, and as an addition to parenteral nutrition solutions. The overall incidence of adverse reactions associated with the parenteral administration of iron is low, but the potential for an anaphylactic reaction requires that an initial test dose be given followed by careful patient observation.

  7. The Technical and Financial Effects of Parenteral Supplementation with Selenium and Vitamin E during Late Pregnancy and the Early Lactation Period on the Productivity of Dairy Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bayril, T.; Yildiz, A. S.; Akdemir, F.; Yalcin, C.; Köse, M.; Yilmaz, O.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of parenteral selenium (Se) and vitamin E supplementation on economic impact, milk yield, and some reproductive parameters in high-yield dairy cows in the dry period and in those at the beginning of lactation. At the beginning of the dry period, cows (n = 323) were randomly divided into three groups as follows: Treatment 1 (T1), Treatment 2 (T2), and Control (C). Cows in group T1 received this preparation 21 days before calving and on calving day, and cows in group T2 received it only on calving day. The cows in the control group did not receive this preparation. Supplementation with Se increased Se serum levels of cows treated at calving day (p<0.05). Differences in milk yield at all weeks and the electrical conductivity values at the 8th and 12th weeks were significant (p<0.05). Supplementation with Se and Vitamin E decreased the incidence of metritis, the number of services per conception and the service period, but had no effects on the incidence of retained fetal membrane. A partial budgeting analysis indicated that Se supplementation was economically profitable; cows in group T1 averaged 240.6$ per cow, those in group T2 averaged 224.6$ per cow. Supplementation with Se and Vitamin E has been found to increase serum Se levels, milk yield, and has positive effects on udder health by decreasing milk conductivity values and incidence of sub-clinical mastitis. PMID:26104521

  8. Parenteral nutrition-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Pomeranz, S; Gimmon, Z; Ben Zvi, A; Katz, S

    1987-01-01

    A case report of a 4-yr-old child who developed an anaphylactic reaction to parenteral nutrition is presented. Dermal allergy tests demonstrated a sensitivity to Travasol solution and Armour multivitamin 2 solution. This is the first reported case known to us of such a response to elemental parenteral nutrition.

  9. Cloud point extraction of vanadium in pharmaceutical formulations, dialysate and parenteral solutions using 8-hydroxyquinoline and nonionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sumaira; Kazi, Tasneem G; Baig, Jameel A; Kolachi, Nida F; Afridi, Hassan I; Wadhwa, Sham Kumar; Shah, Abdul Q; Kandhro, Ghulam A; Shah, Faheem

    2010-10-15

    A cloud point extraction (CPE) method has been developed for the determination of trace quantity of vanadium ions in pharmaceutical formulations (PF), dialysate (DS) and parenteral solutions (PS). The CPE of vanadium (V) using 8-hydroxyquinoline (oxine) as complexing reagent and mediated by nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114) was investigated. The parameters that affect the extraction efficiency of CPE, such as pH of sample solution, concentration of oxine and Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and time period for shaking were investigated in detail. The validity of CPE of V was checked by standard addition method in real samples. The extracted surfactant-rich phase was diluted with nitric acid in ethanol, prior to subjecting electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Under these conditions, the preconcentration of 50 mL sample solutions, allowed raising an enrichment factor of 125-fold. The lower limit of detection obtained under the optimal conditions was 42 ng/L. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of trace quantity of V in various pharmaceutical preparations with satisfactory results. The concentration ranges of V in PF, DS and PS samples were found in the range of 10.5-15.2, 0.65-1.32 and 1.76-6.93 microg/L, respectively.

  10. Vancomycin stability in heparin and total parenteral nutrition solutions: novel approach to therapy of central venous catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Yao, J D; Arkin, C F; Karchmer, A W

    1992-01-01

    To facilitate therapy of central venous catheter-related Gram-positive bacterial infection in patients who require total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy, we studied the stability of vancomycin in a commonly used TPN solution (V-TPN) at final concentrations of 0.5 mg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL and in heparin (100 U/mL in 0.9% NaCl) at 25 micrograms/mL (V-H). Vancomycin concentrations in V-TPN and V-H after storage at 4 degrees C over 35 and 14 days, respectively, were stable (within 10% of the prestorage vancomycin concentration). After 14 days at 4 degrees C heparin activity in V-H solution was 100 +/- 4% of that noted initially. Vancomycin remained stable (100 +/- 6% of the original vancomycin concentration) when the previously refrigerated V-TPN was held for an additional 24 hours at 22 degrees C. When the previously refrigerated V-H was held for an additional 24 hours at 37 degrees C, vancomycin concentrations decreased to 78 +/- 9% of the baseline concentrations (p less than .001). The stability of vancomycin in this TPN solution allows the daily dose of vancomycin to be mixed with the solution and then infused over 10 hours. As shown with pharmacokinetic modeling, this form of therapy will achieve serum vancomycin concentrations within the therapeutic range throughout a 24-hour period. The relative stability of vancomycin in a heparin line-flush solution allows vancomycin concentration in the lumen of the catheter to be maintained at greater than or equal to 15 micrograms/mL during the interval between catheter flushing and the subsequent TPN infusion. A simplified method of administering vancomycin to patients receiving concurrent TPN is possible.

  11. Sedating the apprehensive debilitated patients for dental procedures by combining parenteral sedation and hypnosis with supplemental acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Wu, Ping-Shi; Lu, Winston I

    2012-01-01

    Treating apprehensive debilitated patients (i.e. geriatric patients, patients with cardiac, pulmonary, kidney, or liver diseases, and those with other severe systemic conditions) for dental procedures can cause unexpected medical complications such as cardiac arrest, stroke, asthma or shock, etc. Due to diminishing functional capacities of their organs, sedating those patients with sedative drugs in normal regular dosage could increase the risk of adverse events for this group of patients and can also increase the risk of liability for the clinician. The authors treated 34 apprehensive dental patients with a combination technique using parenteral sedation and hypnosis together with acupuncture. We used Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT) to select the compatible sedative drugs and to individualize the dosage suitable to the patient's medical condition. Oftentimes, BDORT predetermined dosage amounts to a fraction of regular dosage that is normally recommended by manufacturer for regular healthy patients. Such a reduced dosage, though benign to patient, may be insufficient to render a patient to the sedation level for dental treatment. Nevertheless, hypnosis with acupuncture can be applied to potentiate the therapeutic effect of parenteral sedation, thereby reducing the amount of sedative agents required to alleviate patient anxiety. The results indicated that hypnosis with acupuncture and BDORT could effectively allow the reduction of the sedative dosage and may beneficially provide a safe and comfortable situation for the debilitated patients to receive the necessary treatment.

  12. AGREEMENT BETWEEN DIFFERENT EQUATIONS TO ESTIMATE OSMOLARITY OF PARENTERAL NUTRITION SOLUTIONS.

    PubMed

    Valero Zanuy, M A; Pablos Bravo, S; Lazaro Cebas, A; Garcia Sanchez, J; Gomis Muñoz, P; Moreno Villares, J M; Leon Sanz, M

    2015-12-01

    Objetivo: nuestro objetivo era medir la osmolaridad de varias fórmulas de nutrición parenteral (NP) compuestas por diferentes componentes para determinar si las ecuaciones para calcular la osmolaridad de la solución, descritas en la literatura, predicen su osmolalidad en la práctica clínica. Método: se midió mediante osmometría la osmolalidad de 12 fórmulas de NP diferentes: 9 para acceso venoso central y 3 para acceso periférico, en un estudio transversal. Se analizó el acuerdo (test de correlación de Pearson) y las diferencias entre la osmolalidad medida y la osmolaridad calculada mediante tres fórmulas diferentes: ecuación de Pereira Da Silva, ecuación del manual de práctica clínica de ASPEN y ecuación de las guías de ASPEN. Resultados: la media ± desviación estándar de las soluciones era 1.789 ± 256 (rango 1.540 – 2.372) y 751 ± 64 mOsm/kg (rango 689 – 817) para perfusión central y periférica, respectivamente. La osmolalidad era debida principalmente a la glucosa (r = 0,975) y a los aminoacidos (r = 0,948). Todas las ecuaciones presentaban una buena correlación en el análisis bivariante (p = 0,000). Todas las ecuaciones tendían a infraestimar la osmolalidad, en comparación con el valor medido. Sin embargo, la ecuación de las guías de la ASPEN sobreestimaba la osmolalidad de las NP periféricas. Conclusiones: conocer la osmolaridad de la solución de NP periférica es importante para reducir el riesgo de flebitis. Las diferentes ecuaciones descritas en la literatura muestran una buena correlación entre ellas, aunque en general infraestiman la osmolalidad.

  13. Parenteral nutrition supplemented with short-chain fatty acids: effect on the small-bowel mucosa in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Koruda, M J; Rolandelli, R H; Bliss, D Z; Hastings, J; Rombeau, J L; Settle, R G

    1990-04-01

    When enteral nutrition is excluded from animals maintained solely with total parenteral nutrition (TPN), atrophy of the intestinal mucosa is observed. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are produced in the colon by the fermentation of dietary carbohydrates and fiber polysaccharides and have been shown to stimulate mucosal-cell mitotic activity in the intestine. This study compared the effects of an intravenous and an intracecal infusion of SCFAs on the small-bowel mucosa. Rats received standard TPN, TPN with SCFAs (sodium acetate, propionate, and butyrate), TPN with an intracecal infusion of SCFAs, or rat food. After 7 d jejunal and ileal mucosal weights, DNA, RNA, and protein were determined. Standard TPN produced significant atrophy of the jejunal and ileal mucosa. Both the intracecal and intravenous infusion of SCFAs significantly reduced the mucosal atrophy associated with TPN. The intravenous and intracolonic infusion of SCFAs were equally effective in inhibiting small-bowel mucosal atrophy.

  14. Excipient hydrolysis and ester formation increase pH in a parenteral solution over aging.

    PubMed

    Hirakura, Yutaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Wakasawa, Tatsuyoshi; Ban, Kazutoshi; Yokota, Shoji; Kitamura, Satoshi

    2006-11-15

    Recently, the number of drug substances that are poorly water-soluble has increased dramatically. This makes improving solubility one of the most critical tasks in pharmaceutical development today. In this study, the physicochemical stability of an injectable solution of conivaptan hydrochloride salt was investigated. Because its free form is hydrophobic, the drug substance was solubilized in a co-solvent system, 40% of which was composed of different alcohols. Since the free form is also alkaline, lactic acid was added to the co-solvent system to further improve its solubility. Remarkably, the pH of the solution was found to increase gradually over time. Considering the physicochemical nature of the drug substance, uncontrolled increases in pH would pose a potential threat of reducing solubility and forming precipitates. For this reason, a risk evaluation was performed. The evaluation revealed that the pH increase was caused by the hydrolysis of lactic acid oligomers as well as by the ester formation occurring between lactic acid and the alcohols. High concentrations of lactic acid supplied as an excipient usually contain lactic acid oligomers, which are hydrolyzed into lactic acid monomers upon dilution with water. Commercial software was used to determine the pK(a) values of the lactic acid oligomers, which were found to be lower than that of lactic acid monomers. This indicates that hydrolysis causes the pH to increase. Ester formation consumes the acid, which also causes the pH to increase. However, both hydrolysis and ester formation equilibrated by the 16-month time point when stored at 25 degrees C. This information allowed the upper limit of the pH increase to be determined molecularly, thereby ensuring product quality through the prevention of precipitate formation due to reduced solubility. Increased awareness of the importance of risk evaluation in pharmaceutical development is critical as these kinds of chemical reactions between excipients constitute

  15. Quantitation of protein particles in parenteral solutions using micro-flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ting; Sharma, Deepak; Oma, Peter; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2009-09-01

    The U.S. and European Pharmacopeias require subvisible (> or =10 and > or =25 microm) and visible particulate testing of therapeutics to ensure their safety and suitability for clinical use. The objective of this article is to compare the sizing and counting accuracies of light obscuration, which is the standard technique used to measure subvisible particulate matter, and Micro-Flow Imaging (MFI), a new imaging-based technology. An immunoconjugate was selected as the model protein for this study since it could be induced to form particulate matter in PBS. Light obscuration was performed as described in USP chapter <788> while MFI measurements were conducted per the manufacturer's procedures. The two techniques yielded similar results when polystyrene standards were analyzed. However, the MFI measurements indicated the presence of significantly more particles in the protein-containing solution compared to the light obscuration measurements. The presence of nonspherical protein particles as well as particles that possess a refractive index similar to the solvent that they are in appear to be detected by MFI, but not by light obscuration, leading to the difference in the results. Imaging-based technologies could aid in developing formulations and processes that would minimize the formation of protein particulates.

  16. Parenteral iron dextran therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Burns, D L; Mascioli, E A; Bistrian, B R

    1995-01-01

    Iron dextran was introduced more than 30 yr ago for the parenteral treatment of iron deficiency anemia that is refractory to oral therapy. Iron dextran is a preparation of ferric hydroxide complexed with a low molecular weight fraction of dextran. Iron deficiency anemia is one of the most common nutritional deficiency diseases and occurs worldwide secondary to inadequate dietary iron, usually with excessive gastrointestinal blood losses. Repletion of iron stores is often complicated by intolerance to oral iron supplementation and may require parenteral iron. Parenteral iron can be administered via the intramuscular or intravenous route either directly or as an additive to total parenteral nutrition. Both routes of administration can cause various side effects and a test dose is recommended before therapeutic administration to assess the risk for anaphylaxis. Although the efficacy and safety of parenteral iron dextran have been convincingly demonstrated, supplementation may be contraindicated in the setting of infection.

  17. History of parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Dudrick, Stanley J

    2009-06-01

    The concept of feeding patients entirely parenterally by injecting nutrient substances or fluids intravenously was advocated and attempted long before the successful practical development of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) four decades ago. Realization of this 400 year old seemingly fanciful dream initially required centuries of fundamental investigation coupled with basic technological advances and judicious clinical applications. Most clinicians in the 1950's were aware of the negative impact of starvation on morbidity, mortality, and outcomes, but only few understood the necessity for providing adequate nutritional support to malnourished patients if optimal clinical results were to be achieved. The prevailing dogma in the 1960's was that, "Feeding entirely by vein is impossible; even if it were possible, it would be impractical; and even if it were practical, it would be unaffordable." Major challenges to the development of TPN included: (1) formulate complete parenteral nutrient solutions (did not exist), (2) concentrate substrate components to 5-6 times isotonicity without precipitation (not easily done), (3) demonstrate utility and safety of long-term central venous catheterization (not looked upon with favor by the medical hierarchy), (4) demonstrate efficacy and safety of long-term infusion of hypertonic nutrient solutions (contrary to clinical practices at the time), (5) maintain asepsis and antisepsis throughout solution preparation and delivery (required a major culture change), and (6) anticipate, avoid, and correct metabolic imbalances or derangements (a monumental challenge and undertaking). This presentation recounts approaches to, and solution of, some of the daunting problems as really occurred in a comprehensive, concise and candid history of parenteral nutrition.

  18. Effect of amino acid composition of parenteral solutions on nitrogen retention and metabolic response in very-low-birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Chessex, P; Zebiche, H; Pineault, M; Lepage, D; Dallaire, L

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of amino acid preparations on the metabolic response of parenterally fed immature newborn infants, nitrogen retention and plasma amino acid concentrations were compared in very-low-birth-weight infants given two parenteral regimens differing only by the composition of the infused amino acids (Travasol 10% blend B and Vamin 7%). The intakes of fluid, nitrogen, and calories were comparable. The nitrogen retention was 72% +/- 7% with Vamin and 65% +/- 6% with Travasol. The differences in plasma amino acid concentrations were consistent with the composition of the amino acid solutions. During the infusion of Vamin the increased intake of aromatic amino acids resulted in high plasma levels of tyrosine (256 +/- 233 mumol/L, range 67 to 894 mumol/L). The infusion of Travasol resulted in high plasma levels of methionine (114 +/- 39 mumol/L, range 53 to 260 mumol/L) and an elevated load of glycine, which was accompanied by an abnormally high urinary loss of this amino acid. Despite these metabolic imbalances, the growth rate over the whole study was adequate. These results emphasize the importance of the composition of amino acid solutions on the metabolic response of the very immature preterm infant.

  19. Hydrogen Supplementation of Preservation Solution Improves Viability of Osteochondral Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takuya; Onuma, Kenji; Kuzuno, Jun; Ujihira, Masanobu; Kurokawa, Ryosuke; Sakai, Rina; Takaso, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Allogenic osteochondral tissue (OCT) is used for the treatment of large cartilage defects. Typically, OCTs collected during the disease-screening period are preserved at 4°C; however, the gradual reduction in cell viability during cold preservation adversely affects transplantation outcomes. Therefore, improved storage methods that maintain the cell viability of OCTs are needed to increase the availability of high-quality OCTs and improve treatment outcomes. Here, we evaluated whether long-term hydrogen delivery to preservation solution improved the viability of rat OCTs during cold preservation. Hydrogen-supplemented Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM) and University of Wisconsin (UW) solution both significantly improved the cell viability of OCTs during preservation at 4°C for 21 days compared to nonsupplemented media. However, the long-term cold preservation of OCTs in DMEM containing hydrogen was associated with the most optimal maintenance of chondrocytes with respect to viability and morphology. Our findings demonstrate that OCTs preserved in DMEM supplemented with hydrogen are a promising material for the repair of large cartilage defects in the clinical setting. PMID:25506061

  20. Parenteral drug products containing aluminum as an ingredient or a contaminant: Response to Food and Drug Administration notice of intent and request for information. ASCN/A. S. P. E. N. Working Group on Standards for Aluminum Content of Parenteral Nutrition Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    Aluminum remains a significant contaminant of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) solutions and may be elevated in bone, urine, and plasma of infants receiving TPN. Aluminum accumulation in tissues of uremic patients and adult TPN patients has been associated with low-turnover bone disease. Furthermore, aluminum has also been linked with encephalopathy and anemia in uremic patients and with hepatic cholestasis in experimental animals. Because of the toxic effects of aluminum, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently published a notice of intent to set an upper limit of 25 micrograms/L for aluminum in large-volume parenterals and to require manufacturers of small-volume parenterals, such as calcium and phosphate salts, to measure aluminum content and note this content on the package label. The ASCN/A.S.P.E.N. Working Group on Standards for Aluminum Content of Parenteral Nutrition Solutions supports these intentions and further urges the FDA to require that cumulative aluminum intake in terms of safe, unsafe, and toxic quantities of aluminum per kilogram be made known to physicians and pharmacists preparing the TPN solutions, to ensure that manufacturers use appropriate control procedures in aluminum measurements, and to employ a standard unit of aluminum measurement.

  1. Short-chain fatty acid-supplemented total parenteral nutrition alters intestinal structure, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) mRNA and protein, and proglucagon mRNA abundance in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, K A; Drozdowski, L A; Thomson, A B; McBurney, M I

    1998-07-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a complex physiologic process that is not completely understood. Intravenous short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) enhance intestinal adaptation after 80% enterectomy in rats. The purpose of this study was to examine rapid responses to SCFA-supplemented total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in the normal small intestine. After jugular catheterization, 31 Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 258 +/- 3 g) were randomly assigned to receive standard TPN or an isoenergetic, isonitrogenous TPN solution supplemented with SCFAs (TPN+SCFA). Intestinal samples were obtained after 24 or 72 h of nutrient infusion. TPN+SCFA for 24 h increased (P < 0.05) the ileal RNA concentration (microg RNA/mg ileum) whereas TPN+SCFA for 72 h increased (P < 0.05) the ileal DNA concentration (microg DNA/mg ileum) and decreased (P < 0.05) the ileal protein concentration (microg protein/mg ileum). Ileal proglucagon mRNA abundance was elevated (P < 0.05) after 24 h of TPN+SCFA infusion and returned to levels seen with control TPN by 72 h. Glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) mRNA was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the TPN+SCFA groups at both time points when compared with control TPN groups. Ileal GLUT2 protein abundance in the 72-h TPN+SCFA group was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of all other groups. Sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT-1) mRNA and protein abundance and uptake of D-fructose and D-glucose did not differ between groups. Jejunal uptake of L-glucose and lauric acid was significantly higher (P < 0.05) after 72 h of TPN+SCFA than after 24 h, whereas the 24- and 72-h TPN groups did not differ. In summary, SCFAs led to rapid changes in ileal proglucagon and glucose transporter expression in rats receiving TPN and provide insights into therapeutic management of individuals with short bowel syndrome or intestinal malabsorption syndromes.

  2. Parenteral Nutrition–Associated Liver Injury and Increased GRP94 Expression Prevented by ω-3 Fish Oil–Based Lipid Emulsion Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xueping; Xiao, Zhihui; Chen, Xiaoqian; Li, Yanhong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Xu, Yumin; Feng, Xing; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Parenteral nutrition in infants with gastrointestinal disorders can be lifesaving, but it is also associated with parenteral nutrition–associated liver disease. We investigated the effects of incorporating ω-3 fish oil in a parenteral nutrition mixture on signs of parenteral nutrition–associated liver disease and explored the mechanism involved in this process. Methods: Seven-day-old New Zealand rabbits were divided into 3 groups of 8, and for 1 week they were infused via the right jugular vein with standard total parenteral nutrition with soybean oil (TPN-soy) or TPN with ω-3 fish oil–based lipid emulsion (TPN-FO), or naturally nursed with rabbit milk (control). Serum and liver tissues were analyzed for serological indicators and pathology, respectively. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate the messenger RNA levels of the endoplasmic reticulum stress chaperone protein glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) in liver tissues and GRP94 protein levels were compared through immunohistochemistry and Western blot assays. Results: TPN-soy animals had significantly higher serum total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase and lower serum albumin than the controls (P < 0.01, each) or the TPN-FO group, which were similar to the controls (P < 0.01 cf. TPN). Damage to liver tissues of the TPN-FO group was much less than that of the TPN-soy group. GRP94 messenger RNA and protein levels in liver tissues of TPN-soy animals were significantly higher than that of the controls or TPN-FO rabbits, which were similar to the controls. Conclusions: Incorporating ω-3 fish oil in parenteral nutrition emulsion greatly prevented liver dysfunction and liver tissue damage in week-old rabbit kits, possibly by preventing endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:25199039

  3. Calcium Chloride in Neonatal Parenteral Nutrition Solutions with and without Added Cysteine: Compatibility Studies Using Laser and Micro-Flow Imaging Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Robert K.; Christensen, J. Mark; Alshahrani, Sultan M.; Mohamed, Sumeia M.; Clark, Sara M.; Nason, Jeffrey A.; Wu, Ying Xing

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies of compatibility of calcium chloride (CaCl2) and phosphates have not included particle counts in the range specified by the United States Pharmacopeia. Micro-flow imaging techniques have been shown to be comparable to light obscuration when determining particle count and size in pharmaceutical solutions. Objective The purpose of this study was to do compatibility testing for parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions containing CaCl2 using dynamic light scattering and micro-flow imaging techniques. Methods Solutions containing TrophAmine (Braun Medical Inc, Irvine, CA), CaCl2, and sodium phosphate (NaPhos) were compounded with and without cysteine. All solutions contained standard additives to neonatal PN solutions including dextrose, trace metals, and electrolytes. Control solutions contained no calcium or phosphate. Solutions were analyzed for particle size and particle count. Means of Z-average particle size and particle counts of controls were determined. Study solutions were compared to controls and United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Chapter 788 guidelines. The maximum amount of Phos that was compatible in solutions that contained at least 10 mmol/L of Ca in 2.5% amino acids (AA) was determined. Compatibility of these solutions was verified by performing analyses of 5 repeats of these solutions. Microscopic analyses of the repeats were also performed. Results Amounts of CaCl2 and NaPhos that were compatible in solutions containing 1.5%, 2%, 2.5%, and 3% AA were determined. The maximum amount of NaPhos that could be added to TrophAmine solutions of > = 2.5% AA containing at least 10 mmol/L of CaCl2 was 7.5 mmol/L. Adding 50 mg/dL of cysteine increased the amount of NaPhos that could be added to solutions containing 10 mmol/L of CaCl2 to 10 mmol/L. Conclusion Calcium chloride can be added to neonatal PN solutions containing NaPhos in concentrations that can potentially provide an intravenous intake of adequate amounts of calcium and phosphorus

  4. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007239.htm Total parenteral nutrition - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  5. 78 FR 40474 - Sustaining Power Solutions LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Sustaining Power Solutions LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding, of Sustaining Power Solutions LLC's application for...

  6. Chromium deficiency during total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Freund, H; Atamian, S; Fischer, J E

    1979-02-02

    Chromium is required for maintenance of normal glucose tolerance. After complete bowel resection and five months of total parenteral nutrition, severe glucose intolerance, weight loss, and a metabolic encephalopathy-like confusional state developed in a patient. Serum chromium levels were at the lowest normal level. Supplementation of 150 microgram of chromium per day reversed the glucose intolerance, reduced insulin requirements, and resulted in weight gain and the disappearance of encephalopathy. The low levels of chromium and response to chromium supplementation suggest that chromium deficiency can arise in long-term total parenteral nutrition.

  7. Randomised trial of glutamine and selenium supplemented parenteral nutrition for critically ill patients. Protocol Version 9, 19 February 2007 known as SIGNET (Scottish Intensive care Glutamine or seleNium Evaluative Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Peter JD; Avenell, Alison; Noble, David W; Campbell, Marion K; Battison, Claire G; Croal, Bernard L; Simpson, William G; Norrie, John; Vale, Luke D; Cook, Jonathon; de Verteuil, Robyn; Milne, Anne C

    2007-01-01

    Background Mortality rates in the Intensive Care Unit and subsequent hospital mortality rates in the UK remain high. Infections in Intensive Care are associated with a 2–3 times increased risk of death. It is thought that under conditions of severe metabolic stress glutamine becomes "conditionally essential". Selenium is an essential trace element that has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Approximately 23% of patients in Intensive Care require parenteral nutrition and glutamine and selenium are either absent or present in low amounts. Both glutamine and selenium have the potential to influence the immune system through independent biochemical pathways. Systematic reviews suggest that supplementing parenteral nutrition in critical illness with glutamine or selenium may reduce infections and mortality. Pilot data has shown that more than 50% of participants developed infections, typically resistant organisms. We are powered to show definitively whether supplementation of PN with either glutamine or selenium is effective at reducing new infections in critically ill patients. Methods/design 2 × 2 factorial, pragmatic, multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial. The trial has an enrolment target of 500 patients. Inclusion criteria include: expected to be in critical care for at least 48 hours, aged 16 years or over, patients who require parenteral nutrition and are expected to have at least half their daily nutritional requirements given by that route. Allocation is to one of four iso-caloric, iso-nitrogenous groups: glutamine, selenium, both glutamine & selenium or no additional glutamine or selenium. Trial supplementation is given for up to seven days on the Intensive Care Unit and subsequent wards if practicable. The primary outcomes are episodes of infection in the 14 days after starting trial nutrition and mortality. Secondary outcomes include antibiotic usage, length of hospital stay, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. Discussion

  8. HPLC-based method using sample pre-column clean-up for the determination of methanethiol and ethanethiol in parenteral amino acid solutions.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, P C; Bohrer, D; Rohlfes, A L; de Carvalho, L M; Ramirez, A

    2001-05-01

    A method has been developed for the chromatographic determination of methanethiol (MT) and ethanethiol (ET) as contaminants in amino acid parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions. The clean-up of the samples before chromatographic analysis was investigated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) on pre-columns filled with polyethylene powder (PE), aluminium oxide (AlOx), silica (SiOx), or polyurethane foam (PUF) as adsorbents. The thiols were more efficiently separated from the matrices by SPE on PUF pre-columns. Simultaneous derivatization and elution with DTNB (5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)) enabled further discrimination between MT and ET by reversed-phase HPLC with spectrophotometric detection. The retention times for the derivatized MT and ET species were 12.5 and 23.0 min, respectively. Recoveries from spiked PN samples were calculated to be approximately 90%, and the MT and ET content of commercial PN solutions was determined using the methodology described. Detection limits of 15 and 10 microg L(-1) were calculated for MT and ET, respectively.

  9. Use of a systematic risk analysis method to improve safety in the production of paediatric parenteral nutrition solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bonnabry, P; Cingria, L; Sadeghipour, F; Ing, H; Fonzo-Christe, C; Pfister, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Until recently, the preparation of paediatric parenteral nutrition formulations in our institution included re-transcription and manual compounding of the mixture. Although no significant clinical problems have occurred, re-engineering of this high risk activity was undertaken to improve its safety. Several changes have been implemented including new prescription software, direct recording on a server, automatic printing of the labels, and creation of a file used to pilot a BAXA MM 12 automatic compounder. The objectives of this study were to compare the risks associated with the old and new processes, to quantify the improved safety with the new process, and to identify the major residual risks. Methods: A failure modes, effects, and criticality analysis (FMECA) was performed by a multidisciplinary team. A cause-effect diagram was built, the failure modes were defined, and the criticality index (CI) was determined for each of them on the basis of the likelihood of occurrence, the severity of the potential effect, and the detection probability. The CIs for each failure mode were compared for the old and new processes and the risk reduction was quantified. Results: The sum of the CIs of all 18 identified failure modes was 3415 for the old process and 1397 for the new (reduction of 59%). The new process reduced the CIs of the different failure modes by a mean factor of 7. The CI was smaller with the new process for 15 failure modes, unchanged for two, and slightly increased for one. The greatest reduction (by a factor of 36) concerned re-transcription errors, followed by readability problems (by a factor of 30) and chemical cross contamination (by a factor of 10). The most critical steps in the new process were labelling mistakes (CI 315, maximum 810), failure to detect a dosage or product mistake (CI 288), failure to detect a typing error during the prescription (CI 175), and microbial contamination (CI 126). Conclusions: Modification of the process

  10. Home initiation of parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Newton, Alyce F; DeLegge, Mark H

    2007-02-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) has been successfully initiated in the home since the early 1990s. The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Standards for Specialized Nutrition Support: Home Care Patients, Safe Practices for Parenteral Nutrition, and Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients do not contain specific information on the initiation of home PN (HPN). Peer-reviewed, published guidelines are necessary to provide safe and appropriate initiation of HPN. Certain patients should not have PN initiated in the home, such as those with organ failure, uncontrolled diabetes, or uncorrectable electrolyte abnormalities. Excellent candidates for initiation of HPN include patients who have failed enteral feedings, have gastrointestinal (GI) diseases without excessive GI losses, or those with an oncology diagnosis and inability to tube feed. One concern of initiation of HPN is the potential for refeeding syndrome. Refeeding syndrome can be prevented when patients are properly evaluated and managed before initiation of PN. Refeeding syndrome can be avoided by rehydration with fluid and electrolytes before initiation of HPN to normalize blood chemistry when necessary and by starting with a moderate-volume, low-carbohydrate HPN solution compounded with optimal potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium content, and slowly advanced to goal. The "start low and go slow" motto of nutrition support should continue to be followed, but more specific guidelines are needed to assist nutrition support clinicians with safe and appropriate initiation of HPN.

  11. Modular Building Supplement: A Quick, Quality Solution for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodmiller, Brian D.; Schendell, Derek G.

    2003-01-01

    This supplement presents three articles on modular construction that look at: "Fast Track Expansion for a New Jersey School" (involving a modular addition); "Precast Construction Helps Schools Meet Attendance Boom" (precast concrete components are quick, durable, and flexible); and "Airing HVAC Concerns" (poor indoor air quality in prefabricated…

  12. Parenteral arginine infusion in humans: nutrient substrate or pharmacologic agent?

    PubMed

    Sigal, R K; Shou, J; Daly, J M

    1992-01-01

    When given as a dietary supplement, arginine enhances lymphocyte mitogenesis and improves nitrogen balance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate arginine's ability to mediate these same effects when given as the sole nitrogen source with minimum additional calories. Thirty patients were randomized to receive 20 g/day arginine hydrochloride or a mixed amino acid solution (Travasol) by intravenous infusion for 7 days after abdominal operations. Mean patient age, body weight, gender ratios, and preoperative degree of weight loss were similar between groups. Mean plasma arginine and ornithine levels rose to 228 +/- 50 mumol/L and 191 +/- 76 mumol/L in the arginine group during infusion. Mean nitrogen balance was -8.8 g/day and -9.2 g/day in the arginine and Travasol groups, respectively. Mean lymphocyte stimulation indices to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin fell on postoperative day 1 in both groups. No significant differences in patterns of lymphocyte mitogenesis changes were noted between groups. The mean total number of circulating T cells increased in the arginine group at postoperative day 7. Thus, parenteral arginine infusion in postoperative patients provided comparable nitrogen balance to a balanced amino acid solution but did not increase peripheral blood lymphocyte mitogenesis. When arginine is given parenterally as the sole nitrogen source with minimal additional calories to postoperative patients, no enhancement of mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation could be demonstrated.

  13. Parenteral microemulsions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Date, Abhijit A; Nagarsenker, M S

    2008-05-01

    Parenteral delivery of the hydrophobic drugs is a very challenging task. The conventional approaches such as use of co-solvents, oily vehicles and modern approaches such as mixed micelles, liposomes, complexation with cyclodextrins and emulsions have several limitations. Microemulsions have evolved as a novel vehicle for parenteral delivery of the hydrophobic drugs. Their interesting features such as spontaneity of formation, ease of manufacture, high solubilization capacity and self-preserving property make them the vehicle of choice. The review focuses on the excipients available for formulation of the parenteral microemulsions and describes the investigations reported for the various classes of therapeutic agents.

  14. Parenteral iron therapy options.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Scott B; Rodgers, George M

    2004-05-01

    Parenteral iron therapy is occasionally necessary for patients intolerant or unresponsive to oral iron therapy, for receiving recombinant erythropoietin therapy, or for use in treating functional iron deficiency. There are now three parenteral iron products available: iron dextran, ferric gluconate, and iron sucrose. We summarize the advantages and disadvantages of each product, including risk of anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity, dosage regimens, and costs. The increased availability of multiple parenteral iron preparations should decrease the need to use red cell transfusions in patients with iron-deficiency anemia.

  15. Neuroimaging identifies increased manganese deposition in infants receiving parenteral nutrition12

    PubMed Central

    Aschner, Judy L; Anderson, Adam; Slaughter, James Christopher; Aschner, Michael; Steele, Steven; Beller, Amy; Mouvery, Amanda; Furlong, Heather M; Maitre, Nathalie L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Manganese, an essential metal for normal growth and development, is neurotoxic on excessive exposure. Standard trace element–supplemented neonatal parenteral nutrition (PN) has a high manganese content and bypasses normal gastrointestinal absorptive control mechanisms, which places infants at risk of manganese neurotoxicity. Magnetic resonance (MR) relaxometry demonstrating short T1 relaxation time (T1R) in the basal ganglia reflects excessive brain manganese accumulation. Objective: This study tested the hypothesis that infants with greater parenteral manganese exposure have higher brain manganese accumulation, as measured by MR imaging, than do infants with lower parenteral manganese exposure. Design: Infants exposed to parenteral manganese were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Infants classified as having high manganese exposure received >75% of their nutrition in the preceding 4 wk as PN. All others were classified as having low exposure. Daily parenteral and enteral manganese intakes were calculated. Whole-blood manganese was measured by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Brain MR relaxometry was interpreted by a masked reviewer. Linear regression models, adjusted for gestational age (GA) at birth, estimated the association of relaxometry indexes with total and parenteral manganese exposures. Results: Seventy-three infants were enrolled. High-quality MR images were available for 58 infants, 39 with high and 19 with low manganese exposure. Four infants with a high exposure had blood manganese concentrations >30 μg/L. After controlling for GA, higher parenteral and total manganese intakes were associated with a lower T1R (P = 0.01) in the globus pallidus and putamen but were not associated with whole-blood manganese (range: 3.6–56.6 μg/L). Elevated conjugated bilirubin magnified the association between parenteral manganese and decreasing T1R. Conclusion: A short T1R for GA identifies infants at risk of

  16. Severe Hypothyroidism From Iodine Deficiency Associated With Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Golekoh, Marjorie C; Cole, Conrad R; Jones, Nana-Hawa Yayah

    2016-11-01

    Parenteral nutrition is crucial for supply of nutrients in children who cannot tolerate a full enteral diet. In the United States, it is not standard of care to give iodine to children dependent on parenteral nutrition, hence iodine is not routinely included in the micronutrient package. Herein, we present a case of a boy with hypothyroidism secondary to iodine deficiency after prolonged exclusive use of parenteral nutrition. Our case highlights the importance of screening for iodine deficiency and administering timely iodine supplementation in these at-risk children to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism.

  17. Hyperammonemia during total parenteral nutrition in children.

    PubMed

    Seashore, J H; Seashore, M R; Riely, C

    1982-01-01

    Serial blood ammonia (NH3) determinations in 19 low birth weight (LBW) infants, 14 term neonates and 12 children receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) have shown that 73% of patients had one or more elevated NH3 values (greater than 150 micrograms/dl). The mean blood NH3 was 220 +/- 13 micrograms/dl in LBW infants, 180 +/- 9 micrograms/dl in 10 infants, and 140 +/- 7 micrograms/dl in children. All of these values are significantly higher than normal (p less than 0.001). There was no difference in incidence or mean blood ammonia concentration between patients receiving casein hydrolysate and those receiving a crystalline amino acid solution. Only four patients were symptomatic and several infants remained fully alert despite blood NH3 concentration in excess of 400 micrograms/dl. One infant who had sustained hyperammonemia was given another amino acid source (Travasol) containing 1.2 mmol/dl of arginine; blood NH3 promptly fell to the normal range. However, six of seven additional infants had hyperammonemia while receiving Travasol (mean = 184 micrograms/dl). Hyperammonemia is common during TPN in children, often is not recognized clinically, and occurs with equal frequency in infants and older children. The high levels observed in LBW infants may be due to hepatic immaturity. Blood NH3 concentration should be monitored frequently during TPN. Persistent hyperammonemia should be treated by decreasing protein content of the infusate. The role of supplemental arginine is unclear.

  18. Improved preservation of the rat heart with celsior solution supplemented with cariporide plus glyceryl trinitrate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling; Hicks, Mark; MacDonald, Peter S

    2005-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether the addition of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a source of nitric oxide, and/or cariporide, a Na/H exchange inhibitor, to a commercial preservation solution (Celsior) improved and extended cardiac preservation. After baseline indices of cardiac function (aortic flow, coronary flow, heart rate, cardiac output) were measured in an isolated working rat heart model, hearts were arrested and stored at 2-3 degrees C for 6 or 10 h in Celsior solution alone, Celsior supplemented with either 0.1 mg/mL GTN or 10 microM cariporide or both. After storage, functional measurements were repeated and recovery of each parameter was expressed as a percentage of its pre-storage baseline. After 6 h storage, recovery of cardiac function was significantly better in hearts stored in GTN- or cariporide-supplemented Celsior solution compared with Celsior solution alone. The beneficial effect of GTN was significantly abrogated in hearts perfused with glibenclamide prior to storage. Significant recovery of cardiac function after 10 h storage was only observed in hearts stored in Celsior solution supplemented with both GTN and cariporide. Combined supplementation with GTN and cariporide extends the safe period of storage of the rat heart and may be a useful approach to enhancing preservation of the donor heart.

  19. Design Solutions: Supplement to the Curriculum Guide for Art in the Secondary Schools. Field Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Board of Education, IL.

    Intended to clarify the elements and principles of design as stated in the "Curriculum Guide for Art in the Secondary Schools," this illustrated supplement presents 15 design units with step-by-step instructions for clarifying design problems and providing solutions. Each unit is presented in three stages, each of which is a complete…

  20. [Elevated serum lithium concentration due to switch from parenteral nutrition alone to parenteral with enteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Goto, Hidekazu; Tomita, Takashi; Doki, Shotaro; Nakanishi, Rie; Kojima, Chikako; Yoneshima, Mihoko; Yoshida, Tadashi; Tanaka, Katsuya; Kohda, Yukinao

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient with elevated serum lithium concentration caused by switching from parenteral nutrition alone to parenteral with enteral nutrition. A 73-year-old female inpatient was treated with lithium carbonate 600 mg/d for manic episodes of bipolar disorder. Her serum lithium level was maintained at 0.57-0.79 mEq/L. She was administered total parenteral nutrition owing to difficulty in oral intake. Her diet contained 4.8-5.8 g/d of sodium chloride. After this, parenteral with enteral nutrition was initiated. The total sodium chloride intake decreased from 6.3 to 3.0-4.0 g/d following this change. On day 15 after initiation of parenteral with enteral nutrition, her serum lithium level increased to 1.17 mEq/L, which is closer to the upper therapeutic range limit. Therefore enteral nutrition was stopped immediately, and an electrolyte solution was administered instead of enteral nutrition. An antibiotic agent was also simultaneously administered because of infection. The total amount of sodium chloride administered was increased to 7.0 g/d during this treatment. Four days after treatment, the serum lithium level returned to 0.57 mEq/L. This case suggests that administration of appropriate sodium chloride nutrition is important during treatment with lithium carbonate, because disposition of lithium ion is paralleled to that of sodium.

  1. The Use of Parenteral Iron Therapy for the Treatment of Postpartum Anemia.

    PubMed

    Nash, Christopher M; Allen, Victoria M

    2015-05-01

    Rates of postpartum hemorrhage have been increasing in Canada over the last 10 years, with postpartum iron deficiency anemia as the most common consequence. Postpartum anemia is treated with oral iron supplementation and/or blood transfusion. Recent studies have evaluated the use of parenteral iron as a better tolerated treatment modality. Compared with oral iron supplements, parenteral iron is associated with a more rapid rise in serum ferritin and hemoglobin and improved maternal fatigue scores in the postpartum period. It may also decrease rates of blood transfusion. Parenteral iron may be considered in select clinical situations for the treatment of postpartum anemia.

  2. A summary of the iodine supplementation study protocol (I2S2): a UK multicentre randomised controlled trial in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Williams, Fiona; Hume, Robert; Ogston, Simon; Brocklehurst, Peter; Morgan, Kayleigh; Juszczak, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarises the study protocol for the randomised controlled trial of iodine supplementation in preterm infants. Iodine is essential for the synthesis of thyroxine, and thyroxine is essential for normal brain development in utero and for the first 2-3 years of life. The recommended iodine intake in parenteral nutrition regimens is 1 μg/kg/day and commercially available parenteral solutions for infants reflect these recommendations. In the absence of other iodine sources, infants are vulnerable to negative iodine balance and insufficiency. As many preterm infants are fed parenterally for prolonged periods with solutions which have been shown to be iodine-deficient, the I2S2 Trial was designed to establish whether iodine supplementation of preterm infants benefits neurodevelopment.

  3. Supplemental Report: Technetium-99 On-Line Monitoring by Beta Counting for Hanford Supernate Waste Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, R.A.

    2000-08-23

    SRTC is investigating approaches for near-real-time monitoring of 99Tc at selected points in the proposed pretreatment process for Hanford supernate waste solutions. The desired monitoring points include both the feed to and decontaminated product from a technetium-removal column. A Cs-removal column precedes technetium decontamination in the proposed process. Our earlier report (Ref. 1) showed that a simple flow-through beta counting system can easily meet 99Tc detection limit goals for solutions that do not contain interfering radionuclides; however, concentrations of residual interferences were too high in process solutions at the desired monitoring points. That is, technetium can not be measured without additional purification. In this supplement, ADS evaluated ion exchange cartridges to remove radionuclides that interfere with 99Tc beta measurements. Tests on radioactive standard solutions and on Hanford Envelope B (AZ-102) pretreated process solutions show that 99Tc passes through the cation removal cartridge to an on-line beta counter, and that interfering radionuclides were nearly totally removed. Envelope B solutions included both the process's Cs-removed feed to the Tc-removal column and product from the column. Analyses of these solutions before and after the cation exchange cartridge show that the concentration of the primary interference, 137Cs, was reduced to about 1/250th of the feed concentration.

  4. Plasma trace metals during total parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Solomons, N W; Layden, T J; Rosenberg, I H; Vo-Khactu, K; Sandstead, H H

    1976-06-01

    The plasma concentrations of the trace metals zinc and copper were studied prospectively in 13 patients with gastrointestinal diseases treated with parenteral alimentation (TPA) for periods of from 8 days to 7 1/2 weeks. Plasma copper levels fell rapidly and consistently in all patients, with an overall rate of - 11 mug per 100 ml per week. Zinc concentrations declined in 10 of 13 patients at a more gradual rate. Analysis of the standard parenteral alimentation fluids revealed zinc content equivalent to 50% of the daily requirement and a negligible content of copper. From combined analysis of plasma zinc, hair zinc, and taste acuity, there is evidence that increased utilization or redistribution within the body may effect plasma concentrations in some patients. Neither an increase in urinary excretion nor a primary decrease in plasma binding proteins appeared to be a major factor in lowering plasma trace metal concentrations. These findings indicate that a marked decrease in plasma copper is regular and a decline in plasma zinc is common during TPA using fluids unsupplemented with trace metals. Supplementation of parenteral alimentation fluids with the trace metals zinc and copper is recommended.

  5. Use of Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition Solutions as a Risk Factor for Bacillus cereus Peripheral Venous Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infection at a Japanese Tertiary Care Hospital: a Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Sakihama, Tomoko; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2016-11-22

    The risk factors are unclear for peripheral venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (PVCBSIs) caused by Bacillus cereus. We aimed to examine for these risk factors in patients with B. cereus PVCBSI by conducting a 2-year case-control study in a large teaching hospital. We analyzed all adult cases of B. cereus PVCBSI (37 patients) and 180 controls who were randomly selected from among patients who had a PVC in place for at least 2 days. Multivariate analysis using a conditional logistic regression model indicated that independent risk factors were use of a peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) solution with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 88.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.4-451.9), and steroid therapy (adjusted OR, 5.7 [95% CI, 1.3-24.4]). In conclusion, use of PPN solutions or steroids was an independent risk factor for B. cereus PVCBSI. Appropriate use of PPN solutions may help prevent B. cereus PVCBSI. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results.

  6. Parenteral nutrition: never say never

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes the benefits of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients, when prescribed for relevant indications, in adequate quantities, and in due time. Critically ill patients are at risk of energy deficit during their ICU stay, a condition which leads to unfavorable outcomes, due to hypercatabolism secondary to the stress response and the difficulty to optimize feeding. Indirect calorimetry is recommended to define the energy target, since no single predictive equation accurately estimates energy expenditure. Energy metabolism is intimately associated with protein metabolism. Recent evidence calls for adequate protein provision, but there is no accurate method to estimate the protein requirements, and recommendations are probably suboptimal. Enteral nutrition (EN) is the preferred route of feeding, but gastrointestinal intolerance limits its efficacy and PN allows for full coverage of energy needs. Seven recent articles concerning PN for critically ill patients were identified and carefully reviewed for the clinical and scientific relevance of their conclusions. One article addressed the unfavorable effects of early PN, although this result should be more correctly regarded as a consequence of glucose load and hypercaloric feeding. The six other articles were either in favor of PN or concluded that there was no difference in the outcome compared with EN. Hypercaloric feeding was not observed in these studies. Hypocaloric feeding led to unfavorable outcomes. This further demonstrates the beneficial effects of an early and adequate feeding with full EN, or in case of failure of EN with exclusive or supplemental PN. EN is the first choice for critically ill patients, but difficulties providing optimal nutrition through exclusive EN are frequently encountered. In cases of insufficient EN, individualized supplemental PN should be administered to reduce the infection rate and the duration of mechanical ventilation. PN is a safe therapeutic option

  7. Metabolic acidosis during parenteral nutrition: Pathophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Zikou, Xanthi; Koulouras, Vasilis; Katopodis, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is associated with metabolic complications including metabolic acidosis (MA), one of the main disorders of acid-base balance. The main causes involved in the appearance of MA during TPN administration are the metabolism of cationic amino acids and amino acids containing sulfuric acid (exogenous addition), the titratable acidity of the infused parenteral solution, the addition of acidificant agents (hydrochloric acid, acetic acid), thiamine deficiency, disruption of carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways and D-fructose administration. Moreover, hypophosphatemia that appears during TPN therapy contributes significantly to the maintenance of MA. This review describes in a comprehensive way the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the appearance of MA induced by intravenous administration of TPN products most commonly used in critically ill-patients. PMID:25983433

  8. Glutamine: An Obligatory Parenteral Nutrition Substrate in Critical Care Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stehle, Peter; Kuhn, Katharina S.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness is characterized by glutamine depletion owing to increased metabolic demand. Glutamine is essential to maintain intestinal integrity and function, sustain immunologic response, and maintain antioxidative balance. Insufficient endogenous availability of glutamine may impair outcome in critically ill patients. Consequently, glutamine has been considered to be a conditionally essential amino acid and a necessary component to complete any parenteral nutrition regimen. Recently, this scientifically sound recommendation has been questioned, primarily based on controversial findings from a large multicentre study published in 2013 that evoked considerable uncertainty among clinicians. The present review was conceived to clarify the most important questions surrounding glutamine supplementation in critical care. This was achieved by addressing the role of glutamine in the pathophysiology of critical illness, summarizing recent clinical studies in patients receiving parenteral nutrition with intravenous glutamine, and describing practical concepts for providing parenteral glutamine in critical care. PMID:26495301

  9. 77 FR 28594 - Southern Energy Solution Group, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Southern Energy Solution Group, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding of Southern Energy Solution Group, LLC's application for...

  10. 77 FR 64980 - Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... in the above-referenced proceeding of Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC's application for...

  11. 78 FR 75560 - Green Current Solutions, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Green Current Solutions, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... above-referenced proceeding, of Green Current Solutions, LLC's application for market-based...

  12. Safety of refrigerated storage of admixed parenteral fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, D C; Arnow, P M

    1988-01-01

    Many hospital pharmacies are reluctant to store admixed parenteral fluids longer than 24 to 48 h because of concern about possible microbial contamination. We evaluated the safety of prolonged refrigerated storage of admixtures by culturing mixtures in 471 bags prepared routinely in a hospital pharmacy and stored at 4 degrees C for up to 15 days. Low-level contamination (1 CFU per bag) was found in 3 of 253 solutions of saline and/or glucose into which nonantibiotic additives had been injected. None of 171 saline and/or glucose solutions with antibiotic additives or 47 parenteral nutrition fluids was culture positive. The risk of contamination did not increase with duration of storage, and none of 107 bags stored greater than or equal to 5 days was culture positive. Laboratory studies to measure growth of bacteria and fungi in glucose infusate and parenteral nutrition solutions confirmed that storage at 4 degrees C suppresses growth. Eight of twelve bacterial isolates grew in glucose solutions at 25 degrees C, while none grew at 4 degrees C. Of 13 species of bacteria and fungi inoculated in parenteral nutrition fluids, 8 proliferated at 25 degrees C and none proliferated at 4 degrees C. We conclude that refrigerated storage of parenteral fluids for up to 1 week following admixture, as permitted by Centers for Disease Control guidelines, does not appear to increase the risk of microbial contamination when standard aseptic procedures for admixing and storage are followed. PMID:3183025

  13. Oxidation of parenteral lipid emulsion by ambient and phototherapy lights: potential toxicity of routine parenteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Neuzil, J; Darlow, B A; Inder, T E; Sluis, K B; Winterbourn, C C; Stocker, R

    1995-05-01

    Vitamin E can be a prooxidant in isolated lipoprotein suspensions. Because lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition are lipoprotein-like suspensions rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E, we hypothesized that vitamin E may act as a prooxidant in lipid emulsions, as it is in lipoprotein suspensions. We therefore exposed an intravenously administered lipid emulsion (Intralipid) to a single spotlight commonly used in the treatment of neonatal jaundice, and measured the formation of triglyceride hydroperoxides by using high-performance liquid chromatography with postcolumn chemiluminescence detection. Concentrations of these hydroperoxides in different batches of fresh intralipid were usually approximately 10 mumol/L but increased up to 60 times after exposure to phototherapy light for a period of 24 hours, even though significant amounts of vitamin E were present at the end of the exposure. Triglyceride hydroperoxides were formed during phototherapy light exposure whether the intralipid was in plastic tubing used routinely for infusion or in glass containers. Ambient light also caused significant peroxidation of the formula lipids, although to a much lesser extent than observed with phototherapy light. For infants in the neonatal intensive care unit who were receiving intralipid but not phototherapy, solutions being infused at the end of 24 hours contained a mean of 40 mumol/L hydroperoxides. For infants receiving phototherapy, the mean was 97 mumol/L. Phototherapy light-induced formation of triglyceride hydroperoxides was prevented by covering the intralipid with aluminum foil or supplementation with sodium ascorbate before light exposure. We conclude that intralipid is highly susceptible to oxidation and that elevated levels of oxidized lipids can be formed during its clinical use, especially when intralipid infusion is combined with phototherapy. Because lipid hydroperoxides are cytotoxic and can cause adverse effects, inadvertent infusion of rancid

  14. Aluminum in Pediatric Parenteral Nutrition Products: Measured Versus Labeled Content

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Robert L.; Pieroni, Kevin P.; Gaskari, Shabnam; Dixon, Tessa K.; Park, KT; Kerner, John A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Aluminum is a contaminant in all parenteral nutrition solutions. Manufacturers currently label these products with the maximum aluminum content at the time of expiry, but there are no published data to establish the actual measured concentration of aluminum in parenteral nutrition solution products prior to being compounded in the clinical setting. This investigation assessed quantitative aluminum content of products commonly used in the formulation of parenteral nutrition solutions. The objective of this study is to determine the best products to be used when compounding parenteral nutrition solutions (i.e., those with the least amount of aluminum contamination). METHODS All products available in the United States from all manufacturers used in the production of parenteral nutrition solutions were identified and collected. Three lots were collected for each identified product. Samples were quantitatively analyzed by Mayo Laboratories. These measured concentrations were then compared to the manufacturers' labeled concentration. RESULTS Large lot-to-lot and manufacturer-to-manufacturer differences were noted for all products. Measured aluminum concentrations were less than manufacturer-labeled values for all products. CONCLUSIONS The actual aluminum concentrations of all the parenteral nutrition solutions were significantly less than the aluminum content based on manufacturers' labels. These findings indicate that 1) the manufacturers should label their products with actual aluminum content at the time of product release rather than at the time of expiry, 2) that there are manufacturers whose products provide significantly less aluminum contamination than others, and 3) pharmacists can select products with the lowest amounts of aluminum contamination and reduce the aluminum exposure in their patients. PMID:22477831

  15. Compatibility: drugs and parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Talita Muniz Maloni; Ferraresi, Andressa de Abreu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Standardization and systematization of data to provide quick access to compatibility of leading injectable drugs used in hospitals for parenteral nutrition. Methods We selected 55 injectable drugs analyzed individually with two types of parenteral nutrition: 2-in-1 and 3-in-1. The following variables were considered: active ingredient, compatibility of drugs with the parenteral nutrition with or without lipids, and maximum drug concentration after dilution for the drugs compatible with parenteral nutrition. Drugs were classified as compatible, incompatible and untested. Results After analysis, relevant information to the product’s compatibility with parental nutrition was summarized in a table. Conclusion Systematization of compatibility data provided quick and easy access, and enabled standardizing pharmacists work. PMID:27074235

  16. Behavioral and dermatologic changes and low serum zinc and copper concentrations in two premature infants after parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, K N; Henkin, R I

    1978-11-01

    Two premature infants were observed to develop behavioral and dermatologic changes and low serum zinc and copper concentrations following cessation of prolonged parenteral alimentation, while being fed exclusively with human milk. Following treatment with exogenous oral zinc supplementation, prompt relief of symptoms and increases of serum zinc and copper concentrations were observed in both infants. These patients comprise about 5% of our premature infants who are treated with parenteral alimentation for more than two weeks. We recommend that premature infants on prolonged parenteral alimentation should be monitored for changes in serum zinc and copper concentrations and, if a marked fall is observed, supplementation should be considered.

  17. Long-term parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ladefoged, Karin; Jarnum, Stig

    1978-01-01

    Nineteen patients (11 women and eight men) aged 20-68 received long-term parenteral nutrition, mostly at home, for six to 63 months (mean 19 months). Indications for LTPN were extensive, active Crohn's disease in three patients, intestinocutaneous fistulas in three, and short-bowel syndrome in the remaining 13 patients. Subclavian or intra-atrial (Broviac) catheters were most commonly used, for which the average life was four and seven months respectively. Complications of long-term parenteral nutrition included pneumothorax in four out of 48 subclavian vein punctures. Catheter-induced thrombosis of central veins was shown by phlebography 17 times in nine patients, and eight episodes of total occlusion occurred. Two of these patients had pulmonary infarction. Nineteen episodes of catheter sepsis occurred in 11 patients, but only one was fatal. Complications related to intestinal disease included intra-abdominal abscesses and intestinal fistulas, and disturbances of liver function. Five patients died, though in only two was death related to long-term parenteral nutrition. One of these patients died from catheter sepsis, the other had subdural haematoma possibly caused by anticoagulant treatment. Eight of the 14 surviving patients still needed parenteral nutrition. All received a disability pension, but six had an acceptable quality of life with almost normal social activities. Despite problems such as difficulties in maintaining standardised infusion programmes, it was concluded that long-term parenteral nutrition at home is practicable and consistent with an acceptable quality of life. ImagesFIG 2 PMID:98199

  18. Abnormalities of zinc and copper during total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, S F; Goodgame, J T; Smith, J C; Maher, M M; Makuch, R W; Henkin, R I; Brennan, M F

    1979-01-01

    Changes in serum zinc and copper levels were studied in 19 tumor bearing patients undergoing parenteral nutrition (TPN) for five to 42 days. Before initiation of intravenous feeding mean serum zinc and copper concentrations were within normal limits but during TPN levels decreased significantly below those measured prior to parenteral nutrition. During TPN nitrogen, zinc, and copper intake, urinary output and serum levels were studied prospectively in nine of these patients. These nine patients exhibited positive nitrogen retention based upon urinary nitrogen excretion, but elevated urinary zinc and copper excretion and lowered serum zinc and copper concentrations. Neither blood administration nor limited oral intake was consistently able to maintain normal serum levels of zinc or copper. Zinc and copper supplementation of hyperalimentation fluids in four patients studied for five to 16 days was successful in increasing serum zinc and copper levels in only two. The data obtained suggest that patients undergoing parenteral nutrition may require supplementation of zinc and copper to prevent deficiencies of these elements. PMID:103506

  19. Liver membrane composition after short-term parenteral nutrition with and without taurine in guinea pigs: the effect to taurine.

    PubMed

    Guertin, F; Roy, C C; Lepage, G; Yousef, I; Tuchweber, B

    1993-09-01

    Having recently demonstrated that taurine supplementation prevents total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-induced cholestasis, we chose to use this model to examine plasma membrane composition in relation to bile formation. Male guinea pigs received daily a mixture of glucose and of the amino acid solution Travasol with or without added taurine (1.2 mM). After 3 days, bile was collected and liver plasma membrane fractions enriched in sinusoidal lateral membrane and bile canalicular membrane domains were isolated. In animals receiving TPN alone, bile flow and biliary secretory rate of bile acid and bicarbonate decreased significantly compared with controls. Although membrane ATPases (Na+K+ and Mg+) were unchanged, TPN induced an increase in the lipid to protein ratio and a decrease of polyunsaturated fatty acids, in conjunction with a higher content of diene conjugates in sinusoidal lateral membrane fractions. Taurine corrected these changes and, in addition, reduced significantly the cholesterol to phospholipid ratio in both membrane fractions. The data show that changes in liver cell membranes occur in TPN-induced cholestasis and suggest that free radical injury may play a role. As taurine prevented cholestasis as well as membrane changes, it is suggested that taurine should be added to amino acid solutions used for parenteral nutrition.

