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Sample records for park northern minnesota

  1. Water quality of lakes and streams in Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota, 1977-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Water-quality investigations in six interconnected lakes that comprise most of the surface area of Voyageurs National Park in northern Minnesota revealed substantial differences in water-quality. Three large lakes; Sand Point, Namakan, and Rainy, near the eastern and northern boundaries of the Park; are oligotrophic to mesotrophic, having low dissolved solids and alkalinity, and dimictic circulation. In contrast, Kabetogama Lake, Black Bay, and Sullivan Bay, near the western and southern boundaries of the Park, were eutrophic, having higher dissolved solids and alkalinity, and polymictic circulation. Chemical characteristics of the three lakes along the eastern and northern boundary were similar to those of the Namakan River--a major source of inflow that drains an extensive area of exposed bedrock and thin noncalcareous drift east of the Park. The lake and embayments along the western and southern boundary receive inflow from two streams that drain an area west and south of the Park that is overlain by calcareous drift. Samples from one of these streams contained dissolved-solids concentrations about five times, and total alkalinity concentrations about eight times concentrations measured in the Namakan River. The nutrient-enriched lakes and embayments had high algal productivity that produced blooms of blue-green algae in some years. Annual patterns in the levels of trophic-state indicators revealed that the shallow, polymictic lakes experienced seasonal increases in totalphosphorus concentrations in their euphotic zones that did not occur in the deeper, dimictic lakes; this indicates a link between the frequent recirculation of these lakes and internal cycling of phosphorus. Secchi-disk transparency was limited by organic color in Sand Point, Namakan, and Rainy Lakes, and resuspended bottom material reduced transparency in Black Bay. Waters in the large lakes and embayments met nearly all U.S. Environmental Protection Agency criteria for protection of freshwater

  2. Mercury data from small lakes in Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota, 2000-02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Robert M.; Brigham, Mark E.; Steuwe, Luke; Menheer, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Mercury contamination of aquatic ecosystems is a resource concern in Voyageurs National Park. High concentrations of mercury in fish pose a potential risk to organisms that consume large amounts of those fish. During 2000–02, the U.S. Geological Survey measured mercury in water collected from 20 lakes in Voyageurs National Park. Those lakes span a gradient in fish-mercury concentrations, and also span gradients in other environmental variables that are thought to influence mercury cycling. During 2001, near surface methylmercury concentrations ranged from below the method detection limit of 0.04 nanograms per liter (ng/L) to 0.41 ng/L. Near surface total mercury concentrations ranged from 0.34 ng/L to 3.74 ng/L. Hypolimnetic methylmercury ranged from below detection to 2.69 ng/L, and hypolimnetic total mercury concentrations ranged from 0.34 ng/L to 7.16 ng/L. During 2002, near surface methylmercury concentrations ranged from below the method detection limit to 0.46 ng/L, and near surface total mercury ranged from 0.34 ng/L to 4.81 ng/L.

  3. Relation of nutrient concentrations, nutrient loading, and algal production to changes in water levels in Kabetogama Lake, Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Maki, Ryan P.; Kiesling, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment has led to excessive algal growth in Kabetogama Lake, Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota. Water- and sediment-quality data were collected during 2008-09 to assess internal and external nutrient loading. Data collection was focused in Kabetogama Lake and its inflows, the area of greatest concern for eutrophication among the lakes of Voyageurs National Park. Nutrient and algal data were used to determine trophic status and were evaluated in relation to changes in Kabetogama Lake water levels following changes to dam operation starting in 2000. Analyses were used to estimate external nutrient loading at inflows and assess the potential contribution of internal phosphorus loading. Kabetogama Lake often was mixed vertically, except for a few occasionally stratified areas, including Lost Bay in the northeastern part of Kabetogama Lake. Stratification, combined with larger bottom-water nutrient concentrations, larger sediment phosphorus concentrations, and estimated phosphorus release rates from sediment cores indicate that Lost Bay may be one of several areas that may be contributing substantially to internal loading. Internal loading is a concern because nutrients may cause excessive algal growth including potentially toxic cyanobacteria. The cyanobacterial hepatotoxin, microcystin, was detected in 7 of 14 cyanobacterial bloom samples, with total concentrations exceeding 1.0 microgram per liter, the World Health Organization's guideline for finished drinking water for the congener, microcystin-LR. Comparisons of the results of this study to previous studies indicate that chlorophyll-a concentrations and trophic state indices have improved since 2000, when the rules governing dam operation changed. However, total-phosphorus concentrations have not changed significantly since 2000.

  4. Effects of changes in reservoir operations on water quality and trophic state indicators in Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota, 2001-03

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Payne, G.A.; Kallemeyn, Larry W.

    2004-01-01

    Implementation of an order by the International Joint Commission in January 2000 has changed operating procedures for dams that regulate two large reservoirs in Voyageurs National Park in northern Minnesota. These new procedures were expected to restore a more natural water regime and affect water levels, water quality, and trophic status. Results of laboratory analyses and field measurements of chemical and physical properties from May 2001 through September 2003 were compared to similar data collected prior to the change in operating procedures. Rank sum tests showed significant decreases in chlorophyll-a concentrations and trophic state indices for Kabetogama Lake (p=0.021) and Black Bay (p=0.007). There were no significant decreases in total phosphorus concentration, however, perhaps due to internal cycling of phosphorus. No sites had significant trends in seasonal total phosphorus concentrations, with the exception of May samples from Sand Point Lake, which had a significant decreasing trend (tau=-0.056, probability=0.03). May chlorophyll-a concentrations for Kabetogama Lake showed a significant decreasing trend (tau=-0.42, probability=0.05). Based on mean chlorophyll trophic-state indices (2001-03), Sand Point, Namakan, and Rainy Lakes would be classified oligotrophic to mesotrophic, and Kabetogama Lake and Rainy Lake at Black Bay would be classified as mesotrophic. The classification of Sand Point, Namakan, and Rainy Lakes remain the same for data collected prior to the change in operating procedures. In contrast, the trophic classification of Kabetogama Lake and Rainy Lake at Black Bay has changed from eutrophic to mesotrophic.

  5. Marketing Practices of Northern Minnesota Sawmills

    Treesearch

    E.W. Forbes; R.W. Rowe

    1968-01-01

    Most of the lumber produced in northern Minnesota is marketed in Minnesota, and the marketing area increases as mill size increases. Aspen is a dominant species. About 45 percent of the lumber is graded; concentration and grading would improve marketing. Less than one-third of the by-products are marketed

  6. Forest Statistics for Minnesota's Northern Pine Unit.

    Treesearch

    Pat Murray

    1991-01-01

    The fifth inventory of Minnesota's Northern Pine Unit reports 11.1 million acres of land, of which 6.3 million acres are forested. This bulletin presents statistical highlights and contains detailed tables of forest area, as well as timber volume, growth, removals, mortality, and ownership.

  7. 4. View of bridge from Minnesota bank, near northern side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of bridge from Minnesota bank, near northern side of the southeast portal looking southwest - Enloe Bridge No. 90021, Spanning Red River of North between Minnesota & North Dakota on County State Aid Highway 28, Wolverton, Wilkin County, MN

  8. Winter prey caching by northern hawk owls in Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Richard R. Schaefer; D. Craig Rudolph; Jesse F. Fagan

    2007-01-01

    Northern Hawk Owls (Surnia ulula) have been reported to cache prey during the breeding season for later consumption, but detailed reports of prey caching during the non-breeding season are comparatively rare. We provided prey to four individual Northern Hawk Owls in wintering areas in northeastern Minnesota during 2001 and 2005 and observed their...

  9. Predicted yields from selected cutting prescriptions in northern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Pamela J. Jakes; W. Brad Smith

    1980-01-01

    Includes predicted yields based on two sets of cutting prescriptions in northern Minnesota. Indicates that given a specific set of assumptions, average annual growing-stock removals for the decade 1977-1986 would be from 69% to 124% higher than 1976 growing-stock removals.

  10. Timber resource of Minnesota's Northern Pine Unit, 1977.

    Treesearch

    Pamela J. Jakes; Gerhard K. Raile

    1980-01-01

    The fourth inventory of Minnesota's Northern Pine Unit shows a 28% increase in growing-stock inventory, but a 4% decrease in commercial forest area between 1962 and 1977. This report gives statistical highlights and contains detailed tables of forest area as well as timber volume, growth, mortality, ownership, and use.

  11. Tall shrub dynamics in northern Minnesota aspen and conifer forests.

    Treesearch

    James C. Galogh; David F. Grigal

    1988-01-01

    Tall shrub dynamics were examined in upland stands in northern Minnesota. Mortality rates of shrub stems did not differ among the stands. Shrub stem regeneration did differ among the stands and was related to overstory characteristics, soil moisture, and soil nutrients. Stem density was regulated by annual regeneration.

  12. Site-index comparisons for tree species in northern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Willard H. Carmean; Alexander Vasilevsky

    1971-01-01

    Presents site-index comparisons for the following forest species in northern Minnesota: quaking aspen, paper birch, basswood, red oak, black ash, jack pine, red pine, white pine, white spruce, black spruce, balsam fir, white-cedar, and tamarack. Shows site-index relationships among these species by using site-index ratios and species-comparison graphs.

  13. Mosquitoes in Moose Country: A Mosquito Survey of Northern Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Kinsley, A C; Moon, R D; Johnson, K; Carstensen, M; Neitzel, D; Craft, M E

    2016-06-01

    An adult mosquito survey was conducted at 12 sites using carbon dioxide traps in northern Minnesota throughout the summer of 2012. Specimens were counted, identified to species, sorted into pools, and tested for eastern equine encephalitis (EEEV) and West Nile virus (WNV). Our findings extend the known range of Culiseta melanura, Anopheles barberi, and An. quadrimaculatus and document the presence and abundance of 27 other mosquito taxa in the region. None of the pools tested positive for EEEV or WNV.

  14. GENOTOXICITY OF BIOREMEDIATED SOILS FROM THE REILLY TARSITE, ST. LOUIS PARK, MINNESOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    An in vitro approach was used to measure the genotoxicity of creosote-contaminated soil before and after four bioremediation processes. The soil was taken from the Reilly Tar site, a closed Superfund site in Saint Louis Park, Minnesota. The creosote soil was bioremediated in bios...

  15. Controlling spread of the oak wilt pathogen (Ceratocystis fagacearum) in a Minnesota urban forest park reserve

    Treesearch

    Jennifer Juzwik; Joseph O' Brien; Charles Evenson; Paul Castillo; Graham. Mahal

    2010-01-01

    Effectiveness of oak wilt control actions taken between 1997 and 1999 were evaluated for an urban forest park reserve in Minnesota, U.S. A high level of success (84% of evaluated disease centers) was achieved in controlling belowground spread of the vascular pathogen for four to six years by mechanically disrupting inter-tree root connections with the blade of a cable...

  16. Vegetative substrates used by larval northern pike in Rainy and Kabetogama Lakes, Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Anne L. Timm; Rodney B. Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to identify characteristics of aquatic vegetative communities used as larval northern pike nursery habitat in Rainy and Kabetogama lakes, glacial shield reservoirs in northern Minnesota. Quatrefoil light traps fished at night were used to sample larval northern pike in 11 potential nursery areas. Larval northern pike were most commonly sampled among...

  17. Environmental factors controlling methane emissions from peatlands in northern Minnesota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dise, Nancy B.; Gorham, Eville; Verry, Elon S.

    1993-01-01

    The environmental factors affecting the emission of methane from peatlands were investigated by correlating CH4 emission data for two years, obtained from five different peatland ecosystems in northern Minnesota, with peat temperature, water table position, and degree of peat humification. The relationship obtained between the CH4 flux and these factors was compared to results from a field manipulation experiment in which the water table was artificially raised in three experimental plots within the driest peatland. It was found that peat temperature, water table position, and degree of peat humification explained 91 percent of the variance in log CH4 flux, successfully predicted annual CH4 emission from individual wetlands, and predicted the change in flux due to the water table manipulation. Raising the water table in the bog corrals by an average of 6 cm in autumn 1989 and 10 cm in summer 1990 increased CH4 emission by 2.5 and 2.2 times, respectively.

  18. Impact of wildfire on levels of mercury in forested watershed systems - Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; Brigham, Mark E.; Cannon, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of mercury to remote lakes in mid-continental and eastern North America has increased approximately threefold since the mid-1800s (Swain and others, 1992; Fitzgerald and others, 1998; Engstrom and others, 2007). As a result, concerns for human and wildlife health related to mercury contamination have become widespread. Despite an apparent recent decline in atmospheric deposition of mercury in many areas of the Upper Midwest (Engstrom and Swain, 1997; Engstrom and others, 2007), lakes in which fish contain levels of mercury deemed unacceptable for human consumption and possibly unacceptable for fish-consuming wildlife are being detected with increasing frequency. In northern Minnesota, Voyageurs National Park (VNP) (fig. 1) protects a series of southern boreal lakes and wetlands situated on bedrock of the Precambrian Canadian Shield. Mercury contamination has become a significant resource issue within VNP as high concentrations of mercury in loons, bald eagle eaglets, grebes, northern pike, and other species of wildlife and fish have been found. The two most mercury-contaminated lakes in Minnesota, measured as methylmercury in northern pike (Esox lucius), are in VNP. Recent multidisciplinary U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research demonstrated that the bulk of the mercury in lake waters, soils, and fish in VNP results from atmospheric deposition (Wiener and others, 2006). The study by Wiener and others (2006) showed that the spatial distribution of mercury in watershed soils, lake waters, and age-1 yellow perch (Perca flavescens) within the Park was highly variable. The majority of factors correlated for this earlier study suggested that mercury concentrations in lake waters and age-1 yellow perch reflected the influence of ecosystem processes that affected within-lake microbial production and abundance of methylmercury (Wiener and others, 2006), while the distribution of mercury in watershed soils seemed to be partially dependent on forest

  19. Solar heating system design package for a single-family residence at William O'Brien State Park, Minnesota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The plans, specifications, cost trade studies, and verification status of a prototype solar heating and hot water system for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources's single-family dwelling located at O'Brien State Park, 30 miles east of Minneapolis, Minnesota are presented.

  20. Future consumption of timber growth in northern Minnesota: 1980-2030.

    Treesearch

    Mark Rockel; Joseph Buongiorno; David C. Lothner; Edwin Kallio

    1983-01-01

    Consumption projections are reported by major species groups in Northern Minnesota for pulpwood used in pulp production and in construction board, fuelwood, and sawtimber from 1980 to 2030. Total consumption of pulpwood could grow between 97% and 116%.

  1. Morphology, cultural characteristics, and pathogenicity of Rhizosphaera kalkhoffii on Picea spp. in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin

    Treesearch

    Jennifer Juzwik

    1993-01-01

    Morphology, cultural characteristics, and pathogenicity of Rhizosphaera kalkhoffii from spruce (Picea spp.) showing premature needle loss in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin were investigated. Pycnidiospores from needles, conidia of the Hormonema-like synanamorph, and pycnidiospores produced in culture were...

  2. Reproduction and distribution of bald eagles in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, 1973-1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grim, Leland H.; Kallemeyn, Larry W.

    1995-01-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is classified as a threatened species in Minnesota. In 1973, the National Park Service began monitoring the distribution and reproduction of bald eagles in and immediately adjacent to Voyageurs National Park to obtain data that park management could use to protect bald eagles from the effects of use of the park by visitors and from the expansion of park facilities. Thirty-seven breeding areas were identified during 1973-93. Annual productivity ranged from 0.00 to 1.42 fledglings/occupied nest and averaged 0.68 during the 21 breeding seasons. The annual number of breeding pairs tripled, the mean number of fledged eaglets increased 5 times, and reproductive success doubled during the study. However, in more than 15 of the breeding seasons, the mean productivity and the annual reproductive success in Voyageurs National Park were below the 1 fledgling/occupied nest and the 70% reproductive success that are representative of healthy bald eagle populations. We suspect that toxic substances, human disturbance, severe weather, and lack of food in early spring may have kept bald eagles in Voyageurs National Park from achieving a breeding success that was similar to that of conspecifics in the nearby Chippewa National Forest. The cumulative effect of these variables on reproduction and on habitat of bald eagles in Voyageurs National Park is unknown and should be determined.

  3. METHYLMERCURY BIOACCUMULATION DEPENDENCE ON NORTHERN PIKE AGE AND SIZE IN TWENTY MINNESOTA LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercury accumulation in northern pike muscle tissue (fillets) was found to be directly related to fish age and size. Measurements were made on 173 individual northern pike specimens from twenty lakes across Minnesota. Best fit regressions of mercury fillet concentration (wet wt.)...

  4. Landscape variation of seasonal pool plant communities in forests of northern Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Brian Palik; Dwight Streblow; Leanne Egeland; Richard Buech

    2007-01-01

    Seasonal forest pools are abundant in the northern Great Lakes forest landscape, but the range of variation in their plant communities and the relationship of this variation to multi-scale landscape features remains poorly quantified. We examined seasonal pools in forests of northern Minnesota USA with the objective of quantifying the range of variation in plant...

  5. Lacustrine responses to decreasing wet mercury deposition rates: results from a case study in northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, Mark E.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; Gay, David A.; Maki, Ryan P.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Wiener, James G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a case study comparing metrics of methylmercury (MeHg) contamination for four undeveloped lakes in Voyageurs National Park to wet atmospheric deposition of mercury (Hg), sulfate (SO4–2), and hydrogen ion (H+) in northern Minnesota. Annual wet Hg, SO4–2, and H+ deposition rates at two nearby precipitation monitoring sites indicate considerable decreases from 1998 to 2012 (mean decreases of 32, 48, and 66%, respectively). Consistent with decreases in the atmospheric pollutants, epilimnetic aqueous methylmercury (MeHgaq) and mercury in small yellow perch (Hgfish) decreased in two of four lakes (mean decreases of 46.5% and 34.5%, respectively, between 2001 and 2012). Counter to decreases in the atmospheric pollutants, MeHgaq increased by 85% in a third lake, whereas Hgfish increased by 80%. The fourth lake had two disturbances in its watershed during the study period (forest fire; changes in shoreline inundation due to beaver activity); this lake lacked overall trends in MeHgaq and Hgfish. The diverging responses among the study lakes exemplify the complexity of ecosystem responses to decreased loads of atmospheric pollutants.

  6. Vegetation classification, mapping, and monitoring at Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota: An application of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faber-Langendoen, D.; Aaseng, N.; Hop, K.; Lew-Smith, M.; Drake, J.

    2007-01-01

    Question: How can the U.S. National Vegetation Classification (USNVC) serve as an effective tool for classifying and mapping vegetation, and inform assessments and monitoring? Location: Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota, U.S.A and environs. The park contains 54 243 ha of terrestrial habitat in the sub-boreal region of North America. Methods: We classified and mapped the natural vegetation using the USNVC, with 'alliance' and 'association' as base units. We compiled 259 classification plots and 1251 accuracy assessment test plots. Both plot and type ordinations were used to analyse vegetation and environmental patterns. Color infrared aerial photography (1:15840 scale) was used for mapping. Polygons were manually drawn, then transferred into digital form. Classification and mapping products are stored in publicly available databases. Past fire and logging events were used to assess distribution of forest types. Results and Discussion: Ordination and cluster analyses confirmed 49 associations and 42 alliances, with three associations ranked as globally vulnerable to extirpation. Ordination provided a useful summary of vegetation and ecological gradients. Overall map accuracy was 82.4%. Pinus banksiana - Picea mariana forests were less frequent in areas unburned since the 1930s. Conclusion: The USNVC provides a consistent ecological tool for summarizing and mapping vegetation. The products provide a baseline for assessing forests and wetlands, including fire management. The standardized classification and map units provide local to continental perspectives on park resources through linkages to state, provincial, and national classifications in the U.S. and Canada, and to NatureServe's Ecological Systems classification. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  7. National Park Service vegetation inventory program: Mississippi National River and Recreation Area, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hop, Kevin D.; Drake, Jim; Strassman, Andrew C.; Hoy, Erin E.; Jakusz, Joseph; Menard, Shannon; Dieck, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The Mississippi National River and Recreation Area (MISS) vegetation mapping project is an initiative of the National Park Service (NPS) Vegetation Inventory Program (VIP) to classify and map vegetation types of MISS. (Note: “MISS” is also referred to as “park” throughout this report.) The goals of the project are to adequately describe and map vegetation types of the park and to provide the NPS Natural Resource Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program, resource managers, and biological researchers with useful baseline vegetation information.The MISS vegetation mapping project was officially started in spring 2012, with a scoping meeting wherein partners discussed project objectives, goals, and methods. Major collaborators at this meeting included staff from the NPS MISS, the NPS Great Lakes Network (GLKN), NatureServe, and the USGS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) was also in attendance. Common to all NPS VIP projects, the three main components of the MISS vegetation mapping project are as follows: (1) vegetation classification, (2) vegetation mapping, and (3) map accuracy assessment (AA). In this report, each of these fundamental components is discussed in detail.With the completion of the MISS vegetation mapping project, all nine park units within the NPS GLKN have received vegetation classification and mapping products from the NPS and USGS vegetation programs. Voyageurs National Park and Isle Royale National Park were completed during 1996–2001 (as program pilot projects) and another six park units were completed during 2004–11, including the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Grand Portage National Monument, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway, and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.

  8. Using nestling feathers to assess spatial and temporal concentrations of mercury in bald eagles at Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    H. T. Pittman; W. W. Bowerman; L. H. Grim; Teryl Grubb; W. C. Bridges

    2011-01-01

    Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) have been utilized as a biosentinel of aquatic ecosystem health in the Great Lakes Region since the early 1960s. Bald eagle populations have been monitored at Voyageurs National Park (VNP), Minnesota, since 1973. For the past 20 years, researchers have collected feathers from nestling bald eagles to assess their dietary exposure...

  9. Multi-sensor data fusion for estimating forest species composition and abundance in northern Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Peter P. Wolter; Phillip A. Townsend

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude, duration, and frequency of forest disturbance caused by the spruce budworm and forest tent caterpillar in northern Minnesota and neighboring Ontario, Canada have increased over the last century due to a shift in forest species composition linked to historical fire suppression, forest management, and pesticide application that has fostered increased...

  10. Innovations in fuels management: Demonstrating success in treating a serious threat of wildfire in Northern Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Dennis Neitzke

    2007-01-01

    This case study illustrates the positive effects of strategic fuels treatments in continuous heavy fuels. In 1999, a severe windstorm blew down close to 1,000 square miles of forest land in northern Minnesota and Canada. As much as 400,000 acres of the blowdown occurred in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Fire experts were invited to assess the hazardous...

  11. Foresters' perceptions of windthrow dynamics in northern Minnesota riparian management zones

    Treesearch

    Jeremy C. Steil; Charles R. Blinn; Randy Kolka

    2009-01-01

    A survey was mailed to foresters in northern Minnesota to identify their perceptions of what conditions result in higher incidence of windthrow in riparian management zones (RMZ) where the upland has been clearcut. Results indicate that foresters think many variables impact windthrow, often interacting in complex ways. Foresters considered topographic exposure, species...

  12. Determinants of forest land prices in northern Minnesota: a hedonic pricing approach

    Treesearch

    Stephanie A. Snyder; Michael A. Kilgore; Rachel Hudson; Jacob Donnay

    2007-01-01

    A hedonic price model was developed to analyze the market for undeveloped forestland in northern Minnesota. The data included 387 forestland parcels purchased in 2001 or 2002. Information describing parcel physical characteristics, amenity features, merchantable timber volume, development trends, terms of financing, and several proximity, distance, and adjacency...

  13. Modeling water yield response to forest cover changes in northern Minnesota

    Treesearch

    S.C. Bernath; E.S. Verry; K.N. Brooks; P.F. Ffolliott

    1982-01-01

    A water yield model (TIMWAT) has been developed to predict changes in water yield following changes in forest cover in northern Minnesota. Two versions of the model exist; one predicts changes in water yield as a function of gross precipitation and time after clearcutting. The second version predicts changes in water yield due to changes in above-ground biomass...

  14. The hydrology of several peat deposits in northern Minnesota, U.S.A.

    Treesearch

    R.R. Bay

    1968-01-01

    A comprehensive peatland hydrology study has provided data on the climate, hydrogeology, water table levels, and run-off from forested peat deposits in northern Minnesota. Groundwater studies identified two types of hydrogeologic situations-perched bogs, independent of the underground flow system, and groundwater bogs, which were influenced by storage changes in the...

  15. Alternate Host of Jack Pine Needle rust in Northern Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Ralph L. Anderson; Neil A. Anderson

    1978-01-01

    The pine needle rust of jack pine on the Little Sioux Burn in northeastern Minnesota infected large-leaf aster but not goldenrod. The rust was most severe when asters were abundant on the plots. Les than 10 percent of the jack pine were infected over a 3-year period when asters were more than 10 feet (3.05 m) from the mil-acre plots

  16. Northern Minnesota Independence Day storm: a research needs assessment.

    Treesearch

    W.J. Mattson; D.S. Shriner

    2001-01-01

    Nearly 500,000 acres of forest and water were severely impacted by a powerful wind and rain storm in northeastern Minnesota on the fourth of July 1999. Trees were uprooted and snapped off in a swath that was 4-12 miles wide and 30 miles long. This document addresses the many ecological and social research needs in nine discipline areas that were generated as a...

  17. Fishing for Northern Pike in Minnesota: A comparison of anglers and dark house spearers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.

    2014-01-01

    In order to project fishing effort and demand of individuals targeting Northern Pike Esox lucius in Minnesota, it is important to understand the catch orientations, management preferences, and site choice preferences of those individuals. Northern Pike are specifically targeted by about 35% of the approximately 1.5 million licensed anglers in Minnesota and by approximately 14,000–15,000 dark house spearers. Dark house spearing is a traditional method of harvesting fish through the ice in winter. Mail surveys were distributed to three research strata: anglers targeting Northern Pike, dark house spearing license holders spearing Northern Pike, and dark house spearing license holders angling for Northern Pike. Dark house spearers, whether spearing or angling, reported a stronger orientation toward keeping Northern Pike than did anglers. Anglers reported a stronger orientation toward catching large Northern Pike than did dark house spearers when spearing or angling. Northern Pike regulations were the most important attribute affecting site choice for respondents in all three strata. Models for all strata indicated a preference for lakes without protected slot limits. However, protected slot limits had a stronger negative influence on lake preference for dark house spearing licensees (whether spearing or angling) than for anglers.

  18. 75 FR 63212 - Northern States Power Company-Minnesota; Notice of Withdrawal of Application for Amendment to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-282 and 50-306; NRC-2010-0325] Northern States Power Company--Minnesota; Notice of Withdrawal of Application for Amendment to Facility Operating License The U... Company, a Minnesota corporation (the licensee), doing business as Xcel Energy, to withdraw its January 27...

  19. Weight-Volume relationships of Aspen and Winter-Cut Black Spruce Pulpwood in Northern Minnesota

    Treesearch

    David C. Lothner; Richard M. Marden; Edwin Kallio

    1974-01-01

    Seasonal weight-volume relationships were determined for rough (bark on) aspen and black spruce 100-inch pulpwood that was delivered withing 1 week after cutting in northern Minnesota during 1971-72. For aspen, the weight of wood and bark per cubic foot of wood averaged 56 pounds in the winter and 61 pounds in the summer. This relationshipfor winter-cut black spruce...

  20. Degradation of phenolic contaminants in ground water by anaerobic bacteria: St. Louis Park, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ehrlich, G.G.; Goerlitz, D.F.; Godsy, E.M.; Hult, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    Coal-tar derivatives from a coal-tar distillation and wood-treating plant that operated from 1918 to 1972 at St. Louis Park, Minnesota contaminated the near-surface ground water. Solutions of phenolic compounds and a water-immiscible mixture of polynuclear aromatic compounds accumulated in wetlands near the plant site and entered the aquifer. The concentration of phenolic compounds in the aqueous phase under the wetlands is about 30 mg/1 but decreases to less than 0.2 mg/1 at a distance of 430 m immediately downgradient from the source. Concentrations of naphthalene (the predominant polynuclear compound in the ground water) and sodium (selected as a conservative tracer) range from about 20 mg/1 and 430 mg/1 in the aqueous phase at the source to about 2 mg/1 and 120 mg/1 at 430 m downgradient, respectively. Phenolic compounds and naphthalene are disappearing faster than expected if only dilution were occurring. Sorption of phenolic compounds on aquifer sediments is negligible but naphthalene is slightly sorbed. Anaerobic biodegradation of phenolic compounds is primarily responsible for the observed attenuation. Methane was found only in water samples from the contaminated zone (2-20 mg/1). Methane-producing bacteria were found only in water from the contaminated zone. Methane was produced in laboratory cultures of contaminated water inoculated with bacteria from the contaminated zone. Evidence for anaerobic biodegradation of naphthalene under either field or laboratory conditions was not obtained.

  1. Characterization of organic matter in lake sediments from Minnesota and Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, Walter E.

    2006-01-01

    Samples of sediment from lakes in Minnesota and Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were analyzed for organic carbon (OC), hydrogen richness by Rock-Eval pyrolysis, and stable carbon- and nitrogen-isotope composition of bulk organic matter. Values of delta 13C of lake plankton tend to be around -28 to -32 parts per thousand (0/00). Organic matter with values of delta 13C in the high negative 20s overlap with those of organic matter derived from C3 higher terrestrial plants but are at least 10 0/00 more depleted in 13C than organic matter derived from C4 terrestrial plants. If the organic matter is produced mainly by photosynthetic plankton and is not oxidized in the water column, there may be a negative correlation between H-richness (Rock-Eval pyrolysis H-index) and delta 13C, with more H-rich, algal organic matter having lower values of delta 13C. However, if aquatic organic matter is oxidized in the water column, or if the organic matter is a mixture of terrestrial and aquatic organic matter, then there may be no correlation between H-richness and carbon-isotopic composition. Values of delta 13C lower than about -28 0/00 probably indicate a contribution of bacterial biomass produced in the hypolimnion by chemoautotrophy or methanotrophy. In highly eutrophic lakes in which large amounts of 13C-depleted organic matter is continually removed from the epilimnion by photosynthesis throughout the growing season, the entire carbon reservoir in the epilimnion may become severely 13C-enriched so that 13C-enriched photosynthetic organic matter may overprint 13C-depleted chemosynthetic bacterial organic matter produced in the hypolimnon. Most processes involved with the nitrogen cycle in lakes, such as production of ammonia and nitrate, tend to produce 15N-enriched values of delta 15N. Most Minnesota lake sediments are 15N-enriched. However, some of the more OC-rich sediments have delta 15N values close to zero (delta 15N of air), suggesting that organic matter production is

  2. Gray wolves in and adjacent to Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota: Research and Synthesis 1987-1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gogan, P.J.P.; Route, W.T.; Olexa, E.M.; Thomas, N.; Kuehn, D.; Podruzny, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the status of wolves (Canis lupus) in and adjacent to Voyageurs National Park (VNP), Minnesota, from September 1987 through September 1991. Thirteen wolf packs were followed by radiotelemetry (13 males, 18 females were radio-marked) for 6 to 48 months. Six packs had territories exclusively or partially within VNP. Radiotelemetry data gathered during winter daylight hours indicated that wolves within VNP avoided the frozen surfaces and shorelines of larger lakes during that time period. In contrast, snow tracking revealed that wolves regularly traversed frozen surfaces and shorelines after dark. Our howling surveys averaged detection near 50% of the wolf packs known to exist in the study area. Pack territories ranged from 48 km2 to 296 km2 with a mean of 152 km2. Overall, mean mid-winter pack size was 5.5 wolves with a high of 6.3 in 1988 a?? 1989 and a low of 4.5 in 1989a??1990. Non-territorial wolves made up 9.5% of the population. Overall, mean wolf density was 33 / 1,000 km2 with an annual range of 24 to 42 / 1,000 km2. We detected nine dispersals among 20 radio-marked wolves more than eight months old. All dispersals occurred in winter. Dispersing wolves averaged 2.1 pre-dispersal movements beyond their home territory. Ages of dispersing wolves ranged from 1.5 to 7.5 years. Natural causes of mortality among radio-marked wolves included intraspecific strife (n = 4) and starvation (n = 2). Confirmed human-induced causes of mortality among radiomarked wolves included shooting (n = 2), trapping or snaring (n = 2), and unknown method (n = 2). Natural causes of mortality among non-radiomarked wolves included intraspecific strife (n = 1) and starvation (n = 1). Confirmed human-induced causes of mortality among non-radio-marked wolves included automobile collisions (n = 3), shooting (n = 3), and trapping or snaring (n = 2). All mortalities within the boundaries of VNP were attributed to natural causes. Six of eight confirmed mortalities among

  3. Comparing catch orientation among Minnesota walleye, northern pike, and bass anglers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Fulton, David C.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the catch orientations of Minnesota walleye (Sander vitreus), northern pike (Esox lucius), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) anglers. Results were derived from 2009, 2010, and 2012 surveys of anglers targeting these different species. Consistent with previous research, we identified four dimensions of anglers’ catch orientation: (a) catching something, (b) catching big fish, (c) catching many fish, and (d) keeping fish. Walleye anglers were the most motivated to keep fish, while northern pike anglers were more oriented toward catching big fish. Largemouth bass anglers, and to a lesser extent smallmouth bass anglers, were also oriented toward catching big fish. Bass anglers reported the lowest interest in keeping fish. An orientation to keep fish was negatively related to more restrictive management actions, regardless of species. A stronger orientation to catch big fish was associated with support for increased harvest restrictions only for northern pike and smallmouth bass.

  4. Mercury and water level fluctuations in lakes of northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Maki, Ryan P; Christensen, Victoria G.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; LeDuc, Jaime F.; Kissane, Claire; Knights, Brent C.

    2017-01-01

    Large lake ecosystems support a variety of ecosystem services in surrounding communities, including recreational and commercial fishing. However, many northern temperate fisheries are contaminated by mercury. Annual variation in mercury accumulation in fish has previously been linked to water level (WL) fluctuations, opening the possibility of regulating water levels in a manner that minimizes or reduces mercury contamination in fisheries. Here, we compiled a long-term dataset (1997-2015) of mercury content in young-of-year Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) from six lakes on the border between the U.S. and Canada and examined whether mercury content appeared to be related to several metrics of WL fluctuation (e.g., spring WL rise, annual maximum WL, and year-to-year change in maximum WL). Using simple correlation analysis, several WL metrics appear to be strongly correlated to Yellow Perch mercury content, although the strength of these correlations varies by lake. We also used many WL metrics, water quality measurements, temperature and annual deposition data to build predictive models using partial least squared regression (PLSR) analysis for each lake. These PLSR models showed some variation among lakes, but also supported strong associations between WL fluctuations and annual variation in Yellow Perch mercury content. The study lakes underwent a modest change in WL management in 2000, when winter WL minimums were increased by about 1 m in five of the six study lakes. Using the PLSR models, we estimated how this change in WL management would have affected Yellow Perch mercury content. For four of the study lakes, the change in WL management that occurred in 2000 likely reduced Yellow Perch mercury content, relative to the previous WL management regime.

  5. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar PV at the Atlas Industrial Park in Duluth, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, M.; Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 5, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Atlas Industrial Park in Duluth, Minnesota, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The EPA provided funding to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support a feasibility study of solar renewable energy generation at the Atlas Industrial Park. NREL provided technical assistance for this project but did not assess environmental conditions at the site beyond those related to the performance of a photovoltaic (PV) system. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for a possible PV installationmore » and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV configurations. In addition, the study evaluates financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.« less

  6. 76 FR 39445 - Northern States Power Company-Minnesota; Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 1 and 2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ..., combined-cycle plant; a combination of natural gas, wind, and wood-fired generation and conservation; a... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-282 and 50-306; NRC-2009-0507] Northern States Power Company--Minnesota; Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 1 and 2; Notice of Issuance of Renewed...

  7. Downed woody fuel loading dynamics of a large-scale blowdown in northern Minnesota, U.S.A.

    Treesearch

    C.W. Woodall; L.M. Nagel

    2007-01-01

    On July 4, 1999, a large-scale blowdown occurred in the BoundaryWaters Canoe AreaWilderness (BWCAW) of northern Minnesota affecting up to 150,000 ha of forest. To further understand the relationship between downed woody fuel loading, stand processes, and disturbance effects, this study compares fuel loadings defined by three strata: (1) blowdown areas of the BWCAW (n...

  8. Comparisons of soil nitrogen mass balances for an ombrotrophic bog and a minerotrophic fen in northern Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Brian H. Hill; Terri M. Jicha; LaRae L.P. Lehto; Colleen M. Elonen; Stephen D. Sebestyen; Randy Kolka

    2016-01-01

    Wecompared nitrogen (N) storage and flux in soils froman ombrotrophic bogwith that of a minerotrophic fen to quantify the differences in N cycling between these two peatlands types in northernMinnesota (USA). Precipitation, atmospheric deposition, and bog and fen outflowswere analyzed for nitrogen species. Upland and peatland soil sampleswere analyzed for N content,...

  9. Combining satellite imagery with forest inventory data to assess damage severity following a major blowdown event in northern Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Mark D. Nelson; Sean P. Healey; W. Keith Moser; Mark H. Hansen

    2009-01-01

    Effects of a catastrophic blowdown event in northern Minnesota, USA were assessed using field inventory data, aerial sketch maps and satellite image data processed through the North American Forest Dynamics programme. Estimates were produced for forest area and net volume per unit area of live trees pre- and post-disturbance, and for changes in volume per unit area and...

  10. Early response of ground layer plant communities to wildfire and harvesting disturbance in forested peatland ecosystems in northern Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Erika R. Rowe; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; John C. Almendinger

    2017-01-01

    A rare, stand-replacing fire in northern Minnesota, USA provided the opportunity to compare the effects of wildfire and timber harvesting in two peatland forest communities, nutrient-poor black spruce (Picea mariana) bogs (BSB) and nutrient-rich tamarack (Larix laricina) swamps (RTS). We found the response between the two...

  11. Aspen Regeneration in Riparian ManagementZones in Northern Minnesota: Effects ofResidual Overstory and Harvest Method

    Treesearch

    Brian Palik; Kory Cease; Leanne Egeland; Charles Blinn

    2003-01-01

    We examined aspen regeneration under diferent riparian management zone (RMZ) treatments in aspen forests in northern Minnesota. We also compared aspen regeneration in partially harvested RMZs to adjacent upland clearcuts. The four RMZ treatments included: (1) full control (no cutting in RMZ or upland); (2) riparian control (RMZ uncut; upland clearcut); and partially...

  12. Performance of the Forest Vegetation Simulator in managed white spruce plantations influenced by eastern spruce budworm in northern Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Matthew B. Russell; Anthony W. D' Amato; Michael A. Albers; Christopher W. Woodall; Klaus J. Puettmann; Michael R. Saunders; Curtis L. VanderSchaaf

    2015-01-01

    Silvicultural strategies such as thinning may minimize productivity losses from a variety of forest disturbances, including forest insects. This study analyzed the 10-year postthinning response of stands and individual trees in thinned white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) plantations in northern Minnesota, USA, with light to moderate defoliation...

  13. Behavior of beaver in lakes with varying water levels in Northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Douglas W.; Peterson, Rolf O.

    1991-05-01

    We studied the effects of winter water drawdowns (2.3 m) on beavers in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA. Our study was designed to sample areas within the park that differed in water drawdown regime. Lodges were counted and beavers were livetrapped and radio-implanted to study behavior, movements, and mortality. Active beaver lodge density, determined by aerial survey in 1984 and 1986, was greatest along the shoreline of the drawdown reservoir. In winter beavers living on the drawdown reservoir spent less time inside their lodges than did beavers from stable water environments, foraged more above ice, and they were unable to fully use stored food. Only one case of starvation in the drawdown reservoir was documented, but beavers in reservoirs that were drawn down survived winter in poorer condition than did beavers living in areas in which water levels remained high. In spite of an increasing population and lack of widespread mortality, winter water drawdowns did alter beaver behavior. To reduce these impacts, total annual water fluctuation should not exceed 1.5 m, and winter drawdown should not exceed 0.7 m. Possible management alternatives and costs are discussed.

  14. Home range and residency status of Northern Goshawks breeding in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boal, C.W.; Andersen, D.E.; Kennedy, P.L.

    2003-01-01

    We used radio-telemetry to estimate breeding season home-range size of 17 male and 11 female Northern Goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) and combined home ranges of 10 pairs of breeding goshawks in Minnesota. Home-range sizes for male and female goshawks were 2593 and 2494 ha, respectively, using the minimum convex polygon, and 3927 and 5344 ha, respectively, using the 95% fixed kernel. Home ranges of male and female members of 10 goshawk pairs were smaller than combined home-range size of those pairs (mean difference = 3527 ha; 95% CI = 891 to 6164 ha). Throughout the nonbreeding season, the maximum distance from the nest recorded for all but one goshawk was 12.4 km. Goshawks breeding in Minnesota have home ranges similar to or larger than those reported in most other areas. Home-range overlap between members of breeding pairs was typically ???50%, and both members of breeding pairs were associated with breeding home ranges year round. Goshawk management plans based on estimated home-range size of individual hawks may substantially underestimate the area actually used by a nesting pair.

  15. Novel methods for surveying reservoir hosts and vectors of Borrelia burgdorferi in Northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Veronica Aili

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in North America and presents challenges to clinicians, researchers and the public in diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, which is a zoonotic pathogen obligate upon hematophagous arthropod vectors and propagates in small mammal reservoir hosts. Identifying factors governing zoonotic diseases within regions of high-risk provides local health and agricultural agencies with necessary information to formulate public policy and implement treatment protocols to abate the rise and expansion of infectious disease outbreaks. In the United States, the documented primary reservoir host of Lyme disease is the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus, and the arthropod vector is the deer tick, Ixodes scapularis. Reducing the impact of Lyme disease will need novel methods for identifying both the reservoir host and the tick vector. The reservoir host, Peromyscus leucopus is difficult to distinguish from the virtually identical Peromyscus maniculatus that also is present in Northern Minnesota, a region where Lyme disease is endemic. Collection of the Ixodes tick, the Lyme disease vector, is difficult as this is season dependent and differs from year to year. This study develops new strategies to assess the extent of Borrelia burgdorferi in the local environment of Northern Minnesota. A selective and precise method to identify Peromyscus species was developed. This assay provides a reliable and definitive method to identify the reservoir host, Peromyscus leucopus from a physically identical and sympatric Peromyscus species, Peromyscus maniculatus. A new strategy to collect ticks for measuring the disbursement of Borrelia was employed. Students from local high schools were recruited to collect ticks. This strategy increased the available manpower to cover greater terrain, provided students with valuable experience in research methodology, and highlighted the

  16. Effects of riparian timber harvesting on instream habitat and fish assemblages in northern Minnesota streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Blinn, Charles R.; Newman, Raymond M.; Atuke, Dickson M.; Fredricks, Keith; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Merten, Eric; Schlesser, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Relatively few evaluations of aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish communities have been published in peer-reviewed literature detailing the effect of varying residual basal area (RBA) after timber harvesting in riparian buffers. Our analysis investigated the effects of partial harvesting within riparian buffers on aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish communities in small streams from two experiments in northern Minnesota northern hardwood-aspen forests. Each experiment evaluated partial harvesting within riparian buffers. In both experiments, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish were collected 1 year prior to harvest and in each of 3 years after harvest. We observed interannual variation for the macroinvertebrate abundance, diversity and taxon richness in the single-basin study and abundance and diversity in the multiple-basin study, but few effects related to harvest treatments in either study. However, interannual variation was not evident in the fish communities and we detected no significant changes in the stream fish communities associated with partially harvested riparian buffers in either study. This would suggest that timber harvesting in riparian management zones along reaches ≤200 m in length on both sides of the stream that retains RBA ≥ 12.4 ± 1.3 m2 ha−1 or on a single side of the stream that retains RBA ≥ 8.7 ± 1.6 m2 ha−1 may be adequate to protect macroinvertebrate and fish communities in our Minnesota study systems given these specific timber harvesting techniques.

  17. Installation guidelines for solar heating system, single-family residence at William OBrien State Park, Stillwater, Minnesota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Installation procedures for the single family residential solar heating system at the William O'Brien State Park, Stillwater, Minnesota, are presented. The system is a solar-assisted, hydronic-to-warm-air system with solar-assisted domestic water heating. It is composed of the following major components: liquid cooled flat plate collectors; water storage tank; passive solar-fired domestic water preheater; electric hot water heater; heat pump with electric backup; solar hot water coil unit; tube-and-shell heat exchanger, three pumps, and associated pipes and valving in an energy transport module; control system; and air-cooled heat purge unit. Installer guidelines are provided for each subsystem and includes testing and filling the system. Information is also given on the operating procedures, controls, caution requirements and routine and schedule maintenance.

  18. Discharge and nutrient transport between lakes in a hydrologically complex area of Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, 2010-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Wakeman, Eric; Maki, Ryan P.

    2016-01-01

    An acoustic Doppler velocity meter (ADVM) was deployed in the narrows between Namakan and Kabetogama Lakes in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, from November 3, 2010, through October 3, 2012. The ADVM can account for wind, seiche, and changing flow direction in hydrologically complex areas. The objectives were to (1) estimate discharge and document the direction of water flow, (2) assess whether specific conductance can be used to determine flow direction, and (3) document nutrient and chlorophyll a concentrations at the narrows. The discharge direction through the narrows was seasonal. Water generally flowed out of Kabetogama Lake and into Namakan Lake throughout the ice-covered season. During spring, water flow was generally from Namakan Lake to Kabetogama Lake. During the summer and fall, the water flowed in both directions, affected in part by wind. Water flowed into Namakan Lake 70% of water year 2011 and 56% of water year 2012. Nutrient and chlorophyll a concentrations were highest during the summer months when water-flow direction was unpredictable. The use of an ADVM was effective for assessing flow direction and provided flow direction under ice. The results indicated the eutrophic Kabetogama Lake may have a negative effect on the more pristine Namakan Lake. The results also provide data on the effects of the current water-level management plan and may help determine if adjustments are necessary to help protect the aquatic ecosystem of Voyageurs National Park.

  19. Abundance and population characteristics of Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) in Olympic National Park, Washington

    Treesearch

    D. Erran Seaman

    1997-01-01

    We monitored the threatened Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) in Olympic National Park from 1992 through 1996. We used a stratified random sampling scheme to survey 35 plots totaling 236 km?, approximately 10 percent of the forested area of the park.

  20. Northern Goshawk diet in Minnesota: An Analysis using video recording systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smithers, B.L.; Boal, C.W.; Andersen, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    We used video-recording systems to collect diet information at 13 Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) nests in Minnesota during the 2000, 2001, and 2002 breeding seasons. We collected 4871 hr of video footage, from which 652 prey deliveries were recorded. The majority of prey deliveries identified were mammals (62%), whereas birds (38%) composed a smaller proportion of diet. Mammals accounted for 61% of biomass delivered, and avian prey items accounted for 39% of prey biomass. Sciurids and leporids accounted for 70% of the identified prey. Red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), eastern chipmunk (Tamias striatus), and snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) were the dominant mammals identified in the diet, while American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) were the dominant avian prey delivered to nests. On average, breeding goshawks delivered 2.12 prey items/d, and each delivery averaged 275 g for a total of 551 g delivered/d. However, daily (P < 0.001) and hourly (P = 0.01) delivery rates varied among nests. Delivery rates (P = 0.01) and biomass delivered (P = 0.038) increased with brood size. Diversity and equitability of prey used was similar among nests and was low throughout the study area, most likely due to the dominance of red squirrel in the diet. ?? 2005 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  1. Influence of repeated prescribed fire on tree growth and mortality in Pinus resinosa forests, northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bottero, Alessandra; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Palik, Brian J.; Kern, Christel C.; Bradford, John B.; Scherer, Sawyer S.

    2017-01-01

    Prescribed fire is widely used for ecological restoration and fuel reduction in fire-dependent ecosystems, most of which are also prone to drought. Despite the importance of drought in fire-adapted forests, little is known about cumulative effects of repeated prescribed burning on tree growth and related response to drought. Using dendrochronological data in red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.)-dominated forests in northern Minnesota, USA, we examined growth responses before and after understory prescribed fires between 1960 and 1970, to assess whether repeated burning influences growth responses of overstory trees and vulnerability of overstory tree growth to drought. We found no difference in tree-level growth vulnerability to drought, expressed as growth resistance, resilience, and recovery, between areas receiving prescribed fire treatments and untreated forests. Annual mortality rates during the period of active burning were also low (less than 2%) in all treatments. These findings indicate that prescribed fire can be effectively integrated into management plans and climate change adaptation strategies for red pine forest ecosystems without significant short- or long-term negative consequences for growth or mortality rates of overstory trees.

  2. Lake levels and water quality in comparison to fish mercury body burdens, Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, 2013–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Larson, James H.; Maki, Ryan P.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; Brigham, Mark E.; Kissane, Claire; LeDuc, Jamie F.

    2017-01-18

    Within Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota, lake levels are controlled by a series of dams to support a variety of uses. Previous research indicates a link between these artificially maintained water levels, referred to as rule curves, and mercury concentrations in fish owing to the drying and rewetting of wetlands and other nearshore areas, which may release methylmercury into the water when inundated. The U.S. Geological Survey, National Park Service, and University of Wisconsin-La Crosse cooperated in a study to assess the importance of lake-level fluctuation and other factors affecting mercury concentrations in Perca flavescens (yellow perch) in the lakes of Voyageurs National Park. For this study, mercury body burdens were determined for young-of-the-year yellow perch collected from the large lakes within Voyageurs National Park during 2013–15. These mercury body burdens were compared to lake levels and water-quality constituents from the same period.Field properties and profiles of lake water quality indicated that Sand Point, Little Vermilion, and Crane Lakes were anoxic at times near the lake bottom sediments, where sulfate-reducing bacteria may convert mercury to methylmercury. The median dissolved sulfate concentration was highest in Crane Lake, the median total organic carbon concentration was highest in Sand Point Lake, and the median total phosphorus concentration was highest in Kabetogama Lake, all of which is consistent with previous research. All lakes had median chlorophyll a concentrations of 3.6 micrograms per liter or less with the exception of Kabetogama Lake, where the median concentrations were 4.3 micrograms per liter for the midlake sites and 7.1 micrograms per liter and 9.0 micrograms per liter for the nearshore sites.Mercury concentrations in sampled fish varied widely between years and among lakes, from 14.7 nanograms per gram in fish samples from Kabetogama Lake in 2015 to 178 nanograms per gram in fish samples from Crane Lake in

  3. Population dynamics and angler exploitation of the unique muskellunge population in Shoepack Lake, Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frohnauer, N.K.; Pierce, C.L.; Kallemeyn, L.W.

    2007-01-01

    A unique population of muskellunge Esox masquinongy inhabits Shoepack Lake in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. Little is known about its status, dynamics, and angler exploitation, and there is concern for the long-term viability of this population. We used intensive sampling and mark-recapture methods to quantify abundance, survival, growth, condition, age at maturity and fecundity and angler surveys to quantify angler pressure, catch rates, and exploitation. During our study, heavy rain washed out a dam constructed by beavers Castor canadensis which regulates the water level at the lake outlet, resulting in a nearly 50% reduction in surface area. We estimated a population size of 1,120 adult fish at the beginning of the study. No immediate reduction in population size was detected in response to the loss of lake area, although there was a gradual, but significant, decline in population size over the 2-year study. Adults grew less than 50 mm per year, and relative weight (W r) averaged roughly 80. Anglers were successful in catching, on average, two fish during a full day of angling, but harvest was negligible. Shoepack Lake muskellunge exhibit much slower growth rates and lower condition, but much higher densities and angler catch per unit effort (CPUE), than other muskellunge populations. The unique nature, limited distribution, and location of this population in a national park require special consideration for management. The results of this study provide the basis for assessing the long-term viability of the Shoepack Lake muskellunge population through simulations of long-term population dynamics and genetically effective population size. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of ground-water contamination by coal-tar derivatives, St. Louis Park area, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hult, Marc F.; Schoenberg, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Operation of a coal-tar distillation and wood preserving plant for 1918-72 in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, resulted in ground-water contamination. This report presents the results of the first year (1979) of an ongoing study. By 1932, water in the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer, the region 's major source of ground water, was contaminated 3,500 feet from the plant. The hydraulic characteristics of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer , its long contamination history, and fluctuating pumpage combine to creat a complex distribution of coal-tar derivatives observed in the aquifer. The Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer underlies the area at depths of 250 to 500 feet and is overlain by two bedrock aquifers (Platteville and St. Peter), two confining beds (Glenwood and basal part of St. Peter), and 70 to 100 feet of glacial drift. Multiaquifer wells in the area have permitted contaminated water from near-surface aquifers to flow downward into the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer. Flow rates of 20 to 150 gallons per minute from the shallower aquifers into the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer were observed in five wells. In the drift, a hydrocarbon fluid phase is moving vertically downward relative to the aqueous phase. Dissolved constituents in the drift and Platteville aquifer, the uppermost bedrock unit over most of the area, have moved at least 4,000 feet. Low-molecular-weight compounds are moving preferentially through the drift and Platteville aquifer system. (USGS)

  5. Foraging and nesting habitat of breeding male northern goshawks in the laurentian mixed forest province, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boal, C.W.; Andersen, D.E.; Kennedy, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    We used radiotelemetry to examine foraging habitat preferences of 17 breeding, male northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) in Minnesota from 1998-2000. We assessed habitat preference using radio relocation points and 50-m radius buffers of radio relocation points. Our data suggested that foraging male goshawks used early-successional upland conifer stands (???25 yrs old), early-successional upland deciduous stands (???50 yrs old), late-successional upland conifer stands (???50 yrs old), and late-successional upland deciduous stands (???50 yrs old) more frequently than expected based on the abundance of these vegetation types in the landscape. The 2 most available stand types, early-successional upland deciduous (<25 yrs old) and all ages of late-successional lowland conifer stands, were used less than expected by foraging goshawks. Late-successional lowland deciduous stands (???50 yrs old) were used in proportion to availability. Although analysis of relocation points suggested early-successional upland deciduous stands (25-49 yrs old) and late-successional upland conifer stands (???50 yrs old) were used in proportion to availability, analysis of buffers around relocation points indicated that these stand types were also used more than expected by foraging goshawks. Regardless of vegetation community type, stands used by goshawks were structurally similar with high canopy and understory stem densities, high canopy closure, substantial shrub cover, and large amounts of woody debris. Nest stands consisted of taller and larger diameter canopy trees and fewer understory trees than foraging stands, but stands were otherwise similar in structural features, suggesting goshawks used similar stands for nesting and foraging but that they tended to select the most mature stands for nesting. A commonality among nesting and foraging stands was the presence of open spaces between the canopy and understory foliage, and between understory and shrub layer foliage. In our study area

  6. Fish Mercury Loads and Lake Productivity Are Not Impacted by Wildland Fire in Northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, C.; Kolka, R. K.; Nater, E. A.; Witt, E.; Wickman, T.; Woodruff, L. G.; Butcher, J.

    2016-12-01

    Wildland fire can significantly alter mercury (Hg) cycling on land and in adjacent aquatic environments. In addition to enhancing local atmospheric Hg deposition, fire can influence terrestrial movement of Hg and other elements into lakes via runoff from burned upland soil. However, the impact of fire on water quality and the accumulation of Hg in fish remains equivocal. We investigated the effects of fire - specifically a low severity prescribed fire and moderate severity wildfire - on young-of-the-year yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and lake chemistry in two small remote watersheds in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in northeastern Minnesota using a paired watershed approach (fire-impacted vs. control watershed). Prior to fire, surface soil in the two study watersheds contained significant loads of Hg, mainly from atmospheric deposition. We expected fire to increase transport and deposition of Hg from smoke and burned soil into the fire-impacted lake, leading to changes in lake productivity and fish Hg loads. In contrast to our prediction, and despite significant effects of the moderate severity wildfire fire on upland soil Hg stocks, fish Hg accumulation and lake productivity were not affected by fire. Instead, climate and lake water levels were the strongest predictors of lake chemistry and fish responses in our study lakes. Our results suggest that low to moderate severity wildland fire does not alter lake productivity nor Hg accumulation in young-of-the-year yellow perch in these small, shallow lakes in the northern deciduous and boreal forest region. The effect of a high severity fire remains to be tested.

  7. Decadal changes in peat carbon accrual rates in bogs in Northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissore, C.; Nater, E. A.; McFarlane, K. J.

    2017-12-01

    Throughout the Holocene, peatland ecosystems have accumulated substantial amounts of carbon (C) and currently store about one third of all soil organic carbon (SOC) worldwide. Large uncertainty still persists on whether peatland ecosystems located in northern latitudes will continue to act as C sinks, or if the effects of global warming will have greater effects on decomposition processes than on net ecosystem production. We investigated decadal C accrual rates of the top 25 cm of peats in three Sphagnum-rich peatlands located in Northern Minnesota (two ombrotrophic bogs and one fen). We used radiocarbon analysis of Sphagnum cellulose and model fitting to determine peat ages, and peat FTIR spectroscopy to determine humification indices and relative decomposition of peat samples with depth. We had the scope to detect whether recent warming has had an effect on peat decomposition and C accumulation rates. Modeled C accumulation rates in the three peatlands during the past five decades ranged between 78 and 107 g C m-2 yr-1 in the top 25 cm analyzed in this study, values that are higher than the 22 to 29 g C m-2 yr-1 obtained for long-term (millennial) accumulations for the entire bog profiles. Peat IR spectra and C:N ratios confirm low levels of decomposition across the bog sites, especially in the uppermost parts of the peat. The fen site showed very limited decomposition across the entire sampled profile. Higher rates of C accumulation, combined with low decomposition rates close to the surface provide a good estimate of net primary productivity. As substrate decomposition progresses over time, net rates of accumulation decrease. Peat decomposition was more pronounced in the lower depths of the sampled cores in the two ombrotrophic bogs than in the fen, likely an effect of larger temporal variation in water table depth in the bogs than in the fen. Some of the variation in C accumulation and decomposition observed in our bogs and fen suggests that future C

  8. Commercial thinning in small-diameter aspen stands in northern Minnesota: study establishment report

    Treesearch

    Daniel W. Gilmore; Jennifer D. Glenn; Michael E. Ostry; John C. Zasada; Michael A. Benedict

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 1999, a long-term study was established to examine the physical and biological aspects of thinning young aspen stands in Minnesota. Three aspen stands ranging in age from 25 to 35 years were selected on lands owned by the State of Minnesota and UPM Kymmene. Two thinning treatments (low and high density) and an unthinned control were installed at each...

  9. Mercury concentrations in eggs of red-winged blackbirds and tree swallows breeding in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tyser, Robin W.; Rolfhus, Kristofer R.; Wiener, James G.; Windels, Steve K.; Custer, Thomas W.; Dummer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Most investigations of the environmental effects of mercury (Hg) have focused on aquatic food webs that include piscivorous fish or wildlife. However, recent investigations have shown that other species, including passerine songbirds, may also be at risk from exposure to methylmercury (MeHg). We quantified Hg concentrations in eggs of two species of songbirds, red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), nesting in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA. Geometric mean concentrations of total Hg (THg) were lower in red-winged blackbird eggs [218 and 107 ng/g dry weight (dw) for 2012 and 2013, respectively] than in tree swallow eggs (228 and 300 ng/g dw for 2012 and 2013, respectively), presumably reflecting differences in the trophic positions of these two species. Concentrations of MeHg averaged 98.4 % of THg in red-winged blackbird eggs. Levels of THg observed in this study were well below critical toxicological benchmarks commonly applied to eggs of avian species, suggesting these breeding populations were not adversely affected by exposure to MeHg. In red-winged blackbirds, concentrations of THg in eggs collected in 2012 were twice those in eggs collected in 2013. Hg levels in eggs of both species increased with date of clutch initiation. In red-winged blackbirds, for example, temporal patterns showed that a 3-week delay in clutch initiation increased egg THg by 60 %. These observations indicate that in ovo exposure of wetland birds to MeHg can vary significantly within nesting season as well as between years.

  10. Aspen overstory recruitment in northern Yellowstone National Park during the last 200 years

    Treesearch

    Eric J. Larsen; William J. Ripple

    2001-01-01

    Using a monograph provided by Warren (1926) and two sets of aspen increment cores collected in 1997 and 1998, we analyzed aspen overstory recruitment in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) over the past 200 years. We found that successful aspen overstory recruitment occurred on the northern range of YNP from the middle to late 1700s until the 1920s, after which it...

  11. Digging into Minnesota Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Natural Resources, St. Paul.

    This publication presents students with facts about geology and several learning activities. Topics covered include rocks and minerals, volcanoes and earthquakes, fossils, exploration geology, mining in Minnesota, environmental issues related to mining, mineral uses, mining history, and the geology of Minnesota's state parks. A geologic timetable…

  12. Recovery of sediment characteristics in moraine, headwater streams of northern Minnesota after forest harvest

    Treesearch

    Eric C. Merten; Nathaniel A. Hemstad; Randall K. Kolka; Raymond M. Newman; Elon S. Verry; Bruce Vondracek

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the recovery of sediment characteristics in four moraine, headwater streams in north-central Minnesota after forest harvest. We examined changes in fine sediment levels from 1997 (preharvest) to 2007 (10 years postharvest) at study plots with upland clear felling and riparian thinning, using canopy cover, proportion of unstable banks, surficial fine...

  13. Overstory and regeneration dynamics in riparian management zones of northern Minnesota forested watersheds

    Treesearch

    Brian. Palik; Michelle. Martin; Erik. Zenner; Charles. Blinn; Randall. Kolka

    2012-01-01

    We quantified tree regeneration under different riparian management zone (RMZ) treatments along first-order streams in Minnesota, USA. A primary objective for long-term management of RMZs in the study region is to maintain some tree cover and promote establishment of later successional tree species and conifers. We also compared regeneration response to contrasting...

  14. Neighbors: A Partnership Project between the St. Louis Park, Minnesota Schools and the Military Avionics Division of Honeywell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Cindy; Bengtson, Wayne

    1984-01-01

    A partnership between Honeywell and a Minnesota school district benefited both organizations through shared resources and provision of staff development programs. Details on how this collaborative project was designed and implemented are discussed. (DF)

  15. Hind limb malformations in free-living northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) from Maine, Minnesota, and Vermont suggest multiple etiologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Loeffler, I.K.; Fallon, J.F.; Converse, K.A.; Green, E.; Helgen, J.C.; Kersten, S.; Levey, R.; Eaton-Poole, L.; Burkhart, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    Background Reports of malformed frogs have increased throughout the North American continent in recent years. Most of the observed malformations have involved the hind limbs. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the hind limb malformations in wild frogs as an important step toward understanding the possible etiologies. Methods During 1997 and 1998, 182 recently metamorphosed northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were collected from Minnesota, Vermont, and Maine. Malformed hind limbs were present in 157 (86%) of these frogs, which underwent necropsy and radiographic evaluation at the National Wildlife Health Center. These malformations are described in detail and classified into four major categories: (1) no limb (amelia); (2) multiple limbs or limb elements (polymelia, polydactyly, polyphalangy); (3) reduced limb segments or elements (phocomelia, ectromelia, ectrodactyly, and brachydactyly; and (4) distally complete but malformed limb (bone rotations, bridging, skin webbing, and micromelia). Results Amelia and reduced segments and/or elements were the most common finding. Frogs with bilateral hind limb malformations were not common, and in only eight of these 22 frogs were the malformations symmetrical. Malformations of a given type tended to occur in frogs collected from the same site, but the types of malformations varied widely among all three states, and between study sites within Minnesota. Conclusions Clustering of malformation type suggests that developmental events may produce a variety of phenotypes depending on the timing, sequence, and severity of the environmental insult. Hind limb malformations in free-living frogs transcend current mechanistic explanations of tetrapod limb development.

  16. Survival and growth of northern white-cedar and balsam fir seedlings in riparian management zones in northern Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Brian J. Palik; Brooke K. Haworth; Andrew J. David; Randall K. Kolka

    2015-01-01

    Northern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis) and balsam fir (Abies balsamea.) are co-occurring species in riparian forests of the western Great Lakes region. Throughout much of the region, northern white-cedar has been experiencing population declines due to herbivory by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus)....

  17. Forests of Minnesota, 2015

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Dennis Kepler

    2017-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Minnesota based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Estimates are based on field data collected during measurement years 2011-2015 with...

  18. Forests of Minnesota, 2016

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Susan J. Crocker; Brian F. Walters; Dennis Kepler

    2017-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Minnesota based on an inventory conducted by the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program within the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Estimates are based on field data collected during measurement years 2012-2016 with...

  19. Forests of Minnesota, 2013

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Curtis VanderSchaaf

    2014-01-01

    This science update provides an overview of forest resources in Minnesota based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Estimates are based on field data, collected using the FIA annualized sample design, for the...

  20. Forests of Minnesota, 2014

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Curtis VanderSchaaf

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Minnesota based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Estimates are based on field data collected during measurement years 2009-2014 with...

  1. Forests of Minnesota, 2017

    Treesearch

    Scott Hillard

    2018-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Minnesota based on an inventory conducted by the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Estimates are based on field data collected from 2013–2017 with comparisons made to field...

  2. Prevalence of Enteropathogens in Dogs Attending 3 Regional Dog Parks in Northern California.

    PubMed

    Hascall, K L; Kass, P H; Saksen, J; Ahlmann, A; Scorza, A V; Lappin, M R; Marks, S L

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence and risk factors for infection with enteropathogens in dogs frequenting dog parks have been poorly documented, and infected dogs can pose a potential zoonotic risk for owners. To determine the prevalence and risk factors of infection with enteropathogens and zoonotic Giardia strains in dogs attending dog parks in Northern California and to compare results of fecal flotation procedures performed at a commercial and university parasitology laboratory. Three-hundred dogs attending 3 regional dog parks in Northern California. Prospective study. Fresh fecal specimens were collected from all dogs, scored for consistency, and owners completed a questionnaire. Specimens were analyzed by fecal centrifugation flotation, DFA, and PCR for detection of 11 enteropathogens. Giardia genotyping was performed for assemblage determination. Enteropathogens were detected in 114/300 dogs (38%), of which 62 (54%) did not have diarrhea. Frequency of dog park attendance correlated significantly with fecal consistency (P = .0039), but did not correlate with enteropathogen detection. Twenty-seven dogs (9%) were infected with Giardia, and genotyping revealed nonzoonotic assemblages C and D. The frequency of Giardia detection on fecal flotation was significantly lower at the commercial laboratory versus the university laboratory (P = .013), and PCR for Giardia was negative in 11/27 dogs (41%) that were positive on fecal flotation or DFA. Enteropathogens were commonly detected in dogs frequenting dog parks, and infection with Giardia correlated with fecal consistency. PCR detection of Giardia had limited diagnostic utility, and detection of Giardia cysts by microscopic technique can vary among laboratories. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. Simulation of ground-water flow in the St. Peter aquifer in an area contaminated by coal-tar derivatives, St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, D.L.; Stark, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    A model constructed to simulate ground-water flow in part of the Prairie du Chien-Jordan and St. Peter aquifers, St. Louis Park, Minnesota, was used to test hypotheses about the movement of ground water contaminated with coal-tar derivatives and to simulate alternatives for reducing the downgradient movement of contamination in the St. Peter aquifer. The model, constructed for a previous study, was applied to simulate the effects of current ground-water withdrawals on the potentiometric surface of the St. Peter aquifer. Model simulations predict that the multiaquifer wells have the potential to limit downgradient migration of contaminants in the St. Peter aquifermore » caused by cones of depression created around the multiaquifer wells. Differences in vertical leakage to the St. Peter aquifer may exist in areas of bedrock valleys. Model simulations indicate that these differences are not likely to affect significantly the general patterns of ground-water flow.« less

  4. Winter movements of four fish species near a thermal plume in northern Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.J.; Winter, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    During winter 1975, 17 yellow perch (Perca flavescens), 6 northern pike (Esox lucius), 3 walleyes (Stizostedion vitreum), and 2 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were equipped with radio frequency transmitters to compare their winter movements near the thermal plume of a power plant. The mean home range sizes, in hectares, were northern pike 19.0; yellow perch 13.4; largemouth bass 3.7; walleye 2.2. Northern pike and yellow perch had mean home range sizes larger than the discharge area. Mean water depths at fish locations were as follows: largemouth bass 0.8 m; northern pike 1.2 m; yellow perch 1.6 m; walleye 3.5 m.more » Largemouth bass preferred the warmest locations near the discharge point. Yellow perch were most often located in the peripheral areas of the discharge bay while walleyes were most often located in the deeper center area. Northern pike moved over the entire discharge area. All species except largemouth bass moved freely between discharge-affected and unaltered waters. The average numbers of movements per individual per week between heated and unheated areas were the following: northern pike 0.8; yellow perch 1.2; walleye 1.1; largemouth bass, 0.« less

  5. Advanced parking information system evaluation report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-01-01

    The Minnesota Department of Transportation, under the Minnesota Guidestar program, in partnership with the Federal Highway Administration, City of St. Paul and AGS Group, and with the participation of ten Civic Center/Rice Park area parking facilitie...

  6. Plants as indicators of focused ground water discharge to a northern Minnesota lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Striegl, Robert G.; Hudson, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Determining the discharge of ground water to Shingobee Lake (66 ha), north-central Minnesota, is complicated by the presence of numerous springs situated adjacent to the lake and in the shallow portion of the lakebed. Springs first had to be located before these areas of more rapid discharge could be quantified. Two methods that rely on the distribution of aquatic plants are useful for locating springs. One method identifies areas of the near-shore lakebed where floating-leaf and emergent aquatic vegetation are absent. The second method uses the distribution of marsh marigold (Caltha palustris L.) to locate springs that discharge on land near the shoreline of the lake. Marsh marigold produces large (2 to 4 cm diameter) yellow flowers that provide a ready marker for locating ground water springs. Twice as many springs (38) were identified using this method as were identified using the lack of near-shore vegetation. A portable weir was used to measure discharge from onshore springs, and seepage meters were used to measure discharge from near-shore springs. Of the total 56.7 L s-1 that enters the lake from ground water, approximately 30% comes from onshore and near-shore springs.Determining the discharge of ground water to Shingobee Lake (66 ha), north-central Minnesota, is complicated by the presence of numerous springs situated adjacent to the lake and in the shallow portion of the lakebed. Springs first had to be located before these areas of more rapid discharge could be quantified. Two methods that rely on the distribution of aquatic plants are useful for locating springs. One method identifies areas of the near-shore lakebed where floating-leaf and emergent aquatic vegetation are absent. The second method uses the distribution of marsh marigold (Caltha palustris L.) to locate springs that discharge on land near the shoreline of the lake. Marsh marigold produces large (2 to 4 cm diameter) yellow flowers that provide a ready marker for locating ground water

  7. Cretaceous rocks from southwestern Montana to southwestern Minnesota, northern Rocky Mountains, and Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dyman, T.S.; Cobban, W.A.; Fox, J.E.; Hammond, R.H.; Nichols, D.J.; Perry, W.J.; Porter, K.W.; Rice, D.D.; Setterholm, D.R.; Shurr, G.W.; Tysdal, R.G.; Haley, J.C.; Campen, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    In Montana, Wyoming, North and South Dakota, and Minnesota, Cretaceous strata are preserved in the asymmetric Western Interior foreland basin. More than 5,200 m (17,000 ft) of Cretaceous strata are present in southwestern Montana, less than 300 m (1,000 ft) in eastern South Dakota. The asymmetry resulted from varying rates of subsidence due to tectonic and sediment loading. The strata consist primarily of sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, and shale. Conglomerate is locally abundant along the western margin, whereas carbonate is present in most areas of the eastern shelf. Sediment was deposited in both marine and nonmarine environments as the shoreline fluctuated during major tectonic and eustatic cycles.A discussion of Cretaceous strata from southwestern to east-central Montana, the Black Hills, eastern South Dakota, and southwestern Minnesota shows regional stratigraphy and facies relations, sequence, boundaries, and biostratigraphic and radiometric correlations. The thick Cretaceous strata in southwestern Montana typify nonmarine facies of the rapidly subsiding westernmost part of the basin. These strata include more than 3,000 m (10,000 ft) of synorogenic conglomerate of the Upper Cretaceous part of the Beaverhead Group. West of the Madison Range, sequence boundaries bracket the Kootenai (Aptian and Albian), the Blackleaf (Albian and Cenomanian), and the Frontier Formations (Cenomanian and Turonian); sequence boundaries are difficult to recognize because the rocks are dominantly non-marine. Cretaceous strata in east-central Montana (about 1,371 m; 4,500 ft thick) lie at the approximate depositional axis of the basin and are mostly marine terrigenous rocks. Chert-pebble zones in these rocks reflect stratigraphic breaks that may correlate with sequence boundaries to the east and west. Cretaceous rocks of the Black Hills region consist of a predominantly marine clastic sequence averaging approximately 1,524 m (5,000 ft) thick. The Cretaceous System in eastern South

  8. Evaluation of internal loading and water level changes: implications for phosphorus, algal production, and nuisance blooms in Kabetogama Lake, Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Maki, Ryan P.; Kiesling, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrologic manipulations have the potential to exacerbate or remediate eutrophication in productive reservoirs. Dam operations at Kabetogama Lake, Minnesota, were modified in 2000 to restore a more natural water regime and improve water quality. The US Geological Survey and National Park Service evaluated nutrient, algae, and nuisance bloom data in relation to changes in Kabetogama Lake water levels. Comparison of the results of this study to previous studies indicates that chlorophyll a concentrations have decreased, whereas total phosphorus (TP) concentrations have not changed significantly since 2000. Water and sediment quality data were collected at Voyageurs National Park during 2008–2009 to assess internal phosphorus loading and determine whether loading is a factor affecting TP concentrations and algal productivity. Kabetogama Lake often was mixed vertically, except for occasional stratification measured in certain areas, including Lost Bay in the northeastern part of Kabetogama Lake. Stratification, higher bottom water and sediment nutrient concentrations than in other parts of the lake, and phosphorus release rates estimated from sediment core incubations indicated that Lost Bay is one of several areas that may be contributing to internal loading. Internal loading of TP is a concern because increased TP may cause excessive algal growth including potentially toxic cyanobacteria.

  9. 76 FR 31010 - Iowa Northern Railway Company-Trackage Rights Exemption-Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... Corporation d/b/a Canadian Pacific (CP) will agree to grant overhead trackage rights to Iowa Northern Railway..., and milepost 116.70 at the connection with CP's Mason City Subdivision, a distance of approximately 20.80 miles; (2) milepost 116.70 at the connection with CP's Mason City Subdivision and milepost 107.30...

  10. Recovery of sediment characteristics in moraine, headwater streams of northern Minnesota after forest harvest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vondracek, Bruce C.; Merten, Eric C.; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Kolka, Randall K.; Newman, Raymond M.; Verry, Elon S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the recovery of sediment characteristics in four moraine, headwater streams in north-central Minnesota after forest harvest. We examined changes in fine sediment levels from 1997 (preharvest) to 2007 (10 years postharvest) at study plots with upland clear felling and riparian thinning, using canopy cover, proportion of unstable banks, surficial fine substrates, residual pool depth, and streambed depth of refusal as response variables. Basin-scale year effects were significant (p < 0.001) for all responses when evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVAs. Throughout the study area, unstable banks increased for several years postharvest, coinciding with an increase in windthrow and fine sediment. Increased unstable banks may have been caused by forest harvest equipment, increased windthrow and exposure of rootwads, or increased discharge and bank scour. Fine sediment in the channels did not recover by summer 2007, even though canopy cover and unstable banks had returned to 1997 levels. After several storm events in fall 2007, 10 years after the initial sediment input, fine sediment was flushed from the channels and returned to 1997 levels. Although our study design did not discern the source of the initial sediment inputs (e.g., forest harvest, road crossings, other natural causes), we have shown that moraine, headwater streams can require an extended period (up to 10 years) and enabling event (e.g., high storm flows) to recover from large inputs of fine sediment.

  11. Recovery of sediment characteristics in moraine, headwater streams of Northern Minnesota after forest harvest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merten, Eric C.; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Kolka, Randall K.; Newman, Raymond M.; Verry, Elon S.; Vondracek, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the recovery of sediment characteristics in four moraine, headwater streams in north-central Minnesota after forest harvest. We examined changes in fine sediment levels from 1997 (preharvest) to 2007 (10 years postharvest) at study plots with upland clear felling and riparian thinning, using canopy cover, proportion of unstable banks, surficial fine substrates, residual pool depth, and streambed depth of refusal as response variables. Basin-scale year effects were significant (p < 0.001) for all responses when evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVAs. Throughout the study area, unstable banks increased for several years postharvest, coinciding with an increase in windthrow and fine sediment. Increased unstable banks may have been caused by forest harvest equipment, increased windthrow and exposure of rootwads, or increased discharge and bank scour. Fine sediment in the channels did not recover by summer 2007, even though canopy cover and unstable banks had returned to 1997 levels. After several storm events in fall 2007, 10 years after the initial sediment input, fine sediment was flushed from the channels and returned to 1997 levels. Although our study design did not discern the source of the initial sediment inputs (e.g., forest harvest, road crossings, other natural causes), we have shown that moraine, headwater streams can require an extended period (up to 10 years) and enabling event (e.g., high storm flows) to recover from large inputs of fine sediment.

  12. Nutrient concentrations in coarse and fine woody debris of Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests, northern Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klockow, Paul A.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Bradford, John B.; Fraver, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary forest harvesting practices, specifically harvesting woody biomass as a source of bioenergy feedstock, may remove more woody debris from a site than conventional harvesting. Woody debris, particularly smaller diameter woody debris, plays a key role in maintaining ecosystem nutrient stores following disturbance. Understanding nutrient concentrations within woody debris is necessary for assessing the long-term nutrient balance consequences of altered woody debris retention, particularly in forests slated for use as bioenergy feedstocks. Nutrient concentrations in downed woody debris of various sizes, decay classes, and species were characterized within one such forest type, Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests of northern Minnesota, USA. Nutrient concentrations differed significantly between size and decay classes and generally increased as decay progressed. Fine woody debris (≤ 7.5 cm diameter) had higher nutrient concentrations than coarse woody debris (> 7.5 cm diameter) for all nutrients examined except Na and Mn, and nutrient concentrations varied among species. Concentrations of N, Mn, Al, Fe, and Zn in coarse woody debris increased between one and three orders of magnitude, while K decreased by an order of magnitude with progressing decay. The variations in nutrient concentrations observed here underscore the complexity of woody debris nutrient stores in forested ecosystems and suggest that retaining fine woody debris at harvest may provide a potentially important source of nutrients following intensive removals of bioenergy feedstocks.

  13. Molybdenum-Based Diazotrophy in a Sphagnum Peatland in Northern Minnesota

    DOE PAGES

    Warren, Melissa J.; Lin, Xueju; Gaby, John C.; ...

    2017-06-30

    We present that Microbial N 2 fixation (diazotrophy) represents an important nitrogen source to oligotrophic peatland ecosystems, which are important sinks for atmospheric CO 2 and are susceptible to the changing climate. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine the active microbial group and type of nitrogenase mediating diazotrophy in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-dominated peat bog (the S1 peat bog, Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA); and (ii) to determine the effect of environmental parameters (light, O 2, CO 2, and CH 4) on potential rates of diazotrophy measured by acetylene (C 2H 2) reduction and 15N 2incorporation. A molecularmore » analysis of metabolically active microbial communities suggested that diazotrophy in surface peat was primarily mediated by Alphaproteobacteria (15N 2 was suppressed 90% by O 2 and 55% by C 2H 2 and was unaffected by CH 4 and CO 2 amendments. These results suggest that peatland diazotrophy is mediated by a combination of C 2H 2-sensitive and C 2H 2-insensitive microbes that are more active at low concentrations of O 2 and show similar activity at high and low concentrations of CH 4. Importance: Previous studies indicate that diazotrophy provides an important nitrogen source and is linked to methanotrophy in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands. However, the environmental controls and enzymatic pathways of peatland diazotrophy, as well as the metabolically active microbial populations that catalyze this process, remain in question. In conclusion, our findings indicate that oxygen levels and photosynthetic activity override low nutrient availability in limiting diazotrophy and that members of the Alphaproteobacteria (Rhizobiales) catalyze this process at the bog surface using the molybdenum-based form of the nitrogenase enzyme.« less

  14. Reaction modeling of drainage quality in the Duluth Complex, northern Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, Robert; Lapakko, Kim; Piatak, Nadine; Woodruff, Laurel G.

    2015-01-01

    Reaction modeling can be a valuable tool in predicting the long-term behavior of waste material if representative rate constants can be derived from long-term leaching tests or other approaches. Reaction modeling using the REACT program of the Geochemist’s Workbench was conducted to evaluate long-term drainage quality affected by disseminated Cu-Ni-(Co-)-PGM sulfide mineralization in the basal zone of the Duluth Complex where significant resources have been identified. Disseminated sulfide minerals, mostly pyrrhotite and Cu-Fe sulfides, are hosted by clinopyroxene-bearing troctolites. Carbonate minerals are scarce to non-existent. Long-term simulations of up to 20 years of weathering of tailings used two different sets of rate constants: one based on published laboratory single-mineral dissolution experiments, and one based on leaching experiments using bulk material from the Duluth Complex conducted by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR). The simulations included only plagioclase, olivine, clinopyroxene, pyrrhotite, and water as starting phases. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were assumed to be in equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen. The simulations based on the published single-mineral rate constants predicted that pyrrhotite would be effectively exhausted in less than two years and pH would rise accordingly. In contrast, only 20 percent of the pyrrhotite was depleted after two years using the MNDNR rate constants. Predicted pyrrhotite depletion by the simulation based on the MNDNR rate constant matched well with published results of laboratory tests on tailings. Modeling long-term weathering of mine wastes also can provide important insights into secondary reactions that may influence the permeability of tailings and thereby affect weathering behavior. Both models predicted the precipitation of a variety of secondary phases including goethite, gibbsite, and clay (nontronite).

  15. Molybdenum-Based Diazotrophy in a Sphagnum Peatland in Northern Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Melissa J.; Lin, Xueju; Gaby, John C.

    We present that Microbial N 2 fixation (diazotrophy) represents an important nitrogen source to oligotrophic peatland ecosystems, which are important sinks for atmospheric CO 2 and are susceptible to the changing climate. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine the active microbial group and type of nitrogenase mediating diazotrophy in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-dominated peat bog (the S1 peat bog, Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA); and (ii) to determine the effect of environmental parameters (light, O 2, CO 2, and CH 4) on potential rates of diazotrophy measured by acetylene (C 2H 2) reduction and 15N 2incorporation. A molecularmore » analysis of metabolically active microbial communities suggested that diazotrophy in surface peat was primarily mediated by Alphaproteobacteria (15N 2 was suppressed 90% by O 2 and 55% by C 2H 2 and was unaffected by CH 4 and CO 2 amendments. These results suggest that peatland diazotrophy is mediated by a combination of C 2H 2-sensitive and C 2H 2-insensitive microbes that are more active at low concentrations of O 2 and show similar activity at high and low concentrations of CH 4. Importance: Previous studies indicate that diazotrophy provides an important nitrogen source and is linked to methanotrophy in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands. However, the environmental controls and enzymatic pathways of peatland diazotrophy, as well as the metabolically active microbial populations that catalyze this process, remain in question. In conclusion, our findings indicate that oxygen levels and photosynthetic activity override low nutrient availability in limiting diazotrophy and that members of the Alphaproteobacteria (Rhizobiales) catalyze this process at the bog surface using the molybdenum-based form of the nitrogenase enzyme.« less

  16. Molybdenum-Based Diazotrophy in a Sphagnum Peatland in Northern Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Melissa J.; Lin, Xueju; Gaby, John C.; Kretz, Cecilia B.; Kolton, Max; Morton, Peter L.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Weston, David J.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial N2 fixation (diazotrophy) represents an important nitrogen source to oligotrophic peatland ecosystems, which are important sinks for atmospheric CO2 and are susceptible to the changing climate. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine the active microbial group and type of nitrogenase mediating diazotrophy in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-dominated peat bog (the S1 peat bog, Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA); and (ii) to determine the effect of environmental parameters (light, O2, CO2, and CH4) on potential rates of diazotrophy measured by acetylene (C2H2) reduction and 15N2 incorporation. A molecular analysis of metabolically active microbial communities suggested that diazotrophy in surface peat was primarily mediated by Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobiaceae and Beijerinckiaceae). Despite higher concentrations of dissolved vanadium ([V] 11 nM) than molybdenum ([Mo] 3 nM) in surface peat, a combination of metagenomic, amplicon sequencing, and activity measurements indicated that Mo-containing nitrogenases dominate over the V-containing form. Acetylene reduction was only detected in surface peat exposed to light, with the highest rates observed in peat collected from hollows with the highest water contents. Incorporation of 15N2 was suppressed 90% by O2 and 55% by C2H2 and was unaffected by CH4 and CO2 amendments. These results suggest that peatland diazotrophy is mediated by a combination of C2H2-sensitive and C2H2-insensitive microbes that are more active at low concentrations of O2 and show similar activity at high and low concentrations of CH4. IMPORTANCE Previous studies indicate that diazotrophy provides an important nitrogen source and is linked to methanotrophy in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands. However, the environmental controls and enzymatic pathways of peatland diazotrophy, as well as the metabolically active microbial populations that catalyze this process, remain in question. Our findings indicate that oxygen levels

  17. Molybdenum-based diazotrophy in a Sphagnum peatland in northern Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Warren, Melissa J; Lin, Xueju; Gaby, John C; Kretz, Cecilia B; Kolton, Max; Morton, Peter L; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Weston, David J; Schadt, Christopher W; Kostka, Joel E; Glass, Jennifer B

    2017-06-30

    Microbial N 2 fixation (diazotrophy) represents an important nitrogen source to oligotrophic peatland ecosystems, which are important sinks for atmospheric CO 2 and susceptible to changing climate. The objectives of this study were: (i) to determine the active microbial group and type of nitrogenase mediating diazotrophy in a ombrotrophic Sphagnum -dominated peat bog (the S1 peat bog, Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA); and (ii) to determine the effect of environmental parameters (light, O 2 , CO 2 , CH 4 ) on potential rates of diazotrophy measured by acetylene (C 2 H 2 ) reduction and 15 N 2 incorporation. Molecular analysis of metabolically active microbial communities suggested that diazotrophy in surface peat was primarily mediated by Alphaproteobacteria ( Bradyrhizobiaceae and Beijerinckiaceae ). Despite higher dissolved vanadium (V; 11 nM) than molybdenum (Mo; 3 nM) in surface peat, a combination of metagenomic, amplicon sequencing and activity measurements indicated that Mo-containing nitrogenases dominate over the V-containing form. Acetylene reduction was only detected in surface peat exposed to light, with the highest rates observed in peat collected from hollows with the highest water content. Incorporation of 15 N 2 was suppressed 90% by O 2 and 55% by C 2 H 2 , and was unaffected by CH 4 and CO 2 amendments. These results suggest that peatland diazotrophy is mediated by a combination of C 2 H 2 -sensitive and C 2 H 2 -insensitive microbes that are more active at low O 2 and show similar activity at high and low CH 4 Importance Previous studies indicate that diazotrophy provides an important nitrogen source and is linked to methanotrophy in Sphagnum -dominated peatlands. However, the environmental controls and enzymatic pathways of peatland diazotrophy, as well as the metabolically active microbial populations that catalyze this process remain in question. Our findings indicate that oxygen levels and photosynthetic activity override low

  18. Winter movements of four fish species near a thermal plume in northern Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.J.; Winter, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Four fish species were studied during the winter of 1975 to compare their winter movements near the thermal plume of a power plant. Seventeen yellow perch (Perca flavescens), six northern pike (Esox lucius), three walleyes (Stizostedion vitreum), and two largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were equipped with radio frequency transmitters. The spatial distributions differed among species. Only the largemouth bass confined their movements to heated water areas. The yellow perch, which was of particular interest, do not seem to be attracted to warm winter waters, and thus locate themselves in the peripheral areas of the discharge bay and fail to reproduce.more » This finding is contrary to those of previous studies.« less

  19. Interactions between Nitrogen Fixation and Methane Cycling in Northern Minnesota Peat Bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, M. J.; Gaby, J. C.; Lin, X.; Morton, P. L.; Kostka, J. E.; Glass, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Peatlands cover only 3% of the Earth's surface, yet store a third of soil carbon. Increasing global temperatures have the potential to change peatlands from a net sink to a net source of atmospheric carbon. N is a limiting nutrient in oligotrophic Sphagnum-dominated peatlands and biological N2 fixation likely supplies a significant but unknown fraction of N inputs. Moreover, environmental controls on diazotrophic community composition in N-limited peatlands are poorly constrained. Thus, improved understanding of feedbacks between the CH4 and N cycles is critical for predicting future changes to CH4 flux from peat bogs. We coupled measurements of N2 fixation activity measured by the acetylene (C2H2) reduction assay (ARA) with molecular analyses of expression and diversity of nifH genes encoding the molybdenum (Mo)-containing nitrogenase from two peat bogs in the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA. The top 10 cm of peat was sampled from the high CH4 flux S1 bog and the low CH4 flux Zim bog in April and June 2014. Despite similar N concentrations in the top 10 cm of both bogs (0.5-1.0 μM NO2-+NO3- and 2-3 μM NH4+), the S1 bog displayed variable ARA activity (1-100 nmol C2H4 h-1 g-1) whereas the Zim bog had consistently low ARA activity (<1 nmol C2H4 h-1 g-1). Highest ARA activity was measured in June from S1 bog hollows with higher moisture content incubated without O2 in the light (20-100 nmol C2H4 h-1 g-1). Dissolved Fe (1-25 μM) was higher in hollow vs. hummock samples, and at S1 vs. Zim bog, while dissolved V (4-14 nM) was consistently higher than Mo (1-4 nM), suggesting that alternative V or Fe-containing nitrogenases might be present in these bogs. In contrast, Cu, an essential micronutrient for aerobic methanotrophs, was higher in hummocks (25-48 nM) than hollows (6-17 nM). The facultative methanotroph Methylocella was the dominant diazotroph in the S1 bog based on high throughput next generation sequencing of nifH cDNA amplicons. Given previous

  20. A history of trade routes and water-level regulation on waterways in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; LaBounty, Andrew E.

    2018-01-01

    Unlike most national parks, main access to Voyageurs National Park is by boat. This remote system of interconnected waterways along the USA-Canada border was an important transportation route for thousands of years of American Indian occupation, leading up to and including the trade route of the voyageurs, or French-Canadian fur traders from around 1680 to 1870. The Ojibwe people collaborated with the voyageurs and the two cultures developed a trade network that continued to rely on these waterways. By the mid-1800s, European fashion changed, and the fur trade dwindled while the Ojibwe remained tied to the land and waters. The complexity of the waterways increased with the installation of dams on two of the natural lakes in the early 1900s. Modern water levels have affected—and in some cases destabilized—vulnerable landforms within the past century. The knowledge of these effects can be used by resource managers to weigh the consequences of hydrologic manipulation in Voyageurs National Park.

  1. Vertical Stratification of Peat Pore Water Dissolved Organic Matter Composition in a Peat Bog in Northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tfaily, Malak M.; Wilson, Rachel M.; Cooper, William T.; Kostka, Joel E.; Hanson, Paul; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2018-02-01

    We characterized dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition throughout the peat column at the Marcell S1 forested bog in northern Minnesota and tested the hypothesis that redox oscillations associated with cycles of wetting and drying at the surface of the fluctuating water table correlate with increased carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen turn over. We found significant vertical stratification of DOM molecular composition and excitation-emission matrix parallel factor analysis components within the peat column. In particular, the intermediate depth zone ( 50 cm) was identified as a zone where maximum decomposition and turnover is taking place. Surface DOM was dominated by inputs from surface vegetation. The intermediate depth zone was an area of high organic matter reactivity and increased microbial activity with diagenetic formation of many unique compounds, among them polycyclic aromatic compounds that contain both nitrogen and sulfur heteroatoms. These compounds have been previously observed in coal-derived compounds and were assumed to be responsible for coal's biological activity. Biological processes triggered by redox oscillations taking place at the intermediate depth zone of the peat profile at the S1 bog are assumed to be responsible for the formation of these heteroatomic PACs in this system. Alternatively, these compounds could stem from black carbon and nitrogen derived from fires that have occurred at the site in the past. Surface and deep DOM exhibited more similar characteristics, compared to the intermediate depth zone, with the deep layer exhibiting greater input of microbially degraded organic matter than the surface suggesting that the entire peat profile consists of similar parent material at different degrees of decomposition and that lateral and vertical advection of pore water from the surface to the deeper horizons is responsible for such similarities. Our findings suggest that molecular composition of DOM in peatland pore water is dynamic and is

  2. Mercury in soils, lakes, and fish in Voyageurs National Park (Minnesota): Importance of atmospheric deposition and ecosystem factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, J.G.; Knights, B.C.; Sandheinrich, M.B.; Jeremiason, Jeffrey D.; Brigham, M.E.; Engstrom, D.R.; Woodruff, L.G.; Cannon, W.F.; Balogh, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Concentrations of methylmercury in game fish from many interior lakes in Voyageurs National Park (MN, U.S.A.) substantially exceed criteria for the protection of human health. We assessed the importance of atmospheric and geologic sources of mercury to interior lakes and watersheds within the Park and identified ecosystem factors associated with variation in methylmercury contamination of lacustrine food webs. Geologic sources of mercury were small, based on analyses of underlying bedrock and C-horizon soils, and nearly all mercury in the O- and A-horizon soils was derived from atmospheric deposition. Analyses of dated sediment cores from five lakes showed that most (63% ?? 13%) of the mercury accumulated in lake sediments during the 1900s was from anthropogenic sources. Contamination of food webs was assessed by analysis of whole, 1-year-old yellow perch (Perca flavescens), a regionally important prey fish. The concentrations of total mercury in yellow perch and of methylmercury in lake water varied substantially among lakes, reflecting the influence of ecosystem processes and variables that affect the microbial production and abundance of methylmercury. Models developed with the information-theoretic approach (Akaike Information Criteria) identified lake water pH, dissolved sulfate, and total organic carbon (an indicator of wetland influence) as factors influencing methylmercury concentrations in lake water and fish. We conclude that nearly all of the mercury in fish in this seemingly pristine landscape was derived from atmospheric deposition, that most of this bioaccumulated mercury was from anthropogenic sources, and that both watershed and lacustrine factors exert important controls on the bioaccumulation of methylmercury. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  3. Bioactive contaminants of emerging concern in National Park waters of the northern Colorado Plateau, USA.

    PubMed

    Weissinger, Rebecca H; Blackwell, Brett R; Keteles, Kristen; Battaglin, William A; Bradley, Paul M

    2018-05-02

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), wastewater indicators (WWIs), and pesticides (herein, Contaminants of Emerging Concern [CECs]) have been documented in surface waters throughout the world and have associated risks to aquatic life. While much research has focused on temperate and urbanized watersheds, less is known about CEC presence in semi-arid landscapes, where water availability is limited and populations are low. CEC presence in water and sediment is reported for 21 sites in eight U.S. national parks in the northern Colorado Plateau region. From 2012 to 2016, at least one PPCP and/or WWI was detected at most sites on over half of sampling visits, indicating that CECs are not uncommon even in isolated areas. CEC detections were generally fewer and at lower concentrations than in urbanized or agricultural watersheds. Consistent with studies from other U.S. regions, the most frequently detected CECs in this study include DEET, caffeine, organophosphorus flame retardants, and bisphenol A in water and fecal indicators and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment. Maximum concentrations in this study were generally below available water quality benchmarks, sediment quality guidelines, and risk assessment thresholds associated with vertebrates. Additional work is needed to assess the potential activity of hormones, which had high reporting limits in our study, and potential bioactivity of environmental concentrations for invertebrates, microbial communities, and algae. Potential sources of CEC contamination include upstream wastewater effluent discharges and National Park Service invasive-plant-control herbicide applications. CEC occurrence patterns and similarities between continuous and isolated flow locations suggest that direct contamination from individual visitors may also occur. While our data indicate there is little aquatic health risk associated with CECs at our sites, our results demonstrate the ubiquity of CECs on the landscape and a

  4. Bioactive contaminants of emerging concern in National Park waters of the northern Colorado Plateau, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weissinger, Rebecca H; Blackwell, Brett R.; Keteles, Kristen; Battaglin, William A.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2018-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), wastewater indicators (WWIs), and pesticides (herein, Contaminants of Emerging Concern [CECs]) have been documented in surface waters throughout the world and have associated risks to aquatic life. While much research has focused on temperate and urbanized watersheds, less is known about CEC presence in semi-arid landscapes, where water availability is limited and populations are low. CEC presence in water and sediment is reported for 21 sites in eight U.S. national parks in the northern Colorado Plateau region. From 2012 to 2016, at least one PPCP and/or WWI was detected at most sites on over half of sampling visits, indicating that CECs are not uncommon even in isolated areas. CEC detections were generally fewer and at lower concentrations than in urbanized or agricultural watersheds. Consistent with studies from other U.S. regions, the most frequently detected CECs in this study include DEET, caffeine, organophosphorus flame retardants, and bisphenol A in water and fecal indicators and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment. Maximum concentrations in this study were generally below available water quality benchmarks, sediment quality guidelines, and risk assessment thresholds associated with vertebrates. Additional work is needed to assess the potential activity of hormones, which had high reporting limits in our study, and potential bioactivity of environmental concentrations for invertebrates, microbial communities, and algae. Potential sources of CEC contamination include upstream wastewater effluent discharges and National Park Service invasive-plant-control herbicide applications. CEC occurrence patterns and similarities between continuous and isolated flow locations suggest that direct contamination from individual visitors may also occur. While our data indicate there is little aquatic health risk associated with CECs at our sites, our results demonstrate the ubiquity of CECs on the landscape and a

  5. Simulated effects of recruitment variability, exploitation, and reduced habitat area on the muskellunge population in Shoepack Lake, Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frohnauer, N.K.; Pierce, C.L.; Kallemeyn, L.W.

    2007-01-01

    The genetically unique population of muskellunge Esox masquinongy inhabiting Shoepack Lake in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, is potentially at risk for loss of genetic variability and long-term viability. Shoepack Lake has been subject to dramatic surface area changes from the construction of an outlet dam by beavers Castor canadensis and its subsequent failure. We simulated the long-term dynamics of this population in response to recruitment variation, increased exploitation, and reduced habitat area. We then estimated the effective population size of the simulated population and evaluated potential threats to long-term viability, based on which we recommend management actions to help preserve the long-term viability of the population. Simulations based on the population size and habitat area at the beginning of a companion study resulted in an effective population size that was generally above the threshold level for risk of loss of genetic variability, except when fishing mortality was increased. Simulations based on the reduced habitat area after the beaver dam failure and our assumption of a proportional reduction in population size resulted in an effective population size that was generally below the threshold level for risk of loss of genetic variability. Our results identified two potential threats to the long-term viability of the Shoepack Lake muskellunge population, reduction in habitat area and exploitation. Increased exploitation can be prevented through traditional fishery management approaches such as the adoption of no-kill, barbless hook, and limited entry regulations. Maintenance of the greatest possible habitat area and prevention of future habitat area reductions will require maintenance of the outlet dam built by beavers. Our study should enhance the long-term viability of the Shoepack Lake muskellunge population and illustrates a useful approach for other unique populations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  6. Prescribed burning weather in Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Rodney W. Sando

    1969-01-01

    Describes the weather patterns in northern Minnesota as related to prescribed burning. The prevailing wind direction, average wind speed, most persistent wind direction, and average Buildup Index are considered in making recommendations.

  7. 75 FR 63213 - Northern States Power Company-Minnesota; Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 1 and 2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... Company--Minnesota; Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and... accordance with 10 CFR 51.21, the NRC performed an environmental assessment in support of this requested exemption. Based on the results of the environmental assessment, the NRC is issuing a finding of no...

  8. Influence of competition and age on tree growth in structurally complex old-growth forests in northern Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Tuomas Aakala; Shawn Fraver; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik

    2013-01-01

    Factors influencing tree growth in structurally complex forests remain poorly understood. Here we assessed the influence of competition on Pinus resinosa (n = 224) and Pinus strobus (n = 90) growth in four old-growth stands in Minnesota, using mixed effects models. A subset of trees, with...

  9. Elemental and mineralogical changes in soils due to bioturbation along an earthworm invasion chronosequence in northern Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Kathryn Resner; Kyungsoo Yoo; Cindy Hale; Anthony Aufdenkampe; Alex Blum; Stephen Sebestyen

    2011-01-01

    Minnesota forested soils have evolved without the presence of earthworms since the last glacial retreat. When exotic earthworms arrive, enhanced soil bioturbation often results in dramatic morphological and chemical changes in soils with negative implications for the forests' sustainability. However, the impacts of earthworm invasion on geochemical processes in...

  10. Minnesota's forest resources, 2006

    Treesearch

    P.D. Miles; D. Heinzen

    2007-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Minnesota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These annual estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information regarding past inventory reports for...

  11. Minnesota's forest resources, 2010

    Treesearch

    P.D. Miles; T. Aunan

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Minnesota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report...

  12. Minnesota's forest resources, 2012

    Treesearch

    P.D. Miles; C.L. VanderSchaaf

    2012-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Minnesota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report...

  13. Minnesota's forest resources, 2009

    Treesearch

    P.D. Miles; D. Heinzen

    2010-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Minnesota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report...

  14. Minnesota's Forest Resources, 2007

    Treesearch

    P.D. Miles; D. Heinzen

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Minnesota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report....

  15. Minnesota's forest resources, 2011

    Treesearch

    P.D. Miles; C.L. VanderSchaaf

    2012-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Minnesota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report...

  16. HealthSystem Minnesota: a leader in the Minnesota marketplace.

    PubMed

    Greenland, C A

    1997-01-01

    HealthSystem Minnesota is an integrated, patient-centered, care delivery system located in the Twin Cities. In the early 1990's, as pressure built for health care providers to cut costs and increased value, Park Nicollet Clinic, Methodist Hospital, Primary Physician Network, and our other member organizations merged to form HealthSystem Minnesota. Our organization has strong relationships with several major payers, but we have chosen to remain purely a physician-led, professionally managed care delivery system. This structure allows us to focus on our patients as our first priority. This article illustrates the role HealthSystem Minnesota plays in the highly competitive Twin Cities market.

  17. Reconnaissance Study of the Hydrology of American Memorial Park, Island of Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perreault, Jeff A.

    2007-01-01

    American Memorial Park, a unit of the National Park Service on the Island of Saipan, includes among its features a 27-acre estuarine system that has become a rarity within the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The estuarine system's mosaic of marshy areas interspersed with emergent wetlands and mixed wet forests provides critical habitat for various migratory and resident waterfowl, including two Federally listed endangered species: the Marianas gallinule (Gallinula chloropus guami) and the nightingale reed warbler (Acrocephalus luscinia). With sensitivity to the park's ecologic assets and the uncertainty associated with locally rapid urbanization, a need to better understand the hydrology of American Memorial Park was recognized. To address that need, a reconnaissance study of the park was undertaken during August and September 2005. The goals of the study were (1) to describe the occurrence and salinity of surface and ground water within the park; (2) to develop a hydrologic model of the park area of the island, with emphasis on the 27-acre estuarine system; and (3) to identify additional data needed to further develop this model. With regard to surface water, three freshwater inputs to the park's natural wetland are possible: direct rainfall, seaward-flowing ground water, and overland flow. Direct rainfall, which is an important source of freshwater to the wetland, commonly exceeds evapotranspiration both seasonally and per storm. The seaward flow of ground water is likely to be a source of freshwater to the wetland because ground water generally has an upward vertical component in the nearshore environment. Overland flow upgradient of the park could potentially contribute a significant input of freshwater during periods of intense rainfall, but roads that flank the park's perimeter act as a barrier to surficial inflows. During the reconnaissance, four discrete bodies, or zones, of surface water were observed within the park's natural wetland

  18. The influence of partial timber harvest in riparian management zones on macroinvertebrate and fish communities on first- and second-order streams in northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Blinn, Charles R.; Newman, Raymond M.; Atuke, Dickson M.; Fredricks, Keith; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Merten, Eric; Schlesser, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Relatively few evaluations of aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish communities have been published in peer-reviewed literature detailing the effect of varying residual basal area (RBA) after timber harvesting in riparian buffers. Our analysis investigated the effects of partial harvesting within riparian buffers on aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish communities in small streams from two experiments in northern Minnesota northern hardwood-aspen forests. Each experiment evaluated partial harvesting within riparian buffers. In both experiments, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish were collected 1 year prior to harvest and in each of 3 years after harvest. We observed interannual variation for the macroinvertebrate abundance, diversity and taxon richness in the single-basin study and abundance and diversity in the multiple-basin study, but few effects related to harvest treatments in either study. However, interannual variation was not evident in the fish communities and we detected no significant changes in the stream fish communities associated with partially harvested riparian buffers in either study. This would suggest that timber harvesting in riparian management zones along reaches ≤200 m in length on both sides of the stream that retains RBA ≥ 12.4 ± 1.3 m2 ha−1 or on a single side of the stream that retains RBA ≥ 8.7 ± 1.6 m2 ha−1 may be adequate to protect macroinvertebrate and fish communities in our Minnesota study systems given these specific timber harvesting techniques.

  19. Influence of multi-source and multi-temporal remotely sensed and ancillary data on the accuracy of random forest classification of wetlands in northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corcoran, Jennifer M.; Knight, Joseph F.; Gallant, Alisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Wetland mapping at the landscape scale using remotely sensed data requires both affordable data and an efficient accurate classification method. Random forest classification offers several advantages over traditional land cover classification techniques, including a bootstrapping technique to generate robust estimations of outliers in the training data, as well as the capability of measuring classification confidence. Though the random forest classifier can generate complex decision trees with a multitude of input data and still not run a high risk of over fitting, there is a great need to reduce computational and operational costs by including only key input data sets without sacrificing a significant level of accuracy. Our main questions for this study site in Northern Minnesota were: (1) how does classification accuracy and confidence of mapping wetlands compare using different remote sensing platforms and sets of input data; (2) what are the key input variables for accurate differentiation of upland, water, and wetlands, including wetland type; and (3) which datasets and seasonal imagery yield the best accuracy for wetland classification. Our results show the key input variables include terrain (elevation and curvature) and soils descriptors (hydric), along with an assortment of remotely sensed data collected in the spring (satellite visible, near infrared, and thermal bands; satellite normalized vegetation index and Tasseled Cap greenness and wetness; and horizontal-horizontal (HH) and horizontal-vertical (HV) polarization using L-band satellite radar). We undertook this exploratory analysis to inform decisions by natural resource managers charged with monitoring wetland ecosystems and to aid in designing a system for consistent operational mapping of wetlands across landscapes similar to those found in Northern Minnesota.

  20. Recreation conflict potential and management in the northern/central Black Forest Nature Park

    Treesearch

    C. Mann; J. D. Absher

    2008-01-01

    This study explores conflict in recreational use of the Black Forest Nature Park (BFNP) by six different nature sports groups as a function of infrastructure, forest management and other users. A multi-step, methodological triangulation conflict model from US recreation management was applied and tested in the Park. Results from two groups, hikers and mountain bikers,...

  1. 77 FR 5842 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, Bemidji, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ..., Crow Wing, and Kanabec. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's administrative... the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Red Cliff Band of Lake... University (Acc. 103). The mound may have been located in either Crow Wing County, MN or Morrison County, MN...

  2. The geochemical landscape of northwestern Wisconsin and adjacent parts of northern Michigan and Minnesota (geochemical data files)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, William F.; Woodruff, Laurel G.

    2003-01-01

    This data set consists of nine files of geochemical information on various types of surficial deposits in northwestern Wisconsin and immediately adjacent parts of Michigan and Minnesota. The files are presented in two formats: as dbase files in dbaseIV form and Microsoft Excel form. The data present multi-element chemical analyses of soils, stream sediments, and lake sediments. Latitude and longitude values are provided in each file so that the dbf files can be readily imported to GIS applications. Metadata files are provided in outline form, question and answer form and text form. The metadata includes information on procedures for sample collection, sample preparation, and chemical analyses including sensitivity and precision.

  3. Geology and Mineral Resources of the Northern Part of the North Cascades National Park, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staatz, Mortimer Hay; Tabor, Rowland W.; Weis, Paul L.; Robertson, Jacques F.; Van Noy, Ronald M.; Pattee, Eldon C.

    1972-01-01

    The northern part of the North Cascades National Park in northern Washington is north of the Skagit River between Mount Shuksan on the West and Ross Lake on the east. The area occupies approximately 500 square miles of steep mountains and thickly forested valleys centered on the precipitous Picket Range. Old metamorphic rocks and young volcanic and sedimentary rocks are intruded by large masses of granitic rocks that together form a diverse, complicated, but well-exposed geologic section. The granitic rocks are the most abundant in the area; they intrude most of the other rocks, and they separate one suite of rocks in the eastern part of the area from a second suite in the western part. In the eastern part of the area, the oldest rocks are the Custer Gneiss of McTaggart and Thompson, a thick sequence of biotite and hornblende gneisses and schists. We have divided these rocks into three generalized units: light-colored gneiss, banded gneiss, and amphibole-rich gneiss. To the northeast of these rocks lies a metagabbro. This rock type is complex and is made up of several types of gabbro, diorite, amphibolite, ultramafic rocks, and quartz diorite that crop out along the Ross Lake fault zone. To the northeast of these rocks and also along the Ross Lake fault zone is the phyllite and schist of Ross Lake. These rocks are the highly sheared and metamorphosed equivalents of the plagioclase arkose and argillite sequence of Jurassic and Cretaceous age that is so widespread on the east side of Ross Lake. The Cretaceous Hozomeen Group of Cairnes lies along Ross Lake northeast of the phyllite and schist and consists mainly of slightly metamorphosed greenstones with subordinate chert and phyllite. The phyllite in this unit is similar to that in the underlying phyllite and schist of Ross Lake with which it appears to be interbedded. The youngest rocks in the eastern part of the area are the Skagit Volcanics a thick sequence of welded tuff-breccia with some flows and air-laid tuffs

  4. Relations between fish abundances, summer temperatures, and forest harvest in a northern Minnesota stream system from 1997 to 2007

    Treesearch

    Eric Merten; Nathaniel Hemstad; Susan Eggert; Lucinda Johnson; Randall Kolka; Bruce Vondracek; Raymond Newman

    2010-01-01

    Short-term effects of forest harvest on fish habitat have been well documented, including sediment inputs, leaf litter reductions, and stream warming. However, few studies have considered changes in local climate when examining postlogging changes in fish communities. To address this need, we examined fish abundances between 1997 and 2007 in a basin in a northern...

  5. 75 FR 57535 - Northern States Power Company-Minnesota Notice of Issuance of Amendments to Facility Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... issuance. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Thomas J. Wengert, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S... Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. [FR Doc. 2010-23516 Filed 9-20-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-282 and 50-306; NRC-2010-0290] Northern States Power...

  6. Sulfur Isotropic Studies of Archean Slate and Graywacke from Northern Minnesota: Evidence for the Existence of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripley, E. M.; Nicol, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Sulfur isotopic studies of pyrite from metasediments in the 2.6 b.y. old Deer Lake greenstone sequence, Minnesota, were conducted in order to evaluate the possible importance of sulfate reducing bacteria in sulfide formation. Pyrite occurs as ovules up to 2 cm in diameter within graphitic slates, and as fine disseminations in metagraywacke units. SEM studies indicate the pyrite is framboidal in morphology. Delta notation values of pyrite from the Deer Lake sediments range from -2.3 to 11.1 0/00, with a peak at approximately +2 o/oo. Isotopic data is consistent with either high temperature inorganic reduction of circulating seawater sulfate, or low temperature bacterial reduction. However, the lack of sulfide bands or massive occurrences in the sediments, the restriction of pyrite mineralization to the sediments, and the absence of evidence for hot spring activity suggest that a diagenetic origin of pyrite is more feasible. Sulfide in such an environment would be produced principally by the action of sulfate reducing bacteria.

  7. A Guide to Minnesota Environmental Education Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Wes, Comp.; Gruchow, Nancy, Comp.

    More than 400 areas in Minnesota, useful as sites for environmental studies, are catalogued in this guide. They include state parks and waysides, state forests, state wildlife management areas, waterfowl production areas, national forests, nature centers and preserves, metropolitan, county and city parks, outdoor education school sites, school…

  8. Accumulation of Methylmercury in Invertebrates and Masked Shrews (Sorex cinereus) at an Upland Forest-Peatland Interface in Northern Minnesota, USA.

    PubMed

    Tavshunsky, Ilana; Eggert, Susan L; Mitchell, Carl P J

    2017-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) methylation is often elevated at the terrestrial-peatland interface, but methylmercury (MeHg) production at this "hot spot" has not been linked with in situ biotic accumulation. We examined total Hg and MeHg levels in peat, invertebrates and tissues of the insectivore Sorex cinereus (masked shrew), inhabiting a terrestrial-peatland ecotone in northern Minnesota, USA. Mean MeHg concentrations in S. cinereus (71 ng g -1 ) fell between concentrations measured in spiders (mean 70-140 ng g -1 ), and ground beetles and millipedes (mean 29-42 ng g -1 ). Methylmercury concentrations in S. cinereus increased with age and differed among tissues, with highest concentrations in kidneys and muscle, followed by liver and brain. Nearly all Hg in S. cinereus was in the methylated form. Overall, the high proportional accumulation of MeHg in peat at the site (3.5% total Hg as MeHg) did not lead to particularly elevated concentrations in invertebrates or shrews, which are below values considered a toxicological risk.

  9. Minnesota Land Ownership Trends, 1962-1977

    Treesearch

    Pamela J. Jakes; Alexander Vasilevsky

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of Minnesota's commercial forest land among ownership classes has remained stable between 1962 and 1977. This note summarizes commercial forest ownership data by Forest Survey Unit for 1962 and 1977 and presents more detailed area statistics for Minnesota's 17 northern countries.

  10. Local Spatial Heterogeneity of Holocene Carbon Accumulation throughout the Peat Profile of an Ombrotrophic Northern Minnesota Bog

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Karis J.; Hanson, Paul J.; Iversen, Colleen M.

    Here, we evaluated the spatial heterogeneity of historical carbon accumulation rates in a forested, ombrotrophic bog in Minnesota to aid understanding of responses to an ongoing decade-long warming manipulation. Eighteen peat cores indicated that the bog has been accumulating carbon for over 11,000 years, to yield 176±40 kg C m –2 to 225±58 cm of peat depth. Estimated peat basal ages ranged from 5100 to 11,100 cal BP. The long-term apparent rate of carbon accumulation over the entire peat profile was 22±2 kg C m –2yr –1. Plot location within the study area did not affect carbon accumulation rates, butmore » estimated basal ages were younger in profiles from plots closer to the bog lagg and farther from the bog outlet. In addition, carbon accumulation varied considerably over time. Early Holocene net carbon accumulation rates were 30±6 g C m –2yr –1. Around 3300 calendar BP, net carbon accumulation rates dropped to 15±8 g C m –2yr –1until the last century when net accumulation rates increased again to 74±57 g C m –2yr –1. During this period of low accumulation, regional droughts may have lowered the water table, allowing for enhanced aerobic decomposition and making the bog more susceptible to fire. These results suggest that experimental warming treatments, as well as a future warmer climate may reduce net carbon accumulation in peat in this and other southern boreal peatlands. Furthermore, our we caution against historical interpretations extrapolated from one or a few peat cores.« less

  11. Local Spatial Heterogeneity of Holocene Carbon Accumulation throughout the Peat Profile of an Ombrotrophic Northern Minnesota Bog

    DOE PAGES

    McFarlane, Karis J.; Hanson, Paul J.; Iversen, Colleen M.; ...

    2018-05-30

    Here, we evaluated the spatial heterogeneity of historical carbon accumulation rates in a forested, ombrotrophic bog in Minnesota to aid understanding of responses to an ongoing decade-long warming manipulation. Eighteen peat cores indicated that the bog has been accumulating carbon for over 11,000 years, to yield 176±40 kg C m –2 to 225±58 cm of peat depth. Estimated peat basal ages ranged from 5100 to 11,100 cal BP. The long-term apparent rate of carbon accumulation over the entire peat profile was 22±2 kg C m –2yr –1. Plot location within the study area did not affect carbon accumulation rates, butmore » estimated basal ages were younger in profiles from plots closer to the bog lagg and farther from the bog outlet. In addition, carbon accumulation varied considerably over time. Early Holocene net carbon accumulation rates were 30±6 g C m –2yr –1. Around 3300 calendar BP, net carbon accumulation rates dropped to 15±8 g C m –2yr –1until the last century when net accumulation rates increased again to 74±57 g C m –2yr –1. During this period of low accumulation, regional droughts may have lowered the water table, allowing for enhanced aerobic decomposition and making the bog more susceptible to fire. These results suggest that experimental warming treatments, as well as a future warmer climate may reduce net carbon accumulation in peat in this and other southern boreal peatlands. Furthermore, our we caution against historical interpretations extrapolated from one or a few peat cores.« less

  12. Seasonal changes in peatland surface elevation recorded at GPS stations in the Red Lake Peatlands, northern Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeve, A.S.; Glaser, P.H.; Rosenberry, Donald O.

    2013-01-01

    Northern peatlands appear to hold large volumes of free-phase gas (e.g., CH4 and CO2), which has been detected by surface deformations, pore pressure profiles, and electromagnetic surveys. Determining the gas content and its impact in peat is challenging because gas storage depends on both the elastic properties of the peat matrix and the buoyant forces exerted by pore fluids. We therefore used a viscoelastic deformation model to estimate these variables by adjusting model runs to reproduce observed changes in peat surface elevation within a 1300 km2 peatland. A local GPS network documented significant changes in surface elevations throughout the year with the greatest vertical displacements associated with rapid changes in peat water content and unloadings due to melting of the winter snowpack. These changes were coherent with changes in water table elevation and also abnormal pore pressure changes measured by nests of instrumented piezometers. The deformation model reproduced these changes when the gas content was adjusted to 10% of peat volume, and Young's modulus was varied between 5 and 100 kPa as the peat profile shifted from tension to compression. In contrast, the model predicted little peat deformation when the gas content was 3% or lower. These model simulations are consistent with previous estimates of gas volume in northern peatlands and suggest an upper limit of gas storage controlled by the elastic moduli of the peat fabric.

  13. Relations between fish abundances, summer temperatures, and forest harvest in a northern Minnesota stream system from 1997 to 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merten, Eric C.; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Eggert, S.L.; Johnson, L.B.; Kolka, Randall K.; Newman, Raymond M.; Vondracek, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    Short-term effects of forest harvest on fish habitat have been well documented, including sediment inputs, leaf litter reductions, and stream warming. However, few studies have considered changes in local climate when examining postlogging changes in fish communities. To address this need, we examined fish abundances between 1997 and 2007 in a basin in a northern hardwood forest. Streams in the basin were subjected to experimental riparian forest harvest in fall 1997. We noted a significant decrease for fish index of biotic integrity and abundance of Salvelinus fontinalis and Phoxinus eos over the study period. However, for P. eos and Culaea inconstans, the temporal patterns in abundances were related more to summer air temperatures than to fine sediment or spring precipitation when examined using multiple regressions. Univariate regressions suggested that summer air temperatures influenced temporal patterns in fish communities more than fine sediment or spring precipitation.

  14. Relations between fish abundances, summer temperatures, and forest harvest in a northern Minnesota stream system from 1997 to 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merten, Eric C.; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Eggert, L.S.; Johnson, L.B.; Kolka, R.K.; Newman, Raymond M.; Vondracek, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Short-term effects of forest harvest on fish habitat have been well documented, including sediment inputs, leaf litter reductions, and stream warming. However, few studies have considered changes in local climate when examining postlogging changes in fish communities. To address this need, we examined fish abundances between 1997 and 2007 in a basin in a northern hardwood forest. Streams in the basin were subjected to experimental riparian forest harvest in fall 1997. We noted a significant decrease for fish index of biotic integrity and abundance of Salvelinus fontinalis and Phoxinus eos over the study period. However, for P. eos and Culaea inconstans, the temporal patterns in abundances were related more to summer air temperatures than to fine sediment or spring precipitation when examined using multiple regressions. Univariate regressions suggested that summer air temperatures influenced temporal patterns in fish communities more than fine sediment or spring precipitation.

  15. Using nestling plasma to assess long-term spatial and temporal concentrations of organochlorine compounds in bald eagles within Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    H. Tyler Pittman; William W. Bowerman; Leland H. Grim; Teryl G. Grubb; William C. Bridges; Michael R. Wierda

    2015-01-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) population at Voyageurs National Park (VNP) provides an opportunity to assess long-term temporal and spatial trends of persistent environmental contaminants. Nestling bald eagle plasma samples collected from 1997 to 2010 were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides. Trends of total PCBs,...

  16. Vertical Stratification of Peat Pore Water Dissolved Organic Matter Composition in a Peat Bog in Northern Minnesota: Pore Water DOM composition in a peat bog

    DOE PAGES

    Tfaily, Malak M.; Wilson, Rachel M.; Cooper, William T.; ...

    2018-01-29

    Here, we characterized dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition throughout the peat column at the Marcell S1 forested bog in northern Minnesota and tested the hypothesis that redox oscillations associated with cycles of wetting and drying at the surface of the fluctuating water table correlate with increased carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen turn over. We found significant vertical stratification of DOM molecular composition and excitation-emission matrix parallel factor analysis components within the peat column. In particular, the intermediate depth zone (~ 50 cm) was identified as a zone where maximum decomposition and turnover is taking place. Surface DOM was dominated by inputsmore » from surface vegetation. The intermediate depth zone was an area of high organic matter reactivity and increased microbial activity with diagenetic formation of many unique compounds, among them polycyclic aromatic compounds that contain both nitrogen and sulfur heteroatoms. These compounds have been previously observed in coal-derived compounds and were assumed to be responsible for coal's biological activity. Biological processes triggered by redox oscillations taking place at the intermediate depth zone of the peat profile at the S1 bog are assumed to be responsible for the formation of these heteroatomic PACs in this system. Alternatively, these compounds could stem from black carbon and nitrogen derived from fires that have occurred at the site in the past. Surface and deep DOM exhibited more similar characteristics, compared to the intermediate depth zone, with the deep layer exhibiting greater input of microbially degraded organic matter than the surface suggesting that the entire peat profile consists of similar parent material at different degrees of decomposition and that lateral and vertical advection of pore water from the surface to the deeper horizons is responsible for such similarities. Lastly, our findings suggest that molecular composition of DOM in peatland pore

  17. Vertical Stratification of Peat Pore Water Dissolved Organic Matter Composition in a Peat Bog in Northern Minnesota: Pore Water DOM composition in a peat bog

    SciTech Connect

    Tfaily, Malak M.; Wilson, Rachel M.; Cooper, William T.

    We characterized dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition throughout the peat column at the Marcell S1 forested bog in northern Minnesota and tested the hypothesis that redox oscillations associated with cycles of wetting and drying at the surface of the fluctuating water table correlate with increased carbon, sulfur and nitrogen turn over. We found significant vertical stratification of DOM molecular composition and EEM-PARAFAC components within the peat column. In particular the intermediate depth zone (~ 50 cm) was identified as a zone where maximum decomposition and turnover is taking place. Surface DOM was dominated by inputs from surface vegetation. The intermediate-depthmore » zone was an area of high organic matter reactivity and increased microbial activity with diagenetic formation of many unique compounds, among them polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) that contain both nitrogen and sulfur heteroatoms. These compounds have been previously observed in coal-derived compounds and were assumed to be responsible for coal's biological activity. Biological processes triggered by redox oscillations taking place at the intermediate depth zone of the peat profile at the S1 bog are assumed to be responsible for the formation of these heteroatomic PACs in this system. Alternatively these compounds could stem from black carbon and nitrogen derived from fires that have occurred at the site in the past. Surface and deep DOM exhibited more similar characteristics, compared to the intermediate-depth zone, with the deep layer exhibiting greater input of microbially degraded organic matter than the surface suggesting that the entire peat profile consists of similar parent material at different degrees of decomposition and that lateral and vertical advection of pore water from the surface to the deeper horizons is responsible for such similarities. Our findings suggest that molecular composition of DOM in peatland pore water is dynamic and is a function of ecosystem

  18. Vertical Stratification of Peat Pore Water Dissolved Organic Matter Composition in a Peat Bog in Northern Minnesota: Pore Water DOM composition in a peat bog

    SciTech Connect

    Tfaily, Malak M.; Wilson, Rachel M.; Cooper, William T.

    Here, we characterized dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition throughout the peat column at the Marcell S1 forested bog in northern Minnesota and tested the hypothesis that redox oscillations associated with cycles of wetting and drying at the surface of the fluctuating water table correlate with increased carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen turn over. We found significant vertical stratification of DOM molecular composition and excitation-emission matrix parallel factor analysis components within the peat column. In particular, the intermediate depth zone (~ 50 cm) was identified as a zone where maximum decomposition and turnover is taking place. Surface DOM was dominated by inputsmore » from surface vegetation. The intermediate depth zone was an area of high organic matter reactivity and increased microbial activity with diagenetic formation of many unique compounds, among them polycyclic aromatic compounds that contain both nitrogen and sulfur heteroatoms. These compounds have been previously observed in coal-derived compounds and were assumed to be responsible for coal's biological activity. Biological processes triggered by redox oscillations taking place at the intermediate depth zone of the peat profile at the S1 bog are assumed to be responsible for the formation of these heteroatomic PACs in this system. Alternatively, these compounds could stem from black carbon and nitrogen derived from fires that have occurred at the site in the past. Surface and deep DOM exhibited more similar characteristics, compared to the intermediate depth zone, with the deep layer exhibiting greater input of microbially degraded organic matter than the surface suggesting that the entire peat profile consists of similar parent material at different degrees of decomposition and that lateral and vertical advection of pore water from the surface to the deeper horizons is responsible for such similarities. Lastly, our findings suggest that molecular composition of DOM in peatland pore

  19. Texture-contrast profile development across the prairie-forest ecotone in northern Minnesota, USA, and its relation to soil aggregation and clay dispersion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasmerchak, C. S.; Mason, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Along the prairie-forest ecotone, Alfisols with distinct clay-enriched B horizons are found under forest, established only within the past 4 ka, including outlying patches of prairie groves surrounded by prairie. Grassland soils only 5-10 km away from the vegetation boundary show much weaker texture-contrast. In order for clay to be dispersed it must first be released from aggregates upper horizons, which occurs when exposed top soil undergoes wetting and mechanical stress. The relationship between physiochemical soil characteristics and soil aggregation/clay dispersion is of particular interest in explaining texture-contrast development under forest. Soil samples were collected along a transect in northern Minnesota on gentle slopes in similar glacial sediment. Aggregate stability experiments show Mollisol A and B horizons have the most stable aggregates, while Alfisol E horizons have the weakest aggregates and disintegrate rapidly. This demonstrates the strong influence of OM and exchange chemistry on aggregation. Analysis of other physiochemical soil characteristics such as base saturation and pH follow a gradual decreasing eastward trend across the study sites, and do not abruptly change at the prairie-forest boundary like soil morphology does. Linear models show the strongest relationship between rapid aggregate disintegration and ECEC, although they only explain 47-50% of the variance. Higher surface charge enhances aggregation by allowing for greater potential of cation bridging between OM and clay particles. ECEC also represents multiple soil characteristics such as OC, clay, mineralogy, and carbonate presence, suggesting the relationship between aggregation stability and soil characteristics is not simple. Given the parent material consists of calcareous glacial sediment, abundant Ca2+ and Mg2+ from carbonates weathering also contributes to enhanced aggregation in upper horizons. Differences in the rates of bioturbation, most likely also contribute

  20. Picos de Europa National and Regional parks (Northern Spain): the karst underground landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, Daniel; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; José Domínguez-Cuesta, María; Meléndez-Asensio, Mónica; García-Sansegundo, Joaquín

    2015-04-01

    Karst caves represent an environmental with a high value from the Geoheritage and Geodiversity points of view given by hidden underground landscape practically reserved to the speleologists. Nevertheless, cave surveys, 3d models of caves and DEMs, and pictures can be used to approach the endokarst geoheritage characterization. The Picos de Europa National and Regional parks include the 14% of World's Deepest Caves (>1 km depth); moreover these parks shows a high environmental value related with seven protection figures: Biosphere Reserve, Special Protection Area, the Site of Community Importance, and four Natural Monument. The aim of this work is to present the Geoheritage values of the underground landscape of the Picos de Europa National and Regional parks. These parks involve several alpine karst massifs up to 700 km2 and 2,600 m asl, as the Picos de Europa mountains (declared Global Geosite by its geomorphological interest), the Mampodre Massif, and the Peñas Pintas and Yordas peaks (sited in Riaño dam area). The alpine karst involves a large underground landscape formed by more than 3,700 epigenic caves with 403 km of conduits. The 95 % of the cave conduits are located in the Picos de Europa mountains and correspond to caves up to 18.9 km length and 1.6 km depth; the 5 % of cave conduits are sited in other small karst areas and include caves up to 1.5 km length and 200 m depth. The karst caves present high natural, scientific and cultural values. The natural value corresponds to the singularity and the spectacular vertical development of the caves and a very high Geodiversity of cave features. The karst shows a high concentration of deep caves (81 caves deeper than 500 m) that is twice higher than the concentration of other karst areas, as Arabika Massif (Western Caucasus). The natural value is mainly related to the presence of geomorphological and hydrogeological features, highlighting high vadose canyons and shafts, old phreatic and epiphreatic conduits

  1. Educational use assessment of Geomorphosites applied to the Picos de Europa National Park (Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazán, Héctor; Serrano, Enrique; Ruiz-Flaño, Purificación

    2014-05-01

    There are sites that constitute worthy places of preservation or promotion the natural heritage receiving different names according to the object of interest (biological, geological, hydrological, geomorphological, etc.). National parks are places for everybody to learn about abiotic and biotic nature and the way they rely on each other. The abiotic nature implies different parts, as geologic, hydrologic or geomorphologic. The geomorphosites are especially relevant because link geology, climate, surface processes and hydrology with landscape. Beyond the intrinsic scientific, conservation or scenic values, such sites possess a general value being the didactic use one of the aspects considered in the assessment methods. Several authors have indicated that the aim of the evaluation of sites will change if the purpose is leaning to inventories development, environmental impact assessment or divulgation (educational, tourist activities or only protection). One of the meanings of the term educational is "everything suitable to teaching or providing education" as is referred in dictionaries. With this definition, although the geomorphosites has not an educational value per se, any natural element can be used as educational object, and the teacher intention's must transform a geomorphosite in a educational resource. The educational assessment of several methods have been analysed in this work and we have concluded that there are confusing and inaccurate for teaching purposes. The analysed methods do not specify how the geomorphosites are useful for teaching or how the teacher can develop the scholar programs. The objective is a more accuracy in the educational use of geomorphosites focused on the different educational levels as a tool by teaching and leisure activities. Our proposal is the development of methodological sheets that emerge from the analysis of the curricular content and specific bibliography. Sheets on general geomorphology, periglacial, glacial and karst

  2. Impacts of post-harvest slash and live-tree retention on biomass and nutrient stocks in Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests, northern Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klockow, Paul A.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Bradford, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Globally, there is widespread interest in using forest-derived biomass as a source of bioenergy. While conventional timber harvesting generally removes only merchantable tree boles, harvesting biomass feedstock can remove all forms of woody biomass (i.e., live and dead standing woody vegetation, downed woody debris, and stumps) resulting in a greater loss of biomass and nutrients as well as more severe habitat alteration. To investigate the potential impacts of this practice, this study examined the initial impacts (pre- and post-harvest) of various levels of slash and live-tree retention on biomass and nutrient stocks, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N), calcium (Ca), potassium (K), and phosphorus (P), in Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests of northern Minnesota, USA. Treatments examined included three levels of slash retention, whole-tree harvest (WTH), 20% slash retention (20SR), and stem-only harvest (SOH), factored with three levels of green-tree retention, no trees retained (NONE), dispersed retention (DISP), and aggregate retention (AGR). Slash retention was the primary factor affecting post-harvest biomass and nutrient stocks, including woody debris pools. Compared to the unharvested control, stocks of biomass, carbon, and nutrients, including N, Ca, K, and P, in woody debris were higher in all treatments. Stem-only harvests typically contained greater biomass and nutrient stocks than WTH, although biomass and nutrients within 20SR, a level recommended by biomass harvesting guidelines in the US and worldwide, generally did not differ from WTH or SOH. Biomass in smaller-diameter slash material (typically 2.5-22.5 cm in diameter) dominated the woody debris pool following harvest regardless of slash retention level. Trends among treatments in this diameter range were generally similar to those in the total woody debris pool. Specifically, SOH contained significantly greater amounts of biomass than WTH while 20SR was not different from either WTH or

  3. Past and Future Stability of Deep Peatland Carbon Stocks: Assessing the Nature and Fate of Carbon in a Northern Minnesota Ombrotrophic Peatland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, P. J.; Chanton, J.; Iversen, C. M.; McFarlane, K. J.; Tfaily, M. M.; Xu, X.

    2013-12-01

    An ombrotrophic Picea-Sphagnum peatland located on the Marcell Experimental Forest in northern Minnesota is being prepared for experimental manipulations to evaluate carbon cycle responses to warming and elevated CO2. Pretreatment characterization of the peatland, which has a mean peat depth of ~3 meters, showed that belowground carbon (C) stocks were greater than 2200 MgC ha-1. This is easily 10× greater than the combined above- and belowground C stocks found in typical eastern deciduous forests. Carbon has accumulated under saturated, cool to cold conditions since the last glaciers receded some 10,000 years ago. Mean bulk-14C assessments show a modern C signature and decadal turnover time for peat in the raised hummock topography, as well as in the oxic acrotelm layer which extends to a depth of 30-cm below hollow microtopography. Deeper peat layers (below 30-cm depth) have C ages ranging from 1000- to 2000 years for relatively shallow layers, to between 7000 and 8000 years at 2.5 m depth. In contrast, the 14C signatures of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) and dissolved organic C (DOC), which reflect the substrates consumed by microbes, were relatively modern, even at depths of up to 2 meters. The modern 14C signatures indicate that microbial respiration at depth is fueled by surface inputs of DOC. Furthermore, the contrast in δ14C between solid-phase peat and DOC at deeper peat depths will allow researchers to quantify the effects of warming and elevated CO2 on the fate of peat stored in this ombrotrophic peatland for millennia. It is unclear whether C accumulation in peatlands will continue under warmer conditions associated with atmospheric and climatic change. Modeled projections for net peat C turnover throughout the peat profile will be discussed in the context of the planned warming manipulations. Initial hypotheses suggest that peat accumulation may be sustained for low levels of warming, but shift to a pattern of net carbon release as both CO2 and CH4 for

  4. Contributions of non-urban state parks to youth physical activity: A case study in northern Georgia

    Treesearch

    Lincoln R. Larson; Jason W. Whiting; Gary T. Green; J.M. Bowker

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research has documented positive relationships among youth physical activity levels and park use. However, most investigations to date have focused on municipal parks, and relatively little is known about the physical activity levels of racially and ethnically diverse populations of youth using different types of parks in non-urban settings. This...

  5. 75 FR 77899 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, St. Paul and Bemidji, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253-665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, St. Paul and Bemidji, MN AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... funerary objects in the possession of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, St. Paul and Bemidji, MN. The...

  6. Climate Change in Voyageurs National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    Voyageurs National Park was created in 1975. This beautifully forested and lake-dominated landscape shared between Minnesota and Canada has few roads and must be seen by water. The islands and Kabetogama Peninsula are part of the Canadian Shield, some of the oldest exposed rock in the world. Voyageurs National Park boasts many unique landscape and climatic attributes, and like most mid-latitude regions of the northern hemisphere climate change is in play there. The statistical signals of change in the climate record are evident from both temperature and precipitation measurements. The history of these measurements goes back over 100 years. Additionally, studies and measurements of the lakes and general ecosystem already show some consequences of these climate changes. Mean temperature measurements are generally warmer than they once were, most notably in the winter season. Minimum temperatures have changed more than maximum temperatures. Precipitation has trended upward, but has also changed in character with greater frequency and contribution from thunderstorm rainfalls across the park. In addition variability in annual precipitation has become more amplified, as the disparity between wet and dry years has grown wider. Some changes are already in evidence in terms of bird migration patterns, earlier lake ice-out dates, warmer water temperatures with more algal blooms, decline in lake clarity, and somewhat longer frost-free seasons. Climate change will continue to have impacts on Voyageurs National Park, and likely other national parks across the nation. Furthermore scientists may find that the study, presentation, and discussion about climate impacts on our national parks is a particularly engaging way to educate citizens and improve climate literacy as we contemplate what adaptation and mitigation policies should be enacted to preserve the quality of our national parks for future generations.

  7. Assessment of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in selected surface water of the National Park Service Northern Colorado Plateau Network, Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, from 1972 through 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Juliane B.; Thoma, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Nutrients are a nationally recognized concern for water quality of streams, rivers, groundwater, and water bodies. Nutrient impairment is documented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a primary cause of degradation in lakes and reservoirs, and nutrients are related to organic enrichment and oxygen depletion, which is an important cause of degradation in streams. Recently (2011), an effort to develop State-based numeric nutrient criteria has resulted in renewed emphasis on nutrients in surface water throughout the Nation. In response to this renewed emphasis and to investigate nutrient water quality for Northern Colorado Plateau Network streams, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, assessed total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentration data for 93 sites in or near 14 National Park units for the time period 1972 through 2007.

  8. Integrating conservation and development at the National Marine Park of Alonissos, Northern Sporades, Greece: perception and practice.

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Zoi-Sylvia; Dikou, Angela

    2008-11-01

    Available information on the socioeconomic implications of marine protected areas (MPAs) for the socioculturally diverse Mediterranean region is scant. The National Marine Park of Alonissos, Northern Sporades (NMPANS), Greece was established in 1992 as a foundation for the conservation of the endangered Mediterranean monk seal Monachus monachus. The evolution of the degree of acceptance of and satisfaction from the NMPANS by involved stakeholder groups (fishermen, tourism operators, hoteliers and owners of rooms to let, governmental bodies, nongovernmental bodies, students, domestic and foreign tourists) were investigated 13 years after its establishment using written questionnaires delivered during personal interviews. The initial positive attitude of local professionals for the NMPANS has eroded due to the unsatisfactory fulfillment of expectations for socioeconomic development. Fishermen expressed dissatisfaction with, mistrust toward, and a reluctancy to communicate with the NMPANS's management body. They believe that the fishery areas have decreased in actual geographic area because of the prohibitive measures; fish stocks are declining; compensation for damage to fishery equipment by the Mediterranean monk seal and for the prohibitive measures should be provided; and stricter enforcement of regulations should take place. On the other hand, tourism operators, who organize trips for tourists to the NMPANS, unanimously reported direct economic benefits. Furthermore, there was a disparity in the perception of socioeconomic benefits derived from the NMPANS between governmental bodies and local stakeholders. The governmental bodies and the nongovernmental organization MOm-Hellenic Society for the Study and Protection of the Monk Seal postulated that there had been considerable socioeconomic benefits for the local community of Alonissos due to the establishment of the NMPANS, whereas the local nongovernmental organization Ecological and Cultural Movement of

  9. Integrating Conservation and Development at the National Marine Park of Alonissos, Northern Sporades, Greece: Perception and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, Zoi-Sylvia; Dikou, Angela

    2008-11-01

    Available information on the socioeconomic implications of marine protected areas (MPAs) for the socioculturally diverse Mediterranean region is scant. The National Marine Park of Alonissos, Northern Sporades (NMPANS), Greece was established in 1992 as a foundation for the conservation of the endangered Mediterranean monk seal Monachus monachus. The evolution of the degree of acceptance of and satisfaction from the NMPANS by involved stakeholder groups (fishermen, tourism operators, hoteliers and owners of rooms to let, governmental bodies, nongovernmental bodies, students, domestic and foreign tourists) were investigated 13 years after its establishment using written questionnaires delivered during personal interviews. The initial positive attitude of local professionals for the NMPANS has eroded due to the unsatisfactory fulfillment of expectations for socioeconomic development. Fishermen expressed dissatisfaction with, mistrust toward, and a reluctancy to communicate with the NMPANS’s management body. They believe that the fishery areas have decreased in actual geographic area because of the prohibitive measures; fish stocks are declining; compensation for damage to fishery equipment by the Mediterranean monk seal and for the prohibitive measures should be provided; and stricter enforcement of regulations should take place. On the other hand, tourism operators, who organize trips for tourists to the NMPANS, unanimously reported direct economic benefits. Furthermore, there was a disparity in the perception of socioeconomic benefits derived from the NMPANS between governmental bodies and local stakeholders. The governmental bodies and the nongovernmental organization MOm-Hellenic Society for the Study and Protection of the Monk Seal postulated that there had been considerable socioeconomic benefits for the local community of Alonissos due to the establishment of the NMPANS, whereas the local nongovernmental organization Ecological and Cultural Movement of

  10. Paleo-environmental Perspectives on Climate-change Monitoring in the National Parks of the Northern U.S. Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, S. T.; Graumlich, L. J.; Pederson, G. T.; Fagre, D. B.; Betancourt, J. L.; Norris, J. R.; Jackson, S. T.

    2004-12-01

    In the face of growing visitation, encroaching development and a changing climate, the United States National Park Service has initiated a nationwide program to inventory and monitor the resources it protects. The foundation for this initiative lies in the development of baseline or reference datasets for physical and biological systems within each park unit. In a series of paleo-proxy studies from the Greater Yellowstone and Glacier National Park regions, we demonstrate that most instrumental and observational records are too short to capture a significant portion of the climatic and ecological variability that might be expected in the parks of the northern U.S. Rockies. Networks of tree-ring based temperature and precipitation reconstructions spanning the last ~1,000 yr demonstrate that the climates of these regions are not stationary. These climates are instead characterized by strong regime-like behavior over decadal to multidecadal timescales. Complimentary studies of past plant-community and landscape dynamics show how such lower-frequency variability can have a profound impact on vital park resources and amenities. In the eastern Yellowstone region, for example, persistent (20-30 yr) wet/cool periods in the 19th and early 20th centuries led to widespread recruitment of woody plants, and the legacy of these recruitment events still persists in the structure of many woodlands and forests. Studies of fossil packrat middens also suggest that at least some recent woody-plant encroachment and densification- a major management concern in the region- is related to plant late-Holocene plant migration dynamics and population processes rather than changing climate and land-use. Though the timing and effects of such events may differ, similar ecological responses to decadal/multidecadal climate variability are seen in the Glacier National Park region. In combination these studies serve to emphasize the need for careful selection of reference periods and baseline

  11. Quaternary glacial geomorphosites from the Cantabrian Mountains (northern Iberian Peninsula): the Redes Natural Reservation and Picos de Europa Regional Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; José Domínguez-Cuesta, María

    2013-04-01

    The Cantabrian Mountains is a mountain range 480 km-long and up to 2,648 m altitude (Torre Cerredo Peak) trending parallel to the Cantabrian Coastline between Pyrenees and the northwest corner of the Iberian Peninsula (~43oN 5oW). This mountain range is an outstanding area to research the climatic patterns across South Europe during the Quaternary glaciations since well-preserved glacial features evidence the occurrence of past mountain glaciations in a climatic environment marked by the transition from a maritime climate (Atlantic) to Mediterranean one across the mountain range. The available studies in the Cantabrian Mountains stand that the regional glacial maximum recorded here is prior to ca 38, and that glaciers were in some locations remarkably retreated by the time of the global Last Glacial Maximum (Jiménez-Sánchez et al., in press; Serrano et al., in press). This study is focused on an area about 800 km2 that includes 36 peaks over 2,000 m (Pico Mampodre; 2,192 m) and partially covers the Redes Natural Reservation and Picos de Europa Regional Park. A geomorphologic database in ArcGIS was produced for this area as a previous step to reconstruct in detail the extent, flow pattern and chronology of the former glaciers (PhD under progress). Here we present a selection of 18 glacial geomorphosites classified according to genetic criteria in sites that show: (i) a nicely preserved moraine sequence recording the transition from glacial to periglacial conditions; (ii) glacial erosion features; (iii) glacial and ice related deposits (like moraines, ice-dammed deposits, erratic boulders or fluvio-glacial deposits); (iv) slope instability related to glacial debuttressing (complex landslides and rock avalanches); and (v) the interaction between the landscape and human activity. The interest of the geomorphosites is supported by its good quality of preservation, allowing its use as a basis to reconstruct the glacial and paraglacial processes in this region during

  12. Groundwater–surface-water exchange and the geologic setting of northern Minnesota's lakes, wetlands, and streams—Modern-day relevance of Tom Winter's legacy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; Melchior, Robert C.; Jones, Perry M.; Strietz, Andrew; Barr, Kelton D.; Lee, David R.; Piegat, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Tom Winter spent nearly 50 years conducting research in earth science, and he specialized in the exchange between groundwater and surface water. Tom's highly productive career began in Minnesota. This fi eld trip revisits many of the places where Tom conducted his early research and demonstrates the continuing relevance of that research. Stops and topics include the groundwater infl uence on the record low stage of White Bear Lake, the contribution of groundwater to continually rising water levels in an abandoned open-pit iron mine, hydrogeology of the Shingobee headwaters aquatic ecosystem research site, hydrogeology of Lake Sallie, geology associated with the Pillager water gap, and the hydrogeology of Little Rock Lake.

  13. Field-based evaluation of two herbaceous plant community composition sampling methods for long-term monitoring in Northern Great Plains National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symstad, Amy J.; Wienk, Cody L.; Thorstenson, Andy

    2006-01-01

    The Northern Great Plains Inventory & Monitoring (I&M) Network (Network) of the National Park Service (NPS) consists of 13 NPS units in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and eastern Wyoming. The Network is in the planning phase of a long-term program to monitor the health of park ecosystems. Plant community composition is one of the 'Vital Signs,' or indicators, that will be monitored as part of this program for three main reasons. First, plant community composition is information-rich; a single sampling protocol can provide information on the diversity of native and non-native species, the abundance of individual dominant species, and the abundance of groups of plants. Second, plant community composition is of specific management concern. The abundance and diversity of exotic plants, both absolute and relative to native species, is one of the greatest management concerns in almost all Network parks (Symstad 2004). Finally, plant community composition reflects the effects of a variety of current or anticipated stressors on ecosystem health in the Network parks including invasive exotic plants, large ungulate grazing, lack of fire in a fire-adapted system, chemical exotic plant control, nitrogen deposition, increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, and climate change. Before the Network begins its Vital Signs monitoring, a detailed plan describing specific protocols used for each of the Vital Signs must go through rigorous development and review. The pilot study on which we report here is one of the components of this protocol development. The goal of the work we report on here was to determine a specific method to use for monitoring plant community composition of the herb layer (< 2 m tall).

  14. Two-year survival and growth of artificial northern red oak regeneration at Gettysburg National Military Park

    Treesearch

    David S. Larrick; Todd W. Bowersox; Gerald L. Storm; Walter M. Tzilkowski

    1997-01-01

    Overstory competition and foraging by white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and small mammals are cited as reasons for regeneration failure in mixed-oak stands of Pennsylvania. At Gettysburg National Military Park, deer densities are high (>0.6 deer/ha), and the mixed-oak woodlots were lacking in seedling- and sapling-sized natural oak...

  15. Influence of observers and stream flow on northern two-lined salamander (Eurycea bislineata bislineata) relative abundance estimates in Acadia and Shenandoah National Parks, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crocker, J.B.; Bank, M.S.; Loftin, C.S.; Jung Brown, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated effects of observers and stream flow on Northern Two-Lined Salamander (Eurycea bislineata bislineata) counts in streams in Acadia (ANP) and Shenandoah National Parks (SNP). We counted salamanders in 22 ANP streams during high flow (May to June 2002) and during low flow (July 2002). We also counted salamanders in SNP in nine streams during high flow (summer 2003) and 11 streams during low flow (summers 2001?02, 2004). In 2002, we used a modified cover-controlled active search method with a first and second observer. In succession, observers turned over 100 rocks along five 1-m belt transects across the streambed. The difference between observers in total salamander counts was not significant. We counted fewer E. b. bislineata during high flow conditions, confirming that detection of this species is reduced during high flow periods and that assessment of stream salamander relative abundance is likely more reliable during low or base flow conditions.

  16. Communicating a marine protected area through the local press: the case of the National Marine Park of Alonissos, Northern Sporades, Greece.

    PubMed

    Dikou, Angela; Dionysopoulou, Niki

    2011-05-01

    Local distrust for Marine Protected Area (MPA) managers is emerging as an important factor obstructing the fulfillment of MPA objectives, and, thus, there is a need to develop a means of enhancing relationship building between MPA managers and local people. We used the National Marine Park of Alonissos, Northern Sporades (NMPANS), Greece, as a relevant case-study to investigate whether the local print media's framing of the marine park and its management affected locals' attitudes. We conducted a longitudinal review of local newspaper articles pertaining to the NMPANS during 1980-2008, and we conducted telephone interviews with local people. We found that salience of the NMPANS in the local print media remained limited and sporadic, the main stakeholder remained the centralized public sector, and the regional print media was rather detached, moderate, and largely supportive of the NMPANS throughout 1980-2008. The progression of the management periods of the NMPANS, however, was accompanied by increased importance of the NMPANS, increased deviance from conservation as the chief objective of the NMPANS's establishment, a shift from presenting facts to presenting reactions, and a shift from a positive to a mixed image of the NMPANS. Locals who relied on newspapers for local news were better informed about the NMPANS, more likely to accept the NMPANS, and more likely to participate in meetings regarding the NMPANS regardless of gender, age, and occupation than those who did not rely on newspapers. The local print media may be utilized as a free-choice learning vehicle to enhance the value of an MPA among local people and to enhance the development of trust between park managers and locals through a proactive, empowering, and cognitive media strategy.

  17. Communicating a Marine Protected Area Through the Local Press: The Case of the National Marine Park of Alonissos, Northern Sporades, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikou, Angela; Dionysopoulou, Niki

    2011-05-01

    Local distrust for Marine Protected Area (MPA) managers is emerging as an important factor obstructing the fulfillment of MPA objectives, and, thus, there is a need to develop a means of enhancing relationship building between MPA managers and local people. We used the National Marine Park of Alonissos, Northern Sporades (NMPANS), Greece, as a relevant case-study to investigate whether the local print media's framing of the marine park and its management affected locals' attitudes. We conducted a longitudinal review of local newspaper articles pertaining to the NMPANS during 1980-2008, and we conducted telephone interviews with local people. We found that salience of the NMPANS in the local print media remained limited and sporadic, the main stakeholder remained the centralized public sector, and the regional print media was rather detached, moderate, and largely supportive of the NMPANS throughout 1980-2008. The progression of the management periods of the NMPANS, however, was accompanied by increased importance of the NMPANS, increased deviance from conservation as the chief objective of the NMPANS's establishment, a shift from presenting facts to presenting reactions, and a shift from a positive to a mixed image of the NMPANS. Locals who relied on newspapers for local news were better informed about the NMPANS, more likely to accept the NMPANS, and more likely to participate in meetings regarding the NMPANS regardless of gender, age, and occupation than those who did not rely on newspapers. The local print media may be utilized as a free-choice learning vehicle to enhance the value of an MPA among local people and to enhance the development of trust between park managers and locals through a proactive, empowering, and cognitive media strategy.

  18. Enzyme leaching of surficial geochemical samples for detecting hydromorphic trace-element anomalies associated with precious-metal mineralized bedrock buried beneath glacial overburden in northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Robert J.; Meier, A.L.; Riddle, G.; ,

    1990-01-01

    One objective of the International Falls and Roseau, Minnesota, CUSMAP projects was to develop a means of conducting regional-scale geochemical surveys in areas where bedrock is buried beneath complex glacially derived overburden. Partial analysis of B-horizon soils offered hope for detecting subtle hydromorphic trace-element dispersion patterns. An enzyme-based partial leach selectively removes metals from oxide coatings on the surfaces of soil materials without attacking their matrix. Most trace-element concentrations in the resulting solutions are in the part-per-trillion to low part-per-billion range, necessitating determinations by inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry. The resulting data show greater contrasts for many trace elements than with other techniques tested. Spatially, many trace metal anomalies are locally discontinuous, but anomalous trends within larger areas are apparent. In many instances, the source for an anomaly seems to be either basal till or bedrock. Ground water flow is probably the most important mechanism for transporting metals toward the surface, although ionic diffusion, electrochemical gradients, and capillary action may play a role in anomaly dispersal. Sample sites near the Rainy Lake-Seine River fault zone, a regional shear zone, often have anomalous concentrations of a variety of metals, commonly including Zn and/or one or more metals which substitute for Zn in sphalerite (Cd, Ge, Ga, and Sn). Shifts in background concentrations of Bi, Sb, and As show a trend across the area indicating a possible regional zoning of lode-Au mineralization. Soil anomalies of Ag, Co, and Tl parallel basement structures, suggesting areas that may have potential for Cobalt/Thunder Baytype silver viens. An area around Baudette, Minnesota, which is underlain by quartz-chlorite-carbonate-altered shear zones, is anomalous in Ag, As, Bi, Co, Mo, Te, Tl, and W. Anomalies of Ag, As, Bi, Te, and W tend to follow the fault zones, suggesting potential

  19. Minnesota forest statistics, 1977.

    Treesearch

    Pamela J. Jakes

    1980-01-01

    Presents highlights and statistics from the Fourth Minnesota Forest Inventory. Includes detailed tables of forest area, timber volume, net annual growth, timber removals, mortality, and timber products output.

  20. Trophic ecology of largemouth bass and northern pike in allopatric and sympatric assemblages in northern boreal lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soupir, Craig A.; Brown, Michael L.; Kallemeyn, Larry W.

    2000-01-01

    Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and northern pike (Esox lucius) are top predators in the food chain in most aquatic environments that they occupy; however, limited information exists on species interactions in the northern reaches of largemouth bass distribution. We investigated the seasonal food habits of allopatric and sympatric assemblages of largemouth bass and northern pike in six interior lakes within Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. Percentages of empty stomachs were variable for largemouth bass (38-54%) and northern pike (34.7-66.7%). Fishes (mainly yellow perch, Perca flavescens) comprised greater than 60% (mean percent mass, MPM) of the northern pike diet during all seasons in both allopatric and sympatric assemblages. Aquatic insects (primarily Odonata and Hemiptera) were important in the diets of largemouth bass in all communities (0.0-79.7 MPM). Although largemouth bass were observed in the diet of northern pike, largemouth bass apparently did not prey on northern pike. Seasonal differences were observed in the proportion of aquatic insects (P = 0.010) and fishes (P = 0.023) in the diets of northern pike and largemouth bass. Based on three food categories, jackknifed classifications correctly classified 77 and 92% of northern pike and largemouth bass values, respectively. Percent resource overlap values were biologically significant (greater than 60%) during at least one season in each sympatric assemblage, suggesting some diet overlap.

  1. Minnesota's Aspen Resource

    Treesearch

    Pamela J. Jakes

    1981-01-01

    The fourth Minnesota Forest Inventory shows that aspen continues to dominate the State's forests. Thirty-nine percent of Minnesota's commercial forest area is in the aspen forest type. Aspen species accounted for the largest portion of growing-stock inventory, net annual growth, and removals.

  2. Welcome to Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    There is more than snow in Minnesota: Summer brings the Aquatennial with sandcastle competitions, milk-carton-boat races and a torchlight parade, and the St. Paul Winter Carnival has ice carving and snow sculptures and another torchlight parade. But natives and visitors alike note that their favorite season is autumn, which in Minnesota brings…

  3. Minnesota and Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Natural Resources, St. Paul. Environmental Education Board.

    Eight energy education activities are provided. Each activity includes an overview, a brief summary, lists of objectives and materials needed, teacher's notes, and student materials. The activities focus on: (1) using social studies skills to understand Minnesota energy data and to clarify and understand some Minnesota energy issues; (2) giving…

  4. Manoomin: place-based research with Native American students on wild rice lakes on the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Reservation, northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Myrbo, A.; Dalbotten, D. M.; Pellerin, H.; Greensky, L.; Howes, T.; Wold, A.; McEathron, M. A.; Shanker, V.

    2010-12-01

    The manoomin project is a collaboration between Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College (Cloquet, MN), the Reservation’s Resource Management Division, and the University of Minnesota funded by the NSF GEO-OEDG Program. It builds on a successful seven-year history of collaboration between these parties, including regular science camps (gidaakiimanaanimigawig, Our Earth Lodge) for students of a wide range of ages. We are working as a team with Native students to study the history of wild rice (manoomin; Zizania palustris), a culturally important resource, growing on Reservation lakes. The joint project takes two main approaches: study of sediment core samples collected from Reservation lakes; and the collection of traditional knowledge about wild rice from the Elders. Science campers collect lake cores during winter with the assistance of the U of MN’s LacCore (National Lacustrine Core Facility) and Resource Management and visit LacCore to log, split and describe cores soon thereafter. Academic mentors with a range of specialties (phytoliths, pollen, plant macrofossils, sedimentology, geochemistry, magnetics) spend 1-2 weeks during the summer with small groups of college-age (>18, many nontraditional) student interns working on a particular paleoenvironmental proxy from the sediment cores. Younger students (middle and high school) also work in small teams in half day units with the same mentors. All campers become comfortable in an academic setting, gain experience working in research labs learning and practicing techniques, and jointly interpret collective results. The continuation of the project over five years (2009-2014) will allow these students to develop relationships with scientists and to receive mentoring beyond the laboratory as they make transitions into 2- and 4-year colleges and into graduate school. Their research provides historical and environmental information that is relevant to their own land that will be used by Resource Management which is

  5. Nanda-gikendaasowin Naawij Gaa-izhiwebakin Manoomini-zaaga'iganiing: Core-based research by Native students on wild rice lakes in northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrbo, A.; Howes, T.; Defoe, R.; Dalbotten, D. M.; Pellerin, H.; McEathron, M.; Ito, E.

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about how local and global environmental changes affect the habitat of wild rice (manoomin in Ojibwe; Zizania sp.). Using transects of sediment cores from wild rice lakes on the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Reservation (FDL) in Minnesota, undergraduate student researchers are working to reconstruct the lakes' ecological history in order to better manage future change. Reservation Resource Management personnel and University science mentors work together to develop research questions and mentor small groups of college-age students during short (two-week) and long (ten-week) summer internships. Cores are collected during the winter from the frozen lake surface with "Lake Teams" of mainly Native junior high and high school students attending weekend science camps, who also visit LacCore (the National Lacustrine Core Facility) in Minneapolis to conduct initial core description and basic analyses. At the same time as the Fond du Lac Band gains information about the long-term history and variability of the Reservation's lakes, young Native people are exposed to primary research, natural resources management and academia as occupations, and scientists as people. Scientific results, as well as the results of program evaluation, show clearly that this approach has so far been successful and eye-opening for both students and mentors. Lead-210 dated records of the past ~150 years cover the period of European settlement, logging, and the massive ditching of FDL lakes to convert wetlands to agricultural land. Phytolith, pollen, plant macrofossil, and diatom studies by interns, as well as sediment composition and mass accumulation rate data, show anthropogenic lake level and vegetation fluctuations associated with these activities. Earlier in the record (~10,000 years to ~100 years before present), the natural and slow processes of lake infilling and encroachment of shallow-water vegetation are the dominant processes controlling the ecology of the

  6. Agricultural land use and N losses to water: the case study of a fluvial park in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Morari, F; Lugato, E; Borin, M

    2003-01-01

    An integrated water resource management programme has been under way since 1999 to reduce agricultural water pollution in the River Mincio fluvial park. The experimental part of the programme consisted of: a) a monitoring phase to evaluate the impact of conventional and environmentally sound techniques (Best Management Practices, BMPs) on water quality; this was done on four representative landscape units, where twelve fields were instrumented to monitor the soil, surface and subsurface water quality; b) a modelling phase to extend the results obtained at field scale to the whole territory of the Mincio watershed. For this purpose a GIS developed in the Arc/Info environment was integrated into the CropSyst model. The model had previously been calibrated to test its ability to describe the complexity of the agricultural systems. The first results showed a variable efficiency of the BMPs depending on the interaction between management and pedo-climatic conditions. In general though, the BMPs had positive effects in improving the surface and subsurface water quality. The CropSyst model was able to describe the agricultural systems monitored and its linking with the GIS represented a valuable tool for identifying the vulnerable areas within the watershed.

  7. 77 FR 34801 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Minnesota; Regional Haze

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... provisions related to BART. EPA proposed approval of the Minnesota regional haze plan on January 25, 2012 (77... finalizing that rule on May 30, 2012, EPA responded to similar comments in the context of that rulemaking... Royale National Park, and Voyageurs National Park. Response: EPA is committed to the goal of the regional...

  8. Detection of microcystin and other cyanotoxins in lakes at Isle Royale National Park, Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, northern Michigan, 2012–13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Lori M.; Brennan, Angela K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Loftin, Keith A.; Johnson, Heather E.; VanderMeulen, David D.; Lafrancois, Brenda Moraska

    2017-12-05

    Although cyanotoxins released during algal blooms have become an increasing concern in surface waters across the United States, the presence of cyanotoxins in northern Michigan lakes had not been evaluated in detail. The U.S. Geological Survey and National Park Service (NPS) led a 2-year study (2012 and 2013) to determine the presence of microcystin and other algal toxins in several inland lakes at Isle Royale National Park (hereafter referred to as ISRO, Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (hereafter referred to as PIRO), and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (hereafter referred to as SLBE). Samples also were collected at four sites in Lake Michigan within the SLBE. The two analytical techniques used in the study were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for microcystin, cylindrospermopsin, and saxitoxin; and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) for a larger suite of algal toxins. Neither cylindrospermopsin nor saxitoxin were detected in the 211 samples. Microcystin was detected in 31 percent of samples (65 of 211 samples) analyzed by the ELISA method, but no sample results exceeded the World Health Organization recreational health advisory standard for microcystin (10 micrograms per liter [µg/L]). However, about 10 percent of the samples (21 of 211 samples) that were collected from PIRO and SLBE and were analyzed by ELISA for microcystin had concentrations greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water 10-day health advisory of 0.3 µg/L for children preschool age and younger (less than 6-years old). One sample collected in 2012 from SLBE exceeded the EPA drinking water 10-day health advisory of 1.6 µg/L for school-age children through adults (6-years old and older). In 2012, the highest concentration of 2.7 µg/L was detected in Florence Lake within SLBE. Many visitors enjoy recreation in or on the water and camp in the backcountry at these national parks where the most common source of drinking water

  9. Elucidating effects of atmospheric deposition and peat decomposition processes on mercury accumulation rates in a northern Minnesota peatland over last 10,000 cal years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nater, E. A.; Furman, O.; Toner, B. M.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Tfaily, M. M.; Chanton, J.; Fissore, C.; McFarlane, K. J.; Hanson, P. J.; Iversen, C. M.; Kolka, R. K.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change has the potential to affect mercury (Hg), sulfur (S) and carbon (C) stores and cycling in northern peatland ecosystems (NPEs). SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climate and Environmental change) is an interdisciplinary study of the effects of elevated temperature and CO2 enrichment on NPEs. Peat cores (0-3.0 m) were collected from 16 large plots located on the S1 peatland (an ombrotrophic bog treed with Picea mariana and Larix laricina) in August, 2012 for baseline characterization before the experiment begins. Peat samples were analyzed at depth increments for total Hg, bulk density, humification indices, and elemental composition. Net Hg accumulation rates over the last 10,000 years were derived from Hg concentrations and peat accumulation rates based on peat depth chronology established using 14C and 13C dating of peat cores. Historic Hg deposition rates are being modeled from pre-industrial deposition rates in S1 scaled by regional lake sediment records. Effects of peatland processes and factors (hydrology, decomposition, redox chemistry, vegetative changes, microtopography) on the biogeochemistry of Hg, S, and other elements are being assessed by comparing observed elemental depth profiles with accumulation profiles predicted solely from atmospheric deposition. We are using principal component analyses and cluster analyses to elucidate relationships between humification indices, peat physical properties, and inorganic and organic geochemistry data to interpret the main processes controlling net Hg accumulation and elemental concentrations in surface and subsurface peat layers. These findings are critical to predicting how climate change will affect future accumulation of Hg as well as existing Hg stores in NPE, and for providing reference baselines for SPRUCE future investigations.

  10. Minnesota Power Settlement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA and DOJ announced a Clean Air Act settlement with Minnesota Power, an ALLETE company based in Duluth, that will cover its three coal-fired power plants and one biomass-and-coal-fired steam and electricity cogeneration plan

  11. Response of surface CH4 and CO2 fluxes to whole ecosystem warming and elevated CO2 in a boreal black spruce peatland, northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, I. F.; Gill, A. L.; Finzi, A.

    2017-12-01

    productivity and the subsequent belowground transfer of photosynthate. Our results emphasize the susceptibleness of northern peat bog to changes in the environment by illustrating measureable influences of whole ecosystem warming and elevated CO2 on greenhouse gases emission.

  12. Wolf body mass cline across Minnesota related to taxonomy?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Paul, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent genetic studies suggest that in northern Minnesota two species of wolves (Canis lupus L., 1758 or western wolf and Canis lycaon Schreber, 1775 (= Canis rufus Audubon and Bachman, 1851) or eastern wolf) meet and hybridize. However, little morphological information is available about these two types of wolves in Minnesota. We analyzed the mass of 950 female wolves and 1006 males older than 1 year from across northern Minnesota and found that it increased from 26.30 ?? 0.56 kg (mean ?? SE) for females and 30.60 ?? 0.72 kg for males in northeastern Minnesota to 30.01 ?? 0.43 kg for females and 35.94 ?? 0.45 kg for males in northwestern Minnesota (females: r2 = 0.79, P < 0.02; males: r2 = 0.63, P = 0.06). These mass differences add morphological information to the identities of eastern and western wolves and support the view that ranges of the two species meet in Minnesota. ?? 2008 NRC.

  13. Wood and bark percentages and moisture contents of Minnesota pulpwood species.

    Treesearch

    Richard M. Marden; David C. Lothner; Edwin Kallio

    1975-01-01

    To help increase the use of bark for fuel or products, information is presented on the relative proportions of bark and wood by volume and weight, and also moisture contents (ovendry basis) for five northern Minnesota pulpwood species.

  14. Technical and Legal Documents: St. Louis Park Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical and legal documents related to the St. Louis Park Site. Samples of ground water taken in St. Louis Park in 2005 and 2006 by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency were found to contain volatile organic compounds – known as VOCs.

  15. Estimation of water storage changes in small endorheic lakes in Burabay National Nature Park (Northern Kazakhstan, Central Asia); the effect of climate change and anthropogenic influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapiyev, Vadim; Sagintayev, Zhanay; Verhoef, Anne; Samarkhanov, Kanat; Jumassultanova, Saltanat

    2017-04-01

    Both climate change and anthropogenic activities contribute to deterioration of terrestrial water resources and ecosystems worldwide. It has been observed in recent decades that water-limited steppe regions of Central Asia are among ecosystems found to exhibit enhanced responses to climate variability. In fact, the largest share of worldwide net loss of permanent water extent is geographically concentrated in the Central Asia and Middle East regions attributed to both climate variability/change and human activities impacts. We used a digital elevation model, digitized bathymetry maps and high resolution Landsat images to estimate the areal water cover extent and volumetric storage changes in small terminal lakes in Burabay National Nature Park (BNNP), located in Northern Central Asia, for the period 2000-2016. Based on the analysis of long-term climatic data from meteorological stations, hydrometeorological network observations as well as regional climate model projections we evaluate the impacts of past thirty years and future climatic conditions on the water balance of BNNP lake catchments. The anthropogenic water consumption was estimated based on data collected at a local water supply company and regulation authorities. One the one hand historical in-situ observations and future climate projections do not show a significant change in precipitation in BNNP. On the other hand both observations and the model demonstrate steadily rising air temperatures in the area. It is concluded that the long-term decline in water levels for most of these lakes can be largely attributed to climate change (but only via changes in air temperature, causing evaporation to exceed precipitation) and not to direct anthropogenic influences such as increased water withdrawals. In addition, the two largest lakes, showing the highest historical water level decline, do not have sufficient water drainage basin area to sustain water levels under increased evaporation rates.

  16. A 2650-year-long record of environmental change from northern Yellowstone National Park based on a comparison of multiple proxy data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitlock, C.; Dean, W.; Rosenbaum, J.; Stevens, L.; Fritz, S.; Bracht, B.; Power, M.

    2008-01-01

    Geochemical, stable-isotope, pollen, charcoal, and diatom records were analyzed at high-resolution in cores obtained from Crevice Lake, a varved-sediment lake in northern Yellowstone National Park. The objective was to reconstruct the ecohydrologic, vegetation, and fire history of the watershed for the last 2650 years to better understand past climate variations at the forest-steppe transition. The data suggest a period of limited bottom-water anoxia, relatively wet winters, and cool springs and summers from 2650 to 2100 cal yr BP (700-150 BC). Dry warm conditions occurred between 2100 and 850-800 cal yr BP (150 BC and AD 1100-1150), when the lake was anoxic, winter precipitation was low, and summer stratification was protracted. The data are consistent with overall warmer/drier conditions during the Medieval Climate Anomaly, although they suggest a shift towards wetter winters within that period. The period from 850 to 800 cal yr BP (AD 1100-1150) to 250 cal yr BP (AD 1700) was characterized by greater water-column mixing and cooler spring/summer conditions than before. In addition, fire activity shifted towards infrequent large events and pollen production was low. From 250 to 150 cal yr BP (AD 1700-1800), winter precipitation was moderate compared to previous conditions, and the lake was again stratified, suggesting warm summers. Between 150 and 42 cal yr BP (AD 1800-1908), winter precipitation increased and spring and summer conditions became moderate. Metal pollution, probably from regional mining operations, is evident in the 1870s. Large fires occurred between ca. 1800-1880, but in general the forests were more closed than before. The Crevice Lake record suggests that the last 150 years of Yellowstone's environmental history were characterized by intermediate conditions when compared with the previous 2500 years. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA.

  17. Holocene climate in the western Great Lakes national parks and lakeshores: Implications for future climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Margaret; Douglas, Christine; Cole, K.L.; Winkler, Marge; Flaknes, Robyn

    2000-01-01

    We reconstruct Holocene climate history (last 10,000 years) for each of the U.S. National Park Service units in the western Great Lakes region in order to evaluate their sensitivity to global warming. Annual precipitation, annual temperature, and July and January temperatures were reconstructed by comparing fossil pollen in lake sediment with pollen in surface samples, assuming that ancient climates were similar to modern climate near analogous surface samples. In the early Holocene, most of the parks experienced colder winters, warmer summers, and lower precipitation than today. An exception is Voyageurs National Park in northern Minnesota where, by 8000 years ago, January temperatures were higher than today. The combination of high mean annual temperature and lower precipitation at Voyageurs resulted in a dry period between 8000 and 5000 years ago, similar to the Prairie Period in regions to the south and west. A mid-Holocene warm-dry period also occurred at other northern and central parks but was much less strongly developed. In southern parks there was no clear evidence of a mid-Holocene warm-dry period. These differences suggest that global model predictions of a warm, dry climate in the northern Great Plains under doubled atmospheric CO2 may be more applicable to Voyageurs than to the other parks. The contrast in reconstructed temperatures at Voyageurs and Isle Royale indicates that the ameliorating effect of the Great Lakes on temperatures has been in effect throughout the Holocene and presumably will continue in the future, thus reducing the potential for species loss caused by future temperature extremes. Increased numbers of mesic trees at all of the parks in the late Holocene reflect increasing annual precipitation. This trend toward more mesic conditions began 6000 years ago in the south and 4000 years ago in the north and increased sharply in recent millennia at parks located today in lake-effect snow belts. This suggests that lake-effect snowfall is

  18. Minnesota's Forest Trees. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, William R.; Fuller, Bruce L.

    This bulletin describes 46 of the more common trees found in Minnesota's forests and windbreaks. The bulletin contains two tree keys, a summer key and a winter key, to help the reader identify these trees. Besides the two keys, the bulletin includes an introduction, instructions for key use, illustrations of leaf characteristics and twig…

  19. Minnesota Innovation Research Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    Petroleum, Magnetic Controls, Farm Credit Services Corporations, Bush Foundation, and Hospital Corporation of America . .. Unc lassifijed RUNOT...Paper #47 (March, 1986). 7. David Bastien, " Sociolinguistic Studies of Mergers and Acquisitions," to be presented at the Minnesota Conference on...Applied Sociolinguistics , 1986. 8. David Bastien and Andrew Van de Ven, "Managerial and Organizational Dynamics of Mergers and Acquisitions," SNRC

  20. Minnesota's Forests 2008

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; David Heinzen; Manfred E. Mielke; Christopher W. Woodall; Brett J. Butler; Ron J. Piva; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Charles H. Perry; Dale D. Gormanson; Charles J. Barnett

    2011-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Minnesota's forests reports 17 million acres of forest land with an average volume of more than 1,000 cubic feet per acre. Forest land is dominated by the aspen forest type, which occupies nearly 30 percent of the total forest land area. Twenty-eight percent of forest land consists of sawtimber, 35 percent poletimber, 35 percent...

  1. Minnesota Academic Standards: Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Department of Education, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This document contains all of the Minnesota kindergarten academic standards in the content areas of Arts, English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies. For each content area there is a short overview followed by a coding diagram of how the standards are organized and displayed. This document is adapted from the official versions…

  2. Women in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Hubert H. Humphrey Inst. of Public Affairs.

    Based on data from the 1980 Census of Population and Housing, this report contains comprehensive information about the status of women in Minnesota. It includes detailed information about population characteristics, educational attainment and enrollments, marital status, labor force participation and employment, income and earnings, and poverty…

  3. Minnesota forest statistics, 1990.

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Chung M. Chen

    1992-01-01

    The fifth inventory of Minnesota's forests reports 51.0 million acres of land, of which 16.7 million acres are forested. This bulletin presents statistical highlights and contains detailed tables of forest area, as well as timber volume, growth, removals, mortality, and ownership.

  4. Sequoia National Park

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Naked peaks, sheltered valleys, snowfields, towering trees, and alpine meadows make up the varied landscape of Sequoia National Park in California. Established as a National Park by Congress on September 25, 1890, Sequoia National Park is the second-oldest U.S. National Park, after Yellowstone. This national park borders Kings Canyon National Park. The Thematic Mapper sensor on NASA’s Landsat 5 satellite captured this true-color image of Sequoia National Park, outlined in white, on October 22, 2008. Sunlight illuminates southern slopes, leaving northern faces in shadow in this autumn image. In the west, deep green conifers carpet most of the land. These forested mountains are home to the park’s most famous giant sequoia trees. Sequoia National Park sits at the southern end of the Sierra Nevada mountains. Terrain alternates between extremes, from peaks such as Mt. Whitney—the highest peak in the contiguous United States—to deep caverns. The rivers and lakes in this region are part of a watershed valuable not only to the plants and animals of the park, but also to farms and cities in California’s Central Valley. Read more: go.nasa.gov/2bzGOXr Credit: NASA/Landsat5 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Temperature mediated moose survival in Northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenarz, M.S.; Nelson, M.E.; Schrage, M.W.; Edwards, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The earth is in the midst of a pronounced warming trend and temperatures in Minnesota, USA, as elsewhere, are projected to increase. Northern Minnesota represents the southern edge to the circumpolar distribution of moose (Alces alces), a species intolerant of heat. Moose increase their metabolic rate to regulate their core body temperature as temperatures rise. We hypothesized that moose survival rates would be a function of the frequency and magnitude that ambient temperatures exceeded the upper critical temperature of moose. We compared annual and seasonal moose survival in northeastern Minnesota between 2002 and 2008 with a temperature metric. We found that models based on January temperatures above the critical threshold were inversely correlated with subsequent survival and explained >78 of variability in spring, fall, and annual survival. Models based on late-spring temperatures also explained a high proportion of survival during the subsequent fall. A model based on warm-season temperatures was important in explaining survival during the subsequent winter. Our analyses suggest that temperatures may have a cumulative influence on survival. We expect that continuation or acceleration of current climate trends will result in decreased survival, a decrease in moose density, and ultimately, a retreat of moose northward from their current distribution.

  6. National Parks

    Treesearch

    Jill S. Baron; Craig D. Allen; Erica Fleishman; Lance Gunderson; Don McKenzie; Laura Meyerson; Jill Oropeza; Nate Stephenson

    2008-01-01

    Covering about 4% of the United States, the 338,000 km2 of protected areas in the National Park System contain representative landscapes of all of the nation's biomes and ecosystems. The U.S. National Park Service Organic Act established the National Park System in 1916 "to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and...

  7. Minnesota forest ecosystem vulnerability assessment and synthesis: a report from the Northwoods Climate Change Response Framework project

    Treesearch

    Stephen Handler; Matthew J. Duveneck; Louis Iverson; Emily Peters; Robert M. Scheller; Kirk R. Wythers; Leslie Brandt; Patricia Butler; Maria Janowiak; P. Danielle Shannon; Chris Swanston; Kelly Barrett; Randy Kolka; Casey McQuiston; Brian Palik; Peter B. Reich; Clarence Turner; Mark White; Cheryl Adams; Anthony D' Amato; Suzanne Hagell; Patricia Johnson; Rosemary Johnson; Mike Larson; Stephen Matthews; Rebecca Montgomery; Steve Olson; Matthew Peters; Anantha Prasad; Jack Rajala; Jad Daley; Mae Davenport; Marla R. Emery; David Fehringer; Christopher L. Hoving; Gary Johnson; Lucinda Johnson; David Neitzel; Adena Rissman; Chadwick Rittenhouse; Robert. Ziel

    2014-01-01

    Forests in northern Minnesota will be affected directly and indirectly by a changing climate over the next 100 years. This assessment evaluates the vulnerability of forest ecosystems in Minnesota's Laurentian Mixed Forest Province to a range of future climates. Information on current forest conditions, observed climate trends, projected climate changes, and...

  8. Redwood National Park

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    In 1968, after state parks had already been established in northern California, the U.S. Congress established Redwood National Park. This new park supplemented protected lands in the region, and in 1994, state and federal authorities agreed to jointly manage the area’s public lands. On February 6, 2003, the Enhanced Thamatic Mapper Plus on NASA’s Landsat 7 satellite captured this true-color image of the southern end of Redwood National Park - a thin coastal corridor connects the northern and southern ends of the park system. Along the coast, sandy beaches appear off-white, and sediments form swirls of pale blue in the darker blue sea. Inland, the park is dominated by green vegetation, with isolated patches of gray-beige rock. This image of the Redwood National Park includes two stands of trees: Lady Bird Johnson Grove and Tall Trees Grove. The first grove was dedicated to the former first lady by President Richard Nixon in August 1969. The second grove became the focus of efforts to protect the surrounding area from logging. Two waterways appear in this image: Redwood Creek and Klamath River. The more conspicuous Klamath River flows through the park system’s midsection (north of the area pictured here). Redwood Creek flows through the southern portion of the park system. Both waterways have carved gorges through the mountainous landscape. Redwood National and State Parks occupy an area considered to be the most seismically active in the United States. The frequent seismic activity has led to shifting waterways, landslides, and rapid erosion along the coastline. Read more: go.nasa.gov/2bRlryv Credit: NASA/Landsat7 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter

  9. Minnesota Forests 2013

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Curtis L. VanderSchaaf; Charles Barnett; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Dale D. Gormanson; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Tonya W. Lister; William H. McWilliams; Randall S. Morin; Mark D. Nelson; Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Rachel I. Riemann; James E. Smith; Brian F. Walters; Jim Westfall; Christopher W. Woodall

    2016-01-01

    The third full annual inventory of Minnesota forests reports 17.4 million acres of forest land with an average live tree volume of 1,096 cubic feet per acre. Forest land is dominated by the aspen forest type, which occupies 29 percent of the total forest land area. Twenty-eight percent of forest land consists of sawtimber, 35 percent poletimber, 36 percent sapling/...

  10. Precambrian Field Camp at the University of Minnesota Duluth - Teaching Skills Applicable to Mapping Glaciated Terranes of the Canadian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. D.; Hudak, G. J.; Peterson, D.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2007, the central program of the Precambrian Research Center (PRC) at the University of Minnesota Duluth has been a six-week geology field camp focused on the Precambrian geology of the Canadian Shield. This field camp has two main purposes. First and foremost is to teach students specialized field skills and field mapping techniques that can be utilized to map and interpret Precambrian shield terranes characterized by sparse outcrop and abundant glacial cover. In addition to teaching basic outcrop mapping technique , students are introduced to geophysical surveying (gravity, magnetics), glacial drift prospecting, and drill core logging techniques in several of our geological mapping exercises. These mapping methodologies are particularly applicable to minerals exploration in shield terranes. The second and equally important goal of the PRC field camp is to teach students modern map-making and map production skills. During the fifth and sixth weeks of field camp, students conduct "capstone" mapping projects. These projects encompass one week of detailed bedrock mapping in remote regions of northern Minnesota that have not been mapped in detail (e.g. scales greater than 1:24,000) and a second week of map-making and map generation utilizing geographic information systems (currently ArcGIS10), graphics software packages (Adobe Illustrator CS4), and various imaging software for geophysical and topographic data. Over the past five years, PRC students and faculty have collaboratively published 21 geologic maps through the Precambrian Research Center Map Series. These maps are currently being utilized in a variety of ways by industry, academia, and government for mineral exploration programs, development of undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research projects, and for planning, archeological studies, and public education programs in Minnesota's state parks. Acquisition of specialized Precambrian geological mapping skills and geologic map-making proficiencies has

  11. Historical Resources Evaluation, St. Paul District Locks and Dams on the Mississippi River and Two Structures at St. Anthony Falls; Locks and Dams in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Northern Iowa.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    assistant, Charles Babbage Institute for the History of Information Processing, University of Minnesota, 1982. Teaching assistant, Department of...History, 18.4 (June 1935): 375-388. ’ clumbsily written account of Charles Lane Colman and his shirgle factory in LaCrosse, which eventually became...8217..: : . . . . . .. - y :. ,, . .. , . Twining, Charles E. Downriver: Orrin H. Ingram and the Empire Lumber Company. Madison: The State Historical Society of

  12. Empirical yield tables for Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Jerold T. Hahn; Gerhard K. Raile

    1982-01-01

    Describes the tables derived from the 1977 Forest Survey of Minnesota and presents examples of how the tables can be used. These tables are broken down according to Minnesota's four Forest Survey Units, 14 forest types, and 5 site index classes. Presents 210 of the 350 possible tables that contained sufficient data to justify publication.

  13. The Minnesota Tree Improvement Cooperative

    Treesearch

    Andrew David

    2002-01-01

    As the director of the Minnesota Tree Improvement Cooperative (MTIC) based in Cloquet, Minnesota, I would like to tell you a little about our strategy for creating improved seed, and how individual nurseries or nursery associations can interact with tree improvement programs to the benefit of both parties. MTIC is approximately 15 miles west of Duluth, at the...

  14. Minnesota Forest Resources in 2000.

    Treesearch

    David E. Haugen; Manfred E. Mielke

    2002-01-01

    Results of the 2000 annual inventory of Minnesota show over 16.5 million acres of forest land, over 17.6 billion cubic feet of all live volume on timberland, and an estimated 429 million dry tons of all live aboveground tree biomass on timberland. Known pests in Minnesota forests include the forest tent caterpillar, spruce budworm, large aspen tortrix, and introduced...

  15. Powassan virus encephalitis, Minnesota, USA.

    PubMed

    Birge, Justin; Sonnesyn, Steven

    2012-10-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) is a rare tick-borne agent of encephalitis in North America. Historically, confirmed cases occurred mainly in the northeastern United States. Since 2008, confirmed cases in Minnesota and Wisconsin have increased. We report a fatal case of POWV encephalitis in Minnesota. POWV infection should be suspected in tick-exposed patients with viral encephalitis.

  16. Powassan Virus Encephalitis, Minnesota, USA

    PubMed Central

    Sonnesyn, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) is a rare tick-borne agent of encephalitis in North America. Historically, confirmed cases occurred mainly in the northeastern United States. Since 2008, confirmed cases in Minnesota and Wisconsin have increased. We report a fatal case of POWV encephalitis in Minnesota. POWV infection should be suspected in tick-exposed patients with viral encephalitis. PMID:23017222

  17. Minnesota's forest resources in 1999

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Schmidt

    2000-01-01

    The North Central Research Station's Forest Inventory and Analysis Program began fieldwork for the sixth Forest Inventory of Minnesota in 1999. This inventory initiates a new annual inventory system. This Research Note contains preliminary estimates of Minnesota's forest resources prepared from data gathered during the first year of the inventory.

  18. Minnesota Youthbuild Program Overview, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Economic Security, St. Paul.

    Minnesota's Youthbuild program helps at-risk youths gain useful job skills while building safe, affordable housing in their neighborhoods and working toward their high school diploma or General Educational Development (GED) certificate. In 1999, the Minnesota Legislature appropriated 751,000 dollars per year in Youthbuild funds. The program…

  19. Northwest Angle, Minnesota

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-02

    Minnesota's Northwest Angle is the northernmost point of the continental United States. The Angle became part of the US due to a map error during the 1783 Treaty of Paris. Located in the Lake of the Woods, driving there requires crossing the US-Canada border twice. The image was acquired September 22, 2013, covers an area of 40 by 55 km, and is located at 49.2 degrees north, 95.1 degrees west. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21997

  20. Environmental Assessment: Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mission Beddown Minneapolis-St. Paul Air Reserve Station Minneapolis, Minnesota

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    training area. The baseball/ softball field adjacent to Building 750. A parking lot and storage area on station property leased to the Minnesota Air...was constructed on this site to help reduce storm water runoff volume at MSPARS. The baseball/ softball field adjacent to Building 750. Site is the

  1. Park It!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartorius, Tara Cady

    2010-01-01

    Many artists visit national parks to draw, paint and take photographs of some of the most amazing scenery on earth. Raw nature is one of the greatest inspirations to an artist, and artists can be credited for helping inspire the government to create the National Park System. This article features Thomas Moran (1837-1926), one of the artists who…

  2. A regional survey of malformed frogs in Minnesota (USA) (Minnesota malformed frogs).

    PubMed

    Vandenlangenberg, Susan M; Canfield, Jeffrey T; Magner, Joseph A

    2003-02-01

    In late 1995, school children discovered malformed frogs in a south central Minnesota pond. Press coverage resulted in numerous citizen reports of frog malformation across Minnesota in 1996. After some initial site investigation, 3 affected frog sites and 4 nearby reference sites were selected for more detailed evaluation. Field biologists made 89 visits to study sites beginning spring 1997 through fall 1999 to examine the number and type of frog malformations. Over 5,100 Leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were captured and examined at all study sites. Water elevations and associated littoral inundation were recorded from 1997-2000. Results indicate that malformation occurred at all study sites above historical background levels. Rana pipiens malformation across all sites over three seasons averaged 7.9% and ranged from 0 to 7% at reference sites and 4 to 23% at affected sites. At one northern Minnesota site, mink frog (Rana septentrionalis) malformation was 75% in 1998. A site characteristic common to the most affected sites was an elastic zone of littoral inundation. Climate driven hydrologic variation likely influenced water depth and associated breeding locations.

  3. 21 CFR 808.73 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Minnesota. 808.73 Section 808.73 Food and Drugs... and Local Exemptions § 808.73 Minnesota. The following Minnesota medical device requirements are... from preemption under section 521(b) of the act: Minnesota Statutes, sections 145.43 and 145.44. [45 FR...

  4. 21 CFR 808.73 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minnesota. 808.73 Section 808.73 Food and Drugs... and Local Exemptions § 808.73 Minnesota. The following Minnesota medical device requirements are... from preemption under section 521(b) of the act: Minnesota Statutes, sections 145.43 and 145.44. [45 FR...

  5. 21 CFR 808.73 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Minnesota. 808.73 Section 808.73 Food and Drugs... and Local Exemptions § 808.73 Minnesota. The following Minnesota medical device requirements are... from preemption under section 521(b) of the act: Minnesota Statutes, sections 145.43 and 145.44. [45 FR...

  6. 21 CFR 808.73 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Minnesota. 808.73 Section 808.73 Food and Drugs... and Local Exemptions § 808.73 Minnesota. The following Minnesota medical device requirements are... from preemption under section 521(b) of the act: Minnesota Statutes, sections 145.43 and 145.44. [45 FR...

  7. 21 CFR 808.73 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Minnesota. 808.73 Section 808.73 Food and Drugs... and Local Exemptions § 808.73 Minnesota. The following Minnesota medical device requirements are... from preemption under section 521(b) of the act: Minnesota Statutes, sections 145.43 and 145.44. [45 FR...

  8. Methane flux from Minnesota Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crill, P. M.; Bartlett, K. B.; Harriss, R. C.; Gorham, E.; Verry, E. S.; Sebacher, D. I.; Madzar, L.; Sanner, W.

    1988-12-01

    Northern (>40°N) wetlands have been suggested as the largest natural source of methane (CH4) to the troposphere. To refine our estimates of source strengths from this region and to investigate climatic controls on the process, fluxes were measured from a variety of Minnesota peatlands during May, June, and August 1986. Sites included forested and unforested ombrotrophic bogs and minerotrophic fens in and near the U.S. Department of Agriculture Marcell Experimental Forest and the Red Lake peatlands. Late spring and summer fluxes ranged from 11 to 866 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, averaging 207 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 overall. At Marcell Forest, forested bogs and fen sites had lower fluxes (averages of 77 ± 21 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 and 142 ± 19 mg CH4 m-2 d-1) than open bogs (average of 294 ± 30 mg CH4 m-2 d-1). In the Red Lake peatland, circumneutral fens, with standing water above the peat surface, produced more methane than acid bog sites in which the water table was beneath the moss surface (325 ± 31 and 102 ± 13 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, respectively). Peat temperature was an important control. Methane flux increased in response to increasing soil temperature. For example, the open bog in the Marcell Forest with the highest CH4 flux exhibited a 74-fold increase in flux over a three-fold increase in temperature. We estimate that the methane flux from all peatlands north of 40° may be on the order of 70 to 90 Tg/yr though estimates of this sort are plagued by uncertainties in the areal extent of peatlands, length of the CH4 producing season, and the spatial and temporal variability of the flux.

  9. Fact Sheets and Letter to Residents: St. Louis Park Vapor Intrusion Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fact Sheets and letters to residents related to the St. Louis Park Vapor Intrusion site. Samples of ground water taken in St. Louis Park in 2005 and 2006 by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency were found to contain volatile organic compounds, VOCs.

  10. A ground electromagnetic survey used to map sulfides and acid sulfate ground waters at the abandoned Cabin Branch Mine, Prince William Forest Park, northern Virginia gold-pyrite belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeffrey C.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND: Prince William Forest Park is situated at the northeastern end of the Virginia Gold-Pyrite belt northwest of the town of Dumfries, VA. The U. S. Marine Corps Reservation at Quantico borders the park on the west and south, and occupies part of the same watershed. Two abandoned mines are found within the park: the Cabin Branch pyrite mine, a historic source of acid mine drainage, and the Greenwood gold mine, a source of mercury contamination. Both are within the watershed of Quantico Creek (Fig.1). The Cabin Branch mine (also known as the Dumfries mine) lies about 2.4 km northwest of the town of Dumfries. It exploited a 300 meter-long, lens-shaped body of massive sulfide ore hosted by metamorphosed volcanic rocks; during its history over 200,000 tons of ore were extracted and processed locally. The site became part of the National Capitol Region of the National Park Service in 1940 and is currently managed by the National Park Service. In 1995 the National Park Service, in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy reclaimed the Cabin Branch site. The Virginia Gold-Pyrite belt, also known as the central Virginia volcanic-plutonic belt, is host to numerous abandoned metal mines (Pavlides and others, 1982), including the Cabin Branch deposit. The belt itself extends from its northern terminus near Cabin Branch, about 50 km south of Washington, D.C., approximately 175 km to the southwest into central Virginia. It is underlain by metamorphosed volcanic and clastic (non-carbonate) sedimentary rocks, originally deposited approximately 460 million years ago during the Ordovician Period (Horton and others, 1998). Three kinds of deposits are found in the belt: volcanic-associated massive sulfide deposits, low-sulfide quartz-gold vein deposits, and gold placer deposits. The massive sulfide deposits such as Cabin Branch were historically mined for their sulfur, copper, zinc, and lead contents, but also yielded byproduct

  11. Documents related to the Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy's Petition for Withdrawal of Minnesota's NPDES Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    NPDES Petition for Program Withdrawal in Minnesota: Documents related to the Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy (MCEA) Petition for Corrective Action or Withdrawal of NPDES Program Approval from the State of Minnesota.

  12. Characterizing challenged Minnesota ballots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, George; Lopresti, Daniel; Barney Smith, Elisa H.; Wu, Ziyan

    2011-01-01

    Photocopies of the ballots challenged in the 2008 Minnesota elections, which constitute a public record, were scanned on a high-speed scanner and made available on a public radio website. The PDF files were downloaded, converted to TIF images, and posted on the PERFECT website. Based on a review of relevant image-processing aspects of paper-based election machinery and on additional statistics and observations on the posted sample data, robust tools were developed for determining the underlying grid of the targets on these ballots regardless of skew, clipping, and other degradations caused by high-speed copying and digitization. The accuracy and robustness of a method based on both index-marks and oval targets are demonstrated on 13,435 challenged ballot page images.

  13. Hodgson v. Minnesota.

    PubMed

    1990-06-25

    Doctors, clinics, pregnant minors, and the mother of a pregnant minor filed suit in District Court to enjoin enforcement of Minnesota's abortion statute. The plaintiffs objected on due process and equal protection grounds to subdivisions of the statute mandating either that both parents of a minor be notified of her pending abortion, or, in lieu of two-parent notification, that a court authorize the abortion after determining that the minor is capable of giving informed consent. The District Court declared the entire statute unconstitutional. The Court of Appeals reversed, ruling that the provision for judicial bypass of the two-parent notification requirement was valid and saved the statute as a whole. In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed the Court of Appeals judgment. It concluded that while the two-parent notification requirement in itself violated the Constitution, the statute was rendered constitutional by the judicial bypass provision.

  14. 'Shockley park' stirs racism row

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-07-01

    A local authority in Northern California has encountered unexpected resistance to its decision to name a park after the Nobel-prize-winning physicist William Shockley, with a coalition of churches and civic groups preparing to petition against the name at a meeting scheduled for 23 July.

  15. Parkes Telescope

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-08

    This image shows the Parkes telescope in Australia, part of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization. Researchers used the telescope to detect the first population of radio bursts known to originate from beyond our galaxy.

  16. Achieving Technological Literacy in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Describes how Minnesota implemented the Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. Includes the timeline, rationale, potential activities and estimated costs associated with all phases, and steps for implementing the plan: investigate, replicate, integrate, and mandate. (JOW)

  17. Minnesota's forest resources in 2003

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Gary J. Brand; Manfred E. Mielke

    2005-01-01

    Reports the results of all five annual panels (1999-2003) of the sixth inventory of Minnesota's forest resources, the first annual inventory of the State. Includes information on forest area; volume; biomass; growth, removals, and mortality; and forest health.

  18. Minnesota Land Management Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordstrand, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A brief history of the Minnesota Land Management Information Center is given and the present operational status and plans for future development are described. The incorporation of LANDSAT data into the system, hardware and software capabilities, and funding are addressed.

  19. Minnesota's forest resources in 2001

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Manfred E. Mielke; Gary J. Brand

    2003-01-01

    Results of the combined 1999, 2000, and 2001 annual forest inventories of Minnesota show that 16.3 million acres or 32 percent of the total land area is forested. The estimate of total all live tree volume on forest land is 17.4 billion cubic feet or approximately 1,068 cubic feet per acre. Nearly 15.0 million acres of forest land in Minnesota are classified as...

  20. Minnesota's forest resources in 2005

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Gary J. Brand

    2007-01-01

    Reports forest statistics for Minnesota based on five annual inventories from 2001 through 2005. Minnesota's total forest area is estimated at 16.3 million acres or 32 percent of the total land area of the State. The estmated total live-tree volume on forest land is 17.7 billion cubic feet or 1,085 cubic feet per acre. The estimated aboveground live-tree biomass...

  1. Soil-vegetation relationships and community structure in a "terra-firme"-white-sand vegetation gradient in Viruá National Park, northern Amazon, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Bruno A F DE; Fernandes, Elpídio I; Schaefer, Carlos E G R; Mendonça, Júlia G F DE; Vasconcelos, Bruno N F

    2017-01-01

    Viruá National Park encompasses a vast and complex system of hydromorphic sandy soils covered largely by the white sand vegetation ("Campinarana") ecosystem. The purpose of this study was to investigate a vegetation gradient of "terra-firme"-white sand vegetation at the Viruá National Park. Nine plots representing three physiognomic units were installed for floristic and phytosociological surveys as well as to collect composite soil samples. The data were subjected to assessments of floristic diversity and similarity, phytosociological parameters and to statistical analyses, focused on principal components (PC) and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). The vegetation of the Campinaranas types and Forest differed in biomass and species density. Ten species, endemic to Brazil, were particularly well-represented. PC and CCA indicated a clear distinction between the studied plots, based on measured soil variables, especially base sum and clay, which were the most differentiating properties between Campinarana and Forest; For the separation of the Campinarana types, the main distinguishing variable was organic matter content and cation exchange capacity. Higher similarity of Campinaranas was associated to a monodominant species and the lower similarity of Forest was related to the high occurrence of locally rare species.

  2. The Glacier National Park GLORIA Project: A new US Target Region for Alpine Plant Monitoring Installed in the Northern Rocky Mountains, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, K.; Fagre, D.

    2004-12-01

    The Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments (GLORIA) is an international research network whose purpose is to assess climate change impacts on vegetation in alpine environments worldwide. A standard protocol was developed by the international office in Vienna, Austria, and has specific site requirements and techniques that allow sites to be compared worldwide. This protocol requires four summits to be selected within a target region, covering zonal differences of subalpine to nival, and on each of these summits intensive vegetation plots are set up and monitored on a five year interval. Only three target regions in North America have been completed to date, one in Glacier National Park, Montana, and the other two in the Sierra Nevada and White Mountains, California. The four GLORIA summit plots in Glacier National Park were completed over the summers of 2003 and 2004. Because the Continental Divide bisects Glacier National Park (north to south), we chose summits only East of the divide to stay within a similar climatic pattern. Establishing sites was difficult due to the steep and rocky glaciated terrain and the remoteness of suitable sites that required multi-day approaches. Our highest summit (Seward Mtn. 2717 m) is the northernmost and our lowest summit (Dancing Lady Mtn. 2245 m) is southernmost. Treeline is strongly influenced by terrain and is significantly more variable than in the central Rocky Mountains. This also was true of zonal differences of alpine vegetation. Subalpine and even grassland species were found on the same summits as upper alpine species and areas considered subnival. While different zonal areas often occurred on one summit, they were highly influenced by the aspect and slope of that summit area. Between 51 and 82 vascular plants were documented on each summit. There was a high degree of variability in species diversity and percent cover on each summit that was correlated to directional exposure. The summit morphology

  3. Effects of environmental and anthropogenic determinants on changes in groundwater levels in selected peat bogs of Slowinski National Park, northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlost, Izabela; Cieśliński, Roman

    2018-03-01

    The present study focuses on two Baltic-type peat bogs in Slowinski National Park, namely that at Żarnowskie and at Kluki, located in the Lake Łebsko catchment and both characterised by a centrally located dome with a very marshy fringe area featuring an emerging marshy coniferous forest (Vaccinio uliginosi-Pinetum). The Żarnowskie bog is under active protection. A total of 24 flow barriers were installed in drainage ditches during the years 2006 and 2007. The purpose of these barriers was to put a halt to water outflow. In addition, 30 hectares of young pine forest were cleared in order to decrease loss of water via evapotranspiration. Kluki peat bog is only partially protected by Polish law. The lack of efforts to prevent outflow via the canal is due to the fact that the canal is utilised to drain meadows in the vicinity of the village of Łokciowe outside of the national park. Peat formation no longer occurs in this peat bog. The hydrological condition of the bog is catastrophic as a result of its main canal, referred to as Canal C9, which is 2.5 to 3.0 m deep and 10 m wide in places. Both peat bogs are monitored for fluctuations in groundwater. Research has shown that changes in water levels fluctuate based on season of the year and geographical location, which is illustrated quite well using the two studied peat bogs. The water retention rate of the Żarnowskie peat bog may be considered fairly high and is likely to improve due to protective measures enabled by Polish environmental laws. The water retention rate of the bog is consistently improving thanks to these measures, fluctuations in water level are small and the water level does not drop under 0.5 m below ground level even under extreme hydrometeorological conditions. This yields optimum conditions for renewed peat formation in this area. One potential threat is the Krakulice peat extraction facility, which is located in the southern part of the bog close to the boundary with the national park.

  4. Biogenic Gas Dynamics in Peat Soil Blocks using Ground Penetrating Radar: a Comparative Study in the Laboratory between Peat Soils from the Everglades and from two Northern Peatlands in Minnesota and Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabolova, Anastasija

    Peatlands cover a total area of approximately 3 million square kilometers and are one of the largest natural sources of atmospheric methane ( CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO 2). Most traditional methods used to estimate biogenic gas dynamics are invasive and provide little or no information about lateral distribution of gas. In contrast, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is an emerging technique for non-invasive investigation of gas dynamics in peat soils. This thesis establishes a direct comparison between gas dynamics (i.e. build-up and release) of four different types of peat soil using GPR. Peat soil blocks were collected at peatlands with contrasting latitudes, including the Everglades, Maine and Minnesota. A unique two-antenna GPR setup was used to monitor biogenic gas buildup and ebullition events over a period of 4.5 months, constraining GPR data with surface deformation measurements and direct CH 4 and CO2 concentration measurements. The effect of atmospheric pressure was also investigated. This study has implications for better understanding global gas dynamics and carbon cycling in peat soils and its role in climate change.

  5. Fuelwood production in rural Minnesota, 1975.

    Treesearch

    James E. Blyth; Steven Wilhelm

    1980-01-01

    Discusses and analyzes fuelwood production in rural Minnesota from roundwood and primary wood-using mill residue. Compares production in 1975 with production in 1960 and 1970. Assesses outlook for future fuelwood production and potential impact on Minnesota's forest industry.

  6. A net volume equation for Northeastern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Gerhard K. Raile

    1980-01-01

    Describes a net volume equation for northeastern Minnesota developed as part of the 1977 Minnesota Forest Inventory. Equation coefficients are presented by species groupings for both cubic foot and board foot volumes for five tree classes.

  7. Minnesota : innovative choices for congestion relief.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-01-01

    Minnesota UPA projects focus on reducing traffic congestion in the I-35W corridor and in downtown Minneapolis. ITS technologies underlie many of the Minnesota UPA projects, including those centered on tolling, real-time traffic and transit informatio...

  8. Guide to Minnesota crash data files

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-08-01

    The Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS), Driver and Vehicle Services (DVS) : division is required by law to be the centralized place for maintaining reports on traffic : crashes that occur in Minnesota. Within ten days of a crash, law enforce...

  9. Denali Park wolf studies: Implications for Yellowstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Meier, Thomas J.; Burch, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf Recovery Plan approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (1987) recommends re-establishment of wolves (Canis lupus) in Yellowstone National Park. Bills proposing wolf re-establishment in the Park have been introduced into the U.S. House and Senate. However, several questions have been raised about the possible effects of wolf re-establishment on other Yellowstone Park fauna, on human use of the Park and on human use of surrounding areas. Thus the proposed wolf re-establishment remains controversial.Information pertinent to some of the above questions is available from a current study of wolf ecology in Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska, which we began in 1986. Although Denali Park differs from Yellowstone in several ways, it is also similar enough in important respects to provide insight into questions raised about wolf re-establishment in Yellowstone.

  10. Park Smart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Parking Garage Automation System (PGAS) is based on a technology developed by a NASA-sponsored project called Robot sensorSkin(TM). Merritt Systems, Inc., of Orlando, Florida, teamed up with NASA to improve robots working with critical flight hardware at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The system, containing smart sensor modules and flexible printed circuit board skin, help robots to steer clear of obstacles using a proximity sensing system. Advancements in the sensor designs are being applied to various commercial applications, including the PGAS. The system includes a smartSensor(TM) network installed around and within public parking garages to autonomously guide motorists to open facilities, and once within, to free parking spaces. The sensors use non-invasive reflective-ultrasonic technology for high accuracy, high reliability, and low maintenance. The system is remotely programmable: it can be tuned to site-specific requirements, has variable range capability, and allows remote configuration, monitoring, and diagnostics. The sensors are immune to interference from metallic construction materials, such as rebar and steel beams. Inside the garage, smart routing signs mounted overhead or on poles in front of each row of parking spots guide the motorist precisely to free spaces.

  11. Minnesota agripower project. Quarterly report, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Baloun, J.

    The Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) propose to build an alfalfa processing plant integrated with an advanced power plant system at the Granite Falls, Minnesota Industrial Park to provide 75 MW of base load electric power and a competitively priced source of value added alfalfa based products. This project will utilize air blown fluidized bed gasification technology to process alfalfa stems and another biomass to produce a hot, clean, low heating value gas that will be used in a gas turbine. Exhaust heat from the gas turbine will be used to generate steam to power a steam turbine and providemore » steam for the processing of the alfalfa leaf into a wide range of products including alfalfa leaf meal, a protein source for livestock. The plant will demonstrate high efficiency and environmentally compatible electric power production, as well as increased economic yield from farm operations in the region. The initial phase of the Minnesota Agripower Project (MAP) will be to perform alfalfa feedstock testing, prepare preliminary designs, and develop detailed plans with estimated costs for project implementation. The second phase of MAP will include detailed engineering, construction, and startup. Full commercial operation will start in 2001.« less

  12. Chemical Dependency Regional Needs Assessment: Northeastern Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Marylee

    The Minnesota Model of Chemical Dependency Treatment, which evolved from a combination of the grassroots Alcoholics Anonymous movement and the State Mental Health Services in the 1960s has made Minnesota an international leader in chemical dependency treatment efforts. Northeastern Minnesota has shared this reputation with the state. In spite of…

  13. 33 CFR 117.663 - Minnesota River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minnesota River. 117.663 Section 117.663 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Minnesota § 117.663 Minnesota River. The draws of...

  14. Student Loan Default Rates in Minnesota, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    While Minnesota undergraduates are more likely to take out student loans, they are substantially less likely than their peers nationally to default on federal student loans. Fifty-four percent of Minnesota undergraduates took out student loans in 2007-2008, compared to 39 percent of undergraduates across the U.S. Minnesota undergraduates were also…

  15. 33 CFR 117.663 - Minnesota River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minnesota River. 117.663 Section 117.663 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Minnesota § 117.663 Minnesota River. The draws of...

  16. Racial Disparity in Minnesota's Child Protection System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Erik P.; Clark, Sonja; Donald, Matthew; Pedersen, Rachel; Pichotta, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Minnesota has been recognized by several studies as a state with a significant amount of racial disparity in its child protection system. This study, using 2001 data from Minnesota's Social Services Information Service, was conducted to determine at which of the six decision points in Minnesota's child welfare system racial disparities are…

  17. 76 FR 41552 - Minnesota Disaster #MN-00031

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12671 and 12672] Minnesota Disaster MN-00031... Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Minnesota dated 07/07/2011. Incident: Severe Storms and... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Hennepin. Contiguous Counties: Minnesota: Anoka...

  18. 33 CFR 117.663 - Minnesota River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minnesota River. 117.663 Section 117.663 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Minnesota § 117.663 Minnesota River. The draws of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.663 - Minnesota River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minnesota River. 117.663 Section 117.663 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Minnesota § 117.663 Minnesota River. The draws of...

  20. 33 CFR 117.663 - Minnesota River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minnesota River. 117.663 Section 117.663 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Minnesota § 117.663 Minnesota River. The draws of...

  1. 75 FR 41245 - Minnesota Disaster #MN-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12226 and 12227] Minnesota Disaster MN-00025... Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Minnesota dated 07/08/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Otter Tail, Wadena. Contiguous Counties: Minnesota...

  2. 75 FR 65389 - Minnesota Disaster # MN-00027

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12351 and 12352] Minnesota Disaster MN-00027... Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Minnesota dated 10/15/2010. Incident: Severe storms and... the disaster: Primary Counties: Martin, Olmsted, Steele, Wabasha. Contiguous Counties: Minnesota: Blue...

  3. Cumulative Student Loan Debt in Minnesota, 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams-Wyche, Shaun

    2016-01-01

    To better understand student debt in Minnesota, the Minnesota Office of Higher Education (the Office) gathers information on cumulative student loan debt from Minnesota degree-granting institutions. These data detail the number of students with loans by institution, the cumulative student loan debt incurred at that institution, and the percentage…

  4. Biological diversity of the Minnesota caddisflies (Insecta, Trichoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The caddisfly fauna of Minnesota contains at least 277 species within 21 families and 75 genera. These species are based on examination of 312,884 specimens from 2,166 collections of 937 Minnesota aquatic habitats from 1890 to 2007. Included in these totals is my own quantitative sampling of 4 representative habitat types: small streams, medium rivers, large rivers, and lakes, from each of the 58 major Minnesota watersheds from June through September during 1999–2001. All species are illustrated herein, and their known Minnesota abundances, distributions, adult flight periodicities, and habitat affinities presented. Four species: Lepidostoma griseum (Lepidostomatidae), Psilotreta indecisa (Odontoceridae), and Phryganea sayi and Ptilostomis angustipennis (Phryganeidae) are added to the known fauna. An additional 31 dubious species records are removed for various reasons. Of the 5 determined caddisfly regions of the state, species richness per watershed was highest in the Lake Superior and Northern Regions, intermediate in the Southeastern, and lowest in the Northwestern and Southern. Of the 48 individual collections that yielded >40 species, all but 1 were from the Northern Region. Many species, especially within the families Limnephilidae and Phryganeidae, have appeared to decrease in distribution and abundance during the past 75 years, particularly those once common within the Northwestern and Southern Regions. Many species now appear regionally extirpated, and a few have disappeared from the entire state. The loss of species in the Northwestern and Southern Regions, and probably elsewhere, is almost certainly related to the conversion of many habitats to large-scale agriculture during the mid-20th century. PMID:22615539

  5. Woody landscape plant breeding in Minnesota (45°N): It's not all about cold hardiness

    Treesearch

    S.C. ​Hokanson; V.M. Whitaker; J.M. Bradeen; M.C. Long; S.K. Krebs; R.A. Blanchette; J. Juzwik; K. Zuzek; S. McNamara

    2010-01-01

    The Woody Landscape Plant Breeding project at the University of Minnesota has been in existence since 1954. The project was initiated largely to develop an extended palette of cold-hardy woody landscape plants for northern landscapes. Since its inception, it has been responsible for the release of 49 woody plant cultivars including large stature shade trees, small...

  6. Rural Teacher Education for the 21st Century: A Minnesota Outreach Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halcrow, John H.

    In 1986 Bemidji State University (BSU), located in rural northern Minnesota, began an outreach distance learning program for the preservice education of elementary teachers. This college program delivers junior and senior year education courses to students 100 miles plus from the main campus. Junior and senior year requirements are completed in a…

  7. Relationships between environmental characteristics and macroinvertebrate communities in seasonal woodland ponds of Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Darold P. Batzer; Brian J. Palik; Richard Buech

    2004-01-01

    We related macroinvertebrate communities and environmental variables in 66 small seasonal woodland ponds of northern Minnesota, USA. These wetlands were relatively pristine, being embedded in 50- to 100-y-old 2nd-growth forests. Macroinvertebrate taxon richness in ponds increased as hydroperiods lengthened, tree canopies opened, water pH declined, and litter input...

  8. The AFIS tree growth model for updating annual forest inventories in Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Margaret R. Holdaway

    2000-01-01

    As the Forest Service moves towards annual inventories, states may use model predictions of growth to update unmeasured plots. A tree growth model (AFIS) based on the scaled Weibull function and using the average-adjusted model form is presented. Annual diameter growth for four species was modeled using undisturbed plots from Minnesota's Aspen-Birch and Northern...

  9. Stream flow and ground water recharge from small forested watersheds in north central Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Dale S. Nichols; Elon S. Verry

    2001-01-01

    In hydrologic studies of forested watersheds, the component of the water balance most likely to be poorly defined or neglected is deep seepage. In the complex glaciated terrain of the northern Lake States, subsurface water movement can be substantial. On the Marcell experimental forest (MEF) in north-central Minnesota, ground water table elevations measured in...

  10. Inventory shows extent of non-native invasive plants in Minnesota forests

    Treesearch

    W. Keith Moser; Mark D. Nelson; Mark H. Hansen

    2009-01-01

    Readers are no doubt aware of the impact that non-native invasive plants (NNIP) present to Minnesota's ecosystems. The U.S. Forest Service's Northern Research Station (NRS) Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program is studying what determines where these plants are found, including forest type, tree density, disturbance, productivity, and topography.

  11. Technology Solutions Case Study: Cold Climate Foundation Wall Hygrothermal Research Facility, Cloquet, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2014-09-01

    This case study describes the University of Minnesota’s Cloquet Residential Research Facility (CRRF) in northern Minnesota, which features more than 2,500 ft2 of below-grade space for building systems foundation hygrothermal research. Here, the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team researches ways to improve the energy efficiency of the building envelope, including wall assemblies, basements, roofs, insulation, and air leakage.

  12. Minnesota's Soils and Their Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsey, Clifton

    There is an increasing need for land planning and understanding soil is one step toward assuring proper land use. This publication, written by soil scientists and teachers, is designed as a reference for high school teachers. It is designed to be a comprehensive collection about Minnesota soils (although the information can be applied to other…

  13. Minnesota: Early Head Start Initiatiive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Minnesota provides supplemental state funding to existing federal Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) grantees to increase their capacity to serve additional infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. The initiative was started in 1997 when the state legislature earmarked $1 million of the general state Head Start supplemental funds for children…

  14. Minnesota's forest resources in 2004

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Gary J. Brand; Manfred E. Mielke

    2006-01-01

    This report presents forest statistics based on the five annual inventory panels measured from 2000 through 2004. Forest area is estimated at 16.2 million acres or 32 percent of the total land area in the State. Important pests in Minnesota forests include the forest tent caterpillar and spruce budworm.

  15. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Eric J

    Energy used by Minnesota single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  16. Freight performance measures : a yardstick for Minnesota's transportation system : recommendations of the Minnesota Freight Advisory Committee

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-11-01

    Performance measures tell public officials and citizens how well services are meeting customer needs. In this report, the Minnesota Freight Advisory Committee recommends performance measures for Minnesota's freight transportation system. MFAC is a gr...

  17. Minnesota's forest resources in 2002

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Gary J. Brand; Manfred E. Mielke

    2003-01-01

    Results of the combined 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 annual forest inventories of Minesota show that 16.3 million acres or 32 percent of the total land area is forested. The estimate of total all live tree volume on forest land is 17.6 billion cubic feet or approximately 1,080 cubic feet per acre. Just over 15.0 million acres of forest land in Minnesota is classified...

  18. 6. View from the Minnesota side, looking northwest at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View from the Minnesota side, looking northwest at the Minnesota portal the bridge - Enloe Bridge No. 90021, Spanning Red River of North between Minnesota & North Dakota on County State Aid Highway 28, Wolverton, Wilkin County, MN

  19. 3. Photocopy of photograph (original print in collection of Minnesota ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph (original print in collection of Minnesota Historical Society) CORNER VIEW, CORNER OF MINNESOTA AND EAST SIXTH STREETS - New York Life Insurance Company Building, Sixth & Minnesota Streets, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  20. A Study of the Traffic Safety at Roundabouts in Minnesota

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-10-30

    The first Minnesota modern roundabout was constructed in 1995. Since then, roundabouts have been built across the state by the Minnesota Department of Transportation, counties, and cities. There is no definitive count across Minnesota, but it is like...

  1. Minnesota School Principals' Perceptions of Minnesota School Counselors' Role and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karch, Lisa Irene Hanson

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the concurrent mixed methods study was to explore Minnesota principals' perceptive responses regarding the role and functions of Minnesota school counselors. A convenience sample of K-12 school principals was used for this study. Participant criteria was that each individual be a school principal in the state of Minnesota. School…

  2. Yellowstone Park

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-15

    Thirteen years after devastating forest fires burned over 1.6 million acres in Yellowstone National Park, the scars are still evident. In this simulated natural color ASTER image, burned areas appear gray, in contrast to the dark green of unburned forests. The image covers an area of 60 x 63 km. This image was acquired on July 2, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03875

  3. Forests of the Northern United States

    Treesearch

    Stephen R. Shifley; Francisco X. Aguilar; Nianfu Song; Susan I. Stewart; David J. Nowak; Dale D. Gormanson; W. Keith Moser; Sherri Wormstead; Eric J. Greenfield

    2012-01-01

    Bounded by Maine, Maryland, Missouri, and Minnesota, the 20 Northern States have a larger population and a higher proportion of forest cover than other comparably sized U.S. regions. Forest-associated issues across the North include insect and disease pests, invasive species, forest management capacity, management standards, biodiversity, forest fragmentation, water...

  4. Bibliography of Minnesota Materials, Revised Edition, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Instruction.

    Approximately 500 citations are provided to help teachers and media personnel identify materials for teaching about Minnesota in elementary and secondary grades. Entries are presented in ten categories: people of Minnesota; history; government and law; industries and commerce; land, plants, and water; wildlife; recreation; arts; fiction; and…

  5. Water use for aquaculture in Minnesota, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trotta, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Little change in the number of licensees since 1980 -indicates that aquaculture is a viable segment of the Minnesota economy. Trout farming has grown from 10 farms in 1978, to 23 in 1984; most use dug ponds sustained by ground-water inflow. Withdrawals for aquaculture are nonconsumptive and are small compared to other water-use categories in Minnesota.

  6. 40 CFR 81.415 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minnesota. 81.415 Section 81.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.415 Minnesota. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land...

  7. 76 FR 35261 - Minnesota Disaster #MN-00032

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12620 and 12621] Minnesota Disaster MN-00032 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota (FEMA- 1990-DR), dated...

  8. 40 CFR 81.324 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minnesota. 81.324 Section 81.324... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.324 Minnesota. Minnesota—SO2 Designated area Does not meet primary standards Does not meet secondary standards Cannot be...

  9. 78 FR 47815 - Minnesota Disaster #MN-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 13683 and 13684] Minnesota Disaster MN-00051 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota (FEMA- 4131-DR), dated...

  10. Choosing a College. Minnesota 2014-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Office of Higher Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Minnesota is home to some of the finest postsecondary institutions in the country. From campuses large to small, urban to rural, close to home or far away, the state's public and private colleges and universities offer a broad spectrum of surprising educational opportunities and experiences. This guide can help students explore Minnesota College…

  11. 40 CFR 81.415 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minnesota. 81.415 Section 81.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.415 Minnesota. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land...

  12. 40 CFR 81.415 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minnesota. 81.415 Section 81.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.415 Minnesota. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land...

  13. 75 FR 39994 - Minnesota Disaster #MN-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12224 and 12225] Minnesota Disaster MN-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota (FEMA- 1921-DR), dated...

  14. 40 CFR 81.324 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minnesota. 81.324 Section 81.324... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.324 Minnesota. Minnesota—1971 Sulfur Dioxide NAAQS (Primary and Secondary) Designated area Does not meet primary standards...

  15. 77 FR 47908 - MINNESOTA Disaster #MN-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 13166 and 13167] MINNESOTA Disaster MN-00038 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of MINNESOTA (FEMA- 4069-DR), dated...

  16. 40 CFR 81.415 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minnesota. 81.415 Section 81.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.415 Minnesota. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land...

  17. 40 CFR 81.324 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minnesota. 81.324 Section 81.324... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.324 Minnesota. Minnesota—SO2 Designated area Does not meet primary standards Does not meet secondary standards Cannot be...

  18. 40 CFR 81.415 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minnesota. 81.415 Section 81.415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.415 Minnesota. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land...

  19. A Profile of Minnesota Technical College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Capital Research Corp., Chicago, IL.

    A 3-year longitudinal survey of more than 8,000 Minnesota technical college students drawn from 34 campuses across the state was commissioned by the chancellor of the Minnesota State Board of Technical Colleges. The survey, begun in July 1992 and conducted in multiple waves, achieved response rates of 65% to 70% from younger students and their…

  20. 77 FR 51101 - Minnesota Disaster #MN-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 13219 and 13220] Minnesota Disaster MN-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Minnesota dated 08/16/2012. Incident: Severe storms and...

  1. Cultural Symbolism behind the Architectural Design of Mounds Park All-Nations Magnet School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pewewardy, Cornell; May, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    The architectural design of Mounds Park All-Nations Magnet School (St. Paul, Minnesota) incorporates cultural symbols representing the Native American worldview and Medicine Wheel Circle beliefs, as well as design elements from aboriginal housing styles, and colors and sculptured elements that reinforce the relationship of nature to building. (SV)

  2. CANCER MORTALITY IN FOUR NORTHERN WHEAT PRODUCING STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorophenoxy herbicides are used both in cereal grain agriculture and in nonagricultural settings such as right-of-ways, lawns, and parks. Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana grow most of the spring and durum wheat produced in the United States. More than 90% of s...

  3. Suspended-sediment concentrations, bedload, particle sizes, surrogate measurements, and annual sediment loads for selected sites in the lower Minnesota River Basin, water years 2011 through 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groten, Joel T.; Ellison, Christopher A.; Hendrickson, Jon S.

    2016-12-20

    the range for stream gradients from greatest to smallest. Bedload ranged from 3 to 20 percent of the total load at the Le Sueur River, Minnesota River at Mankato, and High Island Creek and was less than 1 percent of the total load at the Minnesota River near Jordan and at Fort Snelling State Park. The reach of the Minnesota River between Mankato and Jordan is a major source of sediment, with the sediment yield at Jordan being two and a half times greater than at Mankato. Between Jordan and Fort Snelling, the sediment yield decreases substantially, which indicates that the Minnesota River in this reach is a sink for sediment. Surrogate measurements (acoustic backscatter) collected with suspended-sediment concentration data from water years 2012 through 2016 from the Minnesota River at Fort Snelling State Park indicated strong relations between the acoustic backscatter and suspended-sediment concentrations. These results point to the dynamic nature of sediment aggradation, degradation, and transport in the Minnesota River Basin. The analyses described in this report will improve the understanding of sediment-transport relations and sediment budgets in the Minnesota River Basin.

  4. Yosemite National Park

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Naked summits alternate with forested lowlands in Yosemite Valley, part of California’s Yosemite National Park. During the Pleistocene Ice Age, glaciers sculpted the underlying rocks in this region, leaving behind canyons, waterfalls, rugged peaks, and granite domes. As the ice retreated, forests grew, but forests only extend as high as 2,900 meters (9,500 feet) above sea level. Above the tree line are rocky landscapes with sparse alpine vegetation. So from the sky, Yosemite Valley appears as a light-and-dark patchwork of forest, rock, and shadow. The Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus on NASA’s Landsat 7 satellite captured this true-color image of part of Yosemite Valley on August 18, 2001. The valley runs roughly east-west, and tall granite peaks lining the valley’s southern side cast long shadows across the valley floor. On the valley’s northern side, steep slopes appear almost white. Along the valley floor, roadways form narrow, meandering lines of off-white, past parking lots, buildings, and meadows. On the north side of Yosemite Valley is El Capitan. Shooting straight up more than 915 meters (3,000 feet) above the valley floor, El Capitan is considered the largest granite monolith in the world. This granite monolith sits across the valley from Bridalveil Fall, one of the valley’s most prominent waterfalls. Read more: go.nasa.gov/2bzGo3d Credit: NASA/Landsat7 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. The quandary of local people—Park relations in Nepal's Royal Chitwan National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepal, Sanjay K.; Weber, Karl E.

    1995-11-01

    This paper analyzes five major causes of park-people conflicts that have occurred in Nepal's Royal Chitwan National Park. The causes include illegal transactions of forest products from the park, livestock grazing in the park, illegal hunting and fishing, crop damage, and threats to human and animal life caused by wild animals from the park. The conflicts indicate a reciprocal relationship between the park and local people. They reflect the attitudes of local people and representatives of the park authority whose priorities and objectives largely diverge. The results show that people settled adjacent to the park are heavily dependent on its resources. Even in places where some, albeit few alternative sources exist, local people continue to trespass the park boundary as these sources are inadequate to ensure the fulfillment of local people's resource needs. Illegal transactions of resources continue throughout the year; however, they are less intense during summer due to flooding caused by the Rapti River, which forms the park boundary towards the northern section where this study is conducted. The frequency of local people's visits to the park is mainly determined by their age, distance between homesteads and park, and volume of crop loss caused by wild animals. Crop damage is the function of size of landholding, distance, and frequency of crop raid. Local people claim that they have no intention of letting their livestock graze in the park; however, the dense vegetation of the park attracts livestock grazing on riverbanks just outside the open park boundary. Many head of livestock are killed by carnivores of the park. Human casualties are mainly caused by sloth bear ( Melursus ursinus), tiger ( Panthera tigris), wild pig ( Sug scrofa), and rhinoceros ( Rhinoceros unicornis). There had been some earlier attempts to reconcile the conflicts by offering local people different kinds of compensations; however, these were unsuccessful measures. An integrated approach is

  6. Process Assessment: Minnesota Reading Corps PreK Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaconis, Athena; Estrera, Elc; Hafford, Carol; Hernandez, Marc; Markovitz, Carrie; Muyskens, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Minnesota Reading Corps is the largest AmeriCorps State program in the country. Its mission is to help every Minnesota child become a proficient reader by the end of third grade. To meet this goal, the Minnesota Reading Corps and its host organization, ServeMinnesota Action Network, engages a diverse group of AmeriCorps members to provide…

  7. Outcome Evaluation: Minnesota Reading Corps PreK Program. Appendices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markovitz, Carrie E.; Hernandez, Marc W.; Hedberg, Eric C.; Silberglitt, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Minnesota Reading Corps is the largest AmeriCorps State program in the country. Its mission is to help every Minnesota child become a proficient reader by the end of third grade. To meet this goal, the Minnesota Reading Corps and its host organization, ServeMinnesota Action Network, engages a diverse group of AmeriCorps members to provide…

  8. Minnesota Kids: A Closer Look. 1997 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kids Count Minnesota, Minneapolis.

    This 1997 Minnesota Kids Count report examines child poverty and changing demographics in the state of Minnesota, and focuses on nine risk indicators for the years 1991 through 1995 in Minnesota's 87 counties. Following a discussion of myths and truths about poverty in Minnesota and a look at demographic changes in the state from 1990 to 1995,…

  9. Lidar quantification of bank erosion in Blue Earth County, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Kessler, A C; Gupta, S C; Dolliver, H A S; Thoma, D P

    2012-01-01

    Sediment and phosphorus (P) transport from the Minnesota River Basin to Lake Pepin on the upper Mississippi River has garnered much attention in recent years. However, there is lack of data on the extent of sediment and P contributions from riverbanks vis-à-vis uplands and ravines. Using two light detection and ranging (lidar) data sets taken in 2005 and 2009, a study was undertaken to quantify sediment and associated P losses from riverbanks in Blue Earth County, Minnesota. Volume change in river valleys as a result of bank erosion amounted to 1.71 million m over 4 yr. Volume change closely followed the trend: the Blue Earth River > the Minnesota River at the county's northern edge > the Le Sueur River > the Maple River > the Watonwan River > the Big Cobb River > Perch Creek > Little Cobb River. Using fine sediment content (silt + clay) and bulk density of 37 bank samples representing three parent materials, we estimate bank erosion contributions of 48 to 79% of the measured total suspended solids at the mouth of the Blue Earth and the Le Sueur rivers. Corresponding soluble P and total P contributions ranged from 0.13 to 0.20% and 40 to 49%, respectively. Although tall banks (>3 m high) accounted for 33% of the total length and 63% of the total area, they accounted for 75% of the volume change in river valleys. We conclude that multitemporal lidar data sets are useful in estimating bank erosion and associated P contributions over large scales, and for riverbanks that are not readily accessible for conventional surveying equipment. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Pertussis outbreak, southeastern Minnesota, 2012.

    PubMed

    Theofiles, Alexander G; Cunningham, Scott A; Chia, Nicholas; Jeraldo, Patricio R; Quest, Daniel J; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin

    2014-10-01

    To describe clinical and laboratory findings from the 2012 southeastern Minnesota pertussis outbreak. Patients were selected for 2 parts of the study. In the first part, nasopharyngeal swabs from a convenience sample of 265 unique patients were used for both the clinician-requested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and culture. B pertussis isolates were tested for macrolide susceptibility and typed using whole genome sequencing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Pertactin gene sequences were analyzed to identify pertactin-deficient B pertussis. In the second part, all patients seen at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who had PCR results positive for Bordetella pertussis or Bordetella parapertussis between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2012, were analyzed for patient demographic features and vaccination records. One hundred sixty patients had results positive for B pertussis, and 21 patients had results positive for B parapertussis. Among the 265 swabs cultured, B pertussis was detected by both culture and PCR in 11. One swab was positive for B pertussis by culture alone, and 13 were positive by PCR alone. Polymerase chain reaction detected B pertussis more frequently than did culture (P=.001). No macrolide resistance was detected. All 12 isolates tested had an altered pertactin gene, including 9 with a signal sequence deletion, 2 with insertion sequence disruptions, and 1 with a premature stop codon. Nine and 3 isolates were pertactin types prn1 and prn2, respectively. Whole genome sequencing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis detected the presence of multiple B pertussis strains. The mean age of patients with pertussis was younger than that of those without pertussis (15.6 and 25.5 years, respectively; P=.002). Compared with those whose test results were negative for B pertussis, fewer patients with positive results had received whole-cell pertussis vaccine (P=.02). In the subgroup who had received acellular vaccine exclusively, the time since the

  11. Bark in the Park: A Review of Domestic Dogs in Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Michael A.; Fitzsimons, James A.; Wescott, Geoffrey; Miller, Kelly K.; Ekanayake, Kasun B.; Schneider, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The presence of domestic dogs Canis familiaris in public open spaces is increasingly controversial. In our review of the literature, we located 133 publications of various types (papers, reports etc.) that examine some aspect of dogs in parks and open spaces (50 % focussed solely on dogs). There has been an exponential growth in the cumulative number of articles ( R 2 = 0.96; 82 % published since 1997); almost all pertain to temperate latitudes (97 %) and most to the northern hemisphere (62 %). Most articles focus on impacts on wildlife (51 %), zoonotic diseases (17 %), and people's perceptions regarding dogs (12 %). Articles mostly describe problems associated with dogs, while reports of low compliance with dog regulations are common. We outline six major findings regarding dogs in parks: (1) there is a paucity of information on dogs in parks, particularly in relation to their interactions with wildlife and regarding their management; (2) published studies are mainly restricted to a handful of locations in developed countries; (3) sectors of societies hold different views over the desirability of dogs in parks; (4) the benefits and risks of dogs to humans and park values are poorly documented and known; (5) dogs represent a notable disease risk in some but not all countries; and (6) coastal parks are over-represented in the literature in terms of potential negative impacts. Park managers globally require better information to achieve conservation outcomes from dog management in parks.

  12. Bark in the park: a review of domestic dogs in parks.

    PubMed

    Weston, Michael A; Fitzsimons, James A; Wescott, Geoffrey; Miller, Kelly K; Ekanayake, Kasun B; Schneider, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The presence of domestic dogs Canis familiaris in public open spaces is increasingly controversial. In our review of the literature, we located 133 publications of various types (papers, reports etc.) that examine some aspect of dogs in parks and open spaces (50 % focussed solely on dogs). There has been an exponential growth in the cumulative number of articles (R (2) = 0.96; 82 % published since 1997); almost all pertain to temperate latitudes (97 %) and most to the northern hemisphere (62 %). Most articles focus on impacts on wildlife (51 %), zoonotic diseases (17 %), and people's perceptions regarding dogs (12 %). Articles mostly describe problems associated with dogs, while reports of low compliance with dog regulations are common. We outline six major findings regarding dogs in parks: (1) there is a paucity of information on dogs in parks, particularly in relation to their interactions with wildlife and regarding their management; (2) published studies are mainly restricted to a handful of locations in developed countries; (3) sectors of societies hold different views over the desirability of dogs in parks; (4) the benefits and risks of dogs to humans and park values are poorly documented and known; (5) dogs represent a notable disease risk in some but not all countries; and (6) coastal parks are over-represented in the literature in terms of potential negative impacts. Park managers globally require better information to achieve conservation outcomes from dog management in parks.

  13. Regional Surface Waves from Mesabi Range Mine Blasts (Northern Minnesota)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-29

    rocks within the Archean basement which underlies the Animikie basin near the source areas. The final analysis was two dimensional raytracing which...overlying the Archean basement. Overlying the Pokegama Quartzite is the Biwabik Iron Formation and the Virginia Formation (Morey, 1983, Southwick and others...composed of intercalated mudstone and siltstone turbidite deposits which thicken and coarsen progressively from north to south across the basin (Morey and

  14. ESTIMATION OF UV RADIATION DOSE IN NORTHERN MINNESOTA WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultraviolet (UV) B wavelength range (280 nm to 320 nm) of solar radiation can be a significant biological stressor, and has been hypothesized to be partially responsible for amphibian declines and malformation. This hypothesis has been difficult to evaluate, in part, because ...

  15. Estimating red pine site index in northern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    1976-01-01

    Methods are presented for estimating red pine site index from the height growth of red pine, site index of several associated species (jack pine, white pine, white spruce, or quaking aspen), and from easily measured soil properties. The restrictions and limitations of each method and their relative precision are discussed.

  16. Proceedings of the first biennial conference of research in Colorado Plateau National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowlands, Peter G.; van Riper, Charles; Sogge, Mark K.

    1993-01-01

    The 19 papers in this volume were selected from the 46 presentations given at the First Biennial Conference on Research in Colorado Plateau National Parks. The overall theme for this meeting was research, inventory, and monitoring in National Park Service units on the Colorado Plateau. The conference, held in Flagstaff Arizona, on 22-25 July 1991, was sponsored by the National Park Service Cooperative Park Studies Unit, Northern Arizona University, and the Petrified Forest, Zion, and Grand Canyon natural history associations.

  17. Monitoring adolescent gambling in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Winters, K C; Stinchfield, R D; Kim, L G

    1995-06-01

    Youth gambling was investigated in a prospective sample of 532 Minnesota adolescents and young adults. Of particular interest was the possible impact among the study sample of a recent state lottery and of reaching the legal age for gambling on changes in the rate and type of gambling. Overall rates of gambling involvement and pathological gambling did not change across the 1.5 year interval. However, a preference for certain types of gambling activities (e.g., lottery, casino machines) significantly increased, whereas more informal and unregulated games (e.g., betting on games of personal skill) significantly decreased. Also, access to gambling activities by underage youths was high, suggesting the need for tighter controls of legalized games and greater awareness of this problem by the gaming industry and public health officials.

  18. Minnesota wood energy scale-up project 1994 establishment cost data

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, M.; Pierce, R.; Kroll, T.

    1996-03-18

    The Minnesota Wood Energy Scale-up Project began in late 1993 with the first trees planted in the spring of 1994. The purpose of the project is to track and monitor economic costs of planting, maintaining and monitoring larger scale commercial plantings. For 15 years, smaller scale research plantings of hybrid poplar have been used to screen for promising, high-yielding poplar clones. In this project 1000 acres of hybrid poplar trees were planted on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land near Alexandria, Minnesota in 1994. The fourteen landowners involved re-contracted with the CRP for five-year extensions of their existing 10-year contracts. Thesemore » extended contracts will expire in 2001, when the plantings are 7 years old. The end use for the trees planted in the Minnesota Wood Energy Scale-up Project is undetermined. They will belong to the owner of the land on which they are planted. There are no current contracts in place for the wood these trees are projected to supply. The structure of the wood industry in the Minnesota has changed drastically over the past 5 years. Stumpage values for fiber have risen to more than $20 per cord in some areas raising the possibility that these trees could be used for fiber rather than energy. Several legislative mandates have forced the State of Minnesota to pursue renewable energy including biomass energy. These mandates, a potential need for an additional 1700 MW of power by 2008 by Northern States Power, and agricultural policies will all affect development of energy markets for wood produced much like agricultural crops. There has been a tremendous amount of local and international interest in the project. Contractual negotiations between area landowners, the CRP, a local Resource Conservation and Development District, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and others are currently underway for additional planting of 1000 acres in spring 1995.« less

  19. Biomass in conifer plantations of northeastern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Lewis F. Ohmann

    1984-01-01

    Provides biomass (pounds/acre) estimates for vegetative strata and herb-low shrub species for 53 conifer plantations in Northeastern Minnesota. The estimates are analyzed by plantation age and silvicultural practices used to establish and release the plantations.

  20. Minnesota Transportation Agency Wants And Needs

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-04-24

    MINNESOTA IS A RECOGNIZED LEADER IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS (ITS). SIGNIFICANT RESEARCH HAS BEEN CONDUCTED TO UNDERSTAND THE NEED FOR ITS, ITS BENEFIT TO THE TRAVELING PUBLIC AND PUBLIC AGENCIES, AND THE ...

  1. Minnesota's Tech Prep Outcome Evaluation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James M.; Pucel, David; Twohig, Cathy; Semler, Steve; Kuchinke, K. Peter

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Minnesota Tech Prep Consortia Evaluation System, which collects outcomes data on enrollment, retention, related job placement, higher education, dropouts, and diplomas/degrees awarded. Explains outcome measures, database development, data collection and analysis methods, and remaining challenges. (SK)

  2. The fourth Minnesota forest inventory: area.

    Treesearch

    Pamela J. Jakes

    1980-01-01

    In 1977 the fourth Minnesota Forest Inventory found 13.7 million acres of commercial forest land, down 11% from that reported in 1962. This bulletin analyzes finding from the inventory and presents detailed tables of forest area.

  3. Parks In Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Sally-Jo

    1998-01-01

    More than 50 National Park Service (NPS) sites interpret Native cultures or early Native contact with Europeans. In about 30 of those, American Indians, Alaska Natives, or Native Hawaiians, in partnership with the NPS, present their own heritage and issues. Describes Native-run aspects of Sitka National Historical Park, Glacier National Park, and…

  4. Interview with Steve Parks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Jennifer Hitchcock interviews community activist and director of Syracuse University's Composition and Cultural Rhetoric doctoral program, Steve Parks. They discuss Parks's working-class background, career path, influences, and activism. Parks also considers the direction of the field of composition and rhetoric and expresses optimism for the…

  5. Minnesota Education Yearbook, 2000: The Status of Pre-K-12 Education in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Coll. of Education and Human Development.

    The Office of Educational Accountability has compiled and analyzed indicators of progress in developing a statewide accountability system in Minnesota. This report focuses on the state as a whole, not on specific schools or districts. Chapter 1 is an introduction to Minnesota's accountability history and current concerns. Chapter 2 examines…

  6. Minnesota Computer Aided Library System (MCALS); University of Minnesota Subsystem Cost/Benefits Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lourey, Eugene D., Comp.

    The Minnesota Computer Aided Library System (MCALS) provides a basis of unification for library service program development in Minnesota for eventual linkage to the national information network. A prototype plan for communications functions is illustrated. A cost/benefits analysis was made to show the cost/effectiveness potential for MCALS. System…

  7. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : content analysis test plan.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-11-17

    This report presents the content analysis test plan for the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The Minnesota UPA projects focus on reducing congestion by employing ...

  8. 5. View from Minnesota bank, near southern side of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View from Minnesota bank, near southern side of the southeast portal looking north - Enloe Bridge No. 90021, Spanning Red River of North between Minnesota & North Dakota on County State Aid Highway 28, Wolverton, Wilkin County, MN

  9. 79. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, ca. 1890, #741.) ALEXANDER RAMSEY HOUSE, ca. 1890 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  10. 77. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1859. #377. Photographer: Illingworth.) LOWER LEVEE FROM JACKSON STREET, 1859 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  11. 76. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1860. #22358.) UPPER LEVEE FROM CHESTNUT STREET, 1860 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  12. 7. Detail of Minnesota (southeast) portal of bridge, from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail of Minnesota (southeast) portal of bridge, from the southeast - Enloe Bridge No. 90021, Spanning Red River of North between Minnesota & North Dakota on County State Aid Highway 28, Wolverton, Wilkin County, MN

  13. 74. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1896. #35105.) FIRST ROBERT STREET BRIDGE, ca. 1896 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  14. 10. Detail of deck underside, from the Minnesota bank, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail of deck underside, from the Minnesota bank, looking northwest - Enloe Bridge No. 90021, Spanning Red River of North between Minnesota & North Dakota on County State Aid Highway 28, Wolverton, Wilkin County, MN

  15. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : safety data test plan.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-11-17

    This report provides the safety data test plan for the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The Minnesota UPA projects focus on reducing congestion by employing strat...

  16. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : telecommuting test plan.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-11-17

    This report presents the telecommuting test plan for the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The Minnesota UPA projects focus on reducing congestion by employing str...

  17. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : exogenous factors test plan.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-11-17

    This report presents the exogenous factors test plan for the national evaluation of the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The Minnesota UPA projects focus on reduc...

  18. Minnesota urban partnership agreement national evaluation : tolling test plan.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-11-17

    This report presents the test plan for collecting and analyzing toll data for the Minnesota Urban Partnership Agreement (UPA) under the United States Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) UPA Program. The Minnesota UPA projects focus on reducing co...

  19. Pleural abnormalities and exposure to elongate mineral particles in Minnesota iron ore (taconite) workers.

    PubMed

    Perlman, David; Mandel, Jeffrey H; Odo, Nnaemeka; Ryan, Andy; Lambert, Christine; MacLehose, Richard F; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Alexander, Bruce H

    2018-05-01

    Iron ore (taconite) mining and processing are an important industry in northern Minnesota and western Michigan. Concerns around exposures have centered largely on exposure to non-asbestiform amphibole elongate mineral particles (EMPs) found in the eastern portion of the Minnesota iron range. A cross sectional survey was undertaken of current and former taconite workers and spouses along with a detailed exposure assessment. Participants provided an occupational history and had a chest radiograph performed. A total of 1188 workers participated. Potential exposures to non-amphibole EMPs were evident across multiple jobs in all active mines. Pleural abnormalities were found in 16.8% of workers. There was an association of pleural abnormalities with cumulative EMP exposure that was not specific to the eastern portion of the range. There was evidence of a mild to moderate increase in pleural abnormalities in this population of miners, associated with geographically non-specific cumulative EMP exposure. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Minnesota Measures: 2007 Report on Higher Education Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Office of Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, Governor Tim Pawlenty and the Minnesota Legislature charged the Minnesota Office of Higher Education with developing an accountability system to measure the higher education sector's effectiveness in meeting state goals. Minnesota's leaders recognized that the knowledge, creativity and intellectual capacity of the state's people are the…

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota School District Finds Cost

    Science.gov Websites

    Savings, Cold-Weather Reliability with Propane Buses Minnesota School District Finds Cost Center: Minnesota School District Finds Cost Savings, Cold-Weather Reliability with Propane Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota School District Finds Cost Savings, Cold

  2. 40 CFR 282.73 - Minnesota State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.73 Minnesota State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Minnesota's underground storage tank program is approved in... chapter. EPA approved the Minnesota underground storage tank program on November 30, 2001, and approval...

  3. 40 CFR 282.73 - Minnesota State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.73 Minnesota State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Minnesota's underground storage tank program is approved in... chapter. EPA approved the Minnesota underground storage tank program on November 30, 2001, and approval...

  4. 40 CFR 282.73 - Minnesota State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.73 Minnesota State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Minnesota's underground storage tank program is approved in... chapter. EPA approved the Minnesota underground storage tank program on November 30, 2001, and approval...

  5. 40 CFR 282.73 - Minnesota State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.73 Minnesota State-Administered Program. (a) The State of Minnesota's underground storage tank program is approved in... chapter. EPA approved the Minnesota underground storage tank program on November 30, 2001, and approval...

  6. 77 FR 46103 - Minnesota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    .... FEMA-4069-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2012-0002] Minnesota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Minnesota (FEMA-4069-DR), dated July 6, 2012, and related... determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Minnesota resulting from severe storms and...

  7. 75 FR 65696 - Minnesota Disaster Number MN-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12349 and 12350] Minnesota Disaster Number MN... the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota... the State of Minnesota, dated 10/13/2010, is hereby amended to include the following areas as...

  8. 75 FR 45680 - Minnesota Disaster Number MN-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12224 and 12225] Minnesota Disaster Number MN... the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Minnesota, dated 07/02/2010, is hereby amended to include the...

  9. 76 FR 32388 - Minnesota Disaster Number MN-00030

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12588 and 12589] Minnesota Disaster Number MN... the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota... MINNESOTA, dated 05/10/2011, is hereby amended to include the following areas as adversely affected by the...

  10. 75 FR 65695 - Minnesota Disaster Number MN-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12349 and 12350] Minnesota Disaster Number MN... the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota... the State of MINNESOTA, dated 10/13/2010, is hereby amended to establish the incident period for this...

  11. 76 FR 44348 - Minnesota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    .... FEMA-1990-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Minnesota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Minnesota (FEMA-1990-DR), dated June 7, 2011, and... have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Minnesota resulting from severe storms...

  12. Educating for the Future: Baseline Estimates of Minnesota's Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fergus, Meredith; Williams-Wyche, Shaun; Brower, Susan; Egbert, Andi

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the Minnesota Legislature enacted legislation setting a target that 70 percent of Minnesota adults age 25 to 44 will have attained a postsecondary certificate or degree by 2025, both for the general population and by racial/ethnic subgroups. This report fulfills the mandated reporting pursuant to Minnesota's educational attainment goal,…

  13. 76 FR 53141 - Minnesota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    .... FEMA-4009-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2011-0001] Minnesota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Minnesota (FEMA-4009-DR), dated July 28, 2011, and related... determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Minnesota resulting from severe storms, flooding...

  14. 76 FR 33395 - Minnesota Disaster Number MN-00030

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12588 and 12589] Minnesota Disaster Number MN... the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota... the State of Minnesota, dated 05/10/2011, is hereby amended to establish the incident period for this...

  15. 75 FR 39959 - Minnesota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    .... FEMA-1921-DR; Docket ID FEMA-2010-0002] Minnesota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Minnesota (FEMA-1921-DR), dated July 2, 2010, and related... that the damage in certain areas of the State of Minnesota resulting from severe storms, tornadoes, and...

  16. 76 FR 8723 - Minnesota Energy Resources Corporation; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. CP11-75-000] Minnesota Energy Resources Corporation; Notice of Application Take notice that on February 1, 2011, Minnesota.... MERC proposes to take service from NorthWestern Energy near the South Dakota/Minnesota border, and...

  17. Recommended Best Practices for Mold Investigations in Minnesota Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, St. Paul.

    The Minnesota Department of Health developed this guidance at the request of the Minnesota Department of Children, Families and Learning. The goal of the document is to assist school district staff of Minnesota public schools in responding to problems related to indoor mold. Its focus is on practical, cost-effective methods to identify indoor mold…

  18. Forestry Best Management Practices for Wetlands in Minnesota

    Treesearch

    Michael J. Phillips

    1997-01-01

    Wetlands are a common landscape feature in Minnesota in spite of significant losses of wetlands to agriculture and development. Prior to European settlement, Minnesota contained 7.5 million ha of wetlands, including both wet, mineral and peat soils. These wetlands covered approximately 35 percent of the state. The current extent of wetlands for Minnesota is...

  19. Parks, Recreation and Public Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Ching-Hua; Payne, Laura; Orsega-Smith, Elizabeth; Godbey, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Reviews what current research says about the holistic health benefits of park and recreation services, focusing on: health benefits according to park users; physical activities in parks; stress reduction benefits of park use; social support, self-determination, and stress reduction; observing nature in parks and associated benefits; and the…

  20. 1. PARKING LOT BEFORE SOUTH ENTRANCE STATION, FACING N. PARK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PARKING LOT BEFORE SOUTH ENTRANCE STATION, FACING N. PARK ENTRANCE SIGN IS IN TREES IN CENTER. - South Entrance Road, Between South park boundary & Village Loop Road, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Custom Homes, St.Paul, Minnesota; DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    For this project Amaris worked with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team, NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, to approach zero energy in Minnesota's cold climate using reasonable, cost-effective, and replicable construction materials and practices. The result is a passive solar, super-efficient 3542-ft2 walkout rambler with all the creature comforts.

  2. Canopy treatment influences growth of replacement tree species in Fraxinus nigra forests threatened by the emerald ash borer in Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Christopher E. Looney; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Robert A. Slesak

    2017-01-01

    Fraxinus nigra Marsh. (black ash), a dominant tree species of wetland forests in northern Minnesota, USA, is imperiled by the invasive insect emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, 1888). Regeneration of associated tree species is generally low in F. nigra forests and could be impacted...

  3. Overstory treatment and planting season affect survival of replacement tree species in emerald ash borer threatened Fraxinus nigra forests in Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Christopher E. Looney; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Robert A. Slesak

    2015-01-01

    Fraxinus nigra Marsh. (black ash) wetland forests in northern Minnesota, USA, are threatened by the invasive insect, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (EAB)). A potential management option is promoting regeneration of tree species that are not EAB hosts to maintain ecosystem functions. Using an operational-scale...

  4. Northern Forest Futures reporting tools and database guide

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Robert J. Huggett; W. Keith Moser

    2015-01-01

    The Northern Forest Futures database (NFFDB) supports the reporting of both current and projected future forest conditions for the 20 states that make up the U.S. North, an area bounded by Maine, Maryland, Missouri, and Minnesota. The NFFDB database and attendant reporting tools are available to the public as a Microsoft AccessTM database. The...

  5. Methane emission from Minnesota peatlands: Spatial and seasonal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dise, Nancy. B.

    1993-03-01

    The variability of methane flux with season, year, and habitat type was investigated in northern Minnesota peatlands from September 1988 through September 1990. Average daily fluxes calculated by integration of annual data for an open poor fen, an open bog, a forested bog hollow, a fen lagg in the forested bog and a forested bog hummock were 180,118, 38, 35, and 10 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, respectively. Fluxes among the five ecosystems were significantly different from one another, although emission from all sites was highest in July and lowest in March. Winter fluxes occurred in all sites but the fen lagg. There was no difference in fluxes measured from the same sites in the spring of 1986, 1989, or 1990, but summer fluxes were significantly higher in the wetter year of 1989 than in 1990, and a summer pulse in methane emission occurred in 1989 that was not seen the next year. Concentrations of methane in pore water, reflecting the seasonal balance of production, oxidation, and release, declined during the month of peak flux, then increased to levels of about 500 μM in December. Consistent spatial and temporal differences in flux could be ascribed to differences in water table, temperature, and peat nutrient status, although additional variability remained. Integration gave an annual average flux of 20 g CH4, m-2 ot; for the three bog ecosystems and 39 g CH4, m-2 for the two fen ecosystems. This gives an estimate of 1-2 Tg CH4, yr-1 from peatlands in the Great Lake states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan.

  6. Highland Park, Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Allen; Broderick, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    This article features the "Barber School of the Gifted and Talented" in Highland Park, Michigan. The school is located in a tiny 2.96 square-mile, economically challenged city--very challenged--completely surrounded by Detroit's 143 square miles and its almost one million people. It is one of five schools in Highland Park--one preK-5 and…

  7. THE SCHOOL PARK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FISCHER, JOHN H.

    TO ASSIST IN DESEGREGATION, VARIOUS MODELS FOR THE SCHOOL PARK ARE PROPOSED--(1) ASSEMBLING ALL STUDENTS AND SCHOOLS OF A SMALL OR MEDIUM-SIZED COMMUNITY ON A SINGLE CAMPUS, (2) SERVING ONE SECTION OF A LARGE CITY, (3) CENTERING ALL SCHOOL FACILITIES FOR A SINGLE LEVEL OF EDUCATION ON A SINGLE SITE, AND (4) ESTABLISHING RINGS OF SCHOOL PARKS ABOUT…

  8. Urban park tree inventories

    Treesearch

    Joe R. McBride; David J. Nowak

    1989-01-01

    A survey of published reports on urban park tree inventories in the United States and the United Kingdom reveal two types of inventories: (1) Tree Location Inventories and (2) Generalized Information Inventories. Tree location inventories permit managers to relocate specific park trees, along with providing individual tree characteristics and condition data. In...

  9. Splendor In The Parks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Anthony Wayne

    1979-01-01

    Civilization is more and more intruding on the esthetic and recreational resources of the National Park System. Increased attention must be paid to controlling noise, pollution, and even the effects of urban lighting which detract from the enjoyment of the parks. (RE)

  10. Future Trends in Park Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, William O.; Murrell, Dan S.

    1986-01-01

    The roles of ranger and park police in America's parks have shifted from visitor protection and resources management to visitor management and resources protection. Eight issues facing park police are discussed. (MT)

  11. Minnesota wolf ear lengths as possible indicators of taxonomic differences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David

    2011-01-01

    Genetic findings suggest that 2 types of wolves, Canis lupus (Gray Wolf) and C. lycaon (Eastern Wolf), and/or their hybrids occupy Minnesota (MN), and this study examines adult wolf ear lengths as a possible distinguisher between these two. Photographic evidence suggested that the Eastern Wolf possesses proportionately longer ears than Gray Wolves. Ear lengths from 22 northwestern MN wolves from the early 1970s and 22 Alaskan wolves were used to represent Gray Wolves, and the greatest length of the sample (12.8 cm) was used as the least length to demarcate Eastern Wolf from Gray Wolf influence in the samples. Twenty-three percent of 112 adult wolves from Algonquin Park in eastern Ontario and 30% of 106 recent adult wolves in northeastern MN possessed ears >12.8 cm. The northeastern MN sample differed significantly from that of current and past northwestern MN wolves. Ear-lengths of wolves in the eastern half of the northeastern MN wolf population were significantly longer than those in the western half of that study area, even though the mean distance between the 2 areas was only 40 km, and the mean length of my 2004–2009 sample was significantly longer than that of 1999–2003. These findings support the hypothesis that Eastern Wolves tend to possess longer ears than do Gray Wolves and suggest a dynamic hybridization process is still underway in MN.

  12. Interactions of wolves and dogs in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritts, S.H.; Paul, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    This article reports on the nature and extent of wolf-dog interactions in Minnesota, based on investigations of complaints received by personnel of the federal government dealing with wolf-depredation control. Findings may indicate the wolf-dog interactions that can be expected in other recovery areas.

  13. Minnesota's aspen and its projected supply

    Treesearch

    Richard W. Groff

    1966-01-01

    Aspen, Minnesota's largest forest type, covers nearly one-third of the commercial forest land in the State. Its major components are bigtooth aspen, P. tremuloides, both fast-growing, generally short-lived, aggressive pioneer species that readily become established in burns and clear cuttings. They cannot be "stored on the stump," as they become...

  14. Minnesota Indian Education Hearings Report, November 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ramona

    Summarizing the analyses of testimonies presented before the Minnesota Subcommittee on Indian Education by both Indians and nonIndians concerned and/or involved with national, state, or local Indian education, this report focuses on findings at the statewide and individual site levels (Minneapolis, St. Paul, Red Wing, Cass Lake, Duluth, White…

  15. Timber resource of Minnesota's Prairie unit, 1977.

    Treesearch

    Jerold T. Hahn; W. Brad Smith

    1980-01-01

    The fourth inventory of Minnesota's Prairie Unit shows that although commercial forest area decreased 31.7% between 1962 and 1977, growing-stock volume increased 22%. This report gives statistical highlights and contains detailed tables of forest area as well as timber volume, growth, mortality, ownership, and use.

  16. A Concise Dictionary of Minnesota Ojibwe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, John D.; Nyholm, Earl

    The dictionary of the Ojibwa or Chippewa language represents the speech of the Mille Lacs Band of Minnesota and contains over 7,000 Ojibwa terms. Each entry gives information on the word stem, grammatical classification, English gloss, form variations, and references to alternate forms. An introductory section describes the entry format and use,…

  17. Job Satisfaction among Minnesota High School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyd, Steven DuWayne

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported the demands of the high school principalship in the United States has deterred qualified candidates from accepting the position. The purpose of this study was to investigate levels of job satisfaction among Minnesota high school principals within a potentially dwindling supply of qualified candidates as reported in other…

  18. Minnesota's forest statistics, 1987: an inventory update.

    Treesearch

    Jerold T. Hahn; W. Brad Smith

    1987-01-01

    The Minnesota 1987 inventory update, derived by using tree growth models, reports 13.5 million acres of timberland, a decline of less than 1% since 1977. This bulletin presents findings from the inventory update in tables detailing timer land area, volume, and biomass.

  19. Forest Statistics for Minnesota's Central Hardwood Unit.

    Treesearch

    Earl C. Leatherberry

    1991-01-01

    In 1990, the fifth inventory of Minnesota's Central Hardwood Unit found 11.9 million acres of land, of which 2.4 million acres are forested. This bulletin presents statistical highlights and contains detailed tables of forest area, as well as timber volume, growth, removal, mortality, and ownership.

  20. Environment and Public Opinion in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tichenor, P. J.; And Others

    Surveys conducted in Minnesota in 1969 and 1970 to obtain public opinion regarding environmental issues are discussed. Several generalizations are made about the state of public opinion about the environmental issue, as follows: (1) The environmental issue has reached public prominence through a sequence from professional and interest-group…

  1. School Boundary Debate Divides Minnesota Suburb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses how an assignment plan intended to keep schools socioeconomically balanced spurs a bitter debate in suburban Eden Prairie. The boundary debate in the 9,700-student Eden Prairie, Minnesota, district has been bruising. Eden Prairie adopted new school attendance boundaries this year based on socioeconomic balance, ensuring for…

  2. Minnesota : innovative choices for congestion relief.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-01-01

    All of the Minnesota UPA projects are in operation. The first project, the Transit Advantage Bus Bypass at the Highway 77/Highway 62 intersection, was implemented in December 2008. Most of the transit projects and the expansion of the existing high-o...

  3. Financing Education in Minnesota, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota House of Representatives, St. Paul. Research Dept.

    This report provides an overview of educational financing in Minnesota. It describes how support for elementary and secondary education in the state comes through a combination of state-collected taxes and locally controlled property taxes. Revenue to the school districts is received in three major categories: state education-finance…

  4. Law School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Law School is a winner in the AS&U 1977 College & University Architectural Competition. The jury commented on the strong recognition of energy conservation and the skillful integration of the building with the existing campus. (Author/MLF)

  5. Troubled Waters for the University of Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priesmeyer, Molly

    2012-01-01

    More than a year and a half after the University of Minnesota made headlines when an administrator halted the premiere of an environmental documentary, controversy and questions persist at the Twin Cities university. "Troubled Waters: A Mississippi River Story" took nearly four years to make. It explores how agricultural runoff and…

  6. Balsam boughs: an important Minnesota resource

    Treesearch

    Mark Hansen; Keith Jacobson

    2005-01-01

    Minnesota is a leader in the production of holiday wreaths and greenery, and one of the reasons for its lead is the State's large resource of balsam fir. Boughs harvested from balsam are used in almost all of the wreaths manufactured. This brochure answers several questions about harvesting balsam fir to help bough harvesters get ready for the coming season.

  7. Minnesota's forests 1999-2003 (Part A)

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Miles; Keith Jacobson; Gary J. Brand; Ed Jepsen; Dacia Meneguzzo; Manfred E. Mielke; Cassandra Olson; Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Ronald J. Piva; Barry Tyler Wilson; Christopher Woodall

    2007-01-01

    The first completed annual inventory of Minnesota's forests reports more than 16.2 million acres of forest land. Additional forest attribute and forest health information is presented along with information on agents of change including changing land use patterns and the introduction of nonnative plants, insects, and diseases.

  8. The private forest landowners of Minnesota--1982.

    Treesearch

    Eugene M. Carpenter; Mark H. Hansen; Dennis M. St. John

    1986-01-01

    Presents the results of a mail canvass of nonindustrial private forest landowners in Minnesota to relate owner attitudes and intentions concerning ownership, management, harvest and recreational use of their forest property. Provides 55 tables contrasting owner characteristics, management actions, and attitudes for the state and its four survey units.

  9. Forest statistics for Minnesota's Prairie Unit.

    Treesearch

    Sue M. Roussopoulos

    1992-01-01

    The fifth inventory of Minnesota's Prairie Unit reports 19.2 million acres of land, of which 660 thousand acres are forested. This bulletin presents statistical highlights and contains detailed tables of forest area, as well as timber volume, growth, removals, mortality, and ownership.

  10. Prevalence of parvovirus in Minnesota turkeys.

    PubMed

    Sharafeldin, T A; Singh, A; Abdel-Glil, M Y; Mor, S K; Porter, R E; Goyal, S M

    2017-02-01

    Poult enteritis syndrome (PES) is characterized by enteritis and decreased body weight gain in growing turkey poults between one d and 7 wk of age. Another syndrome called light turkey syndrome (LTS) causes a decrease in body weight of adult tom turkeys in Minnesota leading to huge economic losses. Reovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus have been found in LTS and PES flocks in Minnesota. We tested 80 fecal pools collected from four LTS flocks and 35 fecal pools from non-LTS flocks for the presence of parvovirus. In addition, 116 fecal and meconium samples from turkeys submitted to the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (MVDL) also were tested. The samples were tested by PCR using primers for the non-structural 1 (NS1) gene of parvovirus. Of the 80 samples from LTS flocks, 41 were positive for parvovirus while 20 of 35 samples from non-LTS flocks were positive. The prevalence of parvovirus in fecal samples submitted to MVDL was relatively low; only five of the 116 pools were positive. The partial NS1 gene sequences from LTS and non-LTS samples showed 98 to 100% nt identity except for one divergent turkey parvovirus (TuPV) strain that revealed 90% identity and clustered with chicken-like parvoviruses. The presence of this divergent strain suggests circulation of a recombinant strain of TuPV in Minnesota turkeys. Our results indicate that TuPVs are circulating in both LTS and non-LTS flocks of turkeys in Minnesota, and further experimental studies are indicated to study the role of TuPV in LTS. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Proceedings of the second biennial conference on research in Colorado Plateau National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Riper, Charles

    1995-01-01

    On 25-28 October 1993 in Flagstaff, Arizona, the National Biological Service Colorado Plateau Research Station (formerly National Park Service Cooperative Park Studies Unit) and Northern Arizona University hosted the Second Biennial Conference of Research on the Colorado Plateau. The conference theme focused on research, inventory, and monitoring on the federal, state, and private lands in the Colorado Plateau biogeographic province.

  12. INTERIOR PHOTOGRAPH OF NORTHERN BEDROOM LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING DOORWAY FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR PHOTOGRAPH OF NORTHERN BEDROOM LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING DOORWAY FOR LIVING ROOM AT CENTER, DOORWAY FOR SOUTHERN BEDROOM AT LEFT, AND CLOSET AT RIGHT - Ketch Ranch, Medicine Park, Comanche County, OK

  13. Acadia National Park

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Acadia National Park is one of the most visited parks in America, drawing more than 2.5 million visitors per year to the craggy, jagged coast of Maine. The park is celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2016. On September 6, 2015, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite acquired these images of Acadia National Park and its surroundings. Mountains and hills roll right up to the Atlantic Ocean in this rocky landscape carved by glaciers at the end of the last Ice Age. Since the beginning of the 20th Century, the park has been pieced together by donations and acquisitions of once-private lands, and it is still growing. Of the park’s 47,000 acres, more than 12,000 are privately owned lands under conservation agreements, while the rest is held by the National Park Service. Mount Desert Island is the focal point of the park, which also includes lands around a former naval base (Schoodic Peninsula), Isle au Haut, and several smaller islands. Read more: go.nasa.gov/2adyd8J Credit: NASA/Landsat8 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  14. TDM Status Report: Parking Cash Out

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1994-02-01

    Employers often provide employees with subsidized parking. Employers may provide free parking to employees in parking spaces they own or lease, or provide parking at rates below market value in the area. The parking subsidy is the difference between ...

  15. NASA IN THE PARK

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-18

    MORE THAN 7,500 PEOPLE ATTENDED NASA MARSHALL SPACE CENTER AND DOWNTOWN HUNTSVILLE, INC.’S THIRD ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF NASA AND THE COMMUNITY JUNE 18. THIS YEAR, THE EVENT MOVED TO HUNTSVILLE’S BIG SPRING PARK.

  16. High School Parking Lots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Thomas G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the reorganization of the site of Ben Davis High School in Wayne Township, Indiana as an example of improvements to school parking lot design and vehicle/pedestrian traffic flow and security. Includes design drawings. (EV)

  17. Protecting national park soundscapes

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-01-01

    America's national parks provide a wealth of experiences to millions of people every year. What visitors seelandscapes, wildlife, cultural activitiesoften lingers in memory for life. And what they hear adds a dimension that sight alone cannot p...

  18. Master Plans for Park Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Meter, Jerry R.

    This booklet is a general guide to park site planning. The four basic steps involved in developing a park site are a) determination of the uses of the site, b) analysis of the site potential for these uses, c) identification of the functional relationship among the uses, and d) coordination of the uses to the park sites. Uses of park sites are…

  19. Biscayne National Park

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    On February 25, 2016, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite acquired this natural-color image of Biscayne National Park. The park encompasses the northernmost Florida Keys, starting from Miami to just north of Key Largo. The keys run like a spine through the center of the park, with Biscayne Bay to the west and the Atlantic Ocean to the east. The water-covered areas span more than 660 square kilometers (250 square miles) of the park, making it the largest marine park in the U.S. National Park System. Biscayne protects the longest stretch of mangrove forest on the U.S. East Coast, and one of the most extensive stretches of coral reef in the world. Read more: go.nasa.gov/1SWs1a3 Credit: NASA/Landsat8 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  20. Water resources of the Minnesota River-Hawk Creek watershed, southwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Voast, Wayne A.; Broussard, W.L.; Wheat, D.E.

    1972-01-01

    The Minnesota River – Hawk Creek watershed is located in southwestern Minnesota. The watershed has an area of 1,479 square miles and is drained along its southwestern edge by the Minnesota River (Minnesota Division of Waters, 1959). The major watercourse within the watershed is Hawk Creek, having a drainage area of 510 square miles. Other, shorter streams drain into the Minnesota River but are mostly ephemeral. The watershed has a gently undulating land surface formed on glacial deposits. Directly underlying the glacial deposits in most of the area are Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks are also locally in contact with overlying glacial deposits. Beds of sand and gravel buried at various depths within the glacial deposits are generally thin and discomtinuous but are the most accessible and widely used aquifers in the watershed. Beds of poorly consolidated sandstone in the Cretaceous rocks are locally good aquifers, generally yielding softer water, but in lesser quantities, than aquifers in the overlying glacial deposits. In the eastern part of the watershed, aquifers in Paleozoic and Precambrian sedimentary rocks are capable of high yields to wells and contain water of similar quality to water in the overlying Cretaceous and glacial deposits.

  1. Water resources of Prince William Forest Park, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, G. Allan

    1981-01-01

    Prince William Forest Park is in the southern part of Prince William County, Va. Its natural beauty and nearness to Washington, D.C. have made it one of the most popular recreation areas in northern Virginia. To help the National Park Service plan the development of new facilities and effectively manage its total resources, the U.S. Geological Survey made a hydrologic study of the park from October 1972 to November 1975. The overall objective of the Survey 's study was to evalute the quantity and quality of the park 's water resources. Available information was compiled and analyzed, and new data on streamflow, ground-water levels, and the chemical quality of water were collected. Test wells were drilled and aquifer tests made at the sites of wells to evaluate the occurrence and availability of ground water. (USGS)

  2. Estimating ecosystem carbon stocks at Redwood National and State Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Madej, Mary Ann; Seney, Joseph; Deshais, Janelle

    2013-01-01

    Accounting for ecosystem carbon is increasingly important for park managers. In this case study we present our efforts to estimate carbon stocks and the effects of management on carbon stocks for Redwood National and State Parks in northern California. Using currently available information, we estimate that on average these parks’ soils contain approximately 89 tons of carbon per acre (200 Mg C per ha), while vegetation contains about 130 tons C per acre (300 Mg C per ha). estoration activities at the parks (logging-road removal, second-growth forest management) were shown to initially reduce ecosystem carbon, but may provide for enhanced ecosystem carbon storage over the long term. We highlight currently available tools that could be used to estimate ecosystem carbon at other units of the National Park System.

  3. Terrain, weather pose challenges in Minnesota project

    SciTech Connect

    Trojack, L.

    1994-12-01

    This paper briefly reviews an innovative method used in installing a natural gas pipeline in Minnesota which traversed a marsh area. Because of the special problems associated with this wetland area, special equipment and techniques had to be used to minimize disturbance associated with the construction. It describes the equipment and the resulting performance the equipment had. It proved to significantly reduce disturbance and result in minimum site restoration work.

  4. Impact of park renovations on park use and park-based physical activity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Deborah A; Han, Bing; Isacoff, Jennifer; Shulaker, Bianca; Williamson, Stephanie; Marsh, Terry; McKenzie, Thomas L; Weir, Megan; Bhatia, Rajiv

    2015-02-01

    Given the concerns about low rates of physical activity among low-income minority youth, many community-based organizations are investing in the creation or renovation of public parks to encourage youth to become more physically active. To what degree park renovations accomplish this goal is not known. We used the System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) to measure park users and their physical activity levels before and after 2 parks were renovated. We compared findings with 4 parks: 2 that were unrenovated parks and 2 that were undergoing renovation. We also surveyed park users and local residents about their use of the parks. Compared with parks that had not yet been renovated, the improved parks saw more than a doubling in the number of visitors and a substantial increase in energy expended in the parks. Increased park use was pronounced in adults and children, but was not seen in teens and seniors. Park renovations were associated with a significantly increased perception of park safety. Park improvements can have a significant impact on increasing park use and local physical activity.

  5. Impact of Park Renovations on Park Use and Park-based Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A; Han, Bing; Isacoff, Jennifer; Shulaker, Bianca; Williamson, Stephanie; Marsh, Terry; McKenzie, Thomas L.; Weir, Megan; Bhatia, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the concerns about low rates of physical activity among low-income minority youth, many community based organizations are investing in the creation or renovation of public parks, in order to encourage youth to become more physically active. To what degree park renovations accomplish this goal is not known. Methods We used the System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC), to measure park users and their physical activity levels before and after two parks were renovated. We compared findings to 4 parks-- 2 that were unrenovated parks and 2 that were undergoing renovation. We also surveyed parks users and local residents about their use of the parks. Results Compared to parks that had not yet been renovated, the improved parks saw more than a doubling in the number of visitors and a substantial increase in energy expended in the parks. Increased park use was pronounced in adults and children, but was not seen in teens and seniors. Park renovations were associated with a significantly increased perception of park safety. Conclusions Park improvements can have a significant impact on increasing park use and local physical activity. PMID:24956608

  6. Tobacco Use among Minnesota Adults, 2014.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Raymond G; Amato, Michael S; Rode, Peter; Kinney, Ann M; St Claire, Ann W; Taylor, Kristie

    2015-09-01

    The changing landscape of tobacco including the introduction of new products such as smokeless tobaccos and electronic delivery devices has highlighted the need for continued surveillance of tobacco use. Minnesota has conducted an in-depth surveillance of adult tobacco use since 1999. For the fifth in the series, conducted in 2014, 9304 telephone interviews were completed. The 2014 prevalence of cigarette smoking (14.4%) continues a downward trend that remains lower than the national smoking prevalence (17.3%). Among all Minnesota adults, use prevalence of other tobacco products was as follows: e-cigarettes 5.9%, all smokeless tobaccos 3.6%, cigars 3.0%, water pipe 1.4%, and regular pipe 0.7%. Among individuals who have never smoked cigarettes, smokeless tobacco was the most common product used (2.0%), nearly twice the prevalence of e-cigarette use (1.2%). Former smokers were equally likely to use smokeless tobacco (4.9%) or e-cigarettes (4.8%). Among smokers, 27.3% reported current use of e-cigarettes. In the past 15 years, cigarette smoking prevalence in Minnesota has dropped by an average of 0.51 percentage points annually, and prevalence could drop to less than 5% by 2034.

  7. Water resources of the Yellow Medicine River Watershed, Southwestern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novitzki, R.P.; Van Voast, Wayne A.; Jerabek, L.A.

    1969-01-01

    The Yellow Medicine and Minnesota Rivers are the major sources of surface water. For physiographic regions – Upland Plain, Slope, Lowland Plain, and Minnesota River Flood Plain – influence surface drainage, and the flow of ground water through the aquifers. The watershed comprises 1070 square miles, including the drainage basin of the Yellow Medicine River (665 square miles) and 405 square miles drained by small streams tributary to the Minnesota River.

  8. Weights, growth, and survival of timber wolf pups in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Ballenberghe, V.; Mech, L.D.

    1975-01-01

    Weights, growth rates, canine tooth lengths, and survival data were obtained from 73 wild wolf (Canis lupus) pups that were 8 to 28 weeks old when live-trapped in three areas of northern Minnesota from 1969 to 1972. Relative weights of wild pups are expressed as percentages of a standard weight curve based on data from captive pups of similar age. These relative weights varied greatly within litters, between litters, and between years; extremes of 31 to 144 percent of the standard were observed. Growth rates ranging from 0.05 to 0.23 kilograms per day were observed, and similar variations in general devel pment and in replacement and growth of canine teeth were noted. Survival data based on radio-tracking and tag returns indicated that pups with relative weights less than 65 percent of standard have a poor chance of survival, whereas pups of at least 80 percent of standard weight have a high survivability. Pups born in 1972 were especially underweight, probably a result of declining white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) densities in the interior of the Superior National Forest study area.

  9. Terrain Park Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, Craig; McIntosh, Scott; Bringhurst, Jade; Danenhauer, Karen; Gilmore, Nathan; Hopkins, Christy L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined demographics, injury pattern, and hospital outcome in patients injured in winter resort terrain parks. Methods: The study included patients ≥12 years of age who presented to a regional trauma center with an acute injury sustained at a winter resort. Emergency department (ED) research assistants collected patient injury and helmet use information using a prospectively designed questionnaire. ED and hospital data were obtained from trauma registry and hospital records. Results: Seventy-two patients were injured in a terrain park, and 263 patients were injured on non-terrain park slopes. Patients injured in terrain parks were more likely to be male [68/72 (94%) vs. 176/263 (67%), p<0.0001], younger in age [23 ± 7 vs. 36 ± 17, p<0.0001], live locally [47/72 (65%) vs. 124/263 (47%), p=0.006], use a snowboard [50/72 (69%) vs. 91/263 (35%), p<0.0001], hold a season pass [46/66 (70%) vs. 98/253 (39%), p<0.0001], and sustain an upper extremity injury [29/72 (40%) vs. 52/263 (20%), p<0.001] when compared to patients injured on non-terrain park slopes. There were no differences between the groups in terms of EMS transport to hospital, helmet use, admission rate, hospital length of stay, and patients requiring specialty consultation in the ED. Conclusions: Patients injured in terrain parks represent a unique demographic within winter resort patrons. Injury severity appears to be similar to those patients injured on non-terrain park slopes. PMID:20046245

  10. Breeding distribution of the marbled murrelet in Redwood National Park and vicinity during 1988

    Treesearch

    C. John Ralph; Peter W. C. Paton; Aivars Zakis; Gary Strachan

    1990-01-01

    We report on an intensive research effort to determine the present status of the marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) in the vicinity of Redwood National Park, in Del Norte and northern Humboldt Counties, California. This seabird is primarily an inhabitant of the nearshore waters and adjacent coastal redwood forests of the northern half of the...

  11. Big Bend National Park

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Alternately known as a geologist’s paradise and a geologist’s nightmare, Big Bend National Park in southwestern Texas offers a multitude of rock formations. Sparse vegetation makes finding and observing the rocks easy, but they document a complicated geologic history extending back 500 million years. On May 10, 2002, the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus on NASA’s Landsat 7 satellite captured this natural-color image of Big Bend National Park. A black line delineates the park perimeter. The arid landscape appears in muted earth tones, some of the darkest hues associated with volcanic structures, especially the Rosillos and Chisos Mountains. Despite its bone-dry appearance, Big Bend National Park is home to some 1,200 plant species, and hosts more kinds of cacti, birds, and bats than any other U.S. national park. Read more: go.nasa.gov/2bzGaZU Credit: NASA/Landsat7 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  12. Cultural Resources Literature Search and Records Review of the Upper Minnesota River Subbasin, Southwestern Minnesota and Northeastern South Dakota. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    CORPS OF ENGERS 1135 U.S. Post Office and Custan House St. Paul, Mirffesota, 55101 Contract No. DACW7-79-C-019 9 LAC #Ift P-l L E ~ &-W N L & - Prepared...By: ARCHAEODLOGICAL FIELD SERVICES, INC. 4?? SOUTTI YAIN STPCET SUIT~ E 4?? 5, STILLWATER MINNESOTA 55082 * .- ~. % ,..VOLE I CULTURAL RESOURCES...County, Minnesota 4. Re&ood County, Minnesota E . Cottonwood River Subbasin 261 1. Brown County, Minnesota 2. Cottorwod County, Minnesota 3. Lyon County

  13. Geology of National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2008-01-01

    This is a set of two sheets of 3D images showing geologic features of many National Parks. Red-and-cyan viewing glasses are need to see the three-dimensional effect. A search on the World Wide Web will yield many sites about anaglyphs and where to get 3D glasses. Red-blue glasses will do but red-cyan glasses are a little better. This publication features a photo quiz game: Name that park! where you can explore, interpret, and identify selected park landscapes. Can you identify landscape features in the images? Can you explain processes that may have helped form the landscape features? You can get the answers online.

  14. High-precision U-Pb geochronology in the Minnesota River Valley subprovince and its bearing on the Neoarchean to Paleoproterozoic evolution of the southern Superior Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitz, M.D.; Bowring, S.A.; Southwick, D.L.; Boerboom, Terrence; Wirth, K.R.

    2006-01-01

    High-precision U-Pb ages have been obtained for high-grade gneisses, late-kinematic to postkinematic granitic plutons, and a crosscutting mafic dike of the Archean Minnesota River Valley tectonic subprovince, at the southern ramparts of the Superior craton of North America. The antiquity of the Minnesota River Valley terranes is confirmed by a high-precision U-Pb zircon age of 3422 ?? 2 Ma for a tonalitic phase of the Morton Gneiss. Voluminous, late-kinematic monzogranites of the Benson (Ortonville granite) and Morton (Sacred Heart granite) blocks yield identical crystallization ages of 2603 ?? 1 Ma, illustrating the synchrony and rapidity of deep crustal melting and plutonism throughout the Minnesota River Valley terranes. Postkinematic, 2591 ?? 2 Ma syenogranites and aplitic dikes in both blocks effectively constrain the final penetrative deformation of the Minnesota River Valley subprovince. Monazite growth from 2609 to 2595 Ma in granulitic paragneisses of the Benson and Montevideo blocks is interpreted to record prograde to peak granulite facies metamorphic conditions associated with crustal thickening and magmatism. Neoarchean metamorphism and plutonism are interpreted to record the timing of collisional accretion and terminal suturing of the Mesoarchean continental Minnesota River Valley terranes to the southern margin of the Superior Province, along the western Great Lakes tectonic zone. Subsequent Paleoproterozoic rifting of this margin is recorded by voluminous basaltic dike intrusion, expressed in the Minnesota River Valley by major WNW-trending tholeiitic diabase dikes dated at 2067 ?? 1 Ma, only slightly younger than the structurally and geochemically similar 2077 ?? 4 Ma Fort Frances (Kenora-Kabetogama) dike swarm of northern Minnesota and adjoining Canada. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  15. Acadia National Park ITS field operational test : parking report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-04-01

    An important goal of the Field Operational Test of ITS at Acadia National Park is to reduce vehicle congestion in the Park. Reduced congestion will have the added benefits of increased mobility of visitors and residents, aesthetic and environmental b...

  16. Headwaters, Wetlands, and Wildfires: Utilizing Landsat imagery, GIS, and Statistical Models for Mapping Wetlands in Northern Colorado's Cache la Poudre Watershed in the aftermath of the June 2012 High Park Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignell, S.; Skach, S.; Kessenich, B.; Weimer, A.; Luizza, M.; Birtwistle, A.; Evangelista, P.; Laituri, M.; Young, N.

    2013-12-01

    The June 2012 High Park Fire burned over 87,000 acres of forest and 259 homes to the west of Fort Collins, CO. The fire has had dramatic impacts on forest ecosystems; of particular concern are its effects on the Cache la Poudre watershed, as the Poudre River is one of the most important headwaters of the Colorado Front Range, providing important ecosystem and economic services before flowing into the South Platte, which in turn flows into the Missouri River. Within a week of the fire, the area received several days of torrential rains. This precipitation--in conjunction with steep riverbanks and the loss of vegetation by fire--caused soil and ash runoff to be deposited into the Poudre's channel, resulting in a river of choking mud and black sludge. Monitoring the effects of such wildfires is critical and requires establishing immediate baseline data to assess impacts over time. Of particular concern is the region's wetlands, which not only provide habitat for a rich array of flora and fauna, but help regulate river discharge, improve water quality, and aid in carbon sequestration. However, the high expense of field work and the changing nature of wetlands have left many of the area's wetland maps incomplete and in need of updating. Utilizing Landsat 5 and Landsat 8 imagery, ancillary GIS layers, and boosted regression trees modeling, the NASA DEVELOP team based at the North Central Climate Science Center at Colorado State University developed a methodology for wetland modeling within the Cache la Poudre watershed. These efforts produced a preliminary model of predicted wetlands across the landscape that correctly classified 89% of the withheld validation points and had a kappa value of approximately 0.78. This initial model is currently being refined and validated using the USGS Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling (SAHM) to run multiple models within three elevation-based 'life zones.' The ultimate goal of this ongoing project is to provide important spatial

  17. A Report to the Minnesota Legislature concerning Interscholastic Athletic Equity in Minnesota High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dildine, Robert A.

    This report analyzes interscholastic athletic programs offered by Minnesota high schools to identify errors in data reporting and suggest corrective action, identify areas of gender inequality in athletic offerings, and identify needed improvements in rule, law, or reporting requirements. The report outlines issues in sports equity, compares…

  18. Success for Minnesota: Success for All Schools in Minnesota Continue To Gain on MCA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Success for All Foundation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Success for All is the most extensively researched of all comprehensive reform models for Title I elementary schools. It incorporates scientifically based principles of reading, cooperative learning, professional development, tutoring, and family support. Minnesota elementary schools using the Success for All reading program have once again made …

  19. Behind from the Start: Prevention Programs Not Reaching Many Minnesota Children. Minnesota Kids Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kids Count Minnesota, Minneapolis.

    This report examines three federal programs (Head Start, WIC--special supplemental food program for Women, Infants, and Children, and immunization) designed to prepare children for a healthy start in life and school and shows, county-by-county, how well Minnesota children are served. It notes that during 1992-93, only 31 percent of eligible…

  20. Association of outdoor recreation availability with physical activity and weight status in Minnesota youth.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja A; Oftedal, Andrew; Schneider, Ingrid

    2014-03-01

    Examine macro-level associations of youth physical activity (PA) and weight status with availability of outdoor recreation resources (i.e., parkland, forestland, natural preserves, nonmotorized trails, and motorized trails) across counties in Minnesota. Hierarchical regression models examined if availability of recreation resources significantly improved prediction of PA and weight status of 9th and 12th grade boys and girls (2010) across Minnesota counties. The inclusion of county-level densities of recreational land variables did not produce a significant increase in R(2) for any of the models predicting 9th grade outcomes, yet county-level densities of recreational trails did significantly increase R(2) for both levels of PA and weight status. In contrast, the inclusion of recreational trails did not produce any significant increases in R(2) for 12th grade outcomes, although the inclusion of recreational land did significantly increase the R(2) for 12th grade girls achieving 30min of PA 5 or more days of the week. Findings indicate that various recreational land and trail types may have different impacts on and associations with PA and health outcomes. As such, it is important that future studies focus not only on parks, but also on other types of recreational lands and trails as well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Watershed management implications of agroforestry expansion on Minnesota's farmlands

    Treesearch

    C. Hobart Perry; Ryan C. Miller; Anthony R. Kaster; Kenneth N. Brooks

    2000-01-01

    Minnesota’s agricultural landscape is changing. The increasing use of woody perennials in agricultural fields, living snow fences, windbreaks, and riparian areas has important watershed management implications for agricultural watersheds in northwestern Minnesota. These changes in land use could lead to reductions in annual water yield, annual flood peaks, and dry...

  2. MINNESOTA COORDINATION UNIT FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSS, JEROME, JR.; NELSON, HOWARD F.

    THE MINNESOTA COORDINATION UNIT FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION WAS ESTABLISHED IN JUNE 1965 AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA FOR THE PURPOSES OF COORDINATING AND STIMULATING OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH, COLLECTING AND DISSEMINATING THE RESULTS OF THAT RESEARCH, PROVIDING TECHNICAL CONSULTATION AND RESEARCH TRAINING, AND…

  3. Impact Evaluation of the Minnesota Reading Corps K-3 Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markovitz, Carrie E.; Hernandez, Marc W.; Hedberg, Eric C.; Silberglitt, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Minnesota Reading Corps (MRC) is the largest AmeriCorps State program in the country. The goal of MRC is to ensure that students become successful readers and meet reading proficiency targets by the end of the third grade. To meet this goal, the MRC program, and its host organization, ServeMinnesota Action Network, recruit, train, place and…

  4. 2. View from the Minnesota bank looking downstream (northnorthwest) at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View from the Minnesota bank looking downstream (north-northwest) at bridge's southwest elevation; the bridge approach is missing - Enloe Bridge No. 90021, Spanning Red River of North between Minnesota & North Dakota on County State Aid Highway 28, Wolverton, Wilkin County, MN

  5. 67. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul Minnesota, ca. 1925. #35109. Photographer: St. Paul Daily News.) VIEW TO NORTHEAST, SHOWING SPAN NOS. 9-19, ca. 1925 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  6. 73. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1867. #MR2.9 SP4.2/rll.) FIRST WABASHA STREET BRIDGE, 1867 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  7. 66. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, ca. 1925. #19657.) VIEW TO NORTHWEST, SHOWING SPAN NOS. 21 TO 26 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  8. 75. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, ca. 1870s. #22006. Photographer: Illingworth.) VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, SHOWING THE UPPER LEVEE AND BLUSS (on left) TO WHICH THE HIGH BRIDGE WAS BUILT - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  9. 72. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, June 25, 1958. #31024. Photographer: St. Paul Dispatch-Pioneer Press. VIEW TO SOUTH, SHOWING THE RESURFACING OF THE BRIDGE IN 1958 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  10. 63. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1958. #31008. Photographer: St. Paul Dispatch-Pioneer Press.) AERIAL VIEW OF HIGH BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, 1958 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  11. 65. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1889. #37682.) VIEW TO NORTH, SHOWING SPAN NOS. 6-24, 1889 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  12. The Minnesota Family, Friend and Neighbor Grant Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susman-Stillman, Amy; Stout, Karen; Cleveland, Jennifer; Hawley, Vicki

    2011-01-01

    In 1997, Minnesota became the first state in the nation to pass legislation establishing an education and support program for family, friend, and neighbor (FFN) care providers. This article describes the Minnesota Family, Friend and Neighbor Grant Program and findings from an evaluation of the programs and a curriculum scan of materials used in…

  13. 68. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1924. #35108. Photographer: St. Paul Daily News.) VIEW TO EAST, SHOWING SPAN NOS. 10-20, 1924 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  14. Projecting treatment opportunities for current Minnesota forest conditions.

    Treesearch

    W. Brad Smith; Pamela J. Jakes

    1981-01-01

    Reviews opportunities for treatment of timber stands in Minnesota for the decade of 1977-1986. Under the assumptions and management guides specified, 27% of Minnesota's commercial forest land would require timber harvest or some other form of treatment during the decade.

  15. 70. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1904. #18613g. Photographer: Albert Munson) VIEW TO WEST, SHOWING FALSEWORK USED IN RECONTRUCTING THE HIGH BRIDGE, 1904. - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  16. 69. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1984. #32375.) VIEW TO WEST, SHOWING DAMAGED BRIDGE AFTER CYCLONE. 1904. - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  17. 71. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Pal, Minnesota, ca. 1905. #30454.) VIEW TO NORTHWEST, POSSIBLY AFTER THE REOPENING OF THE BRIDGE IN MAY 1905 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  18. 64. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul Minnesota, ca. 1891. #35805. Photographer: Haynes and Bros., St. Paul.) VIEW TO SOUTH, SHOWING FOUR PERCENT GRADE OF HIGH BRIDGE, ca. 1981 - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  19. The Minnesota Defense Industry Conversion Project. A Partnership for Retraining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daines, James R.; And Others

    The Minnesota Defense Conversion Adjustment Project was initiated in 1993 with funding provided through the U.S. Department of Labor's Defense Conversion Adjustment Program to help workers at a Minnesota defense plant make the transition from assembler and related production classifications to machinists and other positions requiring specific job…

  20. Minnesota Measures: 2008 Report on Higher Education Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Office of Higher Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    For most of Minnesota's 150 years of statehood, its distinctive economic advantages were largely a function of its natural resources, such as timber, taconite and tourism. Today, while these and other resources remain cornerstones of the state economy, it is clear that the intellectual capacity of Minnesota's people is emerging as a promising…

  1. University of Minnesota Constitutional Autonomy. A Legal Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Deborah K.

    This discussion of the special legal status of the University of Minnesota, known as constitutional autonomy, defines this status, states the rationale for the principle, and describes the relevant territorial act and constitutional provision. The main part of the legal analysis examines Minnesota court cases which addressed the issue of the…

  2. 75 FR 29590 - Minnesota Disaster Number MN-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12132 and 12133] Minnesota Disaster Number MN-00024 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota (FEMA-1900...

  3. 75 FR 32821 - Minnesota Disaster Number MN-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12132 and 12133] Minnesota Disaster Number MN-00024 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota (FEMA-1900...

  4. Minnesota Kids: A Closer Look. 1996 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kids Count Minnesota, Minneapolis.

    Minnesota KIDS COUNT focuses on key risk indicators for children and describes the condition of children in each of Minnesota's 87 counties. According to this second annual report, another generation of children is at risk of growing up with decreasing resources, evidenced by increasing arrest rates for violent crimes and substantiated reports of…

  5. The Minnesota Program: community partnerships for effective pest control

    Treesearch

    Thomas G. Eiber

    1998-01-01

    Oak wilt, a fungal disease of all oak species, continues to be the primary cause of oak mortality in Minnesota. The oak type covers over 650,000 acres in Minnesota and is made up of six species. Forest industry adds $1 billion to the state's economy by harvesting and utilizing oak. In our communities, oak is our most valuable shade tree providing energy...

  6. MN State Profile. Minnesota: Graduation Required Assessments for Diploma (GRAD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Minnesota's Graduation Required Assessments for Diploma (GRAD), comprehensive proficiency assessments of the skills and knowledge in mathematics, reading, and writing that are necessary for graduation. The Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments, Series II, into which the GRAD tests are embedded, measure…

  7. Parents in the Workplace Report: Minnesota Business Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Thomas B.

    A recent survey of 473 Minnesota businesses conducted by Parents in the Workplace (a nonprofit organization based in St. Paul, Minnesota) revealed that most area businesses provide or are considering providing a wide range of child care related benefits for employees. Flexible scheduling of employees' work hours, part-time work, leave to care for…

  8. Minnesota State Grant Statistics Over Time. 2003 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Higher Education Services Office, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This report contains data on the number and dollar amounts of Minnesota State Grants received by Minnesota undergraduates for Fiscal Years 1978 through 2003. Combined federal Pell and State Grant awards are also reported. The report includes a table showing the parameters used in the State Grant Program from Fiscal Year 1984 through 2003. The…

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Transportation Data for

    Science.gov Websites

    Energy Laboratory Case Studies Video thumbnail for Minnesota School District Finds Cost Savings, Cold Reliability with Propane Buses Jan. 26, 2016 Video thumbnail for Minneapolis Makes EV-Charging History Record Minnesota Videos on YouTube Video thumbnail for GE Showcases Innovation in Alternative Fuel Vehicles GE

  10. Housing Seasonal Workers for the Minnesota Processed Vegetable Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziebarth, Ann

    2006-01-01

    The place where we live and work is a reflection of a complex set of economic conditions and social relationships. Very little information is available regarding housing for Minnesota's migrant workers. It is estimated that approximately 20,000 people migrate to Minnesota each summer to work in the production and processing of green peas and sweet…

  11. The Teaching of Evolution and Creationism in Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Randy; Kraemer, Karen

    2005-01-01

    The evolution-related attitudes and actions of Minnesota high school biology teachers were studied to estimate the prevalence of creationism among biology teachers. Minnesota's high school biology teachers were questioned about the evolution education in public schools regarding the percentage of biology teachers who teach evolution, class-time…

  12. Minnesota 4-H Youth Program Quality Improvement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Margo; Grant, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Extension Center for Youth Development made an organizational decision in 2011 to invest in a system-wide approach to implement youth program quality into the 4-H program using the Youth Program Quality Assessment (YPQA) tool. This article describes the four key components to the Minnesota Youth Program Quality…

  13. Developing Entrepreneurial Competence among Minnesota's Technical Institute Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Council on Vocational Technical Education, St. Paul.

    Following up a 1987 study that had identified 1,169 entrepreneurial graduates of Minnesota's technical institutes from the 10-year time period prior to 1984, a study was conducted to determine how Minnesota's technical institutes presently promote entrepreneurial competence for their students and how they can help future students. Questionnaires…

  14. Minnesota STAR Project: Meeting the Needs of Struggling Adult Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kimberly A.; Frank, Margaret M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on findings and implications from a two-year evaluation of the Minnesota STudent Achievement in Reading (STAR) Project. This long-term, job-embedded, professional development activity is provided for Minnesota Adult Basic Education (ABE) practitioners serving intermediate-level adult students reading between 4.0 to 8.9 grade…

  15. Shaping Case Management in Minnesota: In Theory, Reality and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Joyce; Kragthorpe, Candice

    This monograph reports the conclusions of seven 6-month projects addressing issues of case management in the field of developmental disabilities in Minnesota. First, the theory supporting case management is reviewed and alternative definitions and guiding principles are offered. Next, the Minnesota rule on case management is detailed, noting…

  16. Fires in Shenandoah National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A large smoke plume has been streaming eastward from Virginia's Shenandoah National Park near Old Rag Mountain. Based on satellite images, it appears the blaze started sometime between October 30 and 31. This true-color image of the fire was obtained on November 1, 2000 by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. Thermal Infrared data, overlaid on the color image, reveals the presence of two active fires underneath the smoke plume. The northern fire (upper) is burning near the Pinnacles Picnic Area along Skyline Drive. The southern fire (lower) is on Old Rag Mountain. Old Rag is one of the most popular hikes in the Washington, DC area, and features extremely rugged terrain, with granite cliffs up to 90 feet high. This scene was produced using MODIS direct broadcast data received and processed at the Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The smoke plume appears blue-grey while the red and yellow pixels show the locations of the smoldering and flaming portions of the fire, respectively. Image by Liam Gumley, Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, and Robert Simmon, NASA GSFC

  17. Floods of September 2010 in Southern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Sanocki, Chris A.; Lorenz, David L.; Mitton, Gregory B.; Kruse, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    During September 22-24, 2010, heavy rainfall ranging from 3 inches to more than 10 inches caused severe flooding across southern Minnesota. The floods were exacerbated by wet antecedent conditions, where summer rainfall totals were as high as 20 inches, exceeding the historical average by more than 4 inches. Widespread flooding that occurred as a result of the heavy rainfall caused evacuations of hundreds of residents, and damages in excess of 64 million dollars to residences, businesses, and infrastructure. In all, 21 counties in southern Minnesota were declared Federal disaster areas. Peak-of-record streamflows were recorded at nine U.S. Geological Survey and three Minnesota Department of Natural Resources streamgages as a result of the heavy rainfall. Flood-peak gage heights, peak streamflows, and annual exceedance probabilities were tabulated for 27 U.S. Geological Survey and 5 Minnesota Department of Natural Resources streamgages and 5 ungaged sites. Flood-peak streamflows in 2010 had annual exceedance probabilities estimated to be less than 0.2 percent (recurrence interval greater than 500 years) at 7 streamgages and less than 1 percent (recurrence interval greater than 100 years) at 5 streamgages and 4 ungaged sites. High-water marks were identified and tabulated for the most severely affected communities of Faribault along the Cannon and Straight Rivers, Owatonna along the Straight River and Maple Creek, Pine Island along the North Branch and Middle Fork Zumbro River, and Zumbro Falls along the Zumbro River. The nearby communities of Hammond, Henderson, Millville, Oronoco, Pipestone, and Rapidan also received extensive flooding and damage but were not surveyed for high-water marks. Flood-peak inundation maps and water-surface profiles for the four most severely affected communities were constructed in a geographic information system by combining high-water-mark data with the highest resolution digital elevation model data available. The flood maps and

  18. Perimeter security for Minnesota correctional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, D.; Spencer, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    For the past few years, the Minnesota Department of Corrections, assisted by Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a set of standards for perimeter security at medium, close, and maximum custody correctional facilities in the state. During this process, the threat to perimeter security was examined and concepts about correctional perimeter security were developed. This presentation and paper will review the outcomes of this effort, some of the lessons learned, and the concepts developed during this process and in the course of working with architects, engineers and construction firms as the state upgraded perimeter security at some facilities and planned newmore » construction at other facilities.« less

  19. Penokean tectonics along a promontory-embayment margin in east-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chandler, V.W.; Boerboom, Terrence; Jirsa, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent geologic investigations in east-central Minnesota have utilized geophysical data, test drilling, and high-resolution geochronologic dating to produce a significantly improved map of a poorly exposed part of the 1880-1830 Ma Penokean orogen. These investigations have elucidated major changes in the structure of the orogen, as compared to its counterparts in northern Michigan and northwestern Wisconsin. Foreland basin, fold and thrust belt, and magmatic terrane components that are recognized to the east extend into east-central Minnesota, but they appear to be deflected southwards and truncated in proximity to Archean rocks of the Minnesota River Valley (MRV) subprovince. In contrast, the interior of the MRV subprovince to the southwest shows little sign of Penokean tectonism. In addition, the magmatic and metamorphic rocks of the internal zone of the orogen in east-central Minnesota are extensively invaded by ca. 1785-1770 Ma granitic rocks (the East-Central Minnesota Batholith), whereas, post-orogenic granites of this age occur sparingly to the east. These differences in orogenic structure may be related to their location near the juncture of an embayment (Becker embayment) and a promontory (MRV promontory) that formed the pre-Penokean continental margin. In this scenario, the MRV promontory, which at the surface consists chiefly of high-metamorphic-grade Mesoarchean gneisses, would have formed competent, high-standing crust that resisted deformation and did not host significantly thick continental margin sequences. In contrast, the part of the Becker Embayment adjoining the promontory would have involved relatively weak, low-standing crust that favored deposition of continental margin sequences and, during Penokean collision, would have accommodated tectonic loading of the cratonic margin through thin-skinned deformation. Thrusting of thick embayment sequences and possibly a block of Archean crust (Marshfield terrane) onto the embayment margin may have

  20. Assessment of climate change effects on Canada's National Park system.

    PubMed

    Suffling, Roger; Scott, Daniel

    2002-03-01

    To estimate the magnitude of climate change anticipated for Canada's 38 National Parks (NPs) and Park Reserves, seasonal temperature and precipitation scenarios were constructed for 2050 and 2090 using the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (CCCma) coupled model (CGCM1). For each park, we assessed impacts on physical systems, species, ecosystems and people. Important, widespread changes relate to marine and freshwater hydrology, glacial balance, waning permafrost, increased natural disturbance, shorter ice season, northern and upward altitudinal species and biome shifts, and changed visitation patterns. Other changes are regional (e.g., combined East coast subsidence and sea level rise increase coastal erosion and deposition, whereas, on the Pacific coast, tectonic uplift negates sea level rise). Further predictions concern individual parks (e.g., Unique fens of Bruce Peninsular NP will migrate lakewards with lowered water levels, but structural regulation of Lake Huron for navigation and power generation would destroy the fens). Knowledge gaps are the most important findings. For example: we could not form conclusions about glacial mass balance, or its effects on rivers and fjords. Likewise, for the East Coast Labrador Current we could neither estimate temperature and salinity effects of extra iceberg formation, nor the further effects on marine food chains, and breeding park seabirds. We recommend 1) Research on specific large knowledge gaps; 2) Climate change information exchange with protected area agencies in other northern countries; and 3) incorporating climate uncertainty into park plans and management. We discuss options for a new park management philosophy in the face of massive change and uncertainty.

  1. Parks or Prisons?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Gareth

    1998-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity in which students assume the role of grizzly bears in Banff National Park. Concepts such as species diversity, fitness, natural selection, habitat loss, extinction, and population dynamics are discussed. Children learn how human activities can affect the bear's reproductive success. Lists materials, instructional…

  2. Parks and Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov Websites

    information... Outdoor Recreational Trails Advisory Board recruiting new members (5/10/18) for more Involved Volunteers Employment Advisory Board Partners Friends of Parks Poems in Place About Us Contact Eagle Watch Issues Bid Calendar & Results Heritage Newsletter Advisory Board Meetings Store

  3. Olympic National Park

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    It has to be one of America’s most diverse national park landscapes. If you walked from west to east across Olympic National Park, you would start at the rocky Pacific shoreline, move into rare temperate rainforests and lush river valleys, ascend glaciers and rugged mountain peaks, and then descend into a comparatively dry rain shadow and alpine forest. From the beach to the top of Mount Olympus, you would rise 7,980 feet (2430 meters) above sea level. Situated on the Olympic Peninsula in northwestern Washington, these lands were first set aside as a national monument in 1909 by Theodore Roosevelt. Twenty-nine years later, his cousin Franklin officially established Olympic National Park. International institutions have also made a case for treasuring this land, as the area was declared an International Biosphere Reserve in 1976 and a World Heritage Site in 1981. The park encompasses nearly 923,000 acres of wild lands, including 60 named glaciers, 73 miles of coast, and 3,000 miles of rivers and streams. Read more: go.nasa.gov/2bRmzSJ Credit: NASA/Landsat8 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  4. Karst database development in Minnesota: Design and data assembly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gao, Y.; Alexander, E.C.; Tipping, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    The Karst Feature Database (KFD) of Minnesota is a relational GIS-based Database Management System (DBMS). Previous karst feature datasets used inconsistent attributes to describe karst features in different areas of Minnesota. Existing metadata were modified and standardized to represent a comprehensive metadata for all the karst features in Minnesota. Microsoft Access 2000 and ArcView 3.2 were used to develop this working database. Existing county and sub-county karst feature datasets have been assembled into the KFD, which is capable of visualizing and analyzing the entire data set. By November 17 2002, 11,682 karst features were stored in the KFD of Minnesota. Data tables are stored in a Microsoft Access 2000 DBMS and linked to corresponding ArcView applications. The current KFD of Minnesota has been moved from a Windows NT server to a Windows 2000 Citrix server accessible to researchers and planners through networked interfaces. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  5. Parking Structures and the Space Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    2000-01-01

    Presents some solutions to overcrowded parking on college campuses. Tips on selecting sites for parking garages, making parking decks blend with adjacent communities, and turning parking garages into multi use facilities are addressed. (GR)

  6. NASA in the Park, 2018

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-06-20

    NASA in the Park on June 16 in Huntsville featured more than 60 exhibits and demonstrations by NASA experts, as well as performances by Marshall musicians, educational opportunities, games and hands-on activities for all ages. MSFC Summer Interns Eben Lenfest, Nick Bonini, and April Benedict display their artistic talents on Big Spring Park sidewalk during NASA in the Park festivities.

  7. Careers in Parks and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Center of Leisure Studies.

    As reported in the document, the park and recreation profession, a growing field, emphasizes involving people in meaningful leisure activities. This service profession offers varied career opportunities in the areas of public recreation, park management, conservation and outdoor recreation, and park and resource planning. Positions are also…

  8. Equalization Trends in Minnesota Education Finance, 1972 through 1987. A Staff Report to the Minnesota Legislative Commission on Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutter, Joel A.; Hopeman, Alan R., Jr.

    This report is a study of the degree of equalization of school district revenues and tax rates in Minnesota, with emphasis on changes that have occurred over recent years. The report was prepared by the research staff of the Minnesota Senate and House of Representatives. The study places emphasis on the role of school district property wealth in…

  9. Cultural Resource Investigation of Lands Affected by a Flood Control Project at Chaska, Minnesota, along the Minnesota River

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    ethnohistory 1959-76 Minnesota, North Dakota, annual archaeological research 1967 Paleolithic site survey, Pakistan Professional Associations: American...34Interesting Archaeological Reading." Minnesota Archaeologist, Vol. 32, No’s. 1 and 2, pp. 113-114. "Notes on a Paleolithic Site Survey in Pakistan." Asian

  10. Cancer in the Minnesota Hmong population.

    PubMed

    Ross, Julie A; Xie, Yang; Kiffmeyer, William R; Bushhouse, Sally; Robison, Leslie L

    2003-06-15

    The Hmong are an isolated, agrarian people who settled in the mountainous regions of what today are Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. After the Vietnam War, many Hmong were relocated to the U.S. Minnesota has the second largest population (after California) of Hmong individuals. The objective of this study was to examine cancer incidence in this population, because it may indicate areas for targeted surveillance and intervention. The Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System database was screened for Hmong surnames, and proportional incidence ratios (PIRs) were calculated for the period 1988-1999. Compared with all Minnesotans, the Hmong population had increased PIRs for nasopharyngeal cancer (PIR, 39.39; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 21.01-66.86), gastric cancer (PIR, 8.70; 95% CI, 5.39-13.25), hepatic cancer (PIR, 8.08; 95% CI, 3.88-14.71), and cervical cancer (PIR, 3.72; 95% CI, 2.04-6.20) and had decreased PIRs for prostate cancer, breast cancer, Hodgkin disease, and melanoma. The current observations have implications for cancer control interventions. In particular, an increased incidence of cervical cancer might be addressed in part by targeting culturally sensitive screening programs in the Hmong population. Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society.

  11. Survival of postfledging mallards in northcentral Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, Ronald E.; Sargeant, Glen A.

    1999-01-01

    Effective, economical management of waterfowl populations requires an understanding of age-, sex-, and cause-specific forces of mortality. We used radio telemetry to estimate survival rates of immature mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) from fledging to autumn migration in northcentral Minnesota. We monitored 48 females and 42 males during 1972-74 and observed 31 deaths during 2,984 exposure-days. We attributed 7 deaths to predation and 24 to hunting. Survival rates were 0.86 (SE=0.047) for the postfledging-prehunting period, 0.29 (SE=0.107) from the onset of hunting to migration, and 0.25 (SE=0.094) for both periods combined. Natural mortality of fledged young had a negligible effect on recruitment to migration. Reducing natural mortality of fledged juvenile mallards would not have been a feasible means of increasing recruitment. Management strategies that increased nest success, increased brood survival, or decreased hunting mortality would more likely have produced meaningful gains in recruitment and are worthy subjects for continuing study. In northcentral Minnesota, changes in waterfowl habitats, predator populations, and hunting pressure have probably not changed the relative importance of hunting and nonhunting mortality to fledged juvenile mallards since our data were collected.

  12. Public health assessment for New Brighton/Arden Hills (A/K/A US Army Twin Cities ammunition plant), New Brighton, Ramsey County, Minnesota, Region 5. Cerclis No. MN213820908. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-24

    The New Brighton/Arden Hills National Priorities List (NPL) Site in Ramsey County, Minnesota, includes the 4-square-mile Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP) and portions of seven nearby communities: New Brighton, St. Anthony, Arden Hills, Shoreview, Mounds View, Columbia Heights, and Minneapolis. In June 1981, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) and the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) discovered trichloroethylene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in municipal, mobile home park, and private well water in the vicinity of TCAAP. Initial analysis of TCAAP water supply wells revealed high concentrations of TCE (720 parts per billion ppb), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (360 ppb),more » 1,1-dichloroethane (130 ppb), and other VOCs. From its review of available data, ATSDR concludes that hazardous waste sites within TCAAP are public health hazards because people were exposed in the past to groundwater contaminants at concentrations that may cause adverse health effects.« less

  13. Mid-Pleistocene cosmogenic minimum-age limits for pre-Wisconsinan glacial surfaces in southwestern Minnesota and southern Baffin Island: A multiple nuclide approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bierman, P.R.; Marsella, K.A.; Patterson, Chris; Davis, P.T.; Caffee, M.

    1999-01-01

    Paired 10Be and 26Al analyses (n = 14) indicate that pre-Wisconsinan, glaciated bedrock surfaces near the northern (Baffin Island) and southern (Minnesota) paleo-margins of the Laurentide Ice Sheet have long and complex histories of cosmic-ray exposure, including significant periods of partial or complete shielding from cosmic rays. Using the ratio, 26Al/10Be, we calculate that striated outcrops of Sioux Quartzite in southwestern Minnesota (southern margin) were last overrun by ice at least 500,000 years ago. Weathered bedrock tors on the once-glaciated uplands of Baffin Island (northern margin) are eroding no faster than 1.1 m Myr-1, the equivalent of at least 450,000 years of surface and near-surface exposure. Our data demonstrate that exposure ages and erosion rates calculated from single nuclides can underestimate surface stability dramatically because any intermittent burial, and the resultant lowering of nuclide production rates and nuclide abundances, will remain undetected.

  14. Assessment of ground-water contamination by coal-tar derivatives, St. Louis Park area, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hult, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Contaminants reached the Ironton-Galesville aquifer through at least two deep multiaquifer wells (W23 and W38), but the extent of contamination in this aquifer, and in the underlying Mount Simon-Hinckley aquifer, is not known.

  15. Hydrographic surveys of four narrows within the Namakan reservoir system, Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Brenda K.; Strauch, Kellan R.; Ziegeweid, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey performed multibeam echosounder hydrographic surveys of four narrows in the Namakan reservoir system in August 2011, in cooperation with the International Joint Commission and Environment Canada. The data-collection effort was completed to provide updated and detailed hydrographic data to Environment Canada for inclusion in a Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydraulic model. The Namakan reservoir system is composed of Namakan, Kabetogama, Sand Point, Crane, and Little Vermilion Lakes. Water elevations in the Namakan reservoir system are regulated according to rule curves, or guidelines for water-level management based on the time of year, established by the International Joint Commission. Water levels are monitored by established gages on Crane Lake and the outlet of Namakan Lake at Kettle Falls, but water elevations throughout the system may deviate from these measured values by as much as 0.3 meters, according to lake managers and residents. Deviations from expected water elevations may be caused by between-lake constrictions (narrows). According to the 2000 Rule Curve Assessment Workgroup, hydrologic models of the reservoir system are needed to better understand the system and to evaluate the recent changes made to rule curves in 2000. Hydrographic surveys were performed using a RESON SeaBat™7125 multibeam echosounder system. Surveys were completed at Namakan Narrows, Harrison Narrows, King Williams Narrows, and Little Vermilion Narrows. Hydrographic survey data were processed using Caris HIPSTM and SIPSTM software that interpolated a combined uncertainty and bathymetric estimator (CUBE) surface. Quality of the survey results was evaluated in relation to standards set by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) for describing the uncertainty of hydrographic surveys. More than 90 percent of the surveyed areas at the four narrows have resulting bed elevations that meet the IHO “Special Order” quality. Survey datasets published in this report are formatted as text files of x-y-z coordinates and as CARIS Spatial ArchiveTM (CSARTM) files with corresponding metadata.

  16. Valuing the Benefits of the Education Provided by Public Universities: A Case Study of Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damon, Amy; Glewwe, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This study estimates the value of the private and public benefits that accrue to Minnesota residents from state government subsidies to higher education. In 2005, the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system received $832 million from Minnesota's state government to support educational programs. These…

  17. 78 FR 75581 - Minnesota Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. IC-30821; File No. 812-14158] Minnesota Life...: Minnesota Life Insurance Company (``Minnesota Life'' or ``Insurance Company''), Variable Annuity Account...., Washington, D.C. 20549- 1090. Applicants, c/o Daniel P. Preiner, Counsel, Minnesota Life Insurance Company...

  18. Outcome Evaluation: Minnesota Reading Corps PreK Program. Full Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markovitz, Carrie E.; Hernandez, Marc W.; Hedberg, Eric C.; Silberglitt, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Minnesota Reading Corps is the largest AmeriCorps State program in the country. Its mission is to help every Minnesota child become a proficient reader by the end of third grade. To meet this goal, the Minnesota Reading Corps and its host organization, ServeMinnesota Action Network, engages a diverse group of AmeriCorps members to provide…

  19. Motor-park people shift gear.

    PubMed

    Nnoli, C

    1992-01-01

    White, U.S. homosexual males were primarily affected in the early stages of the AIDS pandemic. Some Western researchers argued, however, that the syndrome originated in Africa. Strong political and social response to this notion resulted in only an anemic response to the growing AIDS epidemic in Nigeria. Nonetheless, the Stop AIDS Organization finally launched the Motor Park AIDS Education Program (MPAEP) in 1988, for health and education outreach to populations at risk of STDs and HIV infection. Specifically targeted are long-distance truck drivers, their young male assistants known as motor boys, and the barmaids, prostitutes, and homeless juveniles who frequent motor parks where these drivers rest while on the road. Many of these long-haul drivers have unprotected casual and commercial sex, both homosexual and heterosexual, take drugs, and suffer high rates of STDs. Marginalized, 75% illiterate, and speaking a variety of languages, these populations tend to be largely ignorant of the incurable nature of AIDS. Over 45% of motor park populations are estimated to be infected with an STD, or to have a future re-infection. These drivers are optimal vectors for the spread of HIV both internationally and within Nigeria. MPAEP workers work 6 days/week in the larger interstate motor parks to reach out to their predominantly male customers. They meet a host of primary health needs, and refer STD clients for testing and treatment. Drug use and homosexuality are 2 topics of discussion especially taboo in African society which have nonetheless been vigorously researched by MPAEP. Many drivers are unacknowledged bisexuals who have sex with their motor boys. Workers therefore explain the need to use condoms in same-sex activity without specifically mentioning homosexuality. Many Nigerians deny the existence of HIV and AIDS, are reluctant to speak about sex, and consider MPAEP workers to be intruders. Despite opposition in Muslim- dominated Northern Nigeria, however, program

  20. Birds of the St. Croix River valley: Minnesota and Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faanes, Craig A.

    1981-01-01

    The St. Croix River Valley encompasses nearly 11,550 km2 in east-central Minnesota and northwestern Wisconsin. A wide range of habitats are available for birds including upland oak, lowland deciduous, maple-basswood, lowland and upland coniferous forests, natural basin wetlands, and grasslands. Situated in the north-central region of the United States, the valley is a biological 'crossroads' for many species. Because of the mixed affinities of plant communities, the valley includes the northern and southern range limits for a number of species. Also, because the valley lies near the forest-prairie transition zone, many typical western breeding species (e.g. pintail, western meadowlark, yellow-headed blackbird) breed in proximity to typical eastern species such as tufted titmouse, eastern meadowlark, and cardinal. From 1966 to 1980, I conducted extensive surveys of avian distribution and abundance in the St. Croix River Valley. I have supplemented the results of these surveys with published and unpublished observations contributed by many ornithologists. These additional data include compilations from Christmas Bird Counts sponsored by the National Audubon Society and from the Breeding Bird Survey coordinated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Three hundred fourteen species have been recorded in the study area; data are presented on the migration period, nesting season distribution, winter distribution, relative abundance, and habitat use of each species. Recognizing the uniqueness of the area, and its importance not only to wildlife but also to man, the U.S. Congress designated the St. Croix a National Scenic Riverway. This action provided a considerable degree of protection to lands along and directly adjacent to the river. Unfortunately, no similar legal measure exists to protect lands away from the river. With the exception of the northern quarter of the St. Croix River Valley, agricultural interests have made significant inroads into the habitat base. The

  1. Pinnacles National Park Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Boxer, Barbara [D-CA

    2011-01-25

    Senate - 05/11/2011 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks. Hearings held. With printed Hearing: S.Hrg. 112-124. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3641, which became Public Law 112-245 on 1/10/2013. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Shenandoah National Park

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    On July 3, 1936, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt stood amidst the crowd in Big Meadows and officially dedicated Shenandoah National Park in Virginia. The Thematic Mapper on the Landsat satellite captured this view of the heart of Shenandoah National Park on October 10, 2010, at the height of the fall “leaf-peeping” season. The orange and brown swath across the image highlights the hilly backbone of the park, where leaves had turned to their fall colors. The 169-kilometer (105-mile) Skyline Drive that meanders across the crest of the ridge is often jammed with tourists in autumn. The park includes more than 518 miles of hiking trails, including more than 100 miles of the Appalachian Trail. The highest peak is Hawksbill Mountain at 4,051 feet (1,235 m), but the most popular with hikers is Old Rag Mountain. A circuitous eight-mile (13 kilometer) trail leads to an exposed, rocky summit 3,291 feet (1,003 meters) above sea level. The 2,200 foot elevation change from base to summit, combined with several rock scrambles, make Old Rag not only the most popular but also the most dangerous hike. Read more: go.nasa.gov/2bRnFxH Credit: NASA/Landsat5 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  3. Mount Rainier National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Robert; Woodward, Andrea; Haggerty, Patricia K.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Griffin, Paul C.; Adams, Michael J.; Hagar, Joan; Cummings, Tonnie; Duriscoe, Dan; Kopper, Karen; Riedel, Jon; Samora, Barbara; Marin, Lelaina; Mauger, Guillaume S.; Bumbaco, Karen; Littell, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Natural Resource Condition Assessments (NRCAs) evaluate current conditions for a subset of natural resources and resource indicators in national parks. NRCAs also report on trends in resource condition (when possible), identify critical data gaps, and characterize a general level of confidence for study findings. The resources and indicators emphasized in a given project depend on the park’s resource setting, status of resource stewardship planning and science in identifying high-priority indicators, and availability of data and expertise to assess current conditions for a variety of potential study resources and indicators. Although the primary objective of NRCAs is to report on current conditions relative to logical forms of reference conditions and values, NRCAs also report on trends, when appropriate (i.e., when the underlying data and methods support such reporting), as well as influences on resource conditions. These influences may include past activities or conditions that provide a helpful context for understanding current conditions and present-day threats and stressors that are best interpreted at park, watershed, or landscape scales (though NRCAs do not report on condition status for land areas and natural resources beyond park boundaries). Intensive cause-andeffect analyses of threats and stressors, and development of detailed treatment options, are outside the scope of NRCAs. It is also important to note that NRCAs do not address resources that lack sufficient data for assessment. For Mount Rainier National Park, this includes most invertebrate species and many other animal species that are subject to significant stressors from climate change and other anthropogenic sources such as air pollutants and recreational use. In addition, we did not include an analysis of the physical hydrology associated with streams (such as riverine landforms, erosion and aggradation which is significant in MORA streams), due to a loss of staff expertise from the USGS

  4. Getting People to Parks,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    2 The area is served by the most extensive transit systems in the world , including subways , surface rail and bus systems, and many miles of...private car. The median trip time of visitors to Jacob Riis Park (Brooklyn) using the subway was three times as long as the time taken by motorists...alternatives are discussed below. Subway Urban mass transit systems are geared to the job of moving large numbers of people to work in the morning and

  5. Northern Studies at Northern Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Review: A Multidisciplinary Journal of the Arts and Social Sciences of the North, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Describes college programs and research projects focused on the Arctic, northern studies, or northern concerns at Athabasca University (Alberta), the University of British Columbia, the University of Alaska Anchorage, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Scott Polar Institute at the University of Cambridge (England), and Kent State University…

  6. Species Composition and Abundance of Stink Bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in Minnesota Field Corn.

    PubMed

    Koch, Robert L; Pahs, Tiffany

    2015-04-01

    In response to concerns of increasing significance of stink bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in northern states, a survey was conducted over 2 yr in Minnesota to characterize the Pentatomidae associated with field corn, Zea mays L. Halyomorpha halys (Stål), an exotic species, was not detected in this survey, despite continued detection of this species as an invader of human-made structures in Minnesota. Five species of Pentatomidae (four herbivorous; one predatory) were collected from corn. Across years, Euschistus variolarius (Palisot de Beauvois) and Euschistus servus euschistoides (Vollenhoven) had the greatest relative abundances and frequencies of detection. In 2012, the abundance of herbivorous species exceeded 25 nymphs and adults per 100 plants (i.e., an economic threshold) in 0.48% of fields. However, the abundance of herbivorous species did not reach economic levels in any fields sampled in 2013. The frequency of detection of herbivorous species and ratio of nymphs to adults was highest during reproductive growth stages of corn. The predator species, Podisus maculiventris (Say), was detected in 0 to 0.32% of fields. These results provide baseline information on the species composition and abundance of Pentatomidae in Minnesota field corn, which will be necessary for documentation of changes to this fauna as a result of the invasion of H. halys and to determine if some native species continue to increase in abundance in field crops. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Cigarette Smoking Among Urban American Indian Adults - Hennepin and Ramsey Counties, Minnesota, 2011.

    PubMed

    Forster, Jean; Poupart, John; Rhodes, Kristine; Peterson-Hickey, Melanie; Lamont, Genelle; D'Silva, Joanne; Erickson, Darin

    2016-06-03

    In 2013, it was estimated that the prevalence of cigarette smoking among American Indians was 36.5%, the highest of all racial/ethnic groups in the continental United States (1). Among American Indians, considerable cultural and geographic variation in cigarette smoking exists. Smoking prevalence among American Indians is lowest in the Southwest and highest in the Upper Midwest/Northern Plains (2). Little information is available about tobacco use among urban American Indians, who might not have ever lived on a reservation or be enrolled in or affiliated with a tribe. In Minnesota, a significant proportion of American Indians reside in urban areas. Among Minnesota's residents who identify as American Indian alone or in combination with another race, 30% live in Hennepin County and Ramsey County, which encompass Minneapolis and St. Paul, respectively (collectively known as the Twin Cities). The predominant tribes (Ojibwe [Chippewa] and Dakota/Lakota/Nakota [Sioux]) traditionally have used locally grown tobacco (Nicotiana rustica), red willow, and other plants for religious ceremonies, although nonceremonial tobacco is often substituted for traditional plants. To assess prevalence of cigarette smoking among this population, it is important to distinguish ceremonial tobacco use (smoked or used in other ways) from nonceremonial tobacco use. To obtain estimates of cigarette smoking prevalence among American Indians in Hennepin and Ramsey counties, the American Indian Adult Tobacco Survey was administered to 964 American Indian residents in 2011, using respondent-driven sampling. Among all participants, 59% were current smokers, 19% were former smokers, and 22% had never smoked. Approximately 40% of employed participants reported that someone smoked in their workplace area during the preceding week. High prevalences of cigarette smoking and secondhand smoke exposure among urban American Indians in Minnesota underscores the need for a comprehensive and culturally

  8. Modified Mercalli Intensity Assignments for the May 16, 1909, Northern Plains Earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.; Stickney, M.C.; Rogers, G.

    2009-01-01

    We combine newspaper accounts and Nuttli's (1976) isoseismal map to assign modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) at 76 towns for the May 16, 1909 Northern Plains earthquake. The earthquake was felt across more than 1,500,000 km2 in the States of Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming and the Provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, and Saskatchewan.

  9. Futures project anticipates changes and challenges facing forests of the northern United States

    Treesearch

    Stephen R. Shifley; W. Keith Moser; Michael E. Goerndt; Nianfu Song; Mark D. Nelson; David J. Nowak; Patrick D. Miles; Brett J. Butler; Ryan D. DeSantis; Francisco X. Aguilar; Brian G. Tavernia

    2014-01-01

    The Northern Forest Futures Project aims to reveal how today's trends and choices are likely to change the future forest landscape in the northeastern and midwestern United States. The research is focused on the 20-state quadrant bounded by Maine, Maryland, Missouri, and Minnesota. This area, which encompasses most of the Central Hardwood Forest region, is the...

  10. Mathematical model of parking space unit for triangular parking area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syahrini, Intan; Sundari, Teti; Iskandar, Taufiq; Halfiani, Vera; Munzir, Said; Ramli, Marwan

    2018-01-01

    Parking space unit (PSU) is an effective measure for the area size of a vehicle, including the free space and the width of the door opening of the vehicle (car). This article discusses a mathematical model for parking space of vehicles in triangular shape area. An optimization model for triangular parking lot is developed. Integer Linear Programming (ILP) method is used to determine the maximum number of the PSU. The triangular parking lot is in isosceles and equilateral triangles shape and implements four possible rows and five possible angles for each field. The vehicles which are considered are cars and motorcycles. The results show that the isosceles triangular parking area has 218 units of optimal PSU, which are 84 units of PSU for cars and 134 units of PSU for motorcycles. Equilateral triangular parking area has 688 units of optimal PSU, which are 175 units of PSU for cars and 513 units of PSU for motorcycles.

  11. 222Rn variations in Mystery Cave, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Krafthefer, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    222Rn concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured at 4- h intervals over a 2-y period in Mystery Cave, southeastern Minnesota. Continuous radon monitors and meteorological sensors connected to data loggers were installed at several locations along commercial tour routes. 222Rn concentrations ranged as high as 25 kBq m-3 in summer and 20 kBq m-3 in winter. Average winter concentrations were lower than summer by at least a factor of two. Seasonal radon variations were correlative with outside air temperatures. During the winter, radon concentrations were observed to fluctuate periodically by factors of 20 or more in under 24 h. Both the long- and short-term variations are correlative with temperature- induced mixing of cave air with surface air.

  12. Direct contracting: a Minnesota case study.

    PubMed

    Burrows, S N; Moravec, R C

    1997-08-01

    During 1996, HealthEast Care, Inc., a healthcare provider-owned and governed direct-contracting company, successfully responded to a request for proposal from the metropolitan Minneapolis-St. Paul-based Buyers Health Care Action Group (BHCAG), a coalition of self-insured employers, to provide healthcare services to members of BHCAG's Choice Plus health plan. HealthEast Care developed a care system proposal for BHCAG that balanced consumer and purchaser expectations with historical healthcare costs. Providers are reimbursed for contracted healthcare services according to a unique fee-for-service, budget-based payment model. BHCAG chose to contract with HealthEast Care and 23 other care systems in the metropolitan Minneapolis-St. Paul area and other parts of Minnesota to serve more than 117,500 Choice Plus enrollees.

  13. Satellite inventory of Minnesota forest resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Marvin E.; Burk, Thomas E.; Ek, Alan R.; Coppin, Pol R.; Lime, Stephen D.; Walsh, Terese A.; Walters, David K.; Befort, William; Heinzen, David F.

    1993-01-01

    The methods and results of using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data to classify and estimate the acreage of forest covertypes in northeastern Minnesota are described. Portions of six TM scenes covering five counties with a total area of 14,679 square miles were classified into six forest and five nonforest classes. The approach involved the integration of cluster sampling, image processing, and estimation. Using cluster sampling, 343 plots, each 88 acres in size, were photo interpreted and field mapped as a source of reference data for classifier training and calibration of the TM data classifications. Classification accuracies of up to 75 percent were achieved; most misclassification was between similar or related classes. An inverse method of calibration, based on the error rates obtained from the classifications of the cluster plots, was used to adjust the classification class proportions for classification errors. The resulting area estimates for total forest land in the five-county area were within 3 percent of the estimate made independently by the USDA Forest Service. Area estimates for conifer and hardwood forest types were within 0.8 and 6.0 percent respectively, of the Forest Service estimates. A trial of a second method of estimating the same classes as the Forest Service resulted in standard errors of 0.002 to 0.015. A study of the use of multidate TM data for change detection showed that forest canopy depletion, canopy increment, and no change could be identified with greater than 90 percent accuracy. The project results have been the basis for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the Forest Service to define and begin to implement an annual system of forest inventory which utilizes Landsat TM data to detect changes in forest cover.

  14. Advancing the Renewable Industry in Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Sparby, Michael; Doering, Alan; Timmerman, Denny

    This report deals with seven topics: 1. "Utilizing Ash Wastes as a Nutrient Source for Corn": As forms of gasification and combustion grow in the area of renewable energy in Minnesota the question arises regarding the utilization/application of the ash co product produced from these processes. Currently there are four facilities in Minnesota producing an ash co product (three ethanol facilities and one combusting biomass to produce energy). These ash wastes are generated from using ethanol by-products as a fuel or heating source for fermentation. Other ash wastes from agricultural sources include turkey litter ash. When applied to agricultural fields,more » ash wastes can be a source of nutrients for agricultural crops. Chemical analyses of ash wastes vary, but 200 to 300 lb of P 2O 5 and K 2O per ton of ash is typical. The value of ash wastes as a fertilizer has increased because commercial fertilizer prices have increased significantly over the last few years. Specifically: Compaction/Agglomeration research- Research included development of an appropriate product for use in current delivery systems by densifying the ash into the form of pellets or briquettes which may reduce fertilizer input cost to farmers. The initiative addresses the use of phosphorus and potassium from co-firing or gasification processes as a fertilizer source. 2. "Use of Glycerol as a Corn Replacement in Calf Starter Diets": Glycerol is a sugar alcohol by-product of bio-diesel production. About 1 gallon of glycerin is produced for every 10 gallons of bio-diesel of which the glycerol content may vary between 63 and almost 100%. There is some uncertainty of the exact energy value of glycerol as an ingredient for animal feed but it has been successfully used as a replacement for corn up to 10% of the diet dry matter for lactating dairy cows. There is a lack of information on incorporating glycerol into diets for pre- and post weaned dairy heifer calves which has the potential to expand the

  15. Mountain bikes and metropolitan park districts: issues and trends identified by state parks and state park districts in Ohio

    Treesearch

    Eric L. Longsdorf; Ruthie Kucharewski

    2007-01-01

    This study explored selected issues and trends related to mountain biking within Ohio State Parks and Park Districts. A convenience sample of 21 State Parks and 26 Park Districts completed a 24-item survey assessing mountain bike: (a) access, (b) activity levels, (c) planning, and (d) management. Results indicated that 86 percent of State Parks participating in the...

  16. 77 FR 59654 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Wupatki...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... the Museum of Northern Arizona and the National Park Service, human remains representing a minimum of... Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, AZ. No known individuals were identified. The 481 associated... ceramic pot was also found. On the basis of architecture and ceramics, Wupatki Pueblo is dated to A.D. 900...

  17. Minnesota Campaign Aims at Financial Independence for Women's Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Peter

    1986-01-01

    A major lobbying and advertising effort on behalf of women's athletics of the University of Minnesota, one of the few major sports-playing institutions where the women's athletic department operates independently from the men's program, is described. (MLW)

  18. Minnesota Guidestar : Board of Directors' statewide ITS strategic plan 2000

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-03-01

    ITS Strategic Plan 2000 is Minnesota Guidestar Board of Directors' guide for implementation of an integrated statewide program for Intelligent Transportation Systems. The plan is intended to be used by the Board of Directors, as well as by the broad ...

  19. Evaluation of Intersection Collision Warning Systems in Minnesota

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-10-01

    The Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) is investing significant resources in intersection collision warning systems (ICWS) based on early indications of effectiveness. However, the effectiveness is not well documented, and negative change...

  20. Summer moisture contents of understory vegetation in northeastern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Robert M. Loomis; Peter J. Roussopoulos; Richard W. Blank

    1979-01-01

    Summer moisture contents and factors for converting fresh plant weights to ovendry biomass estimates are presented for some herbs, mosses, and small shrubs found in the upland forest stand of northeastern Minnesota.

  1. How Energy Efficiency is Adding Jobs in St. Paul, Minnesota

    ScienceCinema

    Hannigan, Jim; Coleman, Chris; Oliver, LeAnn; Jambois, Louis

    2018-02-07

    Saint Paul, Minnesota is using an energy efficiency grant to provide commercial retrofits that will allow a local produce distribution company to dramatically reduce its energy costs and add dozens of new workers.

  2. Minnesota logging utilization factors, 1975-1976--development, use, implications.

    Treesearch

    James E. Blyth; W. Brad Smith

    1979-01-01

    Discusses Minnesota saw log and pulpwood logging utilization factors developed during 1975-1976 and their implications. Compares factors for several species groups and shows their use in estimating growing stock cut for pulpwood and saw logs.

  3. Tall shrub layer biomass in conifer plantations in northeastern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Lewis F. Ohmann

    1982-01-01

    Provides estimates of biomass (pounds/acre) for tall shrub species in 53 conifer plantations in northeastern Minnesota. The estimates are analyzed by plantation age and silvicultural practices used to establish and release the plantations.

  4. Biomass relations for components of five Minnesota shrubs.

    Treesearch

    Richard R. Buech; David J. Rugg

    1995-01-01

    Presents equations for estimating biomass of six components on five species of shrubs common to northeastern Minnesota. Regression analysis is used to compare the performance of three estimators of biomass.

  5. Biomass estimation for five shrubs from northeastern Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Lewis F. Ohmann; David F. Grigal; Robert B. Brander

    1976-01-01

    Describes the derivation and use of biomass prediction equations for five shrub species from northeastern Minnesota. The various equations predict four weight variables based on four shrub dimensions used as independent variables.

  6. Rethinking I-94: Minnesota DOT: A TPCB Peer Exchange

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-12-01

    This report highlights key recommendations and noteworthy practices identified at Rethinking I-94: MnDOT Peer Exchange held on August 15-16, 2017 in St. Paul, Minnesota. This event was sponsored by the Transportation Planning Capacity Building ...

  7. 75 FR 23792 - Minnesota; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... Minnesota have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Big Stone, Blue Earth, Brown....039, Hazard Mitigation Grant. W. Craig Fugate, Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency. [FR...

  8. Slope stabilization guide for Minnesota local government engineers.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-06-01

    This user guide provides simple, costeffective methods for stabilizing locally maintained slopes along roadways in Minnesota. Eight slope stabilization techniques are presented that local government engineers can undertake using locally available ...

  9. Minnesota's experience with scrap shingles in bituminous pavements

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-10-01

    The Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) has experimented with the use of shingle scrap in hot mix asphalt (HMA) since 1990. To date, the source of the shingle scrap has been shingle manufacturers exclusively. The manufactured shingle scra...

  10. How Energy Efficiency is Adding Jobs in St. Paul, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Hannigan, Jim; Coleman, Chris; Oliver, LeAnn

    2011-01-01

    Saint Paul, Minnesota is using an energy efficiency grant to provide commercial retrofits that will allow a local produce distribution company to dramatically reduce its energy costs and add dozens of new workers.

  11. Freight transportation in Minnesota : selected data from federal sources

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1996-10-01

    Welcome to the State Freight Transportation Profile. This report presents information on freight transportation in Minnesota and is part of a series of reports covering all 50 States. The purpose of the report is to present the major Federal database...

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Custom Homes, St. Paul, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    None

    For this project, Amaris worked with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team, NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, to develop the first Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) in Minnesota's cold climate using reasonable, cost-effective, and replicable construction materials and practices. The result is a passive solar, super-efficient 3542-ft2 walkout ranch-style home with all the creature comforts. Along with meeting ZERH standards, Amaris also achieved certifications for Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design for Homes v4, MN Green Path Emerald, and a Builders Association of the Twin Cities Reggie Award of Excellence. The home achieves a HERS score of 41 without photovoltaics; withmore » PV, the home achieves a HERS score of 5.« less

  13. Automated Car Park Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabros, J. P.; Tabañag, D.; Espra, A.; Gerasta, O. J.

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to develop a prototype for an Automated Car Park Management System that will increase the quality of service of parking lots through the integration of a smart system that assists motorist in finding vacant parking lot. The research was based on implementing an operating system and a monitoring system for parking system without the use of manpower. This will include Parking Guidance and Information System concept which will efficiently assist motorists and ensures the safety of the vehicles and the valuables inside the vehicle. For monitoring, Optical Character Recognition was employed to monitor and put into list all the cars entering the parking area. All parking events in this system are visible via MATLAB GUI which contain time-in, time-out, time consumed information and also the lot number where the car parks. To put into reality, this system has a payment method, and it comes via a coin slot operation to control the exit gate. The Automated Car Park Management System was successfully built by utilizing microcontrollers specifically one PIC18f4550 and two PIC16F84s and one PIC16F628A.

  14. Geologic field-trip guide to Lassen Volcanic National Park and vicinity, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muffler, L. J. Patrick; Clynne, Michael A.

    2015-07-22

    This geologic field-trip guide provides an overview of Quaternary volcanism in and around Lassen Volcanic National Park in northern California. The guide begins with a comprehensive overview of the geologic framework and the stratigraphic terminology of the Lassen region, based primarily on the “Geologic map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and vicinity” (Clynne and Muffler, 2010). The geologic overview is then followed by detailed road logs describing the volcanic features that can readily be seen in the park and its periphery. Twenty-one designated stops provide detailed explanations of important volcanic features. The guide also includes mileage logs along the highways leading into the park from the major nearby communities. The field-trip guide is intended to be a flexible document that can be adapted to the needs of a visitor approaching the park from any direction.

  15. Use of Dry Tortugas National Park by threatened and endangered marine turtles: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Kristin M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Sartain-Iverson, Autumn R.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite and acoustic tracking results for green turtles, hawksbills, and loggerheads have revealed patterns in the proportion of time that tagged turtles spend within various zones of the park, including the RNA. Green turtles primarily utilize the shallow areas in the northern portion of the park. Hawksbills were mostly observed near Garden Key and loggerheads were observed throughout DRTO. Our record of turtle captures, recaptures, and sightings over the last 4 years serves as a baseline database for understanding the size classes of each species present in the park, as well as species-specific habitats in DRTO waters.

  16. Are park proximity and park features related to park use and park-based physical activity among adults? Variations by multiple socio-demographic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kaczynski, Andrew T; Besenyi, Gina M; Stanis, Sonja A Wilhelm; Koohsari, Mohammad Javad; Oestman, Katherine B; Bergstrom, Ryan; Potwarka, Luke R; Reis, Rodrigo S

    2014-12-06

    Parks are valuable resources for physical activity (PA) given their widespread availability and low cost to maintain and use. Both proximity to parks and the availability of particular features are important correlates of PA. However, few studies have explored multiple measures of proximity simultaneously or the specific facilities associated with park use and park-based PA among adults, let alone differences across socio-demographic characteristics. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between park proximity and park facilities and adults' park use and park-based PA, while also exploring differences by gender, age, race, and income. Data on monthly park use and weekly amount of PA undertaken in parks were collected via a mail survey of adults from randomly-selected households (n = 893) in Kansas City, Missouri (KCMO) in 2010-2011. Three measures of park proximity were calculated within 1 mile of participating households: distance to the closest park, number of parks, and total park area. All parks in KCMO were audited using the Community Park Audit Tool to determine the availability of 14 park facilities within 1 mile of each participant (e.g., trail, playground, tennis court). Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between each of park use and park-based PA and 1) three measures of park proximity, and 2) the availability of 14 park facilities within 1 mile of participants. Separate analyses were conducted by gender, age, race, and income, while controlling for all socio-demographic characteristics and BMI. Across all sub-samples, distance to the closest park was not significantly related to either park use or park-based PA. However, numerous significant associations were found for the relationship of number of parks and amount of park space within 1 mile with both outcomes. As well, diverse facilities were associated with park use and park-based PA. For both park proximity and facilities, the significant

  17. Floods of June 2012 in northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Christiana R.; Fallon, James D.; Kessler, Erich W.

    2012-01-01

    During June 19–20, 2012, heavy rainfall, as much as 10 inches locally reported, caused severe flooding across northeastern Minnesota. The floods were exacerbated by wet antecedent conditions from a relatively rainy spring, with May 2012 as one of the wettest Mays on record in Duluth. The June 19–20, 2012, rainfall event set new records in Duluth, including greatest 2-day precipitation with 7.25 inches of rain. The heavy rains fell on three major watersheds: the Mississippi Headwaters; the St. Croix, which drains to the Mississippi River; and Western Lake Superior, which includes the St. Louis River and other tributaries to Lake Superior. Widespread flash and river flooding that resulted from the heavy rainfall caused evacuations of residents, and damages to residences, businesses, and infrastructure. In all, nine counties in northeastern Minnesota were declared Federal disaster areas as a result of the flooding. Peak-of-record streamflows were recorded at 13 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages as a result of the heavy rainfall. Flood-peak gage heights, peak streamflows, and annual exceedance probabilities were tabulated for 35 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages. Flood-peak streamflows in June 2012 had annual exceedance probabilities estimated to be less than 0.002 (0.2 percent; recurrence interval greater than 500 years) for five streamgages, and between 0.002 and 0.01 (1 percent; recurrence interval greater than 100 years) for four streamgages. High-water marks were identified and tabulated for the most severely affected communities of Barnum (Moose Horn River), Carlton (Otter Creek), Duluth Heights neighborhood of Duluth (Miller Creek), Fond du Lac neighborhood of Duluth (St. Louis River), Moose Lake (Moose Horn River and Moosehead Lake), and Thomson (Thomson Reservoir outflow near the St. Louis River). Flood-peak inundation maps and water-surface profiles were produced for these six severely affected communities. The inundation maps were constructed in a

  18. Glacial Lake Lind, Wisconsin and Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.D.; Addis, K.L.; Ferber, L.R.; Hemstad, C.B.; Meyer, G.N.; Komai, L.T.

    1999-01-01

    Glacial Lake Lind developed in the pre-late Wisconsinan St. Croix River valley, Minnesota and Wisconsin, and lasted more than 1000 yr during the retreat of the Superior lobe at the end of the Wisconsinan glaciation. Lake Lind sediment consists primarily of red varved silt and clay, but also includes mud-flow deposits, nearshore silt (penecontemporaneously deformed in places), nearshore rippled sand, and deltaic sand. Lake Lind varved red clay is not part of glacial Lake Grantsburg, as suggested by earlier authors, because the red varves are separated from overlying glacial Lake Grantsburg silt and clay by a unit of deltaic and fluvial sand. Furthermore, varve correlations indicate that the base of the red varves is younger to the north, showing that the basin expanded as the Superior lobe retreated and was not a lake basin dammed to the southwest by the advancing Grantsburg sublobe. Varve correlations indicate that the Superior lobe retreated at a rate of about 200 m/yr. Uniform winter-clay thickness throughout most of the varve couplets suggests thermal stratification in the lake with clay trapped in the epilimnion; some clay would exit the lake at the outlet prior to winter freeze. Zones of thicker winter-clay layers, in places associated with mud-flow layers, indicate outlet incision, lake-level fall, and shoreline erosion and resuspension of lake clay. The most likely outlet for glacial Lake Lind was in the southwest part of the lake near the present site of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Nearshore sediment indicates that the lake level of glacial Lake Lind was around 280 m. The elevation of the base of the Lake Lind sediments indicates water depth was 20 to 55 m. Evidence in the southern part of the lake basin suggests that the Superior lobe readvanced at least once during the early stages of glacial Lake Lind. Lake Lind ended not by drainage but by being filled in by prograding deltas and outwash plains composed of sand derived from the retreating Superior lobe. It

  19. An REU Project on the Precambrian Rocks of Yellowstone National Park: Some lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, D.; Mogk, D. W.; Mueller, P. A.; Foster, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    An NSF-funded REU project (2011-2013), based in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), was designed to characterize the geology, geochemistry and geochronology of Precambrian rocks in northern YNP. Over two field seasons two cadres of 12 students (12 women and 12 men) were chosen from small-to-large state universities and private colleges. REU students participated in three major activities constituting a complete research experience: Field studies involved geologic mapping and sampling of Precambrian basement; formulation of testable research questions by smaller working groups; and mapping and sampling projects to address research questions; Analytical studies, sample preparation immediately followed field work with petrographic analysis at students' home institutions and a week-long visit to analytical laboratories to conduct follow-up studies by small research groups during the academic year (Univ. Florida - geochemistry and geochronology; Univ. Minnesota - EMPA analysis); Communicating results, each working group submitted an abstract and collectively presented 13 posters at the 2011 and 2012 GSA Rocky Mountain sectional meetings. We used directed discovery to engage students in a community of practice in the field and found that a long apprenticeship (2-3 weeks) is optimal for novice-master interactions in exploring natural setting. Initial group hikes were used to normalize methods and language of the discipline. Students developed a sense of ownership of the overall project and assumed personal responsibility for directed research projects. Training was provided to: guide students in selection and appropriate use of tools; develop sampling strategies; discuss communal ethics, values, and expectations; develop efficient work habits; stimulate independent thinking; and engage decision-making. It was important to scaffold the field experience to students' level of development to lead to mastery. Analytical activities were designed from rock to analysis so that each

  20. NASA in the Park, 2018

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-06-20

    NASA in the Park on June 16 in Huntsville featured more than 60 exhibits and demonstrations by NASA experts, as well as performances by Marshall musicians, educational opportunities, games and hands-on activities for all ages. MSFC Deputy Director Jody Singer welcomes soloist Alyssa Slocum who sang the National Anthem to officially open NASA in the Park activities.