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Sample records for parkinson dementia syndromes

  1. Neurochemical Approaches in the Laboratory Diagnosis of Parkinson and Parkinson Dementia Syndromes: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jesse, Sarah; Steinacker, Petra; Lehnert, Stefan; Gillardon, Frank; Hengerer, Bastian; Otto, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) is rendered on the basis of clinical parameters, whereby laboratory chemical tests or morphological imaging is only called upon to exclude other neurodegenerative diseases. The differentiation between PD and other diseases of the basal ganglia, especially the postsynaptic Parkinson syndromes multisystem atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), is of decisive importance, on the one hand, for the response to an appropriate therapy, and on the other hand, for the respective prognosis of the disease. However, particularly at the onset of symptoms, it is difficult to precisely distinguish these diseases from each other, presenting with an akinetic-rigid syndrome. It is not yet possible to conduct a neurochemical differentiation of Parkinson syndromes. Therefore, a reliable biomarker is still to be found that might predict the development of Parkinson dementia. Since this situation is currently the subject of various different studies, the following synopsis is intended to provide a brief summary of the investigations addressing the field of the early neurochemical differential diagnosis of Parkinson syndromes and the early diagnosis of Parkinson dementia, from direct α-synuclein detection to proteomic approaches. In addition, an overview of the tested biomarkers will be given with regard to their possible introduction as a screening method. PMID:19298613

  2. Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Kramberger, Milica G

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis.

  3. Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Kramberger, Milica G

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis. PMID:27502301

  4. Parkinson's disease and dementia.

    PubMed

    Padovani, A; Costanzi, C; Gilberti, N; Borroni, B

    2006-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, affecting about 1% of the population over the age of 60. In addition to motor abnormalities, there are several non-motor signs and symptoms that may create a considerable burden for patients and care-givers. Dementia is common and affects approximately 40% of PD patients during the course of the disease, the risk for the development of dementia being 6 times higher than in non-PD age-matched controls. In most cases, PD patients with dementia (PDD) display a dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial deficits, while memory is relatively unaffected. The overlap between PDD and dementia with Lewy bodies suggests that they likely share similar underlying neuropathological processes.

  5. C9ORF72 intermediate repeat expansion in patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or Parkinson's disease complicated by psychosis or dementia in a Sardinian population.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Antonino; Solla, Paolo; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Chio, Adriano; Mascia, Marcello Mario; Modugno, Nicola; Muroni, Antonella; Orofino, Gianni; Di Stefano, Francesca; Calvo, Andrea; Moglia, Cristina; Restagno, Gabriella; Meloni, Mario; Farris, Rita; Ciaccio, Daniela; Puddu, Roberta; Vacca, Melisa Iris; Melis, Rosanna; Murru, Maria Rita; Tranquilli, Stefania; Corongiu, Daniela; Rolesu, Marcella; Cuccu, Stefania; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Marrosu, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The hexanucleotide repeat expansion GGGGCC in the C9ORF72 gene larger than 30 repeats has been identified as a major genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Recent papers investigated the possible pathogenic role and associated clinical phenotypes of intermediate C9ORF72 repeat expansion ranging between 20 and 30 repeats. Some studies suggested its pathogenicity for typical Parkinson's disease (PD), atypical parkinsonian syndromes, FTD with/without parkinsonism, and ALS with/without parkinsonism or with/without dementia. In our study, we aimed to screen patients affected by atypical parkinsonian syndromes or PD complicated by psychosis or dementia for the presence of C9ORF72 repeat expansions, and in unrelated age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Consecutive unrelated patients with atypical parkinsonian syndromes and patients with PD complicated by psychosis or dementia were included in this study. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes were further divided into two groups: one with patients who met the criteria for the classic forms of atypical parkinsonism [multiple system atrophy (MSA), Lewy body disease (LBD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD)] ;and patients who did not meet the above criteria, named non-classical atypical parkinsonism with or without dementia. Ninety-two unrelated patients (48 men, 44 women) were enrolled. None of the patients was found to be carriers of C9ORF72 repeat expansions with more than 30 repeats. Intermediate 20-30 repeat expansions were detected in four female patients (4.3 %). Three of them presented clinical features of atypical parkinsonian syndromes, two with non-classical atypical parkinsonism and dementia FTD-like, and one with non-classical atypical parkinsonism without dementia. The other patient presented clinical features of typical PD complicated by psychosis. Among 121 control subjects, none presented long or short expansion for the C9ORF

  6. Dementia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Karen E.

    2004-05-01

    One of the more recently recognized problems in treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is development of cognitive dysfunction and, in many cases, frank dementia. As patients with PD live longer, because of improved care and treatment of motor symptoms, dementia in PD is becoming a major contributor to morbidity in the illness. Prevalence studies suggest that up to 30% of patients with PD develop dementia. Dementia in PD patients is often a multifactorial condition. Neuropathologic changes caused by PD itself may cause memory loss. However, some patients with PD and memory decline also have pathologic changes that are more consistent with Alzheimer's disease. Many PD patients have a mix of the two types of pathology. Other factors, such as underlying illnesses, medication side effects, and interaction of therapeutic agents, may contribute to cognitive changes in PD patients. Predictors of development of dementia in PD include advancing age and severity of neurologic symptoms, which may interact with one another to produce this effect. Recent work suggests that tobacco use also may increase risk of PD dementia, despite its possible protective effect against development of PD itself. Presence of psychiatric illness, especially depression, may interfere with cognition and exacerbate memory loss. Reduction in the dose of dopaminergic agents and of other medications may be helpful in partially improving cognitive function in some cases. The balance between improvement of motor function and preservation of cognitive abilities must be weighed, and it is important for clinicians to discuss this trade-off with patients and their families. At this time, there is no US Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacologic treatment for dementia in PD. However, medication used to treat Alzheimer's disease, such as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, may slow progression of memory loss in some PD patients. Based on work from small double-blind studies, open-label trials

  7. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Dementia Types of Dementia Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies Down ... Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher Study Name 2015 Jesse Mez ...

  8. Neuropsychological prediction of dementia in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahieux, F.; Fenelon, G.; Flahault, A.; Manifacier, M.; Michelet, D.; Boller, F.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To identify neuropsychological characteristics predictive of later dementia in Parkinson's disease.
METHODS—A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery was administered to a cohort of 89 initially non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease consecutively enrolled at a specialised Parkinson's disease clinic. They were reassessed after a mean of 3.5 years for the diagnosis of dementia. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify baseline characteristics predictive of dementia.
RESULTS—Only four of the baseline clinical characteristics of Parkinson's disease and neuropsychological variables remained independently linked to subsequent development of dementia: the age of onset of Parkinson's disease (>60 years; relative risk (RR) 4.1, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.8-24.0, p<0.03), the picture completion subtest of the Wechsler adult intelligence scale (score<10; RR 4.9, 95% CI 1.0-24.1, p<0.02), the interference section of the Stroop test (score<21; RR 3.8, p=0.08), and a verbal fluency task (score<9; RR 2.7, 95% CI 0.8-9.1, p=0.09). Depressive symptoms and the severity of motor impairment were not predictive of dementia.
CONCLUSION—These features are different from the neuropsychological characteristics predictive of Alzheimer's dementia in healthy elderly people (mainly memory and language performance). They are in keeping with the well known specificity of the impairments in Parkinson's disease for visuospatial abilities and difficulties in inhibiting irrelevant stimuli. It is postulated that the composite nature of the picture completion subtest, involving several cognitive abilities impaired in Parkinson's disease, explains its sensitivity.

 PMID:9489527

  9. Adult-onset phenylketonuria with rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Tufekcioglu, Zeynep; Cakar, Arman; Bilgic, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Gurvit, Hakan; Emre, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene, which converts phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although it is principally a childhood disorder, in rare cases, the first signs of PKU may develop in late adulthood resembling common neurological diseases. Here we report a 59-year-old, previously normal functioning man who was admitted with blurred vision, cognitive problems, and gait difficulty that began 8 months before. He had brisk reflexes and left side dominant parkinsonism. His Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was 25/30, and neuropsychological evaluation revealed a dysexecutive syndrome with simultanagnosia and constructional apraxia. His Clinical Dementia Rating score (CDR) was 1. Cranial MRI revealed bilateral diffuse hyperintense lesions in parietal and occipital white matter in T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, and diffusion weighted images. Diagnostic workup for rapidly progressive dementias was all normal except PHE level which was found to be highly elevated (1075 μmol/L, normal 39-240 μmol/L) with normal tyrosine level (61.20 μmol/L, normal 35-100 μmol/L). Three months after PHE-restricted diet, his cognitive impairment and signs of parkinsonism significantly improved, with MRI scan unchanged. This case demonstrates that late-onset PKU is a rare, treatable cause of rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism with certain constellations such as consanguinity and white matter abnormalities (WMAs) in imaging. PMID:26962957

  10. Parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam.

    PubMed

    Steele, John C

    2005-08-01

    On Guam and in two other Pacific locales, indigenous residents and immigrants are prone to familial neurodegeneration that manifests as atypical parkinsonism, dementia, motor neuron disease, or a combination of these three phenotypes. This progressive and fatal disease of the Mariana islands, the Kii peninsula of Japan, and the coastal plain of West New Guinea is similar and the pathological features have close affiliation with universal tauopathies, including progressive supranuclear palsy, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The Chamorros of Guam call the disease lytico-bodig, and neuroscientists refer to it as the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism-dementia complex. During recent decades, its prevalence has declined progressively, and the age at onset has steadily increased. In 2004, motor neuron disease, once 100 times more common than elsewhere is rare, atypical parkinsonism is declining, and only dementia remains unusually common in elderly females. The cause of this obscure malady remains uncertain, despite 60 years of international research, but its ending implicates environmental influences rather than genetic predisposition.

  11. [Treatable dementia syndromes].

    PubMed

    Biedert, S; Schreiter, U; Alm, B

    1987-03-01

    Dementia--a syndrome of acquired intellectual deterioration--is an etiologically non-specific condition which is permanent, progressive, or reversible. In the evaluation of demented patients, a careful exposure history will determine the possible role of drugs, metals, or toxins. The physical examination may reveal focal deficits in cases of intracranial mass lesions and spasticity or ataxia of the lower limbs if hydrocephalus is present. Coexistance of dementia and peripheral neuropathy usually indicates a toxic or metabolic disorder. Asterixis, myoclonus, and postural tremor are common in toxic-metabolic dementias, while resting tremor, choreoathetosis, and rigidity occur in progressive extrapyramidal disorders. EEG is focally abnormal in cases of cerebral mass lesions and exhibits generalized slowing in toxic-metabolic encephalopathies. CT will aid in the identification of hydrocephalus, subdural hematomas, and intracranial mass lesions. A thorough laboratory evaluation including complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, electrolytes, blood urea nitrogen and blood sugar, liver and thyroid tests, calcium and phosphorus levels, B12 and folate levels, serum copper and ceruloplasmin, VDRL, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, and lumbar puncture may demonstrate treatable disorders that are adversely affecting intellectual function. Elderly individuals are particularly susceptible to the effects of toxic or metabolic disorders, and a mild dementia might be exaggerated by relatively minor fluctuations in metabolic status. Treatable causes of dementia should be considered in all demented patients.

  12. Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Keener, Adrienne M; Bordelon, Yvette M

    2016-08-01

    Parkinsonism is a clinical syndrome, which is characterized by bradykinesia, rigidity, rest tremor, and postural instability. Idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) is the most common cause of this syndrome, though there are several other important etiologies that must be considered. These include the atypical Parkinsonian disorders multiple system atrophy (MSA), dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal syndrome (CBS); as well as secondary causes of parkinsonism. These various disease entities may be distinguished based on key clinical features, which is critical for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:27643900

  13. [Neuropsychological characteristics and diagnostic approach to Parkinsońs disease dementia and Lewy body dementia].

    PubMed

    Yubero, Raquel

    2011-10-01

    When approaching the neurophysiological characteristics and diagnostic approach to Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) and Lewy body dementia (LBD), the first idea that comes to mind is that both types of dementia fall within the group of subcortical dementias, with the practical implications that this observation entails. We should therefore leave our knowledge of Alzheimer's dementia and other cortical dementias to one side as, in most cases, these forms of dementia do not correspond clinically or diagnostically to subcortical dementias. Therefore, the clinical and therapeutic approach of PDD and LBD differs from that of cortical dementias in form, if not in essence.

  14. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27193487

  15. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Brain volumes in Guam dementia vs Parkinson dementia complex vs aging Chamorro adults.

    PubMed

    Kaye, J A; Moore, M M; Galasko, D; Craig, U K; Adonay, R; Silbert, L C

    2007-07-10

    We sought to determine if Chamorro individuals with a family history of Guam dementia (GD) or Parkinson dementia complex (PDC) exhibit presymptomatic brain MRI changes. Sixty-six Chamorro subjects had neurocognitive assessment and volumetric MRI. MRI brain volumes differed between diagnostic groups (GD, PDC, control) and according to family history. Chamorros with a family history of PDC or dementia may have increased brain atrophy, suggesting a hereditary susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Visual symptoms in Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Neil K; Clarke, Mike P; Mosimann, Urs P; Burn, David J

    2011-11-01

    Visual symptoms are common in PD and PD dementia and include difficulty reading, double vision, illusions, feelings of presence and passage, and complex visual hallucinations. Despite the established prognostic implications of complex visual hallucinations, the interaction between cognitive decline, visual impairment, and other visual symptoms remains poorly understood. Our aim was to characterize the spectrum of visual symptomatology in PD and examine clinical predictors for their occurrence. Sixty-four subjects with PD, 26 with PD dementia, and 32 age-matched controls were assessed for visual symptoms, cognitive impairment, and ocular pathology. Complex visual hallucinations were common in PD (17%) and PD dementia (89%). Dementia subjects reported illusions (65%) and presence (62%) more frequently than PD or control subjects, but the frequency of passage hallucinations in PD and PD dementia groups was equivalent (48% versus 69%, respectively; P = 0.102). Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity was impaired in parkinsonian subjects, with disease severity and age emerging as the key predictors. Regression analysis identified a variety of factors independently predictive of complex visual hallucinations (e.g., dementia, visual acuity, and depression), illusions (e.g., excessive daytime somnolence and disease severity), and presence (e.g., rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and excessive daytime somnolence). Our results demonstrate that different "hallucinatory" experiences in PD do not necessarily share common disease predictors and may, therefore, be driven by different pathophysiological mechanisms. If confirmed, such a finding will have important implications for future studies of visual symptoms and cognitive decline in PD and PD dementia.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a condition characterized by abnormal ...

  19. Visual symptoms in Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's disease dementia.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Neil K; Clarke, Mike P; Mosimann, Urs P; Burn, David J

    2011-11-01

    Visual symptoms are common in PD and PD dementia and include difficulty reading, double vision, illusions, feelings of presence and passage, and complex visual hallucinations. Despite the established prognostic implications of complex visual hallucinations, the interaction between cognitive decline, visual impairment, and other visual symptoms remains poorly understood. Our aim was to characterize the spectrum of visual symptomatology in PD and examine clinical predictors for their occurrence. Sixty-four subjects with PD, 26 with PD dementia, and 32 age-matched controls were assessed for visual symptoms, cognitive impairment, and ocular pathology. Complex visual hallucinations were common in PD (17%) and PD dementia (89%). Dementia subjects reported illusions (65%) and presence (62%) more frequently than PD or control subjects, but the frequency of passage hallucinations in PD and PD dementia groups was equivalent (48% versus 69%, respectively; P = 0.102). Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity was impaired in parkinsonian subjects, with disease severity and age emerging as the key predictors. Regression analysis identified a variety of factors independently predictive of complex visual hallucinations (e.g., dementia, visual acuity, and depression), illusions (e.g., excessive daytime somnolence and disease severity), and presence (e.g., rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and excessive daytime somnolence). Our results demonstrate that different "hallucinatory" experiences in PD do not necessarily share common disease predictors and may, therefore, be driven by different pathophysiological mechanisms. If confirmed, such a finding will have important implications for future studies of visual symptoms and cognitive decline in PD and PD dementia. PMID:21953737

  20. Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Patients with Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, James B.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Zabetian, Cyrus; Zhang, Jing; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is an already prevalent neurodegenerative disease that is poised to at least double over the next 25 years. Although best known for its characteristic movement disorder, PD is now appreciated commonly to cause cognitive impairment, including dementia, and behavioral changes. Dementia in patients with PD is consequential and has been associated with reduced quality of life, shortened survival, and increased caregiver distress. Here we review clinical presentation and progression, pathological bases, identification of genetic risk factors, development of small molecule biomarkers, and emerging treatments for cognitive impairment in patients with PD. PMID:19754405

  1. A controlled, longitudinal study of dementia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Biggins, C A; Boyd, J L; Harrop, F M; Madeley, P; Mindham, R H; Randall, J I; Spokes, E G

    1992-01-01

    Serial assessments of cognition, mood, and disability were carried out at nine month intervals over a 54 month period on a cohort of 87 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and a matched cohort of 50 control subjects. Dementia was diagnosed from data by rigorously applying DSM-III-R criteria. Initially, 6% (5/87) PD patients were demented, compared with none of the 50 control subjects. A further 10 PD patients met the dementia criteria during the follow up period; this was equivalent, with survival analysis, to a cumulative incidence of 19%. With the number of person years of observation as the denominator, the incidence was 47.6/1000 person years of observation. None of the control subjects fulfilled dementia criteria during the follow up period. The patients with PD who became demented during follow up were older at onset of Parkinson's disease than patients who did not become demented, had a longer duration of Parkinson's disease, and were older at inclusion to the study. PMID:1640232

  2. [Dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: a review].

    PubMed

    Bocanegra, Yamile; Trujillo-Orrego, Natalia; Pineda, David

    2014-12-16

    INTRODUCTION. The cognitive disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD) have traditionally been associated with the presence of dementia in later stages of the disease. Recent studies, however, consider that cognitive impairment can appear as of early stages. Knowing the cognitive profile of PD furthers our understanding of the clinical phenotype, making it easier to reach a timely diagnosis and favouring intervention on the symptoms from the initial stages. AIM. To present a review of the literature on mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia associated with PD. DEVELOPMENT. Several studies report that patients with PD who have a prolonged time to progression develop dementia. Yet, there have also been reports claiming that, as of the early stages, patients can present subtle cognitive alterations known as MCI. The initial neuropsychological profile is mainly of a non-amnesic type, characterised by executive dysfunction, alterations affecting attention, operative memory deficit and faulty retrieval of information. When patients develop dementia, disorders will arise in the storage of information, in semantic fluency, and in visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. Currently there are criteria available for diagnosing the MCI and dementia associated with PD, as well as valid reliable instruments for detecting those disorders. CONCLUSIONS. Cognitive symptoms are frequent in PD. From the initial stages of the disease onwards patients may present MCI that is mainly characterised by a fronto-subcortical cognitive profile, whereas dementia usually develops at later stages, when a pattern of posterior cortical cognitive disorder is also observed.

  3. Diogenes syndrome in patients suffering from dementia.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Lucetti, Claudio; Vedovello, Marcella; Nuti, Angelo

    2012-12-01

    Diogenes syndrome (DS) is a behavioral disorder of the elderly. Symptoms include living in extreme squalor, a neglected physical state, and unhygienic conditions. This is accompanied by a self-imposed isolation, the refusal of external help, and a tendency to accumulate unusual objects. To explore the phenomenon of DS in dementia we searched for the terms: "Diogenes syndrome, self-neglect, dementia. " It has long been understood that individuals with dementia often become shut-ins, living in squalor, in the Eastern Baltimore study, dementia was present in 15% of the elderly cases with moderate and severe social breakdown syndrome; twice as many as in the general population of the same age group. Researchers have underlined the frequent presence of DS (36%) in frontotemporal dementia (FTD): different neuropsychological modifications in FTD may contribute to symptoms of DS. The initial treatment should be a behavioral program, but there is not sufficient information regarding pharmacological treatment of the syndrome.

  4. Parkinson's disease dementia: a diminished role for the Lewy body.

    PubMed

    Libow, Leslie S; Frisina, Pasquale G; Haroutunian, Vahram; Perl, Daniel P; Purohit, Dushyant P

    2009-09-01

    The literature currently views Lewy bodies as central in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) when Alzheimer's disease (AD) or vascular pathology is not present. Because the neuropathology of PDD is not well understood, the pathological features of PDD were characterized in eighteen PD brain specimens using published criteria for AD, Diffuse Lewy Body Disease (DLBD), and Vascular Disease as a framework. Among the PD dementia (n=16) subjects, 3 (19%) did not have LBs outside of the brain stem, nor AD or vascular pathology. In two additional cases, one did have rare LBs in the neocortex and cingulate gyrus. However, these two cases did not meet the diagnostic criteria for DLBD. Beyond these 5 cases, the remaining PD dementia subjects fitted a classical pathological profile consistent with AD (38%), vascular disease (12.5%), DLBD (6%), or a combination of these pathologies (12.5%). The findings from this study do not support the hypothesis that LBs are the main substrate for dementia in PD. More research with a larger sample size is needed to determine whether the LB may be a secondary phenomenon and/or an "innocent-bystander". The entire role of the LB in PD dementia is again brought into question.

  5. Ventricular dilatation and brain atrophy in patients with Parkinson's disease with incipient dementia.

    PubMed

    Camicioli, Richard; Sabino, Jennifer; Gee, Myrlene; Bouchard, Thomas; Fisher, Nancy; Hanstock, Chris; Emery, Derek; Martin, W R Wayne

    2011-07-01

    Age-related ventricular enlargement is accelerated in Alzheimer's disease, but its relationship to cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease is less clear, even though dementia is common in Parkinson's disease. Our goals were to determine if greater enlargement of the ventricles and gray or white matter atrophy occurred in Parkinson's disease patients developing cognitive decline. Older nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease (33) and age- and sex-matched controls (39) were recruited and prospectively assessed for the development of significant cognitive decline over 36 months. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained every 18 months, and ventricular volume and total brain gray and white matter volumes were measured using reliable segmentation of T1-weighted volumetric scans. Subjects with incidental intracranial abnormalities, an atypical course, and stroke as well as dropouts were excluded from a cohort of 52 patients and 50 controls. Among 33 patients and 39 controls, 10 patients and 3 controls developed significant cognitive impairment or dementia. Ventricular change and Parkinson's disease status were significantly associated with dementia. Ventricular change was significantly correlated with change in Mini-Mental Status Examination in the Parkinson's disease with dementia group (r = 0.87, P = .001). Gray matter atrophy was greater in Parkinson's disease with dementia, with similar change over time in both Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's disease with dementia. White matter volumes were not significantly different between Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's disease with dementia; however, the decrease over time might be greater in Parkinson's disease with dementia. Ventricular dilatation occurs early in the course of significant cognitive decline in patients with Parkinson's disease, possibly reflecting both cortical gray and white matter loss. PMID:21442661

  6. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Aarsland, Dag

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) share clinical and pathological similarities. The defining features are motor parkinsonism and cognitive impairment, often accompanied by visual hallucinations, fluctuating consciousness, autonomic and sleep disturbances, and a number of other non-motor symptoms. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be identified in 15% of PD patients at time of diagnosis, and may even precede motor symptoms. MCI usually progresses further, and dementia is a common endpoint. Cognitive impairment is usually the initial symptom of DLB, and the disease course is severe. A variety of biomarkers can assist in the diagnosis and prognosis of PD and DLB, including structural and functional imaging, cerebrospinal fluid, and EEG. Compared to the many treatments available for motor symptoms, relatively few systematic studies exist to guide the treatment of cognitive impairment in PD, and even less in DLB. However, there is good evidence for cholinesterase inhibitors in both DLB and PD with dementia, and some indications that memantine is helpful. Emerging evidence suggest that physical exercise and cognitive training are also effective, as are some reports of various brain stimulation techniques. Disease-modifying agents that delay the rate of cognitive decline in PD and DLB are urgently needed.

  7. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: the dual syndrome hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kehagia, Angie A; Barker, Roger A; Robbins, Trevor W

    2013-01-01

    Research into the heterogeneous nature of cognitive impairment documented in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) has focused on disentangling deficits that vary between individuals, evolve and respond differentially to pharmacological treatments, and relate differentially to PD dementia (PDD). We summarise studies conducted in our laboratory over the last 2 decades, outlining the incremental development of our hypotheses, the starting point for which is our early work on executive deficits mirroring fronto-striatal dysfunction. We present subsequent findings linking these deficits to a model of dopaminergic function that conforms to an inverted curvilinear function. We review studies that investigated the range of dopamine-independent attentional and visuospatial memory deficits seen in PD, demonstrating that abnormalities in these domains more accurately predict PDD. We conclude with an exposition of the dual syndrome hypothesis, which distinguishes between dopaminergically mediated fronto-striatal executive impairments and a dementia syndrome with distinctive prodromal visuospatial deficits in which cholinergic treatments offer some clinical benefits.

  8. Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease: The Dual Syndrome Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kehagia, Angie A.; Barker, Roger A.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2012-01-01

    Research into the heterogeneous nature of cognitive impairment documented in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) has focused on disentangling deficits that vary between individuals, evolve and respond differentially to pharmacological treatments, and relate differentially to PD dementia (PDD). We summarise studies conducted in our laboratory over the last 2 decades, outlining the incremental development of our hypotheses, the starting point for which is our early work on executive deficits mirroring fronto-striatal dysfunction. We present subsequent findings linking these deficits to a model of dopaminergic function that conforms to an inverted curvilinear function. We review studies that investigated the range of dopamine-independent attentional and visuospatial memory deficits seen in PD, demonstrating that abnormalities in these domains more accurately predict PDD. We conclude with an exposition of the dual syndrome hypothesis, which distinguishes between dopaminergically mediated fronto-striatal executive impairments and a dementia syndrome with distinctive prodromal visuospatial deficits in which cholinergic treatments offer some clinical benefits. PMID:23038420

  9. Parkinson's disease dementia: what's in a Lewy body?

    PubMed

    Burn, D J

    2006-01-01

    This brief review deals with pathological aspects of dementia associated with Parkinson's disease (PDD). PDD has been variably linked with cortical Lewy body topography and density. alpha-Synuclein and Alzheimer-type pathology frequently co-exist, suggesting that a combination of pathology related to protein dysmetabolism, possibly with synergistic protein-protein interaction, underpins the cognitive impairment in PDD. Dementia may therefore ensue when a "toxic threshold" is reached, irrespective of the combination of pathologies involved in reaching that threshold. The nature of this putative protein-protein interaction needs to be further elucidated, and also whether there are specific clinical correlates of the pathological substrate. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid proteins or imaging techniques may be useful in future as biomarkers to identify the relative contribution of Lewy-related and Alzheimer-type pathology in a given case of PDD and to inform the rational use of drugs that can reduce alpha-synuclein aggregation and beta-amyloid production.

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Kii Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yui; Morimoto, Satoru; Yoneda, Misao; Kuzuhara, Shigeki; Kokubo, Yasumasa

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex is classified as one of the tauopathies. Methods. The total tau, phosphorylated tau, and amyloid β42 levels were assayed in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex (n = 12), Alzheimer's disease (n = 9), Parkinson's disease (n = 9), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 11), and controls (n = 5) using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Results. Total tau and phosphorylated tau did not increase and amyloid β42 was relatively reduced in Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex. Relatively reduced amyloid β42 might discriminate Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease, and the ratios of phosphorylated-tau to amyloid β42 could discriminate Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex from Alzheimer's disease. Conclusions. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis may be useful to differentiate amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex from Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease.

  11. Motor and cognitive function in Lewy body dementia: comparison with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Gnanalingham, K K; Byrne, E J; Thornton, A; Sambrook, M A; Bannister, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Motor and cognitive function were compared in patients with Lewy body dementia, Parkinson's disease, or Alzheimer's disease, to identify features that may be clinically useful in differentiating Lewy body dementia from Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. METHODS: A range of neuropsychological function and extrapyrimidal signs (EPS) was assessed in 16 patients with Lewy body dementia, 15 with Parkinson's disease, 25 with Alzheimer's disease, and 22 control subjects. RESULTS: The severity of total motor disability scores increased in the following order: controls approximately = Alzheimer's disease << Parkinson's disease < Lewy body dementia. Compared with patients with Parkinson's disease, patients with Lewy body dementia had greater scores for rigidity and deficits in the finger tapping test, but rest tremor and left/right asymmetry in EPS were more evident in Parkinson's disease. Patients with Lewy body dementia were also less likely to present with left/right asymmetry in EPS at the onset of their parkinsonism. "Sensitivity" to neuroleptic drugs was noted in 33% of patients with Lewy body dementia. Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia groups had greater severity of dementia compared with the Parkinson's disease group and controls. Neuropsychological evaluation disclosed severe but similar degrees of impaired performances in tests of attention (digit span), frontal lobe function (verbal fluency, category, and Nelson card sort test) and motor sequencing in both Lewy body dementia and Alzheimer's disease groups, than Parkinson's disease and controls. In the clock face test, improved performance was noted in the "copy" compared to "draw" part of the test in controls, patients with Alzheimer's disease, and those with Parkinson's disease, but not in the patients with Lewy body dementia, who achieved equally poor scores in both parts of the test. CONCLUSIONS: EPS in Lewy body dementia resemble those seen in idiopathic Parkinson's disease

  12. Mediterranean diet in predementia and dementia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Solfrizzi, V; Frisardi, V; Seripa, D; Logroscino, G; Imbimbo, B P; D'Onofrio, G; Addante, F; Sancarlo, D; Cascavilla, L; Pilotto, A; Panza, F

    2011-08-01

    There is a critical need to potentially individualize new strategies able to prevent and to slow down the progression of predementia and dementia syndromes. Only recently higher adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet was associated with decreased cognitive decline although the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) combines several foods, micro- and macronutrients already separately proposed as potential protective factors against dementia and predementia syndromes. In fact, elevated saturated fatty acids could have negative effects on age-related cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Furthermore, at present, epidemiological evidence suggested a possible association among fish consumption, monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (particularly, n-3 PUFA) and reduced risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Light to moderate alcohol use may be associated with a reduced risk of incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD), while for vascular dementia, cognitive decline, and predementia syndromes the current evidence is only suggestive of a protective effect. Finally, the limited epidemiological evidence available on fruit and vegetable consumption and cognition generally supported a protective role of these macronutrients against cognitive decline, dementia, and AD. Moreover, recent prospective studies provided evidence that higher adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet could be associated with slower cognitive decline, reduced risk of progression from MCI to AD, reduced risk of AD, and decreased all-causes mortality in AD patients. These findings suggested that adherence to the MeDi may affect not only the risk for AD, but also for predementia syndromes and their progression to overt dementia. Nonetheless, at present, no definitive dietary recommendations are possible. However, high levels of consumption of fats from fish, vegetable oils, non-starchy vegetables, low glycemic fruits, and diet low in foods with added sugars and with

  13. Epidemiology of alpha-synucleinopathies: from Parkinson disease to dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Savica, R; Boeve, B F; Logroscino, G

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies is still based on clinical criteria and the definition of the different diseases is still a challenge for clinician and researcher. The epidemiologic estimates of prevalence and incidence are highly affected by differences in diagnostic criteria, geographic location, and methodologic limitations. Studies of prevalence and incidence show increases with advancing age and a higher rate of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies in men compared to women. PMID:27637957

  14. [Sleep disorders in patients with dementia in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Litvinenko, I V; Krasakov, I V; Tikhomirova, O V

    2011-01-01

    Dementia and psychotic disorders are frequent complications of Parkinson's disease (PD). They occurred in 40-60% of the cases. These complications are often accompanied by sleep disorders which also are non-motor presentations of PD. The objectives of the present study were 1) the assessment of correlations of daily sleepiness and behavioral disturbances during the fast sleep phase (REM-phase) with cognitive impairment and hallucinations; 2) the comparison of evaluation of sleep disorders in PD with questionnaires or polysomnographic study; 3) the assessment of the effect of galantamine on sleep disorders. Using a battery of scales (MMSE, FAB, ESS, PDSS) and polysomnographic study, we evaluated a state of sleep and cognitive functions in 26 PD patients with dementia before and after treatment with galantamine. The results obtained demonstrated the significant negative correlations of the severity of sleep disorders (excessive day sleepiness and disturbances of behavior in REM-phase) with hallucinations and cognitive disorders. Galantamine improved the quality of night sleep (the restoration of structure, decrease of fragmentation), decreased the severity of behavior disorders during REM-phase and day sleepiness along with changes in the intensity of cognitive disturbances and hallucinations.

  15. Everyday Cognitive Failures and Memory Problems in Parkinson's Patients without Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliakoff, Ellen; Smith-Spark, James H.

    2008-01-01

    There is growing evidence that Parkinson's disease patients without dementia exhibit cognitive deficits in some executive, memory and selective attention tasks. However, the impact of these deficits on their everyday cognitive functioning remains largely unknown. This issue was explored using self-report questionnaires. Twenty-four Parkinson's…

  16. Electroencephalographic prodromal markers of dementia across conscious states in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Latreille, Véronique; Carrier, Julie; Gaudet-Fex, Benjamin; Rodrigues-Brazète, Jessica; Panisset, Michel; Chouinard, Sylvain; Postuma, Ronald B; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In Parkinson's disease, electroencephalographic abnormalities during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement sleep (spindles) were found to be predictive biomarkers of dementia. Because rapid eye movement sleep is regulated by the cholinergic system, which shows early degeneration in Parkinson's disease with cognitive impairment, anomalies during this sleep stage might mirror dementia development. In this prospective study, we examined baseline electroencephalographic absolute spectral power across three states of consciousness (non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep, and wakefulness) in 68 non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease and 44 healthy controls. All participants underwent baseline polysomnographic recordings and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Power spectral analyses were performed on standard frequency bands. Dominant occipital frequency during wakefulness and ratios of slow-to-fast frequencies during rapid eye movement sleep and wakefulness were also computed. At follow-up (an average 4.5 years after baseline), 18 patients with Parkinson's disease had developed dementia and 50 patients remained dementia-free. In rapid eye movement sleep, patients with Parkinson's disease who later developed dementia showed, at baseline, higher absolute power in delta and theta bands and a higher slowing ratio, especially in temporal, parietal, and occipital regions, compared to patients who remained dementia-free and controls. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, lower baseline sigma power in parietal cortical regions also predicted development of dementia. During wakefulness, patients with Parkinson's disease who later developed dementia showed lower dominant occipital frequency as well as higher delta and slowing ratio compared to patients who remained dementia-free and controls. At baseline, higher slowing ratios in temporo-occipital regions during rapid eye movement sleep were associated with poor performance on visuospatial tests in

  17. Identifying Fallers among Home Care Clients with Dementia and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Symron; Hirdes, John P; Maxwell, Colleen J; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Giangregorio, Lora M

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have focused on falls among home care (HC) clients with neurological conditions. This study identified factors that increase risk of falling among HC clients with no recent history of falls, and explored whether risk profiles varied among those with dementia or parkinsonism compared to those without selected neurological conditions. A retrospective cohort design was used and analysis of data from community-based HC clients across Ontario was conducted on a sample of ambulatory clients with dementia, parkinsonism, or none of the selected neurological conditions. Data were obtained from the Resident Assessment Instrument for HC (RAI-HC) assessment. The outcome used in multivariable analyses was whether clients fell during follow-up. Unsteady gait was a strong predictor of falls across all three groups. Co-morbid parkinsonism most strongly predicted falls in the dementia group. Clients with borderline intact to mild cognitive impairment had higher odds of falling within the parkinsonism and comparison groups. PMID:27426223

  18. [The Charles Bonnet syndrome and dementia].

    PubMed

    De Baerdemaeker, E; Bouckaert, F; D'Haenen, H

    2009-01-01

    An 83-year-old visually impaired woman was admitted to the hospital because of complex visual hallucinations. Her symptoms were indicative of the Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS). On the basis of this case we explore the relationship between CBS and dementia and discuss the different opinions on this topic.

  19. Metabolic Syndrome: An Important Risk Factor for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is becoming commoner due to a rise in obesity rates among adults. Generally speaking, a person with metabolic syndrome is twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease and five times as likely to develop diabetes as someone without metabolic syndrome. Increasing oxidative stress in metabolic syndrome and Parkinson's disease is mentioned in the comprehensive articles; however, the system review about clear relation between metabolic syndrome and Parkinson's disease is deficient. In this review, we will focus on the analysis that the metabolic syndrome may be a risk factor for Parkinson's disease and the preventions that reduce the incident of Parkinson's disease by regulating the oxidative stress. PMID:24955210

  20. Vestibular Impairment in Frontotemporal Dementia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Kadono, Kotarou; Koganezawa, Tadachika; Takiguchi, Mao; Terada, Makoto; Yamamoto, Fumiko; Moriyama, Tetsuya; Yanagiha, Kumi; Nohara, Seitaro; Tozaka, Naoki; Miyake, Zenshi; Aizawa, Satoshi; Furusho, Kentaro; Tamaoka, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Background No studies to date have attempted to evaluate frontotemporal lobar degeneration from the perspective of the vestibular system. Objective The present study examined vestibular function in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) clinical syndrome and evaluated whether vestibular disorders are involved in the clinical symptoms due to FTD. Methods Fourteen patients with FTD syndrome, as well as healthy elderly controls without dementia, were included in the present study. All subjects underwent vestibular function tests using electronystagmography, such as caloric tests and visual suppression (VS) tests, in which the induced caloric nystagmus was suppressed by visual stimuli. The association between clinical symptoms and vestibular function in the FTD syndrome group was further examined. Results In the FTD syndrome group, caloric nystagmus was not necessarily suppressed during VS tests. Furthermore, VS was observed to be significantly impaired in FTD syndrome patients with gait disturbance as compared to those without such disturbance. Conclusion The present study revealed that impairment of VS in patients with FTD results in an inability to regulate vestibular function by means of visual perception, regardless of multiple presumed neuropathological backgrounds. This could also be associated with gait disturbance in patients with FTD syndrome. PMID:27350780

  1. Cholinergic and perfusion brain networks in Parkinson disease dementia

    PubMed Central

    McKeith, Ian G.; Burn, David J.; Wyper, David J.; O'Brien, John T.; Taylor, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate muscarinic M1/M4 cholinergic networks in Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and their association with changes in Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) after 12 weeks of treatment with donepezil. Methods: Forty-nine participants (25 PDD and 24 elderly controls) underwent 123I-QNB and 99mTc-exametazime SPECT scanning. We implemented voxel principal components (PC) analysis, producing a series of PC images of patterns of interrelated voxels across individuals. Linear regression analyses derived specific M1/M4 and perfusion spatial covariance patterns (SCPs). Results: We found an M1/M4 SCP of relative decreased binding in basal forebrain, temporal, striatum, insula, and anterior cingulate (F1,47 = 31.9, p < 0.001) in cholinesterase inhibitor–naive patients with PDD, implicating limbic-paralimbic and salience cholinergic networks. The corresponding regional cerebral blood flow SCP showed relative decreased uptake in temporoparietal and prefrontal areas (F1,47 = 177.5, p < 0.001) and nodes of the frontoparietal and default mode networks (DMN). The M1/M4 pattern that correlated with an improvement in MMSE (r = 0.58, p = 0.005) revealed relatively preserved/increased pre/medial/orbitofrontal, parietal, and posterior cingulate areas coinciding with the DMN and frontoparietal networks. Conclusion: Dysfunctional limbic-paralimbic and salience cholinergic networks were associated with PDD. Established cholinergic maintenance of the DMN and frontoparietal networks may be prerequisite for cognitive remediation following cholinergic treatment in this condition. PMID:27306636

  2. Dementia.

    PubMed

    Ljubenkov, Peter A; Geschwind, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Dementia often is defined as a progressive cognitive disturbance leading to a loss of independent function. Most clinicians are familiar with the typical pattern of amnestic Alzheimer's disease, the most common neurodegenerative presentation of dementia. Atypical dementia presentations, including atypical Alzheimer's variants, however, may pose a diagnostic challenge for even experienced clinicians. In this article the authors discuss clinical "pearls" for the diagnosis of various neurodegenerative dementia syndromes. When considering the causes of dementia, the mnemonic VITAMINS can be helpful in considering various etiologies. PMID:27643909

  3. Evidence for modest familial co-aggregation between dementia and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Adina L; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Johansson, Anna L V; Gatz, Margaret; Pedersen, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of shared familial risk to the co-occurrence of dementia and parkinsonism by studying familial co-aggregation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Using Swedish population-based registers we constructed two cohorts; a first-degree relative cohort of persons born 1932-1960 (n = 2,775,332) and a spouse cohort of persons born 1890-1960 (n = 4,736,006). Study persons were followed up between 1969 and 2009 in the National Patient and Cause of Death Registers. We modeled the association between incidence of disease and having at least one affected relative using Cox proportional hazard regression that estimated hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age, sex and number of relatives. Within each disorder; dementia, AD, parkinsonian disorders and PD, there was a strong association between risk of disease and having at least one affected sibling or parent. There was also a modest shared familial risk between the diseases; risk of parkinsonian disorders was associated with having a sibling with AD (HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.11-1.65) and risk of dementia was associated with having a sibling with PD (HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.02-1.41). There were no meaningful familial risks among spouses. The risk of co-occurring dementia in PD was considerably increased (HR 2.83, 95% CI 2.76-2.89). There is strong familial aggregation within dementia, AD, parkinsonian disorders and PD, and modest familial co-aggregation between dementia and parkinsonism. Thus, co-occurrence of dementia and parkinsonism is not primarily caused by shared familial risk between AD and PD. PMID:24248476

  4. [Pathogenetic mechanisms of dementia in the older patients with Parkinson's diseases].

    PubMed

    Chukhlovina, M L

    2014-01-01

    The review covers the current literature on the pathogenetic mechanisms of dementia in older patients with Parkinson's disease(PD). The author emphasizes that, along with the degeneration of brain structures, there are vascular changes that promote the development of mixed dementia. Neurodegenerative process and cerebrovascular pathology are in reciprocal relationship and their combination enhances the development of cognitive impairment. The cholinergic deficit is one of the key patterns of pathogenesis of dementia in PD. In this connection, the efficacy of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors: galantamine (reminil),neuromidin, rivastigmine in the treatment of PD patients with dementia is discussed. It is concluded, that correction of vascular risk factors should be administered to older PD patients with mixed dementia. A multidimensional approach with the close relationship between neurologists, psychiatrists and therapists is needed. PMID:25202788

  5. Brain Connectivity Alterations Are Associated with the Development of Dementia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Josie-Anne; McIntosh, Anthony R; Postuma, Ronald B; Kovacevic, Natasha; Latreille, Véronique; Panisset, Michel; Chouinard, Sylvain; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Dementia affects a high proportion of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and poses a burden on caregivers and healthcare services. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a common nonevasive and nonexpensive technique that can easily be used in clinical settings to identify brain functional abnormalities. Only few studies had identified EEG abnormalities that can predict PD patients at higher risk for dementia. Brain connectivity EEG measures, such as multiscale entropy (MSE) and phase-locking value (PLV) analyses, may be more informative and sensitive to brain alterations leading to dementia than previously used methods. This study followed 62 dementia-free PD patients for a mean of 3.4 years to identify cerebral alterations that are associated with dementia. Baseline resting state EEG of patients who developed dementia (N = 18) was compared to those of patients who remained dementia-free (N = 44) and of 37 healthy subjects. MSE and PLV analyses were performed. Partial least squares statistical analysis revealed group differences associated with the development of dementia. Patients who developed dementia showed higher signal complexity and lower PLVs in low frequencies (mainly in delta frequency) than patients who remained dementia-free and controls. Conversely, both patient groups showed lower signal variability and higher PLVs in high frequencies (mainly in gamma frequency) compared to controls, with the strongest effect in patients who developed dementia. These findings suggest that specific disruptions of brain communication can be measured before PD patients develop dementia, providing a new potential marker to identify patients at highest risk of developing dementia and who are the best candidates for neuroprotective trials. PMID:26708056

  6. Goal Setting for Cognitive Rehabilitation in Mild to Moderate Parkinson's Disease Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies.

    PubMed

    Watermeyer, Tamlyn J; Hindle, John V; Roberts, Julie; Lawrence, Catherine L; Martyr, Anthony; Lloyd-Williams, Huw; Brand, Andrew; Gutting, Petra; Hoare, Zoe; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Clare, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the physical symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, health services must also address the cognitive impairments that accompany these conditions. There is growing interest in the use of nonpharmacological approaches to managing the consequences of cognitive disorder. Cognitive rehabilitation is a goal-orientated behavioural intervention which aims to enhance functional independence through the use of strategies specific to the individual's needs and abilities. Fundamental to this therapy is a person's capacity to set goals for rehabilitation. To date, no studies have assessed goal setting in early-stage Parkinson's disease dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 29 participants from an ongoing trial of cognitive rehabilitation for people with these conditions. Here, we examined the goal statements provided by these participants using qualitative content analysis, exploring the types and nature of the goals set. Participants' goals reflected their motivations to learn new skills or improve performance in areas such as technology-use, self-management and orientation, medication management, and social and leisure activities. These results suggest that goal setting is achievable for these participants, provide insight into the everyday cognitive difficulties that they experience, and highlight possible domains as targets for intervention. The trial is registered with ISRCTN16584442 (DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN16584442 13/04/2015).

  7. Goal Setting for Cognitive Rehabilitation in Mild to Moderate Parkinson's Disease Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Julie; Lloyd-Williams, Huw; Gutting, Petra; Hoare, Zoe; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Clare, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the physical symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, health services must also address the cognitive impairments that accompany these conditions. There is growing interest in the use of nonpharmacological approaches to managing the consequences of cognitive disorder. Cognitive rehabilitation is a goal-orientated behavioural intervention which aims to enhance functional independence through the use of strategies specific to the individual's needs and abilities. Fundamental to this therapy is a person's capacity to set goals for rehabilitation. To date, no studies have assessed goal setting in early-stage Parkinson's disease dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 29 participants from an ongoing trial of cognitive rehabilitation for people with these conditions. Here, we examined the goal statements provided by these participants using qualitative content analysis, exploring the types and nature of the goals set. Participants' goals reflected their motivations to learn new skills or improve performance in areas such as technology-use, self-management and orientation, medication management, and social and leisure activities. These results suggest that goal setting is achievable for these participants, provide insight into the everyday cognitive difficulties that they experience, and highlight possible domains as targets for intervention. The trial is registered with ISRCTN16584442 (DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN16584442 13/04/2015). PMID:27446628

  8. Goal Setting for Cognitive Rehabilitation in Mild to Moderate Parkinson's Disease Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies.

    PubMed

    Watermeyer, Tamlyn J; Hindle, John V; Roberts, Julie; Lawrence, Catherine L; Martyr, Anthony; Lloyd-Williams, Huw; Brand, Andrew; Gutting, Petra; Hoare, Zoe; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Clare, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Alongside the physical symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, health services must also address the cognitive impairments that accompany these conditions. There is growing interest in the use of nonpharmacological approaches to managing the consequences of cognitive disorder. Cognitive rehabilitation is a goal-orientated behavioural intervention which aims to enhance functional independence through the use of strategies specific to the individual's needs and abilities. Fundamental to this therapy is a person's capacity to set goals for rehabilitation. To date, no studies have assessed goal setting in early-stage Parkinson's disease dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 29 participants from an ongoing trial of cognitive rehabilitation for people with these conditions. Here, we examined the goal statements provided by these participants using qualitative content analysis, exploring the types and nature of the goals set. Participants' goals reflected their motivations to learn new skills or improve performance in areas such as technology-use, self-management and orientation, medication management, and social and leisure activities. These results suggest that goal setting is achievable for these participants, provide insight into the everyday cognitive difficulties that they experience, and highlight possible domains as targets for intervention. The trial is registered with ISRCTN16584442 (DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN16584442 13/04/2015). PMID:27446628

  9. [Dementia and psychotic disorders in parkinsonism: common origin and new perspectives in therapy].

    PubMed

    Litvinenko, I V

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we reviewed and analysed the literature of mechanism of cognitive and psychotic disorders in schizophrenia, dementia and Parkinson's disease. Despite of opposite neurotransmitter disturbances in schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease, there is common origin in development of psychotic symptoms. The main risk factors in producing psychotic symptoms are age, cognitive impairment and general disease severity. The key neurotransmitter disturbance of dementia is hypofunction of glutamatergic and cholinergic transmitter systems. An hypofunction of the NMDA glutamate receptors can produce excessively stimulation corticolimbic dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons and appearance of psychosis. We suggest glutamate NMDA receptors can modulate activity of dopaminergic, serotonergic and cholinergic transmitter systems. Successful pharmacological approaches in therapy of cognitive and psychotic disorders in Parkinson's disease may be normalization conditions of glutamatergic and cholinergic transmitter systems.

  10. Genetic Characterization of Movement Disorders and Dementias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Ataxia; Dystonia; Parkinson's Disease; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Corticobasal Degeneration; Multiple System Atrophy; Alzheimer's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Parkinson Disease-Dementia; Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian Atrophy; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Fatal Familial Insomnia; Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome; Krabbe's Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C; Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

  11. Progressive supranuclear palsy presenting as primary lateral sclerosis but lacking parkinsonism, gaze palsy, aphasia, or dementia.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Shigeto; Yokota, Osamu; Nanba, Reiko; Takata, Hiroshi; Haraguchi, Takashi; Ishizu, Hideki; Ikeda, Chikako; Takeda, Naoya; Oshima, Etsuko; Sakane, Katsuaki; Terada, Seishi; Ihara, Yuetsu; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2012-12-15

    We report an autopsy case of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) that clinically showed only slowly progressive and symmetric upper motor neuron syndrome over a disease course of 12 years. A female patient initially exhibited dysarthria at the age of 65, followed by gait disturbance and dysphagia. Neurological examination at age 67 disclosed pseudobulbar palsy, spastic gait, hyperreflexia, and presence of bilateral Hoffmann and Babinski signs. However, muscle atrophy, weakness, evidence of denervation on electromyography, vertical gaze palsy, parkinsonism, gait freezing, aphasia, speech apraxia, or dementia was not noted throughout the course. She was clinically diagnosed as having motor neuron disease consistent with so-called primary lateral sclerosis. Pathological examination disclosed histopathological features of PSP, including argyrophilic and tau-positive tufted astrocytes, neurofibrillary tangles, coiled bodies, and thread-like processes in the motor cortex and superior frontal gyrus, and to a lesser degree, in the basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei. In addition, severe fibrillary gliosis was noted in the precentral gyrus and corticospinal tract, being consistent with upper motor neuron syndrome observed in this case. No TAR-DNA binding protein 43-positive lesion, FUS pathology, Bunina body, or Lewy body-like hyaline inclusion was noted in the motor cortex or lower motor neurons. These findings suggest that when tau pathology is prominent in the motor cortex but is minimal in the basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei, a PSP case can lack all classic clinical features of PSP and show only slowly progressive upper motor syndrome, consistent with clinical picture of primary lateral sclerosis. PMID:23026537

  12. Capgras Syndrome in a Patient with Parkinson's Disease after Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Stahl, Mark C.; Eslinger, Paul; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Lucassen, Elisabeth B.

    2015-01-01

    Capgras syndrome is a delusional misidentification syndrome (DMS) which can be seen in neurodegenerative diseases such as Lewy body dementia and, to a lesser extent, in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we report the case of a 78-year-old man with a history of idiopathic PD who developed Capgras syndrome following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS) implantation. As the risk of DMS has been related to deficits in executive, memory, and visuospatial function preoperatively, this case highlights the importance of continuing to improve patient selection for DBS surgery. Capgras syndrome is a rare potential complication of DBS surgery in PD patients with preexisting cognitive decline. PMID:26078747

  13. Dementia

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, B; Herron, B; Passmore, AP

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical diagnosis requiring new functional dependence on the basis of progressive cognitive decline. It is estimated that 1.3% of the entire UK population, or 7.1% of those aged 65 or over, have dementia. Applying these to 2013 population estimates gives an estimated number of 19,765 people living with dementia in Northern Ireland. The clinical syndrome of dementia can be due to a variety of underlying pathophysiological processes. The most common of these is Alzheimer's disease (50-75%) followed by vascular dementia (20%), dementia with Lewy bodies (5%) and frontotemporal lobar dementia (5%). The clinical symptoms and pathophysiological processes of these diseases overlap significantly. Biomarkers to aid diagnosis and prognosis are emerging. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are the only medications currently licensed for the treatment of dementia. The nature of symptoms mean people with dementia are more dependent and vulnerable, both socially and in terms of physical and mental health, presenting evolving challenges to society and to our healthcare systems. PMID:26170481

  14. Localization of disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex to 17q21-22.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmsen, K. C.; Lynch, T.; Pavlou, E.; Higgins, M.; Nygaard, T. G.

    1994-01-01

    Disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex (DDPAC) is defined by familial adult-onset behavioral disturbance, followed by frontal lobe dementia, parkinsonism, and amyotrophy in variable proportions. A genetic etiology of DDPAC was suspected because of the familial clustering in family Mo, despite their wide geographic distribution. We have mapped the DDPAC locus to a 12-cM (sex averaged) region between D17S800 and D17S787 on chromosome 17q21-22. The basis for the variability of the clinical findings and pathology in DDPAC is unknown but suggests that the DDPAC locus should be screened as a candidate locus in family studies of conditions with behavioral abnormalities and neurological degeneration. PMID:7977375

  15. Localization of disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex to 17q21-22

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.C.; Lynch, T.; Pavlou, E.; Higgins, M.; Nygaard, T.G.

    1994-12-01

    Disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex (DDPAC) is defined by familial adult-onset behavioral disturbance, followed by frontal lobe dementia, parkinsonism, and amyotrophy in variable proportions. A genetic etiology of DDPAC was suspected because of the familial clustering in family Mo, despite their wide geographic distribution. We have mapped the DDPAC locus to a 12-cM (sex averaged) region between D17S800 and D17S787 on chromosome 17q21-22. The basis for the variability of the clinical findings and pathology in DDPAC is unknown but suggests that the DDPAC locus should be screened as a candidate locus in family studies of conditions with behavioral abnormalities and neurological degeneration.

  16. Dementia and visual hallucinations associated with limbic pathology in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalaitzakis, M E; Christian, L M; Moran, L B; Graeber, M B; Pearce, R K B; Gentleman, S M

    2009-03-01

    The pathological basis of dementia and visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease (PD) is not yet fully understood. To investigate this further we have conducted a clinico-pathological study based on 30 post-mortem PD brains. PD cases were stratified into groups according to clinical characteristics as follows: (1) cognitively intact (n=9); (2) cases with severe dementia and visual hallucinations (n=12); (3) cases with severe dementia and no visual hallucinations (n=4); and (4) cases with severe visual hallucinations and no dementia (n=5). The extent of alpha-synuclein (alphaSyn), tau and amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) deposition was then examined in the CA2 sector of the hippocampus and in neocortical and subcortical areas known to subserve cognitive function. We find that dementia in PD is significantly associated with alphaSyn in the anterior cingulate gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, temporal cortex, entorhinal cortex, amygdaloid complex and CA2 sector of the hippocampus. Abeta in the anterior cingulate gyrus, entorhinal cortex, amygdaloid complex and nucleus basalis of Meynert is also associated with dementia as is tau in the CA2 sector of the hippocampus. alphaSyn burden in the amygdala is strongly related to the presence of visual hallucinations but only in those PD cases with concomitant dementia. Statistical analysis revealed that alphaSyn burden in the anterior cingulate gyrus could differentiate demented from non-demented PD cases with high sensitivity and specificity. We conclude that alphaSyn in limbic regions is related to dementia in PD as well as to visual hallucinations when there is an underlying dementia.

  17. Concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hiejima, K; Satake, S

    1978-03-01

    Sixty-nine patients, 23 of whom had documented attacks of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), were studied electrophysiologically and the following results were obtained: (1) Antegrade concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrom (AC WPW) was demonstrated in 7 out of 69 patients by atrial stimulation including extrastimulus. Six of these 7 patients presented an accessory pathway (AP) conduction of the Kent type, 5 of which showed Type A and another, Type B. The remaining one of these 7 patients showed an AP conduction of the Mahaim type. One of the 7 patients showed a combination with the James and Kent types AP conduction. (2) Retrograde concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (RC WPW) was demonstrated in 8 out of 49 patients in whom the presence of V-A conduction was revealed by ventricular stimulation, while PSVT was documented in 7 of these 8 patients. An AP of the Kent type was identified in the left side of the heart in 5 out of 7 patients with documented PSVT, the right side in one and in the septal region in one. (3) The presence of bilateral or two APs were demonstrated in 3 patients. In another one with documented PSVT, the presence of a branched AP from a left-sided Kent bundle was assumed. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that concealed APs may be more frequent than realized. For example, the frequency of RC WPW in patients with PSVT was 30.4% (7/23) in our series. Accordingly, it is postulated that RC WPW may also be indicated for surgical therapy and that detailed electrophysiologic examination by the physician should be carried out for the sake of determining the indication.

  18. Parkinson's disease as a disconnection syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2010-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a major neurodegenerative disorder that is usually considered in terms of midbrain and basal ganglia dysfunction. Regarding PD instead as a disconnection syndrome may prove beneficial to understanding aspects of cognition, perception, and other neuropsychological domains in the disease. PD is usually of unilateral onset, providing evidence of intrahemispheric dissociations and an imbalance in the usual relative strengths of the right and left hemispheres. Hence, in order to appreciate the neuropsychology of PD, it is important to apply to this disease our understanding of hemispheric lateralization effects and within-hemisphere circuitry from brainstem to higher-order association cortex. The focus of this review is on the relevance of PD-related disconnections among subcortical and cortical structures to cognition, perception, emotion, and associated brainstem-based domains such as sleep and mood disturbance. Besides providing information on disease characteristics, regarding PD as a disconnection syndrome allows us to more completely understand normal brain-behavior relations in general.

  19. Induction of α-synuclein aggregate formation by CSF exosomes from patients with Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Stuendl, Anne; Kunadt, Marcel; Kruse, Niels; Bartels, Claudia; Moebius, Wiebke; Danzer, Karin M; Mollenhauer, Brit; Schneider, Anja

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular α-synuclein has been proposed as a crucial mechanism for induction of pathological aggregate formation in previously healthy cells. In vitro, extracellular α-synuclein is partially associated with exosomal vesicles. Recently, we have provided evidence that exosomal α-synuclein is present in the central nervous system in vivo. We hypothesized that exosomal α-synuclein species from patients with α-synuclein related neurodegeneration serve as carriers for interneuronal disease transmission. We isolated exosomes from cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, progressive supranuclear palsy as a non-α-synuclein related disorder that clinically overlaps with Parkinson's disease, and neurological controls. Cerebrospinal fluid exosome numbers, α-synuclein protein content of cerebrospinal fluid exosomes and their potential to induce oligomerization of α-synuclein were analysed. The quantification of cerebrospinal fluid exosomal α-synuclein showed distinct differences between patients with Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. In addition, exosomal α-synuclein levels correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment in cross-sectional samples from patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. Importantly, cerebrospinal fluid exosomes derived from Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies induce oligomerization of α-synuclein in a reporter cell line in a dose-dependent manner. Our data suggest that cerebrospinal fluid exosomes from patients with Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies contain a pathogenic species of α-synuclein, which could initiate oligomerization of soluble α-synuclein in target cells and confer disease pathology.

  20. The Views of People Who Care for Adults with Down's Syndrome and Dementia: A Service Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furniss, Kate Atkins; Loverseed, Annie; Lippold, Tessa; Dodd, Karen

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that people with Down's syndrome are more likely to develop dementia than other people and that onset of dementia is likely to occur earlier at an earlier age. The article reports on a specialist service for people with Down's syndrome and dementia. The service has offered dementia screening and assessment to people with…

  1. Prevalence of Dementia in Adults with and without Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigman, Warren B.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Comparison of adults with mental retardation either with or without Down syndrome and under or over 50 years of age found a significantly higher rate of dementia only in Down syndrome subjects over 50. However, the observed incidence based on functional findings was substantially below the presumed 100% prevalence of neuropathological markers of…

  2. Cholesterol and Alzheimer Type Dementia among Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Frank

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a summary of research by Warren Zigman and colleagues investigating the link between cholesterol levels and Alzheimer type dementia among adults with Down syndrome. Warren Zigman and colleagues followed 123 adults with Down syndrome between May 1998 and April 2006. The participants were aged between 41 and 78 years at the…

  3. Characterization of tau pathologies in gray and white matter of Guam parkinsonism-dementia complex.

    PubMed

    Winton, Matthew J; Joyce, Sonali; Zhukareva, Victoria; Practico, Domenico; Perl, Daniel P; Galasko, Douglas; Craig, Ula; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2006-05-01

    Guam parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy in ethnic Chamorro residents of the Mariana Islands that manifests clinically with parkinsonism as well as dementia and is characterized neuropathologically by prominent cortical neuron loss in association with extensive telencephalic neurofibrillary tau pathology. To further characterize cortical gray and white matter tau, alpha-synuclein and lipid peroxidation pathologies in Guam PDC, we examined the brains of 17 Chamorro PDC and control subjects using biochemical and immunohistological techniques. We observed insoluble tau pathology in both gray and white matter of PDC and Guam control cases, with frontal and temporal lobes being most severely affected. Using phosphorylation dependent anti-tau antibodies, abundant tau inclusions were detected by immunohistochemistry in both neuronal and glial cells of the neocortex, while less alpha-synuclein pathology was observed in more limited brain regions. Further, in sharp contrast to Alzheimer's disease (AD), levels of the lipid peroxidation product 8, 12-iso-iPF(2alpha)-VI isoprostane were not elevated in Guam PDC brains relative to controls. Thus, although the tau pathologies of Guam PDC share similarities with AD, the composite Guam PDC neuropathology profile of tau, alpha-synuclein and 8, 12-iso-iPF(2alpha)-VI isoprostane reported here more closely resembles that seen in other tauopathies including frontotemporal dementias (FTDs), which may imply that Guam PDC and FTD tauopathies share underlying mechanisms of neurodegeneration.

  4. The Adaptive Behaviour Dementia Questionnaire (ABDQ): Screening Questionnaire for Dementia in Alzheimer's Disease in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V.; Farooq, A.; Holder, R.

    2004-01-01

    The diagnosis of dementia in Alzheimer's disease remains at times problematic in adults with intellectual disability. The analysis of 5-year consecutive data developed a researched-based clinical screening tool for dementia in Alzheimer's disease in adults with Down syndrome. The Adaptive Behaviour Dementia Questionnaire (ABDQ) is a 15-item…

  5. Visual Hallucinations and Amyloid Deposition in Parkinson's Disease Dementia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Um, Yoo Hyun; Kim, Tae-Won; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Ho-Jun; Han, Jin-Hee; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jung, Won-Sang; Choi, Woo Hee; Lee, Chang-Uk

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) is notorious for its debilitating clinical course and high mortality rates. Consequently, various attempts to investigate predictors of cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been made. Here we report a case of a 75-year-old female patient with PD who visited the clinic with complaints of recurrent visual hallucinations and cognitive decline, whose symptoms were ameliorated by the titration of rivastigmine. Imaging results showed pronounced diffuse cortical amyloid deposition evidenced by 18F-florbetaben amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. This observation suggests that pronounced amyloid deposition and visual hallucinations in PD patients could be clinically significant predictors of cognitive decline in PD patients. Future research should concentrate on accumulating more evidence for possible predictors of cognitive decline and their association with PD pathology that can enable an early intervention and standardized treatment in PDD patients. PMID:27247605

  6. Intraneuronal aluminum accumulation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism-dementia of Guam

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, D.P.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Garruto, R.M.; Yanagihara, R.T.; Gibbs, C.J.

    1982-09-10

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry was used to analyze the elemental content of neurofibrillary tangle (NFT)-bearing and NFT-free neurons within the Sommer's sector (H1 region) of the hippocampus in Guamanian Chamorros with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia and in neurologically normal controls. Preliminary data indicate prominent accumulation of aluminum within the nuclear region and perikaryal cytoplasm of NFT-bearing hippocampal neurons, regardless of the underlying neurological diagnosis. These findings further extend the association between intraneuronal aluminum and NFT formation and support the hypothesis that environmental factors are related to the neurodegenerative changes seen in the Chamorro population.

  7. Different Clinical and Neuroimaging Characteristics in Early Stage Parkinson's Disease with Dementia and Dementia with Lewy Bodies.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Mami; Sato, Kota; Hatanaka, Noriko; Yamashita, Toru; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) both commonly exhibit brain Lewy body pathology and similar end-stage symptoms, but early symptoms differ. To clarify these differences, we compared the demographic characteristics, symptoms, cognitive and affective functioning, activities of daily life, and neuroimaging results between PDD (n = 52) and DLB (n = 46) patients. In measures of cognitive functioning, PDD patients had worse Hasegawa dementia scale-revised (HDS-R) scores (11.2±4.8) and better frontal assessment battery (FAB) scores (11.3±4.1) compared with DLB (17.0±6.4, p = 0.013 and 8.6±4.7, p = 0.039, respectively). DLB patients performed worse than PDD patients in "orientation to place" tasks. In affective functions, DLB patients had worse GDS (7.6±3.4) and ABS (9.9±5.3) scores than PDD patients (5.1±4.1 and 4.8±3.0, respectively). 99mTc-ECD images showed greater CBF in the whole cingulate gyrus and a lower CBF in the precuneus area in DLB than in PDD. These results suggest that PDD patients' lower average scores for "repetition" (MMSE), "recent memory" (HDS-R), and "lexical fluency" (FAB) were related to lower CBF in the cingulate gyrus than in DLB. Furthermore, DLB patients' poorer average subscale scores of "orientation to place" (MMSE) and "similarities", "conflicting instructions", and "go-no go" (FAB) tasks may be related to the lower CBF in the precuneus area in DLB than PDD.

  8. CBF tomograms with (/sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO in patients with dementia (Alzheimer type and HIV) and Parkinson's disease--initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, D.C.; Ell, P.J.; Burns, A.; Philpot, M.; Levy, R.

    1988-12-01

    We present preliminary data on the utility of functional brain imaging with (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the study of patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), HIV-related dementia syndrome, and the on-off syndrome of Parkinson's disease. In comparison with a group of age-matched controls, the DAT patients revealed distinctive bilateral temporal and posterior parietal deficits, which correlate with detailed psychometric evaluation. Patients with amnesia as the main symptom (group A) showed bilateral mesial temporal lobe perfusion deficits (p less than 0.02). More severely affected patients (group B) with significant apraxia, aphasia, or agnosia exhibited patterns compatible with bilateral reduced perfusion in the posterior parietal cortex, as well as reduced perfusion to both temporal lobes, different from the patients of the control group (p less than 0.05). SPECT studies of HIV patients with no evidence of intracraneal space occupying pathology showed marked perfusion deficits. Patients with Parkinson's disease and the on-off syndrome studied during an on phase (under levodopa therapy) and on another occasion after withdrawal of levodopa (off) demonstrated a significant change in the uptake of (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO in the caudate nucleus (lower on off) and thalamus (higher on off). These findings justify the present interest in the functional evaluation of the brain of patients with dementia. (99mTc)-d,l-HM-PAO and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF)/SPECT appear useful and highlight individual disorders of flow in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions.

  9. Lifestyle-related factors in predementia and dementia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Capurso, Cristiano; D'Introno, Alessia; Colacicco, Anna Maria; Santamato, Andrea; Ranieri, Maurizio; Fiore, Pietro; Capurso, Antonio; Panza, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive decline and dementia have a deep impact on the health and quality of life of older subjects and their caregivers. Since the therapeutic options currently available have demonstrated limited efficacy, the search for preventive strategies for cognitive decline and dementia are mandatory. A possible role of lifestyle-related factors was recently proposed for age-related changes of cognitive function, predementia syndromes and the cognitive decline of degenerative (Alzheimer's disease [AD]) or vascular origin. At present, cumulative evidence suggests that vascular risk factors may be important in the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), dementia and AD. Moderate alcohol drinking has been proposed as a protective factor against MCI and dementia in several longitudinal studies, but contrasting findings also exist. The Mediterranean diet could therefore be an interesting model with which to further study the association between dietary patterns and cognitive functioning, given the suggested role of many components of this diet (monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, cereals and red wine) in contrasting cognitive impairment and dementia. The association between low education and predementia and dementia syndromes is supported by the majority of studies, but very few studies have investigated whether this association may be attributed with lifestyle factors that covary with education. Studies in the literature seem to identify in physical exercise one promising strategy in decreasing cognitive decline, but some of the limitations of these studies do not allow us to draw definite conclusions. At present, in older subjects, healthy diets, antioxidant supplements, the prevention of nutritional deficiencies, and moderate physical activity could be considered the first line of defense against the development and progression of predementia and dementia syndromes. However, in most cases, these were only observational studies, and results are

  10. A Randomized Study of Three Interventions for Aspiration of Thin Liquids in Patients with Dementia or Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logemann, Jeri A.; Gensler, Gary; Robbins, JoAnne; Lindblad, Anne S.; Brandt, Diane; Hind, Jacqueline A.; Kosek, Steven; Dikeman, Karen; Kazandjian, Marta; Gramigna, Gary D.; Lundy, Donna; McGarvey-Toler, Susan; Miller Gardner, Patricia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to identify which of 3 treatments for aspiration on thin liquids--chin-down posture, nectar-thickened liquids, or honey-thickened liquids--results in the most successful immediate elimination of aspiration on thin liquids during the videofluorographic swallow study in patients with dementia and/or Parkinson's…

  11. [Familial juvenile parkinsonism with dementia and autonomic failure--a case report].

    PubMed

    Nitta, E; Ishikawa, A; Ishiguro, H; Baba, H; Fukuhara, N

    1993-01-01

    A case of familial juvenile parkinsonism with dementia, orthostatic hypotension, neurogenic bladder and constipation was reported. He had been in a good health until the age of 28 when a finger tremor occurred on effort to hold hands in a definite position, and disturbances in gait and speech were noted. These symptoms were relieved by levodopa treatment followed by dyskinesia and motor fluctuations. Three years later, he complained of faintness, constipation and urinary frequency. The neurological examination revealed mentally sound male with masked face, tremor and rigidity in his extremities, and short step gait with lateropulsion. Urodynamic study showed uninhibited bladder. In the following years, orthostatic hypotension, dysuria and urinary retention developed gradually. He became mentally loose and was unable to take medicines appropriately. When in the Nishiojiya Byoin National Sanatorium, he tried to snake out the hospital many times. His parents and a brother suffered from Parkinson's disease and juvenile parkinsonism, respectively, suggesting an autosomal dominant inheritance. On admission to our hospital, he was apathetic. He had masked face, bilateral postural tremor, frozen gait and dyskinesia in the right lower extremity. Little bradykinesia or rigidity was noted. His muscle tone and deep tendon reflexes were decreased but neither muscular wasting, weakness, ataxia nor sensory disturbance was observed. Laboratory data including ceruloplasmin, copper, dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and lysosomal enzyme activities were normal except for mild anemia. A cranial CT scan revealed mild cortical atrophy in the frontal and temporal lobes, but nerve conduction study and cortical evoked potentials showed no abnormality. While in the hospital, his mental functions deteriorated to the state of dementia and orthostatic hypotension became apparent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8334779

  12. [Familial juvenile parkinsonism with dementia and autonomic failure--a case report].

    PubMed

    Nitta, E; Ishikawa, A; Ishiguro, H; Baba, H; Fukuhara, N

    1993-01-01

    A case of familial juvenile parkinsonism with dementia, orthostatic hypotension, neurogenic bladder and constipation was reported. He had been in a good health until the age of 28 when a finger tremor occurred on effort to hold hands in a definite position, and disturbances in gait and speech were noted. These symptoms were relieved by levodopa treatment followed by dyskinesia and motor fluctuations. Three years later, he complained of faintness, constipation and urinary frequency. The neurological examination revealed mentally sound male with masked face, tremor and rigidity in his extremities, and short step gait with lateropulsion. Urodynamic study showed uninhibited bladder. In the following years, orthostatic hypotension, dysuria and urinary retention developed gradually. He became mentally loose and was unable to take medicines appropriately. When in the Nishiojiya Byoin National Sanatorium, he tried to snake out the hospital many times. His parents and a brother suffered from Parkinson's disease and juvenile parkinsonism, respectively, suggesting an autosomal dominant inheritance. On admission to our hospital, he was apathetic. He had masked face, bilateral postural tremor, frozen gait and dyskinesia in the right lower extremity. Little bradykinesia or rigidity was noted. His muscle tone and deep tendon reflexes were decreased but neither muscular wasting, weakness, ataxia nor sensory disturbance was observed. Laboratory data including ceruloplasmin, copper, dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and lysosomal enzyme activities were normal except for mild anemia. A cranial CT scan revealed mild cortical atrophy in the frontal and temporal lobes, but nerve conduction study and cortical evoked potentials showed no abnormality. While in the hospital, his mental functions deteriorated to the state of dementia and orthostatic hypotension became apparent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Converging mediators from immune and trophic pathways to identify Parkinson disease dementia

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Christopher T.; Snyder, Noelle L.; Chen, Kewei; Walker, Douglas G.; Davis, Kathryn J.; Belden, Christine; Caviness, John N.; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Adler, Charles H.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Shill, Holly A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify a panel of peripheral inflammatory/immune mediators that could discriminate Parkinson disease with dementia (PDD) from Parkinson disease (PD) without dementia. Methods: Plasma samples from 52 patients with PD and 22 patients with PDD were prepared from freshly collected blood following an institutional review board–approved protocol. A total of 160 proteins were measured using a multiplex antibody array. Plasma α-synuclein levels were analyzed by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. The main objective of the statistical analyses was to identify PDD discriminants using the plasma protein profile alone or in combination with age. Results: The PD and PDD groups differed significantly in cognitive measurements (Mini-Mental State Examination, Auditory Verbal Learning Test-A7, and Clinical Dementia Rating) and age. The age-adjusted levels of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA were significantly different between disease groups. The levels of plasma α-synuclein significantly correlated with 26 proteins; among them, PDGF-BB, TARC, PDGF-AA, and epidermal growth factor were the highest. Linear discriminant analysis with leave-one-out cross-validation identified a 14-protein panel with age as discriminants of PDD (96% sensitivity, 89% specificity, area under the curve = 0.9615). Conclusions: We showed that multiple proteins that are mediators of growth/trophic and immune response-related pathways had discriminatory power for identifying PDD in patients with PD. Validation of this discovery-based study in longitudinal population-based studies is warranted. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that a 14-protein panel plasma assay combined with age has a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 89% for PDD. PMID:26848485

  14. Dementia and Mortality In Persons with Down's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppus, A.; Evenhuis, H.; Verberne, G.-J.; Visser, F.; van Gool, P.; Eikelenboom, P.; van Duijin, C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have documented that persons with Downs syndrome (DS) are at an increased risk of Alzheimers disease (AD). However, at present it is still not clear whether or not all persons with DS will develop dementia as they reach old age. Methods: We studied 506 people with DS, aged 45 years and above. A standardized assessment…

  15. Diagnosing Alzheimer's Dementia in Down Syndrome: Problems and Possible Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieuwenhuis-Mark, Ruth E.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that people with Down syndrome are more likely than the general population to develop Alzheimer's dementia as they age. However, the diagnosis can be problematic in this population for a number of reasons. These include: the large intra-individual variability in cognitive functioning, the different diagnostic and…

  16. Caring for the Student with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prenni, Patricia G.

    2009-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a cardiac condition in which an extra electrical pathway within the heart causes an abnormal increase in heart rate. It affects one to three people of every 1,000 people worldwide, occurring more often in males. Diagnosis usually occurs during young adulthood, so it is important for school nurses to be familiar…

  17. The First Confirmed Case of Down Syndrome with Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V. P.; Airuehia, E.; Carey, M.

    2010-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second commonest cause of dementia in the general population. Several researches have established an association between Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's disease. Very few studies have however showed such an association between dementia with Lewy bodies and Down syndrome. The occurrence of DLB in persons…

  18. Pisa syndrome in Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism: clinical features, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Barone, Paolo; Santangelo, Gabriella; Amboni, Marianna; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Vitale, Carmine

    2016-09-01

    Pisa syndrome is defined as a reversible lateral bending of the trunk with a tendency to lean to one side. It is a frequent and often disabling complication of Parkinson's disease, and has also been described in several atypical forms of parkinsonism and in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders after drug exposure and surgical procedures. Although no consistent diagnostic criteria for Pisa syndrome are available, most investigations have adopted an arbitrary cutoff of at least 10° of lateral flexion for the diagnosis of the syndrome. Pathophysiological mechanisms underlying Pisa syndrome have not been fully explained. One hypothesis emphasises central mechanisms, whereby Pisa syndrome is thought to be caused by alterations in sensory-motor integration pathways; by contrast, a peripheral hypothesis emphasises the role of anatomical changes in the musculoskeletal system. Furthermore, several drugs are reported to induce Pisa syndrome, including antiparkinsonian drugs. As Pisa syndrome might be reversible, clinicians need to be able to recognise this condition early to enable prompt management. Nevertheless, further research is needed to determine optimum treatment strategies. PMID:27571158

  19. Genome-wide analysis of genetic correlation in dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Rita; Escott-Price, Valentina; Darwent, Lee; Parkkinen, Laura; Ansorge, Olaf; Hernandez, Dena G.; Nalls, Michael A.; Clark, Lorraine; Honig, Lawrence; Marder, Karen; van der Flier, Wiesje; Holstege, Henne; Louwersheimer, Eva; Lemstra, Afina; Scheltens, Philip; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Londos, Elisabet; Zetterberg, Henrik; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Ferman, Tanis J.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Ross, Owen A.; Barber, Imelda; Braae, Anne; Brown, Kristelle; Morgan, Kevin; Maetzler, Walter; Berg, Daniela; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Lashley, Tammaryn; Compta, Yaroslau; Revesz, Tamas; Lees, Andrew; Cairns, Nigel J.; Halliday, Glenda M.; Mann, David; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Powell, John; Lunnon, Katie; Lupton, Michelle K.; Dickson, Dennis; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Bras, Jose

    2016-01-01

    The similarities between dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are many and range from clinical presentation, to neuropathological characteristics, to more recently identified, genetic determinants of risk. Because of these overlapping features, diagnosing DLB is challenging and has clinical implications since some therapeutic agents that are applicable in other diseases have adverse effects in DLB. Having shown that DLB shares some genetic risk with PD and AD, we have now quantified the amount of sharing through the application of genetic correlation estimates, and show that, from a purely genetic perspective, and excluding the strong association at the APOE locus, DLB is equally correlated to AD and PD. PMID:26643944

  20. Genome-wide analysis of genetic correlation in dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Rita; Escott-Price, Valentina; Darwent, Lee; Parkkinen, Laura; Ansorge, Olaf; Hernandez, Dena G; Nalls, Michael A; Clark, Lorraine; Honig, Lawrence; Marder, Karen; van der Flier, Wiesje; Holstege, Henne; Louwersheimer, Eva; Lemstra, Afina; Scheltens, Philip; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Londos, Elisabet; Zetterberg, Henrik; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Ferman, Tanis J; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Ross, Owen A; Barber, Imelda; Braae, Anne; Brown, Kristelle; Morgan, Kevin; Maetzler, Walter; Berg, Daniela; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Lashley, Tammaryn; Compta, Yaroslau; Revesz, Tamas; Lees, Andrew; Cairns, Nigel J; Halliday, Glenda M; Mann, David; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Powell, John; Lunnon, Katie; Lupton, Michelle K; Dickson, Dennis; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Bras, Jose

    2016-02-01

    The similarities between dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are many and range from clinical presentation, to neuropathological characteristics, to more recently identified, genetic determinants of risk. Because of these overlapping features, diagnosing DLB is challenging and has clinical implications since some therapeutic agents that are applicable in other diseases have adverse effects in DLB. Having shown that DLB shares some genetic risk with PD and AD, we have now quantified the amount of sharing through the application of genetic correlation estimates, and show that, from a purely genetic perspective, and excluding the strong association at the APOE locus, DLB is equally correlated to AD and PD. PMID:26643944

  1. Cathepsin D in a murine model of frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism-linked to chromosome 17.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montoya, Julia; Pérez, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), are characterized by tau accumulation. This accumulation could result from alterations in tau degradation by either the ubiquitin-proteasome system or the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. To analyze a possible alteration of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway in transgenic mice expressing human tau with three FTDP-17 missense mutations (TauVLW mice), we studied the lysosomal enzyme Cathepsin D. The hippocampi of TauVLW mice, where the human mutant tau accumulates, showed both increased Cathepsin D and partial colocalization of Cathepsin D with human mutant tau. At the ultrastructural level, some multivesicular bodies showed human mutant tau-immunopositive vesicles. This finding could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of tau degradation in human tauopathies.

  2. [Diagnostic Criteria for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex in the Kii Peninsula, Japan].

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Yasumasa

    2015-07-01

    The diagnostic criteria for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex in the Kii peninsula of Japan (Kii ALS/PDC) have been proposed. Muro disease has been considered an endemic neurodegenerative disease in the southern part of the Kii peninsula. Recent intensive and comprehensive research has revealed it to be a complex and genetically heterogeneous disease. At present, there are four subtypes of Muro disease: sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Kii ALS/PDC with tauopathy, ALS with C9orf72 gene mutation, and ALS with optineurin gene mutation. The present criteria are applicable to only one of these subtypes, Kii ALS/PDC with tauopathy, which is quite similar to ALS/PDC in Guam.

  3. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in Parkinsonism-dementia of Guam

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M.; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr307 and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr307 in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr307. These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5–PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr307 by Src. PMID:24395787

  4. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-21

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr(307) and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr(307) in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr(307). These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5-PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr(307) by Src.

  5. Tau pathology involves protein phosphatase 2A in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Garruto, Ralph M; Iqbal, Khalid

    2014-01-21

    Parkinsonism-dementia (PD) of Guam is a neurodegenerative disease with parkinsonism and early-onset Alzheimer-like dementia associated with neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, tau. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been suspected of being involved in the etiology of PD, but the mechanism by which BMAA leads to tau hyperphosphorylation is not known. We found a decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity associated with an increase in inhibitory phosphorylation of its catalytic subunit PP2Ac at Tyr(307) and abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in brains of patients who had Guam PD. To test the possible involvement of BMAA in the etiopathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of this environmental neurotoxin on PP2A activity and tau hyperphosphorylation in mouse primary neuronal cultures and metabolically active rat brain slices. BMAA treatment significantly decreased PP2A activity, with a concomitant increase in tau kinase activity resulting in elevated tau hyperphosphorylation at PP2A favorable sites. Moreover, we found an increase in the phosphorylation of PP2Ac at Tyr(307) in BMAA-treated rat brains. Pretreatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and Src antagonists blocked the BMAA-induced inhibition of PP2A and the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, indicating the involvement of an Src-dependent PP2A pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that BMAA treatment dissociated PP2Ac from mGluR5, making it available for phosphorylation at Tyr(307). These findings suggest a scenario in which BMAA can lead to tau pathology by inhibiting PP2A through the activation of mGluR5, the consequent release of PP2Ac from the mGluR5-PP2A complex, and its phosphorylation at Tyr(307) by Src. PMID:24395787

  6. Lack of Neuronal IFN-β-IFNAR Causes Lewy Body- and Parkinson's Disease-like Dementia.

    PubMed

    Ejlerskov, Patrick; Hultberg, Jeanette Göransdotter; Wang, JunYang; Carlsson, Robert; Ambjørn, Malene; Kuss, Martin; Liu, Yawei; Porcu, Giovanna; Kolkova, Kateryna; Friis Rundsten, Carsten; Ruscher, Karsten; Pakkenberg, Bente; Goldmann, Tobias; Loreth, Desiree; Prinz, Marco; Rubinsztein, David C; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2015-10-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases have been linked to inflammation, but whether altered immunomodulation plays a causative role in neurodegeneration is not clear. We show that lack of cytokine interferon-β (IFN-β) signaling causes spontaneous neurodegeneration in the absence of neurodegenerative disease-causing mutant proteins. Mice lacking Ifnb function exhibited motor and cognitive learning impairments with accompanying α-synuclein-containing Lewy bodies in the brain, as well as a reduction in dopaminergic neurons and defective dopamine signaling in the nigrostriatal region. Lack of IFN-β signaling caused defects in neuronal autophagy prior to α-synucleinopathy, which was associated with accumulation of senescent mitochondria. Recombinant IFN-β promoted neurite growth and branching, autophagy flux, and α-synuclein degradation in neurons. In addition, lentiviral IFN-β overexpression prevented dopaminergic neuron loss in a familial Parkinson's disease model. These results indicate a protective role for IFN-β in neuronal homeostasis and validate Ifnb mutant mice as a model for sporadic Lewy body and Parkinson's disease dementia.

  7. Ambulatory Gait Behavior in Patients With Dementia: A Comparison With Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Mitoma, Hiroshi; Sanjo, Nobuo; Higuma, Maya; Terashi, Hiroo; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-08-01

    Accelerometry-based gait analysis is a promising approach in obtaining insightful information on the gait characteristics of patients with neurological disorders such as dementia and Parkinson's disease (PD). In order to improve its practical use outside the laboratory or hospital, it is required to design new metrics capable of quantifying ambulatory gait and their extraction procedures from long-term acceleration data. This paper presents a gait analysis method developed for such a purpose. Our system is based on a single trunk-mounted accelerometer and analytical algorithm for the assessment of gait behavior that may be context dependent. The algorithm consists of the detection of gait peaks from acceleration data and the analysis of multimodal patterns in the relationship between gait cycle and vertical gait acceleration. A set of six new measures can be obtained by applying the algorithm to a 24-h motion signal. To examine the performance and utility of our method, we recorded acceleration data from 13 healthy, 26 PD, and 26 mild cognitive impairment or dementia subjects. Each patient group was further classified into two, comprising 13 members each, according to the severity of the disease, and the gait behavior of the five groups was compared. We found that the normal, PD, and MCI/dementia groups show characteristic walking patterns which can be distinguished from one another by the developed gait measure set. We also examined conventional parameters such as gait acceleration, gait cycle, and gait variability, but failed to reproduce the distinct differences among the five groups. These findings suggest that the proposed gait analysis may be useful in capturing disease-specific gait features in a community setting. PMID:26372429

  8. [Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease without dementia: a comparative randomized controlled study of melatonin and clonazepam].

    PubMed

    Litvinenko, I V; Krasakov, I V; Tikhomirova, O V

    2012-01-01

    We studied 38 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) without dementia (mean age, 67.3±4.8 years; 15 males, 23 females) with complaints on sleep disorders. Quality of sleep was assessed with the Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) as well as with overnight polysomnographic (PSG) study at baseline and at the end of the trial. The effectiveness of sleep was estimated as TST/TIB x100% (TIB - habitual time in bed, TST - habitual total sleeping time). REM latency (LREM), periodic limb movements (PLM) (total number and sleep index) were measured as well. All patients underwent neuropsychological testing using MMSE, five-word test, digit span and the Hamilton scale (HAM-D). Patients were allocated to 2 groups. Group 1 (n=20) received melatonin in addition to the previous dopaminergic treatment in dose 3 mg 30 minutes before bedtime for 6 weeks, group 2 (n=18) received clonazepam 2 mg at night (with gradual titration over 4 weeks from 0,5 mg). Compared to baseline, melatonin and clonazepam reduced sleep disorders in patients: PDSS scores from 89.9±8.9 to 129.5±9.4 (p=0.0001) and from 91.0±8.7 to 110.1±12.4 scores (p=0.03), respectively. However, the daytime sleepiness (ESS) was significantly increased (from 3.8±1.2 to 7.3±2.2 scores; p=0.0002) in the clonazepam group. In the melatonin group, ESS scores were 4.1±1.4 before treatment and 4.7±1.4 after treatment (p=0.06). Patients treated with melatonin had better scores on the MMSE (p=0.00009), five-word test (p=0.009), Hamilton scale (p=0.00009) at the end of the study period as compared with the clonazepam group. Changes in total point scores on the PSG at the end of week 6, as compared with the beginning of the trial, were in favor of the group treated with melatonin, with significant changes in the LS (p=0.004), total sleep time/time in bad (TST/TIB) (p=0,001) sections. The number of REM sleep epochs remained lower in patients treated with clonazepam (p=0.0001). The data

  9. Parkinson's syndrome after closed head injury: a single case report

    PubMed Central

    Doder, M; Jahanshahi, M; Turjanski, N; Moseley, I; Lees, A

    1999-01-01

    A 36 year old man, who sustained a skull fracture in 1984, was unconscious for 24 hours, and developed signs of Parkinson's syndrome 6 weeks after the injury. When assessed in 1995, neuroimaging disclosed a cerebral infarction due to trauma involving the left caudate and lenticular nucleus. Parkinson's syndrome was predominantly right sided, slowly progressive, and unresponsive to levodopa therapy. Reaction time tests showed slowness of movement initiation and execution with both hands, particularly the right. Recording of movement related cortical potentials suggested bilateral deficits in movement preparation. Neuropsychological assessment disclosed no evidence of major deficits on tests assessing executive function or working memory, with the exception of selective impairments on the Stroop and on a test of self ordered random number sequences. There was evidence of abulia. The results are discussed in relation to previous literature on basal ganglia lesions and the effects of damage to different points of the frontostriatal circuits.

 PMID:10084539

  10. Prospective Study of the Prevalence of Alzheimer-Type Dementia in Institutionalized Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, F. E.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Institutionalized patients with Down syndrome (N=307) were monitored for 5 to 10 years to determine prevalence of Alzheimer-type dementia. Prevalence increased from 11% between ages 40 and 49 to 77% between 60 and 69. All patients 70 and over had dementia. Mean age of onset of dementia was 56 years. Neuropathological findings were consistent with…

  11. Symptoms of Dementia among Adults with Down's Syndrome: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deb, Shoumitro; Hare, M.; Prior, L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Dementia is common among adults with Down's syndrome (DS); yet the diagnosis of dementia, particularly in its early stage, can be difficult in this population. One possible reason for this may be the different clinical manifestation of dementia among people with intellectual disabilities. Aims: The aim of this study was to map out the…

  12. Maladaptive Behaviors Related to Dementia Status in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urv, Tiina K.; Zigman, Warren B.; Silverman, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Changes in maladaptive behaviors related to specific stages of dementia were investigated in 251 adults 45 years of age and older with Down syndrome. Findings indicate clear differences in maladaptive behaviors at various stages of dementia. Generally, individuals with no signs or symptoms of dementia displayed fewer and less severe maladaptive…

  13. Imaging of calcium and aluminum in neurofibrillary tangle-bearing neurons in parkinsonism-dementia of Guam.

    PubMed Central

    Garruto, R M; Fukatsu, R; Yanagihara, R; Gajdusek, D C; Hook, G; Fiori, C E

    1984-01-01

    We report the distribution and imaging of calcium and aluminum in neurofibrillary tangle (NFT)-bearing neurons within Sommer's sector of the hippocampus in Guamanian patients with parkinsonism-dementia, using a method of computer-controlled electron beam x-ray micro-analysis and wavelength dispersive spectrometry. Calcium and aluminum were distributed in cell bodies and axonal processes of NFT-bearing neurons. The elemental images show that both calcium and aluminum deposits occur within the same NFT-bearing hippocampal neuron in this dementing disease, suggesting that these elements are involved in NFT formation. No prominent concentrations of calcium and aluminum were imaged in non-NFT-containing regions within the pyramidal cell layer of the parkinsonism-dementia cases or in the control cases. These findings support the hypothesis that secondary hyperparathyroidism resulting from low environmental calcium and magnesium in the high-incidence focus of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia on Guam had led to abnormal deposition of calcium and aluminum in the central nervous system. Images PMID:6584922

  14. Is PARKIN parkinsonism a cancer predisposition syndrome?

    PubMed

    Schüle, Birgitt; Byrne, Christie; Rees, Linda; Langston, J William

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the PARKIN gene (chromosome 6q25-27) were first described in 1998 in families with "juvenile" autosomal recessive parkinsonism. More than 180 causative variants in the PARKIN gene have been identified; point mutations and copy number variants (i.e., exon deletions or duplications) occur at nearly equal frequencies.(1) PARKIN is one of the largest genes in the human genome (1.3 Mb) and contains a chromosomal fragile site (CFS) FRA6E (6q26) between exons 2 and 8. This is of interest regarding the etiology of cancer because CFSs are prone to spontaneous breaks leading to chromosome alterations. Therefore, it is not surprising that PARKIN mutations have also been found in various cancer cell lines and primary tumors.(2,3) Mutations in PARKIN show decreased PARKIN E3 ligase function with resultant accumulation of cyclin E, creating the potential for mitotic instability in dividing cells.

  15. Delusional misidentification syndromes and dementia: a border zone between neurology and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Vedovello, Marcella; Ulivi, Martina; Lucetti, Claudio; Di Fiorino, Andrea; Nuti, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    The delusional misidentification syndromes (DMSs) are psychopathologic phenomena in which a patient consistently misidentifies persons, places, objects, or events. Although often described in relation to psychotic states including schzofrenia, it is, nevertheless, widely considered that these syndromes have an anatomical basis because of their frequent association with organic brain disease; studies have pointed to the presence of identifiable lesions, especially in the right frontal lobe and adjacent regions, in a considerable proportion of patients. The purpose of this article is to examine the phenomenon in people with dementia. We searched the electronic databases for original research and review articles on DMS in patients with dementia using the search terms "Delusional Misidentification Syndrome, Capgras syndrome, Fregoli syndrome, reduplicative paramnesia, and dementia." The DMSs are a frequent problem in dementia. The violence and dangerousness in patients with dementia having these syndromes are well documented, and forensic aspects are highlighted. Pathogenetic viewpoint and management are considered.

  16. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease without dementia: common and comorbid with other non-motor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Angela H; Weintraub, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD) is common and associated with a range of negative outcomes. Dementia and psychosis are highly correlated in PD, but the frequency and correlates of psychosis in patients without cognitive impairment are not well understood. One hundred and ninety-one non-demented PD patients at two movement disorders centers participated in a study of neuropsychiatric complications in PD and completed a detailed neurological and neuropsychiatric assessment, including the rater-administered Parkinson Psychosis Rating Scale for hallucinations, delusions, and minor symptoms of psychosis (illusions and misidentification of persons). Psychotic symptoms were present in 21.5% of the sample. Visual hallucinations were most common (13.6%), followed by auditory hallucinations (6.8%), illusions or misidentification of people (7.3%), and paranoid ideation (4.7%). Visual hallucinations and illusions or misidentification of people were the most common comorbid symptoms (3.1%). Depression (P = 0.01) and rapid eye movement behavior disorder symptoms (P = 0.03) were associated with psychosis in a multivariable model. The odds of experiencing psychotic symptoms were approximately five times higher in patients with comorbid disorders of depression and sleep-wakefulness. Even in patients without global cognitive impairment, psychosis in PD is common and most highly correlated with other non-motor symptoms. Screening for psychosis should occur at all stages of PD as part of a broad non-motor assessment. In addition, these findings suggest a common neural substrate for disturbances of perception, mood, sleep-wakefulness, and incipient cognitive decline in PD. PMID:22674352

  17. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease without dementia: common and comorbid with other non-motor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Angela H; Weintraub, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD) is common and associated with a range of negative outcomes. Dementia and psychosis are highly correlated in PD, but the frequency and correlates of psychosis in patients without cognitive impairment are not well understood. One hundred and ninety-one non-demented PD patients at two movement disorders centers participated in a study of neuropsychiatric complications in PD and completed a detailed neurological and neuropsychiatric assessment, including the rater-administered Parkinson Psychosis Rating Scale for hallucinations, delusions, and minor symptoms of psychosis (illusions and misidentification of persons). Psychotic symptoms were present in 21.5% of the sample. Visual hallucinations were most common (13.6%), followed by auditory hallucinations (6.8%), illusions or misidentification of people (7.3%), and paranoid ideation (4.7%). Visual hallucinations and illusions or misidentification of people were the most common comorbid symptoms (3.1%). Depression (P = 0.01) and rapid eye movement behavior disorder symptoms (P = 0.03) were associated with psychosis in a multivariable model. The odds of experiencing psychotic symptoms were approximately five times higher in patients with comorbid disorders of depression and sleep-wakefulness. Even in patients without global cognitive impairment, psychosis in PD is common and most highly correlated with other non-motor symptoms. Screening for psychosis should occur at all stages of PD as part of a broad non-motor assessment. In addition, these findings suggest a common neural substrate for disturbances of perception, mood, sleep-wakefulness, and incipient cognitive decline in PD.

  18. C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Repeat Expansion and Guam Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis–Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex

    PubMed Central

    Dombroski, Beth A.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Mata, Ignacio F.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Craig, Ulla-Katrina; Garruto, Ralph M.; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Schellenberg, Gerard D.

    2013-01-01

    Importance High-prevalence foci of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) exist in Japanese on the Kii Peninsula of Japan and in the Chamorros of Guam. Clinical and neuropathologic similarities suggest that the disease in these 2 populations may be related. Recent findings showed that some of the Kii Peninsula ALS cases had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a genotype that causes ALS in Western populations. Objectives To perform genotyping among Guam residents to determine if the C9orf72 expanded repeat allele contributes to ALS-PDC in this population and to evaluate LRRK2 for mutations in the same population. Design and Setting Case-control series from neurodegenerative disease research programs on Guam that screened residents for ALS, PDC, and dementia. Participants Study participants included 24 with ALS and 22 with PDC and 43 older control subjects with normal cognition ascertained between 1956 and 2006. All but one participant were Chamorro, the indigenous people of Guam. A single individual of white race/ethnicity with ALS was ascertained on Guam during the study. Main Outcomes and Measures Participants were screened for C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat length. Participants with repeat numbers in great excess of 30 were considered to have pathogenic repeat expansions. LRRK2 was screened for point mutations by DNA sequencing. Results We found a single individual with an expanded pathogenic hexanucleotide repeat. This individual of white race/ethnicity with ALS was living on Guam at the time of ascertainment but had been born in the United States. All Chamorro participants with ALS and PDC and control subjects had normal repeats, ranging from 2 to 17 copies. No pathogenic LRRK2 mutations were found. Conclusions and Relevance Unlike participants with ALS from the Kii Peninsula, C9orf72 expansions do not cause ALS-PDC in Chamorros. Likewise, LRRK2 mutations do not cause Guam ALS-PDC. PMID:23588498

  19. Dopamine transporter single-photon emission computerized tomography supports diagnosis of akinetic crisis of parkinsonism and of neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martino, G; Capasso, M; Nasuti, M; Bonanni, L; Onofrj, M; Thomas, A

    2015-04-01

    Akinetic crisis (AC) is akin to neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) and is the most severe and possibly lethal complication of parkinsonism. Diagnosis is today based only on clinical assessments yet is often marred by concomitant precipitating factors. Our purpose is to evidence that AC and NMS can be reliably evidenced by FP/CIT single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) performed during the crisis. Prospective cohort evaluation in 6 patients. In 5 patients, affected by Parkinson disease or Lewy body dementia, the crisis was categorized as AC. One was diagnosed as having NMS because of exposure to risperidone. In all FP/CIT, SPECT was performed in the acute phase. SPECT was repeated 3 to 6 months after the acute event in 5 patients. Visual assessments and semiquantitative evaluations of binding potentials (BPs) were used. To exclude the interference of emergency treatments, FP/CIT BP was also evaluated in 4 patients currently treated with apomorphine. During AC or NMS, BP values in caudate and putamen were reduced by 95% to 80%, to noise level with a nearly complete loss of striatum dopamine transporter-binding, corresponding to the "burst striatum" pattern. The follow-up re-evaluation in surviving patients showed a recovery of values to the range expected for Parkinsonisms of same disease duration. No binding effects of apomorphine were observed. By showing the outstanding binding reduction, presynaptic dopamine transporter ligand can provide instrumental evidence of AC in Parkinsonism and NMS.

  20. Tau and α-Synuclein Pathology in Amygdala of Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex Patients of Guam

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Mark S.; Schmidt, M. Luise; Kasturi, Sanjay; Perl, Daniel P.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2002-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of Chamorro residents of Guam and the Mariana Islands, characterized by abundant neuron loss and tau neurofibrillary pathology similar to that observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A variety of neurodegenerative diseases with tau pathology including ALS/PDC also have α-synuclein positive pathology, primarily in the amygdala. We further characterized the tau and α-synuclein pathology in the amygdala of a large series of 30 Chamorros using immunohistochemical and biochemical techniques. Tau pathology was readily detected in both affected and unaffected Chamorros. In contrast, α-synuclein pathology was detected in 37% of patients with PDC but not detected in Chamorros without PDC or AD. The α-synuclein aggregates often co-localized within neurons harboring neurofibrillary tangles suggesting a possible interaction between the two proteins. Tau and α-synuclein pathology within the amygdala is biochemically similar to that observed in AD and synucleinopathies, respectively. Thus, the amygdala may be selectively vulnerable to developing both tau and α-synuclein pathology or tau pathology may predispose it to synuclein aggregation. Furthermore, in PDC, tau and α-synuclein pathology occurs independent of β-amyloid deposition in amygdala thereby implicating the aggregation of these molecules in the severe neurodegeneration frequently observed in this location. PMID:12000724

  1. Inherited and somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in Guam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia.

    PubMed

    Reiff, Dana M; Spathis, Rita; Chan, Chim W; Vilar, Miguel G; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Lynch, Daniel; Ehrlich, Emily; Kerath, Samantha; Chowdhury, Risana; Robinowitz, Leah; Koji Lum, J; Garruto, Ralph M

    2011-10-01

    There is increasing evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders, although the exact role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in this process is unresolved. We investigated inherited and somatic mtDNA substitutions and deletions in Guam amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and parkinsonism-dementia (PD). Hypervariable segment 1 sequences of Chamorro mtDNA revealed that the odds ratio of a PD or ALS diagnosis was increased for individuals in the E1 haplogroup while individuals in the E2 haplogroup had decreased odds of an ALS or PD diagnosis. Once the disorders were examined separately, it became evident that PD was responsible for these results. When the entire mitochondrial genome was sequenced for a subset of individuals, the nonsynonymous mutation at nucleotide position 9080, shared by all E2 individuals, resulted in a significantly low odds ratio for a diagnosis of ALS or PD. Private polymorphisms found in transfer and ribosomal RNA regions were found only in ALS and PD patients in the E1 haplogroup. Somatic mtDNA deletions in the entire mtDNA genome were not associated with either ALS or PD. We conclude that mtDNA haplogroup effects may result in mitochondrial dysfunction in Guam PD and reflect Guam population history. Thus it is reasonable to consider Guam ALS and PD as complex disorders with both environmental prerequisites and small genetic effects.

  2. TDP-43 is deposited in the Guam parkinsonism-dementia complex brains.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masato; Arai, Tetsuaki; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Nonaka, Takashi; Mori, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Tomoyo; Yamazaki, Mineo; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu

    2007-05-01

    TDP-43, a nuclear factor that functions in regulating transcription and alternative splicing, was recently identified as a component of the ubiquitin-positive, tau-negative inclusions specific for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In the present study, we carried out immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses of brains of Guamanians with the parkinsonism-dementia complex (G-PDC) using anti-TDP-43, anti-tau and anti-ubiquitin antibodies. Immunohistochemistry with anti-TDP-43 antibodies revealed various types of positive structures in the frontotemporal and hippocampal regions of G-PDC cases. Most of these structures were negative for tau. By immunoblot analysis with the TDP-43 antibody, an abnormal 45 kDa band, as well as a diffuse staining throughout the gel, was detected in the sarkosyl-insoluble fractions of G-PDC brains. Dephosphorylation has shown that abnormal phosphorylation takes place in the accumulated TDP-43 seen in FTLD-U and ALS. These results suggest that accumulation of TDP-43 is a common process in certain neurodegenerative disorders, including FTLD-U, ALS and G-PDC.

  3. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Marxreiter, F; Winkler, J

    2016-07-01

    Parkinsonism may result from cerebral vascular disorders that feature white matter lesions and small vessel pathology. Vascular Parkinsonism typically presents as lower body Parkinsonism with predominant gait impairment. Urinary incontinence and cognitive decline are additional features of the disease. There is a considerable overlap between vascular Parkinsonism and vascular dementia. We review the clinical characteristics of vascular Parkinsonism and discuss the current treatment approaches, as well as the role of brain imaging for the diagnostic workup. . PMID:27299942

  4. Occurrence of Parkinson's syndrome in type I Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, O; Giladi, N; Elstein, D; Abrahamov, A; Turezkite, T; Aghai, E; Reches, A; Bembi, B; Zimran, A

    1996-09-01

    Gaucher disease, the most prevalent glycolipid storage disorder, is classically subdivided into types according to the presence or absence of neurological involvement. Type I has hitherto been considered non-neuronopathic. We present six cases and a review of the literature of Parkinsonian symptoms in type I Gaucher disease patients. The hallmark of this atypical Parkinsonian syndrome is a relatively severe clinical course with early appearance of neurological signs in the 4th to 6th decade of life, aggressive progression of the signs and refractoriness to conventional anti-Parkinson therapy. We discuss the implications of these findings in the light of enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher disease. PMID:8917744

  5. Down syndrome and dementia: Is depression a confounder for accurate diagnosis and treatment?

    PubMed

    Wark, Stuart; Hussain, Rafat; Parmenter, Trevor

    2014-12-01

    The past century has seen a dramatic improvement in the life expectancy of people with Down syndrome. However, research has shown that individuals with Down syndrome now have an increased likelihood of early onset dementia. They are more likely than their mainstream peers to experience other significant co-morbidities including mental health issues such as depression. This case study reports a phenomenon in which three individuals with Down syndrome and dementia are described as experiencing a rebound in their functioning after a clear and sustained period of decline. It is hypothesized that this phenomenon is not actually a reversal of the expected dementia trajectory but is an undiagnosed depression exaggerating the true level of functional decline associated with the dementia. The proactive identification and treatment of depressive symptoms may therefore increase the quality of life of some people with Down syndrome and dementia.

  6. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dementia may also cause changes in mood and personality. Early on, lapses in memory and clear thinking ... to tears to anger in a few minutes. Personality changes. People who have dementia may have drastic ...

  7. [Clinical and medicine characteristics of patients with Parkinson's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yi, Dan-Hui; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2014-09-01

    This study analyze the characteristics and clinical medicine in 17 hospitals all over China, based on hospital information system diagnostic information database, including 4 497 cases of hospitalized patients with Parkinson's syndrome. Results indicate, the most common comorbidities are infarction, hypertension, coronary heart disease, diabetes and lung infections, including cerebral infarction, the combined incidence of hypertension in men reached 33.46% and 30.05%, respectively, it is slightly lower in the females. Men with coronary heart disease are more than women, women with diabetes and bone disease are more than men. Combined incidence of the disease increases with age, vascular factors occupy an important position. The most common combined diseases in patients with 90 years of age or older are coronary heart disease, lung infection, and often accompanied by metabolic disorders and nutritional emergency, critical care. Constipation, depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, cognitive impairment are common non-motor symptoms. The drug categories associated with Parkinson's core symptoms treatment are about 20% to 30% of clinical medicine, the others are associated with the treatment of combined disease, clinical medicine and disease spectrum consistent. Blood circulation topped Chinese agents applied frequency, reaching 44.52%; laxative drugs accounted for 11.66%; detoxification agent representing 9.46%. The first twenty Chinese medicine of the applying frequency reached 56.07% of the total utilization, including 12 kinds of traditional Chinese medicine injections, accounting for 60%. Therefore, in the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinsons syndrome, the treatment of comorbidities is very important, more attentions should be paid to vascular factors of the disease, Chinese medicine should be more concerned to improve the non-motor symptoms, give full play to the pharmaceutical multi-target, the overall regulation of advantages, integrative medicine, and improve

  8. Validation and attempts of revision of the MDS-recommended tests for the screening of Parkinson's disease dementia.

    PubMed

    Isella, V; Mapelli, C; Siri, C; De Gaspari, D; Pezzoli, G; Antonini, A; Poletti, M; Bonuccelli, U; Vista, M; Appollonio, I M

    2014-01-01

    The Movement Disorders Society (MDS) formulated diagnostic criteria and assessment guidelines for the screening of dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD). We carried out a validation of the cognitive measures suggested in the screening algorithm (i.e. the Mini Mental State Examination - MMSE - total score, serial 7s subtraction, 3-word recall, pentagons copy, and one minute letter fluency) in 86 patients with PD. Thirty-six percent of participants were diagnosed with dementia using the MDS algorithm, but with the Dementia Rating Scale instead of the MMSE. The original MDS procedure misclassified 11 patients (12.8%) as false negatives and 3 (3.5%) as false positives, leading to 65% sensitivity and 95% specificity. The main reason for misdiagnoses was insensitivity of the MMSE total score. Three attempts were made to reach a better screening performance, which warrants high sensitivity more than high specificity: 1. exclusion of the MMSE total score as a diagnostic requirement; 2. determination of a better cut off through Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis; 3. replacement of the MMSE with the equally undemanding, but more PD-specific, Mini Mental Parkinson. The first two strategies generally yielded high sensitivity, but poor specificity. The best outcome was achieved using a Mini Mental Parkinson total score <27 as cognitive criterion: sensitivity was 87% and negative predictive value was 90%; however, specificity was only 67%. Our findings seem to suggest that MDS practical guidelines are specific, but might benefit from the use of more PD-oriented tools than the MMSE in terms of sensitivity. PMID:24084382

  9. Integrative Frequency Power of EEG Correlates with Progression of Mild Cognitive Impairment to Dementia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Gu, Youquan; Chen, Jun; Lu, Yaqin; Pan, Suyue

    2016-04-01

    Clinically, predicting the progression of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and diagnosing dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD) are difficult. This study aims to explore an integrative electroencephalography (EEG) frequency power that could be used to predict the progression of MCI in PD patients. Twenty-six PD patients, in this study, were divided into the mild cognitive impairment group (PDMCI, 17 patients) and dementia group (PDD, 9 patients) according to cognitive performance. Beta peak frequency, alpha relative power, and alpha/theta power were recorded and analyzed for the prediction. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores at initiation, in the first year, and in the second year were examined. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, Matthew correlation coefficient, and positive likelihood ratio were calculated in both the integrative EEG biomarkers and single best biomarker. Of the 17 patients with MCI for 2 years, 6 progressed to dementia. Integrative EEG biomarkers, mainly associated with beta peak frequency, can predict conversion from MCI to dementia. These biomarkers had sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 78%, compared with sensitivity of 61% and specificity of 58% of the beta peak frequency. In conclusion, the integrative EEG frequency powers were more sensitive and specific to MCI progression in PD patients.

  10. Antihypertensive Agents and Risk of Parkinson's Disease, Essential Tremor and Dementia: A Population-Based Prospective Study (NEDICES)

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Benito-León, Julián; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent interest in antihypertensive agents, especially calcium channel blockers, has been sparked by the notion that these medications may be neuroprotective. A modest literature, with mixed results, has examined whether these medications might lower the odds or risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) or dementia. There are no data for essential tremor (ET). Objective To examine the association between antihypertensive use (defined broadly and by individual subclasses) and ET, PD and dementia. For each disorder, we used cross-sectional data (association with prevalent disease) and prospective data (association with incident disease). Methods Prospective population-based study in Spain enrolling 5,278 participants at baseline. Results Use of antihypertensive medications (aside from β-blockers) was similar in prevalent ET cases and controls. Baseline use of antihypertensive agents was not associated with reduced risk of incident ET. Antihypertensive medication use was not associated with prevalent or incident PD. Calcium channel blocker use was marginally reduced in prevalent dementia cases (ORadjusted = 0.63, p = 0.06) but was not associated with reduced risk of incident dementia (RRadjusted = 1.02, p = 0.95). Conclusions We did not find evidence of a protective effect of antihypertensive medications in these three neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19696520

  11. Pathological TDP-43 in parkinsonism-dementia complex and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis of Guam.

    PubMed

    Geser, Felix; Winton, Matthew J; Kwong, Linda K; Xu, Yan; Xie, Sharon X; Igaz, Lionel M; Garruto, Ralph M; Perl, Daniel P; Galasko, Douglas; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2008-01-01

    Pathological TDP-43 is the major disease protein in frontotemporal lobar degeneration characterized by ubiquitin inclusions (FTLD-U) with/without motor neuron disease (MND) and in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As Guamanian parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) or Guamanian ALS (G-PDC or G-ALS) of the Chamorro population may present clinically similar to FTLD-U and ALS, TDP-43 pathology may be present in the G-PDC and G-ALS. Thus, we examined cortical or spinal cord samples from 54 Guamanian subjects for evidence of TDP-43 pathology. In addition to cortical neurofibrillary and glial tau pathology, G-PDC was associated with cortical TDP-43 positive dystrophic neurites and neuronal and glial inclusions in gray and/or white matter. Biochemical analyses showed the presence of FTLD-U-like insoluble TDP-43 in G-PDC, but not in Guam controls (G-C). Spinal cord pathology of G-PDC or G-ALS was characterized by tau positive tangles as well as TDP-43 positive inclusions in lower motor neurons and glial cells. G-C had variable tau and negligible TDP-43 pathology. These results indicate that G-PDC and G-ALS are associated with pathological TDP-43 similar to FTLD-U with/without MND as well as ALS, and that neocortical or hippocampal TDP-43 pathology distinguishes controls from disease subjects better than tau pathology. Finally, we conclude that the spectrum of TDP-43 proteinopathies should be expanded to include neurodegenerative cognitive and motor diseases, affecting the Chamorro population of Guam.

  12. Dementias.

    PubMed

    Sacuiu, S F

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will focus on the descriptive, analytic, and intervention-oriented epidemiology of dementia and its most frequent etiologic type due to Alzheimer's disease. The chapter opens with a brief presentation of the concept of dementia, followed by the presentation of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), including natural history, clinical manifestation, neuropathology, medical prognosis, and management. Further, the chapter presents the prevalence and incidence of dementia, with special consideration of secular trends in prevalence and incidence of DAT, and prognosis of the socioeconomic impact of dementia. Thereafter the main risk factors for DAT are covered. The chapter also addresses the results of ongoing therapeutic and preventive intervention trials for DAT. Finally, the future challenges of the epidemiology of dementia with a focus on the impact of the new diagnostic criteria for neurocognitive disorders, as well as the development of biomarkers for DAT and other types of dementia, will be briefly discussed. PMID:27637956

  13. Critical Issues for Service Planners and Providers of Care for People with Down's Syndrome and Dementia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watchman, Karen

    2003-01-01

    This article raises critical issues that need to addressed while considering the future needs of people with Down syndrome and dementia, along with suggestions as to how they may be met. It discusses dementia diagnosis, staff training, the family's role, advantages of health screening, and difficulties in collating accurate information. (Contains…

  14. Behavioural Characteristics Associated with Dementia Assessment Referrals in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, D.; Oliver, C.; Kalsy, S.; Peters, S.; Broquard, M.; Basra, T.; Konstandinidi, E.; McQuillan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Behavioural changes associated with dementia in Down syndrome are well documented, yet little is known about the effect of such behaviours on carers and referral. By comparing the behavioural and cognitive profiles of individuals referred for a dementia assessment with those of individuals not referred, some insight can be gained into…

  15. The Distinct Cognitive Syndromes of Parkinson's Disease: 5 Year Follow-Up of the CamPaIGN Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Evans, Jonathan R.; Goris, An; Foltynie, Thomas; Ban, Maria; Robbins, Trevor W.; Brayne, Carol; Kolachana, Bhaskar S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Barker, Roger A.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease, with important social and economic implications. Factors influencing their evolution remain unclear but are crucial to the development of targeted therapeutic strategies. We have investigated the development of cognitive impairment and dementia in Parkinson's disease using a longitudinal…

  16. [The psychopathological pictures of the early stages of dementia syndromes (vasogenic and of Alzheimer's type)].

    PubMed

    Bidzan, L

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the research is to determine the early symptoms predicting dementia syndromes both Vasogenic and Alzheimer type. The investigations covered: 36 people without any psychopathological syndrome, 32 people with dementia of Alzheimer type and 36 people with vasogenic dementia. DSM IV criteria were accepted as a basis for recognition of dementia syndromes. The qualified patients underwent basic examination consisting of the following elements: AMDP scale (the estimation of psychic and somatic condition), Global Scale of Dementia, Hachinski scale, Blessed scale, Folsteins scale (MMS), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, Physical self Maintenance Scale and two methods of the authors: Current Events Card and Prodromal Symptoms Card. On the basis of examinations the following conclusions can be stated:--persons in early stages of dementia differ from those without any symptoms of it by the occurrence of many psychopathological symptoms--not only connected with the cognitive sphere;--in the period preceding the development of dementia the frequency of occurrence of some symptoms is different according to etiology of the process (Alzheimer or vasogenic);--the applied clinical scales differ significantly in their value for the diagnosis and the estimation of intensification of dementia processes. PMID:9920996

  17. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... agitated or see things that are not there. Memory loss is a common symptom of dementia. However, memory loss by itself does not mean you have ... with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. Although dementia is common in very ...

  18. Sundown Syndrome in Persons with Dementia: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Khachiyants, Nina; Trinkle, David; Son, Sang Joon

    2011-01-01

    "Sundowning" in demented individuals, as distinct clinical phenomena, is still open to debate in terms of clear definition, etiology, operationalized parameters, validity of clinical construct, and interventions. In general, sundown syndrome is characterized by the emergence or increment of neuropsychiatric symptoms such as agitation, confusion, anxiety, and aggressiveness in late afternoon, in the evening, or at night. Sundowning is highly prevalent among individuals with dementia. It is thought to be associated with impaired circadian rhythmicity, environmental and social factors, and impaired cognition. Neurophysiologically, it appears to be mediated by degeneration of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus and decreased production of melatonin. A variety of treatment options have been found to be helpful to ameliorate the neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with this phenomenon: bright light therapy, melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists, antipsychotics, and behavioral modifications. To decrease the morbidity from this specific condition, improve patient's well being, lessen caregiver burden, and delay institutionalization, further attention needs to be given to development of clinically operational definition of sundown syndrome and investigations on etiology, risk factors, and effective treatment options. PMID:22216036

  19. The undiscovered syndrome: Macdonald Critchley’s case of semantic dementia

    PubMed Central

    Witoonpanich, Pirada; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.; Rossor, Martin N.

    2015-01-01

    Semantic dementia is a unique clinicopathological syndrome in the frontotemporal lobar degeneration spectrum. It is characterized by progressive and relatively selective impairment of semantic memory, associated with asymmetric antero-inferior temporal lobe atrophy. Although the syndrome became widely recognized only in the 1980s, descriptions of cases with typical features of semantic dementia have been on record for over a century. Here, we draw attention to a well documented historical case of a patient with features that would have fulfilled current consensus criteria for semantic dementia, as reconstructed from the notes made by her neurologist, Macdonald Critchley, in 1938. This case raises a number of issues concerning the nosology of the semantic dementia syndrome and the potential value of archived case material. PMID:24818802

  20. White Matter Tract Damage in the Behavioral Variant of Frontotemporal and Corticobasal Dementia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Bramati, Ivanei Edson; Zahn, Roland; Cavanagh, Alyson; Tierney, Michael; Moll, Jorge; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    The phenotypes of the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia and the corticobasal syndrome present considerable clinical and anatomical overlap. The respective patterns of white matter damage in these syndromes have not been directly contrasted. Beyond cortical involvement, damage to white matter pathways may critically contribute to both common and specific symptoms in both conditions. Here we assessed patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia and corticobasal syndrome with whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging to identify the white matter networks underlying these pathologies. Twenty patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia, 19 with corticobasal syndrome, and 15 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Differences in tract integrity between (i) patients and controls, and (ii) patients with the corticobasal syndrome and the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia were assessed with whole brain tract-based spatial statistics and analyses of regions of interest. Behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia and the corticobasal syndrome shared a pattern of bilaterally decreased white matter integrity in the anterior commissure, genu and body of the corpus callosum, corona radiata and in the long intrahemispheric association pathways. Patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia showed greater damage to the uncinate fasciculus, genu of corpus callosum and forceps minor. In contrast, corticobasal syndrome patients had greater damage to the midbody of the corpus callosum and perirolandic corona radiata. Whereas several compact white matter pathways were damaged in both the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia and corticobasal syndrome, the distribution and degree of white matter damage differed between them. These findings concur with the distinctive clinical manifestations of these conditions and may improve the in vivo neuroanatomical and diagnostic characterization of these

  1. A Comparison of Challenging Behaviour in an Adult Group with Down's Syndrome and Dementia Compared with an Adult Down's Syndrome Group without Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huxley, Adam; Van-Schaik, Paul; Witts, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the frequency and severity of challenging behaviour in adults with Down's syndrome with and without signs of dementia. Care staff were interviewed using the Aberrant Behaviour Checklist-Community version (M.G. Aman & N.N. Singh, Slosson, East Aurora, NY, 1994), to investigate the frequency and severity of challenging…

  2. [Clinical and pathological study on early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies].

    PubMed

    Orimo, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    [123I] Meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy has been used to evaluate postganglionic cardiac sympathetic innervation in heart diseases and some neurological disorders. To see clinical usefulness of MIBG myocardial scintigraphy to differentiate Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) from related movement disorders and Alzheimer disease (AD), we performed MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in patients with these disorders. Cardiac uptake of MIBG is specifically reduced in PD and DLB, and this imaging approach is a sensitive diagnostic tool that possibly differentiates PD and DLB from related movement disorders and AD. To see pathological basis of the reduced cardiac uptake of MIBG in Lewy body disease, we immunohistochemically examined cardiac tissues from patients with PD, DLB, related movement disorders and AD using antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and phosphorylated neurofilament (NF). Not only TH- but also NF-immunoreactive (ir) axons in the epicardial nerve fascicles were markedly decreased in Lewy body disease, namely cardiac sympathetic denervation, which accounts for the reduced cardiac uptake of MIBG in Lewy body disease. Patients with PD and DLB have Lewy bodies (LBs) in the nervous system, whereas patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, parkin-associated PD and AD have no LBs in the nervous system. Even in patients with MSA, cardiac sympathetic denervation was associated with the presence of LBs. Therefore, cardiac sympathetic denervation is closely related to the presence of LBs in a wide range of neurodegenerative processes. Taken together, we conclude that the reduced cardiac uptake of MIBG is a potential biomarker for the presence of LBs. Because alpha-synuclein is one of the key molecules in the pathogenesis of PD, we further investigate how alpha-synuclein aggregates are involved in degeneration of the cardiac sympathetic nerve in PD. We

  3. Variability of the Aging Process in Dementia-Free Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsao, Raphaele; Kindelberger, Cecile; Freminville, Benedicte; Touraine, Renaud; Bussey, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to analyze the typical aging process in adults with Down syndrome, focusing on its variability. The sample comprised 120 adults with Down syndrome who were free of dementia. Ages ranged from 20 to 69 years. Each participant was assessed on cognitive functioning and social adaptation, and was checked for…

  4. Neurofibrillary degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam. Immunochemical characterization of tau proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Buée-Scherrer, V.; Buée, L.; Hof, P. R.; Leveugle, B.; Gilles, C.; Loerzel, A. J.; Perl, D. P.; Delacourte, A.

    1995-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles are observed in several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam. The major components of neurofibrillary tangles are hyperphosphorylated tau proteins that can be directly detected in brain homogenates, using immunoblotting with specific immunological probes. To investigate whether tau proteins differ biochemically among various neurodegenerative disorders, we analyzed a series of brain samples from Guamanian patients in comparison with Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and normal aging. In Alzheimer's disease, these hyperphosphorylated tau proteins are composed of a triplet referred to as tau 55, 64, and 69, whereas in progressive supranuclear palsy, neurofibrillary degeneration is characterized by a tau doublet (tau 64 and 69). In the present study, characterization of tau proteins was performed by immunoblotting, on different cortical and subcortical regions of postmortem brain specimens from Guamanian natives. In all of the cases, biochemical data were always consistent with neuropathological findings. In contrast to Alzheimer's disease patients where the tau triplet is found mostly in cortical regions, a similar triplet was strongly detected in both cortical and subcortical areas in Guamanian patients. The tau profile differed quantitatively from case to case demonstrating that the Alzheimer's disease-related tau triplet had a heterogeneous regional distribution. These data suggest that the tau triplet found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam is similar to that observed in Alzheimer's disease, and the regional distribution of tau proteins differs in these disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7717459

  5. Restless Legs Syndrome and Leg Motor Restlessness in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are important nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) that are associated with a negative impact on quality of life. Restless legs syndrome (RLS), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs accompanied by abnormal leg sensations, can coexist with PD, although the pathophysiology of these disorders appears to be different. RLS and PD both respond favorably to dopaminergic treatment, and several investigators have reported a significant relationship between RLS and PD. Sensory symptoms, pain, motor restlessness, akathisia, and the wearing-off phenomenon observed in PD should be differentiated from RLS. RLS in PD may be confounded by chronic dopaminergic treatment; thus, more studies are needed to investigate RLS in drug-naïve patients with PD. Recently, leg motor restlessness (LMR), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs that does not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for RLS, has been reported to be observed more frequently in de novo patients with PD than in age-matched healthy controls, suggesting that LMR may be a part of sensorimotor symptoms intrinsic to PD. In this paper, we provide an overview of RLS, LMR, and PD and of the relationships among these disorders. PMID:26504610

  6. COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF MCI and DEMENTIA TREATMENTS IN A COMMUNITY-BASED DEMENTIA PRACTICE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-04

    Mild Cognitive Impairment; Dementia; Hypoxia; Hyperhomocysteinemia; Vitamin B 12 Deficiency; Iron Deficiency; Anemia; TBI; Neurodegenerative Disorders; Alzheimer's Disease; Vascular Dementia; Brain Injuries; Tauopathies; Parkinson's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Frontotemporal Dementia; TDP-43 Proteinopathies

  7. How We Developed a Multidisciplinary Screening Project for People with Down's Syndrome Given the Increased Prevalence of Early Onset Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jervis, Nicola; Prinsloo, Linda

    2008-01-01

    There has been much research that has identified an increased prevalence of Dementia in adults with Down's syndrome when compared with the general population. Neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's dementia in the brain have been found in most people with Down's syndrome who die over the age of 35 years. Given the limitations of…

  8. [A concise history of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fazekas, Tamás

    2006-01-01

    In a paper entitled Bundle-branch block with short P-R interval in healthy young people prone to paroxysmal tachycardia (Am Heart J 1930; 5: 685-704), Dr. Louis Wolff (1898-1972), Sir John Parkinson (1885-1976) and Paul Dudley White (1886-1973) described an intricate syndrome. Prior case reports had already pointed out the essentials of this entity, which has borne the eponym (WPW syndrome) since the publication by Levine and Beeson (Am Heart J 1941; 22: 401-409). It was long thought that the first patient with a short PR interval, delta-wave-induced widening of the QRS complex and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) was described by Cohn and Fraser in the prestigious cardiological journal edited by Sir Thomas Lewis (1881-1945) in London, UK (Heart 1913/1914; 5: 93-107). Shortly afterwards, Dr János Angyán (1886-1969), a school-founder chairman of medicine (1923-1959) at the University of Pécs, Hungary, also published a clear-cut case of intermittent WPW syndrome in the German periodical Zentralblatt für Herz- und Gefässkrankheiten (1914; 6: 345-349]. In fact, Angyán should be considered the first Hungarian "cardiologist" who dealt steadily with heart diseases and rhythm disturbances. Quite reently, thanks to the activities of Dr Georg von Knorre, Rostock (PACE 2005; 28: 228-230) we have learnt that the earliest documented case of ECGs with ventricular preexcitation and PSVT ("Herzjagen") was published by August Hoffmann (1862-1929) in the 2 Nov 1909 issue of Münchener Medizinische Wochenschrift (56: 2259-2262; Figures 10 and 11). Hoffmann worked as an internist/neurologist and was director of the university hospital in Düsseldorf, Germany. The first successful surgical division of an atrioventricular accessory pathway (bundle of Kent), by Sealy and his coworkers at the Duke University Medical Center in 1967, led to the modern era of curative transcatheter ablation for WPW patients by radiofrequency alternative current or, nowadays, by

  9. Frequency of dementia syndromes with a potentially treatable cause in geriatric in-patients: analysis of a 1-year interval.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Marija; Wedekind, Dirk; Franz, Almuth; Gremke, Melanie; Nau, Roland

    2015-08-01

    In addition to neurodegenerative and vascular causes of dementia, in the differential diagnosis potentially reversible conditions of dementia also must be assessed. Routine laboratory parameters and neuroimaging, which are recommended for the differential diagnosis of suspected dementia by the German S3 Guideline "Dementia", were retrospectively studied in 166 geriatric patients with suspected dementia. Delirium was diagnosed in six patients (3.6%). These six patients were excluded from the study. Of the 160 remaining patients, there were 99 (59.6%) with an already known dementia. In this subgroup of patients, we found a potentially treatable cause of dementia in 18.2%. In the remaining 61 patients (36.8%), the newly diagnosed dementia syndrome was established according to ICD-10 criteria. Potentially reversible causes of the dementia syndrome were found in 19 of these patients (31.1%). The most common cause was depressive pseudodementia in eight patients followed by vitamin B12 deficiency in six patients. A significant amount of our patients showed laboratory or imaging changes suggestive of potentially reversible causes of the dementia syndrome upon admission. The results of our study indicate the importance of careful differential diagnosis of dementia based on the recommendations of guidelines. Although therapy of these potential causes is not always accompanied by a full recovery, the identification and therapy of treatable causes of cognitive deficits are possible even for general practitioners, who often are the primary contact persons of affected individuals. PMID:25716929

  10. Atrial depolarization in Wolf-Parkinson-White and Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome: vectorcardiographic features.

    PubMed

    Zoneraich, O; Zoneraich, S

    1979-07-01

    The atrial depolarization pattern was studied in 22 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White and Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome. The influence of the accessory pathways on the shape, magnitude and conduction pattern of the PSE loop was analyzed. An accurate evaluation of the beginning of the delta wave and of the P loop distortions was obtained by using high magnification (1 mV = 30 cm) recordings. The Frank lead system was used. The influence of atrial size (documented by echocardiography) on the PSE loop is emphasized. Special attention has been focused on the terminal vectors as compared to a control group. In Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome the size of the PSE loop was smaller than in Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome or in the normal group. When atrial conduction disturbances and/or atrial enlargement was present the PSE loop was larger and distorted. The terminal vectors were abnormally oriented in 75 percent of the patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, but only in one with Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome. The beginning of the delta wave in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was located to the left of the E point in all but two. When the "concertina" effect was present, the direction of the terminal vectors remained unchanged. In four patients with the Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome, the PSE loop closed, and in three patients, a small opening was present. We suggest that the changes in contour, duration and amplitude of the PSE loop are due to an abnormal pattern of atrial depolorization in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

  11. A Case of Painless Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome in Parkinson's Disease Responsive to Dopaminergic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Ryota; Noda, Kazuyuki; Tomizawa, Yuji; Hattori, Nobutaka; Okuma, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Painless Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome (PoLMT) is a rare movement disorder characterized by flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and torsion of toes without pain. It is considered a variant of Painful Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome (PLMT), which is characterized by similar movements but with pain. Although neuropathy and several central nervous system (CNS) involvements have been reported to be associated with PoLMT, the actual cause and mechanism remain unclear. Here we describe the first case of PoLMT in Parkinson's Disease (PD), parallel to parkinsonism in severity, who demonstrated a good response to dopaminergic therapy. PMID:27648321

  12. A Case of Painless Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome in Parkinson's Disease Responsive to Dopaminergic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Ryota; Noda, Kazuyuki; Tomizawa, Yuji; Hattori, Nobutaka; Okuma, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Painless Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome (PoLMT) is a rare movement disorder characterized by flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and torsion of toes without pain. It is considered a variant of Painful Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome (PLMT), which is characterized by similar movements but with pain. Although neuropathy and several central nervous system (CNS) involvements have been reported to be associated with PoLMT, the actual cause and mechanism remain unclear. Here we describe the first case of PoLMT in Parkinson's Disease (PD), parallel to parkinsonism in severity, who demonstrated a good response to dopaminergic therapy.

  13. A Case of Painless Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome in Parkinson's Disease Responsive to Dopaminergic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kawajiri, Sumihiro; Hoshino, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Ryota; Noda, Kazuyuki; Tomizawa, Yuji; Hattori, Nobutaka; Okuma, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Painless Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome (PoLMT) is a rare movement disorder characterized by flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and torsion of toes without pain. It is considered a variant of Painful Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome (PLMT), which is characterized by similar movements but with pain. Although neuropathy and several central nervous system (CNS) involvements have been reported to be associated with PoLMT, the actual cause and mechanism remain unclear. Here we describe the first case of PoLMT in Parkinson's Disease (PD), parallel to parkinsonism in severity, who demonstrated a good response to dopaminergic therapy. PMID:27648321

  14. Dementia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Dementia is characterised by chronic, global, non-reversible deterioration in memory, executive function, and personality. Speech and motor function may also be impaired. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments on cognitive symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? What are the effects of treatments on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine), antidepressants (clomipramine, fluoxetine, imipramine, sertraline), antipsychotics (haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone), aromatherapy, benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive stimulation, exercise, ginkgo biloba, memantine, mood stabilisers (carbamazepine, sodium valproate/valproic acid), music therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), omega 3 (fish oil), reminiscence therapy, and statins. PMID:21726471

  15. Dementia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Dementia is characterised by chronic, global, non-reversible deterioration in memory, executive function, and personality. Speech and motor function may also be impaired. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments on cognitive symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? What are the effects of treatments on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (Alzheimer's, Lewy body, or vascular)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 49 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine), antidepressants (clomipramine, fluoxetine, imipramine, sertraline), antipsychotics (haloperidol, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone), aromatherapy, benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), cognitive stimulation, exercise, ginkgo biloba, memantine, mood stabilisers (carbamazepine, sodium valproate/valproic acid), music therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), omega 3 (fish oil), reminiscence therapy, and statins. PMID:23870856

  16. The Movement Disorders Society criteria for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease dementia: their usefulness and limitations in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Kiesmann, Michèle; Chanson, Jean-Baptiste; Godet, Julien; Vogel, Thomas; Schweiger, Laetitia; Chayer, Saïd; Kaltenbach, Georges

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of the Movement Disorders Society (MDS) criteria for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) in the elderly, and also to evaluate the relevance of applying other tests in this patient population. The MDS criteria include a first short part in checklist form, and a second part which is used as a basis for reference and consists of an in-depth neuropsychological examination. Forty consecutive PD patients presenting with cognitive complaints were enrolled. An assessment was made of the performances of the MDS checklist compared with the MDS exhaustive cognitive examination which was used as a basis for reference, and with other cognitive tests including the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS), the French version of the Grober and Buschke test, the verbal fluency test, the Rey-Osterreith complex figure and the paced auditory serial addition test. Out of a total of 40 PD subjects (mean age: 80.5 ± 4.9 years), 20 were diagnosed with PDD according to the checklist and 31 on the basis of the exhaustive examination, i.e. with 11 more patients diagnosed via the latter. The sensitivity of the checklist for the diagnosis of PDD was 0.64, with a specificity of 1.00. The use of the MDRS for PDD diagnosis with a cut-off at ≤ 120 showed a sensitivity of 0.80 and a specificity of 1.00, while at ≤ 132 it displayed a sensitivity of 1.00 and a specificity of 0.444. The specificity of the checklist for the diagnosis of PDD in the elderly was confirmed, but it was lacking in sensitivity. It was also found that the MDRS could be helpful in the diagnosis and screening of PDD. PMID:23835635

  17. [Episodic manifestation of hemiparkinson syndrome with severe dementia personality change and precursors of paranoid hallucination symptoms].

    PubMed

    Postrach, F

    1989-09-01

    A case of episodic manifestation of semiparalysis agitans is described, accompanied by severe demential personality change and precursory hallucinatory symptoms, which is made the basis for the discussion of aspects of mental disorders, notably dementia and symptoms resembling schizophrenia, in Parkinsonian patients. By way of allusion to Glass, a diagnosis including a very extensive, complex, symptomatology is made of a Parkinsonian syndrome.

  18. Incidence and Prevalence of Dementia in Elderly Adults with Mental Retardation without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigman, Warren B.; Schupf, Nicole; Devenny, Darlynne A.; Miezejeski, Charles; Ryan, Robert; Urv, Tiina K.; Schubert, Romaine; Silverman, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    Rates of dementia in adults with mental retardation without Down syndrome were equivalent to or lower than would be expected compared to general population rates, whereas prevalence rates of other chronic health concerns varied as a function of condition. Given that individual differences in vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease have been…

  19. Psychologists' Clinical Practices in Assessing Dementia in Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Ellen; Scior, Katrina

    2008-01-01

    There are now ample guidelines for the assessment and diagnosis of possible dementia in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) and Down syndrome. However, little is known about their implementation in clinical practice. This study set out to examine the clinical practice of one key professional group, namely clinical psychologists. A…

  20. Behavioural Excesses and Deficits Associated with Dementia in Adults Who Have Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Chris; Kalsy, Sunny; McQuillan, Sharna; Hall, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Background: Informant-based assessment of behavioural change and difference in dementia in Down syndrome can aid diagnosis and inform service delivery. To date few studies have examined the impact of different types of behavioural change. Methods: The Assessment for Adults with Developmental Disabilities (AADS), developed for this study, assesses…

  1. "It's All Changed:" Carers' Experiences of Caring for Adults Who Have Down's Syndrome and Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Katrina; Jones, Aled

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative interview study was undertaken to determine the information and support needs of carers of adults who have Down's syndrome and dementia. The data were analysed thematically. Carers' information and support needs were seen to change at pre-diagnosis, diagnosis and post-diagnosis. Helping carers to manage the changing nature of the…

  2. An Experimental Approach to Detecting Dementia in Down Syndrome: A Paradigm for Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Linda D.; Scheibel, Kevin E.; Ringman, John M.; Sayre, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Measures developed from animal models of aging may detect dementia of the Alzheimer's type in a population at-risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although, by middle age, individuals with Down syndrome (DS) show an extraordinarily high prevalence of AD-type pathology, their severe idiopathic cognitive deficits tend to confound the "clinical"…

  3. Alternating Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome associated with attack of angina

    SciTech Connect

    Mangiafico, R.A.; Petralito, A.; Grimaldi, D.R. )

    1990-07-01

    In a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and an inferior-posterior bypass tract, transient restoration of normal conduction occurred during an attack of angina. The ECG pattern of inferior posterior ischemia was present when the conduction was normal. Thallium scintigraphy showed a reversible posterolateral perfusion defect. The possible mechanisms for production of intermittent preexcitation are discussed.

  4. Normalization of reverse redistribution of thallium-201 with procainamide pretreatment in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Nii, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Nomoto, J.; Hiroki, T.; Ohshima, F.; Arakawa, K. )

    1991-03-01

    Stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Reverse redistribution phenomenon was observed in the absence of coronary artery disease. This seems to be the first report of normalization of this phenomenon in association with reversion of accessory pathway to normal atrioventricular conduction after pretreatment with procainamide.

  5. Parkinson-dementia complex and development of a new stable isotope dilution assay for BMAA detection in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Laura R.; Cruz-Aguado, Reyniel; Sadilek, Martin; Galasko, Douglas; Shaw, Christopher A.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-10-15

    {beta}-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been proposed as a global contributor to neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson-dementia complex (PDC) of Guam and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The literature on the effects of BMAA is conflicting with some but not all in vitro data supporting a neurotoxic action, and experimental animal data failing to replicate the pattern of neurodegeneration of these human diseases, even at very high exposures. Recently, BMAA has been reported in human brain from individuals afflicted with PDC or AD. Some of the BMAA in human tissue reportedly is freely extractable (free) while some is protein-associated and liberated by techniques that hydrolyze the peptide bond. The latter is especially intriguing since BMAA is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that has no known tRNA. We attempted to replicate these findings with techniques similar to those used by others; despite more than adequate sensitivity, we were unable to detect free BMAA. Recently, using a novel stable isotope dilution assay, we again were unable to detect free or protein-associated BMAA in human cerebrum. Here we review the development of our new assay for tissue detection of BMAA and show that we are able to detect free BMAA in liver but not cerebrum, nor do we detect any protein-associated BMAA in mice fed this amino acid. These studies demonstrate the importance of a sensitive and specific assay for tissue BMAA and seriously challenge the proposal that BMAA is accumulating in human brain.

  6. Pedunculopontine cholinergic cell loss in hallucinating Parkinson disease patients but not in dementia with Lewy bodies patients.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Dagmar Hyacintha; Ruiter, A M; Galis, Y; Voorn, P; Rozemuller, A J M; Berendse, H W; Foncke, E M J; van de Berg, W D J

    2013-12-01

    There is a cholinergic deficit in Parkinson disease (PD) and in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) that plays a role in a variety of clinical symptoms, including visual hallucinations (VH). The aim of this study was to assess cholinergic neuronal loss and PD and Alzheimer disease pathology in the pedunculopontine nucleus pars compacta (PPNc) of PD and DLB patients with VH. Postmortem brainstem tissue samples of 9 clinically diagnosed and pathologically confirmed PD patients with VH, 9 DLB patients with VH, and 9 age- and sex-matched nondemented controls were obtained from the Netherlands Brain Bank. Using a morphometric approach, we estimated the density of cholinergic neurons in the PPNc and determined the local load of α-synuclein-immunoreactive Lewy pathology, neurofibrillary tangles, and β-amyloid plaques. Cholinergic cell density in the PPNc was significantly lower in PD compared with DLB patients with VH (-39%, p < 0.001) and controls (-41%, p < 0.001). Alpha-synuclein load was higher in PD, whereas β-amyloid plaque pathology was more pronounced in DLB patients. The mean cell density in DLB patients was not significantly reduced compared with that in controls. These results may indicate different patterns of degeneration of cholinergic output structures in PD and DLB.

  7. Pedunculopontine cholinergic cell loss in hallucinating Parkinson disease patients but not in dementia with Lewy bodies patients.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Dagmar Hyacintha; Ruiter, A M; Galis, Y; Voorn, P; Rozemuller, A J M; Berendse, H W; Foncke, E M J; van de Berg, W D J

    2013-12-01

    There is a cholinergic deficit in Parkinson disease (PD) and in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) that plays a role in a variety of clinical symptoms, including visual hallucinations (VH). The aim of this study was to assess cholinergic neuronal loss and PD and Alzheimer disease pathology in the pedunculopontine nucleus pars compacta (PPNc) of PD and DLB patients with VH. Postmortem brainstem tissue samples of 9 clinically diagnosed and pathologically confirmed PD patients with VH, 9 DLB patients with VH, and 9 age- and sex-matched nondemented controls were obtained from the Netherlands Brain Bank. Using a morphometric approach, we estimated the density of cholinergic neurons in the PPNc and determined the local load of α-synuclein-immunoreactive Lewy pathology, neurofibrillary tangles, and β-amyloid plaques. Cholinergic cell density in the PPNc was significantly lower in PD compared with DLB patients with VH (-39%, p < 0.001) and controls (-41%, p < 0.001). Alpha-synuclein load was higher in PD, whereas β-amyloid plaque pathology was more pronounced in DLB patients. The mean cell density in DLB patients was not significantly reduced compared with that in controls. These results may indicate different patterns of degeneration of cholinergic output structures in PD and DLB. PMID:24226265

  8. How to maintain the oral health of a child with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is one of the most important disorders of the heart conduction system. It is caused by the presence of an abnormal accessory electrical conduction pathway between the atria and the ventricles. Case presentation In the present report, we describe the correct oral health management of a 12-year-old Caucasian girl with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Conclusions We successfully undertook the dental care of a girl with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, which we describe here. PMID:25269932

  9. Quantitative Electroencephalography as a Diagnostic Tool for Alzheimer's Dementia in Adults with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Lise Cronberg; Sabers, Anne; Kjaer, Troels W.; Musaeus, Christian; Nielsen, Martin N.; Nielsen, Anne-Grete; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2015-01-01

    Background Assessment of dementia in individuals with intellectual disability is complex due to great inter-individual variability in cognitive function prior to dementia and a lack of standardized instruments. Studies have indicated that quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) results may be used as a diagnostic marker for dementia. The aim of this study was to examine the value of qEEG in the diagnostic evaluation of dementia in patients with Down syndrome (DS). Method The study included 21 patients with DS and mild-to-moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (DS-AD) and 16 age-matched adults with DS without cognitive deterioration assessed by the informant-based Dementia Screening Questionnaire in Intellectual Disability (DSQIID). Conventional EEG was performed and analysed quantitatively using fast Fourier transformation. Outcomes were centroid frequency, peak frequency, absolute power, and relative power. Results In several regions of the brain, a significant decrease in the theta-1 band (4-7 Hz) was identified for the centroid frequency. A significant negative correlation was demonstrated between the mean of the centroid frequency of the theta-1 band and the total DSQIID score. Conclusion We found that qEEG can detect a significant decrease in centroid frequency in a sample of patients with DS-AD as compared to a sample of adults with DS and no cognitive deterioration. PMID:26628899

  10. [Clinical and pathological study on early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies].

    PubMed

    Orimo, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    Cardiac uptake of meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is specifically reduced in Lewy body disease (LBD). To see pathological basis of the reduced cardiac uptake of MIBG in LBD, we immunohistichemically examined cardiac tissues from patients with LBD, related movement disorders and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In LBD, cardiac sympathetic denervation occurs, which accounts for the reduced cardiac uptake of MIBG. Patients with LBD have Lewy bodies (LBs) in the nervous system, whereas patients with the other neurodegenerative parkinsonism, parkin-associated Parkinson's disease (PD) and AD and have no LBs. Therefore, cardiac sympathetic denervation is closely related to the presence of LBs in a wide range of neurodegenerative processes. We further investigate how a-synuclein aggregates are involved in degeneration of the cardiac sympathetic nerve in PD. Accumulation of alpha-synuclein aggregates in the distal axons of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system precedes that of neuronal somata or neurites in the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia and that it heralds centripetal degeneration of the cardiac sympathetic nerve in PD. This chronological and dynamic relationship between alpha-synuclein aggregates and degeneration of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system may represent the pathological mechanism underlying a common degenerative process in PD.

  11. Care considerations for dementia in people with Down's syndrome: a management perspective.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Karen Deborah

    2015-08-01

    Dementia is common in people with Down's syndrome as they age. Having dementia raises huge care considerations for carers and staff. Excellence in care requires attention to a wide variety of interrelated issues. Carers and staff need to have a good understanding of what it means to have dementia to deliver person-centered care. In addition, they need to be clear at all stages of the disease about the outcomes they want to achieve for the person. This will necessitate taking into account both health and social care issues, as well as looking at the physical environment. Staffing and staff training are crucial in providing the right support at the right time. Finally, a vignette of excellence in care is presented. PMID:26295718

  12. [Sleep disturbance in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Nomura, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) complain about sleep disturbances. These symptoms originate from motor symptoms, nocturnal problems, psychiatric symptoms, and other sleep disorders including Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), Restless legs syndrome (RLS), and Sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). Especially, RBD is paid attention to prodromal symptoms of PD. Also, one third of patients with PD have RBD symptoms. Moreover, RBD is one of aggravating factors of motor symptoms, autonomic dysfunctions, and dementia. Now, the evidence based medicine for sleep disturbances is lack in patients with PD. We need to evaluate various causes of sleep disturbances in detail and deal with individuals.

  13. Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia in Down syndrome: Early indicators of clinical Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Dekker, Alain D; Strydom, André; Coppus, Antonia M W; Nizetic, Dean; Vermeiren, Yannick; Naudé, Petrus J W; Van Dam, Debby; Potier, Marie-Claude; Fortea, Juan; De Deyn, Peter P

    2015-12-01

    Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) are a core symptom of dementia and are associated with suffering, earlier institutionalization and accelerated cognitive decline for patients and increased caregiver burden. Despite the extremely high risk for Down syndrome (DS) individuals to develop dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD), BPSD have not been comprehensively assessed in the DS population. Due to the great variety of DS cohorts, diagnostic methodologies, sub-optimal scales, covariates and outcome measures, it is questionable whether BPSD have always been accurately assessed. However, accurate recognition of BPSD may increase awareness and understanding of these behavioural aberrations, thus enabling adaptive caregiving and, importantly, allowing for therapeutic interventions. Particular BPSD can be observed (long) before the clinical dementia diagnosis and could therefore serve as early indicators of those at risk, and provide a new, non-invasive way to monitor, or at least give an indication of, the complex progression to dementia in DS. Therefore, this review summarizes and evaluates the rather limited knowledge on BPSD in DS and highlights its importance and potential for daily clinical practice.

  14. N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and memantine treatment for Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Olivares, David; Deshpande, Varun K; Shi, Ying; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Greig, Nigel H; Rogers, Jack T; Huang, Xudong

    2012-07-01

    Memantine, a partial antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), approved for moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment within the U.S. and Europe under brand name Namenda (Forest), Axura and Akatinol (Merz), and Ebixa and Abixa (Lundbeck), may have potential in alleviating additional neurological conditions, such as vascular dementia (VD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). In various animal models, memantine has been reported to be a neuroprotective agent that positively impacts both neurodegenerative and vascular processes. While excessive levels of glutamate result in neurotoxicity, in part through the over-activation of NMDARs, memantine-as a partial NMDAR antagonist, blocks the NMDA glutamate receptors to normalize the glutamatergic system and ameliorate cognitive and memory deficits. The key to memantine's therapeutic action lies in its uncompetitive binding to the NMDAR through which low affinity and rapid off-rate kinetics of memantine at the level of the NMDAR-channel preserves the physiological function of the receptor, underpinning memantine's tolerability and low adverse event profile. As the biochemical pathways evoked by NMDAR antagonism also play a role in PD and since no other drug is sufficiently effective to substitute for the first-line treatment of L-dopa despite its side effects, memantine may be useful in PD treatment with possibly fewer side effects. In spite of the relative modest nature of its adverse effects, memantine has been shown to provide only a moderate decrease in clinical deterioration in AD and VD, and hence efforts are being undertaken in the design of new and more potent memantine-based drugs to hopefully provide greater efficacy.

  15. Evidence that PICALM affects age at onset of Alzheimer's dementia in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emma L; Mok, Kin; Hanney, Marisa; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Williams, Julie; Ballard, Clive

    2013-10-01

    It is known that individuals with Down syndrome develop Alzheimer's disease with an early age at onset, although associated genetic risk factors have not been widely studied. We tested whether genes that increase the risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease influence the age at onset in Down syndrome using genome-wide association data for age at onset of dementia in a small sample of individuals (N = 67) with Down syndrome. We tested for association with loci previously associated with Alzheimer's disease risk and, despite the small size of the study, we detected associations with age at onset of Alzheimer's disease in Down syndrome with PICALM (β = 3.31, p = 0.011) and the APOE loci (β = 3.58, p = 0.014). As dementia in people with Down syndrome is relatively understudied, we make all of these data publicly available to encourage further analyses of the problem of Alzheimer's disease in Down syndrome.

  16. Differentiating Aging Among Adults With Down Syndrome and Comorbid Dementia or Psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Esbensen, Anna J; Johnson, Emily Boshkoff; Amaral, Joseph L; Tan, Christine M; Macks, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Differences were examined between three groups of adults with Down syndrome in their behavioral presentation, social life/activities, health, and support needs. We compared those with comorbid dementia, with comorbid psychopathology, and with no comorbid conditions. Adults with comorbid dementia were more likely to be older, have lower functional abilities, have worse health and more health conditions, and need more support in self-care. Adults with comorbid psychopathology were more likely to exhibit more behavior problems and to be living at home with their families. Adults with no comorbidities were most likely to be involved in community employment. Differences in behavioral presentation can help facilitate clinical diagnoses in aging in Down syndrome, and implications for differential diagnosis and service supports are discussed.

  17. Withdrawal syndrome after donepezil cessation in a patient with dementia.

    PubMed

    Bidzan, Leszek; Bidzan, Mariola

    2012-12-01

    We describe a 62-year-old female diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, who had been treated with donepezil for approximately 1 year. When she developed a low-grade fever and digestive complaints, her family physician interpreted these symptoms as side effects of the drug and ordered donepezil to be discontinued. Not only was there no improvement of the somatic symptoms after discontinuation of donepezil, but there was also a worsening of the dementia symptoms, culminating in delirium. When donepezil was re-prescribed, the delirium resolved and the patient's mental state stabilized. The authors urge great caution in discontinuing treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil. PMID:22249402

  18. Cognition enhancers for the treatment of dementia.

    PubMed

    Malek, Naveed; Greene, John

    2015-02-01

    Dementia is a broad term used to describe several chronic progressive neurological disorders that adversely affect higher mental functions including memory, language, behaviour, abstract thinking, comprehension, calculation, learning capacity and judgement. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia but other neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease, cerebrovascular disease and chronic infections such as syphilis can also lead to the clinical syndrome of dementia. Initial investigations should always focus on finding any treatable cause for dementia such as HIV, structural lesions such as subdural haematomas or specific nutritional deficiency states such as that due to vitamin B12 and treated appropriately. Where no treatable or reversible aetiology is found, a referral to a specialist should be considered who may initiate further investigations including magnetic resonance imaging or perfusion single-photon emission computerised tomography scans of the brain, and sometimes cerebrospinal fluid examination or an electroencephalogram. PMID:25431454

  19. Parkinson's disease. Diagnosis and the initiation of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, V; Weiner, W J

    2005-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common cause of parkinsonism. Parkinsonism is characterized by resting tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and gait impairment. There is no specific diagnostic test for PD and it is important for clinicians to understand the clinical signs which help to distinguish PD from parkinsonism. It is equally important to be aware of the clinical signs which can be an indication that the diagnosis is not PD. These so-called Parkinson-plus syndromes include progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple systems atrophy (MSA), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), vascular parkinsonism (VP) and parkinsonism with dementia (Lewy body dementia, LBD). The differential diagnosis of parkinsonism will be discussed. Initiating pharmacologic therapy for PD must take into consideration the degree of dysfunction the patient is experiencing, the question of neuroprotection, the degree of motor response required, and the potential complications of long-term treatment. Neuropro-tective trials of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ), vitamin C, vitamin E, monoamine oxidase B inhibitors (MAO-I) and dopamine agonists do not support the use of any of these drugs for a neuroprotective effect. There is recent supportive evidence that levodopa may have a neuroprotective effect. Either dopamine agonists or levodopa may be initiated. Dopamine agonists are associated with fewer motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, while levodopa is associated with better motor performance. Initiation of therapy should be tailored to individual patients with the emphasis on symptom control, with the hope that new approaches to treatment of PD (including neuroprotection) will be forthcoming.

  20. Akinesia: a syndrome common to parkinsonism, retarded depression, and negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bermanzohn, P C; Siris, S G

    1992-01-01

    A distinct hypokinetic syndrome appears to exist across several different neuropsychiatric diagnoses, involving (1) slowed motor activity with difficulty initiating and sustaining behaviors, (2) anhedonia with depressed mood and reduced affective range, and (3) cognitive impairment. Specifically, three well-recognized states--parkinsonism, retarded depression, and the negative symptoms of schizophrenia--prominently feature the components of this syndrome, and reduced dopamine turnover in the brain has been hypothesized to play a part in the pathophysiology of each. While aspects of this conceptualization remain controversial, it generates testable hypotheses that could have implications for the understanding and treatment of these states.

  1. [Dementia with motor and language disorders].

    PubMed

    Frédéric, Assal; Ghika, Joseph

    2016-04-20

    Memory is not the only core diagnostic criteria in Alzheimer's disease and many dementias are characterized by other cognitive deficits. Moreover dementias are often associated with multiple and complex motor signs. The first part of this reviewcovers parkinsonism in diffuse Lewy Body Disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, corticobasal syndrome, or motor deficit in the motoneurone disease-frontotemporal dementia spectrum. In the second part, primary progressive aphasia and its three variants including basic clinical evaluation are described. These complex clinical syndromes involving motor and language systems are important for the clinical practice since they are part of diagnostic criteria of several neurodegenerative diseases and can be considered as phenotypical markers of neurodegeneration. PMID:27276720

  2. Genetics Underlying Atypical Parkinsonism and Related Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Sonja W.; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonism syndromes, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, are neurodegenerative diseases with complex clinical and pathological features. Heterogeneity in clinical presentations, possible secondary determinants as well as mimic syndromes pose a major challenge to accurately diagnose patients suffering from these devastating conditions. Over the last two decades, significant advancements in genomic technologies have provided us with increasing insights into the molecular pathogenesis of atypical parkinsonism and their intriguing relationships to related neurodegenerative diseases, fueling new hopes to incorporate molecular knowledge into our diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches towards managing these conditions. In this review article, we summarize the current understanding of genetic mechanisms implicated in atypical parkinsonism syndromes. We further highlight mimic syndromes relevant to differential considerations and possible future directions. PMID:26501269

  3. (1)H-MRS metabolites in adults with Down syndrome: Effects of dementia.

    PubMed

    Lin, A-L; Powell, D; Caban-Holt, A; Jicha, G; Robertson, W; Gold, B T; Davis, R; Abner, E; Wilcock, D M; Schmitt, F A; Head, E

    2016-01-01

    To determine if proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) detect differences in dementia status in adults with Down syndrome (DS), we used (1)H-MRS to measure neuronal and glial metabolites in the posterior cingulate cortex in 22 adults with DS and in 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. We evaluated associations between (1)H-MRS results and cognition among DS participants. Neuronal biomarkers, including N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and glutamate-glutamine complex (Glx), were significantly lower in DS patients with Alzheimer's should probably be changed to Alzheimer (without ' or s) through ms as per the new naming standard disease (DSAD) when compared to non-demented DS (DS) and healthy controls (CTL). Neuronal biomarkers therefore appear to reflect dementia status in DS. In contrast, all DS participants had significantly higher myo-inositol (MI), a putative glial biomarker, compared to CTL. Our data indicate that there may be an overall higher glial inflammatory component in DS compared to CTL prior to and possibly independent of developing dementia. When computing the NAA to MI ratio, we found that presence or absence of dementia could be distinguished in DS. NAA, Glx, and NAA/MI in all DS participants were correlated with scores from the Brief Praxis Test and the Severe Impairment Battery. (1)H-MRS may be a useful diagnostic tool in future longitudinal studies to measure AD progression in persons with DS. In particular, NAA and the NAA/MI ratio is sensitive to the functional status of adults with DS, including prior to dementia. PMID:27330972

  4. Sugammadex Use in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Şahin, Sevtap Hekimoğlu; Öztekin, İlhan; Kuzucuoğlu, Aytuna; Aslanoğlu, Ayça

    2015-01-01

    Background: Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a disease associated with episodes of supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular pre-excitation or atrial fibrillation. WPW is characterized by an aberrant electrical conduction pathway between atria and ventricles. Case Report: The major anesthetic problem connected with WPW syndrome is the risk of tachyarrhythmias due to accessory pathway. Therefore, it has been proposed that the aim of anesthetic management should be the avoidance of tachyarrhythmia and sympathetic stimulation. Sugammadex was administered as a neuromuscular reversal agent in this case. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of sugammadex use in a patient with WPW. This report presents a case of general anesthesia management in a patient with WPW syndrome. Conclusion: We think that it is appropriate to use sugammadex to reverse rocuronium for the prevention of sudden hemodynamic changes in patients with WPW who underwent general anesthesia. PMID:26185726

  5. The use of sugammadex in a pregnant patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Turker; Saracoglu, Ayten; Sener, Sibel; Bezen, Olgac

    2016-09-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a rare pre-excitation syndrome which develops when atrioventricular conduction occurs through a pathologic accessory pathway known as the bundle of Kent instead of atrioventricular node, hence resulting in tachycardia. Patients with WPW syndrome may experience various symptoms arising from mild-to-moderate chest disease, palpitations, hypotension, and severe cardiopulmonary dysfunction. These patients are most often symptomatic because of cardiac arrhythmias. In this case report, we present an uneventful anesthetic management of a pregnant patient with WPW syndrome undergoing cesarean delivery. A 23-year-old American Society of Anesthesiologists class 2 pregnant patient was diagnosed with WPW syndrome. Her preoperative 12-lead electrocardiogram showed a sinus rhythm at 82 beats per minute, a delta wave, and a short PR interval. After an uneventful surgery, sugammadex 2mg/kg was administered as a reversal agent instead of neostigmine. Then she was discharged to her obstetrics service. Serious hemodynamic disorders may occur in patients with WPW syndrome due to development of fatal arrhythmias. Neostigmine used as a reversal agent in general anesthesia can trigger such fatal arrhythmias by leading changes in cardiac conduction. We believe that sugammadex, which is safely used in many areas in the scope of clinical practice, can be also used for patients diagnosed with WPW syndrome. PMID:27555124

  6. Neuronal damage and its relation to dementia in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Trillo-Pazos, G; Everall, I P

    1996-01-01

    There are an estimated 21.8 million people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) worldwide [Weekly Epidemiol Rec 1996; 27:204-208] and 90% of these people will have some form of neuropathological abnormality during the course of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In this review, we will highlight the primary HIV-associated brain disorders. The role of HIV proteins and cytokines on neuronal damage will be assessed. We will also discuss the role of neuronal loss and functional damage in HIV-associated dementia.

  7. Magnesium deficiency over generations in rats with special references to the pathogenesis of the Parkinsonism-dementia complex and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis of Guam.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Kawakami, Emiko; Kikuchi-Horie, Kae; Ohara, Kazuhiko; Ogata, Kentaro; Takahama, Sachiko; Wada, Manabu; Kihira, Tameko; Yasui, Masayuki

    2006-04-01

    Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are fatal neurological diseases. The incidence on Guam was very high between 1950 and 1965 but decreased dramatically after 1965. It is thought that drinking water containing low levels of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), and high levels of aluminum and of a plant excitatory neurotoxin are involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases. The present experiment was performed in rats that were exposed to low Ca and/or Mg intake over two generations, thus simulating the conditions of human life on Guam, where several generations live continuously in the same environment. Significant loss of dopaminergic neurons was identified exclusively in the substantia nigra in 1-year-old rats that had been exposed continuously to low Mg intake (one-fifth of the normal level) over generations. The present study suggests that low Mg intake over generations may be involved in the pathogenesis of substantia nigra degeneration in humans.

  8. Contribution of cardiac pacing to our understanding of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Wellens, H J

    1975-01-01

    This review discusses the information which can be obtained by cardiac pacing in patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Programmed electrical stimulation when combined with the recording of intracardiac electrograms and surface electrocardiograph leads, can be extremely useful in the following areas. 1) Determining the type of the accessory atrioventricular connexions; 2) determining the electrophysiological properties of the accessory atrioventricular pathway; 3) localizing the position of the accessory atrioventricular pathway; 4) determining the mechanisms of any tachycardia; 5) assessing effect of drugs; 6) identifying patients likely to be at high risk; and 7)evaluating postoperative conduction. PMID:1095036

  9. Environmental risk factors for Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism: the Geoparkinson study

    PubMed Central

    Dick, F D; De Palma, G; Ahmadi, A; Scott, N W; Prescott, G J; Bennett, J; Semple, S; Dick, S; Counsell, C; Mozzoni, P; Haites, N; Wettinger, S Bezzina; Mutti, A; Otelea, M; Seaton, A; Söderkvist, P; Felice, A

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the associations between Parkinson's disease and other degenerative parkinsonian syndromes and environmental factors in five European countries. Methods A case–control study of 959 prevalent cases of parkinsonism (767 with Parkinson's disease) and 1989 controls in Scotland, Italy, Sweden, Romania and Malta was carried out. Cases were defined using the United Kingdom Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank criteria, and those with drug‐induced or vascular parkinsonism or dementia were excluded. Subjects completed an interviewer‐administered questionnaire about lifetime occupational and hobby exposure to solvents, pesticides, iron, copper and manganese. Lifetime and average annual exposures were estimated blind to disease status using a job‐exposure matrix modified by subjective exposure modelling. Results were analysed using multiple logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, country, tobacco use, ever knocked unconscious and family history of Parkinson's disease. Results Adjusted logistic regression analyses showed significantly increased odds ratios for Parkinson's disease/parkinsonism with an exposure–response relationship for pesticides (low vs no exposure, odds ratio (OR) = 1.13, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.57, high vs no exposure, OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.88) and ever knocked unconscious (once vs never, OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.68, more than once vs never, OR = 2.53, 95% CI 1.78 to 3.59). Hypnotic, anxiolytic or antidepressant drug use for more than 1 year and a family history of Parkinson's disease showed significantly increased odds ratios. Tobacco use was protective (OR = 0.50, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.60). Analyses confined to subjects with Parkinson's disease gave similar results. Conclusions The association of pesticide exposure with Parkinson's disease suggests a causative role. Repeated traumatic loss of consciousness is associated with increased risk. PMID:17332139

  10. Depression masquerading as chest pain in a patient with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Madabushi, Rajashree; Agarwal, Anil; Gautam, Sujeet K S; Khuba, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Wolff Parkinson White (WPW) syndrome is a condition in which there is an aberrant conduction pathway between the atria and ventricles, resulting in tachycardia. A 42-year-old patient, who was treated for WPW syndrome previously, presented with chronic somatic pain. With her cardiac condition in mind, she was thoroughly worked up for a recurrence of disease. As part of routine screening of all patients at our pain clinic, she was found to have severe depression as per the Patient Health Questionnaire–9 (PHQ–9) criteria. After ruling out sinister causes, she was treated for depression using oral Duloxetine and counselling. This led to resolution of symptoms, and improved her mood and functional capability. This case highlights the use of psychological screening tools and diligent examination in scenarios as confusing as the one presented here. Addressing the psychological aspects of pain and adopting a holistic approach are as important as treatment of the primary pathology. PMID:27738505

  11. [Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common finding in Parkinson's disease (PD), even in the early stages. The concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in PD was recently formalized with diagnosis being reached after impairments in neuropsychological tasks become significant in at least one domain. The brain profile of cognitive deficits involves executive functions (e. g., planning, set shifting, set maintenance, problem solving), attention and memory function. Memory deficits are characterized by impairments in delayed recall, temporal ordering and conditional associate learning. PD patients demonstrate relatively preserved recognition. Visuospatial dysfunctions have also been reported, while language is largely preserved. The existence of two distinct mild cognitive syndromes has also been suggested. One of these affects mainly the frontostriatal executive deficits that are modulated by dopaminergic medications and by a genetically determined level of prefrontal cortex dopamine release. The other affects the more-posterior cortical abilities, such as visuospatial and memory functions, and is suggested to be associated with an increased risk for conversion to dementia. Cross-sectional studies have commonly reported dementia in 20-30% of PD patients, although the 8-year cumulative incidence of dementia may be as high as 78%. Factors associated with dementia in PD are age at onset, age at the time of examination, akinetic-rigid form PD, depression, hallucination, rapid eye movement sleep behavioral disorder and severe olfactory deficits. Clinical features generally involve the same type of deficits as those found in MCI patients, which are more severe and more extensive. The phenomenology of the dementia syndrome is similar to that seen in dementia with Lewy bodies, and clinicopathological correlation studies have revealed varying results with regard to neurochemical deficits and the pathological substrate underlying cognitive impairment and dementia. Early cognitive

  12. Practitioner-Raised Issues and End-of-Life Care for Adults with Down Syndrome and Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watchman, Karen

    2005-01-01

    The author interviewed a small group of practitioners working in intellectual disability and palliative care settings about their perceptions of a number of end-of-life issues related to people with Down syndrome who were affected by dementia. The study, which took place in Scotland, identified a number of issues and perceptions expressed by the…

  13. Down Syndrome Disintegrative Disorder: New-Onset Autistic Regression, Dementia, and Insomnia in Older Children and Adolescents With Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Worley, Gordon; Crissman, Blythe G; Cadogan, Emily; Milleson, Christie; Adkins, Deanna W; Kishnani, Priya S

    2015-08-01

    Over a 10-year period in a Down syndrome Clinic, 11 children and adolescents were encountered with a history of new-onset (8) or worsening (3) autistic characteristics. Ten of the 11 (91%) had cognitive decline to a dementia-like state and 9 of the 11 (82%) new-onset insomnia. The mean age at which symptoms developed was 11.4 years (standard deviation = 3.6 years; range 5-14 years), an older age than usual for autistic regression in Down syndrome. Ten of 11 cases (91%) had elevated ("positive") thyroperoxidase antibody titers compared to only 5 of 21 (23%) age-matched control subjects with Down syndrome (P < .001). At follow-up at a mean age of 20.7 years (standard deviation = 3.9 years), 8 of the 11 (73%) were at least somewhat better. Down syndrome disintegrative disorder seems an appropriate name for this newly recognized clinical association, which may be due to autoimmunity.

  14. [Posterior cortical atrophy--a new dementia syndrome or a form of Alzheimer's disease?].

    PubMed

    Pantel, J; Schröder, J

    1996-12-01

    Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative disorder initially dominated by disturbances in higher visual functions including object agnosia, prosopagnosia, alexia, environmental agnosia and Balint's syndrome. Language, memory, insight, and judgement remain relatively preserved until late in the course. A characteristic neuroradiological finding consists of focal bilateral parieto-occipital atrophy demonstrated on MRI and CT. It was speculated that the possible underlying pathologic condition could be an atypical clinical variant of Alzheimer's disease, a lobar atrophy analogous to Pick's disease, a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or some previously unrecognized entity. The prognostic question whether the visual agnostic symptoms are only a precursor of generalized dementia remained unsolved. The neuropsychological symptoms in these patients indicate that the occipitoparietal cortex is bilaterally affected which is in contrast to the parietotemporal distribution of lesions in Alzheimer's disease and the frontotemporal type of distribution in Pick's disease. The aim of this study was to review and analyze all cases of posterior cortical atrophy which have been reported in the literature. Up to now 58 cases of posterior cortical atrophy have been described. The first report of such a patient was given by A. Pick in 1902. The results of our analysis show that posterior cortical atrophy is mainly a presenile disorder which in most cases heralds the development of generalized dementia. The histopathological results suggest that the combination of clinical findings referred to as PCA can result from strikingly different pathological entities. However, most cases of PCA which were investigated postmortem revealed the histopathological lesion type of Alzheimer's disease. This suggests that PCA is rather a subgroup of Alzheimer's disease than an independent disease. This conclusion has some implication for the nosological classification of other localized

  15. Memory and the creation of art: the syndrome, as in de Kooning, of 'creating in the midst of dementia'.

    PubMed

    Espinel, Carlos Hugo

    2007-01-01

    The creation of abstract art demands high intellectual capacities. Willem de Kooning, nonetheless, accomplished his last paintings while crippled by impairments diagnosed as Alzheimer's disease. Until my research neither art nor science offered an explanation, or a thinking method, for identifying this phenomenon, for solving a mystery that pertains to human discovery and creation. In this 'ArtScience' study of the de Kooning phenomenon I use 'Thinking Methods' which I devised by a systematic application of information on the workings of the brain, the 'Brain Methods'. With my 'Method of Observation' I examined de Kooning's paintings, created both before and during dementia, and found them comparable in technique and expression. This demonstrates the authenticity of art created in dementia. With my 'Cognitive Analysis' I identified in de Kooning the syndrome herein called 'Creating in the Midst of Dementia'. This Syndrome, unique in mechanisms and presentation, is characterized by (1) a specific combination of brain functions and malfunctions, in this case, preservation of three memory systems - working, procedural, and episodic - and deficit of the semantic memory system, and by (2) a response to precise stimuli, one that triggers brain reactivation, and as a consequence enables creating in the midst of dementia. My work offers: (1) The identification of the 'Syndrome of Creating in the Midst of Dementia'. It (a) presents its definition, the criteria of diagnosis, mechanism, rationale, and possibility of 'cognitive repair' and (b) solves the mystery of de Kooning creating art while crippled by dementia. (2) New Thinking Methods, the 'Brain Methods', that based on information on the workings of the brain, open a new path in the pursuit of truth. The 'Method of Observation' serves to define stimuli, and the 'Cognitive Analysis' to assess cognitive faculties. (3) The integration of art and science into a new discipline of study, 'ArtScience'.

  16. [Case with probable dementia with Lewy bodies, who shows reduplicative paramnesia and Capgras syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Kazuyuki; Morita, Yoshio

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of probable dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), showing reduplicative paramnesia (RP) and Capgras syndrome (CS). The patient, a right-handed 60 year-old male, began to show progressive dementia. At the age of 65, he showed fluctuating cognitive impairment and recurrent visual hallucinations. His SPECT demonstrated hypoperfusion not in the medial temporal cortices, but in the parieto-occipital lobes, where the right hemisphere was dominantly hypoperfused. He was diagnosed with probable DLB. In addition to recurrent visual hallucinations, he showed a sense of self- (or others) transfiguration, consciousness of something non-existent (Leibhaftige Bewusstheit; Jaspers, K.), and fluctuating visuo-spacial impairment. At the age of 67, he gradually complained of his duplicative wives "sosie". Finally he went so far as to talk about a nameless phantom boarder. We considered that RP and CS of this case comprised a sense of self-(or others) transfiguration, misidentification of important persons and places, and productive symptoms such as consciousness of something non-existent (Leibhaftige Bewusstheit) and visual hallucinations. The above mentioned symptoms might be originated not only from the disturbance of visuospacial recognition, which involves the limbic system (especially amygdala), medial frontal cortex, and right hemisphere of the brain, but also from the disturbance of recursive consciousness, due to diffusely damaged brain regions with Lewy body pathology. (Authors' abstract)

  17. The Modified CAMDEX Informant Interview is a Valid and Reliable Tool for Use in the Diagnosis of Dementia in Adults with Down's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, S. L.; Holland, A. J.; Huppert, F. A.; Treppner, P.; Watson, P.; Hon, J.

    2004-01-01

    Dementia because of Alzheimer's disease (AD) commonly affects older adults with Down's syndrome (DS). Methods are needed, with established concurrent and predictive validity, to facilitate the diagnostic assessment of dementia, when it is complicated by pre-existing intellectual disabilities (ID). We report on the reliability and validity of a…

  18. Does the Well-Being of Individuals with Down Syndrome and Dementia Improve When Using Life Story Books and Rummage Boxes? A Randomized Single Case Series Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, Nicola; Adams, Malcolm; Shorten, Nicola; Langdon, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study investigated whether a personalized life story book and rummage box enhanced well-being and led to changes in behaviour for people with Down syndrome (DS) who have dementia. Materials and Methods: A randomized single case series design was used with five participants who had DS and a diagnosis of dementia. Participants were…

  19. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ransmayr, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. There is significantly elevated risk of cognitive decline and associated neuropsychiatric symptoms. Dementia may develop insidiously several years after manifestation of Parkinson motor symptoms (dementia associated with Parkinson's disease; Parkinson's disease dementia) or in close temporal relationship (within one year) after onset of motor symptoms (Dementia with Lewy bodies). There are clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutic similarities between these two conditions. Men are more frequently affected than women. Risk factor or indicators are advanced age at disease onset, disease duration, rigidity, akinesia and posture and gait impairment and falls as opposed to tremor dominance, and associated neuropsychiatric symptoms (depression, apathy, hallucinosis, delirium). Dementia is treatable with cholinesterase inhibitors (rivastigmine, donepezil), memantine, and adjustment of the pharmacological regimen of parkinsonian motor symptoms. Concomitant autonomic nervous system symptoms and neuropsychiatric complications warrant early clinical awareness and are accessible to pharmacological therapy. PMID:26609664

  20. [Syndrome of partial cholinergic deafferentation of the cortical mantle--a concept for describing the brain-behavior relationship in dementia diseases].

    PubMed

    Arendt, T

    1991-03-01

    The identification of morphological and biochemical changes in neurodegenerative disorders with both common and different patterns of neuropsychological dysfunction may help to define the neurobiological substrate of amnesic and dementing disorders, and, furthermore, will give some insight into the neuronal organisation of memory processes. The concept of "subcortical and cortical dementia" and the "cholinergic hypothesis of memory dysfunction" reflect two different theoretical approaches which relate psychopathological disturbances in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Korsakoff's psychosis and related conditions either to structurally or to chemically defined systems of the brain. In order to overcome limitations arising from this dichotomy of structural and chemical approaches to the brain-behaviour-relationship, the concept of a "syndrome of partial cholinergic deafferentation of the cortical mantle" is suggested in the present paper. This concept is supported by evidence derived from the biochemical, morphological and behavioural sequelae of acute and chronic experimental interference with the cholinergic afferentation of the cortical mantle by the application of neurotoxins, by pharmacological intervention and by neurotransplantation in rat. Regarding the cholinergic projection neurons of the basal forebrain and upper brainstem as components of the reticular activating system, the involvement of the cholinergic afferentation of the cortical mantle in the mediation of memory processes and their dysfunction under the conditions of neurodegenerative disorders can be explained on the basis of the "Hippocampal Memory Indexing Theory" of Teyler and DiScenna. PMID:2050315

  1. Toxic adenoma of the thyroid gland and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naço, M; Celiku, E; Llukaçaj, A; Shehaj, J; Kameniku, R

    2009-04-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old girl with toxic adenoma scheduled for surgery right lobectomy and isthmectomy of thyroid gland. During the examination before surgery, patient was diagnosed for the first time as having with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. In the operating room, after the induction of anesthesia, the electrocardiogram showed wide QRS complex tachycardia with a rate of 180 beats/min, which was diagnosed as paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. The patient was treated immediately with antiarrhythmic drugs: adenosine iv three times (at doses of 6 mg, 12 mg, 12 mg bolus) and esmolol iv twice (at doses 28.5 mg). This approach resulted in disappearance of the delta wave and tachycardia for the whole surgery period. In this case report we discuss the role of induction of anesthesia and presence of toxic adenoma in a patient with WPW.

  2. Exome analysis of a family with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome identifies a novel disease locus.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Neil E; Jou, Chuanchau J; Arrington, Cammon B; Kennedy, Brett J; Earl, Aubree; Matsunami, Norisada; Meyers, Lindsay L; Etheridge, Susan P; Saarel, Elizabeth V; Bleyl, Steven B; Yost, H Joseph; Yandell, Mark; Leppert, Mark F; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Gruber, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia that carries a risk of sudden cardiac death. To date, mutations in only one gene, PRKAG2, which encodes the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase subunit γ-2, have been identified as causative for WPW. DNA samples from five members of a family with WPW were analyzed by exome sequencing. We applied recently designed prioritization strategies (VAAST/pedigree VAAST) coupled with an ontology-based algorithm (Phevor) that reduced the number of potentially damaging variants to 10: a variant in KCNE2 previously associated with Long QT syndrome was also identified. Of these 11 variants, only MYH6 p.E1885K segregated with the WPW phenotype in all affected individuals and was absent in 10 unaffected family members. This variant was predicted to be damaging by in silico methods and is not present in the 1,000 genome and NHLBI exome sequencing project databases. Screening of a replication cohort of 47 unrelated WPW patients did not identify other likely causative variants in PRKAG2 or MYH6. MYH6 variants have been identified in patients with atrial septal defects, cardiomyopathies, and sick sinus syndrome. Our data highlight the pleiotropic nature of phenotypes associated with defects in this gene.

  3. Exome analysis of a family with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome identifies a novel disease locus.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Neil E; Jou, Chuanchau J; Arrington, Cammon B; Kennedy, Brett J; Earl, Aubree; Matsunami, Norisada; Meyers, Lindsay L; Etheridge, Susan P; Saarel, Elizabeth V; Bleyl, Steven B; Yost, H Joseph; Yandell, Mark; Leppert, Mark F; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Gruber, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia that carries a risk of sudden cardiac death. To date, mutations in only one gene, PRKAG2, which encodes the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase subunit γ-2, have been identified as causative for WPW. DNA samples from five members of a family with WPW were analyzed by exome sequencing. We applied recently designed prioritization strategies (VAAST/pedigree VAAST) coupled with an ontology-based algorithm (Phevor) that reduced the number of potentially damaging variants to 10: a variant in KCNE2 previously associated with Long QT syndrome was also identified. Of these 11 variants, only MYH6 p.E1885K segregated with the WPW phenotype in all affected individuals and was absent in 10 unaffected family members. This variant was predicted to be damaging by in silico methods and is not present in the 1,000 genome and NHLBI exome sequencing project databases. Screening of a replication cohort of 47 unrelated WPW patients did not identify other likely causative variants in PRKAG2 or MYH6. MYH6 variants have been identified in patients with atrial septal defects, cardiomyopathies, and sick sinus syndrome. Our data highlight the pleiotropic nature of phenotypes associated with defects in this gene. PMID:26284702

  4. The neuropsychiatry of Parkinson's disease and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Edward C

    2004-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with classical Parkinsonian features that respond to dopaminergic therapy. Neuropsychiatric sequelae include dementia, major depression, dysthymia, anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, and sexual disorders. Panic attacks are particularly common. With treatment, visual hallucinations, paranoid delusions, mania, or delirium may evolve. Psychosis is a key factor in nursing home placement, and depression is the most significant predictor of quality of life. Clozapine may be the safest treatment for psychotic features, but more research is needed to establish the efficacy of antidepressant treatments. Dementia with Lewy bodies, the second most common dementia in the elderly, may present in association with systematized delusions, depression, or RBD. Early evidence suggests the utility of rivastigmine, donepezil, low-dose olanzapine, and quetiapine in treating DLB. Parkinson-plus syndromes generally lack a good response to dopaminergic treatment and evidence additional features, including dysautonomia, cerebellar and pontine features, eye signs, and other movement disorders. MSA is associated with dysautonomia and RBD. SND (MSA-P) is associated with frontal cognitive impairments, but dementia, psychosis, and mood disorders have not been strikingly apparent unless additional pathological findings are present. In SDS (MSA-A), impotence is almost ubiquitous; urinary incontinence is frequent; depression is occasional, and sleep apnea should be treated to avoid sudden death during sleep. OPCA neuropsychiatric correlates await further definition. Progressive supranuclear palsy neuropsychiatric features include apathy, subcortical dementia, pathological emotionality, mild depression and anxiety, and lack of appreciable response to donepezil. CBD usually is recognized by early frontal dementia with ideomotor apraxia, often in the right upper extremity, attended later by poorly responsive unilateral Parkinsonism, with additional signs including

  5. Assessing Specific Cognitive Deficits Associated with Dementia in Older Adults with Down Syndrome: Use and Validity of the Arizona Cognitive Test Battery (ACTB)

    PubMed Central

    Sinai, Amanda; Hassiotis, Angela; Rantell, Khadija; Strydom, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Background Down syndrome is associated with specific cognitive deficits. Alongside this, older adults with Down syndrome are a high risk group for dementia. The Arizona Cognitive Test Battery (ACTB), a cognitive assessment battery specifically developed for use with individuals with Down syndrome, has been proposed for use as outcome measures for clinical trials in this population. It has not been validated in older adults with Down syndrome. This study aims to assess the use and validity of the ACTB in older adults with Down syndrome. Methods Participants with Down syndrome aged 45 and over were assessed using the ACTB, standard tabletop tests and informant ratings. Results Assessment outcomes of 49 participants were analysed. Of these, 19 (39%) had a diagnosis of dementia or possible dementia. Most participants were able to attempt most of the tasks, although some tasks had high floor effects (including CANTAB Intra-Extra Dimensional shift stages completed and Modified Dots Task). Of the ACTB tasks, statistically significant differences were observed between the dementia and no dementia groups on CANTAB Simple Reaction Time median latency, NEPSY Visuomotor Precision—Car and Motorbike and CANTAB Paired Associates Learning stages completed. No significant differences were observed for CANTAB Intra-Extra Dimensional Shift, Modified Dots Task, Finger Sequencing, NEPSY Visuomotor precision—Train and Car and CANTAB Paired Associates Learning first trial memory score. Several of the tasks in the ACTB can be used in older adults with Down syndrome and have mild to moderate concurrent validity when compared to tabletop tests and informant ratings, although this varies on a test by test basis. Conclusions Overall, scores for a number of tests in the ACTB were similar when comparing dementia and no dementia groups of older adults with Down syndrome, suggesting that it would not be an appropriate outcome measure of cognitive function for clinical trials of dementia

  6. Grammatical abilities in Parkinson's disease: evidence from written sentences.

    PubMed

    Small, J A; Lyons, K; Kemper, S

    1997-12-01

    This study examined the grammatical content of written sentences elicited from 96 Parkinson's patients, 30 Parkinson's with dementia patients and 167 control subjects. Parkinson's patients without dementia or with mild dementia presented no impairments in sentence length, syntactic complexity or amount of information content. Moderately demented Parkinson's patients showed reduced sentence length and information content but normal syntactic complexity. This pattern of results provides evidence that lexical-semantic content is more susceptible to decline than syntactic structure with the progression of dementia in Parkinson's disease.

  7. Hippocampal sclerosis in the parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam: quantitative examination of neurons, neurofibrillary tangles, and TDP-43 immunoreactivity in CA1.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Yamazaki, Mineo; Hashimoto, Tomoyo; Asakawa, Mika; Wakabayashi, Koichi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    The cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) area in the hippocampus of the parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) of Guam was examined quantitatively with special references to the number of neurons, intraneuronal (i) and extracellular (e) neurofibirillary tangles (NFTs), and TDP-43 (43-kDa trans-activation-responsive region DNA-binding protein)-immunopositive structures, in 24 Chamorro patients with PDC of Guam and seven control Chamorro Guamanians (both groups having no ischemic or anoxic complications). The results were that: (i) in the patients with mildly involved PDC, total numbers of neurons, iNFTs and eNFTs were almost the same as those of neurons of controls; (ii) in patients severely involved, total numbers of neurons, iNFTs and eNFTs decreased markedly; (iii) the decrease of the number of pyramidal neurons in CA1 with positive nuclear TDP-43 was intimately correlated with the decrease in total neuron numbers; (iv) whereas the numbers of neurons and TDP-43-immunopositive intracytoplasmic aggregation in the CA1 area were inversely correlated; and (v) depression of nuclear TDP-43 immuonostainability was not affected by the presence or absence of NFTs. In conclusion, hippocampal sclerosis exists in PDC; there is a possibility of elimination of eNFTs which appeared in the CA1 in patients with PDC and loss of the neurons correlates with disappearance of nuclear TDP-43, but not with appearance of intraneurocytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregation or iNFTs. PMID:25783521

  8. Dopaminergic Therapy Modulates Cortical Perfusion in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia According to Arterial Spin Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for the quantification of altered cerebral blood flow, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic treatments. The authors examined the cerebral perfusion differences among 17 Parkinson disease (PD) patients, 17 PD with dementia (PDD) patients, and 17 healthy controls and used ASL-MRI to assess the effects of dopaminergic therapies on perfusion in the patients. The authors demonstrated progressive widespread cortical hypoperfusion in PD and PDD and robust effects for the dopaminergic therapies. Specifically, dopaminergic medications further decreased frontal lobe and cerebellum perfusion in the PD and PDD groups, respectively. These patterns of hypoperfusion could be related to cognitive dysfunctions and disease severity. Furthermore, desensitization to dopaminergic therapies in terms of cortical perfusion was found as the disease progressed, supporting the concept that long-term therapies are associated with the therapeutic window narrowing. The highly sensitive pharmaceutical response of ASL allows clinicians and researchers to easily and effectively quantify the absolute perfusion status, which might prove helpful for therapeutic planning. PMID:26844450

  9. Hippocampal sclerosis in the parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam: quantitative examination of neurons, neurofibrillary tangles, and TDP-43 immunoreactivity in CA1.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Yamazaki, Mineo; Hashimoto, Tomoyo; Asakawa, Mika; Wakabayashi, Koichi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    The cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) area in the hippocampus of the parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) of Guam was examined quantitatively with special references to the number of neurons, intraneuronal (i) and extracellular (e) neurofibirillary tangles (NFTs), and TDP-43 (43-kDa trans-activation-responsive region DNA-binding protein)-immunopositive structures, in 24 Chamorro patients with PDC of Guam and seven control Chamorro Guamanians (both groups having no ischemic or anoxic complications). The results were that: (i) in the patients with mildly involved PDC, total numbers of neurons, iNFTs and eNFTs were almost the same as those of neurons of controls; (ii) in patients severely involved, total numbers of neurons, iNFTs and eNFTs decreased markedly; (iii) the decrease of the number of pyramidal neurons in CA1 with positive nuclear TDP-43 was intimately correlated with the decrease in total neuron numbers; (iv) whereas the numbers of neurons and TDP-43-immunopositive intracytoplasmic aggregation in the CA1 area were inversely correlated; and (v) depression of nuclear TDP-43 immuonostainability was not affected by the presence or absence of NFTs. In conclusion, hippocampal sclerosis exists in PDC; there is a possibility of elimination of eNFTs which appeared in the CA1 in patients with PDC and loss of the neurons correlates with disappearance of nuclear TDP-43, but not with appearance of intraneurocytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregation or iNFTs.

  10. Dopaminergic Therapy Modulates Cortical Perfusion in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia According to Arterial Spin Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for the quantification of altered cerebral blood flow, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic treatments. The authors examined the cerebral perfusion differences among 17 Parkinson disease (PD) patients, 17 PD with dementia (PDD) patients, and 17 healthy controls and used ASL-MRI to assess the effects of dopaminergic therapies on perfusion in the patients. The authors demonstrated progressive widespread cortical hypoperfusion in PD and PDD and robust effects for the dopaminergic therapies. Specifically, dopaminergic medications further decreased frontal lobe and cerebellum perfusion in the PD and PDD groups, respectively. These patterns of hypoperfusion could be related to cognitive dysfunctions and disease severity. Furthermore, desensitization to dopaminergic therapies in terms of cortical perfusion was found as the disease progressed, supporting the concept that long-term therapies are associated with the therapeutic window narrowing. The highly sensitive pharmaceutical response of ASL allows clinicians and researchers to easily and effectively quantify the absolute perfusion status, which might prove helpful for therapeutic planning.

  11. Missense and silent tau gene mutations cause frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-chromosome 17 type, by affecting multiple alternative RNA splicing regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, I; Poorkaj, P; Hong, M; Nochlin, D; Lee, V M; Bird, T D; Schellenberg, G D

    1999-05-11

    Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism, chromosome 17 type (FTDP-17) is caused by mutations in the tau gene, and the signature lesions of FTDP-17 are filamentous tau inclusions. Tau mutations may be pathogenic either by altering protein function or gene regulation. Here we show that missense, silent, and intronic tau mutations can increase or decrease splicing of tau exon 10 (E10) by acting on 3 different cis-acting regulatory elements. These elements include an exon splicing enhancer that can either be strengthened (mutation N279(K)) or destroyed (mutation Delta280(K)), resulting in either constitutive E10 inclusion or the exclusion of E10 from tau transcripts. E10 contains a second regulatory element that is an exon splicing silencer, the function of which is abolished by a silent FTDP-17 mutation (L284(L)), resulting in excess E10 inclusion. A third element inhibiting E10 splicing is contained in the intronic sequences directly flanking the 5' splice site of E10 and intronic FTDP-17 mutations in this element enhance E10 inclusion. Thus, tau mutations cause FTDP-17 by multiple pathological mechanisms, which may explain the phenotypic heterogeneity observed in FTDP-17, as exemplified by an unusual family described here with tau pathology as well as amyloid and neuritic plaques.

  12. A Comparison of Substantia Nigra T1 Hyperintensity in Parkinson's Disease Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Controls: Volumetric Analysis of Neuromelanin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Yeon; Yun, Won-Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Heejin; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Lee, Jong-Min; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. Results A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusion The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases. PMID:27587951

  13. Rotigotine is safe and efficacious in Atypical Parkinsonism Syndromes induced by both α-synucleinopathy and tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Davide Vito; Binetti, Giuliano; Zanetti, Orazio; Frisoni, Giovanni Battista

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal rotigotine (RTG) is a non-ergot dopamine agonist (D3>D2>D1), and is indicated for use in early and advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD). RTG patch has many potential advantages due to the immediacy of onset of the therapeutic effect. Of note, intestinal absorption is not necessary and drug delivery is constant, thereby avoiding drug peaks and helping patient compliance. In turn, transdermal RTG seems a suitable candidate in the treatment of atypical Parkinsonian disorders (APS). Fifty-one subjects with a diagnosis of APS were treated with transdermal RTG. The diagnoses were: Parkinson’s disease with dementia, multiple system atrophy Parkinsonian type, multiple system atrophy cerebellar type, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Lewy body dementia, and frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism. Patients were evaluated by the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS; part III), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), and mini–mental state examination (MMSE) and all adverse events (AEs) were recorded. Patients treated with RTG showed an overall decrease of UPDRS III scores without increasing behavioral disturbances. Main AEs were hypotension, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, tachycardia, and dystonia. On the whole, 15 patients were affected by AEs and seven patients suspended RTG treatment due to AEs. The results show that transdermal RTG is effective with a good tolerability profile. RTG patch could be a good therapeutic tool in patients with APS. PMID:24940065

  14. [Parkinson disease and cognition].

    PubMed

    Kulisevsky, J; Pascual-Sedano, B

    1999-05-01

    Parkinson's Disease patients may have cognitive deficits, which may vary from mild focal specific deficits to global dementia. Executive functions, working memory, visuoespatial functions and internal control of attention are the main affected cognitive areas. The dopaminergic hypothesis suggests that dopaminergic transmission is involved in most altered cognitive processes. However, other neuronal systems are probably implicated, and the improvement of the cognitive function after dopaminergic replacement is incomplete and not seen in all cognitive tasks. The prevalence of dementia in Parkinson's disease is estimated in 15-25%. The pathologic hallmarks may be similar to that seen in Alzheimer's disease. However, in Parkinson's disease patients pure subcortical alterations are able to produce a severe cognitive impairment, such as lost of dopaminergic neurones from substantia nigra to caudate nucleus and frontal areas. Comprehension of the relationship between depression and dementia in Parkinson's disease patients is incomplete. Parkinson's disease patients with depression show poor neuropsychological performance, especially in frontal tasks, but it is unclear whether depression can be considered a risk factor for the development of dementia in Parkinson's disease.

  15. Atrioventricular reciprocal rhythm and chronic reciprocating tachycardia in a newborn infant with concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Sung, R J; Ferrer, P; Garcia, O L; Castellanos, A; Gelband, H

    1977-01-01

    A case of atrioventricular reciprocal rhythm and chronic reciprocating tachycardia in a newborn infant is presented. Electrophysiological studies suggest that these rhythm disturbances are related to the presence of a right-sided atrioventricular accessory pathway capable only of retrograde conduction (concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome). The technique of recording the sequence of atrial activation during the tachycardia is described and its clinical importance emphasised. PMID:884032

  16. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Playfer, J R

    1997-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common disabling disease of old age. The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on clinical signs and has poor sensitivity, with about 25% of patients confidently diagnosed as having the disease actually having other conditions such as multi-system atrophy and other parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Benign essential tremor and arteriosclerotic pseudo-parkinsonism can easily be confused with Parkinson's disease. The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown. Speculative research highlights the role of oxidative stress and free radical mediated damage to dopaminergic cells. Parkinson's disease is the one neurodegenerative disorder in which drugs have been demonstrated to be of value. There is now a wide variety of drugs and formulations available, including anticholinergics, amantidine, L-dopa, dopamine agonists including apomorphine, selegiline and soon to be available catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors. Disabling side-effects of treatment, fluctuations, dyskinesias and psychiatric problems require strategic use of the drugs available. There is an increasing potential for neurosurgical intervention. PMID:9196696

  17. The behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) syndrome in psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Lanata, Serggio C; Miller, Bruce L

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of this article is to critically discuss the syndromic overlap that exists between early behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD)—the most common clinical syndrome associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD)—and several primary psychiatric disorders. We begin by summarising the current state of knowledge regarding FTLD, including the recent discovery of FTLD-causative genetic mutations. Clinicopathological correlations in FTLD are subsequently discussed, while emphasising that clinical syndromes of FTD are dictated by the distribution of FTLD pathology in the brain. We then review a large number of cases with suspected and confirmed bvFTD that had previously been diagnosed with a primary psychiatric disorder. The clinical and neuroscientific implications of this overlap are discussed, focusing on the importance of early diagnosis for clinical and therapeutic reasons. We propose that largely due to the paucity of biomarkers for primary psychiatric disorders, and the limited use of FTLD-related biomarkers by psychiatrists at present, it is very difficult to separate patients with early bvFTD from those with primary psychiatric disorders based on clinical grounds. Furthermore, specific limitations of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) 5 criteria for bvFTD may inadvertently discourage recognition of bvFTD in mental health settings. Clinically, more research is needed to develop tools that allow early differentiation of bvFTD from primary psychiatric disease, as bvFTD therapies will likely be most effective in the earliest stages of disease. From a neuroscience perspective, we argue that bvFTD provides an excellent paradigm for investigating the neural basis of psychiatric disorders. PMID:26216940

  18. [Effect of high dose pergolide mesilate on restless legs syndrome associated with Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Imamura, Akiko; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Tanaka, Miki; Obata, Toyoshi; Yamada, Tatsuo

    2007-04-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is one of the common nocturnal disturbance seen in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. The prevalence of RLS with PD is greater than that of general populations; however, etiology of RLS in patients with PD is still controversial. We report a 63-year-old man with PD, who was admitted to our hospital with uncontrollable unpleasant feeling in both legs leading to sleep disturbance. At age 59, he experienced numbness and nocturnal myoclonus in his right foot. One year later, he developed resting tremor and bradykinesia in his right hand, and was diagnosed as PD. Levodopa was initiated with favorable response for his resting tremor and bradykinesia, however, his dysesthesia of the legs spread to both side and associated with an urge to move which occurs at rest and was ameliorated by walking. On admission, his parkinsonism was well controlled by 400 mg/ day of levodopa/benserazide. Polysomnography (PSG) revealed periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS). Secondary RLS such as drug-induced, iron deficiency and uraemia, was excluded in this patient. Because levodopa did not improve his RLS, additional symptomatic RLS treatment was initiated. Oral dosage with 150 microg pergolide did not have any effect on his RLS symptoms. An increase up to 750 microg pergolide led to a marked reduction of symptoms. Repeated PSG showed significant reduction of PLMS and improved sleep efficacy. Usually, low dose of dopamine agonist is enough to treat RLS occurred in general populations. However, moderate to high dose of dopamine agonists were needed for our patient with RLS, indicating that pharmacological responses might be different between RLS in general and that associated with PD. It is important to consider that PD-related RLS can be treated with high dose dopamine agonist to obtain favorable management of nocturnal disturbances. PMID:17511286

  19. Spontaneous Transition of Double Tachycardias with Atrial Fusion in a Patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongmin

    2016-01-01

    Among patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia (AVRT) and atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) can coexist in a single patient. Direct transition of both tachycardias is rare; however, it can occur after premature atrial or ventricular activity if the cycle lengths of the two tachycardias are similar. Furthermore, persistent atrial activation by an accessory pathway (AP) located outside of the AV node during ongoing AVNRT is also rare. This article describes a case of uncommon atrial activation by an AP during AVNRT and gradual transition of the two supraventricular tachycardias without any preceding atrial or ventricular activity in a patient with preexcitation syndrome. PMID:27482269

  20. Anesthetic management of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in a pregnant patient posted for emergency caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Palaria, Urmila; Rasheed, Mohd A.; Jain, Geeta; Sinha, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The most common arrhythmia seen during pregnancy is paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome accounts for majority of this in such population. The presence of pre-disposing factors may facilitate the onset of tachyarrhythmias in previously asymptomatic parturients with the WPW syndrome such as increased hemodynamic, hormonal, autonomic, and emotional changes. Therefore, meticulous monitoring is essential perioperatively. Epidural anesthesia providing added advantage of hemodynamic stability and post-operative analgesia is preferred in such pregnant patients undergoing emergency cesarean section. PMID:25885995

  1. Association Between Early-Onset Parkinson Disease and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Nancy J.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Chow, Eva W. C.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Lang, Anthony E.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Clinical case reports of parkinsonism co-occurring with hemizygous 22q11.2 deletions and the associated multisystem syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), suggest that 22q11.2 deletions may lead to increased risk of early-onset Parkinson disease (PD). The frequency of PD and its neuropathological presentation remain unknown in this common genetic condition. OBJECTIVE To evaluate a possible association between 22q11.2 deletions and PD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational study of the occurrence of PD in the world’s largest cohort of well-characterized adults with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis of 22q11.2DS (n = 159 [6 with postmortem tissue]; age range, 18.1–68.6 years) was conducted in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Rare postmortem brain tissue from individuals with 22q11.2DS and a clinical history of PD was investigated for neurodegenerative changes and compared with that from individuals with no history of a movement disorder. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES A clinical diagnosis of PD made by a neurologist and neuropathological features of PD. RESULTS Adults with 22q11.2DS had a significantly elevated occurrence of PD compared with standard population estimates (standardized morbidity ratio = 69.7; 95% CI, 19.0–178.5). All cases showed early onset and typical PD symptom pattern, treatment response, and course. All were negative for family history of PD and known pathogenic PD-related mutations. The common use of antipsychotics in patients with 22q11.2DS to manage associated psychiatric symptoms delayed diagnosis of PD by up to 10 years. Postmortem brain tissue revealed classic loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in all 3 postmortem 22q11.2DS-PD cases. Typical α-synuclein–positive Lewy bodies were present in the expected distribution in 2 cases but absent in another. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings suggest that 22q11.2 deletions represent a novel genetic risk factor for early-onset PD with variable neuropathological

  2. A Four-Year Longitudinal Study on Restless Legs Syndrome in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Marcello; Erro, Roberto; Picillo, Marina; Santangelo, Gabriella; Spina, Emanuele; Allocca, Roberto; Longo, Katia; Amboni, Marianna; Palladino, Raffaele; Assante, Roberta; Pappatà, Sabina; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Barone, Paolo; Vitale, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) prevalence estimates range from 0% to 52% in Parkinson disease (PD), but the causal relationship between the two disorders is still debated. The present study aims to evaluate RLS prevalence in de novo PD subjects, its incidence during the first 4 years from diagnosis, and possible relationships with clinical, laboratory, and neuroradiological data. Methods: One hundred nine newly diagnosed, drug-naïve PD subjects were evaluated at the time of PD diagnosis, and after 2- and 4-years. RLS diagnosis was performed with the RLS Diagnostic Index at each visit. Motor features, additional non-motor symptoms (NMS), and concomitant dopaminergic and nondopaminergic treatments were also gathered. Moreover, at baseline, 65 subjects were randomly selected to undergo a FP-CIT SPECT to study dopamine transporter availability. Results: RLS prevalence rose from 4.6% at baseline evaluation to 6.5% after 2 years and to 16.3% after 4 years (P = 0.007). A multinomial logistic stepwise regression model selected NMS Questionnaire items more likely to be associated with RLS at diagnosis (insomnia, OR = 15.555; P = 0.040) and with occurrence of RLS during follow-up (dizziness, OR = 1.153; P = 0.022; and daytime sleepiness; OR = 9.557; P = 0.001), as compared to patients without RLS. Older age was more likely associated to increased RLS occurrence during follow-up in a random effect logistic regression model (OR = 1.187; P = 0.036). A multinomial logistic stepwise model found increased dopaminergic transporter availability of affected caudate and putamen to be more likely associated with RLS presence at diagnosis (n = 5; OR = 75.711; P = 0.077), and RLS occurrence during follow-up (n = 16; OR = 12.004; P = 0.059), respectively, as compared to patients without RLS (n = 88). Conclusions: RLS is present since PD diagnosis, and increases in prevalence during the course of PD. PD subjects with RLS have higher age at PD onset, more preserved

  3. Longitudinal characterization of two siblings with frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 associated with the S305N tau mutation.

    PubMed

    Boeve, Bradley F; Tremont-Lukats, Ivo W; Waclawik, Andrew J; Murrell, Jill R; Hermann, Bruce; Jack, Clifford R; Shiung, Maria M; Smith, Glenn E; Nair, Anil R; Lindor, Noralane; Koppikar, Vinaya; Ghetti, Bernardino

    2005-04-01

    The background to this study began with the reporting of two Japanese kindreds with the S305N tau mutation. Although the pathological findings in the autopsied cases were well characterized, only limited ante-mortem data were presented. In this study, longitudinal characterization was carried out in two siblings of European ancestry found to have frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) through comprehensive neurobehavioural examinations and other scales at approximate 6-month intervals. Scales included the Mini-Mental State Examination, Short Test of Mental Status, modified motor subtest of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, detailed neuropsychological testing, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Changes in whole-brain volume and ventricular volume were measured from serial MRI studies. All members of the kindred underwent molecular genetic analyses to elucidate the mechanism of inheritance. The missense mutation in tau, S305N, was detected in the proband (onset age 30), who has undergone serial evaluations for almost 4 years. Her older sister (onset age 36) was subsequently found to have the same mutation, and has undergone serial evaluations for 2 years. This mutation is absent in both parents and the only other sibling, and non-paternity was excluded by additional analyses. The siblings have exhibited cognitive and behavioural features typical of FTDP-17, which have proved challenging to manage despite aggressive pharmacological and behavioural therapies. The proband's sister has demonstrated an atypical profile of impairment on neuropsychological testing. Both siblings have developed striking atrophy of the anterior part of temporal lobes and moderate atrophy of the dorsolateral and orbitofrontal cortical regions, which in both cases is relatively symmetrical. The annualized changes in whole-brain volume and ventricular volume, respectively, were -35.2 ml/year (3.23% decrease per year) and +20.75 ml/year (16

  4. Lewy body dementias.

    PubMed

    Walker, Zuzana; Possin, Katherine L; Boeve, Bradley F; Aarsland, Dag

    2015-10-24

    The broad importance of dementia is undisputed, with Alzheimer's disease justifiably getting the most attention. However, dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia, now called Lewy body dementias, are the second most common type of degenerative dementia in patients older than 65 years. Despite this, Lewy body dementias receive little attention and patients are often misdiagnosed, leading to less than ideal management. Over the past 10 years, considerable effort has gone into improving diagnostic accuracy by refining diagnostic criteria and using imaging and other biomarkers. Dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia share the same pathophysiology, and effective treatments will depend not only on successful treatment of symptoms but also on targeting the pathological mechanisms of disease, ideally before symptoms and clinical signs develop. We summarise the most pertinent progress from the past 10 years, outlining some of the challenges for the future, which will require refinement of diagnosis and clarification of the pathogenesis, leading to disease-modifying treatments. PMID:26595642

  5. Frontotemporal Dementia-Like Syndrome Following Recall of Childhood Sexual Abuse.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lisa J; Brody, David

    2015-06-01

    Numerous psychopathological syndromes have been attributed to posttraumatic stress, both at the time of the trauma and many years later. To date, however, there is little literature on pseudodementia as a delayed traumatic stress response. The authors present a case history of a 50-year-old woman who developed severe cognitive impairment following retrieval of previously forgotten memories of childhood sexual abuse. Her cognitive condition deteriorated rapidly and dramatically. Neuropsychological assessment and clinical presentation led to a diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia (vs. corticobasal degeneration). Detailed neurologic and medical evaluations could not identify any underlying physical cause. Her condition progressively worsened over 9 months, at which point memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, was begun. The patient regained full functioning over the next year. Although an organic cause could not be ruled out, it was likely that recovery of traumatic memories was contributory to the patient's condition, as ongoing psychotherapy had begun 1 year into the course. If additional cases with similar presentations are reported, such cases would corroborate the notion that persistent, severe, and reversible cognitive impairment constitutes a previously unrecognized and atypical posttraumatic response.

  6. Cognitive Dysfunction and Dementia in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Frederic; Longato, Nadine; Jung, Barbara; Kleitz, Catherine; Di Bitonto, Laure; Cretin, Benjamin; Collongues, Nicolas; Sordet, Christelle; Fleury, Marie; Poindron, Vincent; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Anne, Olivier; Lipsker, Dan; Martin, Thierry; Sibilia, Jean; de Seze, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Background. Primary Sjögren's syndrome (PSS) is a frequent systemic autoimmune disease. In this study, we aimed to explore the cognitive impairment and the correlations with brain MRI. Methods. Twenty-five patients (mean age 55 ± 11.8 years, 21 females) with PSS were prospectively selected and tested with a French translation of the Brief Repeatable Battery for Neuropsychological Examination. The results were compared with the scores for 25 matched patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 25 controls. Brain lesions were assessed by brain MRI using the Wahlund classification. Results. Fifteen of the 25 PSS patients (60%) presented with cognitive disorders versus 19/25 MS patients (76%). Five patients had dementia in the PSS group. Speed of information processing, attention, immediate and long-term memory, and executive functions were frequently impaired. The mean duration of cognitive complaints was 5.6 ± 6.1 years, and the mean duration of PSS was 15.8 ± 14.0 years. A trend towards a correlation was found between the severity of cognitive impairment and the degree of white matter lesions (WML) (P = 0.03, rho = 0.43). Conclusion. Cognitive impairment—mild or dementia—exists in patients with PSS. Further MRI studies are needed to better understand the precise neural basis of cognitive impairment in PSS patients. PMID:24224097

  7. Language, Executive Function and Social Cognition in the Diagnosis of Frontotemporal Dementia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Harciarek, Michał; Cosentino, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) represents a spectrum of non-Alzheimer’s degenerative conditions associated with focal atrophy of the frontal and/or temporal lobes. Frontal and temporal regions of the brain have been shown to be strongly involved in executive function, social cognition and language processing and, thus, deficits in these domains are frequently seen in patients with FTD or may even be hallmarks of a specific FTD subtype ( i.e., relatively selective and progressive language impairment in primary progressive aphasia). In this review, we have attempted to delineate how language, executive function, and social cognition may contribute to the diagnosis of FTD syndromes, namely the behavioral variant FTD as well as the language variants of FTD including the three subtypes of primary progressive aphasia (PPA): non-fluent/agrammatic, semantic, and logopenic. This review also addresses the extent to which deficits in these cognitive areas contribute to the differential diagnosis of FTD versus AD. Finally, early clinical determinants of pathology are briefly discussed and contemporary challenges to the diagnosis of FTD are presented. PMID:23611348

  8. Synergistic effects of ceftriaxone and erythropoietin on neuronal and behavioral deficits in an MPTP-induced animal model of Parkinson's disease dementia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiu-Ku; Chang, Yen-Ting; Amstislavskaya, Tamara G; Tikhonova, Maria A; Lin, Chih-Li; Hung, Ching-Sui; Lai, Te-Jen; Ho, Ying-Jui

    2015-11-01

    Both ceftriaxone (CEF) and erythropoietin (EPO) show neuroprotection and cognitive improvement in neurodegenerative disease. The present study was aimed at clarifying whether combined treatment with CEF and EPO (CEF+EPO) had superior neuroprotective and behavioral effects than treatment with CEF or EPO alone in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) rat model. The rats were injected with CEF (5 mg/kg/day), EPO (100 IU/kg/day), or CEF+EPO after MPTP lesioning and underwent the bar-test, T-maze test, and object recognition test, then the brains were taken for histological evaluation. MPTP lesioning resulted in deficits in working memory and in object recognition, but the cognitive deficits were markedly reduced or eliminated in rats treated with CEF or CEF+EPO, with the combination having a greater effect. Lesioning also caused neurodegeneration in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system and the hippocampal CA1 area and these changes were reduced or eliminated by treatment with CEF, EPO, or CEF+EPO, with the combination having a greater effect than single treatment in the densities of DAergic terminals in the striatum and neurons in the hippocampal CA1 area. Thus, compared to treatment with CEF or EPO alone, combined treatment with CEF+EPO had a greater inhibitory effect on the lesion-induced behavioral and neuronal deficits. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a synergistic effect of CEF and EPO on neuroprotection and improvement in cognition in a PD rat model. Combined CEF and EPO treatment may have clinical potential for the treatment of the dementia associated with PD. PMID:26296668

  9. Existence of automaticity in anomalous bundle of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Przybylski, J; Chiale, P A; Halpern, M S; Lázzari, J O; Elizari, M V; Rosenbaum, M B

    1978-01-01

    Escape beats probably arising from the anomalous bundle were documented in 2 patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. A third patient, in whom complete AV block developed both in the anomalous bundle and the normal pathway, showed the occurrence of escape beats (an escape-bigeminy pattern), as well as a regular idioventricular rhythm arising from the anomalous bundle. Phase 4 block in the anomalous bundle occurred in 7 other patients, in 4 of them spontaneously and in 3 only after the administration of ajmaline or amiodarone. Only 4 of 14 fully investigated patients (out of a total number of 23) showed absence of both escape beats and phase 4 block. The escape beats were considered as direct evidence, and the phase 4 block as indirect evidence, for the existence of automaticity in the anomalous bundle. Such evidence supports the view that the anomalous bundle, like the His bundle-branch system, may be composed of specialised tissue endowed with the property of automaticity. PMID:656241

  10. [Analysis of early and late results of surgically treated Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zünd, G; von Segesser, L K; Vogt, P; Candinas, R; Amann, F W; Jenni, R; Turina, M

    1996-01-01

    The results of surgical procedures for termination of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) Syndrom were assessed in 59 patients undergoing operation between January, 1980 and December, 1993. All cases of WPW were refractory to medical treatment and 14 of 58 patients had one or several syncopes, and 4 of them had to be reanimated. The surgical treatment of these patients was a dissection of an accessory atrioventricular pathway. 15 patients required additional heart operation. A total of 60 accessory pathways were diagnosed preoperatively, 64 were located intraoperatively. The reoperation rate was 3% (2 patients) due to persistent WPW. Incidence of total AV block after the operation was 7% (4 patients). In the late postoperative stage, 12 patients developed supraventricular tachycardias, but none of these cases required a surgical treatment. The actuarial survival rate after 10 years was 100% and after 14 years 96%. We conclude that surgical dissection of accessory pathways offers a good alternative in cases of unsuccessful catheter ablative procedure or in cases of additional heart operation.

  11. Treatment of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) encompasses a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases with heterogeneous clinical presentations and two predominant types of underlying neuropathology. FTD typically comprises three distinct clinical syndromes: behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), and nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA). FTD also frequently overlaps both clinically and neuropathologically with three other neurodegenerative syndromes: corticobasal syndrome (CBS), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Each syndrome can be associated with one or more underlying neuropathological diagnoses and are referred to as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Although the various FTD syndromes can substantially differ in terms of clinical symptoms and underlying pathology, the symptoms can be broadly categorized into behavioral, cognitive and motor domains. Currently there are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved therapies for the above syndromes except riluzole for ALS. FTD treatment strategies generally rely on off-label use of medications for symptomatic management, and most therapies lack quality evidence from randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. For behavioral symptoms, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be effective, while case reports hint at possible efficacy with antipsychotics or antiepileptics, but use of these latter agents is limited due to concerns regarding side effects. There are no effective therapies for cognitive complaints in FTD, which frequently involve executive function, memory, and language. Motor difficulties associated with FTD may present with parkinsonian symptoms or motor neuron disease, for which riluzole is indicated as therapy. Compared to idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, FTD-related atypical parkinsonism is generally not responsive to dopamine replacement therapies, but a

  12. Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Thorpy, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    Depression, dementia, and physiologic changes contribute to the high prevalence of sleep disturbances in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Antiparkinsonian drugs also play a role in insomnia by increasing daytime sleepiness and affecting motor symptoms and depression. Common types of sleep disturbances in PD patients include nocturnal sleep disruption and excessive daytime sleepiness, restless legs syndrome, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep apnea, sleep walking and sleep talking, nightmares, sleep terrors, and panic attacks. A thorough assessment should include complete medical and psychiatric histories, sleep history, and a 1- to 2-week sleep diary or Epworth Sleepiness Scale evaluation. Polysomnography or actigraphy may also be indicated. Treatment should address underlying factors such as depression or anxiety. Hypnotic therapy for sleep disturbances in PD patients should be approached with care because of the risks of falling, agitation, drowsiness, and hypotension. Behavioral interventions may also be useful. PMID:15259535

  13. Nature and extent of person recognition impairments associated with Capgras syndrome in Lewy body dementia

    PubMed Central

    Fiacconi, Chris M.; Barkley, Victoria; Finger, Elizabeth C.; Carson, Nicole; Duke, Devin; Rosenbaum, R. Shayna; Gilboa, Asaf; Köhler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Capgras syndrome (CS) adopt the delusional belief that persons well-known to them have been replaced by an imposter. Several current theoretical models of CS attribute such misidentification problems to deficits in covert recognition processes related to the generation of appropriate affective autonomic signals. These models assume intact overt recognition processes for the imposter and, more broadly, for other individuals. As such, it has been suggested that CS could reflect the “mirror-image” of prosopagnosia. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether overt person recognition abilities are indeed always spared in CS. Furthermore, we examined whether CS might be associated with any impairments in overt affective judgments of facial expressions. We pursued these goals by studying a patient with Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) who showed clear signs of CS, and by comparing him to another patient with DLB who did not experience CS, as well as to a group of healthy control participants. Clinical magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) atrophy that appeared to be uniquely associated with the presence CS. We assessed overt person recognition with three fame recognition tasks, using faces, voices, and names as cues. We also included measures of confidence and probed pertinent semantic knowledge. In addition, participants rated the intensity of fearful facial expressions. We found that CS was associated with overt person recognition deficits when probed with faces and voices, but not with names. Critically, these deficits were not present in the DLB patient without CS. In addition, CS was associated with impairments in overt judgments of affect intensity. Taken together, our findings cast doubt on the traditional view that CS is the mirror-image of prosopagnosia and that it spares overt recognition abilities. These findings can still be accommodated by models of CS that emphasize deficits in autonomic

  14. SOME IS NOT ENOUGH: QUANTIFIER COMPREHENSION IN CORTICOBASAL SYNDROME AND BEHAVIORAL VARIANT FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Brianna; Gross, Rachel; Clark, Robin; Dreyfuss, Michael; Boller, Ashley; Camp, Emily; Liang, Tsao-Wei; Avants, Brian; McMillan, Corey; Grossman, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Quantifiers are very common in everyday speech, but we know little about their cognitive basis or neural representation. The present study examined comprehension of three classes of quantifiers that depend on different cognitive components in patients with focal neurodegenerative diseases. Patients evaluated the truth-value of a sentence containing a quantifier relative to a picture illustrating a small number of familiar objects, and performance was related to MRI grey matter atrophy using voxel-based morphometry. We found that patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) and posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) are significantly impaired in their comprehension of Cardinal Quantifiers (e.g. “At least three birds are on the branch”), due in part to their deficit in quantity knowledge. MRI analyses related this deficit to temporal-parietal atrophy found in CBS/PCA. We also found that patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are significantly impaired in their comprehension of Logical Quantifiers (e.g. “Some the birds are on the branch”), associated with a simple form of perceptual logic, and this correlated with their deficit on executive measures. This deficit was related to disease in rostral prefrontal cortex in bvFTD. These patients were also impaired in their comprehension of Majority Quantifiers (e.g. “At least half of the birds are on the branch”), and this too was correlated with their deficit on executive measures. This was related to disease in the basal ganglia interrupting a frontal-striatal loop critical for executive functioning. These findings suggest that a large-scale frontal-parietal neural network plays a crucial role in quantifier comprehension, and that comprehension of specific classes of quantifiers may be selectively impaired in patients with focal neurodegenerative conditions in these areas. PMID:21930136

  15. Nature and extent of person recognition impairments associated with Capgras syndrome in Lewy body dementia.

    PubMed

    Fiacconi, Chris M; Barkley, Victoria; Finger, Elizabeth C; Carson, Nicole; Duke, Devin; Rosenbaum, R Shayna; Gilboa, Asaf; Köhler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Capgras syndrome (CS) adopt the delusional belief that persons well-known to them have been replaced by an imposter. Several current theoretical models of CS attribute such misidentification problems to deficits in covert recognition processes related to the generation of appropriate affective autonomic signals. These models assume intact overt recognition processes for the imposter and, more broadly, for other individuals. As such, it has been suggested that CS could reflect the "mirror-image" of prosopagnosia. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether overt person recognition abilities are indeed always spared in CS. Furthermore, we examined whether CS might be associated with any impairments in overt affective judgments of facial expressions. We pursued these goals by studying a patient with Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) who showed clear signs of CS, and by comparing him to another patient with DLB who did not experience CS, as well as to a group of healthy control participants. Clinical magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) atrophy that appeared to be uniquely associated with the presence CS. We assessed overt person recognition with three fame recognition tasks, using faces, voices, and names as cues. We also included measures of confidence and probed pertinent semantic knowledge. In addition, participants rated the intensity of fearful facial expressions. We found that CS was associated with overt person recognition deficits when probed with faces and voices, but not with names. Critically, these deficits were not present in the DLB patient without CS. In addition, CS was associated with impairments in overt judgments of affect intensity. Taken together, our findings cast doubt on the traditional view that CS is the mirror-image of prosopagnosia and that it spares overt recognition abilities. These findings can still be accommodated by models of CS that emphasize deficits in autonomic

  16. Secondary parkinsonism

    MedlinePlus

    Parkinsonism - secondary; Atypical Parkinson disease ... to be less responsive to medical therapy than Parkinson disease. ... Unlike Parkinson disease, some types of secondary parkinsonism may stabilize or even improve if the underlying cause is treated. Brain ...

  17. Reversible Valproate Induced Pisa Syndrome and Parkinsonism in a Neuro-Oncology Patient with Depression and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Botturi, Andrea; Silvani, Antonio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Paoli, Riccardo Augusto; Lucchiari, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric conditions frequently overlap in neuro-oncology. This overlapping negatively affects patients’ quality of life and decreases the ability of providers to manage specific symptoms by therapy modulation, especially when psychopharmacotherapy needs to be prescribed. We describe here a patient with recurrent brain tumor, symptomatic epilepsy and depression who developed Pisa syndrome and parkinsonism after several months of valproic acid use. An accurate recognition of symptoms and treatment side effect allowed an appropriate clinical approach so as to rapidly improve both movement disorder and depression without increasing the risk of developing seizure. This has improved the autonomy and quality of life in a patient with poor prognosis. PMID:27462241

  18. Classifying late-onset dementia with MRI: Is arteriosclerotic brain degeneration the most common cause of Alzheimer’s syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Henry-Feugeas, Marie Cécile; Onen, Fannie; Claeys, Elisabeth Schouman

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to use early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate the causes of cognitive decline in elderly people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Baseline structural and flow quantification MR sequences, and clinical and neuropsychological follow-up for at least two years, were performed on 62 elderly subjects with MCI. Of these subjects, 17 progressed to dementia, and 15 of these progressed to dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT). Conversion to clinically diagnosed DAT was related to six distinct MR profiles, including one profile suggesting severe AD (20% of these converters) and five profiles suggesting severe cerebrovascular dysfunction. Two profiles suggested arteriosclerotic brain degeneration, one profile suggested severe venous windkessel dysfunction, and two suggested marked cerebral hypoperfusion associated with very low craniospinal compliance or marked brain atrophy. As compared with vascular MR type converters, AD MR type converters showed high executive and mobility predementia performances. Severe whole anteromesial temporal atrophy and predominantly left brain atrophy on visual MR analysis was only observed in AD MR type converters. In conclusion, these observations enhance the pathogenic complexity of the Alzheimer syndrome, and suggest that the role of arteriosclerotic brain degeneration in late life dementia is underestimated. PMID:18488889

  19. The Cholinergic System and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Albin, Roger L.

    2010-01-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is viewed traditionally as a motor syndrome secondary to nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, recent studies emphasize non-motor features. Non-motor comorbidities, such as cognitive impairment, are likely the result of an intricate interplay of multi-system degenerations and neurotransmitter deficiencies extending beyond the loss of dopaminergic nigral neurons. The pathological hallmark of parkinsonian dementia is the presence of extra-nigral Lewy bodies that can be accompanied by other pathologies, such as senile plaques. Lewy first identified the eponymous Lewy body in neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM), the source of cholinergic innervation of the cerebral cortex. Although cholinergic denervation is recognized as a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), in vivo neuroimaging studies reveal loss of cerebral cholinergic markers in parkinsonian dementia similar to or more severe than in prototypical AD. Imaging studies agree with post-mortem evidence suggesting that basal forebrain cholinergic system degeneration appears early in PD and worsens coincident with the appearance of dementia. Early cholinergic denervation in PD without dementia appears to be heterogeneous and may make specific contributions to the PD clinical phenotype. Apart from well-known cognitive and behavioral deficits, central, in particular limbic, cholinergic denervation may be associated with progressive deficits of odor identification in PD. Recent evidence indicates also that subcortical cholinergic denervation, probably due to degeneration of brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus neurons, may relate to the presence of dopamine non-responsive gait and balance impairments, including falls, in PD. PMID:20060022

  20. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Surfactant-Resistant α-Synuclein in Cerebral Cortex of Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex of Guam but Not Alzheimer’s Disease or Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wan; Woltjer, Randall L.; Sokal, Izabela; Pan, Catherine; Wang, Yan; Brodey, Mary; Peskind, Elaine R.; Leverenz, James B.; Zhang, Jing; Perl, Daniel P.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) remains a significant health burden to the Chamorro population. We tested the hypothesis that quantitative proteomics might provide fresh insight into this enigmatic illness by analyzing proteins resistant to surfactant extraction from patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or PDC and their matched controls using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification. In addition to the expected increase in abnormal frontal cortical Aβ peptides, tau, ubiquitin, and apolipoprotein E in AD, and tau in PDC, we identified α-synuclein (SNCA) as a major abnormal protein in PDC but not AD. We confirmed our isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification findings by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in frontal and temporal cortices. We extended our assays to include a limited number of cases of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and dementia with Lewy bodies; we observed increased abnormal tau but not SNCA in PSP, and abnormal SNCA in dementia with Lewy bodies that was quantitatively similar to PDC. Finally, soluble Aβ oligomers were selectively increased in AD but not PDC or PSP. These results show that frontal and temporal cortex in PDC is distinguished from AD and PSP by its accumulation of abnormal SNCA and suggest that PDC be considered a synucleinopathy as well as a tauopathy. PMID:17675576

  1. [The dementia patient caregiver].

    PubMed

    Bagnati, Pablo M

    2010-01-01

    Dementia results in an important economic, social and personal burden. To care for a patient with dementia can be a trascendent learning experience. At the same time, the caregiver's role can become strenuous physical and mental work. This article reviews the importance of assessing the caregiver from the moment of diagnostic work up, the stages the caregiver goes through in the disease evolution, and the "Caregiver syndrome" where the caregiver can become the "second victim" of dementia.

  2. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome. Hypothetical application of reward system stimulation for the treatment of anhedonia in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tomoyoshi

    2008-08-01

    The management of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), although imperfect, has already been standardized. However, patients often spend their time idly despite improvement in the elemental motor symptoms. The main cause of this may be anhedonia. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) is a troublesome condition that can occur as a complication of dopamine replacement therapy in PD. As anhedonia and DDS may be converse syndromes in PD patients, it is very important to overcome anhedonia to improve patients' quality of life. In this article, the author proposes the possibility of stimulating patients' desire to participate in physical activity via the incentive of a reward system. Understanding the mechanism of DDS may help in the development of this type of approach.

  3. Familial Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome maps to a locus on chromosome 7q3.

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, C A; Ghaisas, N; Kass, S; Donnelly, S; Basson, C T; Watkins, H C; Anan, R; Thierfelder, L H; McGarry, K; Rowland, E

    1995-01-01

    We have mapped a disease locus for Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) and familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) segregating in a large kindred to chromosome 7 band q3. Although WPW syndrome and FHC have been observed in members of the same family in prior studies, the relationship between these two diseases has remained enigmatic. A large family with 25 surviving individuals who are affected by one or both of these conditions was studied. The disease locus is closely linked to loci D7S688, D7S505, and D7S483 (maximum two point LOD score at D7S505 was 7.80 at theta = 0). While four different FHC loci have been described this is the first locus that can be mutated to cause both WPW and/or FHC. PMID:7657794

  4. Phase analysis in the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome with surgically proven accessory conduction pathways: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K.; Bunko, H.; Tada, A.; Taki, J.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K.; Misaki, T.; Iwa, T.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome who underwent surgical division of the accessory conduction pathway (ACP) were studied by gated blood-pool scintigraphy. In each case, a functional image of the phase was generated, based on the fundamental frequency of the Fourier transform. The location of the ACP was confirmed by electrophysiologic study, epicardial mapping, and surgery. Phase analysis identified the side of preexcitation correctly in 16 out of 20 patients with WPW syndrome with a delta wave. All patients with right-cardiac type (N=9) had initial contraction in the right ventricle (RV). In patients with left-cardiac type (N=10), six had initial movement in the left ventricle (LV); but in the other four the ACPs in the anterior or lateral wall of the left ventricle (LV) could not be detected. In patients with multiple ACPs (N=2), one right-cardiac type had initial contraction in the RV, while in the other (with an intermittent WPW syndrome) the ACP was not detected. These observations indicate that abnormal wall motion is associated with the conduction anomalies of the WPW syndrome. We conclude that phase analysis can correctly identify the side of initial contraction in the WPW syndrome before and after surgery. However, as a method of preoperative study, it seems difficult to determine the precise site of the ACP by phase analysis alone.

  5. Reflections upon the Development of a Dementia Screening Service for Individuals with Down's Syndrome across the Hyndburn and Ribble Valley Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, Victoria; Lamb, Isobel; Smith, Esther

    2011-01-01

    The high prevalence of dementia in individuals with Down's syndrome has led learning disability services in the Hyndburn and Ribble Valley (HRV) area to develop a screening service to address this need; this paper offers reflections upon this process by its members after the first 12 months of operation. A multidisciplinary team comprising…

  6. Will General Practitioners Be Adequately Prepared to Meet the Complexities of Enhanced Dementia Screening for People with Learning Disabilities and Down Syndrome: Key Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a timely response in regard to the Department of Health's current initiative to financially reward GPs to prioritise and undertake dementia screening for people with learning disabilities over the age of 50 years and for people with Down syndrome over the age of 40 years. Whilst GPs are becoming increasingly aware of their…

  7. [Cardioversion for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia during lung surgery in a patient with concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshiharu; Nagata, Hirofumi; Inoda, Ayako; Miura, Hiroko; Watanabe, Yoko; Suzuki, Kenji

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) that occurred during video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy in a patient with concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. A 59-year-old man with lung cancer was scheduled for VATS lobectomy under general anesthesia. After inserting a thoracic epidural catheter, general anesthesia was induced with intravenous administration of propofol. Anesthesia was maintained with inhalation of desfurane in an air/oxygen mixture and intravenous infusion of remifentanil. Recurrent PSVT occurred three times, and the last episode of PSVT continued for 50 minutes regardless of administration of antiarrhythmic drugs. Synchronized electric shock via adhesive electrode pads on the patient's chest successfully converted PSVT back to normal sinus rhythm. The remaining course and postoperative period were uneventful. An electrophysiological study performed after hospital discharge detected concealed WPW syndrome, which had contributed to the development of atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia. Concealed WPW syndrome is a rare, but critical complication that could possibly cause lethal atrial tachyarrhythmias during the perioperative period. In the present case, cardioversion using adhesive electrode pads briefly terminated PSVT in a patient with concealed WPW syndrome.

  8. Should We Refer for a Dementia Assessment? A Checklist to Help Know when to Be Concerned about Dementia in Adults with Down Syndrome and Other Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitwham, Sarah; McBrien, Judith; Broom, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a simple screening checklist to help carers and professionals know when to make a referral for a dementia assessment. A checklist was completed for all new referrals to a dementia service for people with intellectual disabilities. The obtained scores were compared to the diagnostic outcome of a comprehensive…

  9. Genetic impact on cognition and brain function in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: ICICLE-PD study.

    PubMed

    Nombela, Cristina; Rowe, James B; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie E; Hampshire, Adam; Owen, Adrian M; Breen, David P; Duncan, Gordon W; Khoo, Tien K; Yarnall, Alison J; Firbank, Michael J; Chinnery, Patrick F; Robbins, Trevor W; O'Brien, John T; Brooks, David J; Burn, David J; Barker, Roger A

    2014-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with multiple cognitive impairments and increased risk of dementia, but the extent of these deficits varies widely among patients. The ICICLE-PD study was established to define the characteristics and prevalence of cognitive change soon after diagnosis, in a representative cohort of patients, using a multimodal approach. Specifically, we tested the 'Dual Syndrome' hypothesis for cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease, which distinguishes an executive syndrome (affecting the frontostriatal regions due to dopaminergic deficits) from a posterior cortical syndrome (affecting visuospatial, mnemonic and semantic functions related to Lewy body pathology and secondary cholinergic loss). An incident Parkinson's disease cohort (n = 168, median 8 months from diagnosis to participation) and matched control group (n = 85) were recruited to a neuroimaging study at two sites in the UK. All participants underwent clinical, neuropsychological and functional magnetic resonance imaging assessments. The three neuroimaging tasks (Tower of London, Spatial Rotations and Memory Encoding Tasks) were designed to probe executive, visuospatial and memory encoding domains, respectively. Patients were also genotyped for three polymorphisms associated with cognitive change in Parkinson's disease and related disorders: (i) rs4680 for COMT Val158Met polymorphism; (ii) rs9468 for MAPT H1 versus H2 haplotype; and (iii) rs429358 for APOE-ε2, 3, 4. We identified performance deficits in all three cognitive domains, which were associated with regionally specific changes in cortical activation. Task-specific regional activations in Parkinson's disease were linked with genetic variation: the rs4680 polymorphism modulated the effect of levodopa therapy on planning-related activations in the frontoparietal network; the MAPT haplotype modulated parietal activations associated with spatial rotations; and APOE allelic variation influenced the magnitude of activation

  10. Patterns of Performance on the Modified Cued Recall Test in Spanish Adults With Down Syndrome With and Without Dementia.

    PubMed

    Benejam, Bessy; Fortea, Juan; Molina-López, Rafael; Videla, Sebastià

    2015-11-01

    The assessment of memory decline in people with intellectual disability (ID) is more difficult than in the general population, due to a lack of appropriate instruments and to preexisting cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to describe performance of healthy adults with Down syndrome (healthy-DS; prospectively cohort) on a Spanish version of the modified Cued Recall Test (mCRT). We also recruited retrospectively a cohort of DS subjects with Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type (DS-DAT). Healthy-DS obtained higher scores on free recall and total score than DS-DAT. Age was the main factor associated with decreasing mCRT scores. The mCRT was useful in DS subjects with ID at the upper end of the spectrum or ID in the middle range of the spectrum, and discriminated well between DS subjects with and without DAT. PMID:26505869

  11. Patterns of Performance on the Modified Cued Recall Test in Spanish Adults With Down Syndrome With and Without Dementia.

    PubMed

    Benejam, Bessy; Fortea, Juan; Molina-López, Rafael; Videla, Sebastià

    2015-11-01

    The assessment of memory decline in people with intellectual disability (ID) is more difficult than in the general population, due to a lack of appropriate instruments and to preexisting cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to describe performance of healthy adults with Down syndrome (healthy-DS; prospectively cohort) on a Spanish version of the modified Cued Recall Test (mCRT). We also recruited retrospectively a cohort of DS subjects with Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type (DS-DAT). Healthy-DS obtained higher scores on free recall and total score than DS-DAT. Age was the main factor associated with decreasing mCRT scores. The mCRT was useful in DS subjects with ID at the upper end of the spectrum or ID in the middle range of the spectrum, and discriminated well between DS subjects with and without DAT.

  12. Moving from the question of efficacy to the question of therapeutic relevance: an exploratory reanalysis of a controlled clinical study of 130 inpatients with dementia syndrome taking piracetam.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, W M; Stephan, K

    1992-01-01

    The authors reanalyzed previously published data from a prospectively randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase-III study of 130 inpatients with dementia syndrome. The patients in the study had been diagnosed as having suffered from organic brain syndrome (ICD 290), which is the core syndrome of dementia (so-called dementia syndrome) for at least two years. They were treated with piracetam for three months at a dose level of 4,800 mg/d. These data were reexamined in order both to survey the extent of drug-related improvement and response rates when assessed at different levels and to investigate the comparability of efficacy in subgroups suffering from either senile dementia of the Alzheimer type or multi-infarct dementia. Three scales were used for the assessment of efficacy. They were the CGI, or Clinical Global Impression, completed by the physicians; the SCAG, or Sandoz Clinical Assessment Geriatric, used by clinical psychologists; and the BGP, or Beurteilungsskala für Geriatrische Patienten (Evaluation Scale for Geriatric Patients), employed by the nursing staff. The Syndrome-Kurztest (SKT) and Benton tests served to measure performance. The items and subscores of the SCAG and the SKT were highly intercorrelated at baseline, forming a common factor fairly independent of the information gained by BGP. This suggests that merely using different kinds of information-gathering methods, i.e., clinical scales and performance tests, completed by different groups of observers, does not automatically result in nonredundant comprehensive information. When using the most conservative response criterion of individual improvement, i.e., at least one baseline standard deviation, treatment with piracetam showed statistically significant (pe less than .001) explorative response rates of 50% and above in three out of four target variables, as compared to the 0 to 6% obtained with placebo. CGI was used as descriptive variable. Again, using this response criterion from

  13. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B and left bundle-branch block: electrophysiologic and radionuclide study

    SciTech Connect

    Rakovec, P.; Kranjec, I.; Fettich, J.J.; Jakopin, J.; Fidler, V.; Turk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Coinciding left bundle-branch block and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type B, a very rare electrocardiographic occurrence, was found in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy. Electrophysiologic study revealed eccentric retrograde atrial activation during ventricular pacing, suggesting right-sided accessory pathway. At programmed atrial pacing, effective refractory period of the accessory pathway was 310 ms; at shorter pacing coupling intervals, normal atrioventricular conduction with left bundle-branch block was seen. Left bundle-branch block was seen also with His bundle pacing. Radionuclide phase imaging demonstrated right ventricular phase advance and left ventricular phase delay; both right and left ventricular phase images revealed broad phase distribution histograms. Combined electrophysiologic and radionuclide investigations are useful to disclose complex conduction abnormalities and their mechanical correlates.

  14. [Delirium and dementia].

    PubMed

    Marín Carmona, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Delirium and dementia are highly prevalent neurocognitive syndromes in the elderly. These syndromes are defined by level of consciousness, clinical onset, and potential reversibility, etc. Frequently, both syndromes coincide in the elderly patient and share many epidemiologic, pathogenic and clinical features, which are reviewed in this article. There is no solid scientific evidence that explains the association between delirium and dementia. The present article proposes a change of paradigm in the diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic approach to delirium in the elderly that recognizes the inherent complexity of this geriatric syndrome and, unlike dichotomic models, explores the complex interrelations between both geriatric syndromes. Delirium is viewed as an important model to investigate cognitive disorders and dementia.

  15. A 6.4MB duplication of the alpha-synuclein locus causing fronto-temporal dementia and parkinsonism - phenotype-genotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Eleanna; Kiely, Aoife P; Proukakis, Christos; Giffin, Nicola; Love, Seth; Hehir, Jason; Rantell, Khadija; Pandraud, Amelie; Hernandez, Dena G; Nacheva, Elizabeth; Pittman, Alan M; Nalls, Mike A; Singleton, Andrew B; Revesz, Tamas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Quinn, Niall; Hardy, John; Holton, Janice L; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Importance SNCA locus duplications are associated with variable clinical features and reduced penetrance but the reasons underlying this variability are unknown. Objective 1) To report a novel family carrying a heterozygous 6.4Mb duplication of the SNCA locus with an atypical clinical presentation strongly reminiscent of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and late-onset pallidopyramidal syndromes. 2) To study phenotype-genotype correlations in SNCA locus duplications. Design, Setting, Participants and Data sources We report the clinical and neuropathologic features of a family carrying a 6.4Mb duplication of the SNCA locus. To identify candidate disease modifiers, we undertake a genetic analysis in the family and conduct statistical analysis on previously published cases carrying SNCA locus duplication using regression modelling with robust standard errors to account for clustering at the family level. Main outcome measures To assess whether length of the SNCA locus duplication influences disease penetrance and severity, and whether extra-duplication factors have a disease-modifying role. Results We identified a large 6.4Mb duplication of the SNCA locus in this family. Neuropathological analysis showed extensive α-synuclein pathology with minimal phospho-tau pathology. Genetic analysis showed an increased burden of PD-related risk factors and the disease-predisposing H1/H1 MAPT haplotype. Statistical analysis of previously published cases suggested that there is a trend towards increasing disease severity and disease penetrance with increasing duplication size. The corresponding odds ratios (95% CI) from the univariate analyses were 1.17 (0.81 to 1.68) and 1.34 (0.78 to 2.31) respectively. Gender was significantly associated with both disease risk and severity; males compared to females had increased disease risk and severity and the corresponding odds ratios (95% CI) from the univariate analyses were 8.36 (1.97 to 35.42) and 5.55 (1.39 to 22.22) respectively

  16. A progressive syndrome of autism, dementia, ataxia, and loss of purposeful hand use in girls: Rett's syndrome: report of 35 cases.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, B; Aicardi, J; Dias, K; Ramos, O

    1983-10-01

    Thirty-five patients, exclusively girls, from three countries had a uniform and striking progressive encephalopathy. After normal general and psychomotor development up to the age of 7 to 18 months, developmental stagnation occurred, followed by rapid deterioration of higher brain functions. Within one-and-a-half years this deterioration led to severe dementia, autism, loss of purposeful use of the hands, jerky truncal ataxia, and acquired microcephaly. The destructive stage was followed by apparent stability lasting through decades. Additional insidious neurological abnormalities supervened, mainly spastic parapareses, vasomotor disturbances of the lower limbs, and epilepsy. Prior extensive laboratory investigations have not revealed the cause. The condition is similar to a virtually overlooked syndrome described by Rett in the German literature. The exclusive involvement of females, correlated with findings in family data analyses, suggests a dominant mutation on one X chromosome that results in affected girls and nonviable male hemizygous conceptuses. PMID:6638958

  17. Parametric imaging of experimentally simulated Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome conduction abnormalities in dogs: a concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Weismueller, P.H.; Henze, E.; Adam, W.E.; Roth, J.; Bitter, F.; Stauch, M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to test the diagnostic potential of phase analysis of radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) for localizing accessory bundles in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, 24 experimental runs were performed in three open chest instrumented dogs. After a baseline study, WPW syndrome was simulated by stimulation at seven different sites around the base of the ventricles, and RNV's were obtained. Subsequent data processing including Fourier transformation allowed the localization of the site of the first inward motion of the ventricles by an isophasic wave display. In sinus rhythm, the septum contracted first. During ectopic premature ventricular stimulation by triggering the atrial signal, the phase scan was altered only when the stimulus was applied earlier than 20 ms before the expected QRS complex during sinus rhythm. During stimulation with fixed frequency, only the left lateral positions of the premature stimulation were detected by phase analysis with a sensitivity of 86%. Neither the antero- or posteroseptal nor the right ventricular premature contraction pattern could be exactly localized.

  18. Prospective Belgian study of neurodegenerative and vascular dementia: APOE genotype effects

    PubMed Central

    Engelborghs, S; Dermaut, B; Goeman, J; Saerens, J; Marien, P; Pickut, B.; Van den Broeck, M; Serneels, S; Cruts, M; Van Broeckhoven, C; De Deyn, P P

    2003-01-01

    Methods: APOE genotyping was performed in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n=504), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (n=47), vascular dementia (VaD) (n=152), mixed dementia (n=132), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n=44), Parkinson's disease (PD) (n=30), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) (n=17), and multisystem atrophy (MSA)/progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) (n=12). Results: The APOE allele frequencies of this Belgian control population (ε2: 6.9%; ε3: 76.2%; ε4: 16.9%) did not differ from those reported for other white populations. AD, MCI, and mixed dementia patients had higher APOE ε4 (32.9%, 38.6%, and 28.4% respectively) and lower APOE ε3 (62.2%, 53.4%, and 66.3%) frequencies compared with controls, whereas only AD and mixed dementia patients had lower APOE ε2 frequencies (4.9% and 5.3%). Apart from a borderline significant different distribution of APOE allele frequencies in VaD patients compared with controls, no other differences were detected. The influence of APOE ε4 on clinical features of dementia was limited to lower age at onset in AD patients and a less pronounced negative correlation between age at onset and number of ε4 alleles in MCI and mixed dementia patients. Conclusions: This study confirmed the risk association between APOE ε4 and AD. The observation that APOE ε4 is associated with mixed dementia reflected the role of AD in the aetiopathogenesis of this condition. Although MCI is an aetiologically heterogeneous syndrome, the increased APOE ε4 frequencies indicated that a large proportion of the MCI patients included in the study might be predisposed to develop AD. PMID:12876259

  19. Serotonin in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Politis, Marios; Niccolini, Flavia

    2015-01-15

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the motor symptoms of bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity and postural instability. However, non-motor symptoms such as chronic fatigue, depression, dementia and sleep disturbances are also frequent and play a significant role with negative consequences in the quality of life of patients with Parkinson's disease. Although the progressive dopaminergic denervation is the cardinal pathology in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease, others systems such as the serotonergic are affected as well. Over the last decade, several lines of evidence suggest that a progressive and non-linear loss of serotonergic terminals takes place in Parkinson's disease, though this is at a slower pace compared to the dopaminergic loss. Several studies have indicated that serotonergic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease is associated with the development of motor and non-motor symptoms and complications. Here, we aim to review the current evidence with regards to the serotonergic pathology in Parkinson's disease and its relevance to the development of clinical symptoms. We are primarily revising in vivo human studies from research with positron emission tomography molecular imaging.

  20. James Parkinson: Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2013-11-01

    Parkinson's disease is a condition that anyone with a modicum of medical knowledge can recognise in the street--as indeed how it was studied by James Parkinson himself. Its three characteristic features are: 1. Increase in the tone of the voluntary muscles (rigidity). 2. Slowness of movement (bradykinesis). 3. Tremor (the characteristic 'pill rolling' movements of the fingers).

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection of affected individuals, monitoring disease progression, and evaluation of therapeutic effect. PMID:11563438

  2. Contributions of the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología in the diagnosis and treatment of the Wolff-Parkinson - White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iturralde-Torres, Pedro; Márquez, Manlio F

    2010-01-01

    Since the first description of the disease now known as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, much knowledge has been gained through several experimental and clinical studies all over the world. The Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez in Mexico City has not been the exception. In this report, we describe the clinical, electrocardiographic and electrophysiologic contributions of past and present researchers at the Institute, as well as the experience in the diagnosis and treatment of the W-P-W syndrome at this Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez.

  3. [Apathy and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-07-01

    Apathy, which has been attracting attention since Marin's report in 1990, is ubiquitous among neuropsychiatric diseases. It has a major impact on the quality of life in both patients and their caregivers and impairs rehabilitation and outcome. Furthermore, apathy is important as a prodromal syndrome in the development of dementia in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We reviewed the neurobiological basis, prevalence and assessment of potential benefits of non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions for apathy in MCI and dementia. PMID:27395461

  4. The prevalence of frontal variant frontotemporal dementia and the frontal lobe syndrome in a population based sample of 85 year olds

    PubMed Central

    Gislason, T; Sjogren, M; Larsson, L; Skoog, I

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of the frontal lobe syndrome (FLS) and the frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia (fvFTD) in a population based sample of 85 year olds. Methods: A representative sample of 85 year olds (n = 451) in Gothenburg, Sweden was examined with a neuropsychiatric examination and a key informant interview performed by an experienced psychiatrist. A subsample underwent computed tomography (CT) of the head. The Lund-Manchester research criteria were used as a basis for a symptom algorithm to identify individuals with FLS and fvFTD. These were diagnosed blindly to the diagnosis of dementia according to DSM-III-R. Results: A total of 86 individuals (19%) fulfilled the criteria for FLS, and 14 of them fulfilled criteria for fvFTD. There were no differences between men and women. Among those with FLS, 75 (87%) fulfilled DSM-III-R criteria for other types of dementia, mainly Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Among the 14 fvFTD cases, only five were demented according to DSM-III-R. Moderate to severe frontal atrophy was found in 93% of those with FLS (and in all cases with fvFTD), but also in 49% of those without FLS. FLS was found in 35% of those with moderate to severe frontal atrophy, and in 3% of those without these changes. Conclusions: The prevalence of fvFTD was 3% in 85 year olds, which is higher than previously expected in this age group. Only a minority of those with fvFTD were detected by the DSM-III-R criteria for dementia. FLS was even more common, especially in those diagnosed with a dementia disorder. PMID:12810769

  5. Chronic functional bowel syndrome enhances gut-brain axis dysfunction, neuroinflammation, cognitive impairment, and vulnerability to dementia.

    PubMed

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2014-04-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder world wide that lasts for decades. The human gut harbors a diverse population of microbial organisms which is symbiotic and important for well being. However, studies on conventional, germ-free, and obese animals have shown that alteration in normal commensal gut microbiota and an increase in pathogenic microbiota-termed "dysbiosis", impact gut function, homeostasis, and health. Diarrhea, constipation, visceral hypersensitivity, and abdominal pain arise in IBS from the gut-induced dysfunctional metabolic, immune, and neuro-immune communication. Dysbiosis in IBS is associated with gut inflammation. Gut-related inflammation is pivotal in promoting endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and neuroinflammation. A significant proportion of IBS patients chronically consume alcohol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, and fatty diet; they may also suffer from co-morbid respiratory, neuromuscular, psychological, sleep, and neurological disorders. The above pathophysiological substrate is underpinned by dysbiosis, and dysfunctional bidirectional "Gut-Brain Axis" pathways. Pathogenic gut microbiota-related systemic inflammation (due to increased lipopolysaccharide and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and barrier dysfunction), may trigger neuroinflammation enhancing dysfunctional brain regions including hippocampus and cerebellum. These as well as dysfunctional vago-vagal gut-brain axis may promote cognitive impairment. Indeed, inflammation is characteristic of a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases that manifest demntia. It is argued that an awareness of pathophysiological impact of IBS and implementation of appropriate therapeutic measures may prevent cognitive impairment and minimize vulnerability to dementia. PMID:24590859

  6. The utility of cerebral blood flow imaging in patients with the unique syndrome of progressive dementia with motor neuron disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, T.; Hoshi, H.; Jinnouchi, S.; Nagamachi, S.; Watanabe, K.; Mituyama, Y. )

    1990-05-01

    Two patients presenting with progressive dementia coupled with motor neuron disease underwent brain SPECT using N-isopropyl-p iodine-123-iodoamphetamine (({sup 123}I)IMP). The characteristic clinical features of progressive dementia and motor neuron disease were noted. IMP SPECT also revealed reduced uptake in the bilateral frontal and temporal regions, with no reduction of uptake in the parietal, parietal-occipital regions. We conclude that IMP SPECT has potential for the evaluation of progressive dementia with motor neuron disease.

  7. Barium stone impaction in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Erhan, Y; Koyuncu, A; Osmanoglu, N

    1995-06-01

    Autonomic symptoms such as orthostatic hypotension, abnormal sweating and constipation occur frequently in Parkinson's disease. In our case, barium meal used for upper gastrointestinal study caused barium stone formation and a paralytic-ileus-like syndrome. Therefore, attention should be paid while using barium meal for diagnostic purpose in Parkinsonism. PMID:7474296

  8. Ageing and Dementia in a Longitudinal Study of a Cohort with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Janet; Collins, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background: A population sample of people with Down syndrome has been studied from infancy and has now been followed up again at age 47 years. Methods: Intelligence and language skills were tested and daily living skills assessed. Memory/cognitive deterioration was examined using two test instruments. Results: Scores on verbal tests of…

  9. Weight Loss in Adults with Down Syndrome and with Dementia in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V. P.; Metseagharun, T.; Haque, S.

    2004-01-01

    An association between weight loss and Alzheimer's disease has been established in the general population but little information is available regarding this association in people with intellectual disabilities. A 4-year longitudinal study of adults with Down syndrome with and without Alzheimer's disease was undertaken. Age-associated weight loss…

  10. Mutation in GM2A Leads to a Progressive Chorea-dementia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; El Khashab, Heba Y.; Hamad, Muddathir H. A.; Bosley, Thomas M.; Burn, Sabrina; Myers, Angela; Landsverk, Megan L.; Crotwell, Patricia L.; Bilguvar, Kaya; Mane, Shrikant; Kruer, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The etiology of many cases of childhood-onset chorea remains undetermined, although advances in genomics are revealing both new disease-associated genes and variant phenotypes associated with known genes. Methods We report a Saudi family with a neurodegenerative course dominated by progressive chorea and dementia in whom we performed homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing. Results We identified a homozygous missense mutation in GM2A within a prominent block of homozygosity. This mutation is predicted to impair protein function. Discussion Although discovered more than two decades ago, to date, only five patients with this rare form of GM2 gangliosidosis have been reported. The phenotype of previously described GM2A patients has been typified by onset in infancy, profound hypotonia and impaired volitional movement, intractable seizures, hyperacusis, and a macular cherry red spot. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum of GM2A mutation-positive gangliosidosis to include generalized chorea without macular findings or hyperacusis and highlight how mutations in neurodegenerative disease genes may present in unexpected ways. PMID:26203402

  11. Ibutilide for termination of atrial fibrillation in the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Varriale, P; Sedighi, A; Mirzaietehrane, M

    1999-08-01

    Ibutilide promptly restored sinus rhythm on two occasions in an elderly patient with AF and rapid ventricular response associated with the WPW syndrome. As a selective Class III antiarrhythmic agent that prolongs cardiac refractoriness, ibutilide offers an alternative effective therapy for rapid termination of AF in WPW.

  12. Comparison of Informal Care Time and Costs in Different Age-Related Dementias: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Nadège; Ferlicoq, Laura; Derumeaux-Burel, Hélène; Rapp, Thomas; Garnault, Valérie; Gillette-Guyonnet, Sophie; Andrieu, Sandrine; Vellas, Bruno; Lamure, Michel; Grand, Alain; Molinier, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Age-related dementia is a progressive degenerative brain syndrome whose prevalence increases with age. Dementias cause a substantial burden on society and on families who provide informal care. This study aims to review the relevant papers to compare informal care time and costs in different dementias. Methods. A bibliographic search was performed on an international medical literature database (MEDLINE). All studies which assessed the social economic burden of different dementias were selected. Informal care time and costs were analyzed in three care settings by disease stages. Results. 21 studies met our criteria. Mean informal care time was 55.73 h per week for Alzheimer disease and 15.8 h per week for Parkinson disease (P = 0.0076), and the associated mean annual informal costs were $17,492 versus $3,284, respectively (P = 0.0393). Conclusion. There is a lack of data about informal care time and costs among other dementias than AD or PD. Globally, AD is the most costly in terms of informal care costs than PD, $17,492 versus $3,284, respectively. PMID:23509789

  13. Young-Onset Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kuruppu, Dulanji K; Matthews, Brandy R

    2014-01-01

    Young-onset dementia (YOD) is an neurological syndrome that affects behavior and cognition of patients younger than 65 years of age. Although frequently misdiagnosed, a systematic approach, reliant upon attainment of detailed medical history, collateral history from an informant, neuropsychological testing, laboratory studies, and neuroimaging, may facilitate earlier and more accurate diagnosis with subsequent intervention. The differential diagnosis of YOD is extensive and includes early-onset forms of adult neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, Lewy body dementias, Huntington's disease, and prion disease. Late-onset forms of childhood neurodegenerative conditions may also present as YOD and include mitochondrial disorders, lysosomal storage disorders, and leukodystrophies. Potentially reversible etiologies including inflammatory disorders, infectious diseases, toxic/metabolic abnormalities, transient epileptic amnesia, obstructive sleep apnea, and normal pressure hydrocephalus also represent important differential diagnostic considerations in YOD. This review will present etiologies, diagnostic strategies, and options for management of YOD with comprehensive summary tables for clinical reference. PMID:24234358

  14. Parkinson's disease (PD) in the elderly: an example of geriatric syndrome (GS)?

    PubMed

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Silvestrini, Claudio; Nardelli, Anna; Saccavini, Marsilio; Ceda, Gian Paolo

    2012-01-01

    PD is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that affects as many as 1-2% of persons aged 60 years and older. In the latest decade, the approach to PD was dramatically changed. In fact, although for many years PD has been considered only "a disease that affects walking", with a key role of the neurotransmitter dopamine, recently the neurological approach has been substantially modified. The approach for this disease is not only a neurological issue. Given the complexity of its clinical aspects, such as depression, anxiety, dementia, sleep disorder, pneumonia dysfagia-related and malnutrition, a multidisciplinary evaluation and not just a neurological evaluation is needed. We suggest a n multidisciplinary approach for this old actor, underlying a subtle link between neurophatological stages of the disease (Braak's classification) and clinical aspects (Braak's stages 1 and 2 associated with the premotor phase; Braak's stages 3-4 associated with the motor symptoms and Braak's stages 5-6 associated with cognitive impairment). In addition, we emphasize the usefulness of geriatric evaluation for the identification of frail "in situ", frail, and disable status for improving care and treatment in this multifaceted disease. PMID:21459464

  15. Great shakes: famous people with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey M

    2004-12-01

    James Parkinson is credited with the first complete clinical description of the syndrome attributed to his name, Parkinson disease. It is recognized as the first syndrome defined after neurology became a specialty. Descriptions of Parkinson features are rare in antiquity, and famous people with this disorder have not been found before the 1800s. During the 20th century, more and more famous people appear to be afflicted with Parkinson, and this article reviews some of those who have withstood the "test of Time magazine," and examines some of the reasons why the syndrome is a relatively recent disorder. PMID:15646755

  16. Great shakes: famous people with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey M

    2004-12-01

    James Parkinson is credited with the first complete clinical description of the syndrome attributed to his name, Parkinson disease. It is recognized as the first syndrome defined after neurology became a specialty. Descriptions of Parkinson features are rare in antiquity, and famous people with this disorder have not been found before the 1800s. During the 20th century, more and more famous people appear to be afflicted with Parkinson, and this article reviews some of those who have withstood the "test of Time magazine," and examines some of the reasons why the syndrome is a relatively recent disorder.

  17. Exercise testing and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the clinical evaluation of patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Poyatos, M.E.; Suarez, L.; Lerman, J.; Guibourg, H.; Camps, J.; Perosio, A.

    1986-10-01

    In 58 patients with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome (WPW), we performed exercise stress testing in order to investigate the incidence of normalization of the auriculo-ventricular conduction and the ST-segment changes. For a more accurate evaluation of the latter, exercise and redistribution radionuclide images with Thallium-201 were obtained in 18 cases. Forty-nine had type A and nine had type B of WPW. Forty-eight had permanent, four had alternant and six had no pre-excitation (PE) when they started the test. Mean maximal functional capacity, mean maximal heart rate and mean maximal double product were not different when compared to an age-matched control group. Of the 48 patients who began the test with PE, in 23 (48%) it disappeared while PE persisted in 25 (52%). In 16 cases the disappearance of the PE was sudden and in seven it was progressive. Pre-excitation persisted in 39.5% of patients with type A and in 88.8% with type B (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression was observed in 76.6% of patients with PE and in 28.6% of cases without PE (p less than 0.01). ST-segment depression occurred in 44.8% of patients with type A and in 100% of cases with type B (p less than 0.05). Transient abnormal Thallium-201 scans were observed in 62.5% of patients without PE and in 20% with PE. No patients showed exertional arrhythmias. This study suggests the possibility of measuring the duration of the refractory period of the accessory pathway in those patients n which the PE disappears suddenly, at a given heart rate.

  18. [Dementia with Lewy bodies].

    PubMed

    Orimo, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    It is important to differentiate dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and other dementia, especially Alzheimer disease (AD), because the medical treatment, management, and the prognosis of these diseases are different. In regard to clinical features, DLB patients have relatively mild memory disturbance, fluctuating cognition, more severe disturbances of attention, executive function, visuospacial function, visual hallucination, depression, autonomic symptoms, REM sleep behavior disorder, and idiopathic parkinsonism compared to AD patients. In regard to imaging tools, DLB patients have milder atrophy of medial temporal lobe by brain MRI, reduced occipital activity by SPECT or PET, reduced MIBG uptake by MIBG cardiac scintigraphy, and low dopamine transporter activity in the basal ganglia by SPECT or PET. PMID:27025091

  19. Why Wait for Dementia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watchman, Karen

    2003-01-01

    This article offers guidelines for the modification of the living environment of adults with Down syndrome before they develop dementia in order to allow them to remain in familiar surroundings for as long as possible. These include maintaining the person's individuality; aiding his/her communication; changing supports with the course of the…

  20. Semantic Verbal Fluency Pattern, Dementia Rating Scores and Adaptive Behavior Correlate With Plasma Aβ42 Concentrations in Down Syndrome Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hoyo, Laura Del; Xicota, Laura; Sánchez-Benavides, Gonzalo; Cuenca-Royo, Aida; de Sola, Susana; Langohr, Klaus; Fagundo, Ana B.; Farré, Magí; Dierssen, Mara; de la Torre, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is an intellectual disability (ID) disorder in which language and specifically, verbal fluency are strongly impaired domains; nearly all adults show neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including amyloid deposition by their fifth decade of life. In the general population, verbal fluency deficits are considered a strong AD predictor being the semantic verbal fluency task (SVFT) a useful tool for enhancing early diagnostic. However, there is a lack of information about the association between the semantic verbal fluency pattern (SVFP) and the biological amyloidosis markers in DS. In the current study, we used the SVFT in young adults with DS to characterize their SVFP, assessing total generated words, clustering, and switching. We then explored its association with early indicators of dementia, adaptive behavior and amyloidosis biomarkers, using the Dementia Questionnaire for Persons with Intellectual Disability (DMR), the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition (ABAS-II), and plasma levels of Aβ peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42), as a potent biomarker of AD. In DS, worse performance in SVFT and poorer communication skills were associated with higher plasma Aβ42 concentrations, a higher DMR score and impaired communication skills (ABAS–II). The total word production and switching ability in SVFT were good indicators of plasma Aβ42 concentration. In conclusion, we propose the SVFT as a good screening test for early detection of dementia and amyloidosis in young adults with DS. PMID:26635555

  1. [FALLS IN PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA].

    PubMed

    Aizen, Efraim

    2015-05-01

    Older people with dementia are at increased risk of falls and their consequences. Patients with dementia fall twice as often as elderly cognitively intact people and are at greater risk of injurious falls. Falls in older people with dementia cause higher rates of morbidity, mortality and institutionalization. There is limited literature attempting to show specific risk factors for falls in this population, mainly: Lewy body dementia, dementia related to Parkinson's disease and depression, psychotropic medication, functional disability and behavioral disturbances. The Physiological Profile Assessment (PPAJ has been found to be a good fall risk screening tool in this population. There are few trials that have shown limited effectiveness of targeted fall prevention programs in community-dwelling cognitively impaired elderly. The evidence from hospitals and residential care is not conclusive. However, it has been demonstrated that some interventions, primarily exercise interventions, can modify certain risk factors in patients with dementia. Further research is required in specifically targeting fall prevention in older people with dementia. PMID:26168645

  2. Neuroimaging in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Paolo; Migliaccio, Raffaella; Agosta, Federica; Rosen, Howard J.; Geschwind, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Although dementia is a clinical diagnosis, neuroimaging often is crucial for proper assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) may identify nondegenerative and potentially treatable causes of dementia. Recent neuroimaging advances, such as the Pittsburgh Compound-B (PIB) ligand for positron emission tomography imaging in Alzheimer’s disease, will improve our ability to differentiate among the neurodegenerative dementias. High-resolution volumetric MRI has increased the capacity to identify the various forms of the frontotemporal lobar degeneration spectrum and some forms of parkinsonism or cerebellar neurodegenerative disorders, such as corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, and spinocerebellar ataxias. In many cases, the specific pattern of cortical and subcortical abnormalities on MRI has diagnostic utility. Finally, among the new MRI methods, diffusion-weighted MRI can help in the early diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Although only clinical assessment can lead to a diagnosis of dementia, neuroimaging is clearly an invaluable tool for the clinician in the differential diagnosis. PMID:18843575

  3. Atypical parkinsonism caused by Pro105Leu mutation of prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Mano, Kagari Koshi; Matsukawa, Takashi; Mitsui, Jun; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Tokushige, Shin-ichi; Takahashi, Yuji; Sato, Naoko Saito; Nakamoto, Fumiko Kusunoki; Ichikawa, Yaeko; Nagashima, Yu; Terao, Yasuo; Shimizu, Jun; Hamada, Masashi; Uesaka, Yoshikazu; Oyama, Genko; Ogawa, Go; Yoshimura, Jun; Doi, Koichiro; Morishita, Shinichi; Tsuji, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To delineate molecular and clinical characteristics of 3 families with PRNP P105L mutation, a variant of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome whose main motor symptoms were parkinsonism and/or involuntary movements. Methods: The causative mutation was first determined in the affected patients of family 1 using whole-exome sequencing, and then mutational analysis was extended to families 2 and 3. The clinical features of the patients of these 3 families were summarized. Haplotype analysis was performed using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism array. Results: The whole-exome sequencing revealed that the heterozygous mutation c.314C>T (p.P105L) in PRNP was the only known pathogenic mutation shared by the 3 patients of the family with autosomal dominant parkinsonism. We further identified the same mutation in patients of the other 2 families with autosomal dominant parkinsonism and/or involuntary movements. The clinical features of our patients with PRNP P105L mutation included various motor symptoms such as parkinsonism and involuntary movements in addition to progressive dementia. The clinical features in part overlapped with those of other forms of inherited prion diseases, such as fatal familial insomnia and Huntington disease-like type 1. The patients with PRNP P105L mutation shared a haplotype spanning 7.1 Mb around PRNP, raising the possibility that the mutations in the patients originated from a common founder. Conclusion: Most of the patients presented with parkinsonism in addition to progressive dementia. Although spastic paraparesis has been emphasized as the main clinical feature, the clinical spectrum of patients with PRNP P105L is broader than expected. PMID:27066585

  4. Cognitive Rehabilitation of Dementia in Adults with Down Syndrome: A Review of Non-Pharmacological Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Luciana Mascarenhas; Navatta, Anna Carolina Rufino; Bottino, Cássio M.C.; Miotto, Eliane Correa

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a close genetic relationship between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down syndrome (DS), AD being the most severe mental disorder affecting ageing individuals with DS. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation interventions in DS patients with AD by means of a critical literature review. Summary Because AD is progressive and irreversible, treatment is aimed at delaying and reducing the cognitive and functional decline in order to preserve or improve quality of life. The effects that pharmacological treatments and cognitive interventions have on elderly individuals with AD are well documented. Recent clinical trials have investigated the use of pharmacological treatment in DS patients with AD, generating preliminary results that have been unfavourable. Key Messages There is a clear lack of studies addressing the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation interventions in DS patients with AD, and there is an urgent need for studies providing evidence to inform decisions regarding the appropriate choice of treatment strategies. PMID:26483832

  5. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... results in reduction of a critical neurotransmitter called dopamine, a chemical responsible for transmitting messages to parts ... that coordinate muscle movement. Parkinson's patients have less dopamine. Studies have shown that the symptoms of Parkinson's ...

  6. Depression associated with dementia.

    PubMed

    Gutzmann, H; Qazi, A

    2015-06-01

    Depression and cognitive disorders, including dementia and mild cognitive impairment, are common disorders in old age. Depression is frequent in dementia, causing distress, reducing the quality of life, exacerbating cognitive and functional impairment and increasing caregiver stress. Even mild levels of depression can significantly add to the functional impairment of dementia patients and the severity of psychopathological and neurological impairments increases with increasing severity of depression. Depressive symptoms may be both a risk factor for, as well as a prodrome of dementia. Major depressive syndrome of Alzheimer's disease may be among the most common mood disorders of older adults. Treating depression is therefore a key clinical priority to improve the quality of life both of people with dementia as well as their carergivers. Nonpharmacological approaches and watchful waiting should be attempted first in patients who present with mild to moderate depression and dementia. In cases of severe depression or depression not able to be managed through nonpharmacological means, antidepressant therapy should be considered. PMID:25962363

  7. Pisa Syndrome in Parkinson's Disease: Electromyographic Aspects and Implications for Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Balbi, Pietro; Gotti, Francesco; Maestri, Roberto; Sabetta, Annarita; Caremani, Luca; Gobbi, Laura; Capobianco, Marina; Bera, Rossana; Giladi, Nir; Ferrazzoli, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Pisa Syndrome (PS) is a real clinical enigma, and its management remains a challenge. In order to improve the knowledge about resting state and during maximal voluntary muscle contraction (MVMC) of the axial muscles, we described the electromyography results of paraspinal muscles, rectus abdominis, external oblique, and quadratus lumborum of both sides of 60 patients. Electromyography was assessed at rest, during MVMC while bending in the opposite direction of the PS and during MVMC while bending in the direction of the PS. The MVMC gave information about the interferential pattern (INT) or subinterferential pattern (sub-INT). We defined asymmetrical activation (AA) when a sub-INT was detected on the muscle on the side opposite to the PS bending and an INT of same muscle in the direction of PS bending. We observed significant AA during MVMC only in the external oblique muscles in 78% of the subjects. Our results of asymmetric ability to generate maximal voluntary force of the external oblique muscles support a central dissynchronisation of axial muscles as a significant contributor for the bending of the spine in erect position. These results could have important implication to physiotherapy and the use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of PS. PMID:26682083

  8. Alien Limb Syndrome Responsive to Amantadine in a Patient with Corticobasal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gondim, Francisco de Assis Aquino; Tavares Júnior, José Wagner Leonel; Morais, Arlindo A.; Sales, Paulo Marcelo Gondim; Wagner, Horta Goes

    2015-01-01

    Background Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder associated with parkinsonism and alien limb syndrome. Dressing and ideomotor apraxia were reportedly responsive to amantadine. Case Report A 79-year-old female was referred for evaluation of right hemiparesis. Neurological examination showed dementia, normal ocular movements, mild facial hypomimia, and bradykinesia with right hemiparesis. Nine years later, she developed alien limb syndrome and was diagnosed with CBS. After failure to respond to several medications, alien limb syndrome markedly improved with amantadine. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a consistent response of severe, forced dystonic alien limb syndrome to amantadine in a patient with CBS. PMID:26217545

  9. Treating senile dementia with traditional Chinese medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Han; Li, Lin; Tang, Xi Can

    2007-01-01

    Senile dementia is a syndrome in the elderly involving deficits in memory and cognition. There has been a long history of research and medical practice in dementia in China, during which the ancient Chinese people have formed a whole theory and accumulated abundant experience in the treatment of dementia. During recent decades, with new theories and technologies being digested and integrated, progress has been made in the medical and pharmacy research on senile dementia in China. In this review, we will focus on the traditional opinion, clinical practice, and recent progress in pharmacological research in China towards the treatment of dementia. We also discuss the potential trends of global convergence. PMID:18044136

  10. Mild behavioral impairment and risk of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Taragano, FE; Allegri, RF; Krupitzki, H; Sarasola, D; Serrano, CM; Loñ, L; Lyketsos, CG

    2009-01-01

    Background Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a transitional state between normal ageing and dementia, at least for some patients. Behavioral symptoms in MCI are associated with a higher risk of dementia, but their association with dementia risk in patients without MCI is unknown. Mild Behavioral Impairment (MBI) refers to a late life syndrome with prominent psychiatric and related behavioral symptoms in the absence of prominent cognitive symptoms, which may also be a dementia prodrome. Objective To compare MCI and MBI patients and to estimate the risk of dementia development in these two groups. Method A consecutive series of 358 patients (239 with MCI; and 119 with MBI) presenting to an outpatient general hospital specialty clinic were followed for up to 5 years until conversion to dementia or censoring. Results 34% of MCI patients and over 70% of patients with MBI developed dementia (Logrank p=0.011). MBI patients without cognitive symptoms were more likely to develop dementia (Logrank p<0.001). MBI patients were more likely to develop dementia due to frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) as opposed to Alzheimer’s dementia (AD). Conclusion MBI appears to be a transitional state between normal ageing and dementia. MBI (specifically those without cognitive symptoms) may confer a higher risk for dementia than MCI and is likely an FTD prodrome in many cases. These findings have implications for the early detection, prevention, and treatment of patients with dementia in late life, by focusing on the emergence of new behavioral symptoms. PMID:19323967

  11. Breakdown of cross-modal function in dementia.

    PubMed

    Freedman, M; Oscar-Berman, M

    1997-04-01

    To evaluate the possibility that specific language abnormalities in dementia are related to impaired cross-modal ability, the authors studied patients with Alzheimer's disease (which is characterized by a generalized language breakdown or aphasia) and patients with Parkinson's disease and dementia (a disorder associated more with selective deficits in naming than with aphasia). Both groups were initially equated for severity of dementia. Compared with nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease and age-equivalent healthy controls, patients with Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease with dementia showed significant deficits in cross-modal ability. Moreover, the cross-modal deficits were significantly associated with object-naming ability. Results support the concept that language capacity and cross-modal functions are interrelated. PMID:9150510

  12. Clinical varieties and epidemiological aspects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe: A new focus of ALS associated with Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Lannuzel, Annie; Mecharles, Sylvie; Tressières, Benoit; Demoly, Alice; Alhendi, Rabi; Hédreville-Tablon, Marie-Ange; Alecu, Cosmin

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe, using a retrospective study covering 15 years (1996-2011). Sixty-three cases of ALS were reported, with a frequency of 0.93/100,000/year. The incidence was 4.5-fold higher (3.73/100,00/year) on Marie-Galante, a small island in the Guadeloupe archipelago. ALS was associated with Parkinsonism in 23.8% of the cases. Other phenotypes were typical ALS (47.6%), bulbar forms (20.6%), limb-onset variants (6.3%) and ALS associated with frontotemporal dementia (1.6%). Onset of ALS-Parkinsonism was significantly later than in typical forms of ALS (68 vs. 54 years; p = 0.012) and affected males more frequently than did bulbar ALS (80% vs. 23.2%; p = 0.003). After one year of disease duration, the clinical profile of ALS-Parkinsonism included a symmetric akineto-rigid Parkinsonian syndrome unresponsive to levodopa, supranuclear oculomotor palsy (50%), dementia (66.7%) and signs of both lower (100%) and upper (86%) motor neuron involvement, including bulbar signs (100%). In conclusion, a new cluster of ALS-Parkinsonism and a geographical area with a high frequency of ALS were identified in Guadeloupe, suggesting that they result from environmental or genetic factors. Further studies are needed to explore these hypotheses.

  13. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Jeremy; Alty, Jane Elizabeth; Jamieson, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is a significant non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Longitudinal cohort studies have demonstrated that approximately 50% of those with PD develop dementia after 10 years, increasing to over 80% after 20 years. Deficits in cognition can be identified at the time of PD diagnosis in some patients and this mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) has been studied extensively over the last decade. Although PD-MCI is a risk factor for developing Parkinson's disease dementia there is evidence to suggest that PD-MCI might consist of distinct subtypes with different pathophysiologies and prognoses. The major pathological correlate of Parkinson's disease dementia is Lewy body deposition in the limbic system and neocortex although Alzheimer's related pathology is also an important contributor. Pathological damage causes alteration to neurotransmitter systems within the brain, producing behavioural change. Management of cognitive impairment in PD requires a multidisciplinary approach and accurate communication with patients and relatives is essential. PMID:25814509

  14. The neurobiology of the spinal cord in experimental parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Michela; Biagioni, Francesca; Vivacqua, Giorgio; Busceti, Carla Letizia; Bartalucci, Alessia; Soldani, Paola; D'Este, Loredana; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Fornai, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    The neurobiology of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals a number of unexpected areas which once were not recognized a priori as part of the neuropathology underlying PD. These areas may belong either to central nervous system or periphery. Among central areas major efforts in the last decade led to recognize a number of brain nuclei as part of the disease spreading or disease onset in PD patients. Unexpectedly recent evidence deriving from pathological studies in PD patients and corroborated by experimental models of PD provided clear evidence that the spinal cord is often recruited in PD pathology. Such an involvement is intriguing since the major degenerative disease of the spinal cord (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) features the involvement of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta, while some environmental (parkinsonism, ALS, and dementia of Guam) and genetic (Kufor-Rakeb syndrome) diseases are known to be characterized by mixed degeneration of pyramidal and extrapyramidal regions. Thus, the clear-cut between degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the loss of pyramidal motor system appears now more as a continuum of   degeneration which converge in abnormal activity and cell pathology of motor neurons as a final common pathway. Among motor neurons, visceral efferent cells of the spinal cord are involved and provide a robust neurobiological findings which may justify a variety of non-motor autonomic symptoms which characterize PD. Neurodegeneration in the spinal cord extends to the dorsal horn of the grey matter posing an intriguing link between PD and sensory alterations. The present manuscript reviews the involvement of multiple regions of the spinal cord in PD and experimental parkinsonism in the attempt to provide both a neurobiological background to understand non motor symptoms and to provide the anatomical basis for disease spreading. PMID:24873929

  15. Inter-Dependent Mechanisms Behind Cognitive Dysfunction, Vascular Biology and Alzheimer's Dementia in Down Syndrome: Multi-Faceted Roles of APP.

    PubMed

    Nizetic, Dean; Chen, Christopher L; Hong, Wanjin; Koo, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    People with Down syndrome (DS) virtually all develop intellectual disability (ID) of varying degree of severity, and also have a high risk of early Alzheimer's disease (AD). ID prior to the onset of dementia, and its relationship to the onset of dementia in DS is a complex phenomenon influenced by many factors, and scarcely understood. Unraveling the causative factors and modulators of these processes remains a challenge, with potential to be informative for both ID and AD, for the development of early biomarkers and/or therapeutic approaches. We review the potential relative and inter-connected roles of the chromosome 21 gene for amyloid precursor protein (APP), in both pathological conditions. Rare non-DS people with duplication of APP (dupAPP) get familial early onset AD (FEOAD) with virtually 100% penetrance and prominent cerebrovascular pathology, but don't suffer from ID before dementia onset. All of these features appear to be radically different in DS. On the other hand, rare individuals with partial trisomy 21 (T21) (with APP, but not DS-critical region in trisomy) have been described having ID. Likewise, partial T21 DS (without APP trisomy) show a range of ID, but no AD pathology. We review the multi-faceted roles of APP that might affect cognitive functioning. Given the fact that both Aβ secretion and synaptic maturation/plasticity are dependent on neuronal activity, we explore how this conflicting inter-dependency might affect cognitive pathogenesis in a dynamic way in DS, throughout the lifespan of an individual. PMID:26648852

  16. Inter-Dependent Mechanisms Behind Cognitive Dysfunction, Vascular Biology and Alzheimer's Dementia in Down Syndrome: Multi-Faceted Roles of APP

    PubMed Central

    Nizetic, Dean; Chen, Christopher L.; Hong, Wanjin; Koo, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    People with Down syndrome (DS) virtually all develop intellectual disability (ID) of varying degree of severity, and also have a high risk of early Alzheimer's disease (AD). ID prior to the onset of dementia, and its relationship to the onset of dementia in DS is a complex phenomenon influenced by many factors, and scarcely understood. Unraveling the causative factors and modulators of these processes remains a challenge, with potential to be informative for both ID and AD, for the development of early biomarkers and/or therapeutic approaches. We review the potential relative and inter-connected roles of the chromosome 21 gene for amyloid precursor protein (APP), in both pathological conditions. Rare non-DS people with duplication of APP (dupAPP) get familial early onset AD (FEOAD) with virtually 100% penetrance and prominent cerebrovascular pathology, but don't suffer from ID before dementia onset. All of these features appear to be radically different in DS. On the other hand, rare individuals with partial trisomy 21 (T21) (with APP, but not DS-critical region in trisomy) have been described having ID. Likewise, partial T21 DS (without APP trisomy) show a range of ID, but no AD pathology. We review the multi-faceted roles of APP that might affect cognitive functioning. Given the fact that both Aβ secretion and synaptic maturation/plasticity are dependent on neuronal activity, we explore how this conflicting inter-dependency might affect cognitive pathogenesis in a dynamic way in DS, throughout the lifespan of an individual. PMID:26648852

  17. Effects of Training on Controllability Attributions of Behavioural Excesses and Deficits Shown by Adults with Down Syndrome and Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsy, Sunny; Heath, Rebecca; Adams, Dawn; Oliver, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Background: Whereas there is a knowledge base on staff attributions of challenging behaviour, there has been little research on the effects of training, type of behaviour and biological context on staff attributions of controllability in the context of people with intellectual disabilities and dementia. Methods: A mixed design was used to…

  18. Perry syndrome due to the DCTN1 G71R mutation: a distinctive levodopa responsive disorder with behavioral syndrome, vertical gaze palsy, and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Newsway, Victoria; Fish, Mark; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Majounie, Elisa; Williams, Nigel; Hack, Melissa; Warren, Jason D; Morris, Huw R

    2010-04-30

    Perry syndrome is a rare form of autosomal dominant Parkinsonism with respiratory failure recently defined as being due to mutations in the DCTN1 gene. We describe a new family carrying a G71R mutation in the DCTN1 gene. The proband displayed a series of distinctive features not previously described in Perry syndrome: a disorder of vertical downward saccades accompanied by progressive midbrain atrophy, predominant nonmotor symptoms responsive to levodopa, distinctive craniocervical levodopa induced dyskinesias, and a good response to high-dose levodopa therapy and respiratory support. The family was initially thought to have autosomal dominant behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism. This report expands the clinical definition of this distinctive syndrome.

  19. Distinguishing Parkinson's disease from atypical parkinsonian syndromes using PET data and a computer system based on support vector machines and Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Fermín; Illán, Ignacio A; Górriz, Juan M; Ramírez, Javier; Rominger, Axel; Levin, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating between Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonian syndromes (APS) is still a challenge, specially at early stages when the patients show similar symptoms. During last years, several computer systems have been proposed in order to improve the diagnosis of PD, but their accuracy is still limited. In this work we demonstrate a full automatic computer system to assist the diagnosis of PD using (18)F-DMFP PET data. First, a few regions of interest are selected by means of a two-sample t-test. The accuracy of the selected regions to separate PD from APS patients is then computed using a support vector machine classifier. The accuracy values are finally used to train a Bayesian network that can be used to predict the class of new unseen data. This methodology was evaluated using a database with 87 neuroimages, achieving accuracy rates over 78%. A fair comparison with other similar approaches is also provided. PMID:26594165

  20. Distinguishing Parkinson's disease from atypical parkinsonian syndromes using PET data and a computer system based on support vector machines and Bayesian networks

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Fermín; Illán, Ignacio A.; Górriz, Juan M.; Ramírez, Javier; Rominger, Axel; Levin, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating between Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonian syndromes (APS) is still a challenge, specially at early stages when the patients show similar symptoms. During last years, several computer systems have been proposed in order to improve the diagnosis of PD, but their accuracy is still limited. In this work we demonstrate a full automatic computer system to assist the diagnosis of PD using 18F-DMFP PET data. First, a few regions of interest are selected by means of a two-sample t-test. The accuracy of the selected regions to separate PD from APS patients is then computed using a support vector machine classifier. The accuracy values are finally used to train a Bayesian network that can be used to predict the class of new unseen data. This methodology was evaluated using a database with 87 neuroimages, achieving accuracy rates over 78%. A fair comparison with other similar approaches is also provided. PMID:26594165

  1. Reversible dementias

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Manjari; Vibha, Deepti

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to the early diagnostic evaluation of patients with dementia which is essential to identify patients with cognitive symptoms who may have treatable conditions. Guidelines suggest that all patients presenting with dementia or cognitive symptoms should be evaluated with a range of laboratory tests, and with structural brain imaging with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While many of the disorders reported as ‘reversible dementias’ are conditions that may well be associated with cognitive or behavioral symptoms, these symptoms are not always sufficiently severe to fulfill the clinical criteria for dementia. Thus, while the etiology of a condition may be treatable it should not be assumed that the associated dementia is fully reversible. Potentially reversible dementias should be identified and treatment considered, even if the symptoms are not sufficiently severe to meet the clinical criteria for dementia, and even if partial or full reversal of the cognitive symptoms cannot be guaranteed. In the literature, the most frequently observed potentially reversible conditions identified in patients with cognitive impairment or dementia are depression, adverse effects of drugs, drug or alcohol abuse, space-occupying lesions, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and metabolic conditions land endocrinal conditions like hypothyroidism and nutritional conditions like vitamin B-12 deficiency. Depression is by far the most common of the potentially reversible conditions. The review, hence addresses the common causes of reversible dementia and the studies published so far. PMID:21416018

  2. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Somaiya, Mansi; Kumar, Santhosh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is essentially characterized by the motor symptoms in the form of resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, over the years it has been recognized that motor symptoms are just the “tip of the iceberg” of clinical manifestations of PD. Besides motor symptoms, PD characterized by many non-motor symptoms, which include cognitive decline, psychiatric disturbances (depression, psychosis and impulse control), sleep difficulties, autonomic failures (gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, urinary, thermoregulation) and pain syndrome. This review evaluates the various aspects of psychiatric disorders including cognitive decline and sleep disturbances in patients with PD. The prevalence rate of various psychiatric disorders is high in patients with PD. In terms of risk factors, various demographic, clinical and treatment-related variables have been shown to be associated with higher risk of development of psychiatric morbidity. Evidence also suggests that the presence of psychiatric morbidity is associated with poorer outcome. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD are meager. Available evidence suggests that tricyclic antidepressants like desipramine and nortriptyline are efficacious for management of depression. Among the antipsychotics, clozapine is considered to be the best choice for management of psychosis in patients with PD. Among the various cognitive enhancers, evidence suggest efficacy of rivastigmine in management of dementia in patients with PD. To conclude, this review suggests that psychiatric morbidity is highly prevalent in patients with PD. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach must be followed to improve the overall outcome of PD. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of various other measures for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD. PMID:25552854

  3. Managing dysphagia in older people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Gaye

    2011-01-01

    In the UK there is an increasing ageing population, bringing with it a host of degenerative conditions such as dementia. Dementia is a common condition among older people. In the UK there are estimated to be over 750 000 people with dementia and numbers are expected to double in the next 30 years (Comas-Herrera et al, 2007). The term 'dementia' is used to describe a syndrome which may be caused by a number of illnesses and is associated with ongoing decline of the brain and its abilities. There are many types of dementia, the most common are Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies. The most common form of dementia is Alzheimer's which accounts for 62% of all cases. Vascular dementia either alone or co-existent with Alzheimer's, is the second most common subtype of dementia (Knapp et al, 2007). Dementia is associated with complex needs especially in the later stages, and can have a devastating effect on the individual, their family and friends. The care needs often challenge the skills and capacity of carers especially when normal every-day activities decline. Food and drink are fundamental to living. Consequently observing individuals struggling with eating and drinking not only poses difficulties for professionals but also raises emotional issues for the individual and their family.

  4. The development of the dementia concept in 19th century.

    PubMed

    Caixeta, Leonardo; Costa, Jean Newton Lima; Vilela, Ana Caroline Marques; Nóbrega, Magno da

    2014-07-01

    The dementia concept has been reformulated through its history and the 19th century was remarkable in the construction of this concept as we understand it today. Like other syndromes, much of the history of the dementia concept comes from the attempt to separate it from other nosological conditions, giving it a unique identity. The fundamental elements for the arising of the dementia modern concept were: a) correlation of the observed syndrome with organic-cerebral lesions; b) understanding of the irreversibility of the dementia evolution; c) its relation with human ageing; and d) the choice of the cognitive dysfunction as a clinical marker of the dementia concept.

  5. [Clinical concept of alcoholic dementia].

    PubMed

    Kato, N

    1991-06-01

    Intellectual deterioration, changing in behavior and affect are often seen in association with long continued and heavy alcohol ingestion and such deteriorated states of patients are called alcoholic dementia. A large number of investigators have attempted to designate clinical concept of alcoholic dementia throughout the centuries and many kinds of term like as alcoholic pseudo-paralysis, alcoholic mental deficiency and alcoholic deterioration, etc, have been submitted since the beginning of 19th century. Numerous psychometric studies have indicated cognitive impairment and memory disturbance in chronic alcohol abusers and moreover brain PEG and CT-scan studies have shown sulcal widening and enlarged ventricles to be common in alcoholics. However, alcoholic dementia is hard to classify as a distinct disorder caused by alcoholic ingestion. The reason is lack of specific findings, both clinical and histopathological, like as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and other nutritional disorders in alcoholics. Victor, M. describes in his work the majority of patients who have come to autopsy with the clinical diagnosis of primary alcoholic dementia have shown the lesions of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and he postulates alcoholic dementia is heavily contaminated with burned-out Wernicke-Korsakoff disease. The clinical and pathological observations presented by this time represent alcoholic dementia is a residual category for cases in which there are severe impairment of intelligence with marked deterioration of personality following prolonged and heavy drinking.

  6. Stereotypic behaviors in degenerative dementias.

    PubMed

    Prioni, S; Fetoni, V; Barocco, F; Redaelli, V; Falcone, C; Soliveri, P; Tagliavini, F; Scaglioni, A; Caffarra, P; Concari, L; Gardini, S; Girotti, F

    2012-11-01

    Stereotypies are simple or complex involuntary/unvoluntary behaviors, common in fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), but not studied in other types of degenerative dementias. The aim was to investigate stereotypy frequency and type in patients with FTD, Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) in a multicenter observational study; and to investigate the relation of stereotypies to cognitive, behavioral and motor impairment. One hundred fifty-five consecutive outpatients (45 AD, 40 FTD, 35 PSP and 35 PDD) were studied in four hospitals in northern Italy. Stereotypies were examined by the five-domain Stereotypy Rating Inventory. Cognition was examined by the Mini Mental State and Frontal Assessment Battery, neuropsychiatric symptoms by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and motor impairment and invalidity by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III, and activities of daily living. Stereotypies were present in all groups. FTD and PDD had the greatest frequency of one-domain stereotypies; FTD also had the greatest frequency of two-or-more domain stereotypies; movement stereotypies were the most common stereotypies in all groups. AD patients had fewer stereotypies than the other groups. Stereotypies are not exclusive to FTD, but are also fairly common in PSP and PDD, though less so in AD. Stereotypies may be underpinned by dysfunctional striato-frontal circuits, known to be damaged in PSP and PDD, as well as FTD.

  7. Semantic dementia: aspects of the early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Belliard, S; Merck, C; Jonin, P Y; Vérin, M

    2013-10-01

    Semantic dementia is a lobar atrophy syndrome, related to a degeneration of anterior temporal regions, and characterized by a very predominant impairment of semantic memory. Whereas the diagnosis is relatively easy to establish in the typical form and if the patient is seen early, the emergence of possible additional cognitive or psycho-behavioural disorders can lead to a misdiagnosis in favour of a frontotemporal dementia syndrome or even probable Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Vascular dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... to dementia. Risk factors for VaD include: Diabetes Hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) High blood pressure ( hypertension ) ... Control conditions that increase the risk of hardening of the ... saturated fats and salt in the diet Treating related disorders

  9. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from the first ... disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive assessments followed by ...

  10. A Comparison of the Behavioural and Emotional Characteristics of Alzheimer's Dementia in Individuals with and without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Valerie; Konstantareas, M. Mary

    2005-01-01

    The behavioural and emotional changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are compared for individuals with Down syndrome and AD and individuals with AD from the general population (AD-only). The primary caregivers of 30 people with Down syndrome and AD and 30 people with AD-only completed the BEHAVE-AD and the Apathy subscale of the CERAD.…

  11. An update on brain imaging in parkinsonian dementia

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Myria; Kotagal, Vikas; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances of cognition are frequent in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Unlike severe loss of dopamine early in PD, extensive cholinergic losses have been consistently reported in PD with dementia. Cholinergic imaging suggests that basal forebrain cholinergic system degeneration appears early in PD and worsens with dementia development. Cortical cholinergic denervation is similar in PD with dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, supporting a common disease spectrum, at least with respect to cholinergic pathology. Presence of cerebral amyloidopathy in the setting of parkinsonism may accelerate cognitive decline. Novel MRI techniques illustrate the widespread presence of neurodegeneration in PD with dementia, affecting white matter tracts and connectivity functions. This review will outline current concepts regarding dementia development in PD and discuss their correlation with functional and structural neuroimaging including PET and MRI. PMID:22768021

  12. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells make and use a brain chemical called dopamine (say: DOH-puh-meen) to send messages to ... coordinate body movements. When someone has Parkinson's disease, dopamine levels are low. So, the body doesn't ...

  14. The use of body surface potential map for identifying sites of accessory pathway in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Y Z; Hsu, K L; Chiang, F T; Lo, H M; Tseng, C D; Lin, J L

    1998-07-01

    The body surface potential map (BSPM) may reflect regional myocardial electrical activity. This technique can thus provide information regarding the excitation of ventricles. This study is an attempt to evaluate the usefulness of BSPM in determining the sites of the atrioventricular (AV) accessory pathway (AP) in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (W-P-W) syndrome. The BSPMs were obtained from 40 consecutive patients with W-P-W syndrome in a fasting state, using the heart potential map system designed by Toyama et al. Unipolar electrocardiograms were recorded simultaneously from 87 lead points on the chest surface, including 59 lead points on the anterior chest and 28 on the back. Wilson's central terminal was used as a voltage reference and BSPMs in an isopotential distribution pattern were made every millisecond throughout ventricular activation from these unipolar ECGs with the use of a microcomputer system. All patients underwent an electrophysiologic study (EPS) at cardiac catheterization. We analyzed the potential distribution during ventricular depolarization and compared the results between EPS and BSPM findings. The following results were obtained: (1) seven types of BSPM pattern were identified in accordance with the sites of the AV AP confirmed by EPS; (2) the location of the potential minimum of ventricular depolarization and the direction of the excitation wavefront during early ventricular depolarization, the reversal pattern of ventricular potential distribution, the epicardial right ventricular breakthrough and the dynamic change of ventricular potential distribution were useful for the detection of the ventricular pre-excitation site; (3) epicardial right ventricular breakthrough occurred in nearly all patients with left ventricular free wall accessory AV connections; (4) the abnormal early reversal pattern of ventricular potential distribution did not occur in patients with left ventricular AV connections but did appear in most patients with

  15. Evaluation of Screening Tools for Dementia in Older Adults with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Jennifer; Aman, Michael; Kelbley, Thomas; Wallace, Cheryl LeClear; Burt, Diana B.; Primeaux-Hart, Sharon; Loveland, Katherine; Thorpe, Lilian; Bogos, Eleanor S.; Timon, John; Patti, Paul; Tsiouris, John

    2004-01-01

    We compared groups with and without diagnosed dementia matched on IQ, age, and presence of Down syndrome. The Dementia Scale for Down Syndrome and Dementia Questionnaire for Mentally Retarded Persons were used to assess participants. We developed two performance tasks to determine whether they were useful in separating subjects with and without…

  16. Dementia after DBS Surgery: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rektorova, I.; Hummelova, Z.; Balaz, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the case history of a 75-year-old woman with Parkinson's disease who developed severe cognitive problems after deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the bilateral subthalamic nuclei (STN). After a brief cognitive improvement, the patient gradually deteriorated until she developed full-blown dementia. We discuss the case with respect to the cognitive effects of STN DBS and the possible risk factors of dementia after STN DBS surgery. PMID:22191066

  17. Neuropsychiatric Issues in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Jeffrey W; Stacy, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in Parkinson's Disease and may surpass motor symptoms as the major factors impacting patient quality of life. The symptoms may be broadly separated into those associated with the disease process and those that represent adverse effects of treatment. Symptoms attributed to the disease arise from pathologic changes within multiple brain regions and are not restricted to dysfunction in the dopaminergic system. Mood symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and apathy are common and may precede the development of motor symptoms by years, while other neuropsychiatric symptoms such as cognitive impairment, dementia, and psychosis are more common in later stages of the disease. Neuropsychiatric symptoms attributed to treatment include impulse control disorders, pathologic use of dopaminergic medications, and psychosis. This manuscript will review the current understanding of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's Disease. PMID:27048443

  18. Sleepiness in Idiopathic REM Sleep Behavior Disorder and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnulf, Isabelle; Neutel, Dulce; Herlin, Bastien; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Cochen de Cock, Valérie; Vidailhet, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether patients with idiopathic and symptomatic RBD were sleepier than controls, and if sleepiness in idiopathic RBD predicted earlier conversion to Parkinson disease. Methods: The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and its determinants were compared at the time of a video-polysomnography for an RBD diagnosis in patients with idiopathic RBD, in patients with Parkinson disease, and in controls. Whether sleepiness at time of RBD diagnosis predicted an earlier conversion to neurodegenerative diseases was retrospectively analyzed in the followed-up patients. Results: The 75 patients with idiopathic RBD were sleepier (ESS: 7.8 ± 4.6) at the time of RBD diagnosis than 74 age- and sex-matched controls (ESS: 5.0 ± 3.6, P < 0.0001). They reached the levels of 114 patients with Parkinson disease (ESS: 8.7 ± 4.8), whether they had (n = 78) or did not have (n = 36) concomitant RBD. The severity of sleepiness in idiopathic RBD correlated with younger age, but not with sleep measures. Among the 69 patients with idiopathic RBD who were followed up for a median 3 years (1–15 years), 16 (23.2%) developed parkinsonism (n = 6), dementia (n = 6), dementia plus parkinsonism (n = 2), and multiple system atrophy (n = 2). An ESS greater than 8 at time of RBD diagnosis predicted a shorter time to phenoconversion to parkinsonism and dementia, from RBD onset, and from RBD diagnosis (when adjusted for age and time between RBD onset and diagnosis). Conclusions: Sleepiness is associated with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder and predicts more rapid conversion to parkinsonism and dementia, suggesting it is an early marker of neuronal loss in brainstem arousal systems. Citation: Arnulf I, Neutel D, Herlin B, Golmard JL, Leu-Semenescu S, Cochen de Cock V, Vidailhet M. Sleepiness in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder and Parkinson disease. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1529–1535. PMID:26085299

  19. Flavonoids and dementia: an update.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I E; Daglia, M; Nabavi, S F; Loizzo, M R; Sobarzo-Sánchez, E; Nabavi, S M

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a strongly age-related syndrome due to cognitive decline that can be considered a typical example of the combination of physiological and pathological aging-associated changes occurring in old people; it ranges from intact cognition to mild cognitive impairment, which is an intermediate stage of cognitive deterioration, and dementia. The spread of this syndrome has induced to study and try to reduce dementia modifiable risk factors. They include insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, depression, cognitive inactivity or low educational attainment as well as physical inactivity and incorrect diet, which can be considered one of the most important factors. One emerging strategy to decrease the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment and dementia may be the use of nutritional interventions. In the last decade, prospective data have suggested that high fruit and vegetable intakes are related to improved cognitive functions and reduced risks of developing a neurodegenerative process. The protective effects against neurodegeneration could be in part due to the intake of flavonoids that have been associated with several health benefits such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, increased neuronal signaling, and improved metabolic functions. The present article is aimed at reviewing scientific studies that show the protective effects of flavonoid intake against mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

  20. Baseline and longitudinal grey matter changes in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: ICICLE-PD study.

    PubMed

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; Firbank, Michael J; Lawson, Rachael A; Yarnall, Alison J; Duncan, Gordon W; Owen, Adrian M; Khoo, Tien K; Brooks, David J; Rowe, James B; Barker, Roger A; Burn, David J; O'Brien, John T

    2015-10-01

    Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease is associated with progression to dementia (Parkinson's disease dementia) in a majority of patients. Determining structural imaging biomarkers associated with prodromal Parkinson's disease dementia may allow for the earlier identification of those at risk, and allow for targeted disease modifying therapies. One hundred and five non-demented subjects with newly diagnosed idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 37 healthy matched controls had serial 3 T structural magnetic resonance imaging scans with clinical and neuropsychological assessments at baseline, which were repeated after 18 months. The Movement Disorder Society Task Force criteria were used to classify the Parkinson's disease subjects into Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment (n = 39) and Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment (n = 66). Freesurfer image processing software was used to measure cortical thickness and subcortical volumes at baseline and follow-up. We compared regional percentage change of cortical thinning and subcortical atrophy over 18 months. At baseline, cases with Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment demonstrated widespread cortical thinning relative to controls and atrophy of the nucleus accumbens compared to both controls and subjects with Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment. Regional cortical thickness at baseline was correlated with global cognition in the combined Parkinson's disease cohort. Over 18 months, patients with Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment demonstrated more severe cortical thinning in frontal and temporo-parietal cortices, including hippocampal atrophy, relative to those with Parkinson's disease and no cognitive impairment and healthy controls, whereas subjects with Parkinson's disease and no cognitive impairment showed more severe frontal cortical thinning compared to healthy controls. At baseline, Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment

  1. Long-Term Impact of Parental Well-Being on Adult Outcomes and Dementia Status in Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esbensen, Anna J.; Mailick, Marsha R.; Silverman, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Parental characteristics were significant predictors of health, functional abilities, and behavior problems in adults with Down syndrome ("n" ?=? 75) over a 22-year time span, controlling for initial levels and earlier changes in these outcomes. Lower levels of behavior problems were predicted by improvements in maternal depressive…

  2. Hitler's parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Lillian B; Bonney, Phillip A; Smitherman, Adam D; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Of the multitude of medical and psychiatric conditions ascribed to Hitler both in his lifetime and since his suicide in April 1945, few are more substantiated than parkinsonism. While the timeline of the development of this condition, as well as its etiology, are debated, there is clear evidence for classic manifestations of the disease, most prominently a resting tremor but also stooped posture, bradykinesia, micrographia, and masked facial expressions, with progression steadily seen over his final years. Though ultimately speculation, some have suggested that Hitler suffered from progressive cognitive and mood disturbances, possibly due to parkinsonism, that affected the course of events in the war. Here, the authors discuss Hitler's parkinsonism in the context of the Third Reich and its eventual destruction, maintaining that ultimately his disease had little effect on the end result. PMID:26126407

  3. Hitler's parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Lillian B; Bonney, Phillip A; Smitherman, Adam D; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Of the multitude of medical and psychiatric conditions ascribed to Hitler both in his lifetime and since his suicide in April 1945, few are more substantiated than parkinsonism. While the timeline of the development of this condition, as well as its etiology, are debated, there is clear evidence for classic manifestations of the disease, most prominently a resting tremor but also stooped posture, bradykinesia, micrographia, and masked facial expressions, with progression steadily seen over his final years. Though ultimately speculation, some have suggested that Hitler suffered from progressive cognitive and mood disturbances, possibly due to parkinsonism, that affected the course of events in the war. Here, the authors discuss Hitler's parkinsonism in the context of the Third Reich and its eventual destruction, maintaining that ultimately his disease had little effect on the end result.

  4. [Vascular dementia].

    PubMed

    Peters, N; Dichgans, M

    2010-10-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) constitutes the second most frequent cause of dementia following Alzheimer's disease (AD). In contrast to AD, VaD encompasses a variety of conditions and dementia mechanisms including multiple and strategic infarcts, widespread white matter lesions and hemorrhages. The diagnosis of VaD is based on the patient history, the clinical evaluation and neuroimaging. Treatment of VaD should account for the underlying vascular condition and is directed towards the control of vascular risk factors and stroke prevention. The need for early diagnosis and preventive treatment has promoted the concept of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Harmonization standards for the description and study of VCI have recently been published. A common and distinct subtype of VaD is subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) which is related to cerebral small vessel disease. SIVD is clinically characterized by impairment of executive functions and processing speed with relatively preserved memory. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic variant of SIVD, represents an important differential diagnosis and may serve as a model of SIVD.

  5. Sleep, Cognition and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Porter, Verna R; Buxton, William G; Avidan, Alon Y

    2015-12-01

    The older patient population is growing rapidly around the world and in the USA. Almost half of seniors over age 65 who live at home are dissatisfied with their sleep, and nearly two-thirds of those residing in nursing home facilities suffer from sleep disorders. Chronic and pervasive sleep complaints and disturbances are frequently associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and may result in impaired cognition, diminished intellect, poor memory, confusion, and psychomotor retardation all of which may be misinterpreted as dementia. The key sleep disorders impacting patients with dementia include insomnia, hypersomnolence, circadian rhythm misalignment, sleep disordered breathing, motor disturbances of sleep such as periodic leg movement disorder of sleep and restless leg syndrome, and parasomnias, mostly in the form of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is a pre-clinical marker for a class of neurodegenerative diseases, the "synucleinopathies", and requires formal polysomnographic evaluation. Untreated sleep disorders may exacerbate cognitive and behavioral symptoms in patients with dementia and are a source of considerable stress for bed partners and family members. When left untreated, sleep disturbances may also increase the risk of injury at night, compromise health-related quality of life, and precipitate and accelerate social and economic burdens for caregivers. PMID:26478197

  6. Sleep, Cognition and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Porter, Verna R; Buxton, William G; Avidan, Alon Y

    2015-12-01

    The older patient population is growing rapidly around the world and in the USA. Almost half of seniors over age 65 who live at home are dissatisfied with their sleep, and nearly two-thirds of those residing in nursing home facilities suffer from sleep disorders. Chronic and pervasive sleep complaints and disturbances are frequently associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and may result in impaired cognition, diminished intellect, poor memory, confusion, and psychomotor retardation all of which may be misinterpreted as dementia. The key sleep disorders impacting patients with dementia include insomnia, hypersomnolence, circadian rhythm misalignment, sleep disordered breathing, motor disturbances of sleep such as periodic leg movement disorder of sleep and restless leg syndrome, and parasomnias, mostly in the form of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is a pre-clinical marker for a class of neurodegenerative diseases, the "synucleinopathies", and requires formal polysomnographic evaluation. Untreated sleep disorders may exacerbate cognitive and behavioral symptoms in patients with dementia and are a source of considerable stress for bed partners and family members. When left untreated, sleep disturbances may also increase the risk of injury at night, compromise health-related quality of life, and precipitate and accelerate social and economic burdens for caregivers.

  7. Identifying Fallers among Home Care Clients with Dementia and Parkinson’s Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Symron; Hirdes, John P.; Maxwell, Colleen J.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Giangregorio, Lora M.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have focused on falls among home care (HC) clients with neurological conditions. This study identified factors that increase risk of falling among HC clients with no recent history of falls, and explored whether risk profiles varied among those with dementia or parkinsonism compared to those without selected neurological conditions. A retrospective cohort design was used and analysis of data from community-based HC clients across Ontario was conducted on a sample of ambulatory clients with dementia, parkinsonism, or none of the selected neurological conditions. Data were obtained from the Resident Assessment Instrument for HC (RAI-HC) assessment. The outcome used in multivariable analyses was whether clients fell during follow-up. Unsteady gait was a strong predictor of falls across all three groups. Co-morbid parkinsonism most strongly predicted falls in the dementia group. Clients with borderline intact to mild cognitive impairment had higher odds of falling within the parkinsonism and comparison groups. PMID:27426223

  8. The ALS/PDC syndrome of Guam: potential biomarkers for an enigmatic disorder.

    PubMed

    McGeer, Patrick L; Steele, John C

    2011-12-01

    The ALS/parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam is a long latency disease with a diverse phenotypic expression characteristic of classical ALS, parkinsonism and dementia. It is remarkably similar to a syndrome localized to the Kii Peninsula of Japan. There are as yet no identified pathological features that will clearly distinguish the Guam or Kii ALS/PDC syndrome from other degenerative neurological disorders. At present, ALS/PDC of Guam and the Kii Peninsula can be confirmed only by postmortem examination. The most prominent pathological hallmark is the widespread occurrence of neurofibrillary tangles which express the same balance of 3R and 4R tau that is found in Alzheimer disease. They both show an increased prevalence of a peculiar retinal disorder termed linear retinal pigmentary epitheliopathy. The disorders are both highly familial. Several environmental factors have been proposed but no supportive evidence for an environmental or dietary factor has been found. Genome searches have so far failed to identify causative genes although two single nuclear polymorphisms related to MAPT that increase the risk of the Guam syndrome have been located. The two syndromes are clearly unique, and clues as to their causation could be beneficial in understanding the etiology of similar, but much more prevalent disorders in North America, Europe and Asia. Identification of biomarkers for premortem diagnosis would be helpful in management as well as in revealing the true etiology.

  9. Vascular parkinsonism--characteristics, pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson disease is a primary degenerative disease of the brain, but parkinsonism can also result from a variety of vascular disorders. Vascular parkinsonism (VP) most frequently presents as lower body parkinsonism, a condition that is accompanied by the development of white matter lesions (WMLs) and lacunes in the brain. Patients with lower body parkinsonism exhibit gait impairment and go on to develop urinary incontinence, abnormal pyramidal responses and cognitive decline. However, WMLs and lacunes are also common observations among elderly individuals who do not have parkinsonism, which causes difficulty in determining the pathogenetic mechanisms that lead to VP. In addition, imaging studies suggest that many pathological and clinical features are common to VP and Binswanger disease, a type of small vessel vascular dementia. This Review summarizes current understanding of the clinical characteristics of VP, as well as knowledge gained from neuroimaging and nuclear imaging of the pathological features of VP. The lack of current treatment options, and the emergence of new therapies such as cerebrospinal fluid drainage, are also discussed. Finally, consideration is given to whether the overlap between VP and Binswanger disease means that these two disorders should be considered as part of the same disease entity. PMID:25917706

  10. A case of Parkinson's disease following dystonia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Chiharu; Takei, Takanobu; Uozumi, Takenori; Toyota, Tomoko; Yuhi, Tomoaki; Adachi, Hiroaki

    2016-09-29

    Parkinsonism and dystonia are both disorders of the extrapyramidal motor system, and some patients exhibit a complex of the two symptoms. Although several reports have referred to the coexistence of these disorders as parkinsonian disorders with dystonia, in the majority of cases, dystonia appeared after parkinsonism. DAT-scan is useful for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other types of parkinsonism such as dementia with Lewy bodies. This case report describes a 67-year old woman diagnosed with axial dystonia without parkinsonism 6 years previously, which had worsened despite treatment with Botulinum toxin injections, and hindered the patient's gait. The patient visited the hospital because of gait disturbances and DAT-scan showed a levodopa transducer decrease in the putamen. A few weeks later, she was re-admitted to hospital and exhibited Parkinsonism. Levodopa improved the gait disturbances but axial dystonia was unchanged, and a clinical diagnosis of PD was made. In the authors' opinion, this was a rare case of parkinsonian disorders with dystonia, characterized by the development of PD after dystonia. DAT-scan may be helpful for the diagnosis of patients with parkinsonian disorders with dystonia. PMID:27498816

  11. Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Share Plus on Google Plus Alzheimer's & Dementia alz.org | IHaveAlz Overview What Is Dementia ... chapter Join our online community Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease As they age, those affected by Down ...

  12. Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Terzakis, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects one million people in the United States. This article reviews the etiology and pathophysiology of PD, risk factors, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of this common disease. Implications for home care clinicians are included.

  13. Viral Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Haeman; Boltz, David A.; Webster, Robert G.; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a debilitating neurological disorder characterized that affects 1-2% of the adult population over 55 years of age. For the vast majority of cases, the etiology of this disorder is unknown, although it is generally accepted that there is a genetic susceptibility to any number of environmental agents. One such agent may be viruses. It has been shown that numerous viruses can enter the nervous system, i.e. they are neurotropic, and induce a number of encephalopathies. One of the secondary consequences of these encephalopathies can be parkinsonism, that is both transient as well as permanent. One of the most highlighted and controversial cases of viral parkinsonism is that which followed the 1918 influenza outbreak and the subsequent induction of von Economo's encephalopathy. In this review, we discuss the neurological sequelae of infection by influenza virus as well as that of other viruses known to induce parkinsonism including Coxsackie, Japanese encephalitis B, St. Louis, West Nile and HIV viruses. PMID:18760350

  14. Types of Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Dementia Types of Dementia Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies Down ... Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher Study Name 2015 Jesse Mez ...

  15. What to Ask: Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... What to Ask: Dementia Tools and Tips The memory loss and other changes seen in dementia can ... can ask your healthcare proffesional about dementia. Is memory loss a normal part of aging? If so, ...

  16. Progression of Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want ... out daily activities, and treatment complications. Severity of Parkinson's Below are some descriptions of mild, moderate and ...

  17. Sleep alterations in an environmental neurotoxin-induced model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Kimberly A; Hadjimarkou, Maria M; Viechweg, Shaun; Rose, Avigail E; Clark, Sarah M; Yarowsky, Paul J; Mong, Jessica A

    2010-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is classically defined as a motor disorder resulting from decreased dopamine production in the basal ganglia circuit. In an attempt to better diagnose and treat PD before the onset of severe motor dysfunction, recent attention has focused on the early, non-motor symptoms, which include but are not limited to sleep disorders such as excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and REM behavioral disorder (RBD). However, few animal models have been able to replicate both the motor and non-motor symptoms of PD. Here, we present a progressive rat model of parkinsonism that displays disturbances in sleep/wake patterns. Epidemiological studies elucidated a link between the Guamanian variant of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC) and the consumption of flour made from the washed seeds of the plant Cycas micronesica (cycad). Our study examined the effects of prolonged cycad consumption on sleep/wake activity in male, Sprague-Dawley rats. Cycad-fed rats exhibited an increase in length and/or number of bouts of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and Non-REM (NREM) sleep at the expense of wakefulness during the active period when compared to control rats. This hypersomnolent behavior suggests an inability to maintain arousal. In addition, cycad-fed rats had significantly fewer orexin cells in the hypothalamus. Our results reveal a novel rodent model of parkinsonism that includes an EDS-like syndrome that may be associated with a dysregulation of orexin neurons. Further characterization of this early, non-motor symptom, may provide potential therapeutic interventions in the treatment of PD.

  18. The frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease continuum.

    PubMed

    Burrell, James R; Halliday, Glenda M; Kril, Jillian J; Ittner, Lars M; Götz, Jürgen; Kiernan, Matthew C; Hodges, John R

    2016-08-27

    Early reports of cognitive and behavioural deficits in motor neuron disease might have been overlooked initially, but the concept of a frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease continuum has emerged during the past decade. Frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease is now recognised as an important dementia syndrome, which presents substantial challenges for diagnosis and management. Frontotemporal dementia, motor neuron disease, and frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease are characterised by overlapping patterns of TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) pathology, while the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) repeat expansion is common across the disease spectrum. Indeed, the C9orf72 repeat expansion provides important clues to disease pathogenesis and suggests potential therapeutic targets. Variable diagnostic criteria identify motor, cognitive, and behavioural deficits, but further refinement is needed to define the clinical syndromes encountered in frontotemporal dementia-motor neuron disease. PMID:26987909

  19. Assignment of the dystonia-parkinsonism syndrome locus, DYT3, to a small region within a 1.8-Mb YAC contig of Xq13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Haberhausen, G.; Schmitt, I.; Koehler, A.

    1995-09-01

    A YAC contig was constructed of Xq13.1 in order to sublocalize the X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP) syndrome locus, DYT3. The contig spans a region of {approximately}1.8 Mb and includes loci DXS453/DXS348/IL2R{gamma}/GJB1/CCG1/DXS559. For the construction of the contig, nine sequence-tagged sites and four short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) were isolated. The STRPs, designated as 4704 No. 6 (DXS7113), 4704 No. 7 (DXS7114), 67601 (DXS7117), and B4Pst (DXS7119) were assigned to a region flanked by DXS348 proximally and by DXS559 distally. Their order was DXS348/4704 No. 6/4704 No. 7/67601/B4Pst/DXS559. They were applied to the analysis of allelic association and of haplotypes in 47 not-obviously-related XDP patients and in 105 Filipino male controls. The same haplotype was found at loci 67601 (DXS7117) and B4Pst (DXS7119) in 42 of 47 patients. This percentage of common haplotypes decreased at the adjacent loci. The findings, together with the previous demonstration of DXS559 being the distal flanking marker of DYT3, assign the disease locus to a small region in Xq13.1 defined by loci 67601 (DXS7117) and B4Pst (DXS7119). The location of DYT3 was born out by the application of a newly developed likelihood method for the analysis of linkage disequilibrium. 28 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  20. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    PubMed Central

    Grand, Jacob HG; Caspar, Sienna; MacDonald, Stuart WS

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer’s disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by

  1. [The other dementias: the neuropathology of the non-Alzheimer's disease dementias].

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R L

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common causes of dementia, but requires neuropathological verification for a definitive diagnosis because there are a number of other neurodegenerative diseases that may present with dementia. Some of these disorders have considerable overlap both clinically and pathologically with AD, while others have distinct clinical and pathological profiles. Vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) have the greatest overlap with AD and considerable controversy still surrounds the exact contribution of the non AD pathology to the dementia syndrome. The frontotemporal dementias are loosely united by clinical presentation, but are pathologically heterogeneous and include Pick's disease, dementia lacking distinctive histopathology, motor neuron disease inclusion dementia and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). CBD can be difficult to distinguish from progressive supranuclear palsy, especially when the latter lacks the distinctive gaze palsy. Finally, Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (CJD) may be difficult to distinguish from AD when the symptoms progress at an atypically slow pace. Recently, a new variant of CJD (vCJD) that has been linked to bovine spongiform encephalopathy ('mad cow' disease) has heightened awareness of these prion protein disorders. The neuropathological criteria for the diagnosis of these non AD dementia disorders will be reviewed. PMID:12938072

  2. Dementias show differential physiological responses to salient sounds

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Phillip D.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Downey, Laura E.; Golden, Hannah L.; Agustus, Jennifer L.; Clark, Camilla N.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal responsiveness to salient sensory signals is often a prominent feature of dementia diseases, particularly the frontotemporal lobar degenerations, but has been little studied. Here we assessed processing of one important class of salient signals, looming sounds, in canonical dementia syndromes. We manipulated tones using intensity cues to create percepts of salient approaching (“looming”) or less salient withdrawing sounds. Pupil dilatation responses and behavioral rating responses to these stimuli were compared in patients fulfilling consensus criteria for dementia syndromes (semantic dementia, n = 10; behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, n = 16, progressive nonfluent aphasia, n = 12; amnestic Alzheimer's disease, n = 10) and a cohort of 26 healthy age-matched individuals. Approaching sounds were rated as more salient than withdrawing sounds by healthy older individuals but this behavioral response to salience did not differentiate healthy individuals from patients with dementia syndromes. Pupil responses to approaching sounds were greater than responses to withdrawing sounds in healthy older individuals and in patients with semantic dementia: this differential pupil response was reduced in patients with progressive nonfluent aphasia and Alzheimer's disease relative both to the healthy control and semantic dementia groups, and did not correlate with nonverbal auditory semantic function. Autonomic responses to auditory salience are differentially affected by dementias and may constitute a novel biomarker of these diseases. PMID:25859194

  3. Incidence of Dementia in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strydom, Andre; Chan, Trevor; King, Michael; Hassiotis, Angela; Livingston, Gill

    2013-01-01

    Dementia may be more common in older adults with intellectual disability (ID) than in the general population. The increased risk for Alzheimer's disease in people with Down syndrome (DS) is well established, but much less is known about dementia in adults with ID who do not have DS. We estimated incidence rates from a longitudinal study of…

  4. Tests and Medical Conditions Associated with Dementia Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Diana B.; Primeaux-Hart, Sharon; Loveland, Katherine A.; Cleveland, Lynne A.; Lewis, Kay R.; Lesser, Jary; Pearson, Pamela L.

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosis of dementia in adults with intellectual disabilities requires documentation of clinically significant declines in memory and other cognitive skills, as well as changes in everyday and emotional functioning. To improve diagnostic accuracy in adults with Down syndrome, the authors examined conditions often associated with dementia, as well…

  5. The practical management of cognitive impairment and psychosis in the older Parkinson's disease patient.

    PubMed

    Hindle, John V

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has been described as an age-related disease. Ageing significantly increases the risk of psychosis and dementia. Older patients often have a complex mixture of delirium, psychosis, dementia, gait and balance problems and other comorbidities which can cause significant management problems. There are concerns about the safety and tolerability of the treatments for psychosis and dementia. Delirium is common in older Parkinson's patients and must be assessed and managed carefully. The aetiology of psychosis in Parkinson's is complex and often associated with the development of cognitive impairment. Initial adjustments of Parkinson's drugs should be considered if symptoms are intrusive. Where drug therapy is required, evidence suggests that quetiapine may be a safe initial option. There is no contraindication to the use of clozapine in older patients, with the required blood monitoring. Dementia is almost inevitable with very advanced disease and increasing age, and is associated with a marked cholinergic deficit in the brain. Cholinesterase inhibitors may be more effective in PD than in Alzheimer's disease and appear relatively safe with appropriate monitoring of the pulse. There is much less evidence for the use of memantine. There is no current evidence for the use of specific non-pharmacological therapies in the management of psychosis or dementia in PD. Due to the associated gait and balance problems, older Parkinson's patients benefit from comprehensive multi-disciplinary assessment.

  6. Recommendations of the Alzheimer's Disease–Related Dementias Conference

    PubMed Central

    Montine, Thomas J.; Koroshetz, Walter J.; Babcock, Debra; Dickson, Dennis W.; Galpern, Wendy R.; Glymour, M. Maria; Greenberg, Steven M.; Hutton, Michael L.; Knopman, David S.; Kuzmichev, Andrey N.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Marder, Karen S.; Miller, Bruce L.; Phelps, Creighton H.; Seeley, William W.; Sieber, Beth-Anne; Silverberg, Nina B.; Sutherland, Margaret; Torborg, Christine L.; Waddy, Salina P.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2014-01-01

    The National Alzheimer's Project Act, signed into law in 2011, mandates a National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease that is updated annually. In the Plan, the term Alzheimer disease includes not only Alzheimer disease (AD) proper, but also several specified related dementias, namely, frontotemporal, Lewy body, vascular, and mixed dementia. In response to a specific action item in the 2012 National Plan, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, in collaboration with the National Institute on Aging, convened panels of experts and conducted a 2-day public conference to develop research priorities and timelines for addressing Alzheimer disease–related dementias (ADRD) in 5 topic areas: multiple etiology dementias, health disparities, Lewy body dementias including dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson disease dementia, frontotemporal dementia and related tauopathies, and vascular contributions to ADRD. By design, the product was up to 8 prioritized research recommendations in each topic area including estimated timelines from when work on a recommendation is started to completion or to full implementation of an ongoing activity, and recognition of shared research themes across recommendations. These included increased education and training of both researchers and health care professionals, addressing health disparities, fundamental neurobiology research, advanced diagnostics, collaborative biosample repositories, and a focus on developing effective interventions to prevent or treat ADRD by the year 2025 as targeted by the National Plan. PMID:25080517

  7. Characterization of frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with the GGGGCC repeat expansion in C9ORF72

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Kevin B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Knopman, David S.; Pedraza, Otto; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Lowe, Val; Murray, Melissa E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Josephs, Keith A.; Rush, Beth K.; Machulda, Mary M.; Fields, Julie A.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Baker, Matthew; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Adamson, Jennifer; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Adeli, Anahita; Savica, Rodolfo; Boot, Brendon; Kuntz, Karen M.; Gavrilova, Ralitza; Reeves, Andrew; Whitwell, Jennifer; Kantarci, Kejal; Jack, Clifford R.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Lucas, John A.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Numerous kindreds with familial frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been linked to chromosome 9, and an expansion of the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the non-coding region of chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 has recently been identified as the pathogenic mechanism. We describe the key characteristics in the probands and their affected relatives who have been evaluated at Mayo Clinic Rochester or Mayo Clinic Florida in whom the hexanucleotide repeat expansion were found. Forty-three probands and 10 of their affected relatives with DNA available (total 53 subjects) were shown to carry the hexanucleotide repeat expansion. Thirty-six (84%) of the 43 probands had a familial disorder, whereas seven (16%) appeared to be sporadic. Among examined subjects from the 43 families (n = 63), the age of onset ranged from 33 to 72 years (median 52 years) and survival ranged from 1 to 17 years, with the age of onset <40 years in six (10%) and >60 in 19 (30%). Clinical diagnoses among examined subjects included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia with or without parkinsonism (n = 30), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 18), frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with or without parkinsonism (n = 12), and other various syndromes (n = 3). Parkinsonism was present in 35% of examined subjects, all of whom had behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia or frontotemporal dementia/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as the dominant clinical phenotype. No subject with a diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia was identified with this mutation. Incomplete penetrance was suggested in two kindreds, and the youngest generation had significantly earlier age of onset (>10 years) compared with the next oldest generation in 11 kindreds. Neuropsychological testing showed a profile of slowed processing speed, complex attention/executive dysfunction, and impairment in rapid word retrieval. Neuroimaging studies showed bilateral

  8. Hallucinations in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; Fénelon, Gilles; Stebbins, Glenn; Goetz, Christopher G

    2009-06-01

    Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) can experience hallucinations (spontaneous aberrant perceptions) and illusions (misinterpretations of real perceptual stimuli). Of such phenomena, visual hallucinations (VHs) and illusions are the most frequently encountered, although auditory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations can also occur. In cross-sectional studies, VHs occur in approximately one-third of patients, but up to three-quarters of patients might develop VHs during a 20-year period. Hallucinations can have substantial psychosocial effects and, historically, were the main reason for placing patients in nursing homes. Concomitant or overlapping mechanisms are probably active during VHs, and these include the following: central dopaminergic overactivity and an imbalance with cholinergic neurotransmission; dysfunction of the visual pathways, including specific PD-associated retinopathy and functional alterations of the extrastriate visual pathways; alterations of brainstem sleep-wake and dream regulation; and impaired attentional focus. Possible treatments include patient-initiated coping strategies, a reduction of antiparkinson medications, atypical neuroleptics and, potentially, cholinesterase inhibitors. Evidence-based studies, however, only support the use of one atypical neuroleptic, clozapine, and only in patients without dementia. Better phenomenological discrimination, combined with neuroimaging tools, should refine therapeutic options and improve prognosis. The aim of this Review is to present epidemiological, phenomenological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of hallucinations in PD. PMID:19498436

  9. Hallucinations in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; Fénelon, Gilles; Stebbins, Glenn; Goetz, Christopher G

    2009-06-01

    Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) can experience hallucinations (spontaneous aberrant perceptions) and illusions (misinterpretations of real perceptual stimuli). Of such phenomena, visual hallucinations (VHs) and illusions are the most frequently encountered, although auditory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations can also occur. In cross-sectional studies, VHs occur in approximately one-third of patients, but up to three-quarters of patients might develop VHs during a 20-year period. Hallucinations can have substantial psychosocial effects and, historically, were the main reason for placing patients in nursing homes. Concomitant or overlapping mechanisms are probably active during VHs, and these include the following: central dopaminergic overactivity and an imbalance with cholinergic neurotransmission; dysfunction of the visual pathways, including specific PD-associated retinopathy and functional alterations of the extrastriate visual pathways; alterations of brainstem sleep-wake and dream regulation; and impaired attentional focus. Possible treatments include patient-initiated coping strategies, a reduction of antiparkinson medications, atypical neuroleptics and, potentially, cholinesterase inhibitors. Evidence-based studies, however, only support the use of one atypical neuroleptic, clozapine, and only in patients without dementia. Better phenomenological discrimination, combined with neuroimaging tools, should refine therapeutic options and improve prognosis. The aim of this Review is to present epidemiological, phenomenological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of hallucinations in PD.

  10. Parkinson's disease and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ylikoski, Ari; Martikainen, Kirsti; Sieminski, Mariusz; Partinen, Markku

    2015-11-01

    There is a broad spectrum of sleep disturbances observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). The prevalence of symptoms of insomnia and chronic inability to sleep and their association with other sleep disorders were studied. Altogether 1447 randomly selected Parkinson patients, aged 43-89 years, participated in a questionnaire study. A structured questionnaire with 207 items was based on the Basic Nordic Sleep questionnaire. Questions on demographics, PD, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, and other issues were included. The response rate was 59 % (N = 854), and of these 81 % returned fully answered questionnaire (N = 689). Prevalence of chronic inability to sleep was 36.9 % (95 % CI 33.3-40.5). Difficulty of initiating sleep was 18.0 % (95 % CI 15.1-20.9), disrupted sleep 81.54 % (78.5-84.4), awakenings during night 31.3 % (27.8-34.8), early morning awakenings 40.4 % (36.8-44.1) and non-restorative sleep 38.5 % (34.8-42.1). In the logistic regression models, poor quality of life and restless legs syndrome correlated significantly with chronic insomnia disorder. Disrupted sleep and early morning awakenings were the most common insomnia symptoms. PD patients do not seem to have difficulties in sleep initiation. Insomnia symptoms including disruptive sleep and non-restorative sleep are common in patients with Parkinson's disease. Inability to sleep is more common as comorbidity than a single sleep problem. PMID:26099862

  11. Frequency of the apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele in a case-control study of early onset Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, A S; Bertrandy, S; Finnan, F; Butler, A; Smith, G D; Ben-Shlomo, Y

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It has been suggested that Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease may share a common or at least overlapping aetiology. The prevalence of dementia among cases of Parkinson's disease is known to be greater than expected in the general population. The frequency of the apolipoprotein epsilon 4 allele in a large case-control study of early onset Parkinson's disease has been examined. METHODS: 215 patients and 212 population based controls were recruited from the Republic of Ireland between 1992 and 1994. Cases had to have disease onset at 55 years or younger and be born after 1925. RESULTS: The frequency of the epsilon 4 allele was almost identical between cases of Parkinson's disease (14.6%) and healthy controls (13.3%). There was no relation between epsilon 4 status and disease onset, disease duration, Hoehn and Yahr score, and disease progression. The frequency of the epsilon 4 allele was not increased among 10 patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia (10.0%) compared with the other patients without dementia (14.8%). There was no association between epsilon 4 allele status and either a history of smoking, family history of dementia, or Parkinson's disease, or being born in a rural area. The odds ratio for the ApoE epsilon 4 allele associated with Parkinson's disease was 1.10 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.68-1.79), adjusting for age group, sex, and residential status. The pooled odds ratio from a meta-analysis of six studies of ApoE epsilon 4 status and Parkinson's disease was 0.94 (95% CI 0.69-1.27). CONCLUSIONS: The results from our study as well as the pooled meta-analysis exclude any important role for ApoE epsilon 4 status in the development of Parkinson's disease. Our results similarly do not support its role either in dementia associated with Parkinson's disease or disease prognosis. PMID:8890771

  12. Auditory object cognition in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Goll, Johanna C.; Kim, Lois G.; Hailstone, Julia C.; Lehmann, Manja; Buckley, Aisling; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    The cognition of nonverbal sounds in dementia has been relatively little explored. Here we undertook a systematic study of nonverbal sound processing in patient groups with canonical dementia syndromes comprising clinically diagnosed typical amnestic Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 21), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n = 5), logopenic progressive aphasia (LPA; n = 7) and aphasia in association with a progranulin gene mutation (GAA; n = 1), and in healthy age-matched controls (n = 20). Based on a cognitive framework treating complex sounds as ‘auditory objects’, we designed a novel neuropsychological battery to probe auditory object cognition at early perceptual (sub-object), object representational (apperceptive) and semantic levels. All patients had assessments of peripheral hearing and general neuropsychological functions in addition to the experimental auditory battery. While a number of aspects of auditory object analysis were impaired across patient groups and were influenced by general executive (working memory) capacity, certain auditory deficits had some specificity for particular dementia syndromes. Patients with AD had a disproportionate deficit of auditory apperception but preserved timbre processing. Patients with PNFA had salient deficits of timbre and auditory semantic processing, but intact auditory size and apperceptive processing. Patients with LPA had a generalised auditory deficit that was influenced by working memory function. In contrast, the patient with GAA showed substantial preservation of auditory function, but a mild deficit of pitch direction processing and a more severe deficit of auditory apperception. The findings provide evidence for separable stages of auditory object analysis and separable profiles of impaired auditory object cognition in different dementia syndromes. PMID:21689671

  13. [Mini mental state as a method of diagnosing early dementia].

    PubMed

    Bidzan, L; Ussorowska, D

    1995-09-01

    The aim of the present paper was to evaluate the validity of the Mini Mental State as a screening instrument for the diagnosis of dementia in comparison with the DSWM III R criteria for dementing syndromes. We conducted a case-control study of 335 person--89 had a diagnosis of primary progressive dementia, 76 had a diagnosis of vascular dementia. The data show that the Mini Mental State is useful clinical instrument for the preliminary screening for the diagnosis of dementia. PMID:8650033

  14. [Informing of the diagnosis in dementia].

    PubMed

    Robles, María José; Cucurella, Eulàlia; Formiga, Francesc; Fort, Isabel; Rodríguez, Daniel; Barranco, Elena; Catena, Joan; Cubí, Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is a syndrome characterized by a progressive deterioration of cognitive functions, accompanied by psychiatric symptoms and behavioral disturbances that produce a progressive and irreversible disability. The way it should communicate the diagnosis of dementia is a key discussion point on which there is no unanimous agreement so far. The communicating of the diagnosis of dementia is a complex issue that affects not only, the patient but also to caregivers and health professionals who care and must conform to the ethical principles governing medical practice (autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice). Therefore, from the Dementia Working Group of the Catalan Geriatric Society (Grupo de Trabajo de Demencia de la Sociedad Catalana de Geriatría) arises the need to review the issue and propose a course of action for the disclosure of diagnosis.

  15. Epigenetic Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Michael H; Moos, Walter H; Faller, Douglas V; Steliou, Kosta; Pinkert, Carl A

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical Research In this review, we discuss epigenetic-driven methods for treating neurodegenerative disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, focusing on carnitinoid antioxidant-histone deacetylase inhibitors that show an ability to reinvigorate synaptic plasticity and protect against neuromotor decline in vivo. Aging remains a major risk factor in patients who progress to dementia, a clinical syndrome typified by decreased mental capacity, including impairments in memory, language skills, and executive function. Energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction are viewed as determinants in the aging process that may afford therapeutic targets for a host of disease conditions, the brain being primary in such thinking. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a core feature in the pathophysiology of both Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and rare mitochondrial diseases. The potential of new therapies in this area extends to glaucoma and other ophthalmic disorders, migraine, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, systemic exertion intolerance disease, and chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. An emerging and hopefully more promising approach to addressing these hard-to-treat diseases leverages their sensitivity to activation of master regulators of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes, antioxidant response elements, and mitophagy. Drug Dev Res 77 : 109-123, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26899010

  16. Frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Describe the relationships between the clinical, neuropsychological, and imaging findings from a group of patients diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods: The clinical histories, cognitive tests, and structural and perfusion brain images of 21 patients of the Psychiatric Hospital Universitario del Valle, Cali, Colombia, were reviewed. Results: The average age was 59.8 years; the average time for the evolution of disease symptoms was 2.7 years; the most common variant was the behavioral variant; the most common alteration shown through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was frontotemporal atrophy, while the most common alteration shown through single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was frontotemporal hypoperfusion. The most significant result was the normal performance of 61.9% of patients in praxis exams, which was associated with alterations in temporoparietal perfusion in the SPECT images (p <0.02). Neither the mini-mental state evaluation nor the Clock Drawing Executive Test (CLOX) served as screening tests. PMID:25386038

  17. Recognition and management of neuropsychiatric complications in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferreri, Florian; Agbokou, Catherine; Gauthier, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is primarily considered a motor disease characterized by rest tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural disturbances. However, neuropsychiatric complications, including mood and anxiety disorders, fatigue, apathy, psychosis, cognitive impairment, dementia, sleep disorders and addictions, frequently complicate the course of the illness. The pathophysiologic features of these complications are multifaceted and include neuropathophysiologic changes of a degenerative disease, exposure to antiparkinsonian treatments and emotional reactions to having a disabling chronic illness. Changes in mental status have profound implications for the well-being of patients with Parkinson's disease and of their caregivers. Treatment is often efficacious but becomes a challenge in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. In this article, we review the key clinical features of neuropsychiatric complications in Parkinson's disease as well as what is known about their epidemiologic characteristics, risk factors, pathophysiologic features and management. PMID:17146092

  18. Case Studies Illustrating Focal Alzheimer's, Fluent Aphasia, Late-Onset Memory Loss, and Rapid Dementia.

    PubMed

    Camsari, Gamze Balci; Murray, Melissa E; Graff-Radford, Neill R

    2016-08-01

    Many dementia subtypes have more shared signs and symptoms than defining ones. We review 8 cases with 4 overlapping syndromes and demonstrate how to distinguish the cases. These include focal cortical presentations of Alzheimer's disease (AD; posterior cortical atrophy and corticobasal syndrome [CBS]), fluent aphasia (semantic dementia and logopenic aphasia), late-onset slowly progressive dementia (hippocampal sclerosis and limbic predominant AD) and rapidly progressive dementia (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and limbic encephalitis). Recognizing the different syndromes can help the clinician to improve their diagnostic skills, leading to improved patient outcomes by early and accurate diagnosis, prompt treatment, and appropriate counseling and guidance. PMID:27445249

  19. Cognitive and behavioral assessment in the early stages of neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndromes.

    PubMed

    Borroni, B; Turla, M; Bertasi, V; Agosti, C; Gilberti, N; Padovani, A

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) and Corticobasal Degeneration Syndrome (CBDS) are the most common neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndromes. Beyond motor symptoms, cognitive dysfunctions and behavioral disturbances are reported. Neuropsychological and neuropsychiatry features in the early stages, however, are under-investigated, and few comparison studies are available yet. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cognitive and behavioral profile in the early stages of neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndromes. Thirty-nine PD, 27 DLB, 16 CBDS, and 24 PSP were recruited. Groups were matched for global cognitive and motor impairment. The overall sample showed a common neuropsychological core characterized by visuospatial deficits. Although in the early stage of the disease, a high presence of behavioral disturbances was detected, depression and anxiety were the most common disorders, followed by apathy and sleep disturbances. The observation of overlapping clinical entities points the attention on the need of adjunctive diagnostic markers for early differential diagnosis.

  20. The Brain in AIDS: Central Nervous System HIV-1 Infection and AIDS Dementia Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Richard W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the complicated infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in its late stages of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex. Explains the syndrome's development of abnormalities in cognition, motor performance, and behavior. (TW)

  1. Cholinergic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martijn L T M; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2013-09-01

    There is increasing interest in the clinical effects of cholinergic basal forebrain and tegmental pedunculopontine complex (PPN) projection degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent evidence supports an expanded role beyond cognitive impairment, including effects on olfaction, mood, REM sleep behavior disorder, and motor functions. Cholinergic denervation is variable in PD without dementia and may contribute to clinical symptom heterogeneity. Early in vivo imaging evidence that impaired cholinergic integrity of the PPN associates with frequent falling in PD is now confirmed by human post-mortem evidence. Brainstem cholinergic lesioning studies in primates confirm the role of the PPN in mobility impairment. Degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic projections correlates with decreased walking speed. Cumulatively, these findings provide evidence for a new paradigm to explain dopamine-resistant features of mobility impairments in PD. Recognition of the increased clinical role of cholinergic system degeneration may motivate new research to expand indications for cholinergic therapy in PD. PMID:23943367

  2. [What is dementia? 2. A fuzzy construct].

    PubMed

    Derouesné, Christian

    2003-03-01

    Since the publication of the third edition of the classification of mental disorders by the American Psychiatric Association, APA (DSM-III) in 1980, a large international consensus has been reached to define dementia as a multiple cognitive deficit centered by memory disturbances, interfering with the daily life activities and related to organic brain lesions. The DSM-III defined a diagnostic strategy in two steps. First to make the diagnosis of dementia according to the clinical criteria and then to specify its etiology. The more recent editions of the APA classification did not significantly modify these recommendations. The use of the DSM criteria has allowed important advances in epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic research. However, several criticisms should be addressed to the clinical diagnostic criteria as well as to the current concept of dementia. First, from a theoretical point of view, dementia is not a disease, not even a disorder. It only corresponds to a conventional collection of symptoms. Actually, clinical symptoms of dementia basically depend of the localization of brain lesions. Therefore, there could not be one single dementia syndrome. Similarly, the basis of the search for one "antidementia drug" should be questioned. From a clinical point of view, the DSM-IV criteria present some inaccuracies regarding the description of deficits in memory and executive functions as well as in the assessment of the interference of the cognitive decline with the activities of daily living. The definition of dementia as a purely cognitive deficit results in neglecting its psychological and relational manifestations which play a large part in the detection of dementia and its acceptance by the family. A major criticism concerns the definition of dementia as a sincle clinical entity with memory deficits as the core symptom. This definition is well adapted to Alzheimer's disease but results in delayed diagnosis or misclassification of dementias such as

  3. [What is dementia? 2. A fuzzy construct].

    PubMed

    Derouesné, Christian

    2003-03-01

    Since the publication of the third edition of the classification of mental disorders by the American Psychiatric Association, APA (DSM-III) in 1980, a large international consensus has been reached to define dementia as a multiple cognitive deficit centered by memory disturbances, interfering with the daily life activities and related to organic brain lesions. The DSM-III defined a diagnostic strategy in two steps. First to make the diagnosis of dementia according to the clinical criteria and then to specify its etiology. The more recent editions of the APA classification did not significantly modify these recommendations. The use of the DSM criteria has allowed important advances in epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic research. However, several criticisms should be addressed to the clinical diagnostic criteria as well as to the current concept of dementia. First, from a theoretical point of view, dementia is not a disease, not even a disorder. It only corresponds to a conventional collection of symptoms. Actually, clinical symptoms of dementia basically depend of the localization of brain lesions. Therefore, there could not be one single dementia syndrome. Similarly, the basis of the search for one "antidementia drug" should be questioned. From a clinical point of view, the DSM-IV criteria present some inaccuracies regarding the description of deficits in memory and executive functions as well as in the assessment of the interference of the cognitive decline with the activities of daily living. The definition of dementia as a purely cognitive deficit results in neglecting its psychological and relational manifestations which play a large part in the detection of dementia and its acceptance by the family. A major criticism concerns the definition of dementia as a sincle clinical entity with memory deficits as the core symptom. This definition is well adapted to Alzheimer's disease but results in delayed diagnosis or misclassification of dementias such as

  4. Diabetes, Dementia and Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Meneilly, Graydon S; Tessier, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    We are experiencing an epidemic of both diabetes and dementia among older adults in this country. The risk for dementia appears to be increased in patients with diabetes, and patients with dementia and diabetes appear to be at greater risk for severe hypoglycemia. In addition, there may be an increased risk for developing dementia by older patients with diabetes who have had episodes of severe hypoglycemia, although this issue is controversial. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to the increased risk for dementia in older adults with diabetes and outline the complex relationships between hypoglycemia and dementia.

  5. Neuroeconomic dissociation of semantic dementia and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Chiong, Winston; Wood, Kristie A; Beagle, Alexander J; Hsu, Ming; Kayser, Andrew S; Miller, Bruce L; Kramer, Joel H

    2016-02-01

    Many neuropsychiatric disorders are marked by abnormal behaviour and decision-making, but prevailing diagnostic criteria for such behaviours are typically qualitative and often ambiguous. Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (also called semantic dementia) are two clinical variants of frontotemporal dementia with overlapping but distinct anatomical substrates known to cause profound changes in decision-making. We investigated whether abnormal decision-making in these syndromes could be more precisely characterized in terms of dissociable abnormalities in patients' subjective evaluations of valence (positive versus negative outcome) and of time (present versus future outcome). We presented 28 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, 14 patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia, 25 patients with Alzheimer's disease (as disease controls), and 61 healthy older control subjects with experimental tasks assaying loss aversion and delay discounting. In general linear models controlling for age, gender, education and Mini-Mental State Examination score, patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia were less averse to losses than control subjects (P < 0.001), while patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia discounted delayed rewards more steeply than controls (P = 0.019). There was no relationship between loss aversion and delay discounting across the sample, nor in any of the subgroups. These findings suggest that abnormal behaviours in neurodegenerative disease may result from the disruption of either of two dissociable neural processes for evaluating the outcomes of action. More broadly, these findings suggest a role for computational methods to supplement traditional qualitative characterizations in the differential diagnosis of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26667277

  6. Neuroeconomic dissociation of semantic dementia and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Chiong, Winston; Wood, Kristie A; Beagle, Alexander J; Hsu, Ming; Kayser, Andrew S; Miller, Bruce L; Kramer, Joel H

    2016-02-01

    Many neuropsychiatric disorders are marked by abnormal behaviour and decision-making, but prevailing diagnostic criteria for such behaviours are typically qualitative and often ambiguous. Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (also called semantic dementia) are two clinical variants of frontotemporal dementia with overlapping but distinct anatomical substrates known to cause profound changes in decision-making. We investigated whether abnormal decision-making in these syndromes could be more precisely characterized in terms of dissociable abnormalities in patients' subjective evaluations of valence (positive versus negative outcome) and of time (present versus future outcome). We presented 28 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, 14 patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia, 25 patients with Alzheimer's disease (as disease controls), and 61 healthy older control subjects with experimental tasks assaying loss aversion and delay discounting. In general linear models controlling for age, gender, education and Mini-Mental State Examination score, patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia were less averse to losses than control subjects (P < 0.001), while patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia discounted delayed rewards more steeply than controls (P = 0.019). There was no relationship between loss aversion and delay discounting across the sample, nor in any of the subgroups. These findings suggest that abnormal behaviours in neurodegenerative disease may result from the disruption of either of two dissociable neural processes for evaluating the outcomes of action. More broadly, these findings suggest a role for computational methods to supplement traditional qualitative characterizations in the differential diagnosis of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  7. Two cases of food aversion with semantic dementia

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexandra E.; Clark, Camilla N.; Hardy, Christopher J.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Greene, John; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Warren, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accounts of altered eating behavior in semantic dementia generally emphasize gluttony and abnormal food preferences. Here we describe two female patients with no past history of eating disorders who developed early prominent aversion to food in the context of an otherwise typical semantic dementia syndrome. One patient (aged 57) presented features in line with anorexia nervosa while the second patient (aged 58) presented with a syndrome more suggestive of bulimia nervosa. These cases add to the growing spectrum of apparently dichotomous behavior patterns in the frontotemporal dementias and illustrate a potentially under-recognized cause of eating disorders presenting in later life. PMID:26963051

  8. [Prevention of dementia].

    PubMed

    Urakami, Katsuya

    2016-03-01

    The dementia prevention consists of three steps, primary prevention of dementia is to prevent from normal and mild cognitive impairment to dementia, secondary prevention is early detection and early treatment of dementia, and tertiary prevention is three stages of progress prevention of dementia. Primary prevention of dementia had been considered impossible until recently, but potential scientific evidence has been shown recently. The fact that 4.62 million people are person with dementia and 400 million people are person with mild cognitive impairment are considered to be urgent problem and we must intend to perform dementia prevention from primary to tertiary prevention thoroughly. We perform dementia screening using touch panel type computer and we recommend person with mild cognitive impairment to join dementia prevention classroom. Therefore, we can prevent progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia (primary prevention). Early diagnosis and introduction to the specialized medical institution are needed if you find early stage of dementia and treat early (secondary prevention). To prevent progression by the appropriate drug treatment and care for dementia is required (tertiary prevention).

  9. Assessing vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Forette, F; Rigaud, A S; Morin, M; Gisselbrecht, M; Bert, P

    1995-10-01

    Vascular dementia is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly after Alzheimer's disease. Many forms of vascular dementia have been described: multi-infarct dementia, lacunar dementia, Binswanger's subcortical encephalopathy, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, white matter lesions associated with dementias, single infarct dementia, dementia linked to hypoperfusion and haemorrhagic dementia. The difficulty of diagnosing vascular dementia must not be underestimated and an international consensus is needed for epidemiological studies. The NINCDS-AIREN group has recently published diagnostic criteria. The State of California Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostic and Treatment Centers also proposed some which differ from the NINCDS-AIREN criteria in considering only ischaemic vascular dementia and not other mechanisms such as haemorrhagic or hypoxic lesions. Most studies stress hypertension as the most powerful risk factor for all forms of vascular dementia. The incidence rate ranges from 7 per 1000 person-years in normal volunteers to 16 per 1000 person-years in hypertensive patients. No therapeutic attempt has influenced the course of the disease once the dementing condition is established. The only effective approach is preventive treatment. The objective of the SYST-EUR Vascular Dementia project is to confirm that the treatment of isolated systolic hypertension is able to reduce its incidence.

  10. Prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Sato, Kiyoshi; Iseki, Eizo

    2015-07-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementing disorder after Alzheimer's disease (AD), but there is limited information regarding the prodromal DLB state compared with that of AD. Parkinson's disease (PD) and DLB share common prodromal symptoms with Lewy body disease (LBD), allowing us to use a common strategy for identifying the individuals with an underlying pathophysiology of LBD. Dysautonomia, olfactory dysfunction, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and psychiatric symptoms antedate the onset of dementia by years or even decades in patients with DLB. Although RBD is the most potentially accurate prodromal predictor of DLB, disease progression before the onset of dementia could differ between the prodromal DLB state with and without RBD. Experts who specialize in idiopathic RBD and DLB might need communication in order to clarify the clinical relevance of RBD with the disease progression of DLB. The presence of prodromal LBD symptoms or findings of occipital hypoperfusion/hypometabolism helps us to predict the possible pathophysiological process of LBD in non-demented patients. This approach might provide the opportunity for additional neuroimaging, including cardiac (123) I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and dopamine transporter imaging. Although limited radiological findings in patients with prodromal DLB states have been reported, there is now a need for larger clinical multisite studies with pathological verification. The long prodromal phase of DLB provides a critical opportunity for potential intervention with disease-modifying therapy, but only if we are able to clearly identify the diversity in the clinical courses of DLB. In the present article, we reviewed the limited literature regarding the clinical profiles of prodromal DLB. PMID:25690399

  11. [The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP)].

    PubMed

    Oertel, Wolfgang H; Deuschl, Guenther; Eggert, Karla

    2016-04-01

    The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP) is a research infrastructure for disease-oriented translational and clinical research in the field of Parkinson syndromes (PS). It was initiated in 1999 and funded until 2008 by the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF). The CNP created a highly frequented website with information on PS for the general public and for experts. The CNP designed and established one of the first electronic internet-based data entry systems (secuTrial®) - fulfilling the legal standards of data safety and security - a material bank for genetic research on Parkinson's disease (PD), implemented and investigated new methods for early diagnosis of PD and related atypical PS including in vivo dopamine transporter imaging (DAT SPECT), established the German Parkinson Study Group (GPS-Pharma) with 40 certified trial centres for pharmacotherapeutical trials and the German interdisciplinary Parkinson Study Group (neurology and neurosurgery) for deep brain stimulation (GPS-DBS), and carried out several pharmacoeconomic and health care studies on PD in Germany. Sustainability of the infrastructure CNP has in part been achieved in form of the GPS-Pharma and the GPS-DBS, as well as in the German Study Group on REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder (RBD), a prodromal phase of PD. Part of the CNP activities, such as genetic research and research on cohorts of PD patients, have been incorporated into the German Center for Neurodegenerative Disorders (DZNE). Furthermore, topics such as health care research are funded within projects of the EU research program. The article describes problems in setting up a competence network from scratch and contains recommendations how to avoid them in the future.

  12. [The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP)].

    PubMed

    Oertel, Wolfgang H; Deuschl, Guenther; Eggert, Karla

    2016-04-01

    The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP) is a research infrastructure for disease-oriented translational and clinical research in the field of Parkinson syndromes (PS). It was initiated in 1999 and funded until 2008 by the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF). The CNP created a highly frequented website with information on PS for the general public and for experts. The CNP designed and established one of the first electronic internet-based data entry systems (secuTrial®) - fulfilling the legal standards of data safety and security - a material bank for genetic research on Parkinson's disease (PD), implemented and investigated new methods for early diagnosis of PD and related atypical PS including in vivo dopamine transporter imaging (DAT SPECT), established the German Parkinson Study Group (GPS-Pharma) with 40 certified trial centres for pharmacotherapeutical trials and the German interdisciplinary Parkinson Study Group (neurology and neurosurgery) for deep brain stimulation (GPS-DBS), and carried out several pharmacoeconomic and health care studies on PD in Germany. Sustainability of the infrastructure CNP has in part been achieved in form of the GPS-Pharma and the GPS-DBS, as well as in the German Study Group on REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder (RBD), a prodromal phase of PD. Part of the CNP activities, such as genetic research and research on cohorts of PD patients, have been incorporated into the German Center for Neurodegenerative Disorders (DZNE). Furthermore, topics such as health care research are funded within projects of the EU research program. The article describes problems in setting up a competence network from scratch and contains recommendations how to avoid them in the future. PMID:26961981

  13. Dysphagia in stroke, neurodegenerative disease, and advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Richards, Amanda; Goldberg, Leanne; Frucht, Steven; McCabe, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Aspiration risk from dysphagia increases with central and peripheral neurologic disease. Stroke, microvascular ischemic disease, a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, and advancing dementia all have unique aspects. However, there are distinct commonalities in this population. Increasing nutritional requirements to stave off oropharyngeal muscular atrophy and a sedentary lifestyle further tax the patient's abilities to safely swallow. This article reviews stroke, muscular dystrophy, myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and advanced dementia. Approaches to screening and evaluation, recognizing sentinel indicators of decline that increase aspiration risk, and options for managing global laryngeal dysfunction are also presented. PMID:24262965

  14. Precision Medicine: Clarity for the Complexity of Dementia.

    PubMed

    Cholerton, Brenna; Larson, Eric B; Quinn, Joseph F; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Mata, Ignacio F; Keene, C Dirk; Flanagan, Margaret; Crane, Paul K; Grabowski, Thomas J; Montine, Kathleen S; Montine, Thomas J

    2016-03-01

    Three key elements to precision medicine are stratification by risk, detection of pathophysiological processes as early as possible (even before clinical presentation), and alignment of mechanism of action of intervention(s) with an individual's molecular driver(s) of disease. Used for decades in the management of some rare diseases and now gaining broad currency in cancer care, a precision medicine approach is beginning to be adapted to cognitive impairment and dementia. This review focuses on the application of precision medicine to address the clinical and biological complexity of two common neurodegenerative causes of dementia: Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. PMID:26724389

  15. Dysphagia in stroke, neurodegenerative disease, and advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Richards, Amanda; Goldberg, Leanne; Frucht, Steven; McCabe, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Aspiration risk from dysphagia increases with central and peripheral neurologic disease. Stroke, microvascular ischemic disease, a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, and advancing dementia all have unique aspects. However, there are distinct commonalities in this population. Increasing nutritional requirements to stave off oropharyngeal muscular atrophy and a sedentary lifestyle further tax the patient's abilities to safely swallow. This article reviews stroke, muscular dystrophy, myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and advanced dementia. Approaches to screening and evaluation, recognizing sentinel indicators of decline that increase aspiration risk, and options for managing global laryngeal dysfunction are also presented.

  16. Frontotemporal dementia: An updated overview.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, E; Rajmohan, V

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative syndrome occurring between 45 and 65 years. The syndrome is also called frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). However, FTLD refers to a larger group of disorders FTD being one of its subgroups. The other subgroups of FTLD are progressive nonfluent aphasia (PFNA), and semantic dementia (SD). FTLD is characterized by atrophy of prefrontal and anterior temporal cortices. FTD occurs in 5-15% of patients with dementia and it is the third most common degenerative dementia. FTD occurs with equal frequency in both sexes. The age of onset is usually between 45 and 65 years though it may range anywhere from 21 to 81 years. The usual course is one of progressive clinicopathological deterioration with mortality within 6-8 years. Unlike Alzheimer's disease (AD), this condition has a strong genetic basis and family history of FTD is seen in 40-50% of cases. FTD is a genetically complex disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance in majority of cases. Genetic linkage studies have revealed FTLD loci on chromosome 3p, 9, 9p, and 17q. The most prevalent genes are PGRN (progranulin) and MAPT (microtubule-associated protein tau), both located on chromosome 17q21. More than 15 different pathologies can underlie FTD and related disorders and it has four major types of pathological features: (1) microvacuolation without neuronal inclusions, (2) microvacuolation with ubiquitinated rounded intraneuronal inclusions and dystrophic neurites FTLD-ubiquitinated (FTLD-U), (3) transcortical gliosis with tau-reactive rounded intraneuronal inclusions, (4) microvacuolation and taupositive neurofibrillary tangles. Behavior changes are the most common initial symptom of FTD (62%), whereas speech and language problems are most common in NFPA (100%) and SD (58%). There are no approved drugs for the management of FTD and trials are needed to find effective agents. Non-pharmacological treatment and caregiver

  17. Lewy Body Dementia Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... promoting scientific advances. Featured LBD Stories & Tributes Dad's Dementia Journey It's been years since my father passed ... I received an email from the Lewy Body Dementia Association about a benefit... Read Story The Lewy ...

  18. Lewy Body Dementia Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... individuals, it may also be due to the natural course of the disease. All Rights Reserved Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. 912 Killian Hill Road S.W., Lilburn, GA 30047 © 2016 Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. Connect ...

  19. The viral hypothesis in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Elizan, T S; Casals, J

    1983-01-01

    The most crucial unanswered question in Parkinson's disease is its fundamental cause. Since Carlsson's original suggestion that dopamine may be a transmitter in the central nervous system involved in the control of motor function and that it may be involved in the Parkinsonian syndrome (Carlsson, 1959), and the now-classic paper by Ehringer and Hornykiewicz (1960) which definitively showed the significant reduction of dopamine concentration in the neostriatum of cases of idiopathic Parkinson and postencephalitic parkinsonism, the vast amount of work on the subject has focused on the biochemical and pharmacologic correlates of this dopaminergic system failure involving particularly the nigrostriatal pathways. The concept of a specific neurotransmitter deficiency associated with a specific neurological syndrome potentially amenable to replacement therapy, has appropriately generated a considerable degree of clinical and research interest for over 20 years, but, with few exceptions, there has been hardly any focused or concerted research effort on looking at direct causal factors or primary initiating events in this disease process. As in Alzheimer's disease, another of the degenerative diseases of the brain of unknown origin with a specific biochemical substrate, any etiologic hypothesis for Parkinson's disease--whether a virus, an age-related immune system dysfunction, a genetic factor, a "trophic" substance, or a toxin--would have to explain the selective involvement of specific transmitter-defined neuronal pathways, the non-specificity of the brain lesions that define the disease, and the clinical involvement of a sizeable segment of the aging population. Of the several plausible hypotheses mentioned earlier, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive, we would like to critically consider the possibility of a viral cause. PMID:6583315

  20. A characterization of the prosodic loss in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Darkins, A W; Fromkin, V A; Benson, D F

    1988-07-01

    Prosodic contours in the verbal output of 30 patients with Idiopathic Parkinson's disease were contrasted to those of fifteen age-, sex-, and educationally matched normal subjects. All subjects were tested for language disorder, dementia, depression, and the comprehension of linguistic prosody. The striking disorder of prosody in Parkinson's disease relates to motor control, not to a loss of the linguistic knowledge required to make prosodic distinctions. It appears that prosody, language and the motor planning of speech are integrated at a basal ganglia level.

  1. Parkinson disease - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads to ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may come ...

  2. Parkinson disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Parkinson disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Parkinson disease : The Michael J. Fox Foundation -- www.michaeljfox.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  3. The History of Parkinson's Disease: Early Clinical Descriptions and Neurological Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    Although components of possible Parkinson's disease can be found in very early documents, the first clear medical description was written in 1817 by James Parkinson. In the mid-1800s, Jean-Martin Charcot was particularly influential in refining and expanding this early description and in disseminating information internationally about Parkinson's disease. He separated Parkinson's disease from multiple sclerosis and other disorders characterized by tremor, and he recognized cases that later would likely be classified among the Parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Early treatments of Parkinson's disease were based on empirical observation, and anticholinergic drugs were used as early as the nineteenth century. The discovery of dopaminergic deficits in Parkinson's disease and the synthetic pathway of dopamine led to the first human trials of levodopa. Further historically important anatomical, biochemical, and physiological studies identified additional pharmacological and neurosurgical targets for Parkinson's disease and allow modern clinicians to offer an array of therapies aimed at improving function in this still incurable disease. PMID:22229124

  4. Enduring involvement of tau, beta-amyloid, alpha-synuclein, ubiquitin and TDP-43 pathology in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam (ALS/PDC).

    PubMed

    Miklossy, Judith; Steele, John C; Yu, Sheng; McCall, Sherman; Sandberg, Glenn; McGeer, Edith G; McGeer, Patrick L

    2008-12-01

    Guam ALS/PDC is a severe tangle forming disorder endemic to Guam with features overlapping such neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), ALS, corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration (PPND). Since the prevalence is declining, we examined brain tissue from 35 clinically diagnosed Chamorro patients with ALS/PDC and two Chamorro controls autopsied between 1946 and 2006, to determine if distinct variations in the pathology could be identified up to this time. Although the age at autopsy increased by 4.5-5 years per decade, we identified no qualitative differences in pathological deposits with antibodies against tau, ubiquitin, A beta, alpha-synuclein and TDP-43, indicating that these more recently identified proteins have been involved in the neuropathogenesis over the past 6 decades. Tau and TDP-43 positive neuronal, oligodendroglial and astrocytic inclusions involving multiple nerve fiber tracts occurred in both the ALS and PDC types, reinforcing the concept that these forms are part of the same disorder. The results obtained may help to define the commonality of the Guam disease with other tangle forming disorders and may help in monitoring the epidemiological changes that are taking place.

  5. Mediterranean Diet and Risk of Dementia.

    PubMed

    Safouris, Apostolos; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Psaltopoulou, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a major global health challenge, as its burden on society will increase with population aging. Given the lack of effective pharmaceutical treatment for common types of dementia including Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, research interest in lifestyle modifications that could prevent, postpone the clinical syndrome or decelerate progression of dementia is growing. Among the various dietary patterns that were tested for their effects on cognition, the traditional Mediterranean diet (MeDi) has shown promising results. This review aims to summarize the epidemiological evidence on the effects of MeDi on the prevention of dementia, presenting data from cross-sectional as well as longitudinal observational studies conducted both in Mediterranean and non-Mediterranean countries. These findings have been also reproduced in the context of one recent randomized-controlled clinical trial. Postulated mechanisms of action that may account for the potential protective effect of MeDi on cognitive impairment will be briefly discussed. Despite the fact that the link between MeDi and cognitive decline has been only explored for less than a decade, data on efficacy is rapidly increasing and allows optimism that MeDi could emerge as an alternative prophylactic treatment for dementia.

  6. Parkinsonism in FMR1 premutation carriers may be indistinguishable from Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Deborah A.; Howard, Katherine; Hagerman, Randi; Leehey, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Premutation carriers of repeat expansions in the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene develop kinetic tremor and ataxia or the ‘fragile X associated tremor/ataxia syndrome’ (FXTAS). Affected FMR1 premutation carriers also have parkinsonism, but have not been reported to meet criteria for Parkinson disease. This case series illustrates that some patients who are FMR1 premutation carriers may appear by history and examination to have idiopathic Parkinson disease. Based on previous studies, it is likely that the genetic mutation and parkinsonism are associated. Although screening all PD patients is likely to be low yield, genetic testing of FMR1 in individuals with PD and a family history of fragile X syndrome, autism or developmental delay, or other related FMR1 phenotypes is warranted. PMID:18565783

  7. Sudden Death: An Uncommon Occurrence in Dementia with Lewy Bodies.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Joery P; Wilbers, Joyce; Aerts, Marjolein B; Leijten, Quinten H; van Dijk, Jan G; Esselink, Rianne A; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-01-01

    We present a 75-year-old woman with dementia and parkinsonism who developed severe orthostatic hypotension and eventually died. Autopsy revealed extensive Lewy body formation in the midbrain, limbic system, intermediate spinal cord, and medulla oblongata. Furthermore, a vast amount of Lewy bodies was seen in the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia which likely explained the severe autonomic failure. We speculate that this autonomic failure caused sudden death through dysregulation of respiration or heart rhythm, reminiscent of sudden death in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Clinicians should be aware of this complication in patients presenting with parkinsonism and autonomic dysfunction, and that sudden death may occur in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) as it does in MSA. PMID:26891177

  8. [Drug-induced dementia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taro; Akishita, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Many drugs have been reported to induce not only delirium but also cognitive impairment. Some types of drugs are reported to induce dementia, and prolonged hypotension or hypoglycemia induced by overuse of antihypertensive drugs or oral antidiabetic drugs could result in dementia. Recently, taking multiple drugs with anticholinergic activity are reported to cause cognitive decline and anticholinergic burden should be avoided especially in patients with dementia. Drug-induced dementia can be prevented by avoiding polypharmacy and adhering to the saying 'start low and go slow' . Early diagnosis of drug-induced dementia and withdrawal of the offending drug is essential to improve cognitive function. PMID:27025096

  9. Dementia Resulting From Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shively, Sharon; Scher, Ann I.; Perl, Daniel P.; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the earliest illnesses described in human history and remains a major source of morbidity and mortality in the modern era. It is estimated that 2% of the US population lives with long-term disabilities due to a prior TBI, and incidence and prevalence rates are even higher in developing countries. One of the most feared long-term consequences of TBIs is dementia, as multiple epidemiologic studies show that experiencing a TBI in early or midlife is associated with an increased risk of dementia in late life. The best data indicate that moderate and severe TBIs increase risk of dementia between 2-and 4-fold. It is less clear whether mild TBIs such as brief concussions result in increased dementia risk, in part because mild head injuries are often not well documented and retrospective studies have recall bias. However, it has been observed for many years that multiple mild TBIs as experienced by professional boxers are associated with a high risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a type of dementia with distinctive clinical and pathologic features. The recent recognition that CTE is common in retired professional football and hockey players has rekindled interest in this condition, as has the recognition that military personnel also experience high rates of mild TBIs and may have a similar syndrome. It is presently unknown whether dementia in TBI survivors is pathophysiologically similar to Alzheimer disease, CTE, or some other entity. Such information is critical for developing preventive and treatment strategies for a common cause of acquired dementia. Herein, we will review the epidemiologic data linking TBI and dementia, existing clinical and pathologic data, and will identify areas where future research is needed. PMID:22776913

  10. Frontotemporal dementia: from molecular mechanisms to therapy.

    PubMed

    Haass, Christian; Neumann, Manuela

    2016-08-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome characterized by frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Neuropathologically, FTLD is characterized by abnormal protein deposits and almost all cases can now be classified into three major molecular subgroups based on specific accumulating proteins with the most common being FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP (accounting for ~40% and 50%, respectively) and FTLD-FET (accounting for ~5-10%). In this special issue, the molecular and genetic basics as well as clinical approaches and therapeutics are reviewed in a series of articles. This article is part of the Frontotemporal Dementia special issue. PMID:27502123

  11. [Pain and unexpressed symptoms: the other dementia].

    PubMed

    Marín Carmona, José Manuel

    2009-11-01

    Patients with advanced dementia are biologically, socially and personally highly vulnerable. The care of these patients is a challenge in terms of both the quantity of care required and qualitative aspects (the need for specific and adapted approaches). The advanced phases of dementia are characterized by severe speech impairment, loss of mobility, and feeding and nutritional alterations (in patients with severe cognitive and functional impairment). Problems of recognition and verbal expression of sensations hampers the diagnostic and therapeutic approach. This article briefly reviews the clinical characteristics of the symptoms and syndromes prevalent in these patients (pain, neuropsychiatric symptoms, delirium, epilepsy) and emphasizes the general principles for prevention and therapeutic approaches.

  12. VGKC positive autoimmune encephalopathy mimicking dementia.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Anna; Cassidy, Eugene; Ryan, Aisling; O' Toole, Orna

    2011-12-01

    Voltage gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC Abs) are known to cause three rare neurological syndromes- neuromyotonia, Morvan's syndrome and limbic encephalitis although an increasing array of other associated neurological symptoms are becoming recognised. The authors describe the case of a 60-year-old female who presented to the neurology clinic with an apparent early onset dementing process. She was noted to have both extrapyramidal and frontal release signs on examination and was admitted for further evaluation. Her dementia investigation including a neoplastic screen was negative except for VGKC antibody positivity. Her symptoms dramatically improved with commencement of immunosuppression. A non-paraneoplastic VGKC antibody associated dementia-like syndrome has rarely been described. The authors add to the few existing reports of what represents an important reversible cause of cognitive impairment.

  13. Are patients with Parkinson's disease blind to blindsight?

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; Stebbins, Glenn; Schiltz, Christine; Goetz, Christopher G

    2014-06-01

    In Parkinson's disease, visual dysfunction is prominent. Visual hallucinations can be a major hallmark of late stage disease, but numerous visual deficits also occur in early stage Parkinson's disease. Specific retinopathy, deficits in the primary visual pathway and the secondary ventral and dorsal pathways, as well as dysfunction of the attention pathways have all been posited as causes of hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. We present data from patients with Parkinson's disease that contrast with a known neuro-ophthalmological syndrome, termed 'blindsight'. In this syndrome, there is an absence of conscious object identification, but preserved 'guess' of the location of a stimulus, preserved reflexive saccades and motion perception and preserved autonomical and expressive reactions to negative emotional facial expressions. We propose that patients with Parkinson's disease have the converse of blindsight, being 'blind to blindsight'. As such they preserve conscious vision, but show erroneous 'guess' localization of visual stimuli, poor saccades and motion perception, and poor emotional face perception with blunted autonomic reaction. Although a large data set on these deficits in Parkinson's disease has been accumulated, consolidation into one specific syndrome has not been proposed. Focusing on neuropathological and physiological data from two phylogenetically old and subconscious pathways, the retino-colliculo-thalamo-amygdala and the retino-geniculo-extrastriate pathways, we propose that aberrant function of these systems, including pathologically inhibited superior colliculus activity, deficient corollary discharges to the frontal eye fields, dysfunctional pulvinar, claustrum and amygdaloid subnuclei of the amygdala, the latter progressively burdened with Lewy bodies, underlie this syndrome. These network impairments are further corroborated by the concept of the 'silent amygdala'. Functionally being 'blind to blindsight' may facilitate the highly

  14. Regulatory aspects of vascular dementia in the United States.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Armando; Mani, Ranjit; Katz, Russell

    2003-01-01

    There is significant interest in the development of new drugs to treat vascular dementia. However, before US approval of new drugs for this entity is possible, certain issues with regulatory implications need to be addressed. Is vascular dementia a distinct clinical syndrome with valid diagnostic criteria? Can this entity be distinguished from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other causes of dementia? What design features are important for clinical trials in this disorder? The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) convened a special meeting of the Peripheral and Central Nervous System Advisory Committee in an attempt to answer these questions. The conclusions from this meeting indicate that vascular dementia (VaD) is a pathologically heterogeneous disorder but appears to be reasonably distinguishable from AD dementia. The NINDS-AIREN diagnostic criteria are suitable as entry criteria for vascular dementia trials. Trials should be similar in duration to AD dementia trials and should employ a dual outcome strategy (cognitive + global/functional measures). For drugs that are believed to have a disease-modifying effect, clinical trials should study specific vascular dementia subtypes and would need to employ substantially different designs from those used currently. The term "vascular dementia" may not be entirely appropriate to describe this population. PMID:16191257

  15. Competency and consent in dementia.

    PubMed

    Fellows, L K

    1998-07-01

    Health care for demented older persons presents a range of ethical dilemmas. The disease process affects cognitive abilities, making competency a central issue. The syndrome of dementia carries a complex social overlay that colors perceptions of these patients and of their capacity for making decisions. An argument is made for a coherent, ethically based decision-making process that can be applied across the whole spectrum of dementia severity. The major ethical principles implicated in assessing a patient's ability to consent to treatment are reviewed. A sliding scale model of capacity is presented, in which the patient's ability to decide is weighed against the risk associated with the treatment decision in question. This model preserves the autonomy of the demented patient while minimizing the potential for harm. In situations where the patient is deemed incapable, two approaches that can be applied to making treatment decisions are contrasted. The 'prior competent choice' standard stresses the values that the patient held while competent. The 'best interests' standard moves the focus to the patient's subjective experience at the time the treatment is considered. The relative merits of these two concepts are evaluated in the context of dementia. Surveys of actual decision-making practice are contrasted with ethical and legal principles. The challenges inherent to applying the best interests standard are discussed. Despite the pitfalls, this standard offers an opportunity to restore the demented patient's sense of self. PMID:9670887

  16. Respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, L K

    1994-12-01

    The parkinsonian syndromes include idiopathic Parkinson's disease, parkinsonian syndromes secondary to several known causative agents, and parkinsonian syndromes associated with more widespread CNS lesions and extensive neurologic deficits. They constitute movement disorders with a similar constellation of symptoms: rigidity, tremor, bradykinesia, gait impairment, and postural instability. All of the parkinsonian syndromes are associated with excess morbidity and mortality from respiratory causes, and all can produce the pattern of pulmonary function impairment consistent with neuromuscular disease. In addition, the parkinsonian syndromes can produce upper airway obstruction and abnormalities of ventilatory control, both of which can be life-threatening in those with MSA. The medications used to treat these disorders can also produce respiratory disease. A syndrome of L-dopa-induced respiratory dysfunction has been described, which may be a heterogeneic disorder of choreiform movements of the respiratory muscles, rigidity-akinesis of the respiratory muscles, or abnormal central control of ventilation, all related to the drug. In addition, the ergot-derived dopamine agonists can cause pleural and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:7867286

  17. [Akinetic crisis in Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Bächli, E; Albani, C

    1994-06-11

    The akinetic crisis is an "off" state that lasts more than 48 hours with akinesia, rigidity and bradykinesia, occurring with signs of CNS dysregulation in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. 7 akinetic crises lasting 4 to 14 days (average 9.3) were observed in 744 hospitalizations over a period of 7 years. The age of the patients with akinetic crisis and the mean duration and the severity of the disease were significantly higher than in the other patients. While bradykinesia and rigor are the most relevant clinical signs in some 40% of parkinsonian patients, 6 of our 7 patients (86%) had an akinetic-rigid form of the disease. Levodopa withdrawal preceded the akinetic crisis in 4 patients: in 3 patients the akinetic crisis occurred despite adequate dopaminergic therapy, in one patient after benzodiazepine withdrawal, in another case after gastrointestinal bleeding, and in one case without known cause. Hyperthermia, tachycardia and sweating were the most common collateral manifestations. Apomorphine given subcutaneously was effective in four cases, apomorphine and amantidine were effective in one case, and one patient died during an akinetic crisis. The akinetic crisis is a distinct form of motor fluctuation in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease, with clinical signs resembling malignant neuroleptic syndrome (NMS). While NMS is related to dopaminergic receptor blockade or dopaminergic depletion, akinetic crisis can occur despite adequate dopaminergic therapy as a symptom of severe basal ganglia dysfunction related to the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. Outcome and therapy of akinetic crisis depend on the underlying causes. PMID:8023100

  18. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward treatments for millions of people around the world with Autism, Parkinson's, Alzheimers, Schizophrenia and Traumatic Brain ... your state! State Resources Rettsyndrome.org is the world's leading Rett syndrome research funding organization We have ...

  19. Music and dementia.

    PubMed

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of dementia in our aging population, and consequently an urgent need to develop treatments and activities that may alleviate the symptoms of dementia. Accumulating evidence shows that persons with dementia enjoy music, and their ability to respond to music is potentially preserved even in the late or severe stages of dementia when verbal communication may have ceased. Media interest in this topic has contributed to the public perception that music abilities are an "island of preservation" in an otherwise cognitively impaired person with dementia. In this chapter, we review the current literature on music cognition in dementia and show that there has been very scarce rigorous scientific investigation of this issue, and that various types of music memory exist and are differentially impaired in the different types of dementia. Furthermore, we discuss the recent development of music activities as a nonpharmacological treatment for dementia and highlight the methodological limitations of the current literature on this topic. While it has been reported that music activities can improve behavior, (particularly agitation), mood, and cognition in persons with dementia, recent large-scale randomized control studies have questioned the specificity of the effect of music and found that it is no more beneficial than other pleasant activities. Nevertheless, music is unique in its powerful ability to elicit both memories and emotions. This can provide an important link to individual's past and a means of nonverbal communication with carers, which make it an ideal stimulus for persons with dementia. PMID:25725917

  20. Music and dementia.

    PubMed

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of dementia in our aging population, and consequently an urgent need to develop treatments and activities that may alleviate the symptoms of dementia. Accumulating evidence shows that persons with dementia enjoy music, and their ability to respond to music is potentially preserved even in the late or severe stages of dementia when verbal communication may have ceased. Media interest in this topic has contributed to the public perception that music abilities are an "island of preservation" in an otherwise cognitively impaired person with dementia. In this chapter, we review the current literature on music cognition in dementia and show that there has been very scarce rigorous scientific investigation of this issue, and that various types of music memory exist and are differentially impaired in the different types of dementia. Furthermore, we discuss the recent development of music activities as a nonpharmacological treatment for dementia and highlight the methodological limitations of the current literature on this topic. While it has been reported that music activities can improve behavior, (particularly agitation), mood, and cognition in persons with dementia, recent large-scale randomized control studies have questioned the specificity of the effect of music and found that it is no more beneficial than other pleasant activities. Nevertheless, music is unique in its powerful ability to elicit both memories and emotions. This can provide an important link to individual's past and a means of nonverbal communication with carers, which make it an ideal stimulus for persons with dementia.

  1. Exercise for Individuals with Lewy Body Dementia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Inskip, Michael; Mavros, Yorgi; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with Lewy body Dementia (LBD), which encompasses both Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) experience functional decline through Parkinsonism and sedentariness exacerbated by motor, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms. Exercise may improve functional outcomes in Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the multi-domain nature of the LBD cluster of symptoms (physical, cognitive, psychiatric, autonomic) results in vulnerable individuals often being excluded from exercise studies evaluating physical function in PD or cognitive function in dementia to avoid confounding results. This review evaluated existing literature reporting the effects of exercise interventions or physical activity (PA) exposure on cluster symptoms in LBD. Methods A high-sensitivity search was executed across 19 databases. Full-length articles of any language and quality, published or unpublished, that analysed effects of isolated exercise/physical activity on indicative Dementia with Lewy Bodies or PD-dementia cohorts were evaluated for outcomes inclusive of physical, cognitive, psychiatric, physiological and quality of life measures. The protocol for this review (Reg. #: CRD42015019002) is accessible at http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. Results 111,485 articles were initially retrieved; 288 full articles were reviewed and 89.6% subsequently deemed ineligible due to exclusion of participants with co-existence of dementia and Parkinsonism. Five studies (1 uncontrolled trial, 1 randomized controlled trial and 3 case reports) evaluating 16 participants were included. Interventions were diverse and outcome homogeneity was low. Habitual gait speed outcomes were measured in 13 participants and increased (0.18m/s, 95% CI -0.02, 0.38m/s), exceeding moderate important change (0.14m/s) for PD cohorts. Other outcomes appeared to improve modestly in most participants. Discussion Scarce research investigating exercise in LBD

  2. [Dementia study using induced pluripotent stem cells].

    PubMed

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Abe, Koji; Inoue, Haruhisa

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology have facilitated, and have contributed to overcome the difficulty of modeling dementia caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), etc. The following models using iPSCs were reported: the pathophysiology caused by gene mutations such as presenilin or amyloid β precursor protein in AD, α-synuclein in DLB, and microtubule-associated protein tau, fused in sarcoma, progranulin, or chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 in FTLD, anti-AD drug screening, sortilin-related receptor L 1 haplotype influence in sporadic AD, and amyloid β secretion in Down syndrome. Patient-specific iPSC could be expected to reveal the disease pathology and lead to drug discoveries for dementia patients.

  3. [Neuroepigenetics: Desoxyribonucleic acid methylation in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias].

    PubMed

    Mendioroz Iriarte, Maite; Pulido Fontes, Laura; Méndez-López, Iván

    2015-05-21

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that controls gene expression. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), global DNA hypomethylation of neurons has been described in the human cerebral cortex. Moreover, several variants in the methylation pattern of candidate genes have been identified in brain tissue when comparing AD patients and controls. Specifically, DNA methylation changes have been observed in PSEN1 and APOE, both genes previously being involved in the pathophysiology of AD. In other degenerative dementias, methylation variants have also been described in key genes, such as hypomethylation of the SNCA gene in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies or hypermethylation of the GRN gene promoter in frontotemporal dementia. The finding of aberrant DNA methylation patterns shared by brain tissue and peripheral blood opens the door to use those variants as epigenetic biomarkers in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. [The verbal fluency test for the diagnosis of dementia].

    PubMed

    Sciarma, T; Finali, G; Mazzi, P; Poli, R; D'Alessandro, P; Piccirilli, M; Piccinin, G L; Agostini, L

    1990-01-01

    Two forms of verbal fluency test, phonological (FF) and semantic (FS) sets, have been administered to four groups of demented patients: 11 with Alzheimer-type dementia (DAT), 13 with multi-infarct dementia (MID), 8 with Parkinson-Dementia (P-D) and 11 with adult chronic hydrocephalus (ICA). Patients were matched for age, educational level and neuropsychological impairment pattern. Further, ten neurologically healty subjects were selected as control group. Control subjects result to be different from all other groups in both FF and FS; moreover, FF test results to be more impaired in ICA than in DAT. Furthermore, FF is more impaired than FS in P-D and ICA patients. On the basis of our results, verbal fluency tests might represent an useful instrument to differentiate demented subjects from non-demented ones and within demented groups to characterize the different neuropsychological pattern of the cortical and subcortical type of cognitive deterioration.

  5. Current Treatments for Sleep Disturbances in Individuals With Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Deschenes, Cynthia L.; McCurry, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are widespread among older adults. Degenerative neurologic disorders that cause dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, exacerbate age-related changes in sleep, as do many common comorbid medical and psychiatric conditions. Medications used to treat chronic illness and insomnia have many side effects that can further disrupt sleep and place patients at risk for injury. This article reviews the neurophysiology of sleep in normal aging and sleep changes associated with common dementia subtypes and comorbid conditions. Current pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic evidence-based treatment options are discussed, including the use of light therapy, increased physical and social activity, and multicomponent cognitive-behavioral interventions for improving sleep in institutionalized and community-dwelling adults with dementia. PMID:19187704

  6. Hemiparkinsonism-hemiatrophy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ayromlou, Hormoz; Najmi, Safa; Arami, Mohammad Ali

    2011-03-01

    The syndrome of hemiparkinsonism-hemiatrophy is an uncommon form of secondary Parkinsonism that presents with unilateral body Parkinsonism plus variable atrophy on the same side. Diagnosis of this syndrome needs a complete past medical history taking, as well as assessment of the familial history, clinical examination and complete paraclinical tests.The response to medical therapy has been variable in various researches. This case showed a good response to the addition of a dopamine agonist to levodopa therapy.

  7. Impact of Alzheimer's-Type Dementia and Information Source on the Assessment of Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilley, David W.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The level of agreement between the patient and a collateral source with regard to depressive symptomatology was compared for 185 patients with Alzheimer's-type dementia (AD), 57 patients with Parkinson's disease, and 54 nondemented geriatric referrals. Findings highlight the potential insensitivity of patient report in AD. (SLD)

  8. Imaging of genetic and degenerative disorders primarily causing Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David J

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter the structural and functional imaging changes associated with both genetic causes of Parkinson's disease and the sporadic condition are reviewed. The role of imaging for supporting diagnosis and detecting subclinical disease is discussed and the potential use and drawbacks of using imaging biomarkers for monitoring disease progression are debated. Additionally, the use of imaging for differentiating atypical parkinsonian syndromes from Parkinson's disease is presented. PMID:27432680

  9. Action fluency in Parkinson's disease: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Matteo; Volpato, Chiara

    2006-04-01

    The impairment in action fluency task present in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients has been previously interpreted as an indicator of conversion from PD to PD with dementia or as a grammatical deficit for verbs and ascribed to a frontostriatal loop pathophysiology. In the present study, 20 patients with PD without dementia were longitudinally tested with overall cognitive decline scales and semantic, letter, and action fluency tasks in a 24-month follow-up study. In comparison with healthy age-matched controls, PD patients showed a stable and consistent impairment on action fluency without any sign of cognitive decline. Our findings suggest that action fluency task may be an early sign of impairment of frontostriatal circuits in PD and it cannot be considered an indicator of conversion from PD to PD with dementia.

  10. Neurochemical Profile of Dementia Pugilistica

    PubMed Central

    Kokjohn, Tyler A.; Maarouf, Chera L.; Daugs, Ian D.; Hunter, Jesse M.; Whiteside, Charisse M.; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Rodriguez, Emma; Kalback, Walter; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Dementia pugilistica (DP), a suite of neuropathological and cognitive function declines after chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI), is present in approximately 20% of retired boxers. Epidemiological studies indicate TBI is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). Some biochemical alterations observed in AD and PD may be recapitulated in DP and other TBI persons. In this report, we investigate long-term biochemical changes in the brains of former boxers with neuropathologically confirmed DP. Our experiments revealed biochemical and cellular alterations in DP that are complementary to and extend information already provided by histological methods. ELISA and one-dimensional and two dimensional Western blot techniques revealed differential expression of select molecules between three patients with DP and three age-matched non-demented control (NDC) persons without a history of TBI. Structural changes such as disturbances in the expression and processing of glial fibrillary acidic protein, tau, and α-synuclein were evident. The levels of the Aβ–degrading enzyme neprilysin were reduced in the patients with DP. Amyloid-β levels were elevated in the DP participant with the concomitant diagnosis of AD. In addition, the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the axonal transport proteins kinesin and dynein were substantially decreased in DP relative to NDC participants. Traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for dementia development, and our findings are consistent with permanent structural and functional damage in the cerebral cortex and white matter of boxers. Understanding the precise threshold of damage needed for the induction of pathology in DP and TBI is vital. PMID:23268705

  11. [What should be done and not done throughout the process of dementia? Dialogue and aid].

    PubMed

    Duaso Magaña, Enric; Cuadra, Leo; Capo, Mercè; Llonch, Mireia; Loutfi, Sami; Fragoso, Marta; Rodríguez, Daniel; Rey, Antonio

    2009-11-01

    Because dementia is a powerful predictor of dependence, people with this disease are those that live longest with disability. Dementia is the chronic disease provoking the greatest dependence at 12, 24, and 36 months after diagnosis, ahead of other diseases such as stroke, Parkinson's disease and cardiovascular disease. Many of us are aware of the devastating consequences of dementia, but few know how to recognize the symptoms in the initial phases. To rectify this situation, increased public information and training for health professionals is required. To improve the care of the distinct phases of dementia, progress must be made in three areas: dementia must be considered a public health priority, the erroneous belief that nothing can be done for patients with a diagnosis of dementia must be combatted and, finally, no less importantly, knowledge of how to recognize incipient dementia must be acquired. People with dementia less frequently receive palliative care than patients with cancer, despite clearly sharing the need for care in the advances stages of the disease and frequent requests by relatives and carers. In summary, action can be taken to improve the early diagnosis of dementia and the care of the distinct phases of the disease, thus delaying and/or minimizing dependency. Finally, comfort measures at the end stage can be improved.

  12. [Hospitalization and dementia: what was new in 2012?: literature review].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, W

    2013-04-01

    The present work provides a review of literature published in 2012 that were found in a PubMed search with the terms "hospitalization and dementia. Further information was obtained from personal contacts. The rate of publications was ten times higher in 2012 as in previous years. Frequency of dementia, hospital admission, acute coronary syndrome, femoral neck fracture, stroke, complications during hospital stay, outcomes after hospitalization, prediction, rehabilitation, and training are the common topics.

  13. Dementia as a complication of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, P J; Honer, W; Kemp, P; McKenna, P

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Cognitive impairment is known to occur in schizophrenia, and may be marked in institutionalised patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether it ever warrants an additional diagnosis of dementia.
METHODS—A population of chronic schizophrenic patients who were aged 65 or younger and showed no organic risk factors for dementia were screened for presence of disorientation. Any showing this underwent neuropsychological testing, physical investigations, and structural and functional neuroimaging. Information about day to day cognitive function was also obtained from carers.
RESULTS—Eight patients aged 28 to 64 were identified who showed disorientation; in all cases this was accompanied by general intellectual impairment and objective evidence of a dementia syndrome. The patients' schizophrenic symptoms were unexceptional and did not seem sufficient to account for their cognitive impairment. Neuropsychological testing disclosed relative sparing of visual and visuospatial function and language syntax, but pervasive deficits in memory and executive function. Brain CT demonstrated only minor abnormalities but most of the patients showed frontal or temporal hypoperfusion on SPECT.
CONCLUSIONS—Dementia in schizophrenia seems to be a real entity with a neuropsychological signature similar to that of frontotemporal dementia. Functional but not structural imaging abnormalities may also be characteristic.

 PMID:11309451

  14. Dementia paralytica: deterioration from communicating hydrocephalus.

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Roldán, S; Benito, C; Martin, M

    1979-01-01

    Five patients suffering from dementia paralytica who failed to improve or deteriorated after one or several high dosage courses of penicillin, had pneumoencephalographic patterns suggesting communicating hydrocephalus. Measurements of the ventricular index, ratio of cella media to width of the temporal horn, and the callosal angle differed from that in seven cases of dementia paralytica with associated cerebral atrophy. An isotope cisternogram in three cases with communicating hydrocephalus further confirmed a blockage of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at the parasagittal subarachnoid space. Three patients exhibited the full syndrome of gait apraxia, incontinence, and pyramidal tract signs associated with a severe degree of dementia. Shunting of the CSF in three cases was followed by immediate improvement in two, one in a longlasting way. No active parenchymal inflammation was observed in any of three brain biopsy samples taken during surgery, except for leptomeningeal fibrosis in one. Chronic leptomeningitis in dementia paralytica may impair subarachnoid CSF absorption with subsequent communicating hydrocephalus. Progression or inadequate responses after therapeutic dose of penicillin in dementia paralytica should prompt investigation for this complication as an alternative, effective treatment could be offered. Images PMID:469557

  15. Preventing and diagnosing dementia.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Bernie; Jenkins, Catharine; Ginesi, Laura

    While dementia is an umbrella term for a range of degenerative brain disorders, many share similar presentations. Nurses are ideally placed to identify those at risk and empower them to access treatment and plan and prepare for their future needs--as such, they need up-to-date knowledge of the signs and symptoms of the different types of dementia to identify risk factors and make an informed diagnosis. This article, the third in a four-part series on dementia, examines the risk factors, signs, symptoms and diagnosis of dementia, as well as outlining lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise that may help to prevent the development of the condition.

  16. Sexual disinhibition and dementia.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Ulivi, Martina; Danti, Sabrina; Lucetti, Claudio; Nuti, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    To describe inappropriate sexual behaviour (ISB) observed in patients with dementia, we conducted searches using the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Web of Science to find relevant articles, chapters, and books published from 1950 to 2014. Search terms used included 'hypersexuality', 'inappropriate sexual behaviors', and 'dementia'. Publications found through this indexed search were reviewed for further relevant references. Sexuality is a human's need to express intimacy, but persons with dementia may not know how to appropriately meet their needs for closeness and intimacy due to their decline in cognition. Generally, the interaction among brain, physical, psychological, and environmental factors can create what we call ISB. The most likely change in the sexual behaviour of a person with dementia is indifference. However, ISB in dementia appear to be of two types--intimacy-seeking and disinhibited--that differ in their association with dementia type, dementia severity and, possibly, other concurrent behavioural disorder. Tensions develop from uncertainties regarding which, or when, behaviours are to be considered 'inappropriate' (i.e. improper) or abnormal. While most ISB occur in the moderate to severe stages of Alzheimer's dementia, they may also be seen in early stages of frontotemporal dementia because of the lack of insight and disinhibition. ISB are often better managed by non-pharmacological means, as patients may be less responsive to psychoactive therapies, but non-pharmacological interventions do not always stop the behaviour.

  17. Peripheral neuropathy and parkinsonism: a large clinical and pathogenic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sebastien; Vital, Claude

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) has been reported in idiopathic and hereditary forms of parkinsonism, but the pathogenic mechanisms are unclear and likely heterogeneous. Levodopa-induced vitamin B12 deficiency has been discussed as a causal factor of PN in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, but peripheral nervous system involvement might also be a consequence of the underlying neurodegenerative process. Occurrence of PN with parkinsonism has been associated with a panel of mitochondrial cytopathies, more frequently related to a nuclear gene defect and mainly polymerase gamma (POLG1) gene. Parkin (PARK2) gene mutations are responsible for juvenile parkinsonism, and possible peripheral nervous system involvement has been reported. Rarely, an association of parkinsonism with PN may be encountered in other neurodegenerative diseases such as fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome related to premutation CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene, Machado-Joseph disease related to an abnormal CAG repeat expansion in ataxin-3 (ATXN3) gene, Kufor-Rakeb syndrome caused by mutations in ATP13A2 gene, or in hereditary systemic disorders such as Gaucher disease due to mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene and Chediak-Higashi syndrome due to LYST gene mutations. This article reviews conditions in which PN may coexist with parkinsonism. PMID:25582874

  18. Differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative dementias using metabolic phenotypes on F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Tripathi, Manjari; Damle, Nishikant; Kushwaha, Suman; Jaimini, Abhinav; D'Souza, Maria M; Sharma, Rajnish; Saw, Sanjiv; Mondal, Anupam

    2014-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) can be used as a downstream marker of neuronal injury, a hallmark of neurodegenerative dementias. Characteristic patterns of regional glucose metabolism have been used to classify the dementia subtypes, namely Alzheimer's dementia (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), diffuse Lewy body (DLBD) and vascular dementia (VD). We undertook this study to assess the utility of FDG-PET in the differential diagnosis of dementia subtypes. One hundred and twenty-five patients diagnosed with dementia were referred from cognitive disorders and memory clinics of speciality neurology centres for the FDG-PET study. Imaging-based diagnosis of dementia type was established in 101 patients by visual assessment of individual scans by a PET physician blinded to the clinical diagnosis. The results were compared with an 18-month follow-up clinical assessment made by the specialist neurologist. Concordance of visual evaluation of FDG-PET scans with clinical diagnosis of the dementia type was achieved in 90% of patients scanned. This concordance was 93.4% for AD, 88.8% for FTD, 66.6% for DLBD and 92.3% for the other dementia syndromes. FDG-PET performed after the initial work-up of dementias is useful for supporting the clinical diagnosis of dementia subtype. PMID:24571830

  19. Visual hallucinations in PD and Lewy body dementias: old and new hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Onofrj, M; Taylor, J P; Monaco, D; Franciotti, R; Anzellotti, F; Bonanni, L; Onofrj, V; Thomas, A

    2013-01-01

    Visual Hallucinations (VH) are a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson's Disease (PD) and the Lewy body dementias (LBD) of Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The origin of VH in PD and LBD is debated: earlier studies considered a number of different possible mechanisms underlying VH including visual disorders, Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep Intrusions, dysfunctions of top down or bottom up visual pathways, and neurotransmitter imbalance. More recently newer hypotheses introduce, among the possible mechanisms of VH, the role of attention networks (ventral and dorsal) and of the Default Mode Network (DMN) a network that is inhibited during attentional tasks and becomes active during rest and self referential imagery. Persistent DMN activity during active tasks with dysfunctional imbalance of dorsal and ventral attentional networks represents a new hypothesis on the mechanism of VH. We review the different methods used to classify VH and discuss reports supporting or challenging the different hypothetical mechanisms of VH.

  20. Bilateral pallidotomy for treatment of Parkinson's disease induced corticobulbar syndrome and psychic akinesia avoidable by globus pallidus lesion combined with contralateral stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Merello, M; Starkstein, S; Nouzeilles, M; Kuzis, G; Leiguarda, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Posteroventral pallidotomy (PVP) has proved to be an effective method for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, data on bilateral procedures are still limited. To assess the effects of bilateral globus pallidus (GPi) lesion and to compare it with a combination of unilateral GPi lesion plus contralateral GPi stimulation (PVP+PVS), an open blind randomised trial was designed.
METHODS—A prospective series of patients with severe Parkinson's disease refractory to medical treatment, and severe drug induced dyskinesias, were randomised either to simultaneous bilateral PVP or simultaneous PVP+PVS. All patients were assessed with the core assessment programme for intracerebral transplantation (CAPIT), and a comprehensive neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric battery both before surgery and 3 months later.
RESULTS—The severe adverse effects found in the first three patients subjected to bilateral PVP led to discontinuation of the protocol. All three patients developed depression and apathy. Speech, salivation, and swallowing, as well as freezing, walking, and falling, dramatically worsened. By contrast, all three patients undergoing PVP+PVS had a significant motor improvement.
CONCLUSION—Bilateral simultaneous lesions within the GPi may produce severe motor and psychiatric complications. On the other hand, a combination of PVP+ PVS significantly improves parkinsonian symptoms not associated with the side effects elicited by bilateral lesions.

 PMID:11606671

  1. [Hallucinations and dementia. Prevalence, clinical presentation and pathophysiology].

    PubMed

    Fénelon, G; Mahieux, F

    2004-04-01

    Hallucinations are a common feature of certain degenerative diseases with a risk of dementia such as Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body dementia, and Parkinson's disease. Obtaining valid epidemiological data is nevertheless quite difficult because of methodological problems. As a rule, hallucinations are more prevalent in Lewy body disease than Parkinson's disease or Alzheimer's disease. The prevalence in parkinsonian dementia is about the same as in Lewy body disease. Complex visual hallucinations predominate, auditory or tactile hallucinations are more exceptional. Minor forms (illusions, sensation of presence) are also observed. Recurrence is common, mainly in the evening or at night. Patients with advanced mental impairment generally take the hallucinations for reality. The hallucinations can be associated with psychological and behavioral disorders such as delusionnal idea or identification disorders. It is important to search for other causes of hallucinations such as drugs, ocular disorders, or depression, but many of these disorders are common comorbidities in elderly patients with degenerative disease. There is no unique model fitting all the hypothesized pathogenic mechanisms. Complex visual hallucinations most likely arise from abnormal activation of the extra-striat temporal associative regions, but only hypothetical mechanisms have been proposed. Genetic studies and functional imaging have not provided convincing evidence. Current focus is placed on an imbalance between deficient cholinergic transmission and preserved or augmented monoaminergic transmission at the cortical level, but other neurotransmission systems could be involved. The dream dysregulation mechanism proposed in Parkinson's disease cannot be generalized. The link between cognitive disorders and hallucination is also poorly understood: hallucinations are associated with more severe cognitive impairments or more rapid cognitive deline in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, but the

  2. Clinical subtypes of chronic traumatic encephalopathy: literature review and proposed research diagnostic criteria for traumatic encephalopathy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts have been described since the early 20th century. Terms such as punch drunk and dementia pugilistica were first used to describe the clinical syndromes experienced by boxers. A more generic designation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), has been employed since the mid-1900s and has been used in recent years to describe a neurodegenerative disease found not just in boxers but in American football players, other contact sport athletes, military veterans, and others with histories of repetitive brain trauma, including concussions and subconcussive trauma. This article reviews the literature of the clinical manifestations of CTE from 202 published cases. The clinical features include impairments in mood (for example, depression and hopelessness), behavior (for example, explosivity and violence), cognition (for example, impaired memory, executive functioning, attention, and dementia), and, less commonly, motor functioning (for example, parkinsonism, ataxia, and dysarthria). We present proposed research criteria for traumatic encephalopathy syndrome (TES) which consist of four variants or subtypes (TES behavioral/mood variant, TES cognitive variant, TES mixed variant, and TES dementia) as well as classifications of ‘probable CTE’ and ‘possible CTE’. These proposed criteria are expected to be modified and updated as new research findings become available. They are not meant to be used for a clinical diagnosis. Rather, they should be viewed as research criteria that can be employed in studies of the underlying causes, risk factors, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of CTE and related disorders. PMID:25580160

  3. [People's knowledge about dementia].

    PubMed

    Bogolepova, A N

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the most urgent problems due to the high prevalence and disability. Timely identification and early diagnosis of dementia are the most important for successful management of patients that may be possible only if patients refer for medical care. In this connection, people's knowledge about dementia is of great importance. To study people's knowledge about problems of dementia. The survey was carried out in September 2014 in 42 regions of the Russian Federation (130 survey sites) and comprised 1600 respondents. The survey has revealed that 48% of participants are afraid to have dementia, 47% are not aware of signs and symptoms of marked cognitive impairment and 54% have concerns about age-related memory impairment. A low percent of people who refer for medical care may be explained by the widespread opinion (37% of Russians) that dementia is not curable; 42% believe that there are no drugs for treatment of dementia. Only 5% of respondents would visit a doctor if their relative has dementia. The results of this survey highlighted the necessity of using special programs to improve people's knowledge about problems of dementia.

  4. Dealing with Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an NIH-supported Alzheimer’s disease center at the University of Wisconsin. “Symptoms of dementia can include problems with memory, thinking, and language, along with impairments to social skills and some behavioral symptoms.” Several factors can raise your risk for developing dementia. These ...

  5. Living With Semantic Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Karen; Wilkinson, Ray; Keady, John

    2014-01-01

    Semantic dementia is a variant of frontotemporal dementia and is a recently recognized diagnostic condition. There has been some research quantitatively examining care partner stress and burden in frontotemporal dementia. There are, however, few studies exploring the subjective experiences of family members caring for those with frontotemporal dementia. Increased knowledge of such experiences would allow service providers to tailor intervention, support, and information better. We used a case study design, with thematic narrative analysis applied to interview data, to describe the experiences of a wife and son caring for a husband/father with semantic dementia. Using this approach, we identified four themes: (a) living with routines, (b) policing and protecting, (c) making connections, and (d) being adaptive and flexible. Each of these themes were shared and extended, with the importance of routines in everyday life highlighted. The implications for policy, practice, and research are discussed. PMID:24532121

  6. [Hearing impairment and dementia].

    PubMed

    Kilimann, I; Óvari, A; Hermann, A; Witt, G; Pau, H W; Teipel, S

    2015-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) burden of disease study identified dementia and hearing problems as leading causes of loss of quality of life in the industrial world. The prevalence of dementia and hearing problems increases in aging societies. Comorbidity of these two diseases causes increasing demands on healthcare systems. The similarity and possible interaction of symptoms renders diagnosis and therapy of dementia and hearing loss a challenge for neurologists, psychiatrists, ear, nose and throat (ENT) and hearing specialists. Knowledge of both diseases enables an early intervention and helps preserve participation in society and thereby reducing the risk of developing dementia. This paper focuses on the characteristics of the diagnosis and therapy of hearing problems and dementia.

  7. Depression, Dementia, and Social Supports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esser, Sally R.; Vitaliano, Peter P.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews recent literature on the relationships among dementia, depression, and social support, emphasizing the diagnostic differentiation of dementia and depression, and the role of these three entities in elderly with cognitive impairment. Discusses dementia-like symptoms arising in depression and the coexistence of dementia and depression.…

  8. Capgras' syndrome with organic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M. N.; Hawthorne, M. E.; Gribbin, N.; Jacobson, R.

    1990-01-01

    Capgras' syndrome, one form of the delusional misidentification syndromes, is described. Three patients with the syndrome are reported. The first had a right cerebral infarction, the second had nephrotic syndrome secondary to severe pre-eclampsia in the puerperium, and the third had uncontrolled diabetes mellitus with dementia. Evidence is reviewed regarding an organic aetiology for Capgras' syndrome. We conclude that, when the syndrome is present, a thorough search for organic disorder should be made. PMID:2084656

  9. Neural correlates of attention‐executive dysfunction in lewy body dementia and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kobeleva, Xenia; Cherry, George; Killen, Alison; Gallagher, Peter; Burn, David J.; Thomas, Alan J.; O'Brien, John T.; Taylor, John‐Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Attentional and executive dysfunction contribute to cognitive impairment in both Lewy body dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Using functional MRI, we examined the neural correlates of three components of attention (alerting, orienting, and executive/conflict function) in 23 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 32 patients with Lewy body dementia (19 with dementia with Lewy bodies and 13 with Parkinson's disease with dementia), and 23 healthy controls using a modified Attention Network Test. Although the functional MRI demonstrated a similar fronto‐parieto‐occipital network activation in all groups, Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia patients had greater activation of this network for incongruent and more difficult trials, which were also accompanied by slower reaction times. There was no recruitment of additional brain regions or, conversely, regional deficits in brain activation. The default mode network, however, displayed diverging activity patterns in the dementia groups. The Alzheimer's disease group had limited task related deactivations of the default mode network, whereas patients with Lewy body dementia showed heightened deactivation to all trials, which might be an attempt to allocate neural resources to impaired attentional networks. We posit that, despite a common endpoint of attention‐executive disturbances in both dementias, the pathophysiological basis of these is very different between these diseases. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1254–1270, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26705763

  10. Successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of a right posterolateral bypass tract in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome after a previous failed ablative procedure: taking the high road.

    PubMed

    Cohen, T J

    2000-07-01

    A 16-year-old high school basketball player with symptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome underwent an unsuccessful radiofrequency catheter ablative procedure from the femoral venous approach. During this procedure, the patient received 30 applications of radiofrequency energy without injury to the accessory pathway. The patient was treated with flecinide 100 mg orally twice daily and rescheduled for a second ablative procedure via the right internal jugular venous approach. At the second session, prior to any right internal jugular venous applications, 3 additional applications were delivered via the right femoral venous approach using a different catheter, without success. A single radiofrequency energy application from the right internal jugular venous approach eliminated the bypass tract in approximately 2 seconds. The superior approach achieved a more stable catheter position thereby eliminating the bypass tract. In conclusion, an alternative plan of attack should be considered after multiple failures from a given approach. In other words, take the high road if you can't take the low road.

  11. Similarities of cerebral glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's and Parkinsonian dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.; Metter, E.J.; Benson, D.F.; Ashford, J.W.; Riege, W.H.; Fujikawa, D.G.; Markham, C.H.; Maltese, A.

    1985-05-01

    In the dementia of probable Alzheimer's Disease (AD), there is a decrease in the metabolic ratio of parietal cortex/caudate-thalamus which relates measures in the most and in the least severely affected locations. Since some demented patients with Parkinson's Disease (PDD) are known to share pathological and neurochemical features with AD patients, the authors evaluated if the distribution of cerebral hypometabolism in PDD and AD were the same. Local cerebral metabolic rates were determined using the FDG method and positron tomography in subjects with AD (N=23), and PDD (N=7), multiple infarct dementia (MID)(N=6), and controls (N=10). In MID, the mean par/caudthal ratio was normal (0.79 +- 0.9, N=6). In AD and PDD patients, this ratio correlated negatively with both the severity (r=-0.624, rho=0.001) and duration (r=-0.657, rho=0.001) of dementia. The ratio was markedly decreased in subjects with mild to severe dementia (0.46 +- 0.09, N=21) and with dementia duration greater than two years (0.44 +- 0.08, N=18), but the ratio was also significantly decreased in patients with less advanced disease, i.e., when dementia was only questionable (0.64 +- 0.14, N=9) (t=2.27, rho<0.037) and when duration was two years or less (0.62 +- 0.13, N=12)(t=2.88, rho<0.009). This similarity of hypometabolism in AD and PDD is additional evidence that a common mechanism may operate in both disorders. The par/caud-thal metabolic ratio may be an index useful in the differential diagnosis of early dementia.

  12. [Diabetes mellitus and dementia].

    PubMed

    Kopf, D

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus, particularly type 2 diabetes, is a risk factor for dementia and this holds true for incident vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Cerebrovascular complications of diabetes and chronic mild inflammation in insulin resistant states partly account for this increased risk. In addition, cellular resistance to the trophic effects of insulin on neurons and glial cells favor the accumulation of toxic metabolic products, such as amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau protein (pTau). Weight loss frequently precedes overt cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. This results in an increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes in stable diabetic patients who are on suitably adjusted doses of oral insulin or insulinotropic antidiabetic drugs. In turn, hypoglycemic episodes may induce further damage in the vulnerable brains of type 2 diabetes patients. Patients with unexplained weight loss, hypoglycemic episodes and subjective memory complaints must be screened for dementia. Once dementia has been diagnosed the goals of diabetes management must be reevaluated as prevention of hypoglycemia becomes more important than tight metabolic control. As weight loss accelerates the rate of cognitive decline, nutritional goals must aim at stabilizing body weight. There is no available evidence on whether drug treatment of diabetes in middle-aged persons can help to prevent dementia; however, physical exercise, mental activity and higher education have preventive effects on the risk of dementia in later life. In addition, nutritional recommendations that are effective in preventing cardiovascular events have also been shown to reduce the risk of dementia.

  13. Mononuclear cells in dementia.

    PubMed

    Mandas, Antonella; Dessì, Sandra

    2014-04-20

    According to the World Health Organization statistics, dementias are the largest contributors to disease burden in advanced market economies, and the leading cause of disability and dependence among older people worldwide. So far, several techniques have been developed to identify dementias with reasonable accuracy while the patient is still alive, however, no single of them has proven to be ideal, especially if you need to have a satisfactory early diagnosis. Studies of early onset dementia are largely limited by the inaccessibility to direct examination of the living human brain: it appears therefore that for a correct biochemical and molecular characterization of dementias, potential surrogate tissues must be identified. In this context, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) appear particularly attractive because they can be obtained in a minimally invasive manner and can be easily analyzed. This review focuses on the most representative methodologies and strategies in detecting and quantifying fluctuation in dementia that are currently being developed. In addition it provides a comprehensive evaluation of the diagnostic sensitivity of PBMCs in patients with dementia. Finally, it discusses the data supporting the use of the determination of neutral lipids (NLs) in PBMCs by Oil Red O (ORO) staining, which is a minimally invasive, cheap, easy and fast procedure, as the promising method for early detection of dementia and to search for new effective treatments.

  14. Subcortical dementia revisited: similarities and differences in cognitive function between progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA).

    PubMed

    Bak, T H; Crawford, L M; Hearn, V C; Mathuranath, P S; Hodges, J R

    2005-08-01

    To examine the similarities and differences in cognitive function between three predominantly subcortical dementing disorders associated with parkinsonism we compared the profiles of cognitive performance in 39 patients with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP), 26 patients with Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) and 25 with Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD) with those of 30 patients with classic cortical dementia, Alzheimer's Disease (AD), using two different cognitive screening tests: Dementia Rating Scale (DRS) and Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE). The cognitive profile on ACE and DRS subtests distinguished subcortical diseases from each other as well as from AD. All parkinsonian syndromes were characterized by a disproportionate impairment in verbal fluency, particularly letter fluency. The three diseases differed, however, in the degree of language, memory and visuospatial impairment. We conclude that similarities, as well as differences, between PSP, MSA and CBD can be detected using a brief, clinically applicable cognitive screening test. The pattern of cognitive impairment is likely to reflect a different distribution of pathology, in particular a higher degree of cortical involvement in PSP and CBD.

  15. Dementia-friendly neighbourhoods.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Six research projects that will improve understanding of dementia are to receive £20 million in funding from the UK government. The projects, which will be overseen by the National Institute for Health Research and the Economic and Social Research Council, include investigations into creating dementia-friendly neighbourhoods; the lifestyle changes that can reduce the risk of developing the condition; training care home staff to support patients who become agitated; improving predictions of the future financial costs of dementia; living well with the condition; and the effects of visual aids on wellbeing and quality of life.

  16. [Dementia: management and prevention].

    PubMed

    Daher, Oscar; Nguyen, Sylvain; Smith, Cindi; Büla, Christophe; Démonet, Jean-François

    2016-04-20

    Dementia represents a great challenge for health care providers. Detection of cognitive impairment is critical for early diagnosis of dementia. Early diagnosis allows to initiate individualized management that focuses on maintaining patient's autonomy and supporting their caregivers. Proposed multimodal interventions include physical activity, cognitive training, mediterranean diet, and management of cardiovascular risk factors. Before the initiation of pro-cognitive therapy, medication review is essential to evaluate current treament and determine specific therapeutic objectives, based on patient's overall health and preferences. Overall risk reduction for dementia revolves around similar measures that target physical activity, cognition, diet and management of cardiovascular risk factors.

  17. [Esquirol and dementia].

    PubMed

    Albou, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Jean Etienne Dominique Esquirol (1772-1840), after Pinel (1745-1826), stated precisely the symptoms of dementia according to the new medical definition of the word: a disease including all the states of intellectual weakness for various reasons. For example Esquirol clearly distinguished dementia from mania--that is to say our present psychoses--, and also from mental deficiency. In the same time Esquirol became more and more conscious, from 1814 (cf. his contributions to the Dictionnaire des sciences médicales, in 58 volumes, dir. Panckoucke) and 1838 (his famous work Des maladies mentales), of the very nature of senile insanity compared with other kinds of dementia.

  18. [Dementia: management and prevention].

    PubMed

    Daher, Oscar; Nguyen, Sylvain; Smith, Cindi; Büla, Christophe; Démonet, Jean-François

    2016-04-20

    Dementia represents a great challenge for health care providers. Detection of cognitive impairment is critical for early diagnosis of dementia. Early diagnosis allows to initiate individualized management that focuses on maintaining patient's autonomy and supporting their caregivers. Proposed multimodal interventions include physical activity, cognitive training, mediterranean diet, and management of cardiovascular risk factors. Before the initiation of pro-cognitive therapy, medication review is essential to evaluate current treament and determine specific therapeutic objectives, based on patient's overall health and preferences. Overall risk reduction for dementia revolves around similar measures that target physical activity, cognition, diet and management of cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:27276724

  19. The history of parkinsonism: descriptions in ancient Indian medical literature.

    PubMed

    Ovallath, Sujith; Deepa, P

    2013-05-01

    The clinical syndrome of parkinsonism was identified in ancient India even before the period of Christ and was treated methodically. The earliest reference to bradykinesia dates to 600 bc. Evidences prove that as early as 300 bc, Charaka proposed a coherent picture of parkinsonism by describing tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and gait disturbances as its components. The scenario was further developed by Madhava, Vagbhata, and Dalhana all through history. The 15th-century classic "Bhasava rajyam" introduced the term kampavata, which may be regarded as an ayurvedic analogue of parkinsonism. The pathogenesis of kampavata centered on the concept of imbalance in the vata factor, which controls psychomotor activities. The essential element in therapy was the administration of powdered seed of Mucuna pruriens, or atmagupta, which as per reports, contains 4%-6% of levodopa. In addition to proving the existence and identification of parkinsonism in ancient India, the study points to the significance of ancient Indian Sanskrit works in medical history. PMID:23483637

  20. Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... DLB and Parkinson’s disease, and between DLB and Alzheimer’s disease, can often make it difficult for a ... in the brains of people with Parkinson's and Alzheimer’s diseases. These findings suggest that either DLB is ...

  1. Camptocormia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Eldad; Djaldetti, Ruth

    2006-12-01

    Camptocormia is defined as an abnormal, severe and involuntary forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine, which becomes manifest during standing and walking and subsides in the recumbent position. It was originally described as a psychogenic disorder, particularly in soldiers involved in long-term trench service during World War 1. It is becoming increasingly recognized as a prominent and disabling phenomenon during the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). In our experience, there is no clear correlation between camptocormia and levodopa treatment. In a few patients, the abnormal posture improved and in others it was unaltered or even became worse following levodopa administration. In a minority of fluctuating patients, there was a temporary deterioration during the "off" periods, but in most, the severity of camptocormia was unchanged during the "on" and "off" phases. In some patients it is associated with back pains, whereas in others it is painless. It occurs in sporadic PD as well as in postencephalitic and parkin-gene mutation PD and in other parkinsonian syndromes such as MSA. The pathogenesis of this striking clinical sign is unknown. It is definitely not due to a primary vertebral disease causing kyphosis such as ankylosing spondylitis, as the bent spine disappears when the patient lies on his back. The muscles involved may be the abdominal, paravertebral or both. It may by due to a peculiar dystonia or to an extreme form of rigidity. Local myopathic changes were suggested as a possible cause, but these may rather be a secondary phenomenon. Treatment is currently unsatisfactory in most cases. Occasional patients may benefit from intramuscular botulinum toxin injections or from deep brain stimulation.

  2. [Frontotemporal Dementia Presenting as Acute Late Onset Schizophrenia

    PubMed

    Reischle, Ekkehard; Sturm, Kornelia; Schuierer, Gerhard; Ibach, Bernd

    2003-05-01

    The concept of frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a heterogenous group of cortical dementias, including frontotemporal dementia, as the major clinical variant. Because of their highly variable clinical presentation, to establish the diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia could be a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. Here we report a 53 years old caucasian male patient who was admitted for hospitalization due to acute severe schizophrenia-like symptoms. The leading symptomatology comprised acoustic and bizarre optical hallucinations with euphoria and self-overestimation. Remission of the psychotic symptoms demasked the clinical picture of a rapidly progressive frontotemporal dementia with marked apathy, indifference, emotional blunting, loss of insight, change of personality and typical cognitive impairment. The diagnosis was supported by the results of cerebral MRI and FDG-18 PET. This first clinical manifestation of a schizophrenia-like syndrome in the 6 (th) life decade implicates frontotemporal dementia as an important differential diagnosis of schizophrenic disorders in late life. In addition of basically thinking about frontotemporal dementia, a detailed medical history, cognitive testing, neuroimaging and eventually the evaluation of the further disease course are necessary to establish a diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia. PMID:13130343

  3. [A case of schizophreniform disorder in frontotemporal dementia (FTD)].

    PubMed

    Reischle, Ekkehard; Sturm, Kornelia; Schuierer, Gerhard; Ibach, Bernd

    2003-05-01

    The concept of frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a heterogenous group of cortical dementias, including frontotemporal dementia, as the major clinical variant. Because of their highly variable clinical presentation, to establish the diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia could be a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. Here we report a 53 years old caucasian male patient who was admitted for hospitalization due to acute severe schizophrenia-like symptoms. The leading symptomatology comprised acoustic and bizarre optical hallucinations with euphoria and self-overestimation. Remission of the psychotic symptoms demasked the clinical picture of a rapidly progressive frontotemporal dementia with marked apathy, indifference, emotional blunting, loss of insight, change of personality and typical cognitive impairment. The diagnosis was supported by the results of cerebral MRI and FDG-18 PET. This first clinical manifestation of a schizophrenia-like syndrome in the 6th life decade implicates frontotemporal dementia as an important differential diagnosis of schizophrenic disorders in late life. In addition of basically thinking about frontotemporal dementia, a detailed medical history, cognitive testing, neuroimaging and eventually the evaluation of the further disease course are necessary to establish a diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia. PMID:14509045

  4. A clinical overview of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Modugno, Nicola; Lena, Francesco; Di Biasio, Francesca; Cerrone, Gloria; Ruggieri, Stefano; Fornai, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    Although Parkinson's disease (PD) is diagnosed on the basis of motor symptoms, including slowness of movement, tremor, rigidity and difficulties with balance and walking, now we are aware that non-motor symptoms are highly prevalent, since they can anticipate motor symptoms and can cause severe consequences. Several studies have shown that non-motor symptoms, such as depression, anxiety and apathy, psychosis (e.g., hallucinations, delusions), sleep disturbance, and pain may have a greater adverse impact on quality of life and health economics compared with motor symptoms. Non-motor symptoms can be divided into four domains: neuropsychiatric (e.g., depression, anxiety, apathy, hallucinations, dementia), autonomic (e.g., constipation, orthostatic hypotension, urinary changes, sweating abnormalities), sleep (e.g., insomnia, sleep fragmentation, excessive daytime sleepiness, rapid eye movement, sleep behavioural disorder, restless leg syndrome), and sensory dysfunction (e.g., pain, olfactory dysfunction). This review addresses diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. The causative mechanisms remain complex, since they reflect the widespread brainstem and cortical pathology of PD, with involvement of several neurotransmitters, including dopamine (DA), serotonin, norepinephrine, and acetylcholine. The diagnosis is often challenging, especially for psychiatric disorders, and in particular affective disorders, because somatic features of psychopathology may overlap with the movement disorder itself. Treatments used are limited and psychiatric drugs may not be as effective as in general population. Evidence based medicine is quite poor and it still requires well-designed clinical studies. PMID:24873924

  5. Midlife migraine and late-life parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Ross, G. Webster; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Garcia, Melissa; Gudmundsson, Larus S.; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Sigurlaug; Wagner, Amy K.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that having migraine in middle age is related to late-life parkinsonism and a related disorder, restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease (WED). Methods: The AGES-Reykjavik cohort (born 1907–1935) has been followed since 1967. Headaches were classified based on symptoms assessed in middle age. From 2002 to 2006, 5,764 participants were reexamined to assess symptoms of parkinsonism, diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD), family history of PD, and RLS/WED. Results: Subjects with midlife migraine, particularly migraine with aura (MA), were in later life more likely than others to report parkinsonian symptoms (odds ratio [OR]MA = 3.6 [95% CI 2.7–4.8]) and diagnosed PD (ORMA = 2.5 [95% CI 1.2–5.2]). Women with MA were more likely than others to have a parent (ORMA = 2.26 [95% CI 1.3–4.0]) or sibling (ORMA = 1.78 [95% CI 1.1–2.9]) with PD. Late-life RLS/WED was increased for headache generally. Associations were independent of cardiovascular disease and MRI-evident presumed ischemic lesions. Conclusions: These findings suggest there may be a common vulnerability to, or consequences of, migraine and multiple indicators of parkinsonism. Additional genetic and longitudinal observational studies are needed to identify candidate pathways that may account for the comorbid constellation of symptoms. PMID:25230997

  6. Hereditary Parkinson s Disease Natural History Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Parkinson Disease 6, Early-Onset; Parkinson Disease (Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset) 7, Human; Parkinson Disease Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset; Parkinson Disease, Autosomal Recessive Early-Onset, Digenic, Pink1/Dj1

  7. [Vascular factors in dementia].

    PubMed

    Bidzan, Leszek

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrovascular factors are a common cause of dementia or contribute to cognitive decline in other dementias. Studies showing that cerebrovascular factors are the risk factors for neurodegenerative dementias, especially Alzheimer's disease. Practically all neurodegenerative dementias have a vascular component that reduces cerebral perfusion and has great impact on the clinical picture. Recent data support the view that the neurodegenerative process is caused by cerebrovascular mechanisms. The results showed that patients with vascular cognitive impairment have a typical clinical picture. Various important non-cognitive features are caused by cerebrovascular factors and are associated with a more rapid course of illness. On the other hand the term vascular diseases or cerebrovascular factors include a variety of vascular pathologies. PMID:16358596

  8. [Dementia and otorhinolaryngologic practice].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, S; Hesse, G; Laubert, A

    2014-09-01

    The interaction between sensorial registration of peripheral stimuli and their central cognitive processing is not yet understood. The role of sensory deficits such as olfactory deterioration or hearing loss in the development of dementia is currently a focus of concern, with hopes of finding new diagnostic aspects and therapeutic options for multimodal treatment concepts in patients with dementia. The expertise of ENT specialists in the diagnostic and therapeutic fields of dysphagia, vestibular dysfunction and olfactory or hearing loss could make an important contribution to the development of future strategies for dealing with dementia. In this report we present up-to-date basic knowledge and ENT-specific aspects relating to the diagnostics and treatment of dementia. PMID:25103990

  9. Sociopathic behavior and dementia.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Gabriele; Borin, Gemma; Vedovello, Marcella; Di Fiorino, Andrea; Nuti, Angelo

    2013-06-01

    The maintenance of appropriate social behavior is a very complex process with many contributing factors. Social and moral judgments rely on the proper functioning of neural circuits concerned with complex cognitive and emotional processes. Damage to these systems may lead to distinct social behavior abnormalities. When patients present with dysmoral behavior for the first time, as a change from a prior pervasive pattern of behavior, clinicians need to consider a possible, causative brain disorder. The aim is to explore sociopathy as a manifestation of dementia. We searched electronic databases and key journals for original research and review articles on sociopathy in demented patients using the search terms "sociopathy, acquired sociopathy, sociopathic behavior, dementia, and personality". In conclusion, dementia onset may be heralded by changes in personality including alteration in social interpersonal behavior, personal regulation, and empathy. The sociopathy of dementia differs from antisocial/psychopathic personality disorders. PMID:23180469

  10. Personality change in dementia.

    PubMed

    Aitken, L; Simpson, S; Burns, A

    1999-09-01

    This study examined the prevalence and nature of personality change in 99 patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia. Personality was assessed using an informant-rated inventory of the patient's personality before and after the onset of dementia, with the difference equating to a change in personality. Personality characteristics were related to the patients' age and sex, duration of illness, degree of cognitive impairment, the presence of a grasp reflex, and extrapyramidal signs. Personality change was found to be almost universal and negative in nature and was particularly associated with severity of cognitive impairment, longer duration of illness, and neurological signs. The findings reflect those from other studies and emphasize the biological basis of personality changes in dementia.

  11. Dementia - home care

    MedlinePlus

    ... help improve communication skills and prevent wandering. Calming music may reduce wandering and restlessness, ease anxiety, and improve sleep and behavior. People with dementia should have their eyes and ...

  12. Preventing and diagnosing dementia.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Bernie; Jenkins, Catharine; Ginesi, Laura

    While dementia is an umbrella term for a range of degenerative brain disorders, many share similar presentations. Nurses are ideally placed to identify those at risk and empower them to access treatment and plan and prepare for their future needs--as such, they need up-to-date knowledge of the signs and symptoms of the different types of dementia to identify risk factors and make an informed diagnosis. This article, the third in a four-part series on dementia, examines the risk factors, signs, symptoms and diagnosis of dementia, as well as outlining lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise that may help to prevent the development of the condition. PMID:27544960

  13. Dementia and driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... has dementia , deciding when they can no longer drive may be difficult. They may react in different ... that the person may not be able to drive safely, such as: Forgetting recent events Mood swings ...

  14. Multi-Infarct Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multi-Infarct Dementia ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  15. Dementia - daily care

    MedlinePlus

    ... recs.pdf . Accessed on June 27, 2016. Budson AE, Solomon PR. Life adjustments for memory loss, Alzheimer's disease, and dementia. In: Budson AE, Solomon PR, eds. Memory Loss, Alzheimer's Disease, and ...

  16. Neuroimaging and dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.F.

    1986-05-01

    The tremendous increase in dementia has created a need for improved diagnostic techniques, and each of the newly established brain imaging techniques has been applied to this problem. Several, particularly computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and isotope emission tomography, have proved valuable. Each procedure has strengths--specific disorders that can be diagnosed--and weaknesses--types of dementia that cannot be demonstrated.

  17. Complex visual hallucinations in a Parkinson patient: don't blame James if it's Charles's fault.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kurt

    2013-03-01

    A patient with a history of Parkinson's disease and severe bilateral peripheral vision loss due to vitreous hemorrhages had complex visual hallucinations that persisted for three days and appeared every morning on awakening. The persistent nature of these hallucinations, the patient's preserved insight, and the presence of severe visual impairment was suggestive for Charles Bonnet syndrome rather than Parkinson-related hallucinations. A treatment with carbamazepine was started and proved to be successful. Physicians treating Parkinson patients should be familiar with Charles Bonnet syndrome and consider it as a potential alternative etiology for visual hallucinations, especially when the patient has severely impaired vision and when the hallucinations are sustained during wakefulness.

  18. [Post Stroke Dementia].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    Post-stroke dementia (PSD) is a clinical entity that encompasses all types of dementia following an index stroke. Current evidence suggests that 25-30% of ischemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment or vascular dementia. The type of stroke can be either ischemic, hemorrhagic or hypoperfusive. There are multiple risk factors for PSD including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Pre-stroke dementia refers to the occurrence of cognitive impairment before the index stroke, which may be caused by a vascular burden as well as insidious neurodegenerative changes. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke include silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Published clinical trials have not been promising and there is little information on whether PSD can be prevented using pharmacological agents. Control of vascular disease risk and prevention of recurrent strokes are key to reducing the burden of cognitive decline and post-stroke dementia. Modern imaging and analysis techniques will help to elucidate the mechanism of PSD and establish better treatment. PMID:27395459

  19. Early Dementia Screening

    PubMed Central

    Panegyres, Peter K.; Berry, Renee; Burchell, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the world increases, there will be larger numbers of people with dementia and an emerging need for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Early dementia screening is the process by which a patient who might be in the prodromal phases of a dementing illness is determined as having, or not having, the hallmarks of a neurodegenerative condition. The concepts of mild cognitive impairment, or mild neurocognitive disorder, are useful in analyzing the patient in the prodromal phase of a dementing disease; however, the transformation to dementia may be as low as 10% per annum. The search for early dementia requires a comprehensive clinical evaluation, cognitive assessment, determination of functional status, corroborative history and imaging (including MRI, FDG-PET and maybe amyloid PET), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination assaying Aβ1–42, T-τ and P-τ might also be helpful. Primary care physicians are fundamental in the screening process and are vital in initiating specialist investigation and treatment. Early dementia screening is especially important in an age where there is a search for disease modifying therapies, where there is mounting evidence that treatment, if given early, might influence the natural history—hence the need for cost-effective screening measures for early dementia. PMID:26838803

  20. Autophagy in dementias.

    PubMed

    Kragh, Christine Lund; Ubhi, Kiren; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Wyss-Corey, Tony; Masliah, Eliezer

    2012-01-01

    Dementias are a varied group of disorders typically associated with memory loss, impaired judgment and/or language and by symptoms affecting other cognitive and social abilities to a degree that interferes with daily functioning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of a progressive dementia, followed by dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), (VaD) and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The pathogenesis of this group of disorders has been linked to the abnormal accumulation of proteins in the brains of affected individuals, which in turn has been related to deficits in protein clearance. Autophagy is a key cellular protein clearance pathway with proteolytic cleavage and degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway representing another important clearance mechanism. Alterations in the levels of autophagy and the proteins associated with the autophagocytic pathway have been reported in various types of dementias. This review will examine recent literature across these disorders and highlight a common theme of altered autophagy across the spectrum of the dementias. PMID:22150925

  1. Young onset dementia.

    PubMed

    Draper, B; Withall, A

    2016-07-01

    Young onset dementia (YOD), where symptoms of dementia have an onset before the age of 65, has become more prominent due to the population increase from the Baby Boomer generation. This clinical perspective examines key issues in the assessment, diagnosis and management of YOD. Challenges in the assessment and diagnosis of YOD are partly due to the diverse range of types of YOD, where degenerative dementias are less common and secondary dementias more common than in late onset dementia. Early symptoms are broad and include depression, behavioural change, neurological disorders, systemic disorders and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Perceived diagnostic delay may result in frustration and distress in people with YOD and their families. Chronic depression and MCI are associated with longer time to diagnosis, and in these situations, clinicians need to establish appropriate review processes and communicate clearly. A diagnosis of YOD may have marked consequences for a younger person, including early retirement, financial impacts and the psychological challenge of coming to grips with cognitive decline. Partners, children and other supporters often have unmet needs, feel burdened by care and are at high risk of physical and emotional consequences. Concerns about the heritability of dementia may add to family distress. Recent community service developments in Australia for YOD are outlined and the challenges of residential care described. PMID:27405890

  2. Update on Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitakis, Zoe

    2013-01-01

    Background Frontotemporal dementia has recently been recognized as a common cause of young-onset dementia. Objective To review the current approach to the clinical evaluation, understanding of pathophysiology, and management of frontotemporal dementia. Results Two main clinical presentations are: 1) behavioral, with impulsive behaviors and disinhibition, change in personality such as apathy and indifference, and poor judgment, and 2) language, with a non-fluent aphasia with anomia (primary progressive aphasia), or a fluent aphasia with early loss of word meaning (semantic dementia). The differential diagnosis includes other neurodegenerative dementias, vascular and other conditions affecting the brain, and psychiatric diseases. Investigations, including neuropsychological testing, and structural and functional brain imaging, may help support the diagnosis. Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology have suggested that most cases have underlying ubiquitin-positive inclusions, while some have tau-positive inclusions. Genetic mutations, particularly on chromosome 17 in the tau or progranulin genes, have been identified. Management includes a trial of symptomatic medications and a multi-faceted approach, including environmental modification and long-term care planning. Conclusion Medical researchers studying frontotemporal dementia aim to identify disease-modifying drugs and, ultimately, a cure for this devastating disease. PMID:20065792

  3. Genetics Home Reference: frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17

    MedlinePlus

    ... FTDP-17 also have restricted up-and-down eye movement (vertical gaze palsy) and rapid abnormal movements of ... characterized by the gradual death of cells in areas of the brain called the frontal and temporal ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease Foundation Newsletter

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters These include monthly e-newsletters and quarterly science-specific e-newsletters. Read the latest issue below or browse the archives. National Parkinson Foundation and the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation Complete Merger to ...

  5. Further validation of the Internet-based Dementia Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Jason; Blehar, Justin; Anderson, Allan; Gross, Alden L

    2014-01-01

    Most approaches to the detection of presymptomatic or prodromal Alzheimer's disease require the costly collection and analysis of biological samples or neuroimaging measurements. The Dementia Risk Assessment (DRA) was developed to facilitate this detection by collecting self-report and proxy-report of dementia risk variables and episodic memory performance on a free Internet website. We now report two validation studies. In Study 1, 130 community-residing older adults seeking memory screening at senior health fairs were tested using the Mini-Cog, and were then observed while taking the DRA. They were compared to a demographically-matched subsample from our anonymous Internet sample. Participants seeking memory screening had more dementia risk factors and obtained lower scores on the DRA's recognition memory test (RMT) than their Internet controls. In addition, those who failed the Mini-Cog obtained much lower scores on the RMT than those who passed the Mini-Cog. In Study 2, 160 older adults seeking evaluation of cognitive difficulties took the DRA prior to diagnostic evaluations at outpatient dementia clinics. Patients who ultimately received the diagnosis of a dementia syndrome scored significantly lower on the RMT than those diagnosed with other conditions or deemed normal. Lower education, family history of dementia, presence of hypercholesterolemia and diabetes, and memory test score distinguished the dementia and no-dementia groups with around 82% accuracy. In addition, score on the RMT correlated highly with scores on other instruments widely used to detect cognitive decline. These findings support the concurrent validity of the DRA for detecting prevalent cognitive impairment. Prospective studies of cognitively normal persons who subsequently develop dementia will be necessary to establish its predictive validity.

  6. Recommendations for the diagnosis and management of Alzheimer's disease and other disorders associated with dementia: EFNS guideline.

    PubMed

    Waldemar, G; Dubois, B; Emre, M; Georges, J; McKeith, I G; Rossor, M; Scheltens, P; Tariska, P; Winblad, B

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this international guideline on dementia was to present a peer-reviewed evidence-based statement for the guidance of practice for clinical neurologists, geriatricians, psychiatrists, and other specialist physicians responsible for the care of patients with dementia. It covers major aspects of diagnostic evaluation and treatment, with particular emphasis on the type of patient often referred to the specialist physician. The main focus is Alzheimer's disease, but many of the recommendations apply to dementia disorders in general. The task force working group considered and classified evidence from original research reports, meta-analysis, and systematic reviews, published before January 2006. The evidence was classified and consensus recommendations graded according to the EFNS guidance. Where there was a lack of evidence, but clear consensus, good practice points were provided. The recommendations for clinical diagnosis, blood tests, neuroimaging, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, genetic testing, tissue biopsy, disclosure of diagnosis, treatment of Alzheimer's disease, and counselling and support for caregivers were all revised when compared with the previous EFNS guideline. New recommendations were added for the treatment of vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies, for monitoring treatment, for treatment of behavioural and psychological symptoms in dementia, and for legal issues. The specialist physician plays an important role together with primary care physicians in the multidisciplinary dementia teams, which have been established throughout Europe. This guideline may contribute to the definition of the role of the specialist physician in providing dementia health care.

  7. Dementia and Cognitive Impairment: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hugo, Julie; Ganguli, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Clinicians can diagnose the syndromes of dementia (major neurocognitive disorder) and mild cognitive impairment (mild neurocognitive disorder) based on history, examination, and appropriate objective assessments, using standard criteria such as DSM-5. They can then diagnose the etiological subtypes of these syndromes using standard criteria for each of them. Brain imaging and biomarkers are gaining ground for the differential diagnoses among the different disorders. Treatments for the most part are still symptomatic. PMID:25037289

  8. Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Cerejeira, J.; Lagarto, L.; Mukaetova-Ladinska, E. B.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), also known as neuropsychiatric symptoms, represent a heterogeneous group of non-cognitive symptoms and behaviors occurring in subjects with dementia. BPSD constitute a major component of the dementia syndrome irrespective of its subtype. They are as clinically relevant as cognitive symptoms as they strongly correlate with the degree of functional and cognitive impairment. BPSD include agitation, aberrant motor behavior, anxiety, elation, irritability, depression, apathy, disinhibition, delusions, hallucinations, and sleep or appetite changes. It is estimated that BPSD affect up to 90% of all dementia subjects over the course of their illness, and is independently associated with poor outcomes, including distress among patients and caregivers, long-term hospitalization, misuse of medication, and increased health care costs. Although these symptoms can be present individually it is more common that various psychopathological features co-occur simultaneously in the same patient. Thus, categorization of BPSD in clusters taking into account their natural course, prognosis, and treatment response may be useful in the clinical practice. The pathogenesis of BPSD has not been clearly delineated but it is probably the result of a complex interplay of psychological, social, and biological factors. Recent studies have emphasized the role of neurochemical, neuropathological, and genetic factors underlying the clinical manifestations of BPSD. A high degree of clinical expertise is crucial to appropriately recognize and manage the neuropsychiatric symptoms in a patient with dementia. Combination of non-pharmacological and careful use of pharmacological interventions is the recommended therapeutic for managing BPSD. Given the modest efficacy of current strategies, there is an urgent need to identify novel pharmacological targets and develop new non-pharmacological approaches to improve the adverse outcomes associated with

  9. Symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the environment or personal interactions, and the natural progression of the disease. All Rights Reserved Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. 912 Killian Hill Road S.W., Lilburn, GA 30047 © 2016 Lewy Body Dementia Association, Inc. Connect ...

  10. Parkinson's disease in Arabs: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Benamer, Hani T S; de Silva, Rajith; Siddiqui, Khurram A; Grosset, Donald G

    2008-07-15

    Studies of specific populations have provided invaluable knowledge about Parkinson's disease (PD), especially in the field of genetics. The present report systematically reviews the medical literature on PD in Arabs. Medline and Embase were searched, and 24 article were identified: genetic (n = 17), epidemiological (n = 3), and clinical series (n = 5). Both autosomal dominant and recessive forms of inherited PD are described, associated with four genes (Parkin, PINK1, LRRK2, and PARK9). The G2019S LRRK2 mutation is more common in both familial (37-42%) and apparently sporadic PD (41%) in North African Arabs than in Europeans and North Americans (2-3%). The incidence of PD is reported at 4.5 per 100,000 person-years and reported prevalence at 27 to 43 per 100,000 persons. Hospital-based clinical series suggest that parkinsonism is the commonest movement disorder. Clinical features of PD in Arabs are not significantly different from those reported elsewhere. PD was reported as the cause of dementia in around 7% of Arabs. The majority of studies relate to the role of genes in the etiology of PD in North African Arabs. Further genetic, epidemiological and clinical studies from the majority of Arabic countries may enhance our understanding of PD.

  11. [Neuropsychiatric non motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Peralta, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade we have witnessed substantial progress towards the understanding of Parkinson's disease. According to pathological and neuroimaging studies, the traditional view of Parkinson's disease that begins with the development of motor symptoms such as bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor, has begun to change. It is now understood that there would be a "premotor" or "preclinical" period in which the alphasynuclein pathology begins outside of the substantia nigra in the lower brainstem and autonomic nervous system. Although the pathophysiology of this phase is still unclear, it is currently thought that its symptoms would correspond to the so-called "non-motor symptoms". Hyposmia, depression, constipation and REM sleep disorders are one of the most relevant non-motor symptoms at this "premotor" stage. The spectrum of non-motor symptoms is very broad and covers the domains of neuropsychiatric, dysautonomic, gastrointestinal and sensory symptoms as well as sleep disorders. Neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, impulse control disorder, psychosis and dementia, are a major cause of disability as they are directly related to quality of life. PMID:23979552

  12. [Neuropsychiatric non motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Peralta, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade we have witnessed substantial progress towards the understanding of Parkinson's disease. According to pathological and neuroimaging studies, the traditional view of Parkinson's disease that begins with the development of motor symptoms such as bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor, has begun to change. It is now understood that there would be a "premotor" or "preclinical" period in which the alphasynuclein pathology begins outside of the substantia nigra in the lower brainstem and autonomic nervous system. Although the pathophysiology of this phase is still unclear, it is currently thought that its symptoms would correspond to the so-called "non-motor symptoms". Hyposmia, depression, constipation and REM sleep disorders are one of the most relevant non-motor symptoms at this "premotor" stage. The spectrum of non-motor symptoms is very broad and covers the domains of neuropsychiatric, dysautonomic, gastrointestinal and sensory symptoms as well as sleep disorders. Neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, impulse control disorder, psychosis and dementia, are a major cause of disability as they are directly related to quality of life.

  13. Mirtazapine improves visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tagai, Kenji; Nagata, Tomoyuki; Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Tsuno, Norifumi; Ozone, Motohiro; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Psychotic symptoms often occur as a complication in Parkinson's disease patients, and a set of criteria for Parkinson's disease with psychosis (PDPsy) has been established. Among these criteria, hallucinations are one of the specific symptoms, with visual hallucinations being the most common. While atypical antipsychotic agents are often used for the treatment of PDPsy, adverse effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms, often hinder its continuation or tolerance. There have been some reports and reviews indicating that antidepressants may be effective for PDPsy and other forms of dementia with psychosis. In this report, we present a patient with PDPsy who was treated with one of the new-generation antidepressants, mirtazapine. Mirtazapine improved the patient's refractory psychotic symptoms, especially her visual hallucinations, without worsening her motor symptoms.

  14. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease: phenomenology, frequency, risk factors, and current understanding of pathophysiologic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fénelon, Gilles

    2008-03-01

    Psychosis in Parkinson's disease refers to a combination of hallucinations and delusions occurring with a clear sensorium and a chronic course. Hallucinations may involve several sensory modalities. Complex visual hallucinations are the most common type. "Minor" hallucinatory phenomena are frequently present and include visual illusions, passage hallucinations, and sense of presence. Insight may be lost in patients with cognitive impairment. Delusions of a paranoid type are more rare than hallucinations. Both hallucinations and delusions are more frequent in Parkinson's disease patients with dementia. Pathogenesis involves complex and probably multifactorial mechanisms, including pharmacologic (dopaminergic treatment and others) and disease-related factors.

  15. Parkinson's disease showing progressive conduction aphasia.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Ono, Kenjiro; Harada, Hiromi; Shima, Keisuke; Notoya, Masako; Yamada, Masahito

    2012-04-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may develop progressive dementia late in their clinical course. Dementia in PD is mostly related to neuropathological findings of extensive Lewy bodies (LBs), with or without the coexistence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Aphasia has been reported in patients with LB diseases with AD pathology; however, there have been no reports of typical PD patients developing progressive aphasia during their clinical course. We describe a female PD patient who later developed progressive conduction aphasia characterized by phonemic paraphasia and disturbance in repetition of short sentences without disturbance in writing or auditory comprehension. No episodes of fluctuations of attention, memory complaints, or planning errors were observed. She experienced episodes of visual hallucination. Her low scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination suggested impairment of orientation and attention, and her scores on Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices test indicated impaired visuospatial functions. However, her cognitive deficits were not sufficiently severe to impair her daily life. Brain magnetic resonance images revealed atrophy of the left superior temporal gyrus and widening of the left sylvian fissure. [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed glucose hypometabolism in the left cerebral hemisphere. These findings may be related to conduction aphasia. During the progression of PD lesions, the brainstem LB is assumed to take an upward course, extend to the limbic system, and then extend to the neocortex. Conduction aphasia observed in our patient may be associated with an unusual progression of the LB pathology from the brainstem to the left temporoparietal lobe. PMID:21879327

  16. Current Understanding of Psychosis in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Oluwadamilola O; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2016-10-01

    Psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the greatest determinants of nursing home placement and caregiver stress. Traditionally associated with medications with dopaminergic effect, it has now been linked to other medications and other stressors e.g. systemic illnesses. The development of hallucinations in a PD patient can herald the onset of dementia and usually predicts increased mortality risk. Medication reduction in PD psychosis usually reduces the symptoms; however, this comes at the cost of worsening motor function. If gradually decreasing the patient's medications does not resolve the psychosis, the treatment of choice is an atypical antipychotic. Though only clozapine has level A recommendation for this indication, other atypicals like quetiapine continue to get used for this purpose on account of the logistics involved with clozapine use. Cholinesterase inhibitors are also increasingly being used for PD psychosis on account of the association with dementia. The treatment of PD psychosis is an unmet need in PD management and search for suitable agents constitutes an active area of research in PD. PMID:27629356

  17. How Is Parkinson's Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help make life better for people with Parkinson's General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day ® Team Hope ... can help make life better for people with Parkinson's General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day ® Team Hope ...

  18. Extrapyramidal features in advanced Down's syndrome: clinical evaluation and family history.

    PubMed Central

    Vieregge, P; Ziemens, G; Freudenberg, M; Piosinski, A; Muysers, A; Schulze, B

    1991-01-01

    Extrapyramidal, frontal release, and other neurological signs were studied in 54 demented and non-demented patients with Down's syndrome (DS). Fourteen patients were demented and five showed extrapyramidal signs, mainly of the rigid-hypokinetic spectrum and similar to Parkinsonian features in advanced Alzheimer's disease (AD). None of the non-demented patients had Parkinsonian signs. The mean age of the demented DS patients with extrapyramidal signs was significantly higher than that of the patients without. Frontal release signs were present in demented and non-demented patients. A questionnaire showed no increase in either the proportion of early- or senile-onset dementia or Parkinsonism among first- and second-degree relatives of DS patients. Parkinsonian signs appear to be present at a lower frequency in DS than in advanced AD. A speculative hypothesis about a gene dosage effect of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase in preventing toxic radical formation in the substantia nigra of DS patients is presented. PMID:1826326

  19. Computerised brain electrical activity findings of parkinson patients suffering from hyperkinetic side effects (hypersensitive dopamine syndrome) and a review of possible sources.

    PubMed

    Fünfgeld, E W

    1995-01-01

    Among 2,000 Park. pat. hospitalised during the years 1988 till 1990 we found 61 pat. with hyperkinetic side-effects in the sequence of a long-term L-dopa treatment. 43 (mean age 64y.) had a complete clinical data set and hyperkinesia ratings (AIMS scale). Compared to the system's data base--none of these patients showed a strickly normal CEEG. Our standard parkinson treatment was established in 1986: L-dopa as low as possible, dopamine agonists low, amantadines as high as necessary, L-deprenyl till 10 mg and anticholinergics--no, if possible. Our pat. group got initially a mean of 508 mg L-dopa, at the end of the study 296 mg. Conventional EEG (Picker-Schwarzer) and CEEG data were recorded (Dynamic Brain Mapping, Itil). Clinical and CEEG follow-up investigations were done after 2 weeks and 2 years. At follow-up, a reduction of the hyperkinesias was found in 43 patients (AIMS scale). 28 pat. received an additional treatment with nootropic drugs, 15 pat. were without this additional therapy. The visually evaluated CEEG at the latter group showed an acceleration