  20. A Call to Action to Bring Safer Parenteral Micronutrient Products to the U.S. Market.

    PubMed

    Vanek, Vincent W; Borum, Peggy; Buchman, Alan; Fessler, Theresa A; Howard, Lyn; Shenkin, Alan; Valentine, Christina J

    2015-08-01

    The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) started an intensive review of commercially available parenteral vitamin and trace element (TE) products in 2009. The chief findings were that adult multi-TE products currently available in the United States (U.S.) provide potentially toxic amounts of manganese, copper, and chromium, and neonatal/pediatric multi-TE products provide potentially toxic amounts of manganese and chromium. The multivitamin products appeared safe and effective; however, a separate parenteral vitamin D product is needed for those patients on standard therapy who continue to be vitamin D depleted and are unresponsive to oral supplements. The review process also extended to parenteral choline and carnitine. Although choline and carnitine are not technically vitamins or trace elements, choline is an essential nutrient in all age groups, and carnitine is an essential nutrient in infants, according to the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine. A parenteral choline product needs to be developed and available. Efforts are currently under way to engage the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the parenteral nutrient industry so A.S.P.E.N.'s recommendations can become a commercial reality.

  1. Immunonutrition – the influence of early postoperative glutamine supplementation in enteral/parenteral nutrition on immune response, wound healing and length of hospital stay in multiple trauma patients and patients after extensive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kai J.; Schallert, Reiner; Daniel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the postoperative phase, the prognosis of multiple trauma patients with severe brain injuries as well as of patients with extensive head and neck surgery mainly depends on protein metabolism and the prevention of septic complications. Wound healing problems can also result in markedly longer stays in the intensive care unit and general wards. As a result, the immunostimulation of patients in the postoperative phase is expected to improve their immunological and overall health. Patients and methods: A study involving 15 patients with extensive ENT tumour surgery and 7 multiple-trauma patients investigated the effect of enteral glutamine supplementation on immune induction, wound healing and length of hospital stay. Half of the patients received a glutamine-supplemented diet. The control group received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous diet. Results: In summary, we found that total lymphocyte counts, the percentage of activated CD4+DR+ T helper lymphocytes, the in-vitro response of lymphocytes to mitogens, as well as IL-2 plasma levels normalised faster in patients who received glutamine-supplemented diets than in patients who received isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets and that these parameters were even above normal by the end of the second postoperative week. Summary: We believe that providing critically ill patients with a demand-oriented immunostimulating diet is fully justified as it reduces septic complications, accelerates wound healing, and shortens the length of ICU (intensive care unit) and general ward stays. PMID:26734536

  2. New parenteral anticoagulants in development.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, Maria Luisa; Lecumberri, Ramón; Rocha, Eduardo; Pozo-Hernández, Carmen; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio

    2011-02-01

    The therapeutic armamentarium of parenteral anticoagulants available to clinicians is mainly composed by unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), fondaparinux, recombinant hirudins (i.e. bivalirudin, desirudin, lepirudin) and argatroban. These drugs are effective and safe for prevention and/or treatment of thromboembolic diseases but they have some drawbacks. Among other inconveniences, UFH requires regular anticoagulant monitoring as a result of variability in the anticoagulant response and there is a risk of serious heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT). LMWH, fondaparinux and recombinant hirudins are mainly cleared through the kidneys and their use in patients with severe renal insufficiency may be problematic. LMWH is only partially neutralized by protamine while fondaparinux and recombinant hirudins have no specific antidote. Novel anticoagulants in development for parenteral administration include new indirect activated factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors (idrabiotaparinux, ultra-low-molecular-weight heparins [semuloparin, RO-14], new LMWH [M118]), direct FXa inhibitors (otamixaban), direct FIIa inhibitors (flovagatran sodium, pegmusirudin, NU172, HD1-22), direct FXIa inhibitors (BMS-262084, antisense oligonucleotides targeting FXIa, clavatadine), direct FIXa inhibitors (RB-006), FVIIIa inhibitors (TB-402), FVIIa/tissue factor inhibitors (tifacogin, NAPc2, PCI-27483, BMS-593214), FVa inhibitors (drotrecogin alpha activated, ART-123) and dual thrombin/FXa inhibitors (EP217609, tanogitran). These new compounds have the potential to complement established parenteral anticoagulants. In the present review, we discuss the pharmacology of new parenteral anticoagulants, the results of clinical studies, the newly planned or ongoing clinical trials with these compounds, and their potential advantages and drawbacks over existing therapies.

  3. [Artificial nutrition in children (II): parenteral access].

    PubMed

    Estevão-Costa, José

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is crucial when the use of the gastrointestinal tract is not feasible. This article addresses the main techniques for parenteral access in children, its indications, insertion details and maintenance, and complications. The type of venous access is mainly dictated by the expected duration of parenteral nutrition and by the body weight/stature. The peripheral access is viable and advantageous for parenteral nutrition of short duration (< 2 weeks); a tunneled central venous catheter (Broviac) is usually necessary in long-term parenteral nutrition (> 3 weeks); a peripherally introduced central catheter is an increasingly used alternative. Parenteral accesses are effective and safe, but the morbidity and mortality is not negligible particularly in cases of short bowel syndrome. Most complications are related to the catheter placement and maintenance care, and can be largely avoided when the procedures are carried out by experienced staff under strict protocols.

  4. Zinc deficiency in a parenteral nutrition-dependent patient during a parenteral trace element product shortage.

    PubMed

    Franck, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Parenteral nutrition product shortages are common and place vulnerable patients at risk for nutrient deficiencies. This case report describes a parenteral nutrition-dependent patient who was found to have zinc deficiency during a parenteral nutrition product shortage. The management of the patient's zinc deficiency is described.

  5. Is there a role for nutritional supplements in cancer care? Challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    NS are commonly used by patients affected by cancer. Patients are using these supplements mainly to improve their quality of life in their cancer trajectory. An open and empathic approach to this use is essential for successful patient–doctor communication. An informed approach that takes into consideration NS that are safe, with clues of possible effectiveness can lead to a better decision-making and trust in this communication process.

  6. Use of the new preservation solution Custodiol-N supplemented with dextran for hypothermic machine perfusion of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Gallinat, Anja; Lüer, Bastian; Swoboda, Sandra; Rauen, Ursula; Paul, Andreas; Minor, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Custodiol-N is a new preservation solution specifically designed to prevent free radical-induced tissue alterations and to protect vascular integrity of the graft. Thus, Custodiol-N appears particularly suitable as base solution for oxygenated machine preservation and its putative benefit for renal preservation by hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) was investigated using a porcine in vitro model. Kidneys were retrieved from German Landrace pigs and preserved for 20 h by pulsatile oxygenated HMP on a Lifeport kidney transporter (syst. pressure 30 mmHg, 30cycles/min). Each graft was randomly assigned to the use of one of the following preservation solutions: Custodiol-N solution supplemented with 50 g/l dextran 40 (CND) or kidney perfusion solution 1 (KPS-1). Renal viability was evaluated upon reperfusion in vitro with diluted autologous blood from the donor for 120 min at 37°C. After 2h of postischemic reperfusion CND-preserved kidneys exhibited significantly higher renal blood flow and urine production. Oxygen consumption was also higher in the CND group than in KPS-1 kidneys. Clearance of creatinine increased during reperfusion of CND kidneys but declined in KPS-1 grafts ending in significantly higher values in CND kidneys. No differences between the groups were seen for enzyme release or fractional excretion of sodium. In conclusion the data presented provide first experimental evidence for adequate organ protective potential of CND in HMP as compared to the gold standard KPS-KPS-11.

  7. Perspectives on parenteral micronutrient shortages.

    PubMed

    Mirtallo, Jay M

    2015-02-01

    Micronutrients are essential components of parenteral nutrition (PN). Problems related to deficiency and toxicity occur during routine practice, which could be related to the content of commercial sources, inadequate prescribed doses, and the high frequency of at-risk patients receiving PN. Shortages of commercial products result in increased risk of deficiency. Even though there are recommendations to conserve supplies for those at highest risk, practices that provide no micronutrients or doses less than desired are not safe. This article reviews the evidence describing patients at risk for micronutrient deficiency, the rationale for micronutrient product reformulation, and characteristics of deficiency observed during shortages of micronutrient products.

  8. Pediatric Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Israelite, Jill C

    Pediatric parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is typically defined as a decrease in bile flow that is independent of a mechanical obstruction and of any other underlying liver disease. It is most often seen in pediatric patients receiving parenteral nutrition support. Up to 50% to 66% of children receiving long-term parenteral nutrition are reported to be diagnosed with PNALD. The goal of treatment for PNALD is advancement to full enteral nutrition and elimination of dependence on parenteral nutrition support. Achieving this goal is not always possible, especially in patients with short bowel syndrome. The following review article highlights some of the current treatment strategies focused on prevention or correction of PNALD as noted in current American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines.

  9. [Routine comparison of trace element deficiencies during parenteral alimentation].

    PubMed

    du Cailar, J; Mathieu-Daudé, J C; Kienlen, J; Béssou, D; Griffe, O; Bélé-Binda

    1977-01-01

    In 50 patients aged between 3 and 84 years treated in a multidisciplinary Intensive Care Unit and receiving parenteral alimentation, deficiency in certain trace elements or electrolytes (Cu++, Zn++, Mn++, Co++, PO-4, Mg++) was prevented or treated by the administration of a glucose solution (MB 147 G) enriched in trace elements. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate, on the basis of assay of serum levels of the trace elements involved, with the exception of Mn and Co, the effectiveness of treatment. Reference values were determined on the one hand in healthy individuals for normal figures and secondly on subjects included in the study, already on parenteral alimentation for several days, before treatment with MB 147 G, in order to demonstrate the existence of a deficiency (patient control values). In the case of PO--4, however, the patient control values concerned at one and the same time subjects in the study before treatment with MB 147 G and other patients receiving parenteral alimentation who were not part of the trial. MB 147 G solution was presented in units of 500 ml associated with glucose of varying concentrations (15 p. 100, 30 p. 100, 50 p. 100). The average daily amount administered, over a period of 236 days, was 3 unites per 24 hours, corresponding to an intake of copper of 3.78 mg, 3.90 mg of zinc, 0.20 mg of manganese, 0.24 mg of cobalt, 363 mg of magnesium, 240 mg of calcium and 15 mEz of phosphates. The results show that levels of copper, zinc, magnesium and phosphates were low during parenteral alimentation. The administration of MB 147 G resulted in a significant increase in these values, without there being any evidence of accumulation.

  10. Upstream Solutions: Does the Supplemental Security Income Program Reduce Disability in the Elderly?

    PubMed Central

    Herd, Pamela; Schoeni, Robert F; House, James S

    2008-01-01

    Context The robust relationship between socioeconomic factors and health suggests that social and economic policies might substantially affect health, while other evidence suggests that medical care, the main focus of current health policy, may not be the primary determinant of population health. Income support policies are one promising avenue to improve population health. This study examines whether the federal cash transfer program to poor elderly, the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, affects old-age disability. Methods This study uses the 1990 and 2000 censuses, employing state and year fixed-effect models, to test whether within-state changes in maximum SSI benefits over time lead to changes in disability among people aged sixty-five and older. Findings Higher benefits are linked to lower disability rates. Among all single elderly individuals, 30 percent have mobility limitations, and an increase of $100 per month in the maximum SSI benefit caused the rate of mobility limitations to fall by 0.46 percentage points. The findings were robust to sensitivity analyses. First, analyses limited to those most likely to receive SSI produced larger effects, but analyses limited to those least likely to receive SSI produced no measurable effect. Second, varying the disability measure did not meaningfully alter the findings. Third, excluding the institutionalized, immigrants, individuals living in states with exceptionally large benefit changes, and individuals living in states with no SSI supplements did not change the substantive conclusions. Fourth, Medicaid did not confound the effects. Finally, these results were robust for married individuals. Conclusions Income support policy may be a significant new lever for improving population health, especially that of lower-income persons. Even though the findings are robust, further analyses are needed to confirm their reliability. Future research should examine a variety of different income support policies, as

  11. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia: are monomeric iron compounds suitable for parenteral administration?

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Crumbliss, A L

    2000-11-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional problem worldwide, especially in the developing countries. Oral iron supplementation programs have failed because of noncompliance and gastrointestinal toxicity, thereby necessitating parenteral administration of iron. For parenteral administration, only iron-carbohydrate complexes are currently used, because monomeric iron salts release free iron, thereby causing oxidant injury. However, iron-carbohydrate complexes also have significant toxicity, and they are expensive. We have proposed the hypothesis that monomeric iron salts can be safely administered by the parenteral route if iron is tightly complexed to the ligand, thereby causing clinically insignificant release of free iron, and the kinetic properties of the compound allow rapid transfer of iron to plasma transferrin. A detailed analysis of the physicochemical and kinetic properties reveals that ferric iron complexed to pyrophosphate or acetohydroxamate anions may be suitable for parenteral administration. We have demonstrated that infusion of ferric pyrophosphate into the circulation via the dialysate is safe and effective in maintaining iron balance in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Parenteral administration of monomeric iron compounds is a promising approach to the treatment of iron deficiency in the general population and merits further investigation.

  12. Reversal of growth arrest in adolescents with Crohn's disease after parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Layden, T; Rosenberg, F; Nemchausky, G; Elson, C; Rosenberg, I

    1976-06-01

    Growth arrest and delayed onset of puberty often complicate childhood onset Crohn's disease of the small bowel (granulomatous enteritis). Nutritional deficits arising from inadequate dietary intake, malabsorption, and increased caloric needs may contribute to growth retardation. To assess whether a sustained high caloric and nitrogen intake could reestablish growth, 4 children with extensive Crohn's disease of the small bowel were studied before and after parenteral alimentation which was instituted for symtomatic disease control. Weight gain, positive nitrogen balance, and improved nutritional status were achieved during parenteral alimentation in each patient. In 2 patients weight gain was sustained using oral nutritional supplements, and a substantial increase in linear skeletal growth continued in the ensuing months. One patient entered puberty within 4 months of parenteral alimentation and another had the onset of menarche and the development of secondary sex characteristics 4 months after parenteral alimentation and resection of diseased bowel. Growth may be reestablished in some growth-arrested children if intake is sufficient to establish a sustained positive caloric and nitrogen balance. Nutritional requirements imposed by the demands of growth and active disease and often compounded by the catabolic effects of corticosteroids may be excessive; growth may occur only if these needs are met orally and/or parenterally.

  13. Inactivation of aminoglycosides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a nutrition supplementation solution.

    PubMed

    Ammash, H S; Essa, F Y; Padron, V A

    1994-05-01

    1. Possible interference of a nutritional solution (Vamin) with the activity of several aminoglycosides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated in vitro. 2. Inactivation in cultures of 0.75, 1.2, 2.8, 65 micrograms/ml of gentamicin, kanamycin, amikacin, streptomycin, and tobramycin was induced by the addition of 1:20 v/v of the nutritional solution. 3. This inactivation was due to the presence of specific amino acids in the mixture. Deletions of amino acids from the media and amino acid analysis of the cellular pool revealed that valine, leucine, isoleucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, phenylalanine, cysteine, methionine, or threonine were responsible for the inactivation. 4. The concentration of threonine decreased in kanamycin and amikacin treated cells suggesting that certain aminoglycoside antibiotics undergo a decrease in activity when sensitive Ps. aeruginosa are treated with a nutrient solution. 5. Specific amino acids may interfere with the activity of antibiotics by circumventing their effect on amino acid biosynthesis.

  14. Stability-Indicating HPLC-UV Method for Vitamin D3 Determination in Solutions, Nutritional Supplements and Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Temova, Žane; Roškar, Robert

    2016-08-01

    A simple and fast high-performance liquid chromatography method with UV detection for determination of vitamin D3 in stability studies as well as in solutions, nutritional supplements and pharmaceuticals was developed. Successful separation of vitamin D3 from its degradation products was achieved on a Gemini C18 100 × 3.0 mm column using a mixture of acetonitrile and water (99:1, v/v) as а mobile phase. The method was successfully validated according to the ICH guidelines. The described reversed-phase HPLC method is favorable compared with other published HPLC-UV methods because of its stability-indicating nature, short run time (3.3 min) and wide analytical range with outstanding linearity, accuracy and precision. The method was further applied for quantification of vitamin D3 in selected liquid and solid nutritional supplements and prescription medicines, confirming its suitability for routine analysis. Degradation products, formed under stress conditions (hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis and thermal degradation), were additionally elucidated by suitable equipment (LC-DAD-MS) to confirm the stability-indicating nature of the developed method.

  15. Neonatal parenteral nutrition hypersensitivity: a case report implicating bisulfite sensitivity in a newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Huston, Robert K; Baxter, Louise M; Larrabee, Paige B

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a case of parenteral nutrition hypersensitivity in a 37 weeks' gestation infant with congenital diaphragmatic hernia complicated by bowel necrosis and functional short bowel syndrome. The patient developed a rash with subsequent urticaria beginning on the 50th day of life. The reactions were confirmed with a positive rechallenge. After the amino acid solution was replaced with a non-bisulfite-containing product, the infant was able to continue to receive nutrition support through parenteral nutrition without recurrence of symptoms. It is speculated that the bisulfite additive in the amino acid solution may have interacted with the lipid emulsion to sensitize the patient.

  16. Toxicity of parenteral iron dextran therapy.

    PubMed

    Burns, D L; Pomposelli, J J

    1999-03-01

    Parenteral iron dextran is efficacious and safe for iron repletion in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. The risk for developing reactions to parenteral iron infusion can be attenuated if patients are carefully selected. Patients with underlying autoimmune disease, malnutrition with indolent infection, and risk for iron overload syndromes should be carefully monitored for complications. Further, the rate of infusion and the route of administration of iron dextran play roles in the risk of adverse reactions. The purpose of this review is to identify and elucidate the mechanisms of the acute and chronic toxicities associated with parenteral iron dextran use.

  17. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  18. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  19. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  20. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  1. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... used in total parenteral nutrition. 201.323 Section 201.323 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy must not exceed 25 micrograms per liter (µg/L). (b) The package insert...

  2. Parenteral nutrition: indications, risks and nursing care.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jane

    Parenteral nutrition is a recognised method of feeding patients with specific clinical conditions, most notably those with various forms of intestinal failure who cannot be fed enterally. However, it has several associated risks including sepsis, and metabolic and electrolyte imbalances. The aim of this article is to enhance nurses' understanding of parenteral nutrition and how this differs from oral or enteral nutrition, indications for use and the potential risks involved. Appropriate vascular access is discussed as well as the clinical monitoring that is required to ensure complications of therapy are detected quickly. A greater understanding of the issues associated with parenteral nutrition allows nurses caring for patients receiving parenteral nutrition to ensure safe and effective care.

  3. Community parenteral therapy project: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Foster, L; McMurray, A

    1998-01-01

    The pilot study reported in this paper was devised to develop and compare service delivery models that would achieve the provision of high quality parenteral therapy care to patients in the Gold Coast District Health Service community. All data were collected on 113 patients for a 12-month period, January to December 1996. The study compared the provision of outreach nursing services and contracted nursing services on measures of satisfaction and cost. The study showed that patient and carers indicated a preference for community care, medical officers advocated the benefits of administering parenteral therapies in the community, general practitioners were interested in managing future community parenteral therapies, and contracted (nurse) service providers endorsed the development of a parenteral therapy resource centre. The findings also revealed considerable potential cost savings in community-based care.

  4. American Society for Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Continuing Education Certification Claim CE Credits Clinical Nutrition Week eLearning Center Professional Development Webinars Calendar of ... Guidelines Clinical Practice Library Standards Malnutrition Awareness Parenteral ... Resources Practice and Research Toolkits Online Store Research ...

  5. Drugs Used for Parenteral Sedation in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Raymond A.; Gift, Helen C.

    1988-01-01

    The relative efficacy and safety of drugs and combinations used clinically in dentistry as premedicants to alleviate patient apprehension are largely unsubstantiated. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of agents used for parenteral sedation through controlled clinical trials, it is first necessary to identify which drugs, doses, and routes of administration are actually used in practice. A survey instrument was developed to characterize the drugs used clinically for anesthesia and sedation by dentists with advanced training in pain control. A random sample of 500 dentists who frequently use anesthesia and sedation in practice was selected from the Fellows of the American Dental Society of Anesthesiology. The first mailing was followed by a second mailing to nonrespondents after 30 days. The respondents report a variety of parenteral sedation techniques in combination with local anesthesia (the response categories are not mutually exclusive): nitrous oxide (64%), intravenous conscious sedation (59%), intravenous “deep” sedation (47%), and outpatient general anesthesia (27%). Drugs most commonly reported for intravenous sedation include diazepam, methohexital, midazolam, and combinations of these drugs with narcotics. A total of 82 distinct drugs and combinations was reported for intravenous sedation and anesthesia. Oral premedication and intramuscular sedation are rarely used by this group. Most general anesthesia reported is done on an outpatient basis in private practice. These results indicate that a wide variety of drugs is employed for parenteral sedation in dental practice, but the most common practice among dentists with advanced training in anesthesia is local anesthesia supplemented with intravenous sedation consisting of a benzodiazepine and an opioid or a barbiturate. PMID:3250279

  6. Is parenteral phosphate replacement in the intensive care unit safe?

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Banwari; Walecka, Agnieszka; Shaw, Steve; Davenport, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Hypophosphatemia is well recognized in the intensive care setting, associated with refeeding and continuous forms of renal replacement therapy (CCRT). However, it is unclear as to when and how to administer intravenous phosphate supplementation in the general intensive care setting. There have been recent concerns regarding phosphate administration and development of acute kidney injury. We therefore audited our practice of parenteral phosphate administration. We prospectively audited parenteral phosphate administration (20 mmol) in 58 adult patients in a general intensive care unit in a University tertiary referral center. Fifty-eight patients were audited; mean age 57.2 ± 2.0 years, 70.7% male. The median duration of the infusion was 310 min (228-417), and 50% of the patients were on CRRT. 63.8% of patients were hypophosphatemic (<0.87 mmol/L) prior to the phosphate infusion, and serum phosphate increased from 0.79 ± 0.02 to 1.07 ± 0.03 mmol/L, P < 0.001. Two patients became hyperphosphatemic (>1.45 mmol/L). There was no correlation between the change in serum phosphate and the pre-infusion phosphate. Although there were no significant changes in serum urea, creatinine or other electrolytes, arterial ionized calcium fell from 1.15 ± 0.01 to 1.13 ± 0.01 mmol/L, P < 0.01. Although infusion of 20 mmol phosphate did not appear to adversely affect renal function and corrected hypophosphatemia in 67.7% of cases, we found that around 33% of patients who were given parenteral phosphate were not hypophosphatemic, and that the fall in ionized calcium raises the possibility of the formation of calcium-phosphate complexes and potential for soft tissue calcium deposition.

  7. Australasian Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition guidelines for supplementation of trace elements during parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Osland, Emma J; Ali, Azmat; Isenring, Elizabeth; Ball, Patrick; Davis, Melvyn; Gillanders, Lyn

    2014-01-01

    背景:这项工作代表了澳大利亚肠内肠外营养学会自1999 年出台《对接受肠 道外营养的成年患者微量元素补充指南》以来对该领域进展的认可按文献进行 逐步综述的第一部分。方法:通过系统文献综述,基于现有证据并考虑对澳大 利亚和新西兰执业环境的具体内容提出建议。对每项建议的证据力度进行评 估。外部评审人员通过AGREE II 针对指南提供反馈。结果:相比于1999 年 的指南,建议减少锰、铜、铬和钼的剂量,增加硒的剂量。目前市面上多元微 量元素配方的成分是公认的指南实践中的障碍。现有文献的缺乏及监测微量元 素状况的方法存在局限性,使用的肠外营养中微量元素污染对临床的影响不清 楚,需要进一步研究及临床实践。结论:接受肠外营养的患者需要每天补充微 量元素。在结合个体情况基础上,只需对接受长期肠外营养的患者进行监测, 然而要个案处理。在澳大利亚和新西兰,鼓励企业根据新的研究成果修订的指 南调整多元微量元素溶液。该领域需要加大研究投入。

  8. Effects of early parenteral iron combined erythropoietin in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Linxia; Tang, Qingya; Zhu, Wenying; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhu, Yuefang; Wang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Backgroud: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of early parenteral iron supplementation combined erythropoietin for prevention of anemia in preterm infants. Methods: In total, 96 preterm infants were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a control group receiving standard parenteral nutrition (group 1: n = 31), an iron-supplemented group (group 2: IS, n = 33), and an iron-supplemented combined erythropoietin group (group 3: IS+EPO, n = 32). The primary objective was to assess hemoglobin (Hb) levels. The secondary objectives included assessment of red blood cell counts (RBC), mean cell volume (MCV), serum iron, ferritin, percentages of reticulocyte (RET), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and oxidative stress, which was assessed by measuring plasma levels of malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase at baseline and at 2 weeks. The blood routine indices including Hb, RBC, MCV, and percentages of RET were measured at corrected age of 1 and 3 months. Results: At 2 weeks of life, the percentages of reticulocyte in group 2 and group 3 were significantly higher than those in group 1 (2.1±0.4, 2.5±0.3, and 1.7±0.3, respectively, P < 0.001, P<0.001), whereas TIBC were significantly lower than those in group 1 (36.7±4.6, 36.0±4.7, and 41.6 ± 5.2 respectively, P = 0.011, P = 0.006). There were no significant differences in RBC counts, the levels of hemoglobin, ferritin, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase among the 3 groups at 2weeks of life. RBC, Hb, MCV, body weight, body length, and head circumference at a corrected age of 1 month did not differ among 3 groups. At corrected age of 3months, more infants in the control group had abnormal Hb and MCV levels (Hb levels: 114.3 ± 21.3, 123.7 ± 31.6, and 125.1 ± 21.2, P = 0.021, P = 0.034, respectively; MCV: 74.1 ± 3.5, 78.3 ± 4.7 and 79.1 ± 5.2, P = 0.017, P = 0.012, respectively), whereas cases of oral iron, cases of breastfeeding

  9. The necessity of selenium substitution in total parenteral nutrition and artificial alimentation.

    PubMed

    Gramm, H J; Kopf, A; Brätter, P

    1995-03-01

    For the trace element selenium, in contrast to zinc, iron, copper, chromium, manganese and iodine, there is still no clear official recommendation with regard to routine substitution in artificial nutrition. An overview of the manifestations of selenium deficiency in humans during the period 1979-1995 shows that nutritive deficiencies are exclusively TPN-induced or the result of severe malnutrition. The pathology of TPN-induced selenium deficiency and the analytic assessment of selenium status are described. Patients undergoing long-term parenteral nutrition or suffering from an increased loss of intestinal secretions have to be characterized as being especially at risk for clinical selenium deficiency. The relationship of the serum selenium kinetics in pediatric and adult patients to the depletion of body compartments during the course of short-term and prolonged TPN is discussed. Because of the importance of the selenoproteins, the regularly occurring depletion during selenium-free TPN and the borderline supply of selenium in Germany the routine substitution of selenium in TPN is strongly recommended. The pharmaceutical industry should be encouraged to develop a trace element solution that includes selenium, so that the nutritive requirement of patients on TPN can be satisfied. Adequate intravenous dosage recommendations are based on maintenance of glutathione peroxidase homeostasis. The routine supplementation dosage may not meet the selenium requirements of intensive care patients under conditions of increased metabolic demands on their anti-oxidative system.

  10. [Parenteral feeding in child surgery. Results of balance studies].

    PubMed

    Schärli, A F; Rumlova, E

    1975-02-01

    After operations in infancy considerable negative nitrogen balances are regularly observed. Balance examinations have demonstrated that there is a minimal requirement of 300 to 350 mg N in the form of a crystalline amino acid solution for the normalization of the catabolic condition of metabolism. The administration of nitrogen, however, is only reasonable, if simultaneously 60 cal/kg of combustible energy is supplied. In severe surgical diseases and in neonates the metabolic requirements can be twice as high. In such cases, if correctly applied and accompanied by controls of the metabolic condition, parenteral nutrition can be useful and may, therefore, be regarded as one of the greatest progresses of modern medicine.

  11. Metabolic bone diseases during long-term total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Acca, M; Ragno, A; Francucci, C M; D'Erasmo, E

    2007-01-01

    Long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a procedure commonly applied to patients with advanced forms of intestinal malabsorption. Among TPN complications, bone metabolic diseases, such as osteoporosis and osteomalacia, are a common finding. Initially considered to be a manifestation of aluminium toxicity which followed massive contamination with the element of the solutions used in TPN, metabolic osteopathy during TPN is currently considered a multiform syndrome, with a multifactorial pathogenesis, which may manifest itself with vague or clear clinical pictures. In this review, we analyse clinical, pathogenetic, and therapeutic aspects of the most common bone metabolic diseases in patients undergoing long-term TPN.

  12. Access technique and its problems in parenteral nutrition – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 9

    PubMed Central

    Jauch, K. W.; Schregel, W.; Stanga, Z.; Bischoff, S. C.; Braß, P.; Hartl, W.; Muehlebach, S.; Pscheidl, E.; Thul, P.; Volk, O.

    2009-01-01

    Catheter type, access technique, and the catheter position should be selected considering to the anticipated duration of PN aiming at the lowest complication risks (infectious and non-infectious). Long-term (>7–10 days) parenteral nutrition (PN) requires central venous access whereas for PN <3 weeks percutaneously inserted catheters and for PN >3 weeks subcutaneous tunnelled catheters or port systems are appropriate. CVC (central venous catheter) should be flushed with isotonic NaCl solution before and after PN application and during CVC occlusions. Strict indications are required for central venous access placement and the catheter should be removed as soon as possible if not required any more. Blood samples should not to be taken from the CVC. If catheter infection is suspected, peripheral blood-culture samples and culture samples from each catheter lumen should be taken simultaneously. Removal of the CVC should be carried out immediately if there are pronounced signs of local infection at the insertion site and/or clinical suspicion of catheter-induced sepsis. In case PN is indicated for a short period (max. 7–10 days), a peripheral venous access can be used if no hyperosmolar solutions (>800 mosm/L) or solutions with a high titration acidity or alkalinity are used. A peripheral venous catheter (PVC) can remain in situ for as long as it is clinically required unless there are signs of inflammation at the insertion site. PMID:20049083

  13. Evaluation of Bacillus oleronius as a Biological Indicator for Terminal Sterilization of Large-Volume Parenterals.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masamitsu; Fujifuru, Masato; Okada, Aki; Takai, Katsuya; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Udagawa, Takeshi; Miyake, Makoto; Naruyama, Shintaro; Tokuda, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Goro; Yoden, Hikaru; Aoki, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    In the production of large-volume parenterals in Japan, equipment and devices such as tanks, pipework, and filters used in production processes are exhaustively cleaned and sterilized, and the cleanliness of water for injection, drug materials, packaging materials, and manufacturing areas is well controlled. In this environment, the bioburden is relatively low, and less heat resistant compared with microorganisms frequently used as biological indicators such as Geobacillus stearothermophilus (ATCC 7953) and Bacillus subtilis 5230 (ATCC 35021). Consequently, the majority of large-volume parenteral solutions in Japan are manufactured under low-heat sterilization conditions of F0 <2 min, so that loss of clarity of solutions and formation of degradation products of constituents are minimized. Bacillus oleronius (ATCC 700005) is listed as a biological indicator in "Guidance on the Manufacture of Sterile Pharmaceutical Products Produced by Terminal Sterilization" (guidance in Japan, issued in 2012). In this study, we investigated whether B. oleronius is an appropriate biological indicator of the efficacy of low-heat, moist-heat sterilization of large-volume parenterals. Specifically, we investigated the spore-forming ability of this microorganism in various cultivation media and measured the D-values and z-values as parameters of heat resistance. The D-values and z-values changed depending on the constituents of large-volume parenteral products. Also, the spores from B. oleronius showed a moist-heat resistance that was similar to or greater than many of the spore-forming organisms isolated from Japanese parenteral manufacturing processes. Taken together, these results indicate that B. oleronius is suitable as a biological indicator for sterility assurance of large-volume parenteral solutions subjected to low-heat, moist-heat terminal sterilization.

  14. GLP-2 Prevents Intestinal Mucosal Atrophy and Improves Tissue Antioxidant Capacity in a Mouse Model of Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Qiucheng; Bi, Jingcheng; Wang, Xinying; Jiang, Tingting; Wu, Chao; Tian, Feng; Gao, Xuejin; Wan, Xiao; Zheng, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on mucosal atrophy and intestinal antioxidant capacity in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Male mice (6–8 weeks old) were divided into three groups (n = 8 for each group): a control group fed a standard laboratory chow diet, and experimental TPN (received standard TPN solution) and TPN + GLP-2 groups (received TPN supplemented with 60 µg/day of GLP-2 for 5 days). Mice in the TPN group had lower body weight and reduced intestinal length, villus height, and crypt depth compared to the control group (all p < 0.05). GLP-2 supplementation increased all parameters compared to TPN only (all p < 0.05). Intestinal total superoxide dismutase activity and reduced-glutathione level in the TPN + GLP-2 group were also higher relative to the TPN group (all p < 0.05). GLP-2 administration significantly upregulated proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and increased glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) abundance. Compared with the control and TPN + GLP-2 groups, intestinal cleaved caspase-3 was increased in the TPN group (all p < 0.05). This study shows GLP-2 reduces TPN-associated intestinal atrophy and improves tissue antioxidant capacity. This effect may be dependent on enhanced epithelial cell proliferation, reduced apoptosis, and upregulated GRP78 expression. PMID:26761030

  15. Sodium N-(methylsulfonyl)-N-(4-nitro-2-phenoxyphenyl)sulfamate: a water-soluble nimesulide prodrug for parenteral use.

    PubMed

    Rapposelli, Simona; Digiacomo, Maria; Franchi, Silvia; Moretti, Sara; Pinza, Mario; Sacerdote, Paola; Balsamo, Aldo

    2010-10-04

    Several nimesulide preparations (i.e., tablet form, gels) have been marketed, but no parenteral solution has achieved the market because of their low wettability and unsatisfactory chemical-physical properties required for parenteral use. In this paper we describe the synthesis of the nimesulide prodrug 1 and its anti-inflammatory and antihyperalgesic properties. Pharmacological studies, carried out to evaluate the in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of compound 1 and nimesulide, showed that sodium sulfamate 1 is an effective nimesulide prodrug that can be administered by parenteral route, undergoing a satisfactory absorption and an extensive transformation into the active nimesulide compound. Moreover, the evaluation of the plasma concentrations of nimesulide after rat treatment with compound 1 showed an increased and dose-dependent release of nimesulide. In contrast, the plasma concentrations of nimesulide, after "native" drug administration, still remain substantially unchanged. These preliminary results prompt further investigations on this prodrug as a possible candidate for parenteral use.

  16. Stability of sulbactam/ampicillin in diluents for parenteral administration.

    PubMed

    Mushinsky, R F; Reynolds, M L; Nicholson, C A; Crider, L L; Forcier, G A

    1986-01-01

    Compatibility studies were conducted of sulbactam/ampicillin in infusion diluents that are reported to be compatible with ampicillin sodium. A high-performance liquid chromatographic system that simultaneously detects sulbactam and ampicillin was used to determine whether the infusion diluents and the conditions of use recommended for ampicillin sodium are applicable to sulbactam/ampicillin. The results show that the sulbactam/ampicillin preparation for parenteral administration is compatible with all diluents recommended for ampicillin sodium. In all diluents sulbactam was more stable than ampicillin. At the end of the reported use periods, the average retention value for sulbactam in the combination solutions was 96% (range, 91%-101%), whereas the average retention value for ampicillin in the same solutions was 90% (range, 84%-95%). The presence of sulbactam had no adverse effect on the stability of ampicillin. The average retention value for ampicillin alone in the same diluents was 92% (range, 82%-99%). The conditions of use for sulbactam/ampicillin in diluents for parenteral administration are unrestricted by the presence of sulbactam and are, in fact, governed by those of ampicillin sodium.

  17. Marchiafava: Bignami Disease Treated with Parenteral Thiamine

    PubMed Central

    Nemlekar, Saumitra Shankar; Mehta, Ritambhara Yeshwant; Dave, Kamlesh Rushikray; Shah, Nilima Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Marchiafava - Bignami disease is rare sequelae of chronic alcohol use. We present a case with transient ischemic attack like presentation and its management with parenteral thiamine. A 53 year old male with history of country liquor use since 32 years was brought to hospital with acute onset of delirium & mild weakness involving motor functions of left side of the body, non-reactive planters and exaggerated tendon reflexes on left side. The MRI showed bilateral hyper intense signal on T2W and FLAIR images & Hypo intense lesion on T1W images involving body, genu and splenium of corpus callosum. The features are suggestive of Marchiafava - Bignami Disease. There have been few guidelines for management of MBD and literature supports use of parenteral thiamine 500mg leading to remission of symptoms and symptomatic improvement. It is advisable to use parenteral thiamine in all cases as it overlaps management of other co-morbidities of chronic alcoholism. PMID:27114628

  18. Sepsis, parenteral vaccination and skin disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    ASBSTRACT Disinfection should be required for all skin penetrative procedures including parenteral administration of vaccines. This review analyses medically attended infectious events following parenteral vaccination in terms of their microbiological aetiology and pathogenesis. Like ‘clean’ surgical site infections, the major pathogens responsible for these events were Staphylococcal species, implicating endogenous con-tamination as a significant source of infection. As 70% isopropyl alcohol swabbing has been shown to effectively disinfect the skin, it would be medico-legally difficult to defend a case of sepsis with the omission of skin disinfection unless the very low risk of this event was adequately explained to the patient and documented prior to vaccination. There was a significant cost-benefit for skin disinfection and cellulitis. Skin disinfection in the context of parenteral vaccination represents a new paradigm of medical practice; the use of a low cost intervention to prevent an event of very low prevalence but of significant cost. PMID:27295449

  19. Parenteral amino acid intakes in critically ill children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral amino acid formulas used in parenteral nutrition have a variable composition. To determine the amino acid intake of parenterally fed, critically ill children, and compare it with recommended dietary allowances (RDA) established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), we retrospectively review...

  20. Prefilled syringes: An innovation in parenteral packaging

    PubMed Central

    Makwana, Sagar; Basu, Biswajit; Makasana, Yogita; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral administration of pharmaceutical products is one of the most popular methods used to produce quick onset of action and also 100% bioavailability. Main problem occurs with the parenteral drug delivery is lack of convenience, affordability, accuracy, sterility, safety etc. Such drawbacks with this delivery system makes it less preferable. Hence, all the disadvantages of these systems can be easily overcome by use of prefilled syringes. The objective of this review article is to provide information regarding prefilled syringes; it's method of preparation, direction to use, advantages, its future scope, and development. PMID:23071944

  1. L-isoleucine-supplemented oral rehydration solution in the treatment of acute diarrhoea in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Alam, N H; Raqib, R; Ashraf, H; Qadri, F; Ahmed, S; Zasloff, M; Agerberth, B; Salam, M A; Gyr, N; Meier, R

    2011-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides represent an important component of the innate immune defenses of living organisms, including humans. They are broad-spectrum surface-acting agents secreted by the epithelial cells of the body in response to infection. Recently, L-isoleucine and its analogues have been found to induce antimicrobial peptides. The objectives of the study were to examine if addition of L-isoleucine to oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution would reduce stool output and/or duration of acute diarrhoea in children and induce antimicrobial peptides in intestine. This double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Dhaka Hospital of ICDDR,B. Fifty male children, aged 6-36 months, with acute diarrhoea and some dehydration, attending the hospital, were included in the study. Twenty-five children received L-isoleucine (2 g/L)-added ORS (study), and 25 received ORS without L-isoleucine (control). Stool weight, ORS intake, and duration of diarrhoea were the primary outcomes. There was a trend in reduction in mean +/- standard deviation (SD) daily stool output (g) of children in the L-isoleucine group from day 2 but it was significant on day 3 (388 +/- 261 vs. 653 +/- 446; the difference between mean [95% confidence interval (CI) (-)265 (-509, -20); p = 0.035]. Although the cumulative stool output from day 1 to day 3 reduced by 26% in the isoleucine group, it was not significant. Also, there was a trend in reduction in the mean +/- SD intake of ORS solution (mL) in the L-isoleucine group but it was significant only on day 1 (410 +/- 169 vs. 564 +/- 301), the difference between mean (95% CI) (-)154 (-288, -18); p = 0.04. The duration (hours) of diarrhoea was similar in both the groups. A gradual increase in stool concentrations of beta-defensin 2 and 3 was noted but they were not significantly different between the groups. L-isoleucine-supplemented ORS might be beneficial in reducing stool output and ORS intake in children with acute watery diarrhoea. A further

  2. Commercial premixed parenteral nutrition: Is it right for your institution?

    PubMed

    Miller, Sarah J

    2009-01-01

    Two-compartment premixed parenteral nutrition (PN) products are heavily promoted in the United States. These products may present safety advantages over PN solutions mixed by a local pharmacy, although clinical data to support this assertion are scarce. Multicompartment products can be labor-saving for pharmacy and therefore may be cost-effective for some institutions. Before adopting such products for use, an institution must determine that standardized PN solutions are acceptable for many or most of their patients compared with customized PN compounded specifically for individual patients. A larger selection of premixed products is available in Europe and some other parts of the world compared with the United States. Availability of a broader selection of products in the United States, including 3-compartment bags and a wider range of macronutrient concentrations and volumes, may make the use of such products more desirable in the future.

  3. Effects of Formulation Variables and Storage Conditions on Light Protected Vitamin B12 Mixed Parenteral Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Monajjemzadeh, Farnaz; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this research the effect of vitamin B1 and B6 on cyanocobalamin stability in commercial light protected parenteral formulations and upon adding stabilizing agents will be investigated and best formulation composition and proper storage condition will be introduced. Methods: In this research some additives such as co solvents and tonicity adjusters, surfactants, antioxidants and chelating agents as well as buffer solutions, were used to improve the stability of the parenteral mixed formulations of B12 in the presence of other B vitamins (B1 and B6). Screening tests and accelerated stability tests were performed according to ICH guidelines Q1A (R2). Results: Shelf life evaluation revealed the best formulation and the proper storage condition. The results indicated the first kinetic models for all tested formulations and the optimum pH value was determined to be 5.8. There was no evidence of B12 loss when mixed with B1 and B6 in a medical syringe at room temperature for maximum of 8 hours. Conclusion: It is necessary to formulate vitamin B12 mixed parenteral solutions using proper phosphate buffers (pH=5.8) and to indicate “Store in refrigerator” on the mixed parenteral formulations of vitamin B12 with other B vitamins, which has not been expressed on the label of tested Brand formulations at the time of this study. PMID:25436187

  4. Trace elements in parenteral nutrition: a practical guide for dosage and monitoring for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Theresa A

    2013-12-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a life-sustaining therapy for hundreds of thousands of people who have severe impairment of gastrointestinal function. Trace elements are a small but very important part of PN that can be overlooked during busy practice. Serious complications can result from trace element deficiencies and toxicities, and this is especially problematic during times of product shortages. Practical information on parenteral trace element use can be gleaned from case reports, some retrospective studies, and very few randomized controlled trials. A general knowledge of trace element metabolism and excretion, deficiency and toxicity symptoms, products, optimal dosages, and strategies for supplementation, restriction, and monitoring will equip practitioners to provide optimal care for their patients who depend on PN.

  5. Bell's palsy and parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Julia; Andrews, Nick; Wise, Lesley; Miller, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Concern about a possible increased risk of Bell's palsy after parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine was raised following the publication in 2004 of a Swiss study in which there was an increased risk following the nasal inactivated formulation of the vaccine. When data from passive reporting systems in the United States and the United Kingdom were examined there was some evidence of increased reporting following the parenteral vaccine. A large population based study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD) was therefore performed to test the hypothesis that there was an increased risk of Bell's palsy in the three months following parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine. The risk was also assessed for the same period following pneumococcal vaccine and was stratified into three age groups (<45, 45-64 and 65+ years). Relative incidence (RI) estimates were calculated using the self-controlled case-series method and showed no evidence of an increased risk in the three months following parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine RI 0.92 (95% confidence interval 0.78-1.08). There was also no evidence of an increased risk in any age group or following pneumococcal vaccine. A significant increase was seen on the day of vaccination (day 0) probably due to opportunistic recording of cases.

  6. PARENTERAL NUTRITION INDICATIONS, ADMINISTRATION, AND MONITORING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) can be lifesaving or life threatening, depending on when and how it is used. In infants and children who are unable to meet their nutritional requirements over extended periods, it can prevent death from malnutrition. On the other hand, if appropriate attention is not paid ...

  7. Controversies in the Mechanism of Total Parenteral Nutrition Induced Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jain Ajay; Teckman, Jeffery H.

    2015-01-01

    Over 30,000 patients are permanently dependent on Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) for survival with several folds higher requiring TPN for a prolonged duration. Unfortunately, it can cause potentially fatal complications. TPN infusion results in impairment of gut mucosal integrity, enhanced inflammation, increased cytokine expression and trans-mucosal bacterial permeation. It also causes endotoxin associated down regulation of bile acid transporters and Parenteral Nutrition Associated Liver Disease (PNALD), which includes steatosis, disrupted glucose metabolism, disrupted lipid metabolism, cholestasis and liver failure. Despite multiple theories, its etiology and pathophysiology remains elusive and is likely multifactorial. An important cause for TPN related pathologies appears to be a disruption in the normal enterohepatic circulation due to a lack of feeding during such therapy. This is further validated by the fact that in clinical settings, once cholestasis sets in, its reversal occurs when a patient is receiving a major portion of calories enterally. There are several other postulated mechanisms including gut bacterial permeation predisposing to endotoxin associated down regulation of bile acid transporters. An additional potential mechanism includes toxicity of the TPN solution itself, such as lipid mediated hepatic toxicity. Prematurity, leading to a poor development of bile acid regulating nuclear receptors and transporters has also been implicated as a causative factor. This review presents the current controversies and research into mechanisms of TPN associated injury. PMID:27417369

  8. Zinc supplementation enhances the effectiveness of St. Thomas' Hospital No. 2 cardioplegic solution in an in vitro model of hypothermic cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Powell, S R; Aiuto, L; Hall, D; Tortolani, A J

    1995-12-01

    The present study was done to assess the effectiveness of a zinc-supplemented cardioplegic solution in an in vitro model of hypothermic arrest. Isolated hearts were perfused in the nonworking mode. All hearts were subjected to 2 hours of hypothermic arrest, at 10 degrees C, followed by 60 minutes of recovery. In protocol 1, arrest was initiated with infusion of cardioplegic solution with or without 30 mumol/l zinc for 5 minutes, which was then reinfused for 5 minutes every 15 minutes during arrest. In protocol 2, arrest was initiated with infusion of cardioplegic solution with or without 40 mumol/L zinc for 10 minutes. Cardioplegic solution (without zinc) was then reinfused for 5 minutes before the hearts were rewarmed. In protocol 1 hearts, peak postischemic left ventricular developed systolic pressure was 106 +/- 5 mm Hg and 80 +/- 3 mm Hg in zinc-treated versus control hearts, respectively (p < 0.05 by repeated-measures analysis of variance). In protocol 2 hearts, recovery of postischemic left ventricular developed systolic pressure peaked at 74 +/- 4 mm Hg and 46 +/- 8 mm Hg in zinc-treated and control hearts, respectively (p 0.05, repeated-measures analysis of variance). Similar effects were observed for the left ventricular rate of relaxation (p < 0.05, repeated-measures analysis of variance). Except for some minor effects, lactate dehydrogenase release was not affected by zinc supplementation. The present study demonstrates that zinc supplementation further enhances the normally observed preservation of postarrest cardiac function and suggests possible clinical utility for this metal as an additive to standard crystalloid cardioplegic solutions.

  9. Decreased cysteine and proline synthesis in parenterally fed, premature infants.

    PubMed

    Miller, R G; Jahoor, F; Jaksic, T

    1995-07-01

    Little is known about the amino acid (AA) biosynthetic capacity and requirements of premature infants. This study assessed the synthesis of seven biochemically nonessential AA from a universal precursor, glucose, in stable, parenterally fed, premature neonates. Seven infants (six boys, one girl) were studied at a mean age of 6.3 +/- 0.6 (SEM) days; mean gestational age was 29.7 +/- 1.3 (SEM) weeks, and mean birth weight was 1,222.8 +/- 176.5 (SEM) grams. All infants were parenterally fed a mixture of 7.5% to 12.5% dextrose and 2.2% Trophamine, with or without lipid. Mean caloric intake was 93 +/- 8.4 (SEM) kcal/kg/d, and total AA intake was standardized at 2.86 g/kg/d AA, plus supplemental cysteine (30 mg/g AA/d). Each infant received a 4-hour continuous, unprimed intravenous infusion of a stable isotope tracer of D(-)[U13C] glucose (200 mg/kg). Blood samples were obtained before and at the end of the infusion. Conversion of the glucose tracer into seven biochemically nonessential AA (cysteine [Cys], proline [Pro], aspartate [Asp], serine [Ser], glutamate [Glu], alanine [Ala], and glycine [Gly]) was assessed by measuring their isotopic enrichment in plasma, using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and expressed as mole percent excess (MPE) (mean +/- SEM). The isotopic enrichment of plasma glucose was also measured using GC/MS. Free plasma AA concentrations (mean +/- SD) were measured using an automated amino acid analyzer. Mean MPE for M + 1, M + 2 and M + 3 Cys, and for M + 1 and M + 3 Pro were not significantly different from 0; M + 2 Pro barely achieved statistical significance (P = .048).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Evaluation of physicochemical incompatibilities during parenteral drug administration in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Gikic, M; Di Paolo, E R; Pannatier, A; Cotting, J

    2000-06-01

    Patients in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) often receive numerous medications by the parenteral route. Frequently two or more drugs are delivered simultaneously through the same line and the risk of physicochemical incompatibilities is thus important. The objectives of this study were 1) to identify prospectively the combinations of injectable drugs administered in the PICU of our university hospital and 2) to analyze them according to information found in the literature. The data were collected by a pharmacist over a 30-day period and classified in three categories: compatible, incompatible and undocumented. Nineteen patients were included in the study with a median age of 3.2 years. The mean number (+/- SD) of injectable drugs per patient and per day was 6.5 (+/- 2.8), for a total of 26 drugs and 7 solutes. 64 combinations of drugs were observed with 2 (31.3%), 3 (45.3%), 4 (10.9%) or 5 (12.5%) drugs. 81 drug-drug and 94 drug-solute combinations were recorded. Among these, 151 (86.3%) were compatible, 6 (3.4%) incompatible and 18 (10.3%) undocumented. The incompatibilities included furosemide (Lasix), a drug in alkaline solution and Vamina-Glucose, a total parenteral nutrition solution. No clinical consequences resulting from drug incompatibilities were shown in this study. We suggest that in vitro compatibility tests on standard drug combinations, as well as a training program for nurses on drug incompatibility problems would sensitively increase the security of parenteral drug administration.

  11. Intravenous Lipid Emulsions in Parenteral Nutrition123

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Gillian L; Nandivada, Prathima; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Fat is an important macronutrient in the human diet. For patients with intestinal failure who are unable to absorb nutrients via the enteral route, intravenous lipid emulsions play a critical role in providing an energy-dense source of calories and supplying the essential fatty acids that cannot be endogenously synthesized. Over the last 50 y, lipid emulsions have been an important component of parenteral nutrition (PN), and over the last 10–15 y many new lipid emulsions have been manufactured with the goal of improving safety and efficacy profiles and achieving physiologically optimal formulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a background on the components of lipid emulsions, their role in PN, and to discuss the lipid emulsions available for intravenous use. Finally, the role of parenteral fat emulsions in the pathogenesis and management of PN-associated liver disease in PN-dependent pediatric patients is reviewed. PMID:26374182

  12. [The enzymatic activity of ammonia metabolism in the liver during the parenteral nitrogen feeding of animals with experimental liver failure].

    PubMed

    Magarlamov, A G; Levchenko, I V; Anoshina, M Iu; Ishchuk, O E

    1992-03-01

    It was established that liver insufficiency the activity of hepatic glutamate dehydrogenase is markedly reduced that is, apparently, the main cause of hyperammonemia that accompanies hepatic encephalopathy. Here occurs a significant reduction of the processes of ammonia detoxication with formation of glutamine in the liver as evidenced by changes of the activity of glutamine synthetase. Administration parenterally of a preparation of nitrous feeding increases essentially ammonia detoxicating function of muscular tissue which supplements the detoxicating function of the liver.

  13. Taurolidine in Pediatric Home Parenteral Nutrition Patients.

    PubMed

    Hulshof, Emma Claire; Hanff, Lidwien Marieke; Olieman, Joanne; de Vette, Susanna; Driessen, Gert-Jan; Meeussen, Conny; Escher, Johanna Caroline

    2017-02-01

    To reduce the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in home parenteral nutrition patients, the use of taurolidine was introduced in the Sophia Children's Hospital in 2011. This introduction led to a reduction in catheter-related bloodstream infections: 12.7/1000 catheter days before the use of taurolidine, compared with 4.3/1000 catheter days afterwards (n = 7) [relative risk = 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.20-0.65 (P = 0.018)].

  14. Early combined parenteral and enteral nutrition for pancreaticoduodenectomy – Retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Pascal; Keller, Daniel; Steimer, Johannes; Gmür, Emanuel; Haller, Alois; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Rühlin, Maya; Gelpke, Hans; Breitenstein, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Suggested guidelines for nutritional support after pancreaticoduodenectomy are still controversial. Recent evidence suggests that combining enteral nutrition (EN) with parenteral nutrition (PN) improves outcome. For ten years, patients have been treated with Early Combined Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ECPEN) after PD. The aim of this study was to report on rationale, safety, effectiveness and outcome associated with this method. Methods Consecutive PD performed between 2003 and 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Early EN and PN was standardized and started immediately after surgery. EN was increased to 40 ml/h (1 kcal/ml) over 24 h, while PN was supplemented based on a daily energy target of 25 kcal/kg. Standard enteral and parenteral products were used. Results Sixty-nine patients were nutritionally supplemented according to ECPEN. The median coverage of kcal per patients related to the total caloric requirements during the entire hospitalization (nutrition balance) was 93.4% (range: 100%–69.3%). The nutritional balance in patients with needle catheter jejunostomy (NCJ) was significantly higher than in the group with nasojejunal tube (97.1% vs. 91.6%; p < 0.0001). Mortality rate was 5.8%, while major complications (Clavien-Dindo 3–5) occurred in 21.7% of patients. Neither the presence of preoperative malnutrition nor the application of preoperative immunonutrition was associated with postoperative clinical outcome. Conclusion This is the first European study of ECPEN after PD. ECPEN is safe and, especially in combination with NCJ, provides comprehensive coverage of caloric requirements during the postoperative phase. Clinical controlled trials are needed to investigate potential benefits of complete energy supplementation during the early postoperative phase after PD. PMID:26955477

  15. Total parenteral nutrition in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Norcross, E.D.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-03-01

    Parenteral Nutrition with hypertonic glucose is frequently given to diabetic patients. Large amounts of insulin can be required. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a totally parenterally nourished diabetic rat model. 200 g Female Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by i.v. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Rats were then allowed to recover for at least 1 week before undergoing surgical insertion of a central venous catheter for parenteral feeding. TPN was begun 3 days after surgery. Prior to this they were allowed unlimited access to food and water. Control (non-streptozotocin treated) rats were run at the same time. Protein turnover was investigated by using /sup 15/N glycine. Preliminary results: diabetic rats given mostly fat as a calorie source survived well in the absence of exogenous insulin whereas those that were given glucose only as their non-protein calorie source showed poor survival even with exogenous insulin. N balance and protein turnover in the lipid treated diabetic rats were comparable to the non-diabetic control rats.

  16. The Development of Total Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Don K

    2017-01-01

    The first patient to receive complete nourishment of a patient by intravenous infusion independent of the alimentary tract was an infant girl born with near-total small bowel atresia. Total parenteral nutrition, the intravenous infusion of nutrients, has been attempted since Harvey's description of the circulatory system in the early 17th century. The modern era of parenteral nutrition began in the early 20th century, when infusions of glucose, plasma, and emulsified fat into humans proved feasible. Robert Elman, working in the 1930s and 1940s, demonstrated that carefully prepared protein hydrolysates could be safely infused intravenously and incorporated by the body. Stanley Dudrick and Douglas Wilmore, surgeon researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, worked through the many details of preparation, administration, and clinical monitoring in beagle puppies before testing them on adult patients malnourished from a variety of surgical complications and gastrointestinal conditions. They applied their techniques and formulations on a newborn wasting away from congenital absence of the small bowel, the baby growing and developing for several months while being nourished completely by total parenteral nutrition. Their techniques, inspired by patients with progressive malnutrition from devastating intestinal conditions and malformations, form the basis of the practice of intravenous nutrition practiced today.

  17. Review of data of the patients receiving total parenteral nutrition at the intensive care unit of a university hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Ovayolu, Nimet; Torun, Seda; Ucan, Ozlem; Ozdemir, Perihan; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Geyik, Ramazan

    2006-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is commonly administered to patients in intensive care units who cannot be fed gastrointestinally. Several problems might be encountered during parenteral nutrition. We designed this study to evaluate two years' data of the patients who received parenteral nutrition at the intensive care unit of the university hospital. Forty-five patients who were treated at this hospital between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2005 were included in this study. Patient data were collected via questionnaires designed based on the information in the literature. Blood, urinary, oropharyngeal and catheter entry site cultures were obtained and analyzed on the third and seventh days of the treatment. We found the following results: 31.1% of the patients received parenteral nutrition due to renal insufficiency; ready-made amino acid/lipid solutions were used in 86.7% of the patients; 77.8% of the solutions were administered through a peripheral vein; 88.6% of total parenteral nutrition solutions given thorough the peripheral vein had higher osmolarities than 800 mOsmol/L; routine Fe and Fe binding capacity, prothrombin time, cholesterol and triglyceride level assessments were not performed before the initiation of treatment; and the culture tests most commonly revealed Staphylococcus epidermidis in the blood, Candido species in urine, Streptococcus in throat, and Staphylococcus aureus at catheter entry sites. Based on these results, we suggest that organizing a nutrition support team would be useful in order to improve the quality of the nursery and to provide close and rational management and follow-up of the patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. PMID:17225841

  18. Investigation of Possible Maillard Reaction Between Acyclovir and Dextrose upon Dilution Prior to Parenteral Administration.

    PubMed

    Siahi Shadbad, Mohammad Reza; Ghaderi, Faranak; Hatami, Leila; Monajjemzadeh, Farnaz

    2016-12-01

    In this study the stability of parenteral acyclovir (ACV) when diluted in dextrose (DEX) as large volume intravenous fluid preparation (LVIF) was evaluated and the possible Maillard reaction adducts were monitored in the recommended infusion time. Different physicochemical methods were used to evaluate the Maillard reaction of dextrose with ACV to track the reaction in real infusion condition. Other large volume intravenous fluids were checked regarding the diluted drug stability profile. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and mass data proved the reaction of glucose with dextrose. A Maillard-specific high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was used to track the reaction in real infusion condition in vitro. The nucleophilic reaction occurred in diluted parenteral preparations of acyclovir in 5% dextrose solutions. The best diluent solution was also selected as sodium chloride and introduced based on drug stability and also its adsorption onto different infusion sets (PVC or non PVC) to provide an acceptable administration protocol in clinical practices. Although, the Maillard reaction was proved and successfully tracked in diluted solutions, and the level of drug loss when diluted in dextrose was reported to be between 0.27 up to 1.03% of the initial content. There was no drug adsorption to common infusion sets. The best diluent for parenteral acyclovir is sodium chloride large volume intravenous fluid.

  19. Prevention of cold ischemia/rewarming-induced ERK 1/2, p38 kinase and HO-1 activation by trophic factor supplementation of UW solution.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Sam; Foley, John D; Russell, Paul; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christopher J

    2008-08-01

    We have previously shown that trophic factor supplementation (TFS) of University of Wisconsin (UW) solution reduced early apoptotic changes in vascular endothelial cells. Here, we examine the effect of TFS on cell signaling pathways related to cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis after cold ischemic storage. In this study, the effect of TFS on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules ERK (extracellular regulated-signaling kinase) 1/2 and p38 MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinases) and of HO-1 (hemeoxygenase-1), relative to changes seen in unmodified UW solution, were determined by Western blot in cells stored under cold ischemic conditions. Primary cultures of canine kidney proximal tubule cells (CKPTC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used in this study. There was a significant decrease, relative to UW solution, after 1 min rewarming in ERK 1 and 2 activity in CKPTCs. For p38 MAPK, a significant decrease after 5 min rewarming was seen in CKPTC (p<0.05) while significant reductions relative to UW solution were seen in HUVECs after both 1 and 5 min rewarming (p<0.05). Phosphorylated HO-1 was also decreased by 43% and 50% in HUVECs, relative to UW solution, after 1 and 5 min rewarming (p<0.05 at each time point). Collectively, TFS not only limits ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK activity induced by cold ischemic injury and subsequent rewarming, but also substantially restricted increases in HO-1 phosphorylation.

  20. Calcium Chloride in Neonatal Parenteral Nutrition: Compatibility Studies Using Laser Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Robert K.; Christensen, J. Mark; Karnpracha, Chanida; Rosa, Jill E.; Clark, Sara M.; Migaki, Evelyn A.; Wu, YingXing

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We have previously reported results of precipitation studies for neonatal parenteral nutrition solutions containing calcium chloride and sodium phosphate using visual methods to determine compatibility. The purpose of this study was to do further testing of compatibility for solutions containing calcium chloride using more sensitive methods. Methods Solutions of Trophamine (Braun Medical Inc, Irvine, CA) and Premasol (Baxter Pharmaceuticals, Deerfield, IL) were compounded with calcium chloride and potassium phosphate. Controls contained no calcium or phosphate. After incubation at 37° for 24 hours solutions without visual precipitation were analyzed to determine mean particle size using dynamic light scattering from a laser light source. Results Particle sizes were similar for control solutions and those without visual precipitation and a mean particle size <1000 nm. Compatible solutions were defined as those with added calcium and phosphate with no visual evidence of precipitation and mean particle size <1000 nm. In solutions containing 2.5–3% amino acids and 10 mmol/L of calcium chloride the maximum amount of potassium phosphate that was compatible was 7.5 mmol/L. Conclusion Maximum amounts of phosphate that could be added to parenteral nutrition solutions containing Trophamine and calcium chloride were about 7.5–10 mmol/L less for a given concentration of calcium based upon laser methodology compared to visual techniques to determine compatibility. There were minor differences in compatibility when adding calcium chloride and potassium phosphate to Premasol versus Trophamine. PMID:25192060

  1. Insulin Resistance and Body Weight: Recent Human Studies Documenting the Benefits of Supplemental Chromium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The essentiality of chromium for humans was confirmed more than three decades ago with the studies showing that patients on total parenteral nutritrion (TPN) developed severe diabetic-like symptoms that could be reversed by the addition of chromium to their parenteral nutrition solutions. Since the...

  2. Parenteral sulfur amino acid requirements in septic infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate parenteral methionine requirements of critically ill, septic infants, we conducted an investigation involving 12 infants (age 2+/-1 years; weight 13+/-2kg) using the intravenous indicator amino acid oxidation and balance technique. They received a balanced parenteral amino acid formul...

  3. Wernicke's encephalopathy after total parenteral nutrition in patients with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, In Seub; Seok, Hyeri; Eun, Yeong Hee; Lee, You-Bin; Lee, Seung-Eun; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies in Crohn's disease (CD) patients are not uncommon and usually result in a combination of reduced dietary intake, disease-related malabsorption, and a catabolic state. Decreased serum thiamine levels are often reported in patients with CD. Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe form of thiamine deficiency that can cause serious neurologic complications. Although WE is known to occur frequently in alcoholics, a number of non-alcoholic causes have also been reported. Here, we report two cases of non-alcoholic WE that developed in two severely malnourished CD patients who were supported by prolonged total parenteral nutrition without thiamine supplementation. These patients complained of sudden-onset ophthalmopathy, cerebellar dysfunction, and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging allowed definitive diagnosis for WE despite poor sensitivity. The intravenous administration of thiamine alleviated the symptoms of WE dramatically. We emphasize the importance of thiamine supplementation for malnourished patients even if they are not alcoholics, especially in those with CD. PMID:27175122

  4. Home parenteral nutrition in chronic intestinal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Bisset, W M; Stapleford, P; Long, S; Chamberlain, A; Sokel, B; Milla, P J

    1992-01-01

    In children with severe failure of intestinal function, intravenous nutrition is at present the only treatment able to maintain adequate nutrition for prolonged periods of time. Over the last five years we have discharged 10 patients home on parenteral nutrition for a total of 25 patient years and here the outcome of these children is presented. Of the 10 patients, one has discontinued home parenteral nutrition (HPN), seven patients remain well, one patient has recently moved to the USA, and one patient has died after major abdominal surgery. All children had either normal or an accelerated rate of growth on HPN and developmentally all have progressed well. All the children over 5 years attend normal schools. The major complication of treatment was line sepsis with an overall rate of one episode in 476 days and a total of nine central lines (five patients) have required replacement giving an average line life of 680 days. For those children unfortunate enough to suffer from severe intestinal failure, HPN is preferable to prolonged hospital treatment and offers the chance of a good quality of life with prolonged survival. PMID:1739322

  5. ASPEN statement on parenteral nutrition standardization.

    PubMed

    Kochevar, Marty; Guenter, Peggi; Holcombe, Beverly; Malone, Ainsley; Mirtallo, Jay

    2007-01-01

    In response to questions regarding use of standardized parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) developed a Task Force to address some of these issues. A.S.P.E.N. envisions standardized PN as a broader issue rather than simply using a standardized, commercially available PN product. A standardized process for PN must be explored in order to improve patient safety and clinical appropriateness, and to maximize resource efficiency. A standardized process may include use of standardized PN formulations (including standardized, commercial PN products) but also includes aspects of ordering, labeling, screening, compounding, and administration of PN. A safe PN system must exist which minimizes procedural incidents and maximizes the ability to meet individual patient requirements. Using clinicians with nutrition support therapy expertise will contribute to that safe PN system. The purpose of this statement is to present the published literature associated with standardized PN formulations, to provide recommendations, and to identify areas in need of future research.

  6. Parenteral nutrition product shortages: impact on safety.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Beverly

    2012-03-01

    The drug shortage crisis continues in the United States and threatens the integrity of the pharmaceutical supply chain and compromises patient care, especially patients requiring parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy. The number of new drug shortages has increased rapidly over the past 5 years, with the most significant increase in sterile injectable products. The most common reason for a shortage of a sterile injectable medication is a product quality issue. Two surveys of healthcare professionals have assessed the impact of drug shortages on patient safety. Participants in one survey reported over 1000 medication errors or patient adverse events as the result of shortages. The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition also conducted a survey of healthcare professionals regarding PN product shortages and the associated patient care implications. Safety risks were reported throughout the entire PN process, from procurement of PN products to patient outcomes. Providing PN therapy during product shortages requires vigilance and continuous assessment of the entire PN process to optimize patient care quality and avoid patient harm.

  7. Microbial contamination and growth in total parenteral nutrition solutions.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J; Turner, M; Gilbert, P

    1988-04-01

    TPN bags (196) and giving sets were subjected to microbiological examination following administration within a busy nutrition ward. Of these, five (2.6%) were found to be contaminated with coagulase-negative Gram-positive cocci. In all but one instance the contamination was restricted to the terminal ends of the giving sets rather than to the nutrition bag itself. Isolation of micro-organisms from the ward environment suggested that the contamination had arisen extrinsically during the setting up of the infusions. Isolates from the contaminated products, together with type species of Escherichia coli and Candida albicans, were examined with respect to their growth requirements and used to challenge four TPN formulations. Growth and survival of the organisms was monitored for up to 21 days. In all instances significant numbers of organisms were recovered after 72 h. Significant growth of the Staphylococcal isolate and C. albicans occurred over the initial 48-72 h incubation, this appeared to be greater in extent for the lipid-containing formulations. The temperature of storage of the formulation was the major determining factor for microbial growth and survival. No survivors were recovered, however, from any formulation after 21 days.

  8. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  9. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  10. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  11. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  12. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on...

  13. Compartment syndrome due to extravasation of peripheral parenteral nutrition: extravasation injury of parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Park, Huee Jin; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Hyuk Jin; Jeong, Eui Cheol; Kim, Kee Won

    2015-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a rare but devastating condition that can result in permanent neuromuscular or soft tissue injuries. Extravasation injuries, among the iatrogenic causes of compartment syndrome, occur under a wide variety of circumstances in the inpatient setting. Total parenteral nutrition via a peripheral route is an effective alternative for the management of critically ill children who do not obtain adequate nutrition via the oral route. However, there is an inherent risk of extravasation, which can cause compartment syndrome, especially when detected at a later stage. Herein, we report a rare case of compartment syndrome and skin necrosis due to extravasation, requiring emergency fasciotomy and skin graft in a 7-month-old boy who was treated with peripheral parenteral nutrition via a pressurized infusion pump. Although we cannot estimate the exact time at which extravasation occurred, the extent and degree of the wound suggest that the ischemic insult was prolonged, lasting for several hours. Pediatric clinicians and medical teams should carefully examine the site of insertion of the intravenous catheter, especially in patients receiving parenteral nutrition via a peripheral intravenous catheter with a pressurized infusion pump. PMID:26692883

  14. Stability issues of parenteral chemotherapy drugs.

    PubMed

    de Lemos, Mário L; Hamata, Linda

    2007-03-01

    The pharmacist often needs to have all the information required to prepare and to assign an expiry date for parenteral products of antineoplastic agents. The pharmaceutical manufacturers usually provide data on how to prepare their products and the associated physicochemical stability. Standard reference texts also provide additional summary information of other primary data. However, it is not uncommon to find knowledge gaps in this area. Hence, additional extrapolation and consensus on interpretation is often needed to address issues not covered by data from the pharmaceutical manufacturers, standard reference texts, or official guidelines. Some of the key issues have been identified in our recent development of a chemotherapy preparation and stability chart. These include use of data from different brands, expiry date of original vial and final products, risk of contamination, infusion volume and stability, multi-day home-use products, syringe preparations, and products to be used immediately. Potential approaches to address these common issues are described in this article.

  15. Intravenous lipids in home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pironi, Loris; Agostini, Federica; Guidetti, Mariacristina

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsions (IVLEs) are an important component of the nutritional admixtures for patients on long-term home parenteral nutrition (HPN) for chronic intestinal failure (CIF). IVLEs are primarily used as a source of energy and essential fatty acids, and the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is the most important characteristic of IVLEs. IVLEs rich in n-6 PUFAs may have a pro-inflammatory effect, whereas those rich in n-3 PUFAs may exert an anti-inflammatory effect. Other components to be considered are the risk of lipid peroxidation and the contents of α-tocopherol and phytosterols. Published studies were reviewed to determine the effects of the commercially available IVLEs on essential fatty acid status, liver function tests, lipid peroxidation and inflammatory indices, and α-tocopherol status, as well as their clinical safety and efficacy in patients on HPN. Investigations on the efficacy of fish oil-based IVLEs, which are rich in n-3 PUFAs, in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) in adult patients on HPN for CIF were also analyzed. The current commercial IVLE formulations have similar clinical safety profiles and efficacies and can prevent the development of essential fatty acid deficiency in adults on HPN for CIF. IVLE with a low content of n-6 PUFAs and with or without increased n-3 PUFA content may reduce the risk of PNALD. Fish oil-based IVLE, which is rich in n-3 PUFAs, may be effective in reversing hepatic cholestasis due to PNALD.

  16. Parenteral lipids: safety aspects and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A

    2015-01-01

    Lipid emulsions (LEs) used in modern parenteral nutrition formulations are indispensable sources of calories and (essential) fatty acids ((E)FAs). Several generations of LEs based on various FA sources have been developed, and issues related to their safe use deserve attention. The relevant issues concern LE composition, stability and sterility, while other problems are related to the lipid infusion rate, including hypertriglyceridemia and lipid overload syndrome. The FA structure of LEs translates into effects on inflammatory processes and immune cell function and affects the functions of organs, such as the liver and lungs. In addition, disturbed balances of (anti)oxidants and the presence of other bioactive agents in LEs, such as phytosterols, are mechanisms that may underlie the potential adverse effects. Lipid emulsions (LEs) are key components of parenteral nutrition (PN) that bypass the need for (essential) fatty acids ((E)FAs) and provide sufficient energy to decrease the need for the infusion of large amounts of dextrose, thus preventing its associated complications. The oldest available LEs are based on soybean oil (SO-LE) and meet these requirements. (Pre)clinical evidence suggests that various, next-generation LEs based on alternative oil sources are safe and effective; particularly, those based on fish oil (FO-LEs) have less pro-inflammatory characteristics that may convey beneficial effects on the immune system and organ functions. With the exception of decreased liver damage with the use of FO-LEs instead of SO-LEs, the clinical relevance of many of these data needs further validation.

  17. Third generation cephalosporins in the parenteral to oral switch.

    PubMed

    Rimmer, D

    1994-01-01

    In the present economic climate, it is increasingly necessary to ensure the cost-effectiveness of all aspects of healthcare. The expenditure on medications in a hospital is largely determined by the workload and throughput, but efforts to rationalise the use of medications will result in benefits both in patient care and overall costs. The purpose of this report is to discuss the advantages of switching from parenteral to oral cephalosporin therapy after the initial stage of infection treatment, the potential of presently available oral cephalosporins for use in a parenteral-to-oral switch regimen, and the outcome of a parenteral-to-oral switch programme, which used parenteral cefotaxime and oral cefixime, implemented at Hillingdon Hospital.

  18. Effect of fasting and parenteral alimentation on PIPIDA scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T.; McClain, C.J.; Shafer, R.B.

    1983-08-01

    Ten patients were prospectively studied using 99mTc-PIPIDA imaging to evaluate the effects of fasting and parenteral alimentation on gallbladder function. Three of ten patients had initial nonvisualization of the gallbladder for up to 2 hr, yet had normal visualization on repeat imaging performed after resumption of oral intake or after parenteral alimentation was discontinued. 99mTc-PIPIDA imaging should be interpreted with caution in patients fitting into either of these groups.

  19. Sports Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... Sports Supplements? How Some Common Supplements Affect the Body Will Supplements ... improving your sports performance is probably on your mind. Lots of people wonder if taking sports supplements ...

  20. Importance of diet of dam and colostrum to the biological antioxidant status and parenteral iron tolerance of the pig.

    PubMed

    Loudenslager, M J; Ku, P K; Whetter, P A; Ullrey, D E; Whitehair, C K; Stowe, H D; Miller, E R

    1986-12-01

    Fifteen second-parity sows were used to determine the importance of vitamin E (E) and selenium (Se) supplementation of the sow's diet and colostrum consumption by the neonatal pig on tolerance to parenteral iron. Selenium (.1 ppm) and E (50 IU/kg) supplementation of the diet of the sow increased plasma tocopherol and Se concentrations, but did not increase plasma glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity. Colostrum had greater concentrations of E (primarily alpha-tocopherol) and Se than milk. Plasma biological antioxidant status (tocopherol level and GSH-Px activity) of pigs at birth was very low, but by 2 d of age had increased, especially in alpha-tocopherol (nearly a 20-fold increase). Liveability and body weight gain of pigs were not affected by the pre-colostrum iron injection (200 mg Fe as gleptoferron); however, plasma tocopherol concentrations of Fe-injected pigs were lower and plasma Se concentration and GSH-Px activities were higher at 2 d of age than values of pigs not receiving parenteral Fe. Supplementation of the dam's diet with E and Se maintained high tocopherol and Se levels in her colostrum and milk and a high biological antioxidant status in her pigs throughout the nursing period.

  1. Comparison of the Efficacies of Parenteral Iron Sucrose and Oral Iron Sulfate for Anemic Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yoo Min; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Koh, Seong-Joon; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The optimal route for iron administration in anemic patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been determined. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of parenteral and oral iron therapy in IBD patients in Korea. Methods A retrospective multicenter study was performed. Patients who had been administered parenteral iron were matched to the controls with oral iron at a 1:1 ratio according to age, sex, and type of IBD. Results Patients that received parenteral iron exhibited increases in hemoglobin levels of ≥20% from the baseline at lower doses and in shorter durations (p=0.034 and p=0.046, respectively). In the multivariate analysis, parenteral iron therapy appeared to be more efficient than oral iron therapy, but this difference was not statistically significant (hazard ratio [HR], 1.552; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.844 to 2.851; p=0.157). Patients with ulcerative colitis responded better to iron therapy than those with Crohn’s disease (HR, 3.415; 95% CI, 1.808 to 6.450; p<0.001). Patients with an initial hemoglobin level of 10 g/dL or higher responded poorly to iron therapy (HR, 0.345; 95% CI, 0.177 to 0.671; p=0.002). Conclusions Parenteral iron therapy appears to be more efficient than oral iron therapy. Physicians should focus on the iron deficiency of IBD patients and consider parenteral iron supplements in appropriate patient groups. PMID:27021505

  2. Early enteral nutrition vs parenteral nutrition following pancreaticoduodenectomy: Experience from a single center

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian-Wen; Liu, Chang; Du, Zhao-Qing; Liu, Xue-Min; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze and compare postoperative morbidity between patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and early enteral nutrition supplemented with parenteral nutrition (EEN + PN). METHODS: Three hundred and forty patients receiving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) from 2009 to 2013 at our center were enrolled retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups depending on postoperative nutrition support scheme: an EEN + PN group (n = 87) and a TPN group (n = 253). Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters, pathological diagnosis, intraoperative information, and postoperative complications of the two groups were analyzed. RESULTS: The two groups did not differ in demographic characteristics, preoperative comorbidities, preoperative biochemical parameters or pathological findings (P > 0.05 for all). However, patients with EEN + PN following PD had a higher incidence of delayed gastric emptying (16.1% vs 6.7%, P = 0.016), pulmonary infection (10.3% vs 3.6%, P = 0.024), and probably intraperitoneal infection (18.4% vs 10.3%, P = 0.059), which might account for their longer nasogastric tube retention time (9 d vs 5 d, P = 0.006), postoperative hospital stay (25 d vs 20 d, P = 0.055) and higher hospitalization expenses (USD10397 vs USD8663.9, P = 0.008), compared to those with TPN. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that TPN might be safe and sufficient for patient recovery after PD. Postoperative EEN should only be performed scrupulously and selectively. PMID:27076767

  3. Influence of Preoperative Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition with Micronutrients after Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsiu-Chih; Hu, Shu-Hui; Yang, Hui-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The inflammatory reactions are stronger after surgery of malnourished preoperative patients. Many studies have shown vitamin and trace element deficiencies appear to affect the functioning of immune cells. Enteral nutrition is often inadequate for malnourished patients. Therefore, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is considered an effective method for providing preoperative nutritional support. TPN needs a central vein catheter, and there are more risks associated with TPN. However, peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) often does not provide enough energy or nutrients. Purpose. This study investigated the inflammatory response and prognosis for patients receiving a modified form of PPN with added fat emulsion infusion, multiple vitamins (MTV), and trace elements (TE) to assess the feasibility of preoperative nutritional support. Methods. A cross-sectional design was used to compare the influence of PPN with or without adding MTV and TE on malnourished abdominal surgery patients. Results. Both preoperative groups received equal calories and protein, but due to the lack of micronutrients, patients in preoperative Group B exhibited higher inflammation, lower serum albumin levels, and higher anastomotic leak rates and also required prolonged hospital stays. Conclusion. Malnourished patients who receive micronutrient supplementation preoperatively have lower postoperative inflammatory responses and better prognoses. PPN with added fat emulsion, MTV, and TE provides valid and effective preoperative nutritional support. PMID:26000296

  4. Parenteral nutrition improves nutritional status, autonomic symptoms and quality of life in transthyretin amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Russo, Massimo; Vita, Gian Luca; Stancanelli, Claudia; Mazzeo, Anna; Vita, Giuseppe; Messina, Sonia

    2016-06-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) is an inherited amyloidosis, leading to death in about ten years in most cases due to cardiac failure or wasting syndrome. Previous studies showed that modified body mass index was related to time before death, duration of gastrointestinal disturbances, malabsorption and functional capacity. We report two patients in whom nutritional status worsened despite diet modification, hypercaloric supplement and two relevant therapeutic approaches such as liver transplant and tafamidis meglumine, respectively. The first patient, a 52-year-old lady carrying Thr49Ala mutation, had a disease duration of twelve years and had lost weight up to 35 kg because of daily diarrhea. The second patient, a 63-year-old man with Glu89Gln mutation and a disease duration of fifteen years, was in the New York Heart Association (NYHA) Functional Classification class III and his weight was 39 kg. In both cases, a peripherally inserted central catheter was placed for parenteral nutrition. It allowed to improve their nutritional status and clinical conditions, with body weight gains of 11 and 8 kg in a one year follow-up, respectively. Moreover, reduction of autonomic symptoms including postural hypotension, nausea and diarrhoea was recorded with ameliorated quality of life. Our experience suggests that parenteral nutrition may be useful in reducing complications and disabilities in TTR-FAP patients, even when all dietary adjustments have been ineffective. Reasonably, the improvement in nutritional status may prolong survival in TTR-FAP patients.

  5. [Enteral and/or parenteral nutrition in the critically ill : An algorithm as a possible basis for decision-making].

    PubMed

    Weimann, A

    2016-09-01

    Taking into account new data and recent clinical controversies regarding nutritional support within the first 7 days of critical illness, early enteral nutrition is recommended. A normocaloric goal of 25 kcal/kg body weight/day should be achieved. In case of inadequate enteral tolerance, parenteral supplementation starting between day 3 and 5 should be selectively restricted to primarily malnourished patients and those with high risk for complications and prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. This can be summarized in a clinical algorithm.

  6. Hypersensitivity reaction to components of parenteral nutrition in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Carlos Ruiz; Ponce, Esperanza Castejón; Busquets, Ferran Bossacoma; Hernández, Diana Sánchez; Oliva, Silvia Meavilla; Santacruz, Enrique Llerena; Pérez, Naymar; De Los Santos Pelegrini, Mariela; Flaque, Miquel Villaronga

    2016-01-01

    Very rare cases of hypersensitivity reactions to various constituents of parenteral nutrition (PN) have been reported in children. Adverse effects associated with PN administration have centered on metabolic, infectious, and mechanical complications. Here we describe three cases of hypersensitivity to components of PN. Case 1 is a 1-mo-old breastfed baby with a diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis associated with an infection with cytomegalovirus. On the second day of PN, 60 min after the initiation of the infusion, the patient had an allergic reaction with an overall diffused rash. On day 4 of PN, the multivitamin solution and the trace element mix were excluded, showing a good tolerance. Case 2 is a 4-y-old girl with a background of stage III neuroblastoma. On day 3 of PN, 15 min after the initiation of the infusion, the patient showed sudden facial edema. On day 5, suspecting the amino acid solution to be the etiology of her reaction, PN was infused with another amino acid preparation, and the patient showed good tolerance. Case 3 is a 10-y-old boy with a diagnosis of an acute peritonitis. Two h after the initiation of the infusion, the patient showed a general wheal rash. He referred a background of fish allergy. Considering that the lipid emulsion used had components from fish oil (SMOF Lipid), a new PN was infused on day 2. The new PN contained a lipid emulsion containing vegetable oil (ClinOleic). The patient showed good tolerance. In conclusion, we consider that, although the hypersensitivity to PN components is infrequent, there is an increase in reports of pediatric cases describing this allergic pathology.

  7. Evidence that phenylalanine hydroxylation rates are overestimated in neonatal subjects receiving total parenteral nutrition with a high phenylalanine content.

    PubMed

    House, J D; Thorpe, J M; Wykes, L J; Pencharz, P B; Ball, R O

    1998-04-01

    Recent publications have indicated that the parenterally fed neonate has a substantial ability to hydroxylate phenylalanine. Examination of these data suggests that, at high phenylalanine intakes, estimated rates of hydroxylation exceed rates of intake. This implies significant net tissue breakdown. However, the quantitative validity of the estimates of phenylalanine hydroxylation cannot be assessed without nitrogen balance data. We have recently developed a parenterally fed neonatal piglet model and have used this to study aromatic amino acid metabolism in piglets fed different amino acid solutions. Reappraisal of the data from these studies has allowed us to estimate both phenylalanine hydroxylation and tissue protein accretion. Piglets were parenterally fed Vamin [292 micromol of Phe x kg(-1) x h(-1), 26 micromol of Tyr x kg(-1) x h(-1)], Vaminolact + Phe [VLP, 277 micromol of Phe x kg(-1) x h(-1), 26 micromol Tyr x kg(-1) x h(-1)], or Vaminolact + glycyl-L-tyrosine [VLGT, 152 micromol of Phe x kg(-1) x h(-1), 159 micromol of Tyr x kg(-1) x h(-1)] for 8 d. Nitrogen balance was measured over the last 5 study d, and aromatic amino acid kinetics were determined using a primed continuous infusion of L-[1-4C]phenylalanine on d 8. Average body protein gain, derived from nitrogen balance, was 11 g x kg(-1) x d(-1). For the Vamin and VLP groups, the rates of phenylalanine hydroxylation were estimated to be 139 and 90% of intake, respectively. However, phenylalanine hydroxylation was only 16% of intake for the VLGT group. In view of the tissue protein accretion data, it appears that the rate of phenylalanine hydroxylation may be overestimated in neonates fed high phenylalanine parenteral nutrition. The extent to which the parenterally fed neonate can adapt to a high phenylalanine intake, by increasing the rate of phenylalanine hydroxylation, remains to be determined.

  8. Beneficial effect of prolonged total parenteral nutrition in a very malnourished cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, M; Cappello, G; Cortinovis, A M; De Pinto, M; Bertasi, S

    1990-01-01

    A very malnourished Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patient was treated with integrative Parenteral Nutrition (PN). With a mean caloric supplementation of 2,550 Kcal/day a weight gain of 6.5 Kg was achieved. In spite of severe pulmonary complications (pneumotorax and pneumomediastinum), pO2 increased from 53 to 72 mmHg and pCO2 from 38 to 56 mm Hg. General conditions improved, appetite was restored and the patient cleared off continuous oxygen therapy; he left the hospital and did not present any more pulmonary exacerbations. In the following 8-month period he maintained a daily caloric intake of 80 Kcal/kg with a further weight gain of 4.5 Kg.

  9. Total parenteral nutrition in patients with insulin-requiring diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Overett, T K; Bistrian, B R; Lowry, S F; Hopkins, B S; Miller, D; Blackburn, G L

    1986-01-01

    The clinical course of 24 patients with insulin-requiring diabetes mellitus who had received total parenteral nutrition (TPN) was retrospectively analyzed. Routine nutritional assessment disclosed significant depression of anthropometric indices and secretory protein levels in patients with chronic renal failure complicating juvenile onset diabetes mellitus (JODM). Biochemical complications including hypo- or hyperglycemia were significantly more frequent (p less than 0.001) in JODM than in maturity-onset diabetes and found to a lesser degree in patients with renal failure. The catheter infection rate was substantially higher (17%) than usually encountered in TPN therapy. Positive nitrogen balance was achieved in the majority of patients with an average 84% and 92% of estimated protein and caloric requirements being provided. Close monitoring and a protocol of infusion plus supplemental subcutaneous regular insulin was useful in providing adequate TPN safely to these high-risk patients.

  10. Effect of total parenteral nutrition, systemic sepsis, and glutamine on gut mucosa in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, S.; Leskiw, M. J.; Schluter, M. D.; Bush, K. T.; Nagele, R. G.; Lanza-Jacoby, S.; Stein, T. P.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the combination of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and systemic sepsis on mucosal morphology and protein synthesis was investigated. Rats were given a standard TPN mixture consisting of glucose (216 kcal.kg-1.day-1), lipid (24 kcal.kg-1.day-1), and amino acids (1.5 g N.kg-1.day-1) for 5 days. On the 5th day the rats (n = 37) were randomized into four groups according to diet as follows: 1) control nonseptic on standard TPN, 2) control nonseptic on TPN with glutamine, 3) septic on standard TPN, and 4) septic with the TPN supplemented with glutamine. Twenty hours after the injection of Escherichia coli, the rats were given a 4-h constant infusion of [U-14C]leucine to determine the mucosal fractional protein synthesis rates. The following results were obtained. 1) Histological examination showed that systemic sepsis caused tissue damage to the ileum and jejunum. 2) Glutamine supplementation attenuated these changes. 3) There were no visible changes to the colon either from glutamine supplementation or sepsis. 4) Sepsis was associated with an increase in mucosal protein synthesis and decreased muscle synthesis. 5) Addition of glutamine to the TPN mix further increased protein synthesis in the intestinal mucosa of septic rats.

  11. Multimodal analgesia without routine parenteral narcotics for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Aditya Vikram; Boutary, Myriam; Yun, Andrew G; Sirianni, Leigh Ellen; Dorr, Lawrence D

    2006-12-01

    Methods for managing pain after a total hip replacement have changed substantially in the past 5 years. We documented the outcome of patients treated with a multimodal pain program designed to avoid parenteral narcotics. Avoidance of parenteral narcotics can essentially eliminate the complications of respiratory depression, ileus, and narcotic-induced hypotension. It can minimize nausea and vomiting which cause dissatisfaction with an operation. Twenty-one of 140 patients (15%) needed parenteral narcotics postoperatively with only nine patients (6.4%) using parenteral narcotics after the day of surgery. Mean pain scores were below 3 of 10 on all postoperative days. There were no patients with respiratory depression or ileus, and four (2.9%) with urinary retention. Nausea occurred with 35 patients (25%) in the recovery room and in 28 patients (20%) thereafter. Emesis occurred in five patients (3.6%) with two incidences in the recovery room. One hundred and thirty-eight patients (98.6%) were discharged home at a mean of 2.7 seven days postoperatively with 98 (70%) on a single assistive device. The multimodal pain management program, which avoided parenteral narcotics, was effective in providing pain relief, nearly eliminating emesis, and eliminating the severe complications of respiratory depression, urinary tract infection and ileus, as well as accelerating function.

  12. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: intensive care.

    PubMed

    Singer, Pierre; Berger, Mette M; Van den Berghe, Greet; Biolo, Gianni; Calder, Philip; Forbes, Alastair; Griffiths, Richard; Kreyman, Georg; Leverve, Xavier; Pichard, Claude; ESPEN

    2009-08-01

    Nutritional support in the intensive care setting represents a challenge but it is fortunate that its delivery and monitoring can be followed closely. Enteral feeding guidelines have shown the evidence in favor of early delivery and the efficacy of use of the gastrointestinal tract. Parenteral nutrition (PN) represents an alternative or additional approach when other routes are not succeeding (not necessarily having failed completely) or when it is not possible or would be unsafe to use other routes. The main goal of PN is to deliver a nutrient mixture closely related to requirements safely and to avoid complications. This nutritional approach has been a subject of debate over the past decades. PN carries the considerable risk of overfeeding which can be as deleterious as underfeeding. Therefore the authors will present not only the evidence available regarding the indications for PN, its implementation, the energy required, its possible complementary use with enteral nutrition, but also the relative importance of the macro- and micronutrients in the formula proposed for the critically ill patient. Data on long-term survival (expressed as 6 month survival) will also be considered a relevant outcome measure. Since there is a wide range of interpretations regarding the content of PN and great diversity in its practice, our guidance will necessarily reflect these different views. The papers available are very heterogeneous in quality and methodology (amount of calories, nutrients, proportion of nutrients, patients, etc.) and the different meta-analyses have not always taken this into account. Use of exclusive PN or complementary PN can lead to confusion, calorie targets are rarely achieved, and different nutrients continue to be used in different proportions. The present guidelines are the result of the analysis of the available literature, and acknowledging these limitations, our recommendations are intentionally largely expressed as expert opinions.

  13. Total parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis in rats: comparison of different amino acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Belli, D C; Fournier, L A; Lepage, G; Yousef, I; Weber, A M; Tuchweber, B; Roy, C C

    1987-01-01

    It has been suggested that the quantity of amino acids perfused is a pathogenetic factor in total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-associated hepatotoxicity. However, the effect of the qualitative pattern of amino acid solutions has not been studied. Rats on parenteral nutrition for 5 days received 10.2 g of dextrose and 3.4 g of amino acids daily. Bile flow (microliter/min/g liver protein) after administration of Vamin was 16.2 +/- 0.8, which was similar to that in controls given chow and dextrose iv, but it was significantly higher (p less than 0.001) than those on Travasol (12.3 +/- 0.8). The decrease in bile flow was not related to the large concentrations of alanine and glycine present in Travasol. However, the addition to Travasol of serine present only in Vamin increased bile flow significantly. Bile acid secretion rate, biliary lipid constituents, calcium, sodium, and glucose showed little change. In contrast, alpha-amino nitrogen was increased (p less than 0.05) in Vamin-perfused animals. Steatosis was noted in only a few animals in the Travasol group, and was not associated with an increase in the triglycerides content of the liver. Glycogen and protein content of the livers did not differ. The data show that the composition of amino acid solutions may be a determinant of TPN-induced cholestasis and suggest that the presence of methyl donor amino acids may have a protective effect.

  14. Gastroenterology – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 15

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, R. J.; Bischoff, S. C.; Koletzko, B.

    2009-01-01

    In patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis parenteral nutrition (PN) is indicated when enteral nutrition is not possible or should be avoided for medical reasons. In Crohn's patients PN is indicated when there are signs/symptoms of ileus or subileus in the small intestine, scars or intestinal fistulae. PN requires no specific compounding for chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. In both diseases it should be composed of 55–60% carbohydrates, 25–30% lipids and 10–15% amino acids. PN helps in the correction of malnutrition, particularly the intake of energy, minerals, trace elements, deficiency of calcium, vitamin D, folic acid, vitamin B12, and zinc. Enteral nutrition is clearly superior to PN in severe, acute pancreatitis. An intolerance to enteral nutrition results in an indication for total PN in complications such as pseudocysts, intestinal and pancreatic fistulae, and pancreatic abscesses or pancreatic ascites. If enteral nutrition is not possible, PN is recommended, at the earliest, 5 days after admission to the hospital. TPN should not be routinely administered in mild acute pancreatitis or nil by moth status <7 days, due to high costs and an increased risk of infection. The energy requirements are between 25 and 35 kcal/kg body weight/day. A standard solution including lipids (monitoring triglyceride levels!) can be administered in acute pancreatitis. Glucose (max. 4–5 g/kg body weight/day) and amino acids (about 1.2–1.5 g/kg body weight/day) should be administered and the additional enrichment of TPN with glutamine should be considered in severe, progressive forms of pancreatitis. PMID:20049077

  15. [Suppression of cycling activity in sheep using parenteral progestagen treatment].

    PubMed

    Janett, F; Camponovo, L; Lanker, U; Hässig, M; Thun, R

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two synthetic progestagen preparations Chlormadinone acetate (CAP, Chronosyn, Veterinaria AG Zürich) and Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, Nadigest, G Streuli & Co. Uznach) on cycling activity and fertility in sheep. A flock of 28 non pregnant white alpine sheep was randomly divided into three groups, A (n = 10), B (n = 9) and C (n = 9). During a period of 4 weeks the cycling activity was confirmed by blood progesterone analysis. Thereafter, the animals of group A were treated with 50 mg CAP, those of group B with 140 mg MPA and those of group C with physiological saline solution. All injections were given intramuscularly. Suppression of endogenous progesterone secretion lasted from 28 to 49 days (mean = 39 days) in group A and from 42 to 70 days (mean = 50 days) in group B. The synchronization effect of both preparations was unsatisfactory as the occurrence of first estrus was distributed over a period of 3 weeks in group A and 4 weeks in group B. These findings could also be confirmed by the lambing period which lasted 52 days in group A and 36 days in group B. Control animals lambed within 9 days due to the synchronizing effect of the ram. The first fertile estrus was observed 36 days (group A) and 45 days (group B) after the treatment. In group A all 10 animals and in groups B and C 8 of 9 ewes each became pregnant. Parenteral progestagen application with CAP and MPA is a simple, safe and reversible method of estrus suppression in the sheep. The minimal suppressive duration of 4 (CAP) and 5 weeks (MPA) is not sufficient when a period of 3 months (alpine pasture period) is desired.

  16. Dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis in parenteral nutrition mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Le; Yang, Ill; Shen, Jianliang; Gorczyca, Ludwik; Memon, Naureen; Buckley, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) administration can lead to PN-associated liver diseases (PNALD). Although multiple risk factors have been identified for PNALD, to date, the roles of bile acids (BAs) and the pathways involved in BA homeostasis in the development and progression of PNALD are still unclear. We have established a mouse PN model with IV infusion of PN solution containing soybean oil-based lipid emulsion (SOLE). Our results showed that PN altered the expression of genes involved in a variety of liver functions at the mRNA levels. PN increased liver gene expression of Cyp7a1 and markedly decreased that of Cyp8b1, Cyp7b1, Bsep, and Shp. CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 are important for synthesizing the total amount of BAs and regulating the hydrophobicity of BAs, respectively. Consistently, both the levels and the percentages of primary BAs as well as total non-12α-OH BAs increased significantly in the serum of PN mice compared with saline controls, whereas liver BA profiles were largely similar. The expression of several key liver-X receptor-α (LXRα) target genes involved in lipid synthesis was also increased in PN mouse livers. Retinoid acid-related orphan receptor-α (RORα) has been shown to induce the expression of Cyp8b1 and Cyp7b1, as well as to suppress LXRα function. Western blot showed significantly reduced nuclear migration of RORα protein in PN mouse livers. This study shows that continuous PN infusion with SOLE in mice leads to dysregulation of BA homeostasis. Alterations of liver RORα signaling in PN mice may be one of the mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of PNALD. PMID:26564717

  17. The potential clinical relevance of visible particles in parenteral drugs.

    PubMed

    Doessegger, Lucette; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Szczesny, Piotr; Rockstroh, Helmut; Kallmeyer, Georg; Langenkamp, Anja; Herrmann, Joerg; Famulare, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Visible particulates (VP) are one subclass of defects seen during the final visual inspection of parenteral products and are currently one of the top ten reasons for recalls 1,2. The risk posed by particles is still unclear with limited experience reported in humans but remains an important consideration during the manufacture and use of parenteral products. From the experimental and clinical knowledge of the distribution of particulate matter in the body, clinical complications would include events occurring around parenteral administration e.g., as a result of mechanical pulmonary artery obstruction and injection site reaction, or sub-acute or chronic events e.g., granuloma. The challenge is to better understand the implication for patients of single vials with VP and align the risk with the probabilistic detection process used by manufacturers for accept/reject decisions of individual units of product.

  18. Ertapenem: a new opportunity for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Tice, Alan D

    2004-06-01

    Ertapenem is a parenteral carbapenem antimicrobial with pharmacological properties that allow it to be given once daily. This makes it a consideration for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT). In comparison with information from the OPAT Outcomes Registry, ertapenem seems well suited for the types of infections and bacteria that are commonly treated with OPAT, plus it has additional activity against anaerobic bacteria. This added spectrum makes it possible to treat complicated skin/skin-structure, complicated intra-abdominal and pelvic infections with a single antibiotic instead of the multiple agents that have usually been required. Ertapenem is also comparable to other OPAT antimicrobials in terms of adverse effects and clinical outcomes. This antimicrobial can be given with any delivery model, although its stability when mixed is such that daily preparation or self-mixing systems need to be considered. Ertapenem should be added to the growing list of once-daily parenteral antibiotics that can be given to outpatients.

  19. Protein and Calorie Requirements with Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Shizgal, Harry M.; Forse, R. Armour

    1980-01-01

    Body composition measurements, performed by multiple isotope dilution, were used to determine the protein and caloric requirements of patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN). In addition the relative efficacy of lipid as opposed to carbohydrate calories were evaluated. Patients requiring TPN were randomly allocated to receive one of the following TPN solutions: a) 2.5% amino acid with 25% dextrose b) 5% amino acid with 25% dextrose c) 2.5% amino acid with 12.5% dextrose and a 5% lipid emulsion. The efficacy of each solution was evaluated by determining body composition at the onset,and at two week intervals during the course of TPN. In 204 patients who received TPN for 4447 days, 533 body composition studies were performed to evaluate 308 periods of TPN. In the normally nourished patient, as defined by the pre-TPN body composition, the body composition remained unchanged and normal with the three solutions. In the presence of preexisting malnutrition, two weeks of TPN resulted in a significant increase in body weight, arising primarily from an increase in the body cell mass. To evaluate the relative importance of the various factors responsible for the increase in the body cell mass, a multiple linear regression analysis was performed. The mean daily change in the body cell mass was correlated with the carbohydrate, protein and lipid calories infused and with the nutritional state. The resulting regression equation, which was statistically significant, indicated that the rate at which a depleted body cell mass was restored was related to the lipid and carbohydrate calories infused and to the nutritional state of the patient. Carbohydrate calories were more efficient than lipid calories. However increasing the amino acid concentration from 2.5 to 5% had no effect on the rate at which the body cell mass increased. The repletion rate was also directly related to the severity of malnutrition. Thus the correction of a malnourished individual with TPN is

  20. Pulmonary function in rats dying from long-term parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Dahl, P E; Kjaeve, J C

    2003-01-01

    Infusion of Vamin or Intralipid causes death in a rat model of continuous parenteral nutrition. Morphological investigations have shown vascular injury and thrombus formation in the lungs. In this study, lung function in rats was examined before death due to parenteral nutrition. The rats were fed saline intravenously (group I); 100 mL kg(-1) day(-1) (controls); a 7% amino acid-glucose solution (Vamin-Glukos) (group II); 100 mL kg(-1) day(-1), or 20% fat emulsion (Intralipid) (group III); 40 mL kg(-1) day(-1). The infusion was stopped when the condition of the rats deteriorated. In a saline-perfused, isolated lung model, pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa), transpulmonary pressure (Ptp), endothelial function, measured as inactivation of serotonin (bioassay), and the capillary filtration coefficient (CFC) were determined. Haematological parameters were also evaluated. Constant findings in group II and III were central thrombus formation, anaemia and thrombocytopenia. Ppa increased from 0.7 (0.04) kPa in group I to 1.4 (0.1) kPa and 1.7 (0.1) kPa in groups II and III, respectively (p<0.001). Inactivation of serotonin was reduced to 36% (2) in group II and 37% (2) in group III compared with 74% (5) in group I (p<0.002). CFC increased to 25 mg min(-1) (5) (group II) and 30 mg min(-1) (6) (group III) compared with 13 mg min(-1) (2) in controls (p=0.01). The study shows that major pulmonary hypertension and severe reduction of the endothelial function are present when rats deteriorate after infusion of parenteral nutrition substrates.

  1. Fetal growth sustained by parenteral nutrition in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Alsina, M E; Saldana, L R; Stringer, C A

    1984-07-01

    Severe maternal nutritional deprivation has been associated with intrauterine growth retardation, premature labor, and increased perinatal mortality and morbidity. The authors present four cases in which total parenteral nutrition was used successfully to support fetal growth in such diverse complications as twin pregnancy with maternal jejunoileal bypass, regional enteritis, and acute pancreatitis. Maintenance of fetal growth as evidenced by serial sonographic examination allows achievement of fetal lung maturation before delivery. In all the cases presented there was no perinatal mortality or morbidity. The main clinical implication of the report is the possible application of total parenteral nutrition to maintain adequate growth in fetuses small for gestational age because of maternal nutritional deprivation.

  2. Standardised neonatal parenteral nutrition formulations - an Australasian group consensus 2012.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Srinivas; Osborn, David; Sinn, John; Lui, Kei

    2014-02-18

    Standardised parenteral nutrition formulations are routinely used in the neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. In 2010, a multidisciplinary group was formed to achieve a consensus on the formulations acceptable to majority of the neonatal intensive care units. Literature review was undertaken for each nutrient and recommendations were developed in a series of meetings held between November 2010 and April 2011. Three standard and 2 optional amino acid/dextrose formulations and one lipid emulsion were agreed by majority participants in the consensus. This has a potential to standardise neonatal parenteral nutrition guidelines, reduce costs and prescription errors.

  3. Aluminium exposure from parenteral nutrition in preterm infants and later health outcomes during childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Fewtrell, Mary S; Edmonds, Caroline J; Isaacs, Elizabeth; Bishop, Nick J; Lucas, Alan

    2011-08-01

    Aluminium is the most common metallic element, but has no known biological role. It accumulates in the body when protective gastrointestinal mechanisms are bypassed, renal function is impaired, or exposure is high - all of which apply frequently to preterm infants. Recognised clinical manifestations of aluminium toxicity include dementia, anaemia and bone disease. Parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions are liable to contamination with aluminium, particularly from acidic solutions in glass vials, notably calcium gluconate. When fed parenterally, infants retain >75% of the aluminium, with high serum, urine and tissue levels. Later health effects of neonatal intravenous aluminium exposure were investigated in a randomised trial comparing standard PN solutions with solutions specially sourced for low aluminium content. Preterm infants exposed for >10 d to standard solutions had impaired neurologic development at 18 months. At 13-15 years, subjects randomised to standard PN had lower lumbar spine bone mass; and, in non-randomised analyses, those with neonatal aluminium intake above the median had lower hip bone mass. Given the sizeable number of infants undergoing intensive care and still exposed to aluminium via PN, these findings have contemporary relevance. Until recently, little progress had been made on reducing aluminium exposure, and meeting Food and Drug Administration recommendations (<5 μg/kg per d) has been impossible in patients <50 kg using available products. Recent advice from the UK Medicines and Healthcare regulatory Authority that calcium gluconate in small volume glass containers should not be used for repeated treatment in children <18 years, including preparation of PN, is an important step towards addressing this problem.

  4. Glutamine supplementation, citrulline production, and de novo arginine synthesis: Is there a relation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We would like to comment on the recent publications by Buijs et al. The authors hypothesized that a parenteral supplement of glutamine stimulates citrulline formation and enhances de novo arginine synthesis. To test this hypothesis, they conducted an experiment with stable isotopes in patients under...

  5. Supplementing monosodium glutamate to partial enteral nutrition slows gastric emptying in preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that free glutamate may play a functional role in modulating gastroduodenal motor function. We hypothesized that supplementing monosodium glutamate (MSG) to partial enteral nutrition stimulates gastric emptying in preterm pigs. Ten-day-old preterm, parenterally fed pigs re...

  6. Selenite metabolism in total parenteral nutrition (TPN)

    SciTech Connect

    Sitrin, M.D.; Ting, B.T.G.; Hazell, T.; Janghorbani, M. )

    1989-02-01

    Patients on long-term TPN commonly receive selenite to prevent selenium (Se) deficiency. Little information is available concerning the effect of chronic selenite supplementation on Se metabolism. In this study, we have used {sup 74}Se to examine selenite metabolism in 2 home TPN patents, one on selenite and one on no supplementation. Afte rcollection of baseline blood and urine samples, 80 {mu}g of selenite enriched with {sup 74}Se was added to the TPN formula, and infused over 12 hrs. Daily urine output was collected for 10 d. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to determine the isotope ratios of {sup 74}Se to {sup 77}Se, and {sup 74}Se to {sup 82}Se (added in vitro and an internal standard) in urine. Cumulative {sup 74}Se retention and an apparent selenite exchangeable pool size were calculated using standard isotope dilution equations. The unsupplemented TPN patient had biochemical Se deficiency, with decreased plasma Se (1 ng/ml) urine Se (1 ug/d) and red cell and plasma glutathione peroxidase activity (GSH-Px). Retention of {sup 74}Se was very high, 93% at 10 d, and the pool size was extremely low, 566 ug at 10 d. The supplemented patent had normal plasma and urine Se levels and plasma and red cell GSH-Px. {sup 74}Se retention was very poor, only 42% at 1 d and 38% at 10 d. The Se pool size increased rapidly over time, reaching 12000 ug at 10 d. In contrast, our previous studies in normal subjects consuming dietary orgaic Se showed a selenite retention of 85-90% at 1 d and 70-80% at 10 d, and a pool size of 6000-8000 ug at 10 day. Conclusions: 1. Using {sup 74}Se, differences in Se retention and pool size can easily be detected in Se deficient vs replete TPN patients 2. Chronic supplementation with selenite appears to result in decreased {sup 74}Se retention and an expanded selenite exchangeable pool in comparison with normals consuming dietary Se.

  7. Pseudomonas arthritis treated with parenteral and intra-articular ceftazidime.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, K; Hilton, R C; Sen, R A

    1985-01-01

    A 73-year-old diabetic presented with septic arthritis of the knee; Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated. She was successfully treated with a combination of parenteral and intra-articular ceftazidime, after failure to eradicate the organism with adequate serum levels of gentamicin and full doses of azlocillin. PMID:3896166

  8. Phytosterols, Lipid Administration, and Liver Disease During Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2015-09-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols that are structurally and functionally analogous to cholesterol in vertebrate animals. Phytosterols are found in many foods and are part of the normal human diet. However, absorption of phytosterols from the diet is minimal. Most lipid emulsions used for parenteral nutrition are based on vegetable oils. As a result, phytosterol administration occurs during intravenous administration of lipid. Levels of phytosterols in the blood and tissues may reach high levels during parenteral lipid administration and may be toxic to cells. Phytosterols are not fully metabolized by the human body and must be excreted through the hepatobiliary system. Accumulating scientific evidence suggests that administration of high doses of intravenous lipids that are high in phytosterols contributes to the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease. In this review, mechanisms by which lipids and phytosterols may cause cholestasis are discussed. Human studies of the association of phytosterols with liver disease are reviewed. In addition, clinical studies of lipid/phytosterol reduction for reversing and/or preventing parenteral nutrition associated liver disease are discussed.

  9. Micronutrients in Parenteral Nutrition: Boron, Silicon, and Fluoride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (providing nutrients intravenously) is a life-saving treatment for patients with severe malabsorption of nutrients caused by intestinal failure, intestinal trauma (for example, gunshot or stab wounds), and intestinal removal. Metabolic bone disease characterized by min...

  10. Gluconeogenesis continues in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the contribution of total gluconeogenesis, to glucose production in preterm infants receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) providing glucose exceeding normal infant glucose turnover rate, eight infants (0.955 +/- 0.066 kg, 26.5 - 0.5 wks, 4-1 d) were studied while receiving routine ...

  11. Validation of doubly labeled water for measuring energy expenditure during parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A.; Kushner, R.F.; Jones, P.J.

    1986-08-01

    The doubly labeled water method was compared with intake-balance for measuring energy expenditure in five patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Because parenteral solutions were isotopically different from local water, patients had to be placed on TPN at least 10 days before the metabolic period. Approximately 0.1 g 2H2O and 0.25 g H2(18)O per kg total body water were given orally. We collected saliva before, 3 h, and 4 h after the dose for measurement of total body water and urine before, 1 day, and 14 days after the dose for measurement of isotope eliminations. On day 14, total body weight was remeasured and change in body energy stores was calculated, assuming constant hydration. Intake was assessed from weights of TPN fluids plus dietary record for any oral intake. Energy expenditure from doubly labeled water (+/- SD) averaged 3 +/- 6% greater than intake-balance. Doubly labeled water method is a noninvasive, nonrestrictive method for measuring energy expenditure in patients receiving TPN.

  12. Lipid emulsions – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 6

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, M.; Heller, A. R.; Koch, T.; Koletzko, B.; Kreymann, K. G.; Krohn, K.; Pscheidl, E.; Senkal, M.

    2009-01-01

    The infusion of lipid emulsions allows a high energy supply, facilitates the prevention of high glucose infusion rates and is indispensable for the supply with essential fatty acids. The administration of lipid emulsions is recommended within ≤7 days after starting PN (parenteral nutrition) to avoid deficiency of essential fatty acids. Low-fat PN with a high glucose intake increases the risk of hyperglycaemia. In parenterally fed patients with a tendency to hyperglycaemia, an increase in the lipid-glucose ratio should be considered. In critically ill patients the glucose infusion should not exceed 50% of energy intake. The use of lipid emulsions with a low phospholipid/triglyceride ratio is recommended and should be provided with the usual PN to prevent depletion of essential fatty acids, lower the risk of hyperglycaemia, and prevent hepatic steatosis. Biologically active vitamin E (α-tocopherol) should continuously be administered along with lipid emulsions to reduce lipid peroxidation. Parenteral lipids should provide about 25–40% of the parenteral non-protein energy supply. In certain situations (i.e. critically ill, respiratory insufficiency) a lipid intake of up to 50 or 60% of non-protein energy may be reasonable. The recommended daily dose for parenteral lipids in adults is 0.7–1.3 g triglycerides/kg body weight. Serum triglyceride concentrations should be monitored regularly with dosage reduction at levels >400 mg/dl (>4.6 mmol/l) and interruption of lipid infusion at levels >1000 mg/dl (>11.4 mmol/l). There is little evidence at this time that the choice of different available lipid emulsions affects clinical endpoints. PMID:20049078

  13. Effectiveness of enteral and parenteral nutrition in the nutritional management of children with Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed

    Rickard, K A; Kirksey, A; Baehner, R L; Grosfeld, J L; Provisor, A; Weetman, R M; Boxer, L A; Ballantine, T V

    1980-12-01

    The effectiveness of enteral and parenteral feeding in supporting a satisfactory nutrition status and/or reversing protein-energy malnutrition was evaluated in nine children, ages 1 to 7 years (eight female), with Wilms' tumors. At the onset of treatment, eight patients received comprehensive enteral nutrition (CEN) which included intense nutritional counseling and oral supplements while one received total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Despite CEN, the initial, intense treatment period was associated with a decreased energy intake (64 +/- 27% Recommended Dietary Allowances), dramatic weight loss (22 +/- 7% by 26 +/- 17 days from the beginning of treatment), decreased skinfold thickness (< 10th percentile), and decreased albumin concentrations (< 3.2 g/dl). Four of those who initially received CEN subsequently required TPN. A total of five patients received TPN for a mean of 31 days (range 11 to 60); kcal averaged 105 +/- 9% Recommended Dietary Allowances during weight gain. At onset of TPN, the mean albumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count were 3.02 +/- 0.45 g/dl, 155 +/- 40 mg/dl, and, 655 +/- 437/mm3, respectively; all children had abnormal anthropometric measurements and anergy to recall skin test antigens. TPN for 28 or more days supported weight gain (+ 2.44 kg), increased serum albumin (+ 0.58 +/- 0.47 g/dl) and transferrin (+ 76 +/- 34 mg/dl), and reversed anergy despite low total lymphocyte counts. During maintenance treatment, nutritional status was maintained or restored with CEN in the group who responded. These preliminary data document the severity of protein-energy malnutrition which accompanies initial, intense treatment of children with Wilms' tumors, the nutritional and immunological benefits of TPN during continuing intense treatment and the effectiveness of CEN in maintaining a satisfactory nutritional status during maintenance treatment.

  14. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... other products. They can come as pills, capsules, powders, drinks, and energy bars. Supplements do not have to go through the testing that drugs do. Some supplements can play an important role in health. For example, calcium and vitamin D are important for keeping bones ...

  15. Total parenteral alimentation via indwelling umbilical catheters in the newborn period.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, R T; Rhodes, P G

    1976-01-01

    Total parenteral alimentation (TPA) was delivered to 80 infants via indwelling umbilical artery and to 9 via indwelling umbilical venous catheters. The primary indication for catheter placement and maintenance was monitoring of arterial blood gases (umbilical venous catheter tip in left atrium) in a group of sick neonates requiring increased inspired oxygen or assisted ventilation. Results were compared with those from 23 infants who had tunnelled jugular catheters for a variety of chronic medical and surgical problems preventing gastric or intestinal feeding. A mean weight gain was achieved in both groups. Mortality and morbidity rates were similar in both groups. The most common complications were infection and thrombotic phenomena. Metabolic complications were few. It is concluded that infusing TPA solutions via indwelling umbilical catheters presents no greater risk than infusion via tunnelled jugular catheters, and provides a method for supplying adequate caloric intake for growth during the acute stage of illness. PMID:827978

  16. Evaluation of a new amino acid source for use in parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, M D; O'Neill, J A; Meng, H C; Stahlman, M H

    1977-01-01

    Ninety-two patients, ranging from two days to 92 years of age, received parenteral nutrition using a new synthetic amino acid solution designed to provide optimal nitrogen retention and obviate metabolic complications. Weight gain and positive nitrogen balance were produced in the majority of patients. Hyperchloremic acidosis and hypophosphatemia did not occur. Hyperammonemia in infants was avoided with the exception of occasional, transient, asymptomatic elevations of blood ammonia in low birth weight infants. It was suspected that an inadequate nonprotein calorie/gram of nitrogen ratio may have been employed in these infants. Blood ammonia levels declined from initial levels in 80% of adult patient. Nitrogen retention was directly proportional to the supply of nonprotein calories. PMID:402123

  17. Total parenteral nutrition in a methylcholanthrene-induced rat sarcoma model.

    PubMed

    Popp, M B; Morrison, S D; Brennan, M F

    1981-01-01

    Problems with currently available studies of the effects of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on rat tumor models include: inadequate definition of the natural history of the tumor model; use of nutritional techniques and solutions which have not been proven effective; failure to allow animals to recover from stress of catheterization before starting nutritional manipulation; short-term studies; failure to use sham-operated orally fed control animals; and inadequate evaluation of nutritional result. We have instituted TPN after a 4-day postcatheterization recovery period in a defined methylcholanthrene-induced rat sarcoma model. Preliminary results suggest that TPN increases tumor weight without changing tumor composition of water, nitrogen, or fat. TPN also increases carcass fat and water content, but not carcass protein. In tumor-bearing animals, the percentage of energy expended on activity decreases with increasing tumor burden in both TPN and orally fed controls. TPN in these studies appears to support fat stores and stimulate tumor growth.

  18. [Glucose or sugar substitutes in parenteral infusions? The choice of carbohydrates in postoperative infusion therapy].

    PubMed

    Leutenegger, A F

    1980-12-18

    The aim of parenteral nutrition should be to optimise fluid, energy and nitrogen balance. In the post-traumatic or post-operative phase a stress induced glucose intolerance may occur and it may become difficult to meet the patient's energy requirements with glucose alone. For these reasons the use of sugar substitutes (fructose, sorbitol and xylitol) in combination with glucose is recommended as an alternative. Patients receiving a mixed sugar solution of glucose, fructose and xylitol at a ratio of 1:2:1 require less exogenous insulin and yet maintain a lower blood glucose concentration. Used in limited quantities, we encountered no side effects either in patients undergoing elective surgery or requiring intensive care.

  19. Three-in-one parenteral nutrition in neonates and pediatric patients: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Blackmer, Allison Beck; Partipilo, M Luisa

    2015-06-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a life-sustaining therapy designed to deliver essential nutrients to patients unable to meet nutrition needs via the enteral route. PN may be delivered via a 2-in-1 system (one solution containing amino acids, dextrose, electrolytes, vitamins, minerals, and fluids and one solution containing intravenous fat emulsions [IVFEs]) or via a 3-in-1 system (all nutrients mixed in one container). Although the use of 3-in-1 PN solutions is not necessarily therapeutically advantageous, certain benefits may exist such as the potential to reduce the risk of contamination due to decreased manipulations; ease of administration, particularly in the home care setting; possible cost savings; and reduced IVFE wastage. However, the incorporation of IVFE in 3-in-1 solutions also presents unique risks for the neonatal and pediatric population such as decreased stability, increased lipid globule size, decreased sterility and the potential for increased microbial growth/infectious complications, the need to use a larger filter size, precipitation and compatibility risks, and an increased chance of catheter occlusion. This review outlines the unique issues and challenges to be considered when formulating neonatal and pediatric 3-in-1 PN admixtures. While 3-in-1 PN solutions may be advantageous for certain pediatric populations, specifically those dependent on home PN, the risks do not outweigh the benefits in neonatal patients, and use should be avoided in this population.

  20. Is there a role for parenteral feeding in clinical medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Phinney, S D; Siepler, J; Bach, H T

    1996-01-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition as evidenced by loss of weight or of lean body mass is a commonly seen disorder. Although its cause is clearly multifactorial, objective measures of protein-calorie malnutrition have been repeatedly correlated with poor patient outcomes. Total parenteral nutrition was developed to halt or reverse this disorder, but its ability to improve the short- to intermediate-term outcome in patients with impaired nutrient intake has been highly inconsistent. Factors influencing this variable outcome include the degree of functional impairment in the treatment group, the underlying disease causing the impaired intake, and possibly the amount and composition of nonprotein calories delivered. In particular, considerable evidence points to intravenous soybean oil emulsion as a negative factor in the nutritional support of stressed patients. Taken in combination, current information suggests reserving the use of parenteral feeding for patients meeting objective criteria for protein-calorie malnutrition and making parsimonious use of lipid emulsion, especially in stressed patients. PMID:8775726

  1. Glutamine Supplementation in Sick Children: Is It Beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Elise; Hankard, Régis

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a critical appraisal of the literature on Glutamine (Gln) supplementation in various conditions or illnesses that affect children, from neonates to adolescents. First, a general overview of the proposed mechanisms for the beneficial effects of Gln is provided, and subsequently clinical studies are discussed. Despite safety, studies are conflicting, partly due to different effects of enteral and parenteral Gln supplementation. Further insufficient evidence is available on the benefits of Gln supplementation in pediatric patients. This includes premature infants, infants with gastrointestinal disease, children with Crohn's disease, short bowel syndrome, malnutrition/diarrhea, cancer, severe burns/trauma, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, and type 1 diabetes. Moreover, methodological issues have been noted in some studies. Further mechanistic data is needed along with large randomized controlled trials in select populations of sick children, who may eventually benefit from supplemental Gln. PMID:22175008

  2. Surgery and transplantation – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 18

    PubMed Central

    Weimann, A.; Ebener, Ch.; Holland-Cunz, S.; Jauch, K. W.; Hausser, L.; Kemen, M.; Kraehenbuehl, L.; Kuse, E. R.; Laengle, F.

    2009-01-01

    In surgery, indications for artificial nutrition comprise prevention and treatment of catabolism and malnutrition. Thus in general, food intake should not be interrupted postoperatively and the re-establishing of oral (e.g. after anastomosis of the colon and rectum, kidney transplantation) or enteral food intake (e.g. after an anastomosis in the upper gastrointestinal tract, liver transplantation) is recommended within 24 h post surgery. To avoid increased mortality an indication for an immediate postoperatively artificial nutrition (enteral or parenteral nutrition (PN)) also exists in patients with no signs of malnutrition, but who will not receive oral food intake for more than 7 days perioperatively or whose oral food intake does not meet their needs (e.g. less than 60–80%) for more than 14 days. In cases of absolute contraindication for enteral nutrition, there is an indication for total PN (TPN) such as in chronic intestinal obstruction with a relevant passage obstruction e.g. a peritoneal carcinoma. If energy and nutrient requirements cannot be met by oral and enteral intake alone, a combination of enteral and parenteral nutrition is indicated. Delaying surgery for a systematic nutrition therapy (enteral and parenteral) is only indicated if severe malnutrition is present. Preoperative nutrition therapy should preferably be conducted prior to hospital admission to lower the risk of nosocomial infections. The recommendations of early postoperative re-establishing oral feeding, generally apply also to paediatric patients. Standardised operative procedures should be established in order to guarantee an effective nutrition therapy. PMID:20049072

  3. Nepali Supplements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC.

    This volume is intended as a supplement to Nepali language instruction. It contains songs, numerals, dialogues in Devanagari script, a Nepali-English, English-Nepali glossary, and an English-Nepali surveyor technical glossary. (AM)

  4. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  5. Creatine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matthew; Trojian, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    Creatine monohydrate is a dietary supplement that increases muscle performance in short-duration, high-intensity resistance exercises, which rely on the phosphocreatine shuttle for adenosine triphosphate. The effective dosing for creatine supplementation includes loading with 0.3 g·kg·d for 5 to 7 days, followed by maintenance dosing at 0.03 g·kg·d most commonly for 4 to 6 wk. However loading doses are not necessary to increase the intramuscular stores of creatine. Creatine monohydrate is the most studied; other forms such as creatine ethyl ester have not shown added benefits. Creatine is a relatively safe supplement with few adverse effects reported. The most common adverse effect is transient water retention in the early stages of supplementation. When combined with other supplements or taken at higher than recommended doses for several months, there have been cases of liver and renal complications with creatine. Further studies are needed to evaluate the remote and potential future adverse effects from prolonged creatine supplementation.

  6. Cost containment using cysteine HCl acidification to increase calcium/phosphate solubility in hyperalimentation solutions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, G L; Baumgartner, T G; Fischlschweiger, W; Sitren, H S; Thakker, K M; Cerda, J J

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if (1) the calcium/phosphate insoluble product was inversely related to pH [when cysteine HC1 (CH) was added as neonatal supplementation at 0.5 mM/kg/day to hyperalimentation (HAL) solutions] and (2) the potential cost savings to the hospital. The pH of the HAL solutions was adjusted by adding various amounts of CH to the HAL solution. HAL solutions containing 27 mEq of calcium/liter and 30 mEq (15 mM) of phosphate/liter were compounded. Ten-milliliter aliquots were analyzed at 0, 12, 24, and 48 hr. All samples (n = 56) were filtered (0.22 mu), viewed with 7-10,000 X magnification scanning electron microscopy, and qualitatively analyzed with a Philips Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis System equipped with a SW9100 Microprocessor. Calcium/phosphate insoluble product was present in the 0-, 12-, 24-, and 48-hr samples from the CH-free solutions. The solutions containing 759 mg (4.17 mM)/liter of CH however, remained free of precipitant. This investigation demonstrated that addition of CH to HAL can foster significant cost containment (projected $82,000/yr tangible hospital savings) by the elimination of current calcium/phosphate separation procedures for neonates on parenteral nutrition.

  7. [Electrolytes content in parenteral drugs authorised in Spain].

    PubMed

    Mirchandani Jagwani, J N; Arias Rico, R

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: La fluidoterapia es una de las prácticas más habituales en la práctica clínica diaria pero para un correcto manejo de electrolitos tanto en la sueroterapia como en la Nutrición Parenteral se deben conocer todos los aportes de electrolitos y fluidos y todas aquellas situaciones fisiopatológicos que conllevan alteraciones en la homeostasis de fluidos. Objetivos: Conocer el contenido y tipo de electrolitos de los medicamentos administrados por vía parenteral comercializados y autorizados en España hasta Febrero 2012. Métodos: Revisión de todas las fichas técnicas de todos aquellos medicamentos que estuvieran comercializados en España y con presentación comercial disponible por vía parenteral. Aquellos medicamentos con un contenido menor de 1 miliequivalente o 1 milimol por presentación comercial fueron excluidos. Resultados: De los 1800 principios activos estudiados, sólo 221 formaban parte de alguna presentación comercial por vía parenteral. De estos 221, 52 principios activos cumplían los criterios de inclusión del estudio y la mayoría (51-98,07%) tenían sodio en contenido mayor de un miliequivalente por presentación comercial, luego el potasio estaba presente en 3 y el calcio únicamente en uno. Discusión: La mayoría de medicamentos objeto del estudio contenían como principal electrolito el sodio, siendo la alteración de las concentraciones de este electrolito una de las más frecuentes en el entorno hospitalario y, en algunos casos, indicador de calidad en la atención del paciente. Por ello, para un mejor manejo de la reposición de electrolitos tanto en la sueroterapia como por Nutrición Parenteral es necesario tener en cuenta el aporte recibido por la medicación prescrita en los casos en que sea necesario.

  8. Parenteral Vaccination Can Be an Effective Means of Inducing Protective Mucosal Responses

    PubMed Central

    Freytag, Lucy C.

    2016-01-01

    The current paradigm in vaccine development is that nonreplicating vaccines delivered parenterally fail to induce immune responses in mucosal tissues. However, both clinical and experimental data have challenged this concept, and numerous studies have shown that induction of mucosal immune responses after parenteral vaccination is not a rare occurrence and might, in fact, significantly contribute to the protection against mucosal infections afforded by parenteral vaccines. While the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood, the realization that parenteral vaccination can be an effective means of inducing protective mucosal responses is paradigm-shifting and has potential to transform the way vaccines are designed and delivered. PMID:27122485

  9. Dietary supplements for aquatic sports.

    PubMed

    Derave, Wim; Tipton, Kevin D

    2014-08-01

    Many athletes use dietary supplements, with use more prevalent among those competing at the highest level. Supplements are often self-prescribed, and their use is likely to be based on an inadequate understanding of the issues at stake. Supplementation with essential micronutrients may be useful when a diagnosed deficiency cannot be promptly and effectively corrected with food-based dietary solutions. When used in high doses, some supplements may do more harm than good: Iron supplementation, for example, is potentially harmful. There is good evidence from laboratory studies and some evidence from field studies to support health or performance benefits from appropriate use of a few supplements. The available evidence from studies of aquatic sports is small and is often contradictory. Evidence from elite performers is almost entirely absent, but some athletes may benefit from informed use of creatine, caffeine, and buffering agents. Poor quality assurance in some parts of the dietary supplements industry raises concerns about the safety of some products. Some do not contain the active ingredients listed on the label, and some contain toxic substances, including prescription drugs, that can cause health problems. Some supplements contain compounds that will cause an athlete to fail a doping test. Supplement quality assurance programs can reduce, but not entirely eliminate, this risk.

  10. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: central venous catheters (access, care, diagnosis and therapy of complications).

    PubMed

    Pittiruti, Mauro; Hamilton, Helen; Biffi, Roberto; MacFie, John; Pertkiewicz, Marek

    2009-08-01

    When planning parenteral nutrition (PN), the proper choice, insertion, and nursing of the venous access are of paramount importance. In hospitalized patients, PN can be delivered through short-term, non-tunneled central venous catheters, through peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC), or - for limited period of time and with limitation in the osmolarity and composition of the solution - through peripheral venous access devices (short cannulas and midline catheters). Home PN usually requires PICCs or - if planned for an extended or unlimited time - long-term venous access devices (tunneled catheters and totally implantable ports). The most appropriate site for central venous access will take into account many factors, including the patient's conditions and the relative risk of infective and non-infective complications associated with each site. Ultrasound-guided venepuncture is strongly recommended for access to all central veins. For parenteral nutrition, the ideal position of the catheter tip is between the lower third of the superior cava vein and the upper third of the right atrium; this should preferably be checked during the procedure. Catheter-related bloodstream infection is an important and still too common complication of parenteral nutrition. The risk of infection can be reduced by adopting cost-effective, evidence-based interventions such as proper education and specific training of the staff, an adequate hand washing policy, proper choices of the type of device and the site of insertion, use of maximal barrier protection during insertion, use of chlorhexidine as antiseptic prior to insertion and for disinfecting the exit site thereafter, appropriate policies for the dressing of the exit site, routine changes of administration sets, and removal of central lines as soon as they are no longer necessary. Most non-infective complications of central venous access devices can also be prevented by appropriate, standardized protocols for line insertion

  11. Technology Solutions Case Study: Evaluation of the Performance of Houses With and Without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate, New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this project by Building Science Corporation was to evaluate the humidity control performance of new single family high performance homes, and compare the interior conditions and mechanical systems operation between two distinct groups of houses: homes with a supplemental dehumidifier installed in addition to HVAC system, and homes without any supplemental dehumidification. The subjects of the study were 10 single-family new construction homes in New Orleans, LA. Data logging equipment was installed at each home in 2012, and interior conditions and various end-use loads were monitored for one year. In terms of averages, the homes with dehumidifiers are limiting elevated levels of humidity in the living space; however, there was significant variation in humidity control between individual houses. An analysis of the equipment operation did not show a clear correlation between energy use and humidity levels. In general, no single explanatory variable appears to provide a consistent understanding of the humidity control in each house. Indoor humidity is likely due to all of the factors we have examined, and the specifics of how they are used by each occupant.

  12. Practical handling of AIO admixtures – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 10

    PubMed Central

    Mühlebach, S.; Franken, C.; Stanga, Z.

    2009-01-01

    All-in-one admixtures (AIO-admixtures) provide safe, effective and low-risk PN (parenteral nutrition) for practically all indications and applications. Water, energy (carbohydrates and lipids), amino acids, vitamins and trace elements are infused together with PN either as industrially-manufactured AIO admixtures provided as two- or three-chamber bags (shelf life usually more than 12 months) completed with electrolytes and micronutrients where appropriate or as individually compounded ready-to-use AIO admixtures (compounding, usually prepared by a pharmacy on either a daily or weekly basis and stored at 2–8°C). Physico-chemical and microbial stability of an AIO admixture is essential for the safety and effectiveness of patient-specific PN, and its assurance requires specialist pharmaceutical knowledge. The stability should be documented for an application period of 24 (–48) hours. It is advisable to offer a limited selection of different PN regimes in each hospital. For reasons of drug and medication safety, PN admixtures prepared for individual patients must be correctly labelled and specifications for storage conditions must also be followed during transport. Monitoring is required where applicable. Micronutrients are usually administered separately to AIO admixtures. In case compatibility and stability have been well documented trace elements and/or combination preparations including water-soluble or water-soluble/fat soluble vitamin supplements can be added to PN admixtures under strict aseptic conditions. AIO admixtures are usually not used as vehicles for drugs (incompatibilities). PMID:20049073

  13. Parenteral iron compounds: potent oxidants but mainstays of anemia management in chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A

    2006-09-01

    Ferric iron (Fe)-carbohydrate complexes are widely used for treating Fe deficiency in patients who are unable to meet their Fe requirements with oral supplements. Intravenous Fe generally is well tolerated and effective in correcting Fe-deficient states. However, the complexing of Fe to carbohydrate polymers does not block its potent pro-oxidant effects; systemic free radical generation and, possibly, tissue damage may result. The purpose of this review is to (1) underscore the capacity of currently used parenteral Fe formulations to induce oxidative stress, (2) compare the severity of these oxidant reactions with those that result from unshielded Fe salts and with each other, and (3) speculate as to the potential of these agents to induce acute renal cell injury and augment systemic inflammatory responses. The experimental data that are reviewed should not be extrapolated to the clinical setting or be used for clinical decision making. Rather, it is hoped that the information provided herein may have utility for clinical hypothesis generation and, hence, future clinical studies. By so doing, a better understanding of Fe's potential protean effects on patients with renal disease may result.

  14. Parenteral Administration of l-Arginine Prevents Fetal Growth Restriction in Undernourished Ewes12

    PubMed Central

    Lassala, Arantzatzu; Bazer, Fuller W.; Cudd, Timothy A.; Datta, Sujay; Keisler, Duane H.; Satterfield, M. Carey; Spencer, Thomas E.; Wu, Guoyao

    2010-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a major health problem worldwide that currently lacks an effective therapeutic solution. This study was conducted with an ovine IUGR model to test the hypothesis that parenteral administration of l-arginine (Arg) is effective in enhancing fetal growth. Beginning on d 28 of gestation, ewes were fed a diet providing 100% (control-fed) or 50% (underfed) of NRC-recommended nutrient requirements. Between d 60 of gestation and parturition, underfed ewes received i.v. infusions of saline or 155 μmol Arg-HCl/kg body weight 3 times daily, whereas control-fed ewes received only saline. The birth weights of lambs from saline-infused underfed ewes were 23% lower (P < 0.01) than those of lambs from control-fed dams. Administration of Arg to underfed ewes increased (P < 0.01) concentrations of Arg (69%), ornithine (55%), proline (29%), methionine (37%), leucine (36%), isoleucine (35%), cysteine (19%), and FFA (43%) in maternal serum, decreased maternal circulating levels of ammonia (18%) and triglycerides (32%), and enhanced birth weights of lambs by 21% compared with saline-infused underfed ewes. There was no difference in birth weights of lambs between the control-fed and the Arg-infused underfed ewes. These novel results indicate that parenteral administration of Arg to underfed ewes prevented fetal growth restriction and provide support for its clinical use to ameliorate IUGR in humans. The findings also lay a new framework for studying cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the beneficial effects of Arg in regulating conceptus growth and development. PMID:20505020

  15. Aminosyn PF or trophamine: which provides more protection from cholestasis associated with total parenteral nutrition?

    PubMed

    Forchielli, M L; Gura, K M; Sandler, R; Lo, C

    1995-11-01

    Cholestasis often occurs in infants on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for long periods. Amino acid formulations developed specifically for infants, namely Aminosyn PF and Trophamine, may protect against cholestasis associated with total parenteral nutrition (CATPN). The development of cholestasis may also be caused by other risk factors such as prematurity, surgery, sepsis, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). To evaluate the relative effectiveness of the pediatric amino acid formulations in reducing CATPN, the courses of 70 infants < 1 year of age who received TPN for at least 14 days were reviewed. Cholestasis was defined as a conjugated serum bilirubin > or = 2 mg/dl subsequent to the initiation of TPN; CATPN was considered present when other factors related to cholestasis were ruled out. Liver function tests were recorded 24 h before starting TPN and at day 7, 15, and 21 during TPN infusion. Thirty infants (42.8%) developed cholestasis. CATPN was judged to have occurred in 15 (21.4%) of 70 infants, while 15 (21.4%) developed cholestasis secondary to other factors. Of the 15 CATPN patients, 7 had received Trophamine, 6 had received Aminosyn PF, and 2 had received both solutions. Aminosyn PF and Trophamine, along with other potential risk factors for CATPN such as antecedent surgery, sepsis, ECMO, prematurity, and nitrogen/calorie intake were analyzed by regression-analysis methods. None was statistically significant except the length of TPN (p = 0.0063). In conclusion, we cannot support the view that Trophamine is more effective than Aminosyn PF in the prevention of CATPN.

  16. Characterizing the Severe Reactions of Parenteral Vitamin K1.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rachel B; Brown, Jamie N

    2016-01-01

    Parenteral vitamin K1 (phytonadione) is used for anticoagulant reversal, and a boxed warning exists with intravenous and intramuscular administration due to the possibility of severe reactions, including fatalities. These reactions resemble hypersensitivity or anaphylaxis, including anaphylactoid reaction, and have led to shock and cardiac and/or respiratory arrest. The objective of this review is to summarize the available literature detailing the anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions with parenteral vitamin K1 in order to better characterize the reaction and provide a more in-depth understanding of its importance. A comprehensive literature search of MEDLINE (1946 to June 2016) and EMBASE (1947 to June 2016) was conducted using the terms vitamin K1, phytonadione, phytomenadione, vitamin K group, anaphylaxis, polyoxyethylated castor oil, and cremophor. A total of 2 retrospective surveillance studies, 2 retrospective cohort studies, and 17 case reports were identified for inclusion and assessment. Based on a review of the literature, use of parenteral vitamin K1 may result in severe hypotension, bradycardia or tachycardia, dyspnea, bronchospasm, cardiac arrest, and death. These reactions are most consistent with a nonimmune-mediated anaphylactoid mechanism. It appears that intravenous administration is more frequently associated with these reactions and occurs at an incidence of 3 per 10 000 doses of intravenous vitamin K1. The solubilizer may also increase the risk of adverse reactions, which occurred in patients with and without previous exposure to vitamin K1. Although there are known factors that increase the risk of an adverse drug event occurring, reactions have been reported despite all precautions being properly followed.

  17. Parenteral opioids for maternal pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Roz; Smith, Lesley A; Burns, Ethel; Mori, Rintaro; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenteral opioids are used for pain relief in labour in many countries throughout the world. Objectives To assess the acceptability, effectiveness and safety of different types, doses and modes of administration of parenteral opioids given to women in labour. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (30 April 2011) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials examining the use of intramuscular or intravenous opioids (including patient controlled analgesia) for women in labour. We looked at studies comparing an opioid with another opioid, placebo, other non-pharmacological interventions (TENS) or inhaled analgesia. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, collected data and assessed risk of bias. Main results We included 57 studies involving more than 7000 women that compared an opioid with placebo, another opioid administered intramuscularly or intravenously or compared with TENS to the back. The 57 studies reported on 29 different comparisons, and for many outcomes only one study contributed data. Overall, the evidence was of poor quality regarding the analgesic effect of opioids, satisfaction with analgesia, adverse effects and harm to women and babies. There were few statistically significant results. Many of the studies had small sample sizes, and low statistical power. Overall findings indicated that parenteral opioids provided some pain relief and moderate satisfaction with analgesia in labour, although up to two-thirds of women who received opioids reported moderate or severe pain and/or poor or moderate pain relief one or two hours after administration. Opioid drugs were associated with maternal nausea, vomiting and drowsiness, although different opioid drugs were associated with different adverse effects. There was no clear evidence of adverse effects of opioids on the newborn. We

  18. Total parenteral nutrition for the very low birth weight infant.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pinkal; Bhatia, Jatinder

    2017-02-01

    Preterm infants, especially very low birth weight (VLBW; <1500 g) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW; <1000 g) infants, are susceptible to growth failure in postnatal life if nutritional demands are not met. Poor postnatal growth in preterm infants is associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes during childhood. Early parental nutrition is of paramount importance to provide appropriate protein and energy in VLBW infants when enteral nutrition is not feasible or is suboptimal. An "early and aggressive" approach of parenteral nutrition in preterm infants has been shown to prevent protein catabolism, induce positive nitrogen balance and improve postnatal growth.

  19. Malassezia Pneumonia: A Rare Complication of Parenteral Nutrition Therapy.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richelle M; Stegink, Ryan J; Manaloor, John J; Schmitt, Bryan H; Stevens, John C; Christenson, John C

    2016-11-01

    Malassezia species (formerly known as Pityrosporum) are part of normal human skin flora and have been associated with benign dermatologic conditions, such as seborrheic dermatitis and tinea versicolor. In rare cases, however, Malassezia has been associated with systemic disease in immunocompromised patients and infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. Malassezia species require long-chain fatty acids for growth and therefore have a known predilection for individuals receiving lipid containing intravenous parenteral nutrition (PN). Systemic infections are characterized by prolonged fevers and illness but can include nonspecific signs and symptoms. We present the diagnosis and management of a rare case of an immunocompetent, nonneonatal, PN-dependent child with Malassezia furfur pneumonia.

  20. Malassezia furfur meningitis associated with total parenteral nutrition subdural effusion.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Cecilia M; Jackson, Mary Anne; Zwick, David

    2004-01-01

    We present a case of Malassezia furfur meningitis arising in a very low birth weight infant with chronic lung disease, necrotizing enterocolitis, and intraventricular hemorrhage. M. furfur meningitis was probably acquired late following successful treatment for earlier systemic central line-associated M. furfur infection. M. furfur meningitis has only once been previously reported. Unlike the previous case where meningitis was secondary to widespread blood-borne dissemination, infection was limited to the leptomeninges and arose in association with extravasation of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and intralipid fluid into subarachnoid space via peripheral scalp catheter.

  1. Vitamin D3 supplementation in healthy adults: a comparison between capsule and oral spray solution as a method of delivery in a wintertime, randomised, open-label, cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Todd, Joshua J; McSorley, Emeir M; Pourshahidi, L Kirsty; Madigan, Sharon M; Laird, Eamon; Healy, Martin; Magee, Pamela J

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin D is typically supplied in capsule form, both in trials and in clinical practice. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of vitamin D administered via oral sprays - a method that primarily bypasses the gastrointestinal absorption route. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of vitamin D3 liquid capsules and oral spray solution in increasing wintertime total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations. In this randomised, open-label, cross-over trial, healthy adults (n 22) received 3000 IU (75 µg) vitamin D3 daily for 4 weeks in either capsule or oral spray form. Following a 10-week washout phase, participants received the opposite treatment for a final 4 weeks. Anthropometrics and fasted blood samples were obtained before and after supplementation, with samples analysed for total 25(OH)D, creatinine, intact parathyroid hormone and adjusted Ca concentrations. At baseline, vitamin D sufficiency (total 25(OH)D>50 nmol/l), insufficiency (31-49 nmol/l) and clinical deficiency (<30 nmol/l) were evident in 59, 23 and 18 % of the participants, respectively. Overall, baseline total mean 25(OH)D concentration averaged 59·76 (sd 29·88) nmol/l, representing clinical sufficiency. ANCOVA revealed no significant difference in the mean and standard deviation change from baseline in total 25(OH)D concentrations between oral spray and capsule supplementation methods (26·15 (sd 17·85) v. 30·38 (sd 17·91) nmol/l, respectively; F=1·044, adjusted r 2 0·493, P=0·313). Oral spray vitamin D3 is an equally effective alternative to capsule supplementation in healthy adults.

  2. Enteral obeticholic acid prevents hepatic cholestasis in total parenteral nutrition-fed neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a vital support for neonatal infants with congenital or acquired gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and requiring small bowel resection. An adverse outcome associated with prolonged TPN use is parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis (PNAC). We previously showed t...

  3. Evaluation of Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy at a Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Emily Sydnor; Kendall, Brian; Orlando, Patricia; Perez, Christian; De Amorim, Marina; Samore, Matthew; Pavia, Andrew T; Hersh, Adam L

    2015-09-01

    We reviewed outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center to identify opportunities for antimicrobial stewardship intervention. A definite or possible modification would have been recommended in 60% of courses. Forty-one percent of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy courses were potentially avoidable, including 22% involving infectious diseases consultation.

  4. Mechanisms of disease: update on the molecular etiology and fundamentals of parenteral nutrition associated cholestasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since its introduction into clinical practice in the 1970s, parenteral nutrition has revolutionized the care of premature neonates. Serum transaminase and bilirubin levels are commonly elevated in infants on parenteral nutrition, but their normalization is typical in the setting of short-term admini...

  5. Hepatic transcriptomic profiles of preterm piglets nourished by enteral and parenteral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving nutritional support for more than half a million premature and hospitalized infants in the U.S. annually. Lipids in parenteral nutrition provide essential fatty acids and are a major source of energy. Intralipid (IL) is the only approved lipid emulsion in the U....

  6. Modification of a micellar system for amino acid separation by MEKC--application for amino acid profiling in formulations for parenteral use.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Małgorzata; Szulińska, Zofia; Wilk, Małgorzata; Anuszewska, Elżbieta

    2010-12-15

    The paper proposes a new method for amino acid determination which can be applied for amino acid profiling in solutions for parenteral nutrition. The MEKC method based on a mixed micellar system was developed for the separation of 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) derivatized amino acids. Background electrolyte was based on tris-borate buffer with high alkaline pH. Sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles were modified using 1,2-hexanediol as a co-surfactant. The effect of the modifier on amino acid migration was studied with respect to hydrophobicity of the analytes. The modifier appeared to be suitable to improve the separation of AQC-tagged amino acids without an adverse effect on buffer ionic strength or EOF velocity. The method was successfully validated and applied for amino acid profiling in medicinal preparations for parenteral nutrition. The results obtained were compared with a reference chromatographic method (amino acid analyser).

  7. Early enteral and parenteral nutrition on immune functions of neurocritically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Qi, S Y; Wang, W T; Chen, C Y; Chu, Z D; Liu, X J; Liu, X J

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of early enteral and parenteral nutrition on immune functions of neurocritically ill patients. Patients who were admitted to the neurological intensive care unit (ICU) of The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University between May 2014 and January 2016 were selected. They had been hospitalized for more than one week and received enteral nutrition (EN) via nasogastric tube, with a gross energy of 25 kcal/(Kg • d). Patients were divided into EN group, EN + early PN (EPN) group and EN + supplemental PN (SPN) group according to the time of PN support. Differences in patients’ general information and changes in serum protein and immune indexes were compared between the three groups. On admission, patients’ Glasgow coma scale (GCS), age, immune functions and protein indexes had no obvious differences between the three groups. After nutritional support, serum protein level reduced in the EN group while prealbumin (PALB) and retinol binding protein (RBP) increased in the EN + EPN group and EN + SPN group after one week of admission to hospital, and the differences were statistically significant (p less than 0.05). Total protein (TP), albumin (ALB), PALB and transferrin (TRF) increased significantly in the EN + EPN group and EN + SPN group compared with the EN group (p < 0.05); before and after treatment, an increase was found in ALB in the EN + EPN group in comparison with EN + SPN group, with a notable difference (p < 0.05); C3, C4, immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) increased in the EN + SPN group after nutritional support compared with before treatment, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Moreover, immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA in the EN + EPN group increased after nutritional support comparing to prior to nutritional support, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). After nutritional treatment, IgA and IgG increased markedly in the EN + EPN group

  8. Oral rehydration solutions in non-cholera diarrhea: a review.

    PubMed

    Atia, Antwan N; Buchman, Alan L

    2009-10-01

    The use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) has revolutionized the management of acute diarrhea. The implementation of the standard World Health Organization ORS (WHO-ORS) has resulted in decreased mortality associated with acute diarrheal illnesses in children, although in general stool volume and diarrhea durations are not reduced. Decreased morbidity and mortality have occurred because of improved hydration status. Decreased morbidity has also been described in adults who used this therapy. Various modifications to the standard ORS have been derived. These modifications have included hypo-osmolar or hyperosmolar solutions, use of rice-based ORS, zinc supplementation, and the use of amino acids, including glycine, alanine, and glutamine. Some of these variations have been successful, some have not, and others are still under investigation. ORS has been used for travelers' diarrhea and to decrease intravenous (IV) fluid requirements in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) who require parenteral nutrition (PN). This paper reviews the standard WHO-ORS and its mechanism of action, followed by more contemporary reduced osmolarity ORS and rice-based ORS in non-cholera diarrhea. Various modifications to improve ORS are also discussed.

  9. Parenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Bizari, Letícia; da Silva Santos, Andressa Feijó; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi; Marchini, Júlio Sérgio; Suen, Vivian Marques Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a severe malabsorption disorder, and prolonged parenteral nutrition is essential for survival in some cases. Among the undesirable effects of long-term parenteral nutrition is an increase in proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to measure the serum levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and transforming growth factor beta, in patients with short bowel syndrome on cyclic parenteral nutrition and patients who had previously received but no longer require parenteral nutrition. The study was cross-sectional and observational. Three groups were studied as follows: Parenteral nutrition group, 9 patients with short bowel syndrome that receive cyclic parenteral nutrition; Oral nutrition group, 10 patients with the same syndrome who had been weaned off parenteral nutrition for at least 1 year prior to the study; Control group, 13 healthy adults, matched for age and sex to parenteral and oral groups. The following data were collected: age, tobacco use, drug therapies, dietary intake, body weight, height, blood collection. All interleukins were significantly higher in the parenteral group compared with the control group as follows: interleukin-6: 22 ± 19 vs 1.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL, P= .0002; transforming growth factor β: 854 ± 204 vs 607 ± 280 pg/mL, P= .04; interleukin-10: 8 ± 37 vs 0.6 ± 4, P= .03; tumor necrosis factor α: 20 ± 8 vs 8 ± 4 pg/mL, P< .0001. We concluded that parenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines.

  10. Plasma lipid levels in preterm neonates receiving parenteral fat emulsions.

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, J L; Shannon, D L; Hunter, M A; Brans, Y W

    1983-01-01

    Concentrations of various plasma lipid fractions were determined during 96 hours of continuous parenteral infusions of lipid emulsions in 10 normally-grown neonates whose birth-weights ranged from 960 to 1760 g and whose gestational ages ranged from 26 to 32 weeks. Total lipid, triglyceride, free glycerol, and free fatty acid concentrations were measured. During lipid infusions, mean plasma concentrations of all lipid fractions increased above the mean preinfusion values if 2 g/kg a day or more of lipid emulsion was used. There were no further significant increases in mean plasma lipid levels if the infused dosage was increased to 3 or 4 g/kg a day. At these higher infusion rates however, there were considerable individual variations. The only neonate less than 27 weeks of gestation had plasma lipid levels severalfold higher than any of his peers, his plasma was frankly creamy on visual inspection, and the study had to be stopped. Further investigations are needed to determine the optimal modalities of parenteral nutrition with fat emulsions. PMID:6402989

  11. Nitrogen sparing by 2-ketoisocaproate in parenterally fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, M.; Matthews, D.E.; Walser, M. )

    1990-11-01

    In rats receiving total parenteral nutrition with or without sodium 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC; 2.48 g.kg-1.day-1), L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine and (1-{sup 14}C)KIC were constantly infused for 6 h. CO{sub 2} production, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} enrichment, urinary urea nitrogen (N) plus ammonia N and total urinary N were measured. Whole body protein synthesis (S) was calculated in non-KIC-infused rats and also in unfed rats infused with (1-{sup 14}C)leucine from fractional oxidation of labeled leucine (1-F), where F is fractional utilization for protein synthesis, and urea N plus ammonia N excretion (C) as S = C x F/(1-F). Addition of KIC caused a significant reduction in N excretion and a significant improvement in N balance. Fractional oxidation of labeled KIC increased, whereas fractional utilization of labeled KIC for protein synthesis decreased, but the extent of incorporation of infused KIC into newly synthesized protein (as leucine) amounted to at least 40% of the total rate of leucine incorporation into newly synthesized whole body protein. We conclude that addition of KIC spares N in parenterally fed rats and becomes a major source of leucine for protein synthesis.

  12. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  13. Cardiac tamponade as a complication of parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Diego Paim Carvalho; Neto, Clarissa Santos; Hubner, Pablo Nelson Valle; Furtado, Thiago de Almeida; Petroianu, Andy; Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complications arising from the use of central venous catheters are numerous, but cardiac tamponade is a complication well defined, very rare and often fatal. The mortality rate is 47–77% in the literature. Presentation of case We report a case of successful diagnosis and treatment of cardiac tamponade by parenteral nutrition in a 31-year-old female. Discussion There are only few cases of cardiac tamponade reported in the world literature since 1958. The true incidence is unclear and the most cases occur in children. Despite the rarity of this condition, it has a high mortality rate. The clinical findings are pain and discomfort in the epigastrium and chest region, nausea, dyspnea, tachycardia, distended jugular veins, paradoxical pulse, hypotension, electrocardiographic tracing signals with low voltage and enlargement of cardiac area. The immediate diagnosis and the treatment of cardiac tamponade are capital for patient survival. Conclusion Cardiac tamponade should be suspected among patients with sudden onset of shock in use of parenteral nutrition, and therefore immediately treated. PMID:25681814

  14. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  15. Hepatobiliary dysfunction during total parenteral nutrition is caused by infusate, not the route of administration.

    PubMed

    Moss, R L; Das, J B; Ansari, G; Raffensperger, J G

    1993-03-01

    Cholestatic jaundice is the major complication of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Both the intravenous (IV) route of nutrition and the enteral fast have been implicated as causes of TPN-associated cholestasis (TPN-AC). The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPN-AC is caused by the TPN solution itself or the IV route of administration and enteral fast. Prepubescent rabbits (n = 24) were divided into four groups: CONTROL, fed standard lab chow; TPN, received a standard hyperalimentation solution of dextrose, Aminosyn, and lipids via the jugular vein; ENT, received the same hyperalimentation solution via a duodenostomy tube; and OSM, received a polymeric formula (Osmolite) via a duodenostomy tube. After 14 days on these diets, we measured bile flow, bile acid excretion, sulfobromophthalein (BSP) excretion, plasma amino acid profile, serum liver enzymes, and liver histology. Statistical analysis was by analysis of variance. Hyperalimentation solution significantly depressed hepatobiliary function, whether it was given IV or by gut. Bile flow in both the TPN (36.4 microL/kg/min) and ENT (46.2) groups was significantly less than CONTROL (84.5) or OSM (62.9). Hepatic secretory function, measured by excretion of the cholephilic dye BSP, was depressed in both TPN and ENT (57% and 55% of IV dose excreted in bile over 60 minutes, respectively) compared with CONTROL (84%) or OSM (71%). Serum liver enzymes were normal in all groups. Histological injury similar to TPN-AC in humans (portal inflammation and hepatocyte degeneration) was seen in both groups receiving the hyperalimentation solution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Development of clinical application for a nutritional prescription support system for total parenteral/enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Syuzo; Oka, Ryusho; Uwai, Koji; Matsuda, Yumi; Shiraishi, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yoshito; Shoji, Tohru; Mihara, Chie; Takeshita, Mitsuhiro; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2009-09-01

    One of the important roles of pharmacists as members of a nutrition support team is nutritional prescription support. We developed a nutritional prescription support system (NPSS) that facilitates prescription support and analysis and evaluated its usefulness in nutritional therapy. An NPSS for prescription support and the management of patient information was created. With this NPSS, the nutritional status was assessed, and, on the basis of the results, such variables as the total energy expenditure were calculated. This system allows prescription support for parenteral nutrition (PN) therapy, enteral nutrition (EN) therapy, and the transition period between them. This system was used for 2 representative patients and evaluated. In a malnourished patient receiving oral warfarin, EN solutions were compared by means of the NPSS, and an appropriate EN solution was selected. In addition, the prothrombin time-international normalized ratio was monitored, and favorable results were obtained regarding the adjustment of the warfarin dose and nutritional management. In a patient with aspiration pneumonia, continuous nutritional management to EN from PN therapy was straightforwardly performed with the NPSS. This NPSS allows rapid, comprehensive nutritional management during the transition period to EN from PN therapy, despite these therapies being considered separately in conventional nutritional management. The NPSS is useful for simplifying prescription support and facilitating information sharing among members of a nutrition support team.

  17. Rapid intravenous administration of amino acids prevents biliary sludge induced by total parenteral nutrition in humans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z S; Yu, L; Lin, Y J; Jun, Z J; Min, W S; Jun, Y; Hua, Z B

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether daily rapid intravenous administration of amino acids (IVAA) prevented the formation of biliary sludge in humans receiving long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Thirty adult patients receiving TPN for more than 28 consecutive days were studied. They were randomized to receive either saline solution (placebo) intravenously (15 patients) or 6.9% branched chain amino acid (BCAA)-enriched amino acid (15 synthetic amino acids; Freamine HBC) solution given by administration rapid intravenous (15 patients). The groups were similar with respect to age, sex, diagnosis, liver function test results, amylase levels, TPN time, and time of study. All patients underwent weekly ultrasound studies. Volume and emptying studies of the gallbladder in response to the study drug were performed after 1 week. As a result, none of the patients receiving rapid IVAA had sludge, whereas 11 of the 15 patients receiving placebo had sludge (P < 0.01). Results of emptying studies showed significant contraction of the gallbladder in those in the rapid IVAA group, but not in the placebo group. Consequently, the data suggest that rapid IVAA given daily prevents TPN-induced stasis and sludge in the gallbladder. We conclude that rapid IVAA should be used as routine prophylaxis against biliary sludge and formation of gallstones in patients receiving long-term TPN.

  18. Pharmaceutical feasibility of sub-visible particle analysis in parenterals with reduced volume light obscuration methods.

    PubMed

    Hawe, Andrea; Schaubhut, Frank; Geidobler, Raimund; Wiggenhorn, Michael; Friess, Wolfgang; Rast, Markus; de Muynck, Christian; Winter, Gerhard

    2013-11-01

    The draft for a new United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) monograph {787} "Sub-visible Particulate Matter in Therapeutic Protein Injections" describes the analysis of sub-visible particles by light obscuration at much lower sample volumes as so far required by the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) and the USP for parenterals in general. Our aim was to show the feasibility of minimizing the sample expenditure required for light obscuration similar to the new USP settings for standards and pharmaceutically relevant samples (both proteins and small molecules), without compromising the data quality. The light obscuration method was downscaled from >20 ml volume as so far specified in Ph. Eur./USP to 1 ml total sample volume. Comparable results for the particle concentration in all tested size classes were obtained with both methods for polystyrene standards, stressed BSA solutions, recombinant human IgG1 formulations, and pantoprazol i.v. solution. An additional advantage of the low volume method is the possibility to detect vial-to-vial variations, which are leveled out when pooling several vials to achieve sufficient volume for the Ph. Eur./USP method. This is in particular important for biotech products where not only the general quality aspect, but also aggregate formation of the drug substance is monitored by light obscuration.

  19. Cost analysis of adult parenteral nutrition systems: three-compartment bag versus customized.

    PubMed

    Berlana, David; Sabin, Pilar; Gimeno-Ballester, Vicente; Romero-Jiménez, Rosa; Zapata-Rojas, Amalia; Marquez, Esther; Martínez-Cutillas, Julio; Schoenenberger-Arnaiz, Joan Anton

    2013-11-01

    Background Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a costly technology used widely to provide nutrition to patients who have an inaccessible or non-functioning intestine. Two all-in-one systems currently being used are customized formulations and three-compartment bags. Objective To provide a systematic cost comparison of the two all-in-one PN systems: individualized (made from nutrient solutions) versus commercialized (made from three-compartment bag), both prepared in hospital pharmacies. Setting This study was conducted in three public Spanish hospitals. Method We conducted a cost-minimization study to analyze prospectively the total cost of PN bags, accounting for all of the processes involved in preparing and delivering PN bags (cost of manpower, nutrition solutions, medical supplies and quality controls) in three different healthcare settings. To compare therapeutic alternatives of equivalent nutritional value, the study was performed for the most frequently employed formulation and similar to commercial preparations. A univariate sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of different rates of use of three-compartment PN bag. Results 157 routine acts of PN bag preparation (65 customized and 92 three-compartment) were observed and timed over 9 days. Total costs of the 157 PN bags were included in the study. Mean costs of customized bags were higher than three-compartment bags, 51.16±5.63€ versus 39.69±3.00€ respectively (p.

  20. [Management of parenteral nutrition in intensive care units in Spain].

    PubMed

    Vaquerizo Alonso, Clara; Mesejo, Alfonso; Acosta Escribano, José; Ruiz Santana, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos: No se sabe con exactitud aspectos de relevancia en nutrición parenteral como aportes calórico-proteicos, volumen total, control de glucemia, tipo de emulsión lipídica o comparación de diferentes fórmulas, en las UCIs españolas. Planteamos como objetivo conocer los patrones de práctica clínica habitual en la terapéutica con nutrición artificial, fundamentalmente parenteral, en dichas UCIs. Material y métodos: Participaron doce UCIs representativas, de enero a marzo de dos mil doce, para la realización de una encuesta nutricional. La encuesta se dividió en dos apartados : A) Manejo del soporte nutricional artificial en el paciente grave y B) Valoración de una nueva fórmula de nutrición parenteral adaptada al paciente grave. Se recogió: porcentaje de pacientes con nutrición artificial; disponibilidad de fórmulas enterales; tipos de emulsiones lipídicas; calorías, aminoácidos y lípidos aportados; adición de glutamina, vitaminas y oligoelementos; manejo del volumen y de la hiperglucemia y datos comparativos de pacientes con la nueva formulación frente a fórmulas de uso habitual: control glucémico, afectación hepática y complicaciones infecciosas, así como aportes de calorías totales, proteínas, volumen e insulina administrada. Resultados: La media de camas hospitalarias es de 780 y de UCI de 25, con una media de ingresos de 950 pacientes/año. Un 49% son pacientes médicos, 31% quirúrgicos y 20% traumatológicos. El 59,75% precisaron nutrición artificial (NA). De ellos, 58,7% nutrición enteral (NE), 16% nutrición parenteral total (NPT) y 25,3% nutrición parenteral complementaria (NPC). Ante NE contraindicada, el 83,3% inicia NPT precoz (24 horas) y ante NE insuficiente el 66,7% inicia NPC en 48 horas. En relación con la práctica habitual de los prescriptores, un 50% intenta reducción de volumen y el 100% dispone de protocolo de infusión de insulina. Un 39% recomiendan NPT hiperproteica, baja en volumen

  1. Leucine supplementation of a low-protein meal increases skeletal muscle and visceral tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs by stimulating mTOR-dependent translation initiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein synthesis and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) activation are increased in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs parenterally infused with amino acids. Leucine appears to be the most effective single amino acid to trigger these effects. To examine the response to enteral leucine supplementation...

  2. Serum amino acid concentrations in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition with an amino acid plus dextrose mixture.

    PubMed

    Philcox, J C; Hartley, T F; Worthley, L I; Thomas, D W

    1984-01-01

    The results of monitoring the serum amino acid concentrations during three infusion regimens using a 5:4 mixture of 70% glucose and the synthetic L-amino acid solution, Synthamin 17 (Travasol) are reported. Twelve stabilized patients received continuous total parenteral nutrition (TPN), eight of whom were subsequently placed on a second regimen of cyclical feeding. A separate group of five patients was infused with amino acids, both with and without simultaneous glucose. The serum amino acid concentrations indicated that the supply of valine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine, and histidine, and the synthesis of taurine from the infused methionine was suboptimal, particularly if the period of TPN was prolonged. The synthesis of tyrosine from phenylalanine appeared to be inversely proportional to the infusion rate of the TPN mixture, in particular the glucose component, resulting in depressed tyrosine and increased phenylalanine concentrations in serum during continuous iv nutrition. Cyclical infusions, on the other hand, permitted the tyrosine and phenylalanine concentrations to return to normal during the noninfusion stage of the cycle. Amino acid measurements enabled us to design an amino acids additive mixture which normalized the serum concentrations in three long-term home parenteral nutrition patients. As a result of these investigations serum amino acid measurements are used routinely to monitor the efficacy of TPN and accommodate any specific amino acid requirements of individual patients.

  3. PROTEIN NEEDS OF CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS RECEIVING PARENTERAL NUTRITION.

    PubMed

    Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento Freitas, Renata; Negrão Nogueira, Roberto José; Hessel, Gabriel

    2015-07-01

    Introducción: evaluar si las recomendaciones de ingesta de proteínas actuales pueden mejorar los parámetros bioquímicos de los pacientes críticos que reciben nutrición parenteral. Métodos: estudio longitudinal con tres evaluaciones realizadas (durante las primeras 72 horas, en el séptimo y los días decimocuarto de nutrición parenteral). Se aplicaron las siguientes pruebas: albúmina, proteína C reac ti va, prealbúmina, colesterol total, HDL, triglicéridos, linfocitos y glutatión peroxidasa. La gravedad se determinó por SOFA. El análisis estadístico incluyó las pruebas de Spearman y Mann-Whitney, así como ANOVA (análisis de varianza). Resultados: de los 53 pacientes evaluados, 20 (37,74%) fallecieron. La caloría media fue de 24,68 ± 9,78 kcal/kg (comienzo de PN), 26,49 ± 8,89 kcal/kg (tercero-séptimo días de PN), y 30,9 ± 12,19 kcal/kg (séptimo-décimo cuarto días de PN). La proteína media fue de 1,19 ± 0,44 g/ kcal/kg (primeras 72 horas de PN), 1,29 ± 0,44 g/kcal/kg (tercero-séptimo días de PN) y 1,49 ± 0,69 g/kcal/kg (séptimo- decimocuarto días de PN). La prealbúmina, la albúmina, el colesterol total y la HDL estaban por debajo de los valores de referencia, mientras que los niveles de PCR eran altos. A lo largo de los tres tiempos de evaluación, no hay una mejora significativa en los niveles de los exámenes de laboratorio. Una correlación fuerte y negativa entre SOFA y prealbúmina (r = -0,64, p = 0,05). Conclusiones: la oferta de proteínas, de acuerdo con las recomendaciones tradicionales, no fue suficiente para mejorar los parámetros bioquímicos de los pacientes críticos sometidos a nutrición parenteral.

  4. Safety and role of ketogenic parenteral nutrition for intractable childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da Eun; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Heung Dong

    2012-09-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the safety and role of ketogenic parenteral nutrition in patients with intractable childhood epilepsy. The ketogenic parenteral nutrition was given to 10 patients who were unable to absorb nutrients through the intestinal tract because of various gastrointestinal disorders and required complete bowel rest. This nutrition consisted of conventional intravenous fat emulsion (20% Lipision) plus dextrose and amino acid (6% Trophamine) hyperalimentation in a 4:1 (or 3:1) lipid to non-lipid ratio, infused during the bowel rest. If the ketogenic parenteral nutrition allowed normal daily functioning or resolved the underlying problems, we soon changed it to the enteral ketogenic diet (KD). The mean (±SD) duration of the ketogenic parenteral nutrition was 4.1 (±1.5) days. Although a brief span of several days, all patients could maintain ketosis and the efficacy of the previous enteral KD during the ketogenic parenteral nutrition. Complications included elevated aspartate aminotransferase and/or alanine aminotransferase in one patient. Amylase and lipase increased in one patient. Serum triglyceride level increased to the level of 1885 mg/dl in one patient, but normalized in one week after discontinuation of the ketogenic parenteral nutrition and resuming of the enteral KD. Nine patients (90%) remained on the enteral KD after the ketogenic parenteral nutrition (the mean follow-up period was 9 months), including 2 patients who successfully completed the diet with seizure free state. Only one patient discontinued the ketogenic parenteral nutrition because of persistent increase of the amylase and lipase levels. The ketogenic parenteral nutrition proved to be a relatively safe short-term method of continuing KD to maintain ketosis for seizure control, while patients were unable to absorb nutrients through their intestinal tract.

  5. Total parenteral nutrition in very low birth weight infants with Travasol 10% blend C.

    PubMed

    Pineault, M; Chessex, P; Lepage, D; Dallaire, L; Brisson, G; Qureshi, I

    1986-01-01

    Ten very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (birth weight: 994 +/- 66 g, gestational age: 27 +/- 0.5 wk) requiring total parenteral nutrition (TPN) were studied in order to evaluate their metabolic response to the amino acid solution Travasol 10% blend C. These patients received the solution at a constant rate, providing 2.61 +/- 0.02 g/kg/day of amino acids and 76 +/- 1 kcal/kg/day. Plasma amino acids analysis was performed after 4.6 +/- 0.3 day of infusion and compared to values reported previously with Travasol blend B. The new solution (blend C) showed a significantly lower (p less than 0.001) glycinemia (485 +/- 24 vs 993 +/- 69 mumol/liter), methioninemia (39 +/- 2 vs 114 +/- 12 mumol/liter) and phenylalaninemia (67 +/- 3 vs 92 +/- 5 mumol/liter) related to the lower intake of these amino acids. Despite the provision of 47.5 mmol/liter of serine with blend C no changes in plasma level (182 +/- 15 vs 196 +/- 41 mumol/liter) were noted. The increased molar arginine/glycine ratio (blend C: 0.48 vs blend B 0.22) could have contributed to keep ammoniemia within normal levels (55.1 +/- 4.2 mumol/liter). Wide variations in insulin response (9.9 to 26.4 microU/ml) allowed for a correlation between its plasma concentration and those of sensitive amino acids, underlining its role in protein metabolism. Despite the immaturity of the study population no short-term metabolic imbalance has been encountered with the Travasol blend C solution.

  6. Reactive Geochemical Transport Modeling of Concentrated AqueousSolutions: Supplement to TOUGHREACT User's Guide for the PitzerIon-Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel , Carl

    2006-12-15

    In this report, we present: -- The Pitzer ion-interactiontheory and models -- Input file requirements for using the TOUGHREACTPitzer ion-interaction model and associated databases -- Run-time errormessages -- Verification test cases and application examples. For themain code structure, features, overall solution methods, description ofinput/output files for parameters other than those specific to theimplemented Pitzer model, and error messages, see the TOUGHREACT User'sGuide (Xu et al., 2005). The TOUGHREACT Pitzer version runs on aDEC-alpha architecture CPU, under OSF1 V5.1, with Compaq Digital FortranCompiler. The compiler run-time libraries are required for execution aswell as compilation. The code also runs on Intel Pentium IV andhigher-version CPU-based machines with Compaq Visual Fortran Compiler orIntel Fortran Compiler (integrated with the Microsoft DevelopmentEnvironment). The minimum hardware configuration should include 1 GB RAMand 1 GB (2 GB recommended) of available disk space.

  7. An exclusively based parenteral fish-oil emulsion reverses cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Triana Junco, Miryam; García Vázquez, Natalia; Zozaya, Carlos; Ybarra Zabala, Marta; Abrams, Steven; García de Lorenzo, Abelardo; Sáenz de Pipaón Marcos, Miguel

    2014-10-25

    Prolonged parenteral nutrition (PN) leads to liver damage. Recent interest has focused on the lipid component of PN. A lipid emulsion based on w-3 fatty acids decrease conjugated bilirubin. A mixed lipid emulsion derived from soybean, coconut, olive, and fish oils reverses jaundice. Here we report the reversal of cholestasis and the improvement of enteral feeding tolerance in 1 infant with intestinal failure-associated liver disease. Treatment involved the substitution of a mixed lipid emulsion with one containing primarily omega-3 fatty acids during 37 days. Growth and biochemical tests of liver function improved significantly. This suggests that fat emulsions made from fish oils may be more effective means of treating this condition compared with an intravenous lipid emulsion containing soybean oil, medium -chain triglycerides, olive oil, and fish oil.

  8. A review of parenteral sustained-release naltrexone systems

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, J.L.; Kincl, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    The ideal naltrexone sustained-release delivery system should be easy to inject or implant, not cause adverse tissue reaction, release the drug at a relatively constant rate for at least 30 days, and biodegrade within a short time afterwards. Mechanisms which can be used for sustaining drug release include reducing solubility and surface area, coating, encapsulation and microencapsulation, complexation, binding and hydrophilic gelation. Drug release from such systems is controlled by diffusion through a barrier/film, diffusion from a monolithic device, erosion of the surface, hydrolysis, ion exchange, biodegradation, or a combination of these. Injectable systems would seem to be ultimately preferred because of the ease of administration and handling, while the implantable devices may find first use in man since they are easily removable, should that be necessary. Maintaining particulate-free products and sterilization methods are two problems with all parenteral dosage forms. Production must be particularly well controlled and validated.

  9. [Hypersensibility reaction to parenteral nutrition approach; a case report].

    PubMed

    Sanchez Acera, Elián; Arenas Villafranca, Jose Javier; Abilés, Jimena; Faus Felipe, Vicente

    2014-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is essential in the treatment of many hospitalized patients. However, administration of PN is not without potential complications and patients are exposed to related possible adverse reactions such as hypersensitivity. For that reason and because of the complexity of this treatment, PNs are considered by the ISMP (Institute for Safe Medication Practice) a high risk medication. Following is introduced the case of an oncologic patient with severe malnutrition, who after receiving PN for several days, developed a hypersensitivity reaction that could have being associated with intravenous mixture administration. Our aim is to analize the difficulties related with pre-surgery nutrition and to clarify the main possible causes of the reaction.

  10. A re-evaluation of energy expenditure during parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Quebbeman, E J; Ausman, R K; Schneider, T C

    1982-01-01

    Nutritional support regimens are currently based on estimates of energy expenditure, and these estimates are then increased substantially in patients with severe trauma or sepsis because of a presumed hypermetabolic state. Forty-four patients on parenteral nutrition were evaluated using indirect calorimetry to measure actual energy expenditure, and an attempt was made to correlate metabolic rate with clinical diagnosis. We found no statistical difference in metabolic rates between groups of patients classified as malnourished, stressed, or catabolic, If high levels of nonprotein energy substrates are to be administered to a catabolic or "hypermetabolic" patient group, the justification must be on a basis other than a significant increase in actual rate of energy expenditure. PMID:6800313

  11. Precipitation of trace elements in parenteral nutrition mixtures.

    PubMed

    Allwood, M C; Martin, H; Greenwood, M; Maunder, M

    1998-10-01

    Trace elements are an essential additive to parenteral nutrition (PN) mixtures. Previous studies have indicated that certain trace elements, in particular copper and iron, may interact with complete PN mixtures leading to precipitate formation. The causes of these incompatibilities have not been fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine factors responsible for common trace element incompatibilities, using X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy to examine the elemental content of precipitates isolated from stored PN mixtures with added trace elements. Results indicated that copper sulphide precipitated most rapidly in PN mixtures containing Vamin 9 and in mixtures stored in multilayered bags. Copper sulphide precipitation was delayed in PN mixtures containing Vamin 14 and was not observed in PN mixtures stored in EVA bags. Iron phosphate precipitates were observed in Synthamin-containing PN mixtures after storage, but this was prevented in mixtures containing vitamins stored in multilayered bags.

  12. The effect of acute discontinuation of total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Wagman, L D; Newsome, H H; Miller, K B; Thomas, R B; Weir, G C

    1986-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the impact of acute discontinuation (AD) of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on serum glucose, insulin, and glucagon levels and on the generation of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Fifty studies were performed in 48 patients. In none of the 30 studies of 1 hour duration nor in the 20 studies of 8 hours duration was there a single episode of symptomatic hypoglycemia. One patient had a glucose below normal (60 mg/dl) during the first hour after AD. Glucose and insulin concentrations were elevated at the start of TPN discontinuation but returned to normal values within 60 minutes and remained there during the successive 7 hours of study. Although glucagon levels were slightly elevated at zero time, no significant decrease occurred. There was no evidence for counter-regulation based on the patterns of glucose and hormone levels. With some restrictions, acute discontinuation is a safe, rapid method of ending a prolonged TPN infusion. PMID:3094465

  13. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition in hemodialysis patients: Acute and chronic intervention.

    PubMed

    Avery-Lynch, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Protein and calorie malnutrition have been encountered more frequently than expected in the hemodialysis patients. Intradialytic parenteral nutrition (IDPN) has been documented to improve nutritional status in hemodialysis patients in both acute and chronic settings (Henrich, 1996). The aim of this study was to support the usage of IDPN in our malnourished hemodialysis patients. Serum concentration of albumin is one of the main indicators of mortality in the dialysis population. The serum albumin concentration for six out of eight of our hemodialysis (HD) patients receiving IDPN increased significantly. There was a mean increase of 7.0 g/L of plasma albumin for the eight patients assessed. These results demonstrate that IDPN is an effective nutritional intervention for malnourished hemodialysis patients.

  14. Gastrointestinal immune and microbiome changes during parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Joseph F

    2017-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a lifesaving therapy that provides intravenous nutrition support to patients who cannot, or should not, feed via the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Unfortunately, PN also carries certain risks related to infection and metabolic complications compared with enteral nutrition. In this review, an overview of PN and GI immune and microbiome changes is provided. PN impacts the gut-associated lymphoid tissue functions, especially adaptive immune cells, changes the intestinal epithelium and chemical secretions, and significantly alters the intestinal microbiome. Collectively, these changes functionally result in increased susceptibility to infectious and injurious challenge. Since PN remains necessary in large numbers of patients, the search to improve outcomes by stimulating GI immune function during PN remains of interest. This review closes by describing recent advances in using enteric nervous system neuropeptides or microbially derived products during PN, which may improve GI parameters by maintaining immunity and physiology.

  15. Lipid composition and structure of commercial parenteral emulsions.

    PubMed

    Férézou, J; Nguyen, T L; Leray, C; Hajri, T; Frey, A; Cabaret, Y; Courtieu, J; Lutton, C; Bach, A C

    1994-07-14

    In order to study the influence of the phospholipid/triacylglycerol (PL/TG) ratio of parenteral emulsions on the distribution and the physico-chemical properties of their fat particles, commercial 10, 20 or 30% fat formulas were fractionated by centrifugation into an upper lipid cake (resuspended in aqueous glycerol) and a subnatant or mesophase, from which a PL-rich subfraction (d = 1.010-1.030 g/l) was purified by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Chemical and 31P-NMR analyses of these fractions indicated that at least two types of fat particles coexist in parenteral emulsions: (i) TG-rich particles (mean diameter: 330, 400, 470 nm in the 10, 20, 30% emulsion) which contain practically all the TG and esterified phytosterols of native emulsions, but only a fraction of their PL, unesterified cholesterol and phytosterols, and other minor lipids; (ii) PL-bilayer particles or liposomes (mean diameter: 80-100 nm) which are constituted with the remaining PL and relatively very small amounts of TG and other lipids. The higher the oil content of the emulsion, the lower the amount of these PL-rich particles, which represent the major particle population of the mesophase. Indeed, minute amounts of TG-rich particles (probably the smallest ones) are also present in the mesophase, even in the PL-rich subfraction which contains the bulk of liposomal PL. Since the PL-rich particles of the infused emulsion generate lipoprotein X-like particles, only the large TG-rich particles can be considered as true chylomicron counterparts.

  16. Effect of supplementation of University of Wisconsin solution with glycoproteins from psychrophilic strains of yeast on hypothermic liver storage of rats.

    PubMed

    Tilser, I; Breierová, E; Tichý, M; Skalská, H; Ettlerová, E

    1996-06-01

    Extracellular yeast glycoproteins (YG) produced by Rhodosporidium toruloides have been shown to increase the survival rate of different yeast species after storage in liquid nitrogen. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of YG on cold-stored rat livers. Water-soluble YG produced either by Phaffia rhodozyma (G3) or by Leucosporidium antarcticum (G4) were added to a modified University of Wisconsin solution (mUW) and used for cold storage (1 degree C) of isolated livers. The functional status of each liver was then assessed under conditions of 90-min normothermic reperfusion. The 46-h cold storage in mUW without G3 and G4 resulted in serious preservation-reperfusion injury of the liver. The addition of G3 to mUW for 46-h preservation of the liver resulted in significantly higher bile flow (4.32 +/- 0.35 vs 2.35 +/- 0.49 microliters/min/10 g at 75-90 min), higher portal blood flow (10.99 +/- 0.2 vs 4.78 +/- 1.07 ml/min/g at 90 min), lower liver weight after reperfusion (102.4 +/- 1.5 vs 116.7 +/- 6.6% of weight before preservation), and lower total tissue water after reperfusion (2.49 +/- 0.05 vs 2.92 +/- 0.13 g water/g dry weight). However, the activity of ALT, AST, and LDH in perfusate was not changed. The beneficial effect of G4 was less pronounced. The 24-h storage in mUW resulted in a significant increase of AST and LDH activity in perfusate; the addition of G3 to mUW for 24-h preservation did not affect these parameters. In conclusion, the addition of 0.05% G3 or G4 to mUW was only partially beneficial in improving rat liver preservation.

  17. PIPIDA scintigraphy for cholecystitis: false positives in alcoholism and total parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, W.P.; Gibbs, P.; Rudd, T.G.; Mack, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A review of gallbladder scintigraphy in patients with potentially compromised hepatobiliary function revealed two groups in whom cholecystitis might be mistakenly diagnosed. In 200 consecutive hospitalized patients studied with technetium-99m-PIPIDA for acute cholecystitis or cholestasis, there were 41 alcoholics and 17 patients on total parenteral nutrition. In 60% of the alcoholics and 92% of those on parenteral nutrition, absent or delayed visualization of the gallbladder occurred without physical or clinical evidence of cholecystitis. A cholecystagogue, sincalide, did not prevent the false-positive features which presumably are due to altered bile flow kinetics related to alcoholism and parenteral nutrition. Four patients on parenteral nutrition undergoing cholecystectomy for suspected cholecystitis had normal gallbladders filled with jellylike viscous thick bile. A positive (nonvisualized or delayed visualized) gallbladder PIPIDA scintigram in these two populations should not be interpreted as indicating a need for cholecystectomy.

  18. Validating hyperbilirubinemia and gut mucosal atrophy with a novel ultramobile ambulatory total parenteral nutrition piglet model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) provides all nutrition intravenously. Although TPN therapy has grown enormously, it causes significant complications, including gut and hepatic dysfunction. Current models use animal tethering which is unlike ambulatory human TPN delivery and is cost prohibitive. We ...

  19. Role of carbonic anhydrase in bone - Partial inhibition of disuse atrophy of bone by parenteral acetazolamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    The effectiveness of orally and subcutaneously administered acetazolamide sodium in preventing denervation-induced bone loss in rats is examined. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with acetazolamide either orally by incorporation of 0.2, 0.5, or 1.5 percent concentrations in their diet for 15 days, or subcutaneously by either injection of 0.5 ml/rat of a solution containing either 20 or 100 mg/ml of the drug twice daily for 15 days or by continuous infusion of 5, 50, 500, or 1000 mg/ml of acetazolamide sodium for 8 days using an osmotic minipump. The effects of acetazolamide on body weight, food consumption, and plasma calcium content are evaluated. It is observed that parenteral administration is equally effective as oral administration in partially preventing denervation-induced bone mass changes. The data reveal that approximately 50 percent protection occurs with daily doses of 1094, 129, and 8 mg/kg body weight for the oral, subcutaneous injection, and subcutaneous infusion methods, respectively.

  20. Parenteral nutrition-induced hepatobiliary dysfunction in infants and prepubertal rabbits.

    PubMed

    Loff, S; Kränzlin, B; Moghadam, M; Dzakovic, A; Wessel, L; Back, W; Hosie, S; Wirth, H; Waag, K L

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed clinical, biochemical, and histo- logic parameters of ten infants with parenteral nutrition-induced hepatobiliary dysfunction. The data were compared with the results of a rabbit model. All infants were born prematurely with low birth weight. Their clinical diagnoses were necrotizing enterocolitis (6), gastroschisis (1), intrauterine volvulus (1), and lung hypoplasia (2). All required total (TPN) or partial parenteral nutrition for at least 8 weeks. All had repeated episodes of infections or sepsis. A rise in bilirubin and aminotransferase levels occurred after a minimum of 5 weeks; peak bilirubin levels ranged from 4 to 14 mg% and aminotransferases from 40 to 140 IU/l. One child later developed gallstones. Liver biopsies after 1 to 24 months showed fibrosis, bile-duct proliferation, cholestasis, and hydropic degeneration. All of the above-mentioned clinical factors have been accused of causing the observed biochemical and histologic changes. In our rabbit model we were able to produce almost identical symptoms by TPN alone: gallbladder distension, sludge, and stones developed after 1-4 weeks of TPN as well as uncharacteristic changes in aminotransferases and bilirubin after 4 weeks. Liver histology revealed severe hydropic degeneration of zone 3 as early as 1 week after beginning TPN. A rise of fibrosis and bile-duct proliferation after 1 to 4 weeks of infusion was statistically significant. Cholestasis, as was observed in the infants, could not be detected. In our model, all alterations observed could be attributed exclusively to TPN. We therefore assume that TPN was the true cause of the dysfunction. In a second experimental series infusions were reduced to 80% PN and free access to lab chow. These animals produced normal feces, indicating physiologic enteral stimulation. They developed the same degenerative and proliferative histologic changes, whereas gallbladder distension, sludge, and stones were not noted. We conclude that: (1) The TPN solution

  1. Parenteral nutrition product shortages: the A.S.P.E.N. strategy.

    PubMed

    Mirtallo, Jay M; Holcombe, Beverly; Kochevar, Marty; Guenter, Peggi

    2012-06-01

    Product (drug) shortages have had a significant impact on the healthcare system, particularly on patients and clinicians. This has been especially true with patients requiring parenteral nutrition (PN). The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) has dealt with PN product shortages in the past on behalf of its members and their patients. However, the shortage severity and duration have made dealing with the PN product shortages in 2010-2012 extremely challenging.

  2. Parenteral buprenorphine-naloxone abuse is a major cause of fatal buprenorphine-related poisoning.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Margareeta; Heikman, Pertti; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2013-10-10

    Buprenorphine (BPN) medication for opioid maintenance treatment in Finland consists predominantly of buprenorphine-naloxone (BNX). Both BPN and BNX are associated with diversion, abuse and non-medically supervised use worldwide. Our purpose was to estimate the proportion of BNX to all BPN-related fatalities. The material consisted of 225 deceased drug abusers in Finland from January 2010 to June 2011 with a positive BPN and/or norbuprenorphine (NOR) and/or naloxone (NX) finding in urine. The data were divided into three groups based on the urine NX and BPN concentrations. The "Parenteral BNX" group (>100 μg/l NX) was presumed to consist of injecting or snorting BNX abusers and the "Parenteral BPN" group (>50 μg/l BPN, 0 μg/l NX) of injecting or snorting BPN abusers, while the "Other BNX or BPN" group (≤100 μg/l NX, or ≤50 μg/l BPN combined with 0 μg/l NX) was presumed to consist of mainly sublingual BNX or BPN users. In 12.4% of cases the NX urine concentration was higher than the threshold 100 μg/l. In fatal BPN poisonings, the proportion of parenteral BNX was 28.4%. In the "Parenteral BNX", "Parenteral BPN" and "Other BNX or BPN" groups, the proportion of fatal BPN poisonings was 67.9, 31.0 and 22.6%, respectively. BNX abuse can be fatal. Among the 225 BPN-related fatalities, parenteral abuse of BNX was shown to be common (12.4%) and BNX poisoning was the underlying cause of death in 8.4%. Parenteral BNX caused fatal BPN poisoning proportionally more often than parenteral BPN.

  3. Home parenteral nutrition in management of patients with severe radiation enteritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lavery, I.C.; Steiger, E.; Fazio, V.W.

    1980-03-01

    Five patients who would have been unable to survive because of intestinal complications of radiation therapy were able to lead an otherwise normal life with the use of parenteral nutrition administered at home. One patient died of recurrent carcinoma of the cervix after 14 months. Another patient died as the result of a totally avoidable pharmaceutical error after 2 1/2 years. The remaining three are still disease free without morbidity relating to the parenteral nutrition.

  4. An advanced protocol-driven transition from parenteral prostanoids to inhaled trepostinil in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Manyoo; Rischard, Franz; De Marco, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) often require parenteral prostanoids to improve symptoms and signs of PAH. Complications of parenteral prostanoids—such as catheter-related infections and intolerable adverse effects—may develop, prompting transition to inhaled prostanoids. We report a prospective, protocol-driven transition from parenteral prostanoids to inhaled prostanoids with monitoring of exercise gas exchange and acute hemodynamics. Three PAH centers recruited patients transitioning from parenteral prostanoids to inhaled trepostinil. Rigid inclusion criteria were used, including parenteral prostanoid dose < 30 ng/kg/min, New York Heart Association functional class (FC) < 3, and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) < 6 Wood units. Of the 9 patients meeting initial inclusion criteria, 3 were excluded. In the remaining patients, the parenteral prostanoid was reduced and the inhaled prostanoid was increased over 24–36 hours with continuous hemodynamic monitoring. Exercise capacity and FC were measured at baseline and weeks 1, 4, and 12. All patients were successfully weaned from parenteral prostanoids. An acute PVR decrease was seen with most inhaled prostanoid doses, but PVR varied throughout the transition. Patients tolerated inhaled prostanoids for 9–12 breaths 4 times a day with no treatment-limiting adverse events. At week 12, FC was unchanged, and all patients continued to receive inhaled prostanoids without serious adverse events or additional PAH therapy. In 5 of 6 patients, 6-minute walk distance and peak V˙O2 were within 10% of baseline. Using a strict transition protocol and rigid patient selection criteria, the parenteral prostanoid to inhaled prostanoid transition appeared safe and well tolerated and did not result in clinical deterioration over 12 weeks. Hemodynamic variability noted acutely during transition in our study did not adversely affect successful transition. (Trial registration: Clinical

  5. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly

  6. Herbal Products and Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... of dietary supplement that contains one or more herbs.Herbal health products and supplements are available in ... wort.Are herbal health products and supplements safe?Herbs aren't necessarily safer than the ingredients in ...

  7. Parenteral iron therapy: a single institution's experience over a 5-year period.

    PubMed

    Laman, Christopher A; Silverstein, Scott B; Rodgers, George M

    2005-11-01

    Many patients require parenteral iron therapy for optimal correction of anemia, including cancer patients who require erythropoietic drugs. Available parenteral iron therapy options include iron dextran, iron gluconate, and iron sucrose. The purpose of this study is to summarize our institution's experience with parenteral iron therapy over a 5-year period, with a focus on comparative safety profiles. All patients receiving parenteral iron therapy over this period were included in the analysis. Chi-squared test and Fisher's exact test were used to compare the adverse event rates of each product. A total of 121 patients received 444 infusions of parenteral iron over this period. Iron dextran was the most commonly used product (85 patients) and iron sucrose was the least used (2 patients). Iron gluconate was used by 34 patients. Overall adverse event rates per patient with iron dextran and iron gluconate were 16.5% and 5.8%, respectively (P = .024). Premedication with diphenhydramine and acetaminophen before infusions of iron dextran reduced adverse event rates per infusion from 12.3% to 4.4% (P = .054). Test doses of iron dextran were used 88% of the time for initial infusions of iron dextran. All adverse events for all parenteral iron products were mild or moderate. There were no serious adverse events and no anaphylaxis was observed. Our results suggest that, if test doses and premedications are used, iron dextran is an acceptable product to treat iron deficiency.

  8. Fermentation of deproteinized cheese whey powder solutions to ethanol by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae: effect of supplementation with corn steep liquor and repeated-batch operation with biomass recycling by flocculation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Carina; Guimarães, Pedro M R; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2010-09-01

    The lactose in cheese whey is an interesting substrate for the production of bulk commodities such as bio-ethanol, due to the large amounts of whey surplus generated globally. In this work, we studied the performance of a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing the lactose permease and intracellular beta-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis in fermentations of deproteinized concentrated cheese whey powder solutions. Supplementation with 10 g/l of corn steep liquor significantly enhanced whey fermentation, resulting in the production of 7.4% (v/v) ethanol from 150 g/l initial lactose in shake-flask fermentations, with a corresponding productivity of 1.2 g/l/h. The flocculation capacity of the yeast strain enabled stable operation of a repeated-batch process in a 5.5-l air-lift bioreactor, with simple biomass recycling by sedimentation of the yeast flocs. During five consecutive batches, the average ethanol productivity was 0.65 g/l/h and ethanol accumulated up to 8% (v/v) with lactose-to-ethanol conversion yields over 80% of theoretical. Yeast viability (>97%) and plasmid retention (>84%) remained high throughout the operation, demonstrating the stability and robustness of the strain. In addition, the easy and inexpensive recycle of the yeast biomass for repeated utilization makes this process economically attractive for industrial implementation.

  9. Fish oil-based lipid emulsion: current updates on a promising novel therapy for the management of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Gohel, Tushar; Deen, Omer J.; DeChicco, Robert; Shatnawei, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal failure is characterized by loss of enteral function to absorb necessary nutrients and water to sustain life. Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a lifesaving therapeutic modality for patients with intestinal failure. Lifelong PN is also needed for patients who have short bowel syndrome due to extensive resection or a dysmotility disorder with malabsorption. However, prolonged PN is associated with short-term and long-term complications. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is one of the long-term complications associated with the use of an intravenous lipid emulsion to prevent essential fatty acid deficiency in these patients. PNALD affects 30–60% of the adult population on long-term PN. Further, PNALD is one of the indications for isolated liver or combined liver and intestinal transplantation. There is no consensus on how to manage PNALD, but fish oil-based lipid emulsion (FOBLE) has been suggested to play an important role both in its prevention and reversal. There is significant improvement in liver function in those who received FOBLE as lipid supplement compared with those who received soy-based lipid emulsion. Studies have also demonstrated that FOBLE reverses hepatic steatosis and reduces markers of inflammation in patients on long-term PN. Future prospective studies with larger sample sizes are needed to further strengthen the positive role of FOBLE in PNALD. PMID:25858884

  10. Aggressive parenteral nutrition and growth velocity in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Ribed Sánchez, Almudena; Romero Jiménez, Rosa Ma; Sánchez Gómez de Orgaz, Ma Carmen; Sánchez Luna, Manuel; Sanjurjo Sáez, María

    2013-11-01

    Introducción: La administración parenteral de nutrientes para mantener el crecimiento en recién nacidos representa un importante reto terapéutico. Objetivo: Describir las prácticas de nutrición parenteral (NP) en un hospital de tercer nivel y evaluar el crecimiento postnatal en recién nacidos prematuros. Material y métodos: Estudio observacional retrospectivo de 3 meses de duración. Se incluyeron niños ingresados en el Servicio de Neonatología que iniciaron NP. Se recogieron datos demográficos, antropométricos, calorías diarias, ingesta de proteínas y componentes de la NP. La velocidad de crecimiento se midió mediante la media de la ganancia diaria de peso y se comparó con el crecimiento intrauterino. Resultados: 68 niños prematuros iniciaron NP durante el período de estudio. La mayoría de los niños (65%) nacieron por cesárea y la media de edad gestacional fue de 33 semanas. El 25% de los recién nacidos no recuperó el peso de nacimiento. El 75% restante recuperó el peso de nacimiento en el tercer día de NP y la media de la ganancia diaria de peso fue de 16 g/kg/d, con un rango de 12 a 22g/kg/d. A pesar de que la ganancia de peso se acercó a la tasa intrauterina, la mayoría de los niños nacidos con menos de 30 semanas de gestación no lograron la media de la población de referencia. La NP precoz e intensiva se administró con una media de 3, 11 y 3g/Kg/d de proteínas, hidratos de carbono y lípidos, respectivamente, alcanzando un máximo en el cuarto día de 4, 18, 4 g/kg/d, respectivamente. Discusión: La NP intensiva se utiliza en el ámbito hospitalario. Los recién nacidos prematuros alcanzaron antes el peso de nacimiento y presentaron una velocidad de crecimiento mayor que en otros estudios y similar al crecimiento intrauterino.

  11. The efficiency of fractionated parenteral iron treatment in CAPD patients.

    PubMed

    Akcicek, F; Ozkahya, M; Cirit, M; Ok, E; Unsal, A; Toz, H; Celik, A; Atabay, G; Basci, A

    1997-01-01

    Some chronic renal failure patients respond poorly to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). In continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, such a poor response may indicate inadequate dialysis or low body iron stores. To correct iron deficiency, once-a-week intravenous iron supplementation is recommended. However, hemodialysis patients receive iron supplements three times a week. This study was designed to compare the efficacy of iron supplementation between once-weekly and twice-weekly regimens. In both groups, rHuEPO doses were similar. Seventeen CAPD patients were studied. All had hemoglobin levels less than 10 g/dL. Ten patients were given 100 mg intravenous iron once weekly, and 7 were given 50 mg intravenous iron twice weekly until a total iron dose of 600 mg was achieved (stage I). The patients were crossed over to receive another 600 mg iron (stage II). Hematocrit increased significantly in patients receiving twice-a-week iron supplementation (+3.8% and 6%) compared to those receiving once-a-week iron supplementation (+1.3% and 1.4%) during stages I and II. The ferritin levels were not different between the groups. In conclusion, rHuEPO is more effective when administered with intravenous iron.

  12. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): gastrointestinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Álvarez, C; Zabarte Martínez de Aguirre, M; Bordejé Laguna, L

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal surgery and critical illness place tremendous stress on the body, resulting in a series of metabolic changes that may lead to severe malnutrition, which in turn can increase postsurgical complications and morbidity and mortality and prolong the hospital length of stay. In these patients, parenteral nutrition is the most widely used form of nutritional support, but administration of enteral nutrition early in the postoperative period is effective and well tolerated, reducing infectious complications, improving wound healing and reducing length of hospital stay. Calorie-protein requirements do not differ from those in other critically-ill patients and depend on the patient's underlying process and degree of metabolic stress. In patients intolerant to enteral nutrition, especially if the intolerance is due to increased gastric residual volume, prokinetic agents can be used to optimize calorie intake. When proximal sutures are used, tubes allowing early jejunal feeding should be used. Pharmaconutrition is indicated in these patients, who benefit from enteral administration of arginine, omega 3 and RNA, as well as parenteral glutamine supplementation. Parenteral nutrition should be started in patients with absolute contraindication for use of the gastrointestinal tract or as complementary nutrition if adequate energy intake is not achieved through the enteral route.

  13. Nucleic acid labeling with ( sup 3 H)orotic acid and nucleotide profile in rats in protein deprivation, enteral and parenteral essential amino acid administration, and 5-fluorouracil treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsson, B.; el Hag, I.A.; Andersson, M.; Christensson, P.I.; Stenram, U. )

    1990-09-01

    Rats were fed a 0% casein diet for 1 week, with or without enteral or parenteral administration of essential amino acids, or a 25% casein diet, in one group supplemented with 5-fluorouracil treatment. Ninety minutes before sacrifice the rats were given a tracer of (3H)orotic acid. Incorporation into the acid soluble fraction, RNA, and DNA was determined in liver, small intestine, bone marrow, and kidney. Nucleotide profile was examined in liver and intestine. Protein deficiency caused inter alia a decrease in body weight; a decrease in RNA/DNA ratio and an increase in the specific RNA labeling in liver and kidney; an altered nucleotide profile in the liver; an increase in the nucleotide/DNA and RNA/DNA ratios and a decrease in the specific labeling of the acid soluble fraction, RNA, and DNA in the bone marrow. These changes were prevented to the same extent by giving essential amino acids, either orally or intravenously. The minor changes in intestinal nucleotide profile in protein deprivation were prevented to a slightly larger extent by amino acids orally than parenterally. 5-Fluorouracil treatment gave a decrease in the RNA/DNA ratio in the liver and kidney but an increase in the nucleotide/DNA and RNA/DNA ratios in the bone marrow. Nucleotide profiles were unaltered. The amount of DNA per gram of tissue decreased in bone marrow and increased in kidney. Parenteral administration per se resulted in almost no changes.

  14. Root cause evaluation of particulates in the lyophilized indomethacin sodium trihydrate plug for parenteral administration.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Akhtar; Rahman, Ziyaur; Khan, Saeed R; Awotwe-Otoo, David; Khan, Mansoor A

    2014-10-01

    Particulate growth in parenteral product frequently results in product recalls causing drug shortages. While this is mostly attributed to quality issues in a firm, particulates growth could also be due to inadequate product, process, or environmental understanding. Therefore, the objective of this study was to use indomethacin sodium trihydrate (drug) as a model drug for lyophilization and evaluates short-term stability with respect to particulate growth at different storage temperatures. Under aseptic condition, each vial filled with filtered drug solution was lyophilized, and stoppered in LyoStar3. Crimped vials were kept at 5°C, 15°C, 25°C, 25°C/60%RH, and 40°C/75%RH. At predefined time interval, samples were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), thermal, and spectroscopic method. Lyophilized formulation showed four thermal events: 60-90°C demonstrating glass transition, 110-160°C showing recrystallization exotherm,170-220°C exhibiting endotherm of potential polymorph, and 250°C showing melting endotherm. XRPD of the lyophilized powder demonstrated peak at 2 θ 11.10. Spectroscopic studies of lyophilized powder indicated alteration in symmetric and asymmetric carboxylate peaks over time indicating initiation of crystallization and crystal growth. Reconstitution studies indicated higher reconstitution time after six weeks for sample stored at 40°C/75%RH. Furthermore, reconstituted solution showed presence of particulates after 8 weeks storage. These studies suggest that particulate growth can stem from poorly developed formulation and not necessarily due to frequently ascribed filtration issues.

  15. Refeeding syndrome: screening, incidence, and treatment during parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Russell S

    2013-12-01

    The possible deleterious effects of feeding after a period of prolonged starvation have been known for over 60 years. The resultant biochemical disturbance, symptoms, and signs have been termed the refeeding syndrome (RS). The key to the pathophysiology is the stimulation of insulin release resulting in anabolic activity. Depleted electrolyte and micronutrient stores are overwhelmed and cellular function disrupted. A concise definition of RS is not agreed and hampers interpretation of clinical data. Hypophosphatemia and appearance of tissue edema/pathological fluid shifts are the most often agreed diagnostic criteria. The characteristics of particular patient groups at risk have been recognized for some time, and there are guidelines from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence in the UK to aid recognition of individuals at high risk along with protocols for initiating nutrition. Using loose diagnostic criteria, RS appears to occur in 4% of cases of parenteral nutrition (PN) when case records were reviewed by experts in a large study into PN care in the UK. Disappointingly, prescribers recognized only 50% of at risk cases. Early data from a similar study in New Zealand appear to show a similar pattern. Prospective series looking at patients receiving nutrition support in institutions with Nutrition Support Teams have found an incidence of 1-5%. RS is still underrecognized. Patients receiving PN should be counted as being in a high-risk category and feeding protocols to avoid RS applied. Low rates of RS then occur and death from this cause be avoided.

  16. Fundamental understanding of drug absorption from a parenteral oil depot.

    PubMed

    Kalicharan, Raween W; Schot, Peter; Vromans, Herman

    2016-02-15

    Oil depots are parenteral drug formulations meant for sustained release of lipophilic compounds. Until now, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of drug absorption from oil depots is lacking. The aim of this paper was to fill this gap. A clinical study with healthy volunteers was conducted. An oil depot with nandrolone decanoate and benzyl alcohol was subcutaneously administered in the upper arm of female volunteers. Pharmacokinetic profiles of both substances were related to each other and to literature data. Benzyl alcohol absorbs much more rapidly than nandrolone. In detail, it appears that benzyl alcohol enters the central compartment directly, while nandrolone decanoate is recovered in serum after a lag time. This lag time is also seen in literature data, although not reported explicitly. The absorption of nandrolone is enhanced by the presence of benzyl alcohol. This is most likely an effect of altered oil viscosity and partition coefficient between the oil and aqueous phase. The absorption rate constant of compounds is found to be related to the logP of the solubilized prodrug. The absorption rate is however not only determined by the physico-chemical properties of the formulation but also by the tissue properties. Here, it is argued that lymphatic flow must be considered as a relevant parameter.

  17. Home Parenteral Nutrition: Fat Emulsions and Potential Complications.

    PubMed

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Salonen, Bradley R; Bonnes, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Since the first intravenous nutrition support attempt with olive oil in the 17th century, intravenous fat emulsions (IVFEs) have evolved to become an integral component in the management of patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). IVFEs serve as a calorie source and provide essential fatty acids (linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid) in patients unable to achieve adequate intake of these fatty acids through alternative means. However, IVFE use is also associated with multiple complications, including increased infection risk, liver disease, and systemic proinflammatory states. In the United States, most IVFEs are composed of 100% soybean oil; internationally multiple alternative IVFEs (using fish oil, olive oil, and long- and medium-chain triglycerides) are available or being developed. The hope is that these IVFEs will prevent, or decrease the risk of, some of the HPN-associated complications. The goal of this article is to review how IVFEs came into use, their composition and metabolism, options for IVFE delivery in HPN, benefits and risks of IVFE use, and strategies to minimize the risks associated with IVFE use in HPN patients.

  18. Innovative Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Therapy for Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hau D.; Fallon, Erica M.; de Meijer, Vincent E.; Malkan, Alpin D.; Puder, Mark; Gura, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Children with intestinal failure suffer from insufficient intestinal length or function, making them dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) for growth and survival. PN and its components are associated with many complications ranging from simple electrolyte abnormalities to life-threatening PN-associated liver disease, which is also called intestinal failure-associated liver disease (ILALD). From a nutrition perspective, the ultimate goal is to provide adequate caloric requirements and make the transition from PN to full enteral Nutrition (EN) successful. Upon review of the literature, we have summarized the most effective and innovative PN and EN therapies for this patient population. Antibiotic-coated catheters and antibiotic or ethanol locks can be implemented, as they appear effective in reducing catheter-related infection and thus further reduce the risk of IFALD. Lipid emulsions should be given judiciously. The use of an omega-3 fatty acid-based formulation should be considered in patients who develop IFALD. Trophic feeding is important for intestinal adaptation, and EN should be initiated early to help wean patients from PN. Long term management of children with IF continues to be an emerging field. We have entered uncharted territory as more children survive complications of IF, including IFALD. Careful monitoring and individualized management to ensure maintenance of growth with avoidance of complications are the keys to successful patient outcomes. PMID:20123271

  19. Should pediatric parenteral nutrition be individualized?☆

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Renata Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento; Nogueira, Roberto José Negrão; Saron, Margareth Lopes Galvão; Lima, Alexandre Esteves Souza; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations are commonly individualized, since their standardization appears inadequate for the pediatric population. This study aimed to evaluate the nutritional state and the reasons for PN individualization in pediatric patients using PN, hospitalized in a tertiary hospital in Campinas, São Paulo. METHODS: This longitudinal study comprised patients using PN followed by up to 67 days. Nutritional status was classified according to the criteria established by the World Health Organization (WHO) (2006) and WHO (2007). The levels of the following elements in blood were analyzed: sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, chloride, magnesium, inorganic phosphorus, and triglycerides (TGL). Among the criteria for individualization, the following were considered undeniable: significant reduction in blood levels of potassium (<3mEq/L), sodium (<125mEq/L), magnesium (<1mEq/L), phosphorus (<1.5mEq/L), ionic calcium (<1mmol), and chloride (<90mEq/L), or any value above the references. RESULTS: Twelve pediatric patients aged 1 month to 15 years were studied (49 individualizations). Most patients were classified as malnourished. It was observed that 74/254 (29.2%) of examinations demanded individualized PN for indubitable reasons. CONCLUSION: The nutritional state of patients was considered critical in most cases. Thus, the individualization performed in the beginning of PN for energy protein adequacy was indispensable. In addition, the individualized PN was indispensable in at least 29.2% of PN for correction of alterations found in biochemical parameters. PMID:25510996

  20. Nutritional intake of gut failure patients on home parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    DiCecco, S.; Nelson, J.; Burnes, J.; Fleming, C.R.

    1987-11-01

    Nutrient intake patterns were analyzed in 23 patients with gut failure who were receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). All patients had stable weights without changes in intravenous calories or protein for 3 consecutive months. Our objectives were to assess oral intake of calories, carbohydrates, fat, and protein, to examine relationships between oral nutrient intakes and disease categories, and to compare oral and intravenous intakes to calculated resting energy expenditure (REE). Two patterns of oral nutrient intake were identified among the patients. Patients with short bowel syndrome, regardless of the underlying disease, consumed calories by mouth that clearly exceeded calculated resting energy expenditure (short bowel, non-Crohn's, 170% of REE; short bowel, Crohn's, 200 of REE); however, calories approximating the REE had to be given via HPN, suggesting that efficiency of absorption was at a very low level. Patients with diffuse gut diseases (radiation enteritis or pseudo-obstruction syndromes) had very low intakes of oral nutrients. The distribution of oral calories among carbohydrate, protein, and fat did not differ among the disease categories.

  1. Parenteral iron therapy in the anaemia of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bentley, D P; Williams, P

    1982-05-01

    Thirty anaemic patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were each given 800 mg of iron , as iron dextran, intramuscularly over an interval of four weeks. The haemoglobin concentration rose significantly within two months in 26 of the patients but this was followed by a significant fall to the pre-treatment level nine months after treatment. The response to iron therapy was not related to the initial haemoglobin concentration, serum iron concentration, transferrin saturation nor to the amount of storage iron, whether assessed by bone marrow stainable iron or the serum ferritin concentration. There was an unexpected fall in the serum ferritin concentration within the first two months after treatment in half of the patients and this was followed by a rise towards the pre-treatment level during the following seven months, such that there was no apparent addition to the amount of storage iron over the period of the study. The possible mechanisms for these findings are discussed. A response to parenteral iron therapy in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis should not be regarded as evidence of iron deficiency and only by correction of the underlying inflammatory process will lasting improvement in the anaemia be obtained.

  2. Parenteral Lipid Tolerance and Adverse Effects: Fat Chance for Trouble?

    PubMed

    Wanten, Geert J A

    2015-09-01

    Lipid emulsions (LEs) are indispensable sources of fuel calories and (essential) fatty acids (FAs) in modern parenteral nutrition formulations. The use of LE, however, also remains associated with the development of adverse effects. Intolerance for LE mostly becomes apparent upon the development of patient complaints or disturbed blood function tests, mainly of the liver. These issues may be associated with the composition, stability, or the infusion rate of the emulsion. Also, altered balances of (anti)oxidants or the presence or absence of protective or toxic bioactive agents such as phytosterols and tocopherol in LE may lead to complications, especially in already vulnerable patients with an inflammatory condition. While the oldest available LEs are based on pure soybean oil (SO-LE), rich in the proinflammatory ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid, more recent next-generation LEs where alternative FA sources such as olive and fish oil (partially) replace soybean oil to lower the content of linoleic acid seem safe and effective. Especially LEs containing fish oil (FO-LE) have less proinflammatory characteristics that promise to convey beneficial effects on immune system and organ functions, although much of the available evidence awaits more robust clinical validation.

  3. Hematologic disorders in trauma patients during parenteral alimentation with lipids.

    PubMed

    Faintuch, J; Machado, F K; Freire, A N; Reis, J R; Machado, M; Pinto, L P; Ramos, S M; Loebens, M; Jovchelevich, V; Pinotti, H W

    1996-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition with lipids is a well-accepted modality of metabolic support in seriously ill trauma patients. Intolerance to lipid administration is unusual when dosage limits are not exceeded, and few hematologic disturbances have been recorded with modern fat emulsions. In the course of intravenous alimentation of six adults admitted for traumatic lesions, eosinophilia with or without leukocytopenia was noticed after periods of four days to five weeks. Principal clinical events and hematologic derangements were documented in this population. Sepsis was not always present in the patients by the time of the complication, and in those that did require antibiotics and other drugs, the prescription remained unchanged along the episode. Discontinuation of the nutritional regimen with lipids was followed by normalization of the hematologic profile, suggesting that an acute or sub-acute allergic reaction was responsible. The appearance of skin rash in two occasions reinforces this hypothesis, and the possibility of hemophagocytosis merits consideration in two of the cases who displayed reversible acute leukocytopenia. It is concluded that blood cell aberrations are possible during intravenous feeding with lipids in trauma subjects, but tend to respond to suppression of the lipid-containing nutritional prescription.

  4. Fatty Acids as Therapeutic Auxiliaries for Oral and Parenteral Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Michael J.; Zaro, Jennica L.; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Guley, Patrick C.; Cho, Moo J.

    2012-01-01

    Many drugs have decreased therapeutic activity due to issues with absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion. The co-formulation or covalent attachment of drugs with fatty acids has demonstrated some capacity to overcome these issues by improving intestinal permeability, slowing clearance and binding serum proteins for selective tissue uptake and metabolism. For orally administered drugs, albeit at low level of availability, the presence of fatty acids and triglycerides in the intestinal lumen may promote intestinal uptake of small hydrophilic molecules. Small lipophilic drugs or acylated hydrophilic drugs also show increased lymphatic uptake and enhanced passive diffusional uptake. Fatty acid conjugation of small and large proteins or peptides have exhibited protracted plasma half-lives, site-specific delivery and sustained release upon parenteral administration. These improvements are most likely due to associations with lipid-binding serum proteins, namely albumin, LDL and HDL. These molecular interactions, although not fully characterized, could provide the ability of using the endogenous carrier systems for improving therapeutic outcomes. PMID:22921839

  5. L-carnitine supplementation in childhood epilepsy: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    De Vivo, D C; Bohan, T P; Coulter, D L; Dreifuss, F E; Greenwood, R S; Nordli, D R; Shields, W D; Stafstrom, C E; Tein, I

    1998-11-01

    In November 1996, a panel of pediatric neurologists met to update the consensus statement issued in 1989 by a panel of neurologists and metabolic experts on L-carnitine supplementation in childhood epilepsy. The panelists agreed that intravenous L-carnitine supplementation is clearly indicated for valproate (VPA)-induced hepatotoxicity, overdose, and other acute metabolic crises associated with carnitine deficiency. Oral supplementation is clearly indicated for the primary plasmalemmal carnitine transporter defect. The panelists concurred that oral L-carnitine supplementation is strongly suggested for the following groups as well: patients with certain secondary carnitine-deficiency syndromes, symptomatic VPA-associated hyperammonemia, multiple risk factors for VPA hepatotoxicity, or renal-associated syndromes; infants and young children taking VPA; patients with epilepsy using the ketogenic diet who have hypocarnitinemia; patients receiving dialysis; and premature infants who are receiving total parenteral nutrition. The panel recommended an oral L-carnitine dosage of 100 mg/kg/day, up to a maximum of 2 g/day. Intravenous supplementation for medical emergency situations usually exceeds this recommended dosage.

  6. Vitamin E in new-generation lipid emulsions protects against parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in parenteral nutrition-fed preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) in preterm infants leads to PN-associated liver disease (PNALD). PNALD has been linked to serum accumulation of phytosterols that are abundant in plant oil but absent in fish oil emulsions. Whether modifying the phytosterol and vitamin E composition of soy and fish oil lipi...

  7. The use of parenteral nutrition for the management of PKU patient undergoing chemotherapy for lymphoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Salvarinova-Zivkovic, R; Hartnett, C; Sinclair, G; Dix, D; Horvath, G; Lillquist, Y; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, S

    2012-04-01

    The metabolic control of phenylalanine levels is a challenge during illness. We present the metabolic management of a 6 year old boy with classical PKU who was diagnosed with stage III intraabdominal Burkit's lymphoma and underwent surgical resection and chemotherapy. The metabolic control during chemotherapy was achieved by the use of parenteral custom made amino acid solution and pro-active adjustment of intake. From the 94 obtained plasma phenylalanine (Phe) levels, 18.4% were above our clinic's recommended upper limit (360 μmol/L, 6 mg/dL) while 52.7% of Phe levels were below the recommended lower limit (120 μmol/L, 2 mg/dL). Phe levels above recommended range were associated with low caloric/protein intake, while levels below recommended range reflected the difficulty in achieving the full prescribed Phe intake. We recommend early institution of custom made amino acid solution with maximum amino acid content and caloric intake to provide optimal phenylalanine control. Administration of phenylalanine via regular intravenous amino acid solution may assist in avoiding low Phe levels when prescribed intake is compromised due to vomiting and other disease related illnesses. Use of custom made, phenylalanine free amino acid solution proved beneficial in the management of blood phenylalanine levels in a PKU patient during chemotherapy for Burkitt lymphoma.

  8. Parenteral nutrition support: Beyond gut feeling? Quality control study of parenteral nutrition practices in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Shankar, Bhuvaneshwari; Ranganathan, Lakshmi; Daphnee, D. K.; Bharadwaj, Adithya; Venkataraman, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteral nutrition (EN) is preferred over parenteral nutrition (PN) in hospitalized patients based on International consensus guidelines. Practice patterns of PN in developing countries have not been documented. Objectives: To assess practice pattern and quality of PN support in a tertiary hospital setting in Chennai, India. Methods: Retrospective record review of patients admitted between February 2010 and February 2012. Results: About 351,008 patients were admitted to the hospital in the study period of whom 29,484 (8.4%) required nutritional support. About 70 patients (0.24%) received PN, of whom 54 (0.18%) received PN for at least three days. Common indications for PN were major gastrointestinal surgery (55.6%), intolerance to EN (25.9%), pancreatitis (5.6%), and gastrointestinal obstruction (3.7%). Conclusions: The proportion of patients receiving PN was very low. Quality issues were identified relating to appropriateness of indication and calories and proteins delivered. This study helps to introspect and improve the quality of nutrition support. PMID:26955215

  9. [Enteral nutrition in the therapy of gastrointestinal diseases (according to materials of the European Association of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition)].

    PubMed

    Osina, V A; Kuz'mina, T N

    2007-01-01

    The present article gives evidence-based recommendations for the indication, application and type of formula of enteral nutrition (EN) (oral nutrition supplements (ONS) or tube feeding (TF)) in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), short bowel syndrome (SBS), acute and chronic pancreatitis, alcoholic steatogepatitis and cirrosis. ONS and/or TF in addition to normal food is indicates in undernourished patients with CD or UC to improve nutritional status. In active CD EN is the first line therapy in children and should be used as sole therapy in adults mainly when treatment with corticosteroids is not feasible. No significant differences have been shown in the effects of free amino acid, peptide-based and hole protein formulae for TF. In remission ONS is recommended only in steroid dependent patients in CD. In patients with SBS TF should be introduced in the adaptation phase and should be changed with progressing adaptation to ONS in addition to normal food. Special nutrition support should not be used routinely in patients with mild or moderate acute pancreatitis. EN is the preffered route in patients with pancreatitis and should be attempted before initiating parenteral nutrition. Nutrition assessment in patients with liver disease should include screening for micronutrient deficiencies. Protein restriction should be implemented for the acute management of hepatic encephalopathy and should not be implemented chronically in patients with liver disease.

  10. Accelerated in vitro release testing methods for extended release parenteral dosage forms

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in vitro drug release testing of extended release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in situ depot-forming systems, and implants. Key findings Extended release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, “real-time” in vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Conclusions Accelerated in vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable, however for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. PMID:22686344

  11. Effect of the addition of beta-mercaptoethanol to a thawing solution supplemented with caffeine on the function of frozen-thawed boar sperm and on the fertility of sows after artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Funahashi, H

    2012-03-15

    We have reported that artificial insemination (AI) with frozen-thawed boar semen supplemented with caffeine increased the number of uterine sperm by inhibiting the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) into the uterine lumen, thereby improving the fertility of gilts and sows. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of the addition of the antioxidant beta-mercaptoethanol (bME) and caffeine to the thawing solution on the function of frozen-thawed sperm, on the phagocytic activity of PMNs for sperm, and on the fertility of sows after AI. When frozen-thawed sperm were cultured in the presence of 25 or 50 μm bME, sperm capacitation and spontaneous acrosome reactions were inhibited (P < 0.01). There was no effect of bME on phagocytic activity of PMNs for sperm in vitro. When hormonally treated (400 IU of equine chorionic gonadotropin + 200 IU of human chorionic gonadotropin) weaned sows experienced a single intrauterine insemination with frozen-thawed sperm (25 × 10(8) sperm per 50 ml dose) 40 h after subsequent hCG administration, pregnancy and farrowing rates were unaffected by the addition of 50 μm bME (pregnancy rate, 20 vs 21% in controls; farrowing rate, 20 vs 21%; n = 15 and 14, respectively). However, litter size tended to be higher than in the presence of 50 μm bME compared to its absence (10.0 ± 1.0 vs 5.7 ± 1.5, respectively; P < 0.07). Thus, the addition of bME to the thawing solution containing caffeine could be of benefit for improving the function of frozen-thawed sperm without influencing the phagocytic activity of PMNs for sperm. Although there were no statistically significant effects of bME on pregnancy or farrowing rates, the litter size tended to be higher in the sows subjected to a fixed-time single AI treatment with synchronized ovulation.

  12. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel “myths” about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of “near zero” PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting “near zero” catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of “near zero” PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition. PMID

  13. 100 patient-years of ambulatory home total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Dudrick, S J; O'Donnell, J J; Englert, D M; Matheny, R G; Blume, E R; Nutt, R E; Hickey, M S; Barroso, A O

    1984-01-01

    More than 100 patient-years' experience has been acquired in the treatment of 133 patients with ambulatory home total parenteral nutrition (TPN) between May 1974 and December 1983. Indications for chronic or permanent home TPN include short bowel syndrome, malabsorption, scleroderma, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide syndrome. Indications for acute or temporary home TPN include Crohn's disease, malignancies, gastrointestinal fistulas, ulcerative colitis, anorexia nervosa, and numerous other disorders. Eighty-two patients in the acute group were treated primarily with percutaneously placed standard subclavian catheters and 51 patients in the chronic group have been treated thus far with implanted silicone rubber, Dacron-cuffed catheters for a cumulative total of 38,939 patient days. Of the 125 implanted catheters, 115 were placed in the superior vena cava and ten in the inferior vena cava for an average duration of 250 catheter-days, the longest single catheter remaining in situ for more than 8 1/2 years. Catheter-related sepsis occurred 33 times with the implanted catheters, or once every 2.6 catheter-years. One hundred and fourteen temporary catheters were placed percutaneously in the superior vena cava via a subclavian vein for an average duration of 68 days, the longest single catheter remaining in situ for 213 days. Catheter-related sepsis occurred seven times, equivalent to one episode per 3 catheter-years. Total catheter-related complications were quite infrequent and were directly related to duration of catheterization. They included venous thrombosis (12), clotted catheter (11), catheter failure or rupture (8), catheter compression (5) and inadvertent catheter removal (4). Twenty-six catheters were repaired or spliced in situ when the external segment was accidentally damaged or deteriorated secondary to long-term material fatigue. One remarkable patient has been maintained exclusively by TPN originally as an inpatient and subsequently as an outpatient

  14. [Parenteral administration medicines: recommendations of preparation, administration and stability].

    PubMed

    Gaspar Carreño, M; Torrico Martín, F; Novajarque Sala, L; Batista Cruz, M; Ribeiro Gonçalves, P; Porta Oltra, B; Sánchez Santos, J C

    2014-11-03

    Objetivo: Elaborar unas recomendaciones de preparacion de medicamentos de administracion parenteral (MAP) para valorar la posibilidad de transferir su preparacion, desde las unidades de enfermeria en planta de hospitalizacion al servicio de farmacia (SF). Método: Se procede a elaborar una tabla de estabilidades de los medicamentos incluidos en la guia farmacoterapeutica del Hospital, aplicando la Guia USP (Pharmaceutical compounding Sterile Preparations) y la Guia de de buenas practicas de preparacion de medicamentos en los servicios de farmacia hospitalaria. Se recopilo informacion sobre las MAP: metodo de preparacion, compatibilidad, conservacion, periodo de validez, modo de administracion y tipo de envase. Los datos se obtuvieron mediante consulta de las fichas tecnicas, laboratorios, revision bibliografica y otras bases de datos. Resultados: Tras revisar 209 farmacos se elaboro un listado de recomendaciones. Segun los datos obtenidos, las MAP se prepararan de la siguiente forma: 89 seran preparadas desde el SF, 62 en unidad de enfermeria en planta de hospitalizacion pues son medicamentos que requieren administracion inmediata y 58 ya van acondicionados para su administracion por la industria. De los 62 farmacos que se prepararan por enfermeria, en 14 de ellos las dosis siguientes se prepararan desde el SF. Por lo tanto de los 209 farmacos solo 48 se prepararan exclusivamente en la unidad de enfermeria. Conclusiones: Desde el SF se ha establecido un metodo normalizado de preparacion, conservacion, administracion y periodo de validez de MAP. La preparacion de MAP en SF ampliaria su tiempo de conservacion, al tener en cuenta la estabilidad fisicoquimica, el nivel de riesgo y la vulnerabilidad del preparado a la contaminacion microbiologica. La informacion aportada contribuira a una disminucion de errores asociados al proceso de preparacion y administracion de MAP.

  15. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy in osteoarticular infections in children.

    PubMed

    Maraqa, Nizar F; Gomez, Margarita M; Rathore, Mobeen H

    2002-01-01

    There are few data on the use of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) in the management of osteoarticular infections (OAIs) in childhood. The objective of this study was to determine if OPAT is safe and effective in the management of OAIs. Using their OPAT database, the authors evaluated the use of OPAT in children younger than 18 years old treated for OAIs between January 1, 1995, and December 31, 1999. One hundred eighty-four OAIs were treated in 179 patients over 5 years. OPAT involved central venous lines (CVLs) in 110 (59.8%), peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in 71 (38.6%), and peripheral cannulas in 3 (1.6%). One hundred eighteen (64%) OPAT courses were completed without interruption. Rehospitalization occurred in 48 (26.1%) courses and occurred earlier with PICC. OPAT complications were catheter-related in 58 (30%) courses, not catheter-related in 60 (32%), and unknown in 10 (5.3%). The mechanical complication rate was 6.3 per 1,000 catheter-days (CVL 4.2, PICC 10.6), and the rate of infectious complications was 2.7 per 1,000 catheter-days (CVL 2.8, PICC 2.4). One hundred sixty-eight (98%) of 172 evaluable OAIs were cured. Four (2.2%) patients failed treatment: one had recurrence and three had persistent infection. The authors conclude that OPAT can be safely used to manage OAIs in children without compromising outcome. Mechanical complications are more common with PICCs.

  16. [Validation of cold chain during distribution of parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Tuan, Federico; Perone, Virginia; Verdini, Rocio; Pell, Maria Betina; Traverso, Maria Luz

    2015-09-01

    Objetivo: el presente estudio tiene la finalidad de demostrar la aptitud del proceso empleado para acondicionar las mezclas de nutrición parenteral extemporáneas para su distribución, considerando el objetivo de conservar la cadena de frío durante el traslado hasta que llega al paciente, necesario para asegurar la estabilidad, efectividad y seguridad de estas mezclas. Método: validación concurrente; diseño e implementación de un protocolo de evaluación del proceso de acondicionamiento y distribución de MNPE elaboradas por un laboratorio farmacéutico. Ejecución de test, según criterios de aceptación predefinidos. Se efectúa en dos oportunidades, en verano y en las rutas que requieren un tiempo de traslado más prolongado. Evaluación de la conservación de la temperatura mediante supervisión de los valores de temperatura interna de cada tipo de empaquetado, registrados por equipos data loggers calibrados. Resultados: los diferentes test cumplen con los criterios preestablecidos. Los valores obtenidos permiten asegurar el mantenimiento de la cadena de frío durante un tiempo superior al traslado hasta los puntos más distantes. Conclusiones: este estudio permite mostrar la aptitud del proceso de acondicionamiento de MNPE para su distribución, manteniendo la cadena de frío durante todo el traslado desde el Laboratorio farmacéutico hasta el paciente. Considerando que la rotura de la cadena de frío puede ocasionar alteraciones de la compatibilidad y estabilidad de las nutriciones parenterales, así como fallas en el soporte nutricional, este estudio contribuye a la seguridad del paciente, una de las dimensiones relevantes de la calidad de la atención de la salud.

  17. A study of parenteral iron regimens in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Besarab, A; Kaiser, J W; Frinak, S

    1999-07-01

    The administration of parenteral iron dextran to hemodialysis patients is typically intermittent. We sought to determine the most appropriate intervals for sampling iron parameters during intermittent need-based and continuous maintenance regimens and to quantify differences in efficacy between such regimens during long-term therapy. After a single course of 10 consecutive 100-mg iron doses administered to 14 patients on 16 occasions, transferrin saturation (TSAT) and ferritin were unreliable indices of iron status for the next 2 and 6 weeks, respectively. TSAT and ferritin levels at 1 week were virtually identical to those at 2 weeks after the administration of a single 50-mg or 100-mg iron dextran dose to 16 other patients. Twelve patients on maintenance iron therapy (25 to 100 mg/wk; TSAT, 30% to 50%) had a statistically significant decrease in the amount of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) needed to maintain hemoglobin (Hb) levels between 10 and 11 g/dL compared with 12 patients receiving intermittent need-based dosing, an effect that persisted from week 16 to week 72 of the study. Maintenance iron was feasible even in a third group of eight patients targeted to sustain an Hb level of 14 g/dL. In both iron maintenance groups, iron indices could be measured at weekly intervals, and ferritin levels did not progressively increase over time. Continuous maintenance iron dextran used to maintain TSATs of 30% to 50% significantly reduced rHuEPO requirements and resulted in no adverse side effects in chronic hemodialysis patients. After weekly maintenance 25- to 100-mg iron dextran doses, iron indices can be measured after 1 week; a delay of 2 weeks is not necessary.

  18. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-02-04

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel "myths" about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of "near zero" PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting "near zero" catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of "near zero" PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition.

  19. Gut Lymphocyte Phenotype Changes after Parenteral Nutrition and Neuropeptide Administration

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Mark A; Heneghan, Aaron F; Fechner, John H; Pierre, Joseph F; Sano, Yoshifumi; Lan, Jinggang; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Objective Define gut associated lymphocyte phenotype (GALT) changes with parenteral nutrition (PN) and PN with bombesin (BBS). Summary Background Data PN reduces respiratory tract (RT) & GALT Peyer’s patch and lamina propria (LP) lymphocytes, lowers gut and RT IgA levels and destroys established RT antiviral & antibacterial immunity. BBS, an enteric nervous system (ENS) neuropeptide, reverses PN-induced IgA and RT immune defects. Methods Exp 1: IV-cannulated ICR mice received Chow, PN or PN + BBS injections for 5 days. LSR-II flow cytometer analyzed PP and LP isolated lymphocytes for homing phenotypes (L-selectin+ & LPAM-1+) and state of activation (CD25+, CD44+) in T (CD3+) cell subsets (CD4+ & CD8+) along with homing phenotype (L-selectin+ & LPAM-1+) in naive B (IgD+) and antigen-activated (IgD− or IgM+) B (CD45R/B220+) cells. Exp 2: Following initial experiment 1 protocol, LP T regulatory (Treg) cell phenotype was evaluated by Foxp3 expression. Results Exp 1: PN significantly reduced LP 1) CD4+CD25+ (activated) and 2) CD4+CD25+LPAM-1+ (activated cells homed to LP) T cells while PN-BBS assimilated Chow levels. PN significantly reduced LP 1) IgD+ (naïve), 2) IgD-LPAM+ (antigen-activated homed to LP) and CD44+ memory B cells while PN-BBS assimilated Chow levels. Exp 2: PN significantly reduced LP CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells compared to Chow mice while PN+BBS assimilated Chow levels. Conclusions PN reduces LP activated and regulatory T cells as well as naïve and memory B cells. BBS addition to PN maintains these cell phenotypes, demonstrating the intimate involvement of the ENS in mucosal immunity. PMID:25563877

  20. Glycemic Variation in Tumor Patients with Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Cheng; Dai, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Li-Ming; Xie, Yi-Bin; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Li, Guo-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcomes and mortality in several patients. However, studies evaluating hyperglycemia variation in tumor patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between glycemia and tumor kinds with TPN by monitoring glycemic variation in tumor patients. Methods: This retrospective clinical trial selected 312 patients with various cancer types, whose unique nutrition treatment was TPN during the monitoring period. All patients had blood glucose (BG) values assessed at least six times daily during the TPN infusion. The glycemic variation before and after TPN was set as the indicator to evaluate the factors influencing BG. Results: The clinical trial lasted 7.5 ± 3.0 days adjusted for age, gender, family cancer history and blood types. There were six cancer types: Hepatic carcinoma (HC, 21.8%), rectal carcinoma (17.3%), colon carcinoma (CC, 14.7%), gastric carcinoma (29.8%), pancreatic carcinoma (11.5%), and duodenal carcinoma (DC, 4.8%). The patients were divided into diabetes and nondiabetes groups. No statistical differences in TPN glucose content between diabetes and nondiabetes groups were found; however, the tumor types affected by BG values were obvious. With increasing BG values, DC, HC and CC were more represented than other tumor types in this sequence in diabetic individuals, as well as in the nondiabetic group. BG was inclined to be more easily influenced in the nondiabetes group. Other factors did not impact BG values, including gender, body mass index, and TPN infusion duration time. Conclusions: When tumor patients are treated with TPN, BG levels should be monitored according to different types of tumors, besides differentiating diabetes or nondiabetes patients. Special BG control is needed for DC, HC and CC in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. If BG overtly increases, positive measurements are needed to control BG values. The

  1. Multiplication of Nosocomial Pathogens in Intravenous Feeding Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gelbart, S. M.; Reinhardt, G. F.; Greenlee, H. B.

    1973-01-01

    A major problem in total parenteral nutrition is sepsis, particularly that caused by Candida. Studies of four solutions, a casein hydrolysate, a fibrin hydrolysate, and two crystalline amino acid solutions, show that the protein hydrolysate solutions appear to be highly selective for Candida over bacteria, whereas the crystalline amino acid solutions are not. These findings suggest that the crystalline amino acid preparations may offer a partial solution to the infection problem by minimizing the contribution of the solution as a reservoir for organism multiplication, because they retard the growth of both bacteria and Candida. PMID:4203333

  2. Preparation, Characterization and in vivo Evaluation of Parenteral Sustained Release Microsphere Formulation of Zopiclone

    PubMed Central

    Swapna, N; Jithan, AV

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare zopiclone-loaded polycaprolactone microspheres by emulsion solvent evaporation technique with different drug-to-carrier ratios {MP 1 (1:1), MP 2 (1:2), MP 3 (1:3), and MP 4 (1:4)}, characterize and evaluate the in vivo performance. The microspheres were characterized for particle size, surface morphology, drug excipient compatibility, percentage yield, drug entrapment, and in vitro release kinetics. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics were evaluated after parenteral administration so as to determine the sustained action of the drug after one-time administration of the formulation in a rat model. Of four formulations prepared, MP 2, i.e., 1:2 (drug–polymer) ratio was selected as the optimized formulation based on particle size, particle shape, and the release behavior. The size of microspheres was found to be ranging from 5.4 to 12.1 µm. The shape of microspheres was found to be spherical by SEM. Among the four formulations, MP 2 (1:2) showed maximum percentage yield of 75% ± 2.68%. There was no interaction between drug and polymer by FT-IR study. In the in vitro release study, formulation MP 2 (1:2) showed 86.5% drug release and was found to be sustained for 10 days. The microsphere formulations were able to sustain the release of drug both in vitro and in vivo. Pharmacodynamic study (Maze apparatus) indicated that the anxiolytic activity shown by zopiclone microspheres was significant when compared to the zopiclone solution given daily. PMID:21042475

  3. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens Bloodstream Infections in Patients Receiving Parenteral Nutrition Prepared by a Compounding Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neil; Hocevar, Susan N.; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A.; Stevens, Kelly M.; McIntyre, Mary G.; Jensen, Bette; Kuhar, David T.; Noble-Wang, Judith A.; Schnatz, Rick G.; Becker, Shawn C.; Kastango, Eric S.; Shehab, Nadine; Kallen, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Compounding pharmacies often prepare parenteral nutrition (PN) and must adhere to rigorous standards to avoid contamination of the sterile preparation. In March 2011, Serratia marcescens bloodstream infections (BSIs) were identified in 5 patients receiving PN from a single compounding pharmacy. An investigation was conducted to identify potential sources of contamination and prevent further infections. Methods. Cases were defined as S. marcescens BSIs in patients receiving PN from the pharmacy between January and March 2011. We reviewed case patients’ clinical records, evaluated pharmacy compounding practices, and obtained epidemiologically directed environmental cultures. Molecular relatedness of available Serratia isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results. Nineteen case patients were identified; 9 died. The attack rate for patients receiving PN in March was 35%. No case patients were younger than 18 years. In October 2010, the pharmacy began compounding and filter-sterilizing amino acid solution for adult PN using nonsterile amino acids due to a national manufacturer shortage. Review of this process identified breaches in mixing, filtration, and sterility testing practices. S. marcescens was identified from a pharmacy water faucet, mixing container, and opened amino acid powder. These isolates were indistinguishable from the outbreak strain by PFGE. Conclusions. Compounding of nonsterile amino acid components of PN was initiated due to a manufacturer shortage. Failure to follow recommended compounding standards contributed to an outbreak of S. marcescens BSIs. Improved adherence to sterile compounding standards, critical examination of standards for sterile compounding from nonsterile ingredients, and more rigorous oversight of compounding pharmacies is needed to prevent future outbreaks. PMID:24729502

  4. The choleretic effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in total parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Nussinovitch, M; Zahavi, I; Marcus, H; Hackelman, B; Dinari, G

    1996-12-01

    Cholestasis is a frequent problem in patients on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), especially aspirin, cause choleresis in animals. We studied the effect of aspirin on bile flow and bile salt secretion in TPN-associated cholestasis in rats. Four groups of 6-10 animals each received either 154 mM NaCl (saline) or 2.5% amino acid solution (TRAVASOL, Travenol, Israel) and 10% glucose i.v. (TPN) for 3 h. During the second and third hours, taurocholate, the main bile salt in rats, was infused at a rate of 10 micromol/min per kg to prevent bile salt pool depletion. Aspirin, one of the main NSAIDs, was infused during the last 2 h into animals with or without TPN treatment at a rate of 100 mg/kg. Bile was directly collected from the common bile duct for 3 h. Rats given TPN showed a significant reduction in bile flow and bile salt secretion rate compared to control groups: 20.89 vs. 29.60 microl/min per kg (P <0.02) and 0.37 vs. 0.65 micromol/min per kg (P <0.0001), respectively. Aspirin had a significant choleretic effect and was able to overcome the bile flow and bile salt secretion rate reduction caused by TPN; 33.07 vs. 20.89 microl/min per kg (P <0.002) and 0.66 vs. 0.37 micromol/min per kg (P <0.0001), respectively. These results may have clinical implications for TPN-associated cholestasis.

  5. Comparison of Intradialytic Parenteral Nutrition with Glucose or Amino Acid Mixtures in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Xiao, Xiao; Qin, Dan-Ping; Tan, Rong-Shao; Zhong, Xiao-Shi; Zhou, Dao-Yuan; Liu, Yun; Xiong, Xuan; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Many long-term maintenance hemodialysis patients have symptoms of protein-energy wasting caused by malnutrition. Each session of hemodialysis removes about 10 to 12 g of amino acids and 200 to 480 kcal of energy. Patients receiving hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease may be undernourished for energy, protein consumption, or both. Non-diabetic hemodialysis patients were randomized to three treatment groups: oral supplementation, oral supplementation plus high-concentration glucose solution (250 mL containing 50% glucose) and these two interventions plus 8.5% amino acids solution. The post-treatment energy status of the glucose group was significantly higher than its baseline level, whereas the control group’s status was significantly lower. The glucose group had significantly higher concentrations of asparagine, glutamine, glycine, alanine, and lysine after treatment. All treatment groups had significantly increased hemoglobin levels but significantly decreased transferrin levels after treatment compared to baseline. After treatment, the amino acid group had significantly higher albumin level compared to the glucose group (p = 0.001) and significantly higher prealbumin level compared to the control group (p = 0.017). In conclusion, long-term intervention with high-concentration glucose solution at each hemodialysis session is a simple and cheap method that replenished energy stores lost during hemodialysis of non-diabetic patients. PMID:27271658

  6. Comparison of Intradialytic Parenteral Nutrition with Glucose or Amino Acid Mixtures in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Xiao, Xiao; Qin, Dan-Ping; Tan, Rong-Shao; Zhong, Xiao-Shi; Zhou, Dao-Yuan; Liu, Yun; Xiong, Xuan; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-06-02

    Many long-term maintenance hemodialysis patients have symptoms of protein-energy wasting caused by malnutrition. Each session of hemodialysis removes about 10 to 12 g of amino acids and 200 to 480 kcal of energy. Patients receiving hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease may be undernourished for energy, protein consumption, or both. Non-diabetic hemodialysis patients were randomized to three treatment groups: oral supplementation, oral supplementation plus high-concentration glucose solution (250 mL containing 50% glucose) and these two interventions plus 8.5% amino acids solution. The post-treatment energy status of the glucose group was significantly higher than its baseline level, whereas the control group's status was significantly lower. The glucose group had significantly higher concentrations of asparagine, glutamine, glycine, alanine, and lysine after treatment. All treatment groups had significantly increased hemoglobin levels but significantly decreased transferrin levels after treatment compared to baseline. After treatment, the amino acid group had significantly higher albumin level compared to the glucose group (p = 0.001) and significantly higher prealbumin level compared to the control group (p = 0.017). In conclusion, long-term intervention with high-concentration glucose solution at each hemodialysis session is a simple and cheap method that replenished energy stores lost during hemodialysis of non-diabetic patients.

  7. Non-Parenteral Medications for Procedural Sedation in Children- A Narrative: Review Article.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Razieh; Ferdosian, Farzad; Shajari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Procedural sedation may be needed in many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in children. To make pediatric procedural sedation as safe as possible, protocols should be developed by institutions. Response to sedation in children is highly variable, while some become deeply sedated after minimal doses, others may need much higher doses. Child developmental status, clinical circumstances and condition of patient should be considered and then pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for sedation be selected. Drug of choice and administration route depend on the condition of the child, type of procedure, and predicted pain degree. The drugs might be administered parenteral (intravenous or intramuscular) or non parenteral including oral, rectal, sublingual, aerosolized buccal and intranasal. The use of intravenous medication such propofol, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, or etomidate may be restricted in use by pediatric anesthesiologist or pediatric critical care specialists or pediatric emergency medicine specialists. In this review article we discuss on non-parenteral medications that can be used by non- anesthesiologist.

  8. Dry influenza vaccines: towards a stable, effective and convenient alternative to conventional parenteral influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Jasmine; Born, Philip A; Frijlink, Henderik W; Hinrichs, Wouter L J

    2016-11-01

    Cold-chain requirements, limited stockpiling potential and the lack of potent immune responses are major challenges of parenterally formulated influenza vaccines. Decreased cold chain dependence and stockpiling can be achieved if vaccines are formulated in a dry state using suitable excipients and drying technologies. Furthermore, having the vaccine in a dry state enables the development of non-parenteral patient friendly dosage forms: microneedles for transdermal administration, tablets for oral administration, and powders for epidermal, nasal or pulmonary administration. Moreover, these administration routes have the potential to elicit an improved immune response. This review highlights the rationale for the development of dried influenza vaccines, as well as processes used for the drying and stabilization of influenza vaccines; it also compares the immunogenicity of dried influenza vaccines administered via non-invasive routes with that of parenterally administered influenza vaccines. Finally, it discusses unmet needs, challenges and future developments in the field of dried influenza vaccines.

  9. Non-Parenteral Medications for Procedural Sedation in Children- A Narrative: Review Article

    PubMed Central

    FALLAH, Razieh; FERDOSIAN, Farzad; SHAJARI, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Procedural sedation may be needed in many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in children. To make pediatric procedural sedation as safe as possible, protocols should be developed by institutions. Response to sedation in children is highly variable, while some become deeply sedated after minimal doses, others may need much higher doses. Child developmental status, clinical circumstances and condition of patient should be considered and then pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for sedation be selected. Drug of choice and administration route depend on the condition of the child, type of procedure, and predicted pain degree. The drugs might be administered parenteral (intravenous or intramuscular) or non parenteral including oral, rectal, sublingual, aerosolized buccal and intranasal. The use of intravenous medication such propofol, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, or etomidate may be restricted in use by pediatric anesthesiologist or pediatric critical care specialists or pediatric emergency medicine specialists. In this review article we discuss on non-parenteral medications that can be used by non- anesthesiologist. PMID:26401146

  10. Case of congenital short small intestine: survival with use of long-term parenteral feeding.

    PubMed

    Dorney, S F; Byrne, W J; Ament, M E

    1986-03-01

    Isolated congenital short small intestine is a rare anomaly. Of six (one male, five females) previously reported cases, four died in infancy from intractable diarrhea. We report the case of 7-year-old boy with this syndrome in whom a 2-year period of parenteral feeding at home allowed normal weight gain, growth, and development while intestinal adaptation occurred. Parenteral feeding was discontinued at age 2 1/3 years, and for the past 5 years his weight has remained between the tenth and 25th percentiles and his stature between the 25th and 50th percentiles. His development has been normal and he functions at or above grade level at school. Coefficient of fat absorption has increased from 54% to 81%. Vitamin B12 absorption has improved but has not normalized. He remains lactose intolerant. We believe his survival, growth, and development would have been compromised if he had not received a prolonged period of parenteral feeding.

  11. Use of erythropoietin and parenteral iron dextran in a severely anemic Jehovah's Witness with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Madura, J A

    1993-10-01

    A Jehovah's Witness presented with colon cancer and profound anemia. On admission, her hemoglobin level was 30 g/L (3.0 g/dL). She refused all transfusions and failed to respond to oral iron therapy. She was ultimately prepared for surgery using recombinant human erythropoietin, iron dextran, and total parenteral nutrition. It took nearly 1 month to increase her hemoglobin level to an acceptable preoperative level of 110 g/L (11.0 g/dL). During the postoperative period, erythropoietin and parenteral iron therapy were briefly continued and a follow-up hemoglobin level of greater than 120 g/L (12.0 g/dL) was observed. Recombinant human erythropoietin, along with parenteral iron and adequate nutrition, may be useful in patients who refuse transfusion or cannot be transfused because of difficult cross-reacting antibodies.

  12. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Modern Parenteral Nutrition: A Review of the Current Evidence.

    PubMed

    Klek, Stanislaw

    2016-03-07

    Intravenous lipid emulsions are an essential component of parenteral nutrition regimens. Originally employed as an efficient non-glucose energy source to reduce the adverse effects of high glucose intake and provide essential fatty acids, lipid emulsions have assumed a larger therapeutic role due to research demonstrating the effects of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on key metabolic functions, including inflammatory and immune response, coagulation, and cell signaling. Indeed, emerging evidence suggests that the effects of omega-3 PUFA on inflammation and immune response result in meaningful therapeutic benefits in surgical, cancer, and critically ill patients as well as patients requiring long-term parenteral nutrition. The present review provides an overview of the mechanisms of action through which omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA modulate the immune-inflammatory response and summarizes the current body of evidence regarding the clinical and pharmacoeconomic benefits of intravenous n-3 fatty acid-containing lipid emulsions in patients requiring parenteral nutrition.

  13. [Indications and practical management of parenteral iron therapy].

    PubMed

    Kosch, Markus; Schaefer, Roland M

    2003-06-24

    Absolute or functional iron deficiency is a common problem in chronic disease which may lead to iron-deficient erythropoesis. Moreover, lack of available iron is the most common reason for unresponsiveness to epoetin in patients on chronic dialysis. Measurements of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation and percentage of hypochromic red blood cells allow the assessment of iron status. Lack of iron resorption and dose-dependent side-effects limit oral supplementation in a number of patients. Several iron preparations are available for intravenous substitution, especially the newly registered iron-saccharose offers safe and reliable iron supplementation and reduces the risk of anaphylaxis and iron toxicity. This review discusses new guidelines concerning diagnosis of iron status, indication for therapy and application of intravenous iron preparation.

  14. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly des...

  15. [Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT): the Lausanne experience supporting new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Moulin, Estelle; Boillata, Noémie; De Vallière, Serge

    2016-04-13

    With the increase of infections without option for an oral treatment, the systematic use of hospitalization overloads the healthcare system and causes growing political concern. For carefully selected patients, outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy is an interesting alternative, with more than 40 years of experience in several countries. In this perspective, an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) unit was established in Lausanne two years ago. This article aims to describe its activity. Its practice, involving especially self-administration, seems to be safe, efficacious and cost-effective, as long as international good practice recommendations are applied.

  16. ROLE OF PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN ONCOLOGIC PATIENTS WITH INTESTINAL OCCLUSION AND PERITONEAL CARCINOMATOSIS.

    PubMed

    Aría Guerra, Eva; Cortés-Salgado, Alfonso; Mateo-Lobo, Raquel; Nattero, Lía; Riveiro, Javier; Vega-Piñero, Belén; Valbuena, Beatriz; Carabaña, Fátima; Carrero, Carmen; Grande, Enrique; Carrato, Alfredo; Botella-Carretero, José Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    Introducción y objetivos: el papel preciso de la nutrición parenteral en el manejo de los pacientes oncológicos con obstrucción intestinal no está bien definido todavía. El objetivo del presente trabajo es evaluar los efectos de la nutrición parenteral en este tipo de pacientes en cuanto al pronóstico. Material y métodos: fueron incluidos 55 pacientes con obstrucción intestinal y carcinomatosis peritoneal. La nutrición parenteral proporcionó 20-35 kcal/Kg/día y 1.0 g/kg/día de aminoácidos. El peso, el IMC, el tipo de tumor, el tipo de quimioterapia recibida y el ECOG, entre otras variables, fueron recogidas y analizadas. Resultados: un 69,1% de los pacientes presentaban tumors gastrointestinales, un 18,2% ginecológicos y otros tumores el 12,7% restante. La edad media fue de 60 ± 13 años, con un ECOG basal de 1,5 ± 0,5 y un IMC de 21,6 ± 4,3. La presencia de malnutrición fue de un 85%. La supervivencia desde el inicio de la nutrición parenteral no fue significativamente distinta entre los pacientes al considerar su ECOG basal (log rank = 0,593, p = 0,743), las líneas previas de quimioterapia recibida (log rank = 2,117, p = 0,548), el IMC basal (log rank = 2,686, p = 0,261), o el tipo de tumor (log rank = 2,066, p = 0,356). La supervivencia en los pacientes en que fue posible el alta hospitalaria con nutrición parenteral fue superior (log rank = 7,090, p = 0,008). La supervivencia en los pacientes en que se inició la quimioterapia durante o tras iniciar la nutrición parenteral fue también superior (log rank = 17,316, p < 0,001). Un total de 3,6% de los pacientes presentaron infección relacionada con el catéter sin afectar la supervivencia (log rank = 0,061, p = 0,804). Conclusión: la nutrición parenteral en los pacientes oncológicos con obstrucción intestinal y carcinomatosis peritoneal es segura y, en aquellos que responden a qui mioterapia, el uso de la nutrición parenteral domiciliaria, junto con en tratamiento antitumoral activo

  17. Parenteral nutrition in the malnourished: dialysis, cancer, obese, and hyperemesis gravidarum patients.

    PubMed

    Lau, Mary Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition is a complication of many disease processes and can have deleterious effects on patient care outcomes. Providing adequate nutritional support requires a plan that is tailored to the individual needs of the patient and occasionally requires the use of parenteral nutrition. The varied nutritional needs of malnourished dialysis, cancer, obese, and hyperemesis gravidarum patients will be discussed. The infusion nurse specialist is a vital member of the nutrition support team in the care and recovery of the malnourished patient who requires parenteral nutrition.

  18. Hemosiderosis secondary to chronic parenteral iron therapy in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Pitts, T O; Barbour, G L

    1978-01-01

    Autopsy data on 24 chronic maintenance hemodialysis patients who had received varying doses of parenteral iron as the iron-dextran complex were reviewed for evidence of iron overload (hemosiderosis) and tissue fibrosis or organ dysfunction (hemochromatosis). Hemosiderosis was frequent in patients who received high total doses of iron but absent in those who received little or no iron. The degree of tissue iron did not increase with increased iron administration above a total of 2.5 g. Hemochromatosis or organ dysfunction secondary to tissue iron deposition was not noted in any patient. Chronic parenteral iron administration may improve anemia and result in tissue iron deposition but does not lead to hemochromatosis.

  19. Feasibility of parenteral iron therapy as a field approach for management of pregnancy anaemia.

    PubMed

    Raman, L; Vasumathi, N; Rawal, A; Rajalakshmi, K

    1989-08-01

    The feasibility of parenteral iron administration for treatment of pregnancy anaemia, in field conditions was investigated. High reaction rates were observed (30-40%) with either intramuscular (im) or intravenous (iv) iron-dextran complex (test dose). Mothers with lower body weight had higher reaction rates with both im or iv iron-dextran complex. In pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) the reaction rate was significantly lower. Our study indicates that under the existing situations of the health care system in India and the poor body weight and weight gain of Indian women during pregnancy, parenteral iron therapy for controlling anaemia may not be a feasible approach, at the field level.

  20. Total management of short gut secondary to midgut volvulus without prolonged total parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Tepas, J J; MacLean, W C; Kolbach, S; Shermeta, D W

    1978-12-01

    Absorption studies in rats have shown that intestinal adaptation after catastrophic injury can be stimulated by early enteral feeding. Using this concept, we have devised a technique of early initiation and advancement of oral feedings that begins with Cho-Free and Polycose and gradually adds sucrose and MCT in increasing proportions. The increasing complexity and caloric density of this diet provide sufficient nutrition to allow weaning from total parenteral alimentation within 2--3 wk. Our preliminary experience in babies with midgut volvulus, necrotizing enterocolitis, and gastroschisis has been successful and uncomplicated. These patients have demonstrated consistent weight gain and have been spared the complications associated with prolonged parenteral alimentation.

  1. Selenium deficiency and the effects of supplementation on preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Renata Germano B. O. N.; Nogueira, Roberto José N.; Antonio, Maria Ângela R. G. M.; Barros-Filho, Antonio de Azevedo; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to review the literature about blood concentrations of selenium associated with gestational age, feeding, supplementation and related clinical features in preterm infants. Data sources: Systematic review in the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, Google academics, SciELO. org, ScienceDirect (Elsevier) and CINAHL-Plus with Full Text (EBSCO). Articles published up to January 2013 with the keywords "selenium deficiency", "selenium supplementation", "neonates", "infants", "newborn" and "preterm infants" were selected. Data synthesis: The studies reported that low blood selenium levels are associated with increased risk of respiratory diseases. Preterm infants, especially with low birth weight, presented lower selenium levels. Selenium deficiency has also been associated with the use of oral infant formula, enteral and parenteral nutrition (with or without selenium addition). The optimal dose and length of selenium supplementation is not well-established, since they are based only on age group and selenium ingestion by breastfed children. Furthermore, the clinical status of the infant affected by conditions that may increase oxidative stress, and consequently, selenium requirements is not taken into account. Conclusions: Prematurity and low birth weight can contribute to low blood selenium in premature infants. Selenium supplementation seems to minimize or prevent clinical complications caused by prematurity. PMID:24676200

  2. Iron supplementation moderates but does not cure the Belgrade anemia.

    PubMed

    Garrick, M; Scott, D; Walpole, S; Finkelstein, E; Whitbred, J; Chopra, S; Trivikram, L; Mayes, D; Rhodes, D; Cabbagestalk, K; Oklu, R; Sadiq, A; Mascia, B; Hoke, J; Garrick, L

    1997-04-01

    Belgrade rats inherit microcytic, hypochromic anemia as an autosomal recessive trait (gene symbol b). Erythrocytes and tissue are iron deficient in the face of elevated TIBC (total iron binding capacity) and percent iron saturation; iron injections increased the number of erythrocytes but their appearance remained abnormal. We have investigated iron supplements to improve husbandry of b/b rats and to learn more about the underlying defect and its tissue distribution. Weekly i.m. (intramuscular) injections of iron-dextran (Imferon at 30 mg kg-1) improved the anemia but did not alter the red cell morphology. Certain diets also improved the health of b/b rats when compared to standard rat chows by the criteria of weight, survival to adulthood, hematology and reproduction. The critical nutritional factor turned out to be iron bioavailability, with ferrous iron added to the diet improving the health of Belgrade rats without affecting the underlying erythroid defect. Tissue iron measurements after dietary or parenteral supplementation confirmed the iron deficient status of untreated b/b rats and established that dietary ferrous iron partially relieved this deficiency, with injections leading to greater amounts of tissue iron. Serum iron and TIBC were also found to be elevated in untreated b/b rats, with dietary supplementation decreasing but not eliminating the elevation in TIBC. These studies indicate that iron supplements can improve the health of b/b rats without altering the underlying defect and also suggest that the mutation could alter iron uptake in the GI (gastrointestinal) tract.

  3. Emerging Supplements in Sports

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Bryan C.; Lavallee, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Nutritional supplements advertised as ergogenic are commonly used by athletes at all levels. Health care professionals have an opportunity and responsibility to counsel athletes concerning the safety and efficacy of supplements on the market. Evidence Acquisition: An Internet search of common fitness and bodybuilding sites was performed to identify supplement promotions. A search of MEDLINE (2000–August, 2011) was performed using the most commonly identified supplements, including glutamine, choline, methoxyisoflavone, quercetin, zinc/magnesium aspartate, and nitric oxide. The search terms supplement, ergogenic aid, and performance were also used. Results: Six common and newer supplements were identified, including glutamine, choline, methoxyisoflavone, quercetin, zinc/magnesium aspartate, and nitric oxide. Conclusions: Controlled studies have not determined the effects of these supplements on performance in athletes. Scientific evidence is not available to support the use of these supplements for performance enhancement. PMID:23016081

  4. Quality by design in formulation and process development for a freeze-dried, small molecule parenteral product: a case study.

    PubMed

    Mockus, Linas N; Paul, Timothy W; Pease, Nathan A; Harper, Nancy J; Basu, Prabir K; Oslos, Elizabeth A; Sacha, Gregory A; Kuu, Wei Y; Hardwick, Lisa M; Karty, Jacquelyn J; Pikal, Michael J; Hee, Eun; Khan, Mansoor A; Nail, Steven L

    2011-01-01

    A case study has been developed to illustrate one way of incorporating a Quality by Design approach into formulation and process development for a small molecule, freeze-dried parenteral product. Sodium ethacrynate was chosen as the model compound. Principal degradation products of sodium ethacrynate result from hydrolysis of the unsaturated ketone in aqueous solution, and dimer formation from a Diels-Alder condensation in the freeze-dried solid state. When the drug crystallizes in a frozen solution, the eutectic melting temperature is above -5°C. Crystallization in the frozen system is affected by pH in the range of pH 6-8 and buffer concentration in the range of 5-50 mM, where higher pH and lower buffer concentration favor crystallization. Physical state of the drug is critical to solid state stability, given the relative instability of amorphous drug. Stability was shown to vary considerably over the ranges of pH and buffer concentration examined, and vial-to-vial variability in degree of crystallinity is a potential concern. The formulation design space was constructed in terms of pH and drug concentration, and assuming a constant 5 mM concentration of buffer. The process design space is constructed to take into account limitations on the process imposed by the product and by equipment capability.

  5. Enteral obeticholic acid promotes intestinal growth in total parenteral nutrition fed neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intestinal atrophy is an adverse outcome associated with prolonged total parenteral nutrition (PN) partly due to disruption of normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. Previously we showed that enteral treatment with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a dual agonist for the nuclear receptor, farne...

  6. Course and outcome of parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis in neonates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (TPN-Chol) leads to significant morbidity and mortality. To assess the safety and effectiveness of potential interventions, it is necessary to evaluate the natural history of TPN-Chol. This retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the typical course...

  7. Continuous parenteral and enteral nutrition induces metabolic dysfunction in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously showed that parenteral nutrition (PN) compared with formula feeding results in hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis in neonatal pigs. The current aim was to test whether the route of feeding (intravenous [IV] vs enteral) rather than other feeding modalities (diet, pattern) had cont...

  8. Impact of parenteral lipid emulsions on the metabolomic phenotype in preterm TPN-fed piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids in parenteral nutrition provide essential fatty acids and are a major source of energy for hospitalized neonates. Intralipid (IL) is the only approved lipid emulsion in the U.S, but new generation emulsions include Omegaven (OV) and SMOFlipid (SL). There are no studies describing the metaboli...

  9. Fish oils in parenteral nutrition: Why could these be important for gastrointestinal oncology?

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2015-01-01

    By the time a gastroenterology patient is moved to parenteral nutrition, he or she is usually in poor health. All parenteral nutrition formulae contain essential nutrients, avoiding components that could cause an adverse reaction. The lipid component is often provided by a soy extract, containing all the fatty acids considered to be essential in the diet. Several trials have considered parenteral nutrition formulas with added fish oils, high in the long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Given the range of biological functions associated with such compounds, especially in reducing inflammatory symptoms, this move would appear rational. However, while data from such trials are often positive, there has been variability among results. Some of this variability could be caused by environmental contaminants in the fish, and/or oxidation of the lipids because of poor storage. The situation is complicated by a recent report that fish oils may counter the effects of platinum chemotherapy. However, this effect associated with a minor component, hexadeca-4,7,10,13-tetraenoic acid. It is suggested that pure DHA and EPA would be beneficial additions to parenteral nutrition, reducing the probability of carcinogenesis and enhancing rational disease management. However, the jury is still out on fish oils more generally. PMID:26380055

  10. Chronic parenteral nutrition induces hepatic inflammation, steatosis and insulin resistance in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prematurity and overfeeding in infants are associated with insulin resistance in childhood and may increase the risk of adult disease. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a major source of infant nutrition support and may influence neonatal metabolic function. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that...

  11. Chronic parenteral nutrition reduces lean tissue growth and induces insulin resistance in neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most very low birthweight infants receive their nutrition parenterally prior to achieving full enteral feedings. Recent studies indicate that infants born less than 32 weeks gestation showed evidence of insulin resistance at 4 to 10 years. However, there is little information regarding the effect of...

  12. Pregnancy and lactation during long-term total parenteral nutrition: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Borbolla Foster, Ailsa; Dixon, Steven; Tyrrell-Price, J; Trinder, Johanna

    2016-12-01

    There is a paucity of clinical data regarding the management of pregnancy and lactation in women requiring long-term total parenteral nutrition with complex nutritional needs. This case report and literature review highlights common challenges in care and presents evidence which can guide the obstetrician's approach to care.

  13. Copper deficiency-related bone marrow changes secondary to long-term total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Oo, Thein Hlaing; Hu, Shimin

    2017-02-01

    Total parenteral nutrition can be complicated by the marrow sea-blue histiocytes as well as copper deficiency-related bone marrow changes. Cytoplasmic vacuoles in the erythroid and myeloid precursors raise the possibility of copper deficiency anemia. If the diagnosis is delayed, the clinical course can be complicated by neurologic deficits.

  14. Total parenteral nutrition induces liver steatosis and apoptosis in neonatal piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) induces a high rate of liver disease in infants, yet the pathogenesis remains elusive. We used neonatal piglets as an animal model to assess early events leading to TPN-mediated liver injury. Newborn piglets (n = 7) were nourished for 7 d on TPN or enteral nutrition ...

  15. Parenteral nutrition as an unexpected and preventable source of mercury exposure in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Jering, Karola; Aschner, Michael; Beller, Amy; Hamm, Ellyn L.; Langdon, Margaret; Maitre, Nathalie L.

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal mercury exposure has neurodevelopmental consequences, which may be worse in preterm infants. In our cohort (N=60), maternal and infant prenatal exposures were low, but infant levels increased during hospitalization and correlated only with duration of parenteral nutrition. A non-negligible exposure resulted from the nutrition preparation on equipment shared with adult preparations. PMID:25812777

  16. Bilateral chylothorax after transsternal total thymectomy: resolution with short period of fasting and total parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinsik; Kim, Su Wan; Lee, Seogjae

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral chylothorax after transsternal total thymectomy is very rare, but can be a serious complication. Disruption of minor lymphatic channels in the anterior mediastinum which is remote from thoracic duct is considered to be the cause of chylothorax. We report the case of bilateral chylothorax followed by thymectomy which was treated with pleural drainage, total parenteral nutrition, and fasting without octreotide injection. PMID:27076983

  17. Impact of parenteral lipid emulsions on metabolomic phenotype in preterm TPN-fed piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids in parenteral nutrition provide essential fatty acids and are a major source of energy for hospitalized neonates. Intralipid (IL) is the only approved lipid emulsion in the US, but new generation emulsions include Omegaven (OV) and SMOFlipid (SL). There are no studies describing the metabolit...

  18. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems of cilostazol for oral and parenteral administration.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Dina B; Shukr, Marwa H; Bendas, Ehab R

    2014-12-10

    The current investigation was aimed to improve the solubility of poorly soluble drug, cilostazol (CLZ). Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) composed of oil, surfactant and co-surfactant for both oral and parenteral administration of CLZ was formulated. The components for SNEDDS were identified by solubility studies, and pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were plotted to identify the efficient self-emulsification regions. The optimum formula, composed of Capryol 90 as an oil phase, Cremophor EL as a surfactant, and Transcutol HP as a co-surfactant in a ratio of 19.8:30.5:49.7 by weight, was able to solubilize CLZ 2000 times higher than its solubility in water. This formula was able to form grade "A" nanoemulsion when diluted with water, resulted in emulsification time of 50±1.1 s, particle size of 14.3 nm, PDI of 0.5 and % transmittance was 97.40%±0.65. It showed excellent in vitro dissolution of 93.1% and 81.5% after 5 min in 0.3% sodium lauryl sulphate solution and phosphate buffer pH 6.4, respectively when compared with the marketed tablet formulation and drug suspension as the tablets showed only 44.3% and 9.9% while CLZ suspension showed 33.9% and 8.8% in 0.3% sodium lauryl sulphate solution and phosphate buffer pH 6.4, respectively. It was found to be robust to dilution, thermodynamically stable with low viscosity values of 14.20±0.35 cP. In vivo study revealed significant increase in bioavailability of CLZ in rabbits to 3.94 fold compared with the marketed tablet formulation after oral administration. This formula could be sterilized by autoclaving and did not cause significant hemolysis to human blood which indicates its safety for intravenous administration with a 1.12 fold increase in bioavailability compared with its oral administration. Our study illustrated the potential use of SNEDDS of poorly soluble CLZ orally, and its successful administration of parenterally when required in acute cases of myocardial and cerebral infarction.

  19. A review of copper status of cattle in Canada and recommendations for supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Marion E.; Cymbaluk, Nadia F.; Christensen, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Primary and secondary copper deficiency has been identified in most Canadian provinces. Research has been done investigating the environmental and dietary factors that influence dietary copper availability and the effect of deficient copper status on the health and production of cattle. Across Canada, a high percentage of forages and grains are marginal to deficient in copper. In certain regions, high sulphates in the water and/or high molybdenum concentrations in the feed decrease dietary copper availability. The value of various oral and parenteral copper supplements in the treatment and prevention of copper deficiency is discussed. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:17423962

  20. Preliminary study on the effect of parenteral naloxone, alone and in association with calcium gluconate, on bone healing in an ovine "drill hole" model system

    PubMed Central

    Petrizzi, Lucio; Mariscoli, Massimo; Valbonetti, Luca; Varasano, Vincenzo; Langhoff, Jens D; Von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    Background Several diseases affect bone healing and physiology. Many drugs that are commonly used in orthopaedics as "analgesics" or anti-inflammatory agents impair bone healing. Stressful conditions are associated with decreased serum osteocalcin concentration. High endorphin levels alter calcium metabolism, blocking the membrane channels by which calcium normally enters cells. The consequent decrease of intracellular calcium impairs the activities of calcium-related enzymes. Naloxone is a pure opioid antagonist. Morphine-induced osteocalcin inhibition was abolished when osteoblasts were incubated with naloxone. Naloxone restored the altered cellular and tissue physiology by removing β-endorphins from specific receptors. However, this is only possible if the circulating Ca concentration is adequate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of parenteral naloxone administration in inducing fast mineralization and callus remodelling in a group of sheep with a standardised bone lesion. Methods Twenty ewes were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups. Group A acted as control, group B received a solution of calcium gluconate, group C a solution of naloxone, and group D a solution of calcium gluconate and naloxone. A transverse hole was drilled in the left metacarpus, including both cortices, then parenteral treatment was administered intramuscularly, daily for four weeks. Healing was evaluated by weekly radiographic examination for eight weeks. For quantitative evaluation, the ratio of the radiographic bone density between the drill area and the adjacent cortical bone was calculated. After eight weeks the sheep were slaughtered and a sample of bone was collected for histopathology Results Group D showed a higher radiographic ratio than the other groups. Sheep not treated with naloxone showed a persistently lower ratio in the lateral than the medial cortex (P < 0.01). Histopathology of bone samples showed more caverns and fewer osteoblasts in group D

  1. Chemical stability of teniposide in aqueous and parenteral lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Cui, Yue; Tang, Xing

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degradation kinetics of teniposide in lipid emulsion and aqueous solution. The chemical stability of teniposide in lipid emulsion and aqueous solution at various pH values and temperatures was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography. In addition, the viscosities of emulsion at different temperatures were investigated. The degradation of teniposide both in emulsion and in aqueous solution was shown to follow pseudo-first-order degradation kinetics. The t (1/2) values of teniposide lipid emulsion (TLE) and the aqueous solution were 80 and 2.6 days at 10 degrees C, respectively. Under the most stable pH range of 6.0-6.5, stability of teniposide in the emulsion increased more than 30-fold compared with that in aqueous solution. Furthermore, there was a difference between the shelf life of TLE actually measured (29 days) at 10 degrees C and the one deduced (15 days) from the degradation data of high temperatures by Arrhenius equation. It could be hypothesized that the difference was due to a slower diffusion of teniposide from oil phase to aqueous phase at the lower temperatures, which would be a speed-limited process in the degradation of TLE. The results of viscosity test confirmed the presumption.

  2. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling and Simulation of Cefiderocol, a Parenteral Siderophore Cephalosporin, for Dose Adjustment Based on Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takayuki; Wajima, Toshihiro; Ishibashi, Toru; Arjona Ferreira, Juan Camilo; Echols, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Cefiderocol, a novel parenteral siderophore cephalosporin, exhibits potent efficacy against most Gram-negative bacteria, including carbapenem-resistant strains. Since cefiderocol is excreted primarily via the kidneys, this study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetics (PK) model to determine dose adjustment based on renal function. Population PK models were developed based on data for cefiderocol concentrations in plasma, urine, and dialysate with a nonlinear mixed-effects model approach. Monte-Carlo simulations were conducted to calculate the probability of target attainment (PTA) of fraction of time during the dosing interval where the free drug concentration in plasma exceeds the MIC (Tf>MIC) for an MIC range of 0.25 to 16 μg/ml. For the simulations, dose regimens were selected to compare cefiderocol exposure among groups with different levels of renal function. The developed models well described the PK of cefiderocol for each renal function group. A dose of 2 g every 8 h with 3-h infusions provided >90% PTA for 75% Tf>MIC for an MIC of ≤4 μg/ml for patients with normal renal function, while a more frequent dose (every 6 h) could be used for patients with augmented renal function. A reduced dose and/or extended dosing interval was selected for patients with impaired renal function. A supplemental dose immediately after intermittent hemodialysis was proposed for patients requiring intermittent hemodialysis. The PK of cefiderocol could be adequately modeled, and the modeling-and-simulation approach suggested dose regimens based on renal function, ensuring drug exposure with adequate bactericidal effect.

  3. Parenteral selenium and vitamin E supplementation to lambs: hematology, serum biochemistry, performance, and relationship with other trace elements.

    PubMed

    Mohri, Mehrdad; Ehsani, Abdollah; Norouzian, M A; Bami, Mohammad Heidarpour; Seifi, Hesam A

    2011-03-01

    Most regions in Iran are generally selenium (Se) deficient and all mineral premixes which used in farm animals contain Se in the form of sodium selenite. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of injected Se and vitamin E (vit E) on hematology, serum proteins, and performance of lambs during the period which the animals are at risk of Se and/or vit E deficiency. The study also aims to determine the relationship between selenium injection and the levels of other trace elements in blood serum of lambs. A total of 16 lambs of Baloochi breed (age, 70 ± 7 days and weight, 15.2 ± 1.4) were enrolled in the study. The animals were divided into two groups. In the test group, vit E and Se injected at a dose of 0.2 ml/kg BW (Vetoquinol, Selepherol®, Lure Cedex, France, α-tocopherol acetate 3.82 g/100 ml plus sodium selenite 0.023 g/100 ml) at the enrollment. Control lambs were received equal amounts of normal saline as placebo. Blood was sampled from the jugular vein at the beginning of the study (enrollment, before injection of vit E and selenium and saline) and at days 7, 14, 21, and 28 of experiment. The amounts of total serum protein, albumin, glucose, iron, copper, zinc, creatine kinase (CK), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and Se were measured. The concentration of globulin was calculated as the difference between total serum protein and albumin. For evaluation of growth and health, body weight of all the lambs was measured at day 0 of the experiment and the sampling times and days of treatment for each lamb were recorded. Treatment with Se and vit E decreased the activities of CK and AST compared to the controls (p < 0.05). Age (sampling time) had significant effects on the values of Se, iron, zinc, AST, hemoglobin, total protein, glucose, weight, height, and length (p < 0.05). Significant interactions between sampling time and group were seen for CK, AST, iron, glucose, weight, and length. No significant differences were seen for total weight gain (control, 3.48 ± 0.75 kg; test, 3.85 ± 0.9 kg), and average daily gain (control, 0.12 ± 0.03 kg; test, 0.14 ± 0.03 kg) between trial groups.

  4. Supplements and athletes.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, John A

    2004-09-01

    Supplements have become a staple with athletes. Athletes take supplements to enhance their performance through replenishment of real and perceived deficiencies, anabolic action of stimulants, increased energy and alertness, and for weight control. Physicians who deal with athletes should be aware of the supplements being utilized by athletes, the athletes' desired effects and the efficacy of the supplement, the adverse effects, and whether the supplement is banned by leagues or organizations in which the athletes are competing. For those athletes who are regularly drug tested for performance enhancers, it is important to remember that one cannot be 100% sure that any supplement will not result in a positive drug test, because there is no independent agency certifying purity.

  5. Benefits and risks of iron supplementation in anemic neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Paweł; Starzyński, Rafał R; Canonne-Hergaux, François; Tudek, Barbara; Oliński, Ryszard; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Dziaman, Tomasz; Thibaudeau, Olivier; Gralak, Mikołaj A; Smuda, Ewa; Woliński, Jarosław; Usińska, Agnieszka; Zabielski, Romuald

    2010-09-01

    Iron deficiency is a common health problem. The most severe consequence of this disorder is iron deficiency anemia (IDA), which is considered the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide. Newborn piglets are an ideal model to explore the multifaceted etiology of IDA in mammals, as IDA is the most prevalent deficiency disorder throughout the early postnatal period in this species and frequently develops into a critical illness. Here, we report the very low expression of duodenal iron transporters in pigs during the first days of life. We postulate that this low expression level is why the iron demands of the piglet body are not met by iron absorption during this period. Interestingly, we found that a low level of duodenal divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin, two iron transporters located on the apical and basolateral membrane of duodenal absorptive enterocytes, respectively, correlates with abnormally high expression of hepcidin, despite the poor hepatic and overall iron status of these animals. Parenteral iron supplementation by a unique intramuscular administration of large amounts of iron dextran is current practice for the treatment of IDA in piglets. However, the potential toxicity of such supplemental iron implies the necessity for caution when applying this treatment. Here we demonstrate that a modified strategy for iron supplementation of newborn piglets with iron dextran improves the piglets' hematological status, attenuates the induction of hepcidin expression, and minimizes the toxicity of the administered iron.

  6. Benefits and Risks of Iron Supplementation in Anemic Neonatal Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lipiński, Paweł; Starzyński, Rafał R.; Canonne-Hergaux, François; Tudek, Barbara; Oliński, Ryszard; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Dziaman, Tomasz; Thibaudeau, Olivier; Gralak, Mikołaj A.; Smuda, Ewa; Woliński, Jarosław; Usińska, Agnieszka; Zabielski, Romuald

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a common health problem. The most severe consequence of this disorder is iron deficiency anemia (IDA), which is considered the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide. Newborn piglets are an ideal model to explore the multifaceted etiology of IDA in mammals, as IDA is the most prevalent deficiency disorder throughout the early postnatal period in this species and frequently develops into a critical illness. Here, we report the very low expression of duodenal iron transporters in pigs during the first days of life. We postulate that this low expression level is why the iron demands of the piglet body are not met by iron absorption during this period. Interestingly, we found that a low level of duodenal divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin, two iron transporters located on the apical and basolateral membrane of duodenal absorptive enterocytes, respectively, correlates with abnormally high expression of hepcidin, despite the poor hepatic and overall iron status of these animals. Parenteral iron supplementation by a unique intramuscular administration of large amounts of iron dextran is current practice for the treatment of IDA in piglets. However, the potential toxicity of such supplemental iron implies the necessity for caution when applying this treatment. Here we demonstrate that a modified strategy for iron supplementation of newborn piglets with iron dextran improves the piglets’ hematological status, attenuates the induction of hepcidin expression, and minimizes the toxicity of the administered iron. PMID:20805566

  7. Parenteral nanoemulsions as promising carriers for brain delivery of risperidone: Design, characterization and in vivo pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Đorđević, Sanela M; Cekić, Nebojša D; Savić, Miroslav M; Isailović, Tanja M; Ranđelović, Danijela V; Marković, Bojan D; Savić, Saša R; Timić Stamenić, Tamara; Daniels, Rolf; Savić, Snežana D

    2015-09-30

    This paper describes design and evaluation of parenteral lecithin-based nanoemulsions intended for brain delivery of risperidone, a poorly water-soluble psychopharmacological drug. The nanoemulsions were prepared through cold/hot high pressure homogenization and characterized regarding droplet size, polydispersity, surface charge, morphology, drug-vehicle interactions, and physical stability. To estimate the simultaneous influence of nanoemulsion formulation and preparation parameters--co-emulsifier type, aqueous phase type, homogenization temperature--on the critical quality attributes of developed nanoemulsions, a general factorial experimental design was applied. From the established design space and stability data, promising risperidone-loaded nanoemulsions (mean size about 160 nm, size distribution <0.15, zeta potential around -50 mV), containing sodium oleate in the aqueous phase and polysorbate 80, poloxamer 188 or Solutol(®) HS15 as co-emulsifier, were produced by hot homogenization and their ability to improve risperidone delivery to the brain was assessed in rats. Pharmacokinetic study demonstrated erratic brain profiles of risperidone following intraperitoneal administration in selected nanoemulsions, most probably due to their different droplet surface properties (different composition of the stabilizing layer). Namely, polysorbate 80-costabilized nanoemulsion showed increased (1.4-7.4-fold higher) risperidone brain availability compared to other nanoemulsions and drug solution, suggesting this nanoemulsion as a promising carrier worth exploring further for brain targeting.

  8. Assessment of anti-factor Xa activity of heparin in binary parenteral nutrition admixtures for premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Foinard, A; Perez, M; Barthélémy, C; Lannoy, D; Flamein, F; Storme, L; Tournoys, A; Décaudin, B; Odou, P

    2015-07-01

    An in vitro study was carried out to determine the anti-Xa activity of heparin in binary parenteral nutrition (BPN) admixtures for premature neonates in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) after a 24-hour infusion, as well as to assess drug interaction with a 50% glucose solution. Two types of bags were prepared: (1) BPN admixtures (composition defined in the NICU) including sodium heparin at 77 UI/mL and (2) bags containing only G50% with sodium heparin at 193 UI/mL. The anti-Xa activity of heparin was measured in bags at T0, after the 24-hour infusion and in eluates at the outlet of the infusion line after 24hours, using a validated chromogenic anti-Xa method. Comparisons of the mean concentration observed with the theoretical value for anti-Xa activity were performed with the Student t-test. Mean values of anti-Xa activity do not differ significantly from the values expected for all conditions. We found a slight variation in anti-Xa activity when infused over 24hours for both types of bags, with and without in-line filtration, showing that heparin remains stable during this infusion period in both BPN admixtures and G50%.

  9. Term Neonate With Liver Laceration, Obstructive Uropathy, and Ascites—Secondary to Extravasation of Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Adesanya, Olubukunola; Naqvi, Mubariz

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare, but serious, complication of a malpositioned umbilical venous catheter in a term male infant who developed laceration, hematoma, and necrosis of liver, ascites, and left-sided obstructive uropathy secondary to extravasation of total parenteral nutrition. Abdominal paracentesis confirmed the presence of parenteral nutrition in the peritoneal cavity. Although, the umbilical venous catheterization is a common intravenous access used in neonatal intensive care units, judicious continued monitoring of its use should be practiced to avoid serious complications. PMID:27766283

  10. [Parenteral nutrition "à la carte" in major abdominal surgery with mixtures of Totamine concentrate and Vintène. A clinical study based on nitrogen balance].

    PubMed

    Vanden Bavière, H; De Roose, J; Derom, F; Anné, T

    1981-01-01

    The authors present a series of thirty patients who underwent major abdominal surgery. Each patient received preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN) during bowel preparation. After the operation the TPN was continued immediately, even if reanimation was necessary. The dosages of nitrogen and calories were individually adapted in function of the daily calculated nitrogen-balances. So the authors were able to administer a TPN "à la carte" using eight solutions mixed in a single bag, containing amino-acids (varying between 6 and 20 g of nitrogen), glucose (ad 150 Kcal/gN) lipids (constituting 40% of the calorie-intake), ions, vitamins and oligoelements. With a follow-up of minimum 10 days, the study proves the possibility of creating positive nitrogen-balances in 87% of the cases and an acceptable deviation in the daily measured glycemia and plasma-ionograms.

  11. The Parenteral Vitamin C Improves Sepsis and Sepsis-Induced Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome via Preventing Cellular Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yan-Fen

    2017-01-01

    Cellular immunosuppression appears to be involved in sepsis and sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Recent evidence showed that parenteral vitamin C (Vit C) had the ability to attenuate sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS. Herein, we investigated the impact of parenteral Vit C on cellular immunosuppression and the therapeutic value in sepsis. Using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), sepsis was induced in WT and Gulo−/− mice followed with 200 mg/Kg parenteral Vit C administration. The immunologic functions of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD4+CD25− T cells, as well as the organ functions, were determined. Administration of parenteral Vit C per se markedly improved the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS of WT and Gulo−/− mice. The negative immunoregulation of Tregs was inhibited, mainly including inhibiting the expression of forkhead helix transcription factor- (Foxp-) 3, cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen- (CTLA-) 4, membrane associated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-βm+), and the secretion of inhibitory cytokines [including TGF-β and interleukin- (IL-) 10], as well as CD4+ T cells-mediated cellular immunosuppression which was improved by parenteral Vit C in WT and Gulo−/− septic mice. These results suggested that parenteral Vit C has the ability to improve the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS and is associated with improvement in cellular immunosuppression. PMID:28210072

  12. The Parenteral Vitamin C Improves Sepsis and Sepsis-Induced Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome via Preventing Cellular Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Lei; Lu, Bin; Zhai, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yan-Cun; Qi, Hai-Xia; Yao, Ying; Chai, Yan-Fen; Shou, Song-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Cellular immunosuppression appears to be involved in sepsis and sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Recent evidence showed that parenteral vitamin C (Vit C) had the ability to attenuate sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS. Herein, we investigated the impact of parenteral Vit C on cellular immunosuppression and the therapeutic value in sepsis. Using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), sepsis was induced in WT and Gulo(-/-) mice followed with 200 mg/Kg parenteral Vit C administration. The immunologic functions of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, as well as the organ functions, were determined. Administration of parenteral Vit C per se markedly improved the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS of WT and Gulo(-/-) mice. The negative immunoregulation of Tregs was inhibited, mainly including inhibiting the expression of forkhead helix transcription factor- (Foxp-) 3, cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen- (CTLA-) 4, membrane associated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β(m+)), and the secretion of inhibitory cytokines [including TGF-β and interleukin- (IL-) 10], as well as CD4(+) T cells-mediated cellular immunosuppression which was improved by parenteral Vit C in WT and Gulo(-/-) septic mice. These results suggested that parenteral Vit C has the ability to improve the outcome of sepsis and sepsis-induced MODS and is associated with improvement in cellular immunosuppression.

  13. Case report of acute thiamine deficiency occurring as a complication of vitamin-free parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, Suzie

    2012-02-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a relatively recent life-saving development in medicine but brings with it a range of new potential complications. Much of our knowledge about the signs and symptoms of individual micronutrient deficiencies comes from observations of patients receiving PN, and an example of this is the pivotal paper by Velez and colleagues published in Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in 1985. This case report was the first published study to identify acute thiamine deficiency with cardiopathy and metabolic acidosis occurring in adult patients receiving vitamin-free PN. Although the importance of thiamine has been recognized since the late 19th century, it is still unclear exactly what dose is required for full repletion of a deficient patient, and further research would be useful to elucidate this question.

  14. Guidelines for parenteral and enteral nutrition support in geriatric patients in China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Junmin; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Mingwei; Cao, Weixin; Wang, Xinying; Shi, Hanping; Dong, Birong; Sun, Jianqin; Chen, Huaihong; Zhou, Yeping; Zhou, Suming; Xu, Jingyong

    2015-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity of geriatric patients is much higher than for younger patients, especially when critically ill. This may be attributed to a lower reserve capacity in most organs and systems, reduced ability to deal with physical stress and the presence of acute or chronic co-mobidities. Parenteral and enteral nutrition support can improve the clinical condition of the elderly patient and result in better outcomes, such as lower mortality, reduced hospital stay and reduced medical costs. There is a need to standardize nutrition screening and assessment, and the implementation of appropriate evidence based nutritional support of geriatric patients in China. The Chinese Medical Association's Group of Geriatric Nutrition Support has developed guidelines by researching the present situation in Chinese hospitals and by referring to the guidelines from both American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) and the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN).

  15. [Intra-dialysis parenteral nutrition in chronic renal patients: consensus SEN-SENPE].

    PubMed

    García de Lorenzo, A; Arrieta, J; Ayúcar, A; Barril, G; Huarte, E

    2010-01-01

    Given the high prevalence of the hyponutrition state among haemodialysis patients and knowing that this implies an increase in the rates of infection, hospitalisation and hospital stay, which translates into an increase in global morbid-mortality, the Spanish Society of Nephrology (SEN) and the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE) have reached a consensus on the indications, contraindications, and limitations of Intra-Dialysis Parenteral Nutrition (IDPN.) This consensus considers IDPN as a valid alternative to other types of nutritional support when these show their lack of efficacy. The bases are set regarding the timing of nutritional intervention with IDPN, its ideal composition, the time of administration, its controls, follow-up schedules, and the time at which the nutritional support has to be discontinued.

  16. Family Living Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truitt, Debbie

    This family living supplement contains 125 supplemental ideas and strategies designed to help vocational home economics teachers increase student motivation and enrich the teaching process. Ideas and strategies are organized into seven sections. These are career planning, securing a job, and career success; managing financial resources, buying…

  17. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  18. Coverage of pilot parenteral vaccination campaign against canine rabies in N'Djaména, Chad.

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, U.; Mindekem, R.; Yémadji, N.; Vounatsou, P.; Kaninga, Y.; Ndoutamia, A. G.; Zinsstag, J.

    2003-01-01

    Canine rabies, and thus human exposure to rabies, can be controlled through mass vaccination of the animal reservoir if dog owners are willing to cooperate. Inaccessible, ownerless dogs, however, reduce the vaccination coverage achieved in parenteral campaigns. This study aimed to estimate the vaccination coverage in dogs in three study zones of N'Djaména, Chad, after a pilot free parenteral mass vaccination campaign against rabies. We used a capture-mark-recapture approach for population estimates, with a Bayesian, Markov chain, Monte Carlo method to estimate the total number of owned dogs, and the ratio of ownerless to owned dogs to calculate vaccination coverage. When we took into account ownerless dogs, the vaccination coverage in the dog populations was 87% (95% confidence interval (CI), 84-89%) in study zone I, 71% (95% CI, 64-76%) in zone II, and 64% (95% CI, 58-71%) in zone III. The proportions of ownerless dogs to owned dogs were 1.1% (95% CI, 0-3.1%), 7.6% (95% CI, 0.7-16.5%), and 10.6% (95% CI, 1.6-19.1%) in the three study zones, respectively. Vaccination coverage in the three populations of owned dogs was 88% (95% CI, 84-92%) in zone I, 76% (95% CI, 71-81%) in zone II, and 70% (95% CI, 66-76%) in zone III. Participation of dog owners in the free campaign was high, and the number of inaccessible ownerless dogs was low. High levels of vaccination coverage could be achieved with parenteral mass vaccination. Regular parenteral vaccination campaigns to cover all of N'Djaména should be considered as an ethical way of preventing human rabies when post-exposure treatment is of limited availability and high in cost. PMID:14758434

  19. Nanocrystals for the parenteral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Yeo, Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Nanocrystals have drawn increasing interest in pharmaceutical industry because of the ability to improve dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals can be produced by top-down and bottom-up technologies and have been explored for a variety of therapeutic applications. Here we review the methods of nanocrystal production and parenteral applications of nanocrystals. We also discuss remaining challenges in the development of nanocrystal products. PMID:23645994

  20. Impact of Computerized Provider Order Entry on Total Parenteral Nutrition in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    O'Mara, Keliana

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine if computerized provider order entry (CPOE) implementation impacts the time it takes for preterm neonates to reach their parenteral macronutrient goals. METHODS: Retrospective review of neonates <1750 g receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) before and after the implementation of CPOE. Primary outcome was the attainment of parenteral macronutrient goals. Secondary outcomes included time to attainment, the frequency of electrolyte abnormalities, and the incidence of required adjustments made to PN orders by verification pharmacists. RESULTS: Goal PN was achieved by 12/47 (25.5%) intervention vs. 2/44 (4.5%) control group infants (p < 0.05). This goal was attained in 10.8 ± 7.5 days in the intervention group and 10 ± 4.2 days in the control group (p = 0.90). Goal protein was reached by 74.5% of CPOE patients vs. 36.4% of controls, p < 0.05. Lipid goals were achieved by 98% vs. 100% (p = 0.33) of patients and were attained at an average of 1.5 ± 0.8 days vs. 2.0 ± 1.1 days (p < 0.05). Abnormal serum electrolyte values occurred more frequently in the control group (0.79 vs. 1.12/day PN). Adjustments by a verification pharmacist were required in 5.6% of CPOE compared with 30.4% of control group orders (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: CPOE parenteral nutrition increased the proportion of preterm neonates attaining overall macronutrient goals. With CPOE, protein goals were reached by more patients and goal lipids were achieved faster. This system also decreased the number of pharmacist interventions during verification of PN orders and appeared to positively impact the incidence of serum electrolyte disturbances. PMID:27713674

  1. Alterations in pentobarbital pharmacokinetics in response to parenteral and enteral alimentation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Knodell, R G; Spector, M H; Brooks, D A; Keller, F X; Kyner, W T

    1980-12-01

    Recent in vitro observations suggest that the intestine, in addition to the liver, may be an important organ of first-pass drug metabolism. While a variety of changes in intestinal morphology and function in response to continuous parenteral and enteral nutrition have been documented, the effect of different routes of alimentation on intestinal drug metabolism has not been previously investigated. Objectives of this study were to assess the contribution of intestinal pentobarbital metabolism to overall in vivo pentobarbital pharmacokinetics in the rat and to determine if differences in pentobarbital pharmacokinetics were seen between parenterally and enterally nourished animals. After 7 days of continuous infusion of amino acid-glucose mixture via a gastric or jugular vein catheter, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined after 40 mg/kg of pentobarbital was given orally or into the portal or femoral vein. Reduced systemic availability of pentobarbital after oral administration as compared to portal vein injection was seen in both alimentation groups indicating that significant intestinal metabolism of pentobarbital occurred in vivo. Total area under the pentobarbital plasma concentration-time curve was significantly greater in parenterally nourished animals as compared with enterally alimented animals after oral, portal vein and systemic vein drug administration. Differences in pentobarbital, pharmacokinetics between the two alimentation groups appeared to be primarly due to effects on hepatic pentobarbital metabolism. While the mechanism producing these changes has not been defined, differences in gut hormones release and/or pancreatic secretion in response to the two routes of alimentation may be contributory. The widespread use of enteral and parenteral alimentation in clinical medicine suggests that studies to determine if nutrition route of administration similarly influences drug metabolism in humans may be indicated.

  2. Comparison between Total Parenteral Nutrition Vs. Partial Parenteral Nutrition on Serum Lipids Among Chronic Ventilator Dependent Patients; A Multi Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Radpay, Rojan; Radpay, Badiozaman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is very common among chronically hospitalized patients, especially those in the intensive care unit (ICU). Identifying the patients at risk and providing suitable nutritional support can prevent and/or overcome malnutrition in them. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and partial parenteral nutrition (PPN) are two common routes to deliver nutrition to hospitalized patients. We conducted a multicenter, prospective double blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and compare their adverse effects of each method. Materials and Methods: 97 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the inclusion criteria. Serum protein, serum albumin, serum transferrin, and total lymphocyte count were measured on days 7 and 14. Results: We did not find any statistically significant differences in clinical status or laboratory values between the two groups but there were significant improvements in measured lab values between days 7 and 14 (p<0.005) indicating improved nutritional status in each groups. Conclusion: This study shows that both TPN and PPN can be used safely in chronic ICU patients to provide nutritional support and prevent catabolic state among chronic critically ill patients. We need to develop precise selection criteria in order to choose the patients who would benefit the most from TPN and PPN. In addition, appropriate laboratory markers are needed to monitor the metabolic requirements of the patients and assess their progress. PMID:27403176

  3. [Sorption of amino acids from aqueous solutions on activated charcoal].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Tsibanov, V V

    1985-03-01

    Various methods for quantitative description of amino acid sorption from solutions for parenteral nutrition on activated charcoal were studied under dynamic and static conditions. With the use of the well-known Freindlich and Langmuir absorption isotherms it was shown to be possible to describe in a simplified way the complex multicomponent process of sorption of the amino acids and to estimate their loss at the filtration stage.

  4. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Modern Parenteral Nutrition: A Review of the Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Klek, Stanislaw

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsions are an essential component of parenteral nutrition regimens. Originally employed as an efficient non-glucose energy source to reduce the adverse effects of high glucose intake and provide essential fatty acids, lipid emulsions have assumed a larger therapeutic role due to research demonstrating the effects of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on key metabolic functions, including inflammatory and immune response, coagulation, and cell signaling. Indeed, emerging evidence suggests that the effects of omega-3 PUFA on inflammation and immune response result in meaningful therapeutic benefits in surgical, cancer, and critically ill patients as well as patients requiring long-term parenteral nutrition. The present review provides an overview of the mechanisms of action through which omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA modulate the immune-inflammatory response and summarizes the current body of evidence regarding the clinical and pharmacoeconomic benefits of intravenous n-3 fatty acid-containing lipid emulsions in patients requiring parenteral nutrition. PMID:26959070

  5. Drug delivery and drug targeting with parenteral lipid nanoemulsions - A review.

    PubMed

    Hörmann, Karl; Zimmer, Andreas

    2016-02-10

    Lipid nanosized emulsions or nanoemulsions (NE) are oil in water dispersions with an oil droplet size of about 200nm. This size of oil droplets dispersed in a continuous water phase is a prerequisite for the parenteral, namely intravenous administration. Many parenteral nutrition and drug emulsions on the market confirm the safe use of NE over years. Parenteral emulsions loaded with APIs (active pharmaceutical ingredients) are considered as drug delivery systems (DDS). DDS focuses on the regulation of the in vivo dynamics, such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, and extended bioavailability, thereby improving the effectiveness and the safety of the drugs. Using an emulsion as a DDS, or through the use of surface diversification of the dispersed oil droplets of emulsions, a targeted increase of the API concentration in some parts of the human body can be achieved. This review focuses on NE similar to the marketed once with no or only low amount of additional surfactants beside the emulsifier from a manufacturing point of view (technique, used raw materials).

  6. Growth and hepatic composition in the guinea pig after long-term parenteral hyperalimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C.J.H.; Redmond, D.; Baggs, R.B.; Schecter, A.; Gasiewicz, T.A.

    1986-08-01

    This study examined the feasibility of maintaining male Hartley guinea pigs on long-term hyperalimentation. Data from animals fed ad libitum, but infused with 0.9% saline, indicated that there was minimal effect from catheter implantation, sepsis, or the infusion of large volumes of fluid. This group compared with animals fed and watered ad libitum demonstrated a nearly identical growth rate serum chemistry, tissue weights, and hepatic composition and morphology. Animals infused with a total parenteral diet demonstrated growth rates of 4.06 +/- 1.46 g/day for up to 25 days. Loss of infused animals was due in varying degrees to sepsis, mechanical failure, improper placement of the cannula, loss of patency, and death from unknown causes. Morphological analysis of animals fed by total parenteral nutrition revealed an altered distribution and increased size of lipid droplets in hepatic parenchymal and Kupffer cells and glycogen accumulation by the parenchymal cells. Decreased hepatic content of total protein and lipid, as well as cytochrome P450, was also observed. Similarly, serum values of triglyceride were decreased in animals fed by the total parenteral diet. This study indicated that the guinea pig fed by hyperalimentation may be a useful animal model for a number of clinical and basic research applications.

  7. Parenteral penicillin for children with meningococcal disease before hospital admission: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Harnden, Anthony; Ninis, Nelly; Thompson, Matthew; Perera, Rafael; Levin, Michael; Mant, David; Mayon-White, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact on mortality and morbidity of parenteral penicillin given to children before admission to hospital with suspected meningococcal disease. Design Retrospective comparison of fatal and non-fatal cases. Setting England, Wales, and Northern Ireland; December 1997 to February 1999. Participants 158 children aged 0-16 years (26 died, 132 survived) in whom a general practitioner had made the diagnosis of meningococcal disease before hospital admission. Results Administration of parenteral penicillin by general practitioners was associated with increased odds ratios for death (7.4, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 37.7) and complications in survivors (5.0, 1.7 to 15.0). Children who received penicillin had more severe disease on admission (median Glasgow meningococcal septicaemia prognostic score (GMSPS) 6.5 v 4.0, P = 0.002). Severity on admission did not differ significantly with time taken to reach hospital. Conclusions Children who were given parenteral penicillin by a general practitioner had more severe disease on reaching hospital than those who were not given penicillin before admission. The association with poor outcome may be because children who are more severely ill are being given penicillin before admission. PMID:16554335

  8. Therapeutic Interchange of Parenteral Anticoagulants: Challenges for Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committees.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh

    2011-11-07

    This is a review of key factors for pharmacy and therapeutics committees to consider when developing a therapeutic interchange (TI) program for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis. Recent patient safety initiatives aimed at reducing the incidence of hospital-acquired VTE may increase the prescribing of thromboprophylactic agents recommended in VTE management guidelines. As a result, more pharmacy and therapeutics committees may consider TI programs for parenteral anticoagulants. However, the TI of anticoagulants appears challenging at this time. Firstly, the therapeutic equivalence of the commonly prescribed parenteral anticoagulants, enoxaparin, dalteparin and fondaparinux, has not been established. Secondly, because of the wide range of clinical indications for these anticoagulants, a blanket agent-specific TI program could lead to off-label use. Use of an indication-specific TI program could be difficult to manage administratively, and may cause prescribing confusion and errors. Thirdly, careful dosing and contraindications of certain parenteral anticoagulants in special patient populations, such as those with renal impairment, further impact the suitability of these agents for inclusion in TI programs. Finally, although TI may appear to offer lower drug-acquisition costs, it is important to determine its effect on all cost parameters and ultimately ensure that the care of patients requiring VTE prophylaxis is not compromised.

  9. Oral and parenteral therapy with saperconazole (R 66905) of invasive aspergillosis in normal and immunocompromised animals.

    PubMed Central

    Van Cutsem, J; Van Gerven, F; Janssen, P A

    1989-01-01

    Saperconazole (R 66905) is a broad-spectrum antifungal triazole with potent in vitro activity against Aspergillus spp. A total of 279 strains were tested in brain heart infusion broth. Development of the Aspergillus spp. was completely inhibited at 0.1 and 1 microgram of saperconazole per ml for 80.3 and 99.6% of the strains, respectively. Normal and immunocompromised guinea pigs were infected intravenously with Aspergillus fumigatus and treated orally, intravenously, or intraperitoneally with saperconazole or intraperitoneally with amphotericin B. Leukopenia, neutropenia, lymphocytosis, and monocytosis were obtained with mechlorethamine hydrochloride; leukopenia, neutrophilia, and lymphopenia were obtained with cyclophosphamide. Saperconazole was dissolved for oral treatment in polyethylene glycol and for parenteral treatment in cyclodextrins. Amphotericin B was given parenterally as Fungizone (E.R. Squibb & Sons). Treatment was given once daily for 14 days. An early starting treatment was efficacious, but the activity of saperconazole was maintained even when the onset of the treatment was delayed to the moribund state. The activity of saperconazole was not altered in immunocompromised animals. Saperconazole was clearly superior to amphotericin B and free of side effects. The oral and parenteral formulations of saperconazole were equipotent. The systemic activity of saperconazole in guinea pigs was confirmed in invasive aspergillosis in pigeons. PMID:2619273

  10. Study of teduglutide effectiveness in parenteral nutrition-dependent short-bowel syndrome subjects.

    PubMed

    Vipperla, Kishore; O'Keefe, Stephen J

    2013-11-01

    Loss of intestinal absorptive capacity from congenital defect, surgical resection or mucosal disease results in short bowel syndrome (SBS)-associated intestinal failure. In the past, few medical management options were available besides dietary modification, controlling diarrhea or high stomal output, and providing parenteral fluid, electrolyte and nutrient support (parenteral support). Recent research on strategies to enhance the intestinal absorptive capacity focused on glucagon-like peptide-2, an intestinotrophic hormone that has been shown to increase the villus height and crypt depth, and decrease gastric motility and intestinal secretory losses. STEPS is a Phase III randomized double-blinded controlled trial in which teduglutide, a recombinant analog of glucagon-like peptide-2, or placebo was given subcutaneously to SBS patients for 24 weeks. A clinically meaningful response, defined as a 20-100% reduction in parenteral support volume, was achieved in 63% of the treatment group compared with 30% in the placebo group (p = 0.002) without an increase in serious side effects. Teduglutide offers a new targeted approach to SBS-associated intestinal failure management. Its specific role in clinical practice remains to be evaluated.

  11. Effects of different parenteral nutrition infusions in a patient with short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chia-Chee; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, we demonstrate the effects of different lipid emulsions on liver function in a 52-year-old woman with short bowel syndrome who was totally dependent on parenteral nutrition. Over a 13-month period after small bowel resection and jejunostomy, we followed the patient's plasma triglycerides and liver enzyme levels as well as body weight and discomfort levels. During the first 3 months when parenteral nutrition including a lipid emulsion containing 50% soybean oil/50% medium-chain triglyerides was administered daily, the patient reported feeling unwell (experiencing dizziness and palpitations) and her triglycerides and liver enzyme levels rose to 366 mg/dL and 145 U/L (alanine aminotransferase [ALT]), respectively; these levels recovered when this emulsion was discontinued. For the following 9 months, an emulsion containing 80% olive oil and 20% soybean oil was administered, and the patient's triglycerides (182 mg/dL) did not increase to abnormal levels and liver enzyme levels were only mildly elevated (109 U/L). The patient felt well and her body weight increased from 51 kg to 55 kg during this period. These results suggest that parenteral nutrition with a reduced soybean oil content may better preserve liver function in patients with short bowel syndrome.

  12. Enhanced antimalarial activity by a novel artemether-lumefantrine lipid emulsion for parenteral administration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufan; Lu, Tingli; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Ying; Chen, Ting; Mei, Qibing; Chen, Tao

    2014-10-01

    Artemether and lumefantrine (also known as benflumetol) are difficult to formulate for parenteral administration because of their low aqueous solubility. Cremophor EL as an emulsion excipient has been shown to cause serious side effects. This study reports a method of preparation and the therapeutic efficacies of novel lipid emulsion (LE) delivery systems with artemether, lumefantrine, or artemether in combination with lumefantrine, for parenteral administration. Their physical and chemical stabilities were also evaluated. Furthermore, the in vivo antimalarial activities of the lipid emulsions developed were tested in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. Artemether, lumefantrine, or artemether in combination with lumefantrine was encapsulated in an oil phase, and the in vivo performance was assessed by comparison with artesunate for injection. It was found that the lumefantrine lipid emulsion (LUM-LE) and artemether-lumefantrine lipid emulsion (ARM-LUM-LE-3) (1:6) began to decrease the parasitemia levels after only 3 days, and the parasitemia inhibition was 90% at doses of 0.32 and 0.27 mg/kg, respectively, with immediate antimalarial effects greater than those of the positive-control group and constant antimalarial effects over 30 days. LUM-LE and ARM-LUM-LE-3 demonstrated the best performance in terms of chemical and physical stabilities and antiplasmodial efficacy, with a mean particle size of 150 nm, and they have many favorable properties for parenteral administration, such as biocompatibility, physical stability, and ease of preparation.

  13. Beware of Fraudulent 'Dietary Supplements'

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers ... Supplements Dietary Supplements More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical ...

  14. Herbs, Supplements and Alternative Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Diabetes > Treatment and Care > Medication > Other Treatments > Herbs, Supplements, and Alternative Medicines Share: Print Page Text ... magazine: meds-other, In this section Medication Other Treatments Herbs, Supplements, and Alternative Medicines Types of Dietary Supplements ...

  15. Parenteral iron therapy in obstetrics: 8 years experience with iron-sucrose complex.

    PubMed

    Perewusnyk, G; Huch, R; Huch, A; Breymann, C

    2002-07-01

    Fe is an essential component of haem in myoglobin and accounts for 70 % of haemoglobin. The balance of Fe, unlike that of other metals such as Na or Ca, is regulated solely by gastrointestinal absorption, which itself depends on the bioavailability of Fe in food, i.e. the chemical Fe species. Factors that maintain Fe homeostasis by modulating Fe transfer through the intestinal mucosa are found at the luminal, mucosal and systemic levels. Fe deficiency and its consequence, Fe-deficiency anaemia, form the commonest nutritional pathology in pregnant women. The current gold standard to detect Fe deficiency remains the serum ferritin value. Previously there was general consensus against parenteral Fe administration, i.e. parenteral Fe was only recommended for special conditions such as unresponsiveness to oral Fe, intolerance to oral Fe, severe anaemia, lack of time for therapy etc. However, especially in hospital settings, clinicians regularly face these conditions but are still worried about reactions that were described using Fe preparations such as Fe-dextrans. A widely used and safe alternative is the Fe-sucrose complex, which has become of major interest to prevent functional Fe deficiency after use of recombinant erythropoietin Numerous reports show the effectiveness and safety of the Fe-sucrose complex. Good tolerance to this Fe formulation is partly due to the low allergenic effect of the sucrose complex, partly due to slow release of elementary Fe from the complex. Accumulation of Fe-sucrose in parenchyma of organs is low compared with Fe-dextrans or Fe-gluconate, while incorporation into the bone marrow for erythropoiesis is considerably faster. Oral Fe is only started if haemoglobin levels are below 110 g/l. If levels fall below 100 g/l or are below 100 g/l at time of diagnosis, parenteral Fe-sucrose is used primarily. In cases of severe anaemia (haemoglobin <90 g/l) or non-response to parenteral Fe after 2 weeks, recombinant erythropoietin is considered in

  16. Clinical relevance of trace element measurement in patients on initiation of parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Salota, Rashim; Omar, Sohail; Sherwood, Roy A; Raja, Kishor; Vincent, Royce P

    2016-11-01

    Background and Aims Serum zinc, copper and selenium are measured in patients prior to commencing on parenteral nutrition; however, their interpretation can be difficult due to acute phase reactions. We assessed (i) the relationship of raised C-reactive protein with trace elements and albumin (ii) benefits of measuring trace elements when C-reactive protein is raised in patients requiring short-term parenteral nutrition. Methods Samples were collected for zinc, copper, selenium and albumin at baseline and then every two weeks and correlated with C-reactive protein results in patients on parenteral nutrition. Results were categorized into four groups based on the C-reactive protein concentrations: (i) <20 mg/L, (ii) 20-39 mg/L, (iii) 40-79 mg/L and (iv) ≥80 mg/L. Results In 166 patients, zinc, selenium and albumin correlated (Spearman's) negatively with C-reactive protein; r = -0.26, P < 0.001 (95% CI -0.40 to -0.11), r = -0.44, P < 0.001 (-0.56 to -0.29) and r = -0.22 P = 0.005 (-0.36 to -0.07), respectively. Copper did not correlate with C-reactive protein (r = 0.09, P = 0.25 [-0.07 to 0.25]). Comparison of trace elements between the four groups showed no difference in zinc and copper (both P > 0.05), whereas selenium and albumin were lower in the group with C-reactive protein > 40 mg/L ( P < 0.05). Conclusion In patients on short-term parenteral nutrition, measurement of C-reactive protein is essential when interpreting zinc and selenium but not copper results. Routine measurement of trace elements prior to commencing parenteral nutrition has to be considered on an individual basis in patients with inflammation.

  17. Supplements for exotic pets.

    PubMed

    Mejia-Fava, Johanna; Colitz, Carmen M H

    2014-09-01

    The use of supplements has become commonplace in an effort to complement traditional therapy and as part of long-term preventive health plans. This article discusses historical and present uses of antioxidants, vitamins, and herbs. By complementing traditional medicine with holistic and alternative nutrition and supplements, the overall health and wellness of exotic pets can be enhanced and balanced. Further research is needed for understanding the strengths and uses of supplements in exotic species. Going back to the animals' origin and roots bring clinicians closer to nature and its healing powers.

  18. Improving cabazitaxel chemical stability in parenteral lipid emulsions using cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yanjie; Zhang, Chungang; Yao, Qing; Wang, Yueqi; Tian, Bin; Tang, Xing; Wang, Yanjiao

    2014-02-14

    Intravenous lipid emulsions of cabazitaxel (CLEs) with a high stability were prepared by adding cholesterol (CH) to provide a new and more suitable delivery system for its administration. The factors affecting CLEs, such as the solubility of cabazitaxel in various oils, different kinds of lecithin, pH, different types of oil phases, and different concentrations of lipoid E80®, CH and poloxamer 188 were investigated systematically. The degradation of cabazitaxel in aqueous solution and lipid emulsion both followed pseudo first-order kinetics. A degradation mechanism was suggested by the U-shaped pH-rate profile of cabazitaxel. A formulation containing 0.5% (w/v) CH and another formulation without CH were made to investigate the protective influence of CH on the chemical stability of CLEs. The activation energy of the two formulations was calculated to be 65.74±6.88 and 54.24±1.43 kJ/mol (n=3), respectively. Compared with the untreated CH, the shelf-life of cabazitaxel with added CH was longer, namely 134.0±23.4 days versus 831.4±204.4 days (n=3) at 4 °C. This indicates that the addition of CH significantly improved the lifetime of cabazitaxel in intravenous lipid emulsions. The hydrogen bonding that takes place between cabazitaxel and CH accounts for the protective effect of CH on the chemical stability of CLEs in two ways: preventing cabazitaxel from leaking and hydrolyzing in aqueous solution and hindering hydrolysis in the oil phase. Finally, the hypothesis was confirmed by LC/TOFMS and Fourier-transform infrared-spectroscopy. As a result, CLEs were obtained successfully by the addition of CH and were stable enough to allow further research.

  19. FDA 101: Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers ... Knowledge About Vitamins More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical ...

  20. Breastfeeding: Vitamin D Supplementation

    MedlinePlus

    ... able to synthesize additional vitamin D through routine sunlight exposure. However, published reports of cases of vitamin ... a vitamin supplement or from adequate exposure to sunlight. A number of factors decrease the amount of ...

  1. Supplements to Textbook Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Ken

    1994-01-01

    Describes the many kinds of materials that English teachers can draw upon to enrich and expand students' experiences with literature. Outlines ancillary materials used to supplement the study of William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." (HB)

  2. Dietary Supplements for Toddlers

    MedlinePlus

    ... about which supplements are needed and the amounts. Iron Deficiency Iron deficiency does occur among some young children and ... need to receive at least 15 milligrams of iron a day in their food, but many fail ...

  3. Iron supplements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  4. A Short Bowel (Small Intestine = 40 cm), No Ileocecal Valve, and Colonic Inertia Patient Works Well with Oral Intake Alone without Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsiu-Chih; Yang, Hui-Lan

    2014-01-01

    We present a 50-year-old male who suffered from ischemic bowel disease, having undergone massive resection of small intestine and ileocecal valve. He had to cope with 40 cm proximal jejunum and 70 cm distal colon remaining. In the postoperative period parenteral nutrition (PN) was used immediately for nutrition support and electrolyte imbalance correction. We gave him home PN as regular recommendation for the short bowel status after discharge from hospital. This patient has tolerated regular oral intake 2 months later and did not develop significant short bowel syndrome. There were several episodes of venous access infection which troubled this patient and admitted him for treatment during home PN. Therefore, we changed home PN to cyclic tapering pattern. The patient could maintain his nutrition and hydration with oral intake alone after tapering home PN 15 months later. He has survived more than one year without PN support and still maintained 80% ideal body weight with average albumin of 3.5 ± 0.2 mg/dL. Although patient was hospitalized every two months to supplement nutrients, however, this has greatly improved the quality of life. PMID:25018889

  5. [The partial parenteral nutrition of preterm infants with a body weight < 1000 g: the effects of an infusion of human albumin on plasma amino acid concentration].

    PubMed

    Cassata, N; Didato, M; Faranda, C; Fazio, M; Giaccone, G; Gioeli, R; La Francesca, G; Sulliotti, G; Priolisi, A

    1993-01-01

    This paper concerns with the changes of plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations of N. 10 ELBW infants receiving a regimen of partial parenteral nutrition including human serum albumin (HSA) as a protein supply. The plasma AA concentration has been compared with VLBW infants orally fed with human milk (HM) or human milk supplemented with human milk protein (HMP). As for the essential AA: in comparison to VLBW infants fed HM, the plasma concentration of VAL, PHE and LYS is significantly higher, that of THR, MET, LEU and HIS is similar, whereas that of ILE is significantly lower; in comparison to VLBW infants fed HMP, with the exception of PHE whose plasma concentration is higher, concentration of essential AA significantly lower; the percentage ratio between plasma concentration and intake is in the range of 1,4 to 3,3, except for LYS (= 0.83), indicating a good efficacy of the i.v. administered HSA as AA source, or a slow plasma clearance or a sustained flux of AA from body protein catabolism. Further researches are needed to investigate these aspects and the intermediate steps between i.v. infusion of HSA and the utilization of the component AA for body protein synthesis.

  6. An usual approach to treatment of a case of multidrug resistance Pseudomonas aeruginosa peritonitis: parenteral and intraperitoneal aminoglycosides and parenteral colistin

    PubMed Central

    May, Ian; Abu-Khdeir, Maha; Blackwood, Roland Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming more common and increasingly more difficult to treat due to the continued development of drug resistance. While sensitivity to colistin (polymyxin E) is well known, it is frequently avoided due to concerns of nephrotoxicity. Reported here is a case of a multi-drug resistance pseudomonal typhlitis, bacteremia and pleural cavity infection that required significant intensive care, and serial abdominal washouts. Intra-peritoneal tobramycin in combination with broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics including colistin were used. Several instillations of tobramycin into the abdominal cavity along with concomitant IV administration of colistin, ceftazidime and tobramycin and per os colistin, tobramycin and nystatin resulted in the clearance of the pseudomonal infection without any evidence of toxicity from the treatment. Intra-abdominal tobramycin with parenteral colistin therapy can be used in complicated clinical settings with appropriate nephroprotection. PMID:24470950

  7. Towards a Mobile-Based Platform for Traceability Control and Hazard Analysis in the Context of Parenteral Nutrition: Description of a Framework and a Prototype App

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The parenteral nutrient (PN) mixtures may pose great risks of physical, microbiological, and chemical contamination during their preparation, storage, distribution, and administration. These potential hazards must be controlled under high levels of excellence to prevent any serious complications for the patients. As a result, management control and traceability of any of these medications is of utmost relevance for the patient care, along with ensuring treatment continuity and adherence. Objective The aim of this study is to develop a mobile-based platform to support the control procedures and traceability services in the domain of parenteral nutrient (PN) mixtures in an efficient and nonintrusive manner. Methods A comprehensive approach combining techniques of software engineering and knowledge engineering was used for the characterization of the framework. Local try-outs for evaluation were performed in a number of application areas, carrying out a test/retest monitoring to detect possible errors or conflicts in different contexts and control processes throughout the entire cycle of PN. From these data, the absolute and relative frequencies (percentages) were calculated. Results A mobile application for the Android operating system was developed. This application allows reading different types of tags and interacts with the local server according to a proposed model. Also, through an internal caching mechanism, the availability of the system is preserved even in the event of problems with the network connection. A set of 1040 test traces were generated for the assessment of the system under various environments tested. Among those, 102 traces (9.81%) involved conflictive situations that were properly taken care of in this paper by suggesting solutions to overcome them. Conclusions A mobile oriented system was generated and tested in order to allow enhanced control and quality management of PN mixtures that is easy to integrate into the daily praxis of

  8. Comparison of the effects of enteral feeding with continuous and intermittent parenteral nutrition on hepatic triglyceride secretion in human beings

    SciTech Connect

    Isabel-Martinez, L.; Skinner, C.; Parkin, A.; Hall, R.I.

    1989-03-01

    Plasma triglyceride turnover was measured during steady-state conditions in 22 postoperative patients. Nine had received nutritional support with an enteral regimen, seven had received an equivalent regimen as continuous parenteral nutrition, and six received the same parenteral regimen as a cyclical infusion. After 5 days of nutritional support, each patient received an intravenous bolus of tritiated glycerol. Plasma radiolabeled triglyceride content was measured during the subsequent 24 hours. The data were analyzed by means of a simple deterministic model of plasma triglyceride kinetics and compared with the results obtained by stochastic analysis. The rates of hepatic triglyceride secretion obtained by deterministic analysis were higher than those obtained by the stochastic approach. However, the mode of delivery of the nutritional regimen did not affect the rate of hepatic triglyceride secretion regardless of the method of analysis. The results suggest that neither complete nutritional bypass of the gastrointestinal tract nor interruption of parenteral nutrition in an attempt to mimic normal eating has any effect on hepatic triglyceride secretion. Any beneficial effect that enteral feeding or cyclical parenteral nutrition may have on liver dysfunction associated with standard parenteral nutrition appears to be unrelated to changes in hepatic triglyceride secretion.

  9. Pediatric parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and cholestasis: Novel advances in pathomechanisms-based prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Orso, Giuseppe; Mandato, Claudia; Veropalumbo, Claudio; Cecchi, Nicola; Garzi, Alfredo; Vajro, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition constitutes a life-saving therapeutic tool in patients unable to ingest/absorb oral or enteral delivered nutrients. Liver function tests abnormalities are a common therapy-related complication, thus configuring the so-called Parenteral Nutrition Associated Liver Disease (PNALD) or cholestasis (PNAC). Although the damage is frequently mild, and resolves after discontinuation of parenteral nutrition, in some cases it progresses into cirrhotic changes, especially in neonates and infants. We present a literature review focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms-driven prevention and therapies for the cases where parenteral nutrition cannot be discontinued. Ursodeoxycholic acid has been proposed in patients with cholestatic hepatopathy, but its efficacy needs to be better established. Little evidence is available on efficacy of anti-oxidants, antibiotics, probiotics and anti TNFα. Lipid emulsions based on fish oil with a high content of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids ω-3 appear effective both in decreasing intrahepatic inflammation and in improving biliary flow. Most recent promising variations such as soybean/MCT/olive/fish oil emulsion [third generation lipid emulsion (SMOFlipid)] are under investigation. In conclusion, we remark the emergence of a number of novel pathomechanisms underlying the severe liver impairment damage (PNALD and PNAC) in patients treated with parenteral nutrition. Only few traditional and innovative therapeutic strategies have hitherto been shown promising.

  10. Packed red blood cell transfusions as a risk factor for parenteral nutrition associated liver disease in premature infants

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Antoni; Algotar, Anushree; Pan, Ling; Schwarz, Steven M; Treem, William R; Valencia, Gloria; Rabinowitz, Simon S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine if packed red blood cell transfusions contribute to the development of parenteral nutrition associated liver disease. METHODS A retrospective chart review of 49 premature infants on parenteral nutrition for > 30 d who received packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions was performed. Parenteral nutrition associated liver disease was primarily defined by direct bilirubin (db) > 2.0 mg/dL. A high transfusion cohort was defined as receiving > 75 mL packed red blood cells (the median value). Kaplan-Meier plots estimated the median volume of packed red blood cells received in order to develop parenteral nutrition associated liver disease. RESULTS Parenteral nutritional associated liver disease (PNALD) was noted in 21 (43%) infants based on db. Among the 27 high transfusion infants, PNALD was present in 17 (64%) based on elevated direct bilirubin which was significantly greater than the low transfusion recipients. About 50% of the infants, who were transfused 101-125 mL packed red blood cells, developed PNALD based on elevation of direct bilirubin. All infants who were transfused more than 200 mL of packed red blood cells developed PNALD. Similar results were seen when using elevation of aspartate transaminase or alanine transaminase to define PNALD. CONCLUSION In this retrospective, pilot study there was a statistically significant correlation between the volume of PRBC transfusions received by premature infants and the development of PNALD. PMID:27872824

  11. Lipid emulsions in the treatment and prevention of parenteral nutrition–associated liver disease in infants and children123

    PubMed Central

    Nandivada, Prathima; Fell, Gillian L; Gura, Kathleen M; Puder, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) carries the risk of progressive liver disease in infants with intestinal failure. Although PN-associated liver disease (PNALD) is multifactorial in etiology, components of soybean oil lipid emulsions have been implicated in the disease’s pathogenesis. Historically, infants with PNALD who were unable to wean from PN to full enteral feeding developed cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease, which require liver transplantation to survive. Over the past 2 decades, novel strategies for the management of parenteral lipids have improved morbidity and mortality from PNALD in infants with intestinal failure. Current strategies for the treatment of PNALD include restricting the dose of parenteral soybean oil lipid emulsion and/or replacing the soybean oil with a parenteral fish-oil lipid emulsion or emulsions of mixed-lipid sources. The purpose of this report is to review published data that evaluate these strategies in parenteral lipid management for the treatment and prevention of PNALD. PMID:26791189

  12. [Protocol for peripheral parenteral nutrition management ready to use in surgical patients].

    PubMed

    Pinzón Espitia, Olga Lucia; Varón Vega, Martha Liliana

    2014-10-03

    Introducción: Los pacientes sometidos a cirugía electiva, requieren de un tratamiento clínico integral que propenda por mantener o evitar el deterioro del estado nutricional y favorecer los resultados clínicos, y a su vez mejorar la seguridad de la terapia nutricional parenteral mediante la optimización de la tecnología, como una opción enfocada a la minimización de riesgo y la disminución de los costos operativos en las instituciones de prestación de servicios de salud. Objetivo: Realizar una revisión de la literatura con el fin de estudiar las indicaciones y recomendaciones del soporte nutricional parenteral periférico y/o complementario listo para usar en personas sometidas a una intervención quirúrgica. Métodos: Síntesis de datos tras la revisión de la bibliografía pertinente, que permitiera el diseño del protocolo. Se realizó la búsqueda en las siguientes bases de datos: PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect y Embase. Conclusiones: La nutrición parenteral periférica lista para usar es una alternativa de soporte nutricional, que permite mejorar el aporte Proteico-Energético así como demostrar mejoras en la seguridad del paciente, disminución de los costos y aumentar la satisfacción del paciente.

  13. S-adenosylmethionine prevents total parenteral nutrition-induced cholestasis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Belli, D C; Fournier, L A; Lepage, G; Yousef, I; Roy, C C

    1994-07-01

    Both an excess and an imbalance of amino acids have been associated with total parenteral nutrition-induced cholestasis. The present study was undertaken to further our understanding of this condition in light of observations that methyl donor amino acids may be protective. Rats were maintained on Travasol (3.4 g amino acids/24 h) and dextrose (10.2 g/24 h) with and without the "active methyl" S-adenosylmethionine at a dose of 75 mg/kg/24 h for 5 days, and compared to control rats on dextrose alone (10.2 g/24 h) with free access to rat chow. Bile flow (microliters/min) was lower (p < 0.025) in the Travasol (8.65 +/- 0.78) than in the control group (12.30 +/- 0.52) and was restored in the Travasol+S-adenosylmethionine animals (11.42 +/- 10). Furthermore, the bile acid secretory rate (mumol/h) was higher (p < 0.05) with S-adenosylmethionine (23.34 +/- 3.71) than without S-adenosylmethionine (14.16 +/- 2.19). As expected, the molar ratio of biliary cholesterol was lower (p < 0.005) in both total parenteral nutrition groups. However, in the total parenteral nutrition group without S-adenosylmethionine, there was also a decrease in the molar ratio of phospholipids which correlated well with the bile acid secretory rate. Analysis of liver plasma membranes showed that a lower activity of Na+K(+)-ATPase (mumol Pi/mg protein/h) (p < 0.005) in the Travasol animals (6.26 +/- 0.53) was restored to control values (15.20 +/- 1.43) by the addition of S-adenosylmethionine (17.07 +/- 2.87). In the three groups, a close correlation was observed between Na+K(+)-ATPase activity and bile flow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Metabolic effects of recombinant human growth hormone in patients receiving parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, T R; Young, L S; Manson, J M; Wilmore, D W

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant human methionyl growth hormone (Protropin) (Genetech, Inc., San Francisco, CA) administered to normal volunteers receiving hypocaloric parenteral nutrition minimized weight loss and induced positive nitrogen balance. To evaluate whether growth hormone (GH) can promote anabolism in surgical patients, 11 stable malnourished individuals were studied. In the initial trial, subjects received a constant parenteral infusion of a hypocaloric diet that provided approximately 1100 kcal/24 hr and 1.3 g protein/kg/24 hr for at least 2 weeks. During 1 week, GH 10 mg was given subcutaneously daily, whereas the other week served as the control. Daily balance studies demonstrated that administration of GH resulted in significant retention of nitrogen (+3.4 g/24 h) and phosphorus (+218 mg/24 h), despite provision of only 60% of caloric requirements. With GH, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and potassium fell, whereas glucose and insulin tended to rise, and levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 increased three to fourfold. Weight gain occurred with GH and was associated with positive mineral and water balance. Six patients received GH (10 mg subcutaneously daily) for 13-25 consecutive days after an initial control week. Significant nitrogen and phosphorus retention occurred over the entire period of GH administration, and no significant side effects were observed. In these depleted patients, GH caused significant and sustained nitrogen retention over a wide range of nutritional support. GH appears to enhance the efficacy of parenteral nutrition in stable individuals requiring repletion of body protein. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3133995

  15. The role of parenteral lipids in supporting gluconeogenesis in very premature infants.

    PubMed

    Sunehag, Agneta L

    2003-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated that very premature infants receiving glucose at 17 micromol/kg min plus appropriate supply of parenteral lipids (Intralipid) and amino acids (TrophAmine) maintained normoglycemia by glucose produced primarily via gluconeogenesis. The present study addressed the individual roles of parenteral lipids and amino acids in supporting gluconeogenesis. Fourteen premature infants (993 +/- 36 g 27 +/- 1 wk) (mean +/- SE) were studied for 8 h on d 5 +/- 1 of life. All infants were receiving standard TPN prior to the study. At start of study, the glucose infusion rate was decreased to approximately 17 micromol/kg min and either Intralipid (g + AA; n = 8) or TrophAmine (g + IL; n = 6) was discontinued. Data from 14 previously studied infants receiving glucose (approximately 17 micromol/kg min) + TrophAmine + Intralipid (g + AA + IL) are included for comparison. Gluconeogenesis was measured by [U-13 C]glucose, (g + AA) and (8 infants of the g + AA + IL group) or [2-13C]glycerol, (g + IL) and (6 infants of the g + AA + IL group). Infants studied by the same method were compared. Withdrawal of Intralipid resulted in decreased gluconeogenesis, 6.3 +/- 0.9 (g +AA) vs. 8.4 +/- 0.7 micromol/kg min (g + AA + IL) (p = 0.03). Withdrawal of TrophAmine affected neither total gluconeogenesis, 7.5 +/- 0.8 vs. 7.9 +/- 0.9 micromol/kg min nor gluconeogenesis from glycerol, 4.4 +/- 0.6 vs. 4.9 +/- 0.7 micromol/kg min (g+ IL and g + AA + IL groups, respectively). In conclusion, in parenterally fed very premature infants, lipids play a primary role in supporting gluconeogenesis.

  16. Simulated Leaching (Migration) Study for a Model Container-closure System Applicable to Parenteral and Ophthalmic Drug Products (PODPs).

    PubMed

    Jenke, Dennis; Egert, Thomas; Hendricker, Alan; Castner, James; Feinberg, Thomas; Houston, Christopher; Hunt, Desmond; Lynch, Michael; Nicholas, Kumudini; Norwood, Daniel L; Paskiet, Diane; Ruberto, Michael; Smith, Edward J; Holcomb, Frank

    2016-12-14

    A simulating leaching (migration) study was performed on a model container-closure system relevant to parenteral and ophthalmic drug products (PODP). This container-closure system consisted of a linear-low density polyethylene bottle (primary container), a polypropylene cap and an elastomeric cap liner (closure), an adhesive label (labeling) and a foil overpouch (secondary container). The bottles were filled with simulating solvents (aqueous salt/acid mixture at pH 2.5, aqueous buffer at pH 9.5, and 1/1(v/v) IPA/water), a label was affixed to the filled and capped bottles, the filled bottles were placed into the foil overpouch and the filled and pouched units were stored either upright or inverted for up to 6 months at 40°C. After storage, the leaching solutions were tested for leached substances using multiple complementary analytical techniques to address volatile, semi-volatile, and non-volatile organic and inorganic extractables as potential leachables. The leaching data generated supported several conclusions, including that (a) the extractables (leachables) profile revealed by a simulating leaching study can qualitatively be correlated with compositional information for materials of construction, (b) the chemical nature of both the extracting medium and the individual extractables (leachables) can markedly affect the resulting profile and (c) while direct contact between a drug product and a system's material of construction may exacerbate the leaching of substances from that material by the drug product, direct contact is not a prerequisite for migration and leaching to occur.

  17. Hexapeptides from human milk prevent the induction of oxidative stress from parenteral nutrition in the newborn guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Miloudi, Khalil; Tsopmo, Apollinaire; Friel, James K.; Rouleau, Thérèse; Comte, Blandine; Lavoie, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In preterm neonates, peroxides contaminating total parenteral nutrition (TPN) contribute to oxidative stress, which is suspected to be a strong inducer of hepatic complications related to prematurity. Recently, others reported that hexapeptides derived from human milk (HM) exerted free radical–scavenging activities in vitro. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the capacity of these hexapeptides to limit the generation of peroxides in TPN and to prevent TPN-induced hepatic oxidative stress. METHODS At 3 d of life, guinea pigs were infused, through a catheter in jugular vein, with TPN containing or not peptide-A (YGYTGA) or peptide-B (ISELGW). Peroxide concentrations were measured in TPN solutions, whereas glutathione, glutathionyl-1,4-dihydroxynonenal (GS-HNE) and mRNA levels of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) were determined in liver after 4 d of infusion. RESULTS The addition of peptide-A to TPN allowed a reduction in peroxide contamination by half. In vivo, peptide-A or peptide-B corrected the hepatic oxidative status induced by TPN. Indeed, both peptides lowered the hepatic redox potential of glutathione and the level of GS-HNE, a marker of lipid peroxidation. As compared with animals infused with TPN without peptide, the hepatic mRNA levels of IL-1 and TNFα were lower in animals infused with TPN containing peptide-A or peptide-B. DISCUSSION These results suggest that the addition of YGYTGA or ISELGW to TPN will reduce oxidative stress in newborns. The reduction in mRNA of two proinflammatory cytokines could be important for the incidence of hepatic complications related to TPN. PMID:22337230

  18. Parenteral organophosphorus poisoning in a rural emergency department: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Poisoning is a common presentation in the emergency department. Oral exposures to organophosphorus compounds are especially frequent in rural and agricultural regions of South Asia and throughout the developing world. Case presentation Here we report a case of deliberate self-harm with an organophosphorus pesticide via the relatively uncommon parenteral route. A young woman injected herself with chlorpyriphos. Although the cholinergic effects were mild, cellulitis and abscess development were noted as a result. Conclusion Resource limited agricultural countries like Nepal present health care workers with numerous challenges in poisoning management. This case represents a rare but potentially morbid method of agrochemical poison exposure. PMID:24321121

  19. Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy in an Academic Practice in Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Touzard Romo, F; Resnick, B; Perez-Cioe, M; Flanigan, TP; Kojic, E; Beckwith, CG

    2015-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is an increasingly utilized treatment modality that has been proven to be safe and cost-effective for treating infections that require prolonged antimicrobial treatment. Adequate patient selection, a structured OPAT team with an effective communication system, and routine clinical monitoring are key elements to establish a successful OPAT program. The Infectious Diseases and Immunology Center at The Miriam Hospital offers a multidisciplinary OPAT model coordinated by infectious diseases specialists and serves as a major referral center in Rhode Island. PMID:25562060

  20. Right atrial thrombus associated with subclavian catheter developed due to total parenteral nutrition application

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Nursel; Basarici, Ibrahim; Erbasan, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheterization as a frequent routine clinical procedure may have significant complications. Mechanical complications may occur during catheter placement, whereas thromboembolic and infectious complications can be seen during follow-up. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) associated central venous catheterizations may result in early mechanical complications and thrombotic and infectious complications in the long term. This paper describes a patient diagnosed as mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy requiring long-term central venous catheterization for TPN implementation, who had an infected thrombus on the catheter tip resected by cardiac surgery. PMID:27212985

  1. Examination of factors that lead to complications for new home parenteral nutrition patients.

    PubMed

    de Burgoa, Lori Jeris; Seidner, Douglas; Hamilton, Cindy; Stafford, Judy; Steiger, Ezra

    2006-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition carries a risk of infectious, metabolic, and mechanical complications that cause significant morbidity and mortality. This study investigated the incidence and the causative factors of these complications that occur within the first 90 days after discharge from the hospital to home. Data were prospectively collected and analyzed for 97 adult patients. A complication developed in one third of the patients, and the majority required rehospitalization. Infectious complications were the most prevalent, followed by mechanical and then metabolic complications. The authors describe their methods of collecting data in a quantifiable manner with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.

  2. Gamma processing technology: an alternative technology for terminal sterilization of parenterals.

    PubMed

    Reid, B D

    1995-01-01

    This paper will outline the advantages of utilizing gamma radiation as a means for terminally sterilizing parenterals and other pharmaceutical products. The factors which must be evaluated in order to qualify a product for radiation sterilization will be detailed. It will also compare the characteristics of this method with other technologies currently available. The highest SAL can be achieved by combining a knowledge of the microbial quality of the raw materials, and the manufacturing environment with a formulation designed to promote the most radiation stable form of the product.

  3. Enteral versus parenteral feeding. Effects on septic morbidity after blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Kudsk, K A; Croce, M A; Fabian, T C; Minard, G; Tolley, E A; Poret, H A; Kuhl, M R; Brown, R O

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the importance of route of nutrient administration on septic complications after blunt and penetrating trauma, 98 patients with an abdominal trauma index of at least 15 were randomized to either enteral or parenteral feeding within 24 hours of injury. Septic morbidity was defined as pneumonia, intra-abdominal abscess, empyema, line sepsis, or fasciitis with wound dehiscence. Patients were fed formulas with almost identical amounts of fat, carbohydrate, and protein. Two patients died early in the study. The enteral group sustained significantly fewer pneumonias (11.8% versus total parenteral nutrition 31.%, p less than 0.02), intra-abdominal abscess (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and line sepsis (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and sustained significantly fewer infections per patient (p less than 0.03), as well as significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.05). Although there were no differences in infection rates in patients with injury severity score less than 20 or abdominal trauma index less than or equal to 24, there were significantly fewer infections in patients with an injury severity score greater than 20 (p less than 0.002) and abdominal trauma index greater than 24 (p less than 0.005). Enteral feeding produced significantly fewer infections in the penetrating group (p less than 0.05) and barely missed the statistical significance in the blunt-injured patients (p = 0.08). In the subpopulation of patients requiring more than 20 units of blood, sustaining an abdominal trauma index greater than 40 or requiring reoperation within 72 hours, there were significantly fewer infections per patient (p = 0.03) and significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.01). There is a significantly lower incidence of septic morbidity in patients fed enterally after blunt and penetrating trauma, with most of the significant changes occurring in the

  4. [Indication and effectiveness of endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation for the home care patient].

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Hida, S; Higasa, K; Shinomiya, S; Matsumoto, T; Fukuoka, K; Yamanaka, E; Ozaki, S; Takayama, E

    2000-12-01

    We are managing 8 home care patients who have a gastrostomy made using an endoscopic percutaneous technique as a route of parenteral alimentation. Based on our experience, the preconditions for an endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation are 1. normal gastrointestinal function, 2. difficulty in swallowing, 3. possibility that the caregiver can manage the gastrostomy. When we performed an endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation for 8 home care patients, we obtained the several advantages mentioned below. 1. Swallowing pneumonia was prevented. 2. Adequate amount of alimental liquid could be infused. 3. Patient could take a bath or shower with the gastrostomy, and good QOL was realized. 4. The home care patient with the gastrostomy could have a satisfactorily long life.

  5. High rates of resolution of cholestasis in parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease with fish oil-based lipid emulsion monotherapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our research was conducted to determine factors leading to resolution of cholestasis in patients with parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease treated with fish-oil-based lipid emulsion (FOLE). We used a prospective observational study of 57 infants <6 months of age with parenteral nutrition-as...

  6. A multicenter, retrospective study of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension transitioned from parenteral prostacyclin therapy to inhaled iloprost

    PubMed Central

    Channick, Richard N.; Frantz, Robert P.; Kawut, Steven M.; Palevsky, Harold; Tumuluri, Ramagopal; Sulica, Roxana; Lauto, Paula O.; Benton, Wade W.; de Boisblanc, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by progressive increases in pulmonary vascular resistance, leading to right heart failure and death. Guidelines recommend customization of treatment, necessitating the development of effective strategies for transitioning patients among treatments. In this study, we characterized our experience with patient transitions from parenteral prostacyclin to inhaled iloprost. We retrospectively assessed records from 11 centers of 37 consecutive patients with PAH aged ≥ 18 years who were treated with intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) prostacyclin analogues and transitioned to inhaled iloprost. The transition period began on the first day of inhaled iloprost with the intent of discontinuing parenteral prostacyclin and ended on the first day on inhaled iloprost free of parenteral prostacyclin. Persistence was defined as the absence of (1) parenteral prostacyclin while remaining on inhaled iloprost during post-transition Days 1-90 and (2) no reinitiation of parenteral prostacyclin during post-transition Days 90-365. All patients were clinically stable before transitioning to inhaled iloprost. The mean age was 46.5 years, 70.3% were female, 51.4% had idiopathic PAH, and 43.0% were in New York Heart Association Functional Class III. Among patients with an overlapping transition, the mean transition period was 10.5 days. A transition dosing algorithm was used in 10 patients (27.0%). At one year, 78.4% of the patients remained persistent on inhaled iloprost and 81.1% were free of clinical worsening. In selected patients on background oral PAH therapy, transitioning from parenteral prostacyclin to inhaled iloprost appears safe and feasible and is associated with long-term success. Further study is needed to define the optimal patient selection criteria and transition algorithm. PMID:24015339

  7. Hospital length-of-stay and costs among pulmonary embolism patients treated with rivaroxaban versus parenteral bridging to warfarin.

    PubMed

    Weeda, Erin R; Wells, Philip S; Peacock, W Frank; Fermann, Gregory J; Baugh, Christopher W; Ashton, Veronica; Crivera, Concetta; Wildgoose, Peter; Schein, Jeff R; Coleman, Craig I

    2017-04-01

    We sought to compare length-of-stay (LOS), total hospital costs, and readmissions among pulmonary embolism (PE) patients treated with rivaroxaban versus parenterally bridged warfarin. We identified adult PE (primary diagnostic code = 415.1x) patients in the Premier Database (11/2012-9/2015), and included those with ≥1 PE diagnostic test on days 0-2. Rivaroxaban users (allowing ≤2 days of prior parenteral therapy) were 1:1 propensity score matched to patients parenterally bridged to warfarin. LOS, total costs, and readmission for venous thromboembolism (VTE) or major bleeding within the same or subsequent 2 months were compared between cohorts. Separate analyses were performed in low-risk PE patients. Rivaroxaban use was associated with a 1.4-day [95 % confidence interval (CI) -1.47 to -1.28] shorter LOS, and $2322 (95 % CI -$2499 to -$2146) reduction in costs compared to parenterally bridged warfarin (p < 0.001 for both). There was no difference in readmission for VTE (1.5 versus 1.7 %) or major bleeding (0.3 versus 0.2 %) between the rivaroxaban and parenterally bridged warfarin cohorts (p ≥ 0.27 for both). Results were similar in low-risk patients (0.2-1.0 day and $251-$1751 reductions in LOS and costs, respectively, p ≤ 0.01 for all). In patients with PE, rivaroxaban was associated with reduced LOS and costs, without increased risk of readmission versus parenterally bridged warfarin. Similar results were observed in low-risk PE patients.

  8. Ampicillin-sulbactam: an update on the use of parenteral and oral forms in bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Betrosian, Alex P; Douzinas, Emmanuel E

    2009-09-01

    Ampicillin-sulbactam has a wide range of antibacterial activity that includes Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. However, the drug is not active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and pathogens producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases. The combination could be considered particularly active against Acinetobacter baumannii infections due to the intrinsic activity of sulbactam. The drug is indicated as empirical therapy for a broad range of community acquired infections supervened in adults or children and is effective in either parenteral (ampicillin-sulbactam) or oral (as a mutual prodrug sultamicillin) form. In clinical trials, sultamicillin has proved clinically and bacteriologically effective in adults and children against a variety of frequently encountered infections, including mild upper and lower respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, diabetic foot and skin and soft tissue infections. Furthermore, adverse effects rarely occur with the diarrhoea to represent the most commonly reported. The parenteral ampicillin-sulbactam is indicated for community infections of mild-to-moderate severity acquired infections such as intra-abdominal or gynecological. Moreover, it seems to represent the alternative of choice for the treatment of A. baumannii infections for carbapenem-resistant strains in the nosocomial setting. Thus, ampicillin-sulbactam remains a valuable agent in the physician's armamentarium in the management of adult and pediatric infections.

  9. Changes in total body water and extracellular fluid volume in infants receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Coran, A G; Drongowski, R A; Wesley, J R

    1984-12-01

    The nature of weight gain seen in infants receiving total parenteral nutrition continues to be controversial. The debate centers around whether or not the weight gain represents an increase in body mass or water retention. The following study was carried out to answer this question. Eighteen infants receiving peripheral or central intravenous nutrition following major surgery were studied for periods ranging from 1 to 17 weeks. The following studies were carried out after receiving informed consent from the parents and in accordance with the standards established by the Human Use Committee. Total body water was measured using the nonradioactive isotope, deuterium oxide; extracellular fluid volume was assayed using the nonradioactive isotope, sodium bromide. Both body fluid compartments were calculated using the Fick principle of dye dilution. Following double vacuum distillation, serum deuterium oxide was assayed using the falling drop technique. Serum bromide was measured by a technique developed in our laboratory that involves the complexing of bromide with gold chloride and the measurement of this chemical complex colorimetrically. Weight gain was observed in all patients. Total body water percent body weight was 82% +/- 15% prior to the initiation of intravenous nutrition; it decreased within the first week to 71% +/- 12% and then stabilized for the remainder of the study period at 75% +/- 7%. The extracellular fluid volume percent body weight was 56% +/- 15% prior to the start of intravenous nutrition; it fell to 47% +/- 10% during the first week of parenteral nutrition, and then stabilized at 40% +/- 9%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Review of Copper Provision in the Parenteral Nutrition of Adults [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Callum

    2017-04-01

    The essential trace element copper (Cu) is required for a range of physiologic processes, including wound healing and functioning of the immune system. The correct amount of Cu must be provided in parenteral nutrition (PN) if deficiency and toxicity are to be avoided. While provision in line with the standard recommendations should suffice for most patients, Cu requirements may be higher in patients with increased gastrointestinal losses and severe burns and lower in those with cholestasis. The tests of Cu status that are currently available for clinical use are unreliable. Serum Cu concentration is the most commonly ordered test but is insensitive to Cu deficiency and toxicity and is misleadingly increased during the acute phase response. These limitations make it difficult for prescribers to assess Cu status and to decide how much Cu to provide. There is a need for better tests of Cu status to be developed to decrease uncertainty and improve individualization of Cu dosing. More information is needed on Cu requirements in disease and Cu contamination of PN components and other intravenous fluids. New multi-trace element products should be developed that provide Cu doses in line with the 2012 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition recommendations. This article discusses the evaluation and treatment of Cu deficiency and toxicity in patients treated with PN.

  11. Bacterial infection of central venous catheters in short-term total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Chan, L; Ngeow, Y F; Parasakthi, N

    1998-03-01

    Fourteen severely ill ventilated patients in an intensive care unit, requiring short-term total parenteral nutrition, were examined for catheter-related infection. Microbiological analysis using Maki's SQ technique was carried out on catheter exit site, catheter hub, proximal subcutaneous segment of catheter and catheter up. Qualitative cultures were carried out on total parenteral nutrition and peripheral blood samples. Twenty six of 29 catheters removed (90%) were culture positive but only 7 catheters were related to positive blood cultures, giving a catheter-related bacteremia (CRB) rate of 24%. Haematogenous seeding was strongly implicated in 7/29 (24%) of catheters. Patients' skin flora appeared to be the main source of catheter-related infection. The organisms isolated for patients with CRB included coagulase-negative staphylococci, Acinetobacter and Klebsiella. It is suggested that to control infective complications of central venous catheters, emphasis should be focused on specialised intravenous therapy teams and the use of strict protocols for insertion and care of central lines.

  12. Plasma ammonia levels in preterm infants receiving parenteral nutrition with crystalline L-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Shohat, M; Wielunsky, E; Reisner, S H

    1984-01-01

    In order to investigate the severity and incidence of hyperammonemia in preterm infants receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with crystalline L-amino acids having high arginine content (Travasol), we determined the plasma ammonia (PA) levels in a group of 29 preterm infants on TPN, weekly and 1 wk posttherapy. Their mean gestational age was 29.9 +/- 2.6 wk and mean birth weight 1208 +/- 262 g. Thirty five blood samples obtained from 15 preterm infants not on TPN with mean gestational age 32.2 +/- 1.9 wk and a birth weight of 1495 +/- 161 g served as a control. In the parenteral nutrition group the mean PA level (140 +/- 58 micrograms/100 ml) was significantly higher (p less than 0.001) than that in the same group one week post TPN (97 +/- 34 micrograms/100 ml) and in the control group (86 +/- 35 micrograms/100 ml). The incidence of hyperammonemia (greater than 160 micrograms/100 ml) was 30% in the TPN group versus 3% in the controls (p less than 0.01). Maximal PA level during that treatment was 405 versus 216 micrograms/100 ml 1 wk post-TPN versus 163 micrograms/100 ml in the controls. The data show a significant increase in PA levels in preterm infants receiving TPN with Travasol, possibly because of its high glycine content.

  13. Hepatic Overexpression of GRP94 in a Rabbit Model of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xueping; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yu, Lingling; Xu, Yumin; Feng, Xing; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To use a rabbit model of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) to study changes of the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) marker glucose regulatory protein 94 (GRP94) and determine its role in the pathogenesis of PNALD. Methods. A rabbit PNALD model total parenteral nutrition (TPN) group was established. A corresponding control group received breast-feeding for one week. Serum biochemical parameters were measured and liver histological examinations were performed. The level of GRP94 mRNA and protein were measured. Results. The results showed that the serum TBIL, DBIL, and γ-GT levels in the TPN group were significantly higher than those in the control group, while levels of serum ALB in TPN group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The immunohistochemistry results showed that the protein expression level of GRP94 in the liver of TPN group was significantly increased compared with the control group. The RT-PCR results showed that the level of GRP94 mRNA in the liver of the TPN group was significantly higher compared with the control group. Conclusions. The mRNA and protein levels of GRP94 in the TPN group were both significantly increased, indicating that ERS may be directly related to the occurrence and development of PNALD. PMID:25918521

  14. Parenteral magnesium load testing with /sup 28/Mg in weanling and young adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Caddell, J.L.; Calhoun, N.R.; Howard, M.P.; Patterson, K.Y.; Smith, J.C. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    A sound diagnostic test for Mg deficiency is needed. This is a report of the parenteral Mg load test conducted in weanling and young adult rats fed a purified basal diet containing 3 mg magnesium/100 g with 150 mg of added magnesium/100 g (control) or 0 added magnesium (deficient). Weanlings were studied at about 1 week of dietary treatment and young adults at 2 weeks. The protocol included: a) a 6-hour preload urinary collection; b) an intraperitoneal load of 15 mg of magnesium/kg (weanlings) or 12 mg/kg (young adults) with 2 microCi 28Mg given simultaneously with each load; c) a 6-hour postload urinary collection; d) chemical analysis of selected tissues and urine for Mg; and e) 28Mg counting 6 and 24 hours postload. Controls all excreted large amounts of Mg pre- and postload, retaining less than 26% of nonradioactive loads. They had high urinary 28Mg counts. In Mg-deficient animals, the concentration of Mg in bone more than halved. These animals avidly conserved Mg and retained over 85% of nonradioactive Mg loads. Their 28Mg activity in vital organs was 3--6 times greater than in controls. We concluded that the parenteral Mg load test reliably identifies severe Mg deficiency.

  15. Construction and Characterization of Human Rotavirus Recombinant VP8* Subunit Parenteral Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xiaobo; Cao, Dianjun; Jones, Ronald W.; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2012-01-01

    Two currently licensed live oral rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, the efficacy of such vaccines in selected low-income African and Asian countries is much lower than that in middle or high-income countries. Additionally, these two vaccines have recently been associated with rare case of intussusception in vaccinated infants. We developed a novel recombinant subunit parenteral rotavirus vaccine which may be more effective in low-income countries and also avert the potential problem of intussusception. Truncated recombinant VP8* (ΔVP8*) protein of human rotavirus strain Wa P[8], DS-1 P[4] or 1076 P[6] expressed in E. coli was highly soluble and was generated in high yield. Guinea pigs hyperimmunized intramuscularly with each of the ΔVP8* proteins (i.e., (P[8], P[4] or P[6]) developed high levels of homotypic as well as variable levels of heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the selected ΔVP8* proteins when administered to mice at a clinically relevant dosage, route and schedule, elicited high levels of serum anti-VP8* IgG and/or neutralizing antibodies. Our data indicated that the ΔVP8* proteins may be a plausible additional candidate as new parenteral rotavirus vaccines. PMID:22885016

  16. Construction and characterization of human rotavirus recombinant VP8* subunit parenteral vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaobo; Cao, Dianjun; Jones, Ronald W; Li, Jianping; Szu, Shousun; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2012-09-21

    Two currently licensed live oral rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) are highly efficacious against severe rotavirus diarrhea. However, the efficacy of such vaccines in selected low-income African and Asian countries is much lower than that in middle or high-income countries. Additionally, these two vaccines have recently been associated with rare case of intussusception in vaccinated infants. We developed a novel recombinant subunit parenteral rotavirus vaccine which may be more effective in low-income countries and also avert the potential problem of intussusception. Truncated recombinant VP8* (ΔVP8*) protein of human rotavirus strain Wa P[8], DS-1 P[4] or 1076 P[6] expressed in Escherichia coli was highly soluble and was generated in high yield. Guinea pigs hyperimmunized intramuscularly with each of the ΔVP8* proteins (i.e., P[8], P[4] or P[6]) developed high levels of homotypic as well as variable levels of heterotypic neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the selected ΔVP8* proteins when administered to mice at a clinically relevant dosage, route and schedule, elicited high levels of serum anti-VP8* IgG and/or neutralizing antibodies. Our data indicated that the ΔVP8* proteins may be a plausible additional candidate as new parenteral rotavirus vaccines.

  17. Incidence and Risk Factors of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Cholestasis in Omani Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Sharef, Sharef W.; Al-Sinani, Siham; Al-Naamani, Khalid; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Reyes, Zenaida S.; Al-Ryiami, Hilal; Khan, Ashfaq A.; Al-Mamari, Watfa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis (PNAC) is one of the most challenging complications of prolonged parenteral nutrition (PN) in neonates. There is a lack of research investigating its incidence in newborn infants in Oman and the Arab region. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the incidence of PNAC and its risk factors in Omani neonates. Methods: This retrospective study took place between January and April 2014. All neonates who received PN for ≥14 days during a four-year period (June 2009 to May 2013) at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, were enrolled. Results: A total of 1,857 neonates were admitted to the NICU over the study period and 135 neonates (7.3%) received PN for ≥14 days. Determining the incidence of PNAC was only possible in 97 neonates; of these, 38 (39%) had PNAC. The main risk factors associated with PNAC were duration of PN, duration of enteral starvation, gastrointestinal surgeries, blood transfusions and sepsis. Neonates with PNAC had a slightly higher incidence of necrotising enterocolitis in comparison to those without PNAC. Conclusion: This study found a PNAC incidence of 39% in Omani neonates. There were several significant risk factors for PNAC in Omani neonates; however, after logistic regression analysis, only total PN duration remained statistically significant. Preventive strategies should be implemented in NICUs so as to avoid future chronic liver disease in this population. PMID:26052457

  18. Iron Supplementation Attenuates the Inflammatory Status of Anemic Piglets by Regulating Hepcidin.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yutian; Guo, Bingxiu; Liu, Dan; Xiong, Haitao; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2015-09-01

    Iron deficiency is common throughout the world and has been linked to immunity impairments. Using piglets to model human infants, we assessed the impact of systemic iron homeostasis on proinflammatory status. Artificially reared piglets were parenterally supplied with iron dextran by intramuscular administration at the age of 3 days. Relative to no iron supplementation (control), iron dextran-treated (FeDex) piglets increased hematological parameters as well as iron levels in serum and tissues from days 21 to 49. High expression of hepcidin was observed in FeDex-treated piglets, which correlated with suppressed expression of ferroportin in duodenum. Lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine (IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-1β) transcripts were detected in ileum of FeDex-treated piglets, which indicated that iron supplementation could attenuate the increase of inflammatory cytokines caused by iron deficiency. Histopathological analysis of liver and duodenum proved the less inflammatory responses after iron supplementation. Hepcidin was highly stimulated by FeDex supplementation and attenuated the inflammation of anemia, which implied that hepcidin might had antiinflammatory function and is a candidate regulator of the cross-talk between iron regulation and inflammation.

  19. Psychology: Teacher Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Rebecca

    This supplement provides teachers with tests, quizzes, answers to questions in the text, and general teaching information for using the student text, "Psychology," by Rebecca Stark. Quizzes included are on the topics of human development; the nervous system; the brain; cognitive development; sensation and perception; conditioning; learning;…

  20. Weight Loss Nutritional Supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerson, Joan M.

    Obesity has reached what may be considered epidemic proportions in the United States, not only for adults but for children. Because of the medical implications and health care costs associated with obesity, as well as the negative social and psychological impacts, many individuals turn to nonprescription nutritional weight loss supplements hoping for a quick fix, and the weight loss industry has responded by offering a variety of products that generates billions of dollars each year in sales. Most nutritional weight loss supplements are purported to work by increasing energy expenditure, modulating carbohydrate or fat metabolism, increasing satiety, inducing diuresis, or blocking fat absorption. To review the literally hundreds of nutritional weight loss supplements available on the market today is well beyond the scope of this chapter. Therefore, several of the most commonly used supplements were selected for critical review, and practical recommendations are provided based on the findings of well controlled, randomized clinical trials that examined their efficacy. In most cases, the nutritional supplements reviewed either elicited no meaningful effect or resulted in changes in body weight and composition that are similar to what occurs through a restricted diet and exercise program. Although there is some evidence to suggest that herbal forms of ephedrine, such as ma huang, combined with caffeine or caffeine and aspirin (i.e., ECA stack) is effective for inducing moderate weight loss in overweight adults, because of the recent ban on ephedra manufacturers must now use ephedra-free ingredients, such as bitter orange, which do not appear to be as effective. The dietary fiber, glucomannan, also appears to hold some promise as a possible treatment for weight loss, but other related forms of dietary fiber, including guar gum and psyllium, are ineffective.

  1. Examples of Dietary Supplement Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... is absorbed by the body.Supplement: Saw PalmettoPossible drug-supplement interaction with:Birth control pills. Can decrease effects of estrogen in the body, which can reduce the effectiveness of birth control ...

  2. Dietary Supplements: What Is Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and side effects of dietary supplements Dietary supplement advertising and promotion Talking with your doctor about dietary ... Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook Instagram Cancer Information, Answers, and Hope. Available Every ...

  3. Vitamin Supplements: Healthy or Hoax?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recognition & Awards Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Vitamin Supplements: Healthy or Hoax? Updated:Jun 12,2015 Can vitamin and mineral supplements really make you healthier? Overwhelmed ...

  4. First Report on Infant Acute Urticaria after Mother’s Parenteral Use of Meglumine Antimoniate (Glucantime): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    MOZAFARI, Omid; SHOROFI, Seyed Afshin; YOUSEFI, Seyde Sedighe

    2016-01-01

    Pentavalent antimonials are still the first drug of choice for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). Like other treatments, they can cause adverse reactions including musculoskeletal pain, gastrointestinal disturbances, and mild to moderate headaches. In this paper, we report the first case of an infant who developed acute urticaria after her mother’s parenteral use of meglumine antimoniate (glucantime). PMID:27957467

  5. Fish oil–based lipid emulsions in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease: An ongoing positive experience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported the beneficial effect of fish oil-based lipid emulsions (FOLEs) as monotherapy in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). In this report, we share our ongoing experience at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, in the use of FOLE in treatment of P...

  6. Gluconeogenesis is not regulated by either glucose or insulin in extremely low birth weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine potential factors regulating gluconeogenesis (GNG) in extremely low birth weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition. Seven infants (birth weight, 0.824 +/- 0.068 kg; gestational age, 25.4 +/- 0.5 weeks; postnatal age, 3.3 +/- 0.2 days) were studied for 11 hou...

  7. Enteral feeding induces diet-dependent mucosal dysfunction, bacterial overgrowth and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm parenterally-fed pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preterm neonates have an immature gut and metabolism and may benefit from a period of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) before enteral food introduction. Conversely, delayed enteral feeding may inhibit gut maturation and sensitize to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal mass and NEC lesions we...

  8. Addition of parenteral cefoxitin to regimen of oral antibiotics for elective colorectal operations. A randomized prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Schoetz, D J; Roberts, P L; Murray, J J; Coller, J A; Veidenheimer, M C

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of cefoxitin, a perioperative parenteral antibiotic, combined with mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotics to prevent wound infections and other septic complications in patients undergoing elective colorectal operations, was examined in a prospective randomized study. All 197 patients who completed the study received mechanical bowel preparation and oral neomycin/erythromycin base. In addition a perioperative parenteral antibiotic was given in three divided doses to 101 patients. The other 96 patients received no parenteral antibiotics. The overall incidence of intra-abdominal septic complications was 7.3% (7 of 96) in the control group (no cefoxitin) and 5% (5 of 101) in the treatment group (cefoxitin). This difference was not statistically significant. The incidence of abdominal wound infection was 14.6% in the control group and 5% in the treatment group, a statistically significant difference (p = 0.02). The addition of perioperative parenteral cefoxitin greatly reduced the incidence of wound infections in patients undergoing elective colorectal operations who had been prepared with mechanical bowel cleansing and oral antimicrobial agents. PMID:2100983

  9. Organisation, regulations, preparation and logistics of parenteral nutrition in hospitals and homes; the role of the nutrition support team - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 8.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, S C; Kester, L; Meier, R; Radziwill, R; Schwab, D; Thul, P

    2009-11-18

    PN (parenteral nutrition) should be standardised to ensure quality and to reduce complications, and it should be carried out in consultation with a specialised nutrition support team whenever possible. Interdisciplinary nutrition support teams should be established in all hospitals because effectiveness and efficiency in the implementation of PN are increased. The tasks of the team include improvements of quality of care as well as enhancing the benefit to cost ratio. Therapeutic decisions must be taken by attending physicians, who should collaborate with the nutrition support team. "All-in-One" bags are generally preferred for PN in hospitals and may be industrially manufactured, industrially manufactured with the necessity to add micronutrients, or be prepared "on-demand" within or outside the hospital according to a standardised or individual composition and under consideration of sterile and aseptic conditions. A standardised procedure should be established for introduction and advancement of enteral or oral nutrition. Home PN may be indicated if the expected duration of when PN exceeds 4 weeks. Home PN is a well established method for providing long-term PN, which should be indicated by the attending physician and be reviewed by the nutrition support team. The care of home PN patients should be standardised whenever possible. The indication for home PN should be regularly reviewed during the course of PN.

  10. Instant and supersaturated dissolution of naproxen and sesamin (poorly water-soluble drugs and supplements) nanoparticles prepared by continuous expansion of liquid carbon dioxide solution through long dielectric nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Toshihiko; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Nakahara, Koichi

    2012-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of naproxen (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, BCS Class 2) and sesamin (a poorly water-soluble lignan) were investigated. By applying a newly developed rapid expansion system of liquid carbon dioxide solutions equipped with a dielectric nozzle, well-separated and fine both naproxen NPs (averaged particle size (APS) = 46.9 nm) and sesamin NPs (APS = 60.2 nm) were obtained without heating, surfactants, and co-solvents. Obtained naproxen and sesamin NPs had large surface/weight ratio, therefore, they showed instant dissolution to water until about ten percent higher than the saturated concentrations. In addition, the technique developed in the study has big advantage on producing especially drug NPs because the NPs produced by the method never includes neither poisonous additives (especially co-solvents and detergents) nor thermally denatured compounds.

  11. Republication of: New solutions to Einstein's equations of gravitation. B. Explicit determination of static, axially symmetric fields. By Rudolf Bach. With a supplement on the static two-body problem. By H. Weyl.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Rudolf; Weyl, Hermann

    2012-03-01

    This is the English translation of the third of a series of 3 papers by Hermann Weyl (the third one jointly with Rudolf Bach), first published in 1917-1922, in which the authors derived and discussed the now-famous Weyl two-body static axially symmetric vacuum solution of Einstein's equations. The English translations of the other two papers are published alongside this one. The papers have been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for re-publication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. This republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Gernot Neugebauer, David Petroff and Bahram Mashhoon, and by a brief biography of R. Bach, written by H. Goenner.

  12. [ERGOGENIC SPORT SUPPLEMENTS FOR ATHLETES].

    PubMed

    Arieli, Rakefet; Lahav, Yair

    2016-06-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from recreational athletes to professional athletes. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have adverse effects. Nutritional supplements are categorized into the following categories: I. Apparently Effective. II. Possibly Effective. III. Too Early To Tell. IV. Apparently Ineffective. This article will review 4 ergogenic supplements which are categorized in the first category--"Apparently Effective"--1) Buffer agents 2) Creatine 3) Caffeine and 4 Nitric Oxide. Given the widespread use of performance enhancing supplements, physicians, and dietitians should be prepared to counsel athletes about their effectiveness, safety and legality.

  13. Effective Nutritional Supplement Combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Matt; Cribb, Paul J.

    Few supplement combinations that are marketed to athletes are supported by scientific evidence of their effectiveness. Quite often, under the rigor of scientific investigation, the patented combination fails to provide any greater benefit than a group given the active (generic) ingredient. The focus of this chapter is supplement combinations and dosing strategies that are effective at promoting an acute physiological response that may improve/enhance exercise performance or influence chronic adaptations desired from training. In recent years, there has been a particular focus on two nutritional ergogenic aids—creatine monohydrate and protein/amino acids—in combination with specific nutrients in an effort to augment or add to their already established independent ergogenic effects. These combinations and others are discussed in this chapter.

  14. Supplementation patterns in marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Nieman, D C; Gates, J R; Butler, J V; Pollett, L M; Dietrich, S J; Lutz, R D

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the use of supplements in a large group of endurance runners (no. = 347) who had participated in the 1987 Los Angeles Marathon. Three-day dietary records were analyzed for nutrient content and supplement usage. The runners' supplementation patterns with respect to demographics, dietary quality, training habits, and race performance were investigated. In general, no significant associations were found between supplement use and the aforementioned variables. Use of supplements, especially vitamins C and E, calcium, and zinc, increased with age (p less than .05). Daily use of at least one type of supplement was reported by 29% of the runners; 48% reported use of at least one type of supplement within the 3-day period.

  15. Active viral B hepatitis in parenteral drug abusers with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Leevy, C B; Nurse, H; Kapila, R

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-percent of 47 parenteral drug abusers with hepatomegaly and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome had HBV DNA in serum, although only 27% were HBsAg or "e" antigen-positive by polyclonal radioimmunoassay. Liver biopsies from each of 37 HBV DNA seropositive patients showed HBV DNA and were HBcAg-positive. The absence of positive HBsAg and "e" antigen in HBV DNA-positive patients was attributable to the presence of immune complexes; after in vitro dissociation of these complexes there was an increase in HBsAg from 24% to 86%, and of "e" antigen from 19% to 62%. These data indicate that actively replicating hepatitis B virus is common in patients with AIDS, and that precautions should be taken to prevent its dissemination. Therapy in these patients should address both human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B virus infections.

  16. [Endocarditis caused by Trichoderma longibrachiatumin a patient receiving home parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Peralta, Laura I; Mañas Vera, Ma Reyes; García Delgado, Manuel J; Pérez de la Cruz, Antonio J

    2013-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) improves the quality of life of the patients although it has complications. Catheter-related infections and mechanical complications are the most frequent ones. We report the case of endocarditis over catheter in a man suffering from short bowel and receiving HPN. The special features of the case are firstly the catheter was a remaining fragment on the right atrial and secondly the infection was caused by Trichoderma longibrachiatum, an isolated fact regarding this pathology so far. Conventional surgery was applied to take the catheter out. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Ochrobactrum anthropi and Trichoderma longibrachiatum were isolated from the surgical specimen. The extraction of the infected catheter along with antibiotic therapy led to the complete recovery of the subject. Ochrobactrum anthropi and Trichoderma longibrachiatum are unusual microorganisms but they are acquiring more relevance. Although there is no agreement about intravascular retained catheter management, the most recommended approach consists on monitoring them and removing the device in case of complications.

  17. Evidence-based practice in the management of vascular access devices for home parenteral nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Marcia

    2006-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection and catheter occlusion are potential significant complications of parenteral nutrition therapy. The increased incidence and associated morbidity, mortality, increased costs, and quality-of-life issues experienced with these adverse events necessitate specialized management of vascular access devices. The host coagulation response to biomaterials and the associated development of biofilm on vascular devices are complex phenomena. Multiple interventions are required to prevent access of bacteria to both intraluminal and extraluminal catheter surfaces, and the occurrence of catheter occlusion. The discovery of the biofilm form of microbial life and the associated recalcitrance of biofilm bacteria to antimicrobials has provided insight into the failure of current prevention, diagnostic, and treatment protocols. Critical interventions are presented correlating current evidence with new discoveries in pathogenesis.

  18. [Generalized persistent lymphadenopathy syndrome in parenteral drug addicts. Lymph node biopsy study of 41 patients].

    PubMed

    Vera-Sempere, G; Vera-Sempere, F J; Guix-García, J

    1990-12-01

    Of a total of 41 VIH positive patients, parenteral drug addicts, with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy syndrome, we performed 43 lymph-node biopsies. In two sequential biopsies, 2 and 12 months respectively after the first biopsy, were carried-out. After a clinical follow-up (ranging between 4-28 months) 12 patients (24.3%) were qualified as SIDA cases according to CDC-1987 criteria. Lymph-node biopsy was of diagnostic or prognostic value in 16.27% and in 6.97% respectively. Upon comparing histological types and peripheral lymphocyte subsets it was demonstrated how the forms of major morphological deterioration tend to associate with a lower number of OKT4+ lymphocytes and a lower relation OKT4+/OKT8+.

  19. Use of intravenous iron dextran injection in children receiving total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Reed, M D; Bertino, J S; Halpin, T C

    1981-09-01

    We conducted studies using intravenous (IV) iron dextran injection in 14 hospitalized infants and children with iron deficiency who required total parenteral nutrition. A single, total dose of IV iron dextran was administered during a two-hour period (preceded by a test dose of 25 mg). Doses administered ranged from 50 to 782 mg, with an average dose of 15.2 mg/kg body weight. No adverse reactions were noted during the test dose or infusion. The IV administration of iron dextran appears to be a safe method of treatment for iron repletion in children who are unable to tolerate feedings as a result of malabsorption, inflammatory bowel disease, or chronic debilitating diseases.

  20. Efectiveness of long-term home parenteral nutrition with peripherally inserted central catheter: a case report

    PubMed

    Santacruz-Cerdán, Elisa; Arcano, Karina; Arrieta Blanco, Francisco; Ortiz Flores, Andrés; Mateo Lobo, Raquel; Botella Carretero, José Ignacio; Vázquez Martínez, Clotilde; Zamarrón Cuesta, Isabel

    2016-02-16

    The use of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in patients who can not obtain their nutritional requirements by the enteral route is increasing in recent years, allowing normalization lifestyle of patients. Neoplasm and mesenteric ischaemia are some of the diseases that most frequently require HPN in Spain. However, HPN is one of the cornerstones of the treatment of much less frequent illnesses as in the case of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis. We present the case of a patient with encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis and HPN support for more than 7 years with a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) for over 6 years without complications and the autonomy to perform his normal business activity. Given the exceptional nature of the case we refer it to its publication.

  1. [TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN A PREGNANT PATIENT WITH ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE DEFICIENCY].

    PubMed

    Contreras-Bolívar, Victoria; González-Molero, Inmaculada; Valdivieso, Pedro; Olveira, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of severe acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia secondary to lipoprotein lipase (LPL) deficiency in a pregnant patient with gestational diabetes, initially maneged with diet but it was later necessary to carry out artificial nutricional support measures: total parenteral nutrition. LPL deficiency might cause severe hypertriglyceridemia, repetition acute pancreatitis which is an unwieldy and severe situation during pregnancy. Acute familial hypertriglyceridemia pancreatitis accounts for 5% of cases, including LPL deficiency. The goal of treatment is to reach triglycerides levels below 500 mg/dl, being very low fat diet the treatment of choice, drugs or plasmapheresis techniques can also be associated. TPN enriched in ω3 fatty acids and glutamine was safe and effective in our patient with significant decrease in triglyceride levels.

  2. Red cell folate concentrations in patients with Crohn's disease on parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, M.; Iida, M.; Aoyagi, K.; Kohrogi, N.; Matsui, T.; Fujishima, M.

    1989-01-01

    To examine changes in the folate concentrations in red cell during relatively long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN), 10 Japanese patients with Crohn's disease (7 males), the mean Crohn's disease activity index on admission being 211, were given folic acid in a dose of 400 micrograms/day (AMA-FDA formulation) or 800 micrograms/day for 6-16 weeks (mean 10.5). The red cell folate concentrations were determined before TPN and once every week or 2-4 weeks thereafter. The folate concentrations were very low even after TPN with folic acid of 400 micrograms/day. In those given 800 micrograms of daily folic acid, the folate levels tended to increase, but did not reach the normal range. We propose that folic acid over 800 micrograms/day or a double dose of AMA-FDA formulation should be prescribed for Crohn's disease treated with long-term TPN. PMID:2515529

  3. Stability of cocarboxylase in parenteral nutrition mixtures stored in multilayer bags.

    PubMed

    Allwood, M C; Martin, H

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the stability of cocarboxylase, a thiamine derivative employed as a vitamin B1 source in multivitamin additives, in parenteral nutrition (PN) mixtures containing different commercial amino acid infusions. In particular, the influence of a metabisulphite-containing amino acid product, Freamine III, was investigated. A liquid chromatographic assay method for cocarboxylase was developed and employed to investigate cocarboxylase degradation during extended storage of PN mixtures at 5 degrees C in multilayered bags. Results indicated that cocarboxylase was relatively stable over the 28-day storage period in PN mixtures containing Synthamin or Vamin products as amino acid source. In contrast, degradation was accelerated in PN mixtures containing Freamine III, suggesting that cocarboxylase is degraded by sodium metabisulphite, showing similar sensitivity to thiamine.

  4. Formulation, stability, and administration of parenteral nutrition with new lipid emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Gil; Puzovic, Marko

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsions (IVLE) are an important source of energy and essential fatty acids and their incorporation into pediatric and adult parenteral nutrition (PN) regimens has revolutionized nutrition therapy. However, their clinical use has not been without risk, and will continue to remain so because of the intravenous route of administration. Pharmaceutical and microbiological concerns are centered around the methods of compounding all-in-one (AIO) admixtures, but these can be largely minimized with today's technologies and advanced understanding of aseptic principles. Modern lipid products, based on olive, coconut, and/or fish oils, have demonstrable formulation and clinical benefits over traditional soybean and safflower IVLE and, when combined in the new multi-chamber bags, can also offer improvements in stability and safety. This review outlines the rationale for different lipid formulations in PN admixtures, reviews the factors influencing stability and efficacy of lipid-based AIO regimens and evaluates some technologies for minimizing peroxidation and maximizing stability of AIO admixtures.

  5. [The progression of parenteral and enteral nutrition based on new guidelines].

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Yu, J C; Li, Z J; Wu, G H

    2017-01-01

    As people are getting a better understanding of organism's metabolism and the concept of disease treatment is being continuously updated, parenteral and enteral nutrition become an inter discipline subject that serves for the clinic and involves a number of disciplines. Just in the past five years, related guidelines at home and abroad have been published as much as more than 40. In order to better serve the clinical decision making, this text attempts to give a carding and interpretation from the three aspects of nutrition screening and assessment, the implementing of nutritional intervention and the progress of special nutrition support. It is observed that the standard clinical nutrition diagnosis and treatment process has been formed consensus. But in the practical application, there are still many details need to confirm and further study.

  6. [HOME AND AMBULATORY ARTIFICIAL NUTRITION (NADYA) GROUP REPORT, HOME PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN SPAIN, 2014].

    PubMed

    Wanden-Berghe, Carmina; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; Cuerda Compes, Cristina; Moreno Villares, José Manuel; Pérez de la Cruz, Antonio; Burgos Peláez, Rosa; Gómez Candela, Carmen; Virgili Casas, Nuria; Penacho Lázaro, M Angeles; Martinez Faedo, Ceferino; Garde Orbaiz, Carmen; Gonzalo Marín, Montserrat; Sanz Paris, Alejandro; Álvarez, Julia; Sánchez Martos, Eva Angeles; Martín Folgueras, Tomás; Campos Martín, Cristina; Matía Martín, Pilar; Zugasti, Ana; Carabaña Pérez, Fátima; García Zafra, Maria Victoria; Ponce Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Suárez Llanos, José Pablo; Martínez Costa, Cecilia; De Luis, Daniel; Apezetxea Celaya, Antxón; Luengo Pérez, Luis Miguel; Díaz Guardiola, Patricia; Gil Martinez, M Carmen; Del Olmo García, M Dolores; Leyes García, Pere; Vidal Casariego, Alfonso; Joaquin Ortiz, Clara; Sánchez-Vilar Burdiel, Olga; Laborda González, Lucía

    2015-12-01

    Objetivo: comunicar los datos del registro de Nutrición Parenteral Domiciliaria (NPD) del grupo de trabajo NADYA-SENPE del año 2014. Material y métodos: recopilación de los datos de NPD del registro “on-line” del grupo de Nutrición Artificial Domiciliaria y Ambulatoria (NADYA) desde el 1 de enero de 2014 al 31 de diciembre de 2014. Resultados: se registraron 220 pacientes, con 229 episodios de NPD, procedentes de 37 hospitales; lo que representa una tasa de 4,73 pacientes/millón de habitantes/ año 2014. Las patologías más frecuentes en los adultos fueron: ‘otros diagnósticos’ (22,3%), la neoplasia paliativa (20,4%), seguida por la neoplasia activa radical (11,8%) y la isquemia mesentérica (10,9%). En los niños las patologías más frecuentes fueron: ‘alteraciones congénitas intestinales’ (33,3%), seguidas por ‘intestino corto traumático’ y ‘otro diagnóstico’. Conclusiones: se observa un aumento del número de pacientes que reciben nutrición parenteral domiciliaria y de los centros colaboradores. Consideramos que la NPD debería ser regulada por la Administración Sanitaria en el marco del Consejo Interterritorial del Sistema Nacional de Salud, y que su inclusión en la Cartera de Servicios de los diferentes Servicios de Salud de las diferentes comunidades autónomas redundaría en un beneficio para el paciente y los profesionales.

  7. Meta-analysis of structured triglyceride versus other lipid emulsions for parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengbai; Li, Xueliang

    2013-06-01

    Structured triglyceride (STG) is a new emulsion synthesized from long-chain fatty acids and medium-chain fatty acids bound to the same glycerol backbone. We performed a meta-analysis to examine the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of STG for parenteral nutrition. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Chinese Biomedicine Database, with the last search done in May 2012. Only randomized controlled trials in humans published in Chinese or English were included. Search terms included structured triglyceride and structural lipid. Methodologic quality was evaluated using the Jadad Scale. Meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager 5.0.24 to calculate the weighted mean difference (WMD) and standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals. Twenty-one studies (833 participants) published in English or Chinese were included in the analysis. STG significantly affected plasma triglycerides (WMD = -0.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.29 to -0.01; P = 0.04), plasma glycerol (WMD = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.01-0.41; P = 0.04), free fatty acids (WMD = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.03-0.39; P = 0.02), nitrogen balance (SMD = 1.13; 95% CI, 0.26-1.99; P = 0.01), AST (WMD = -5.97; 95% CI, -7.17 to -4.76; P < 0.00001), and glucose (WMD = -0.18; 95% CI, -0.30 to -0.06; P = 004), but not respiratory quotient, resting energy expenditure, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, bilirubin, cholesterol, serum creatinine, or vital signs. STG is rapidly metabolized without harming the liver, and positively affects nitrogen balance. STG is at least as safe and effective for parenteral nutrition as other triglycerides.

  8. Parenteral administration of attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium ΔznuABC is protective against salmonellosis in piglets.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, J; Pesciaroli, M; Gaetarelli, B; Scaglione, F E; Pregel, P; Ammendola, S; Battistoni, A; Bollo, E; Alborali, G L; Pasquali, P

    2014-07-07

    A major cause of salmonellosis in humans is the contamination of pork products. Infection in pigs can be controlled using bio-security programs, but they are not sufficient in countries where a high level of infection is recorded. In this context, the use of vaccines can represent a valid supplementary method of control. Recently, we have demonstrated that an attenuated strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium ΔznuABC) is protective against systemic and enteric salmonellosis in mouse and pig infection models, candidating this strain as an oral attenuated vaccine. In this study, we compared the efficacy of this attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium strain when administered orally or parenterally. Furthermore, in order to reproduce a pseudo-natural infection model, vaccinated pigs were allocated in the same pen with animals shedding virulent Salmonella Typhimurium. Animals were monitored weekly after vaccination and contact with infected piglets. Diarrhea and ataxia were recorded and Salmonella shedding was tested individually through bacterial culture. After four weeks of cohousing, piglets were euthanized, after which lymph nodes reactivity and gross lesions of the gut sections were scored at necropsy. Organs were submitted to microbiological and histological analyses. The data reported herein show that parenterally vaccinated animals do not shed the attenuated strain, and at the same time the absence of symptoms and decrease in virulent strain shedding in feces from day 6 after challenge demonstrated protection against infection induced by virulent Salmonella Typhimurium. In conclusion, our findings suggest that this is an alternative route of Salmonella Typhimurium ΔznuABC administration, without ignoring the advantages associated with oral vaccination.

  9. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy for orthopedic infections - a successful public healthcare experience in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba; Felix, Cassia da Silva; Carvalho, Vladimir Cordeiro de; Giovani, Arlete Mazzini; Reis, Rosangela Suarti Dos; Beraldo, Marisa; Albuquerque, Edmir Peralta; Ferreira, Walter Cintra; Silva, Jorge Dos Santos; Lima, Ana Lucia Lei

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of orthopedic infections usually requires prolonged antimicrobial therapy, ranging from 14 days up to 6 months. Nowadays, rising levels of antimicrobial resistance demands parenteral therapy for many patients. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is a modality that allows treatment out of hospital in these situations. In Brazil, where a public universal healthcare system allows full coverage for all citizens, implantation and dissemination of OPAT programs would be beneficial for patients and for the system, because it would allow a better allocation of health resources. The Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da USP (IOT) started, in July 2013, a partnership with municipal health authorities in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in order to initiate an OPAT program in which patients discharged from that hospital would be able to continue antimicrobial therapy at primary care facilities. When necessary, patients could also receive their therapy at the day-hospital located at IOT. Primary care nursing and physician staff were trained about antimicrobial infusion and peripherally inserted central catheter manipulation. An OPAT specific antimicrobial protocol was designed and a special reference and counter-reference organized. As a result, 450 primary healthcare professionals were trained. In the first year of this program, 116 patients were discharged for OPAT. Chronic and acute osteomyelitis were most frequent diagnosis. Teicoplanin, ertapenem and tigecycline were the most used drugs. Duration of treatment varied from 10 to 180 days (average 101, median 42). Total sum of days in OPAT regimen was 11,698. Only 3 patients presented adverse effects. Partnership between services of different levels of complexity allowed implantation of a safe and effective public healthcare OPAT program for treatment of orthopedic infections. This program can serve as a model for developing similar strategies in other regions

  10. Early Parenteral Nutrition in Patients with Biliopancreatic Mass Lesions, a Prospective, Randomized Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Janine; Meffert, Peter J.; Vogt, Lena J.; Gärtner, Simone; Steveling, Antje; Kraft, Matthias; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Aghdassi, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with biliopancreatic tumors frequently suffer from weight loss and cachexia. The in-hospital work-up to differentiate between benign and malignant biliopancreatic lesions requires repeated pre-interventional fasting periods that can aggravate this problem. We conducted a randomized intervention study to test whether routine in-hospital peripheral intravenous nutrition on fasting days (1000 ml/24 h, 700 kcal) has a beneficial effect on body weight and body composition. Material and Methods 168 patients were screened and 100 enrolled in the trial, all undergoing in-hospital work-up for biliopancreatic mass lesions and randomized to either intravenous nutrition or control. Primary endpoint was weight loss at time of hospital discharge; secondary endpoints were parameters determined by bioelectric impedance analysis and quality of life recorded by the EORTC questionnaire. Results Within three months prior to hospital admission patients had a median self-reported loss of 4.0 kg (25*th: -10.0 kg and 75*th* percentile: 0.0kg) of body weight. On a multivariate analysis nutritional intervention increased body weight by 1.7 kg (95% CI: 0.204; 3.210, p = 0.027), particularly in patients with malignant lesions (2.7 kg (95% CI: 0.71; 4.76, p < 0.01). Conclusions In a hospital setting, patients with suspected biliopancreatic mass lesions stabilized their body weight when receiving parenteral nutrition in fasting periods even when no total parenteral nutrition was required. Analysis showed that this effect was greatest in patients with malignant tumors. Further studies will be necessary to see whether patient outcome is affected as well. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02670265 PMID:27861546

  11. Retrospective Evaluation of Parenteral Nutrition in Alpacas: 22 Cases (2002–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Clore, E.R.S.; Freeman, L.M.; Bedenice, D.; Buffington, C.A. Tony; Anderson, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Parenteral nutrition is an important method of nutritional support in hospitalized animals, but minimal information has been published on its use in camelids. Hypothesis/Objectives The purpose of this study was to characterize the use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in alpacas, evaluate the formulations used, and determine potential complications. Animals Twenty-two alpacas hospitalized at the Tufts Cummings School for Veterinary Medicine (site 1: n = 8) and the Ohio State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (site 2: n = 14). Methods A retrospective analysis of all alpacas that received TPN between 2002 and 2008 was performed to assess clinical indications, clinical and clinicopathologic data, and outcome. Results The most common underlying diseases in animals receiving TPN were gastrointestinal dysfunction (n = 16), hepatic disease (n = 2), and neoplasia (n = 2). Several metabolic abnormalities were identified in animals (n = 20/22) before TPN was initiated, including lipemia (n = 12/22), hyperglycemia (11/22), and hypokalemia (n = 11/22). Median age was significantly lower for site 1 cases (0.1 years; range, 0.01–11.0) compared with those from site 2 (4.9 years; range, 0.1–13.7; P = .03). Animals at site 2 also had a longer duration of hospitalization (P = .01) and TPN administration (P = .004), as well as higher survival rate (P < .02). Twenty-one of 22 alpacas developed at least 1 complication during TPN administration. Metabolic complications were most prevalent (n = 21/22) and included hyperglycemia (n = 8/21), lipemia (n = 7/21), hypokalemia (n = 3/21), and refeeding syndrome (n = 3/21). Conclusions and Clinical Importance TPN is a feasible method of nutritional support for alpacas when enteral feeding is not possible. Prospective studies are warranted to determine optimal TPN formulations for alpacas. PMID:21418323

  12. Nitrite and Nitrate Concentrations and Metabolism in Breast Milk, Infant Formula, and Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jesica A.; Ninnis, Janet R.; Hopper, Andrew O.; Ibrahim, Yomna; Merritt, T. Allen; Wan, Kim-Wah; Power, Gordon G.; Blood, Arlin B.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary nitrate and nitrite are sources of gastric NO, which modulates blood flow, mucus production, and microbial flora. However, the intake and importance of these anions in infants is largely unknown. Nitrate and nitrite levels were measured in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants, infant formulas, and parenteral nutrition. Nitrite metabolism in breast milk was measured after freeze-thawing, at different temperatures, varying oxygen tensions, and after inhibition of potential nitrite-metabolizing enzymes. Nitrite concentrations averaged 0.07 ± 0.01 μM in milk of mothers of preterm infants, less than that of term infants (0.13 ± 0.02 μM) (P < .01). Nitrate concentrations averaged 13.6 ± 3.7 μM and 12.7 ± 4.9 μM, respectively. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in infant formulas varied from undetectable to many-fold more than breast milk. Concentrations in parenteral nutrition were equivalent to or lower than those of breast milk. Freeze-thawing decreased nitrite concentration ∼64%, falling with a half-life of 32 minutes at 37°C. The disappearance of nitrite was oxygen-dependent and prevented by ferricyanide and 3 inhibitors of lactoperoxidase. Nitrite concentrations in breast milk decrease with storage and freeze-thawing, a decline likely mediated by lactoperoxidase. Compared to adults, infants ingest relatively little nitrite and nitrate, which may be of importance in the modulation of blood flow and the bacterial flora of the infant GI tract, especially given the protective effects of swallowed nitrite. PMID:23894175

  13. Structure of carbohydrate-bound polynuclear iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in parenteral formulations.

    PubMed

    Kudasheva, Dina S; Lai, Jriuan; Ulman, Abraham; Cowman, Mary K

    2004-11-01

    Intravenous iron therapy is used to treat anemia associated with chronic kidney disease. The chemical structures of parenteral iron agents have not been characterized in detail, and correlations between structure, efficiency of iron delivery, and toxicity via catalysis of oxygen-derived free radical creation remain to be established. In this study, two formulations of parenteral iron have been characterized by absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and elemental analysis. The samples studied were Venofer (Iron Sucrose Injection, USP) and Ferrlecit (Sodium Ferric Gluconate in Sucrose Injection). The 250-800-nm absorption spectra and the XRD patterns showed that both formulations contain a mineral core composed of iron oxyhydroxide in the beta-FeOOH mineral polymorph known as akaganeite. This was further confirmed for each formulation by imaging using TEM and AFM. The average core size for the nanoparticles, after dialysis to remove unbound or loosely bound carbohydrate, was approximately 3+/-2 nm for the iron-sucrose, and approximately 2+/-1 nm for the iron-gluconate. Each of the nanoparticles consists of a mineral core, surrounded by a layer of bound carbohydrate. The overall diameter of the average bead in the dialyzed preparations was approximately 7+/-4 nm for the iron-sucrose, and 3+/-1 nm for the iron-gluconate. Undialyzed preparations have particles with larger average sizes, depending on the extent of dilution of unbound and loosely bound carbohydrate. At a dilution corresponding to a final Fe concentration of 5 mg/mL, the average particle diameter in the iron-sucrose formulation was approximately 22+/-9 nm, whereas that of the iron-gluconate formulation was approximately 12+/-5 nm.

  14. Home parenteral nutrition--a 3-year analysis of clinical and laboratory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Burnes, J U; O'Keefe, S J; Fleming, C R; Devine, R M; Berkner, S; Herrick, L

    1992-01-01

    We report a 3-year analysis (1986 to 1989) of the management of 63 home parenteral nutrition patients, 40 with short-bowel syndrome and 23 with chronic intestinal obstruction with or without intestinal resection. Intravenous fluid requirements varied from 0.9 to 6 L/day, and the content of glucose varied between 46 and 531 g/day, protein varied from .0 to 85 g/day, fat from .0 to 100 g/day, sodium from 37 to 695 mEq/day, potassium from 30 to 220 mEq/day, chloride from 60 to 760 mEq/day, and acetate from 0 to 200 mEq/day. Body weight was normalized and well maintained in the majority of patients, but using the strict definition of deficiency as the presence of one abnormal value during 3 years, more than half had abnormal plasma chloride, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, total protein, albumin, selenium, and iron concentrations, and more than a third had low calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and vitamin C levels. Normochromic anemia was seen in 73% and high blood creatinine associated with low urine volumes in 42%. Most (78%) returned to relatively normal lifestyles, but employability was occasionally impaired by loss of third-party insurance coverage resulting from a therapy that may cost $100,000 per year. Overall mortality was low (5% per year), but 73% needed readmission to hospital, mainly for suspected catheter sepsis. The results indicate that home parenteral nutrition has allowed many patients to survive gut failure and return to work but problems with chronic fluid, electrolyte and micronutrient deficiencies, catheter sepsis, and insurance coverage often restrict optimal rehabilitation.

  15. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations and metabolism in breast milk, infant formula, and parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jesica A; Ninnis, Janet R; Hopper, Andrew O; Ibrahim, Yomna; Merritt, T Allen; Wan, Kim-Wah; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-09-01

    Dietary nitrate and nitrite are sources of gastric NO, which modulates blood flow, mucus production, and microbial flora. However, the intake and importance of these anions in infants is largely unknown. Nitrate and nitrite levels were measured in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants, infant formulas, and parenteral nutrition. Nitrite metabolism in breast milk was measured after freeze-thawing, at different temperatures, varying oxygen tensions, and after inhibition of potential nitrite-metabolizing enzymes. Nitrite concentrations averaged 0.07 ± 0.01 μM in milk of mothers of preterm infants, less than that of term infants (0.13 ± 0.02 μM) (P < .01). Nitrate concentrations averaged 13.6 ± 3.7 μM and 12.7 ± 4.9 μM, respectively. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations in infant formulas varied from undetectable to many-fold more than breast milk. Concentrations in parenteral nutrition were equivalent to or lower than those of breast milk. Freeze-thawing decreased nitrite concentration ~64%, falling with a half-life of 32 minutes at 37°C. The disappearance of nitrite was oxygen-dependent and prevented by ferricyanide and 3 inhibitors of lactoperoxidase. Nitrite concentrations in breast milk decrease with storage and freeze-thawing, a decline likely mediated by lactoperoxidase. Compared to adults, infants ingest relatively little nitrite and nitrate, which may be of importance in the modulation of blood flow and the bacterial flora of the infant GI tract, especially given the protective effects of swallowed nitrite.

  16. The natural history of cirrhosis from parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease after resolution of cholestasis with parenteral fish oil therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nandivada, Prathima; Chang, Melissa I.; Potemkin, Alexis K.; Carlson, Sarah J.; Cowan, Eileen; O’loughlin, Alison A.; Mitchell, Paul D.; Gura, Kathleen M.; Puder, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the natural history of cirrhosis from parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) after resolution of cholestasis with fish oil (FO) therapy Background Historically, cirrhosis from PNALD resulted in end-stage liver disease (ESLD), often requiring transplantation for survival. With FO therapy, most children now experience resolution of cholestasis and rarely progress to ESLD. However, outcomes for cirrhosis after resolution of cholestasis are unknown and patients continue to be considered for liver/multivisceral transplantation. Methods Prospectively collected data was reviewed for children with cirrhosis due to PNALD who had resolution of cholestasis after treatment with FO from 2004 to 2012. Outcomes evaluated included need for liver/multivisceral transplantation, mortality, and the clinical progression of liver disease. Results Fifty-one patients with cirrhosis from PNALD were identified, with 76% demonstrating resolution of cholestasis after FO therapy. The mean direct bilirubin decreased from 6.4 ± 4 mg/dL to 0.2 ± 0.1 mg/dL (p <0.001) 12 months after resolution of cholestasis, with a mean time to resolution of 74 days. None of the patients required transplantation or died from ESLD. Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease (PELD) scores decreased from 16 ± 4.6 to −1.2 ± 4.6, 12 months after resolution of cholestasis (p <0.001). In children who remained PN-dependent, the PELD score remained normal throughout the follow-up period. Conclusions Cirrhosis from PNALD may be stable rather than progressive once cholestasis resolves with FO therapy. Furthermore, these patients may not require transplantation and show no clinical evidence of liver disease progression, even when persistently PN-dependent. PMID:24374535

  17. Low Dose Parenteral Soybean Oil for the Prevention of Parenteral Nutrition Associated Liver Disease in Neonates with Gastrointestinal Disorders: a Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Kara L.; Havranek, Thomas; Kelley-Quon, Lorraine I.; Cerny, Laura; Flores, Martiniano; Grogan, Tristan; Shew, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonates with gastrointestinal disorders (GD) are at high risk for parenteral nutrition associated liver disease (PNALD). Soybean-based intravenous lipid emulsions (S-ILE) have been associated with PNALD. This study’s objective was to determine if a lower dose when compared to a higher dose of S-ILE prevents cholestasis without compromising growth. Material and Methods This multi-center randomized controlled pilot study enrolled subjects with GD who were ≤ 5 days of age to a low dose (approximately 1 g/kg/day) (LOW) or control dose of S-ILE (approximately 3 g/kg/day) (CON). The primary outcome was cholestasis (direct bilirubin (DB) > 2 mg/dL) after the first seven days of age. Secondary outcomes included growth, PN duration, and late onset sepsis. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between the LOW (n=20) and CON groups (n=16). When the LOW group was compared to the CON group, there was no difference in cholestasis (30% vs. 38%, p=0.7) or secondary outcomes. However, mean (±SE) DB rate of change over the first eight weeks (0.07±0.04 vs. 0.3±0.09 mg/dL/week, p=0.01) and entire study (0.008±0.03 vs. 0.2±0.07 mg/dL/week, p=0.02) was lower in the LOW group when compared to the CON group. Conclusion In neonates with GD who received a lower dose of S-ILE, DB increased at a slower rate in comparison to neonates who received a higher dose of S-ILE. Growth was comparable between the groups. This study demonstrates a need for a larger, randomized controlled trial comparing two different S-ILE doses for cholestasis prevention in neonates at risk for PNALD. PMID:26024828

  18. Stability of hydrophilic vitamins mixtures in the presence of electrolytes and trace elements for parenteral nutrition: a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Balzano, Federica; Aiello, Federica; Falugiani, Niccolò; Desideri, Ielizza

    2015-03-25

    In total parenteral nutrition (TPN), especially in the case of preterm infants, simultaneous administration of vitamins and trace elements is still a problematic issue: guidelines put in evidence the lack of specific documentation. In this work NMR spectroscopy was applied to the study of vitamins (pyridoxine hydrochloride, thiamine nitrate, riboflavin-5'-phosphate and nicotinamide) stability in presence of salts and trace elements. Vitamins in D2O were first analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy in absence of salts and trace elements; changes in chemical shifts or in diffusion coefficients, measured by NMR DOSY technique, were analyzed. The effects of salts and trace elements on single vitamins and on their admixtures were then investigated by performing quantitative analyses during 48h. Selected vitamins are subject to intermolecular interactions. No degradative effects were observed in presence of salts and trace elements. Only riboflavin-5'-phosphate is subject to precipitation in presence of divalent cations; however, at low concentration and in presence of other vitamins this effect was not observed. Solutions analyzed, in the condition of this study, are stable for at least 48h and vitamins and trace elements can be administered together in TPN.

  19. Supplementing national menu labeling.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G; White, Lexi C

    2012-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants' menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., "heart-healthy" graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence.

  20. Hyperkalemia from Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Villgran, Vipin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common electrolyte problem in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is typically caused by medications in patients with poor kidney function. Patients with comorbodities such as heart failure and diabetes are predisposed to electrolyte problems. Salt substitutes and dietary supplements are uncommon causes of hyperkalemia, but we propose that they are under-recognized and underdiagnosed causes in patients with chronic kidney disease. Our case report and literature review illustrates that a careful dietary history is essential in patients presenting with electrolyte disorders, especially hyperkalemia. PMID:27924248

  1. Supplementing managed competition.

    PubMed

    Higgins, W

    President Clinton's proposal for health care reform calls for managed competition within global expenditure targets. However, it is unlikely that health plans will have sufficient leverage with providers to negotiate arrangements consistent with expenditure targets in nonurban areas. This paper describes a reimbursement system based on competitive prospective payment and capitation (CPPC) which can supplement managed competition in less populous areas or replace managed competition should that strategy prove unsuccessful. The CPPC system is capable of enforcing an expenditure target while encouraging the formation of capitated networks and creating strong incentives for efficiency. It is generally compatible with the Clinton administration's version of managed competition.

  2. Special Supplement Introduction: Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Charles; Waters, Flavie

    2014-01-01

    This Special Supplement presents reports from 11 working groups of the interdisciplinary International Consortium on Hallucination Research meeting in Durham, UK, September 2013. Topics include psychological therapies for auditory hallucinations, culture and hallucinations, hallucinations in children and adolescents, visual hallucinations, interdisciplinary approaches to the phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), AVHs in persons without need for care, a multisite study of the PSYRATS instrument, subtypes of AVHs, the Hearing Voices Movement, Research Domain Criteria for hallucinations, and cortical specialization as a route to understanding hallucinations. PMID:24936079

  3. Effects of parenteral infusion with fish-oil or safflower-oil emulsion on hepatic lipids, plasma amino acids, and inflammatory mediators in septic rats.

    PubMed

    Chao, C Y; Yeh, S L; Lin, M T; Chen, W J

    2000-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of preinfusion with total parenteral nutrition (TPN) using fish-oil (FO) versus safflower-oil (SO) emulsion as fat sources on hepatic lipids, plasma amino-acid profiles, and inflammatory-related mediators in septic rats. Normal rats, with internal jugular catheters, were assigned to two different groups and received TPN. TPN provided 300 kcal. kg(-1). d(-1), with 40% of the non-protein energy as fat. All TPN solutions were isonitrogenous and identical in nutrient composition except for the fat emulsion, which was made of SO or FO. After receiving TPN for 6 d, each group of rats was further divided into control and sepsis subgroups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture; control rats received sham operation. All rats were classified into four groups as follows: FO control group (FOC; n = 7), FO sepsis group (FOS; n = 8), SO control group (SOC; n = 8), and SO sepsis group (SOS; n = 9). The results of the study demonstrated that plasma concentrations of triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acids did not differ between the FO and SO groups, regardless of whether the animals were septic. SOS had significantly higher total lipids and cholesterol content in the liver than did the SOC group. The FOS group, however, showed no difference from the FOC group. Plasma leucine and isoleucine levels were significantly lower in the SOS group than in the SOC group, whereas no difference in these two amino acids was observed between the FOC and FOS groups. Plasma arginine levels were significantly lower in both septic groups than in the groups without sepsis when either FO or SO was infused. Plasma glutamine levels, however, did not differ across groups. No differences in interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or leukotriene B(4) concentrations in peritoneal lavage fluid were observed between the two septic groups. These results suggest that catabolic reaction in septic rats preinfused with FO

  4. Aerobic growth of campylobacter in media supplemented with C3-monocarboxylates and C4-dicarboxylates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to examine aerobic growth of Campylobacter spp. in media supplemented with C4-dicarboxylates (fumarate, succinate, or malate) and C3-monocarboxylates (pyruvate or lactate). Basal broth media composed of tryptose, yeast extract, and a mineral-vitamin solution was supplement...

  5. Zinc supplementation in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Caldis-Coutris, Nancy; Gawaziuk, Justin P; Logsetty, Sarvesh

    2012-01-01

    Micronutrient supplementation is a common practice throughout many burn centers across North America; however, uncertainty pertaining to dose, duration, and side effects of such supplements persists. The authors prospectively collected data from 23 hospitalized patients with burn sizes ranging from 10 to 93% TBSA. Each patient received a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement, 50 mg zinc (Zn) daily, and 500 mg vitamin C twice daily. Supplements were administered orally or enterally. Albumin, prealbumin, C-reactive protein, serum Zn, and serum copper were measured weekly during hospital admission until levels were within normal reference range. Our study concluded that 50 mg daily dose of Zn resulted in normal serum levels in 19 of 23 patients at discharge; 50 mg Zn supplementation did not interfere with serum copper levels; and Zn supplements, regardless of administration route, did not result in gastrointestinal side effects.

  6. MICROBIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF FOOD SUPPLEMENTS.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Magdalena; Kubicka, Marcelina M; Kamińska, Dorota; Długaszewska, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Many specialists note that the food offered today - as a result of very complex technological processing - is devoid of many components that are important for the organism and the shortages have to be supplemented. The simplest for it is to consume diet supplements that provide the missing element in a concentrated form. In accordance with the applicable law, medicinal products include all substances or mixtures of substances that are attributed with properties of preventing or treating diseases with humans or animals. Permits to admit supplements to the market are issued by the Chief Sanitary Inspector and the related authorities; permits for medicines are issued by the Chief Pharmaceutical Inspector and the Office for Registration of Medicinal Products, Medical Devices and Biocidal Products. Therefore, admittance of a supplement to the market is less costly and time consuming_than admittance of a medicine. Supplements and medicines may contain the same component but medicines will have a larger concentration than supplements. Sale of supplements at drug stores and in the form of tablets, capsules, liquids or powders makes consumer often confusing supplements with medicines. Now there are no normative documents specifying limits of microbiological impurities in diet supplements. In Polish legislation, diet supplements are subject to legal acts concerning food. Medicines have to comply with microbiological purity requirements specified in the Polish Pharmacopeia. As evidenced with the completed tests, the proportion of diet supplement samples with microbiological impurities is 6.5%. Sales of diet supplements have been growing each year, they are consumed by healthy people but also people with immunology deficiencies and by children and therefore consumers must be certain that they buy safe products.

  7. Bodybuilding supplementation and tooth decay.

    PubMed

    Ali, M S; Batley, H; Ahmed, F

    2015-07-10

    Supplementation is a key component in bodybuilding and is increasingly being used by amateur weight lifters and enthusiasts to build their ideal bodies. Bodybuilding supplements are advertised to provide nutrients needed to help optimise muscle building but they can contain high amounts of sugar. Supplement users are consuming these products, while not being aware of their high sugar content, putting them at a higher risk of developing dental caries. It is important for dental professionals to recognise the increased risk for supplement users and to raise awareness, provide appropriate preventative advice and be knowledgeable of alternative products to help bodybuilders reach their goals, without increasing the risk of dental caries.

  8. Nutritional Supplementation and Meal Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, Jim

    For the competitive athlete and the serious recreational athlete, nutritional supplementation can have a positive effect on training and on performance. There are many fad supplements on the market, and many that have come and gone. However, two nutrients have withstood the test of time and many tests in research laboratories around the world, and they continue to have positive training- and performance-enhancing effects. Carbohydrates are commonly supplemented to improve energy availability and to replace valuable muscle and liver glycogen stores. Protein supplementation usually is associated with building muscle tissue.

  9. Calcium and phosphorus solubility in neonatal intravenous feeding solutions.

    PubMed Central

    MacMahon, P; Mayne, P D; Blair, M; Pope, C; Kovar, I Z

    1990-01-01

    The limited solubility of calcium and phosphorus in standard parenteral nutrition formulations has restricted the ability to provide sufficient minerals to preterm infants to prevent substrate deficient metabolic bone disease. We determined the solubility limits of calcium and phosphorus in a total of 160 formulations under carefully controlled conditions. By increasing the concentrations of dextrose, amino acids, and by using Addiphos instead of 8.7% dipotassium hydrogen phosphate as the phosphorus source, higher concentrations of both calcium and phosphorus were held in solution. This should permit the delivery of increased concentrations of these minerals at rates which approximate fetal accretion. PMID:2110803

  10. Potential for human immunodeficiency virus parenteral transmission in the Middle East and North Africa: An analysis using hepatitis C virus as a proxy biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Mohamoud, Yousra A; Miller, F DeWolfe; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2014-01-01

    The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has endured several major events of infection parenteral transmission. Recent work has established the utility of using hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a proxy biomarker for assessing the epidemic potential for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) parenteral transmission. In this review, we use data on the prevalence of HCV infection antibody (seroprevalence) among general population and high risk population groups to assess the potential for HIV parenteral transmission in MENA. Relatively low prevalence of HCV infection in the general population groups was reported in most MENA countries indicating that parenteral HIV transmission at endemic levels does not appear to be a cause for concern. Nonetheless, there could be opportunities for localized HIV outbreaks and transmission of other blood-borne infections in some settings such as healthcare facilities. Though there have been steady improvements in safety measures related to parenteral modes of transmission in the region, these improvements have not been uniform across all countries. More precautions, including infection control training programs, surveillance systems for nosocomial infections and wider coverage and evaluation of hepatitis B virus immunization programs need to be implemented to avoid the unnecessary spread of HIV, HCV, and other blood-borne pathogens along the parenteral modes of transmission. PMID:25278675

  11. Spontaneous neural tube defects in splotch mice supplemented with selected micronutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J. . E-mail: bwlodarczyk@ibt.tamhsc.edu; Tang, Louisa S.; Triplett, Aleata; Aleman, Frank; Finnell, Richard H.

    2006-05-15

    Splotch (Sp/Sp) mice homozygous for a mutation in the Pax3 gene inevitably present with neural tube defects (NTDs), along with other associated congenital anomalies. The affected mutant embryos usually die by gestation days (E) 12-13. In the present study, the effect of modifier genes from a new genetic background (CXL-Sp) and periconceptional supplementation with selected micronutrients (folic acid, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, methionine, myoinositol, thiamine, thymidine, and {alpha}-tocopherol) was determined with respect to the incidence of NTDs. In order to explore how different exposure parameters (time, dose, and route of compound administration) modulate the beneficial effects of micronutrient supplementation, female mice received either short- or long-term nutrient supplements via enteral or parenteral routes. Embryos were collected on E12.5 and examined for the presence of anterior or posterior NTDs. Additionally, whole mount in situ hybridization studies were conducted in order to reveal/confirm normal expression patterns of the Pax3 gene during neurulation in the wild-type and Sp/Sp homozygous mutant mouse embryos utilized in this study. A strong Pax3 signal was demonstrated in CXL-Sp embryos during neural tube closure (E9.5 to E10.5). The intensity and spatial pattern of expression were similar to other Splotch mutant mice. Of all the micronutrients tested, only supplementation with folic acid or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate rescued the normal phenotype in Sp/Sp embryos. When the folate supplementation dose was increased to 200 mg/kg in the diet, the incidence of rescued splotch homozygotes reached 30%; however, this was accompanied by six-fold increased resorption rate.

  12. Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay for detection and quantitation of endotoxin in a small-volume parenteral product.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, K; Steindler, K A; Harrison, S J

    1980-01-01

    A Limulus amoebocyte lysate gel-clotting method for the determination of endotoxin in a small-volume parenteral product has been described. Sample dilution with 0.1 M potassium phosphate monobasic buffer (pH 8.0) effectively eliminated assay interference, whereas dilution with water did not. The threshold pyrogenic dose for Escherichia coli EC-2 and O127:B8 endotoxins was determined to be 1.0 ng of endotoxin per kg of body weight. Not more than 1.0 ng of endotoxin (the threshold pyrogenic dose) per the highest recommended human dose or the USP pyrogen test dose per kg of body weight, whichever dose is more stringent, is a logical limit for the quantity of bacterial endotoxin in small-volume parenteral products. Excellent correlation was attained when this criterion was used to compare the Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay with the USP pyrogen test. PMID:6448582

  13. 32 CFR 651.24 - Supplemental EAs and supplemental EISs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Supplemental EAs and supplemental EISs. 651.24 Section 651.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Records and Documents §...

  14. 32 CFR 651.24 - Supplemental EAs and supplemental EISs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Supplemental EAs and supplemental EISs. 651.24 Section 651.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Records and Documents §...

  15. 32 CFR 651.24 - Supplemental EAs and supplemental EISs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Supplemental EAs and supplemental EISs. 651.24 Section 651.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Records and Documents §...

  16. 32 CFR 651.24 - Supplemental EAs and supplemental EISs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Supplemental EAs and supplemental EISs. 651.24 Section 651.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Records and Documents §...

  17. 32 CFR 651.24 - Supplemental EAs and supplemental EISs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Supplemental EAs and supplemental EISs. 651.24 Section 651.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Records and Documents §...

  18. [Use of glutamine in total parenteral nutrition of bone marrow transplant patients].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Martínez, Aura Dulcinea; Alhambra Expósito, María R; Manzano García, Gregorio; Molina Puertas, María J; Calañas Continente, Alfonso; Bahamondez Opazo, Rodrigo; Muñoz Jiménez, Concepción; Rojas Contreras, Rafael; Gálvez Moreno, María A

    2015-04-01

    La glutamina es un amioácido esencial para la síntesis de nucleótidos y una fuente de energía para la replicación celular, existe evidencia contradictoria respecto a los beneficios de su administración como parte de la nutrición parenteral en pacientes sometidos a trasplante de médula ósea (TMO). Más del 75% de los pacientes sometidos a trasplante de precursores hematopoyéticos, presentan durante su evolución complicaciones que comprometen el tracto digestivo, principalmente mucositis, limitando la ingesta oral, de allí la necesidad del uso de nutrición parenteral total (NPT) en estos casos. Objetivo: Analizar la relación entre uso de glutamina en la NPT de TMO y la evolución de complicaciones agudas como mucositis, EICH e infecciones, así como la estancia hospitalaria y los días de nutrición parenteral total. Material y métodos: Estudio observacional retrospectivo. Se incluyeron la totalidad de TMO con NPT entre 2007 y 2013 en nuestro hospital. Se analizaron días de hospitalización, días de soporte nutricional, uso de glutamina y complicaciones agudas. Los resultados se analizaron con el programa SPSS 15.0. Resultados: Se incluyeron 73 pacientes trasplantados, se dividieron en dos grupos según el aporte de glutamina siendo ambos grupos comparables entre sí. La edad media fue de 36,96±12,89 años. El 47,9% de los pacientes estudiados recibió suplemento de glutamina en la NPT. Los pacientes que recibieron glutamina tuvieron una estancia media de 31,49±7,41 días con 14,11±5,87 días de NPT en comparación a los que no recibieron glutamina con 32,16±7,99 y 15,50±7,71 días respectivamente (p=0,71 y 0,39). La duración de la mucositis en los pacientes que recibieron glutamina fue de 12,23±5,66 días comparado con 15,50±7,71 días en los que no recibieron glutamina (p=0,042).Se observaron grados severos de EICH (II, III) en un 20,6% de los pacientes sin glutamina en comparación al 13,7% en los que la recibieron (p=0,636). . Del total

  19. A Patient With Parenteral Nutrition-Dependent Short Bowel Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease With 4-Year Exposure to Teduglutide.

    PubMed

    Compher, Charlene; Levinson, Katherine Boothe; Cambor, Carolyn L; Stoner, Nancy; Boullata, Joseph I; Piarulli, Amanda; Kinosian, Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Clinical trials of the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue teduglutide resulted in approval of the drug by the Food and Drug Administration in 2012 as a treatment for parenteral nutrition-dependent short bowel syndrome in adults. This report presents the case study of a man with short bowel syndrome caused by portal vein thrombosis who had 4 years exposure to the drug at the time of his death due to cardiovascular disease.

  20. Extravasation of parenteral alimentation fluid into the renal pelvis--a complication of central venous catheter in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Nadroo, A M; al-Sowailem, A M

    2001-01-01

    Many complications of central venous catheters, which include perforation of the vessel walls and extravasation of the infusate into pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities, have been reported. We report an infant with a central venous catheter in inferior vena cava who experienced extravasation of parenteral alimentation fluid into the right renal pelvis secondary to perforation of the renal vein. To our knowledge, this rare complication has not been reported earlier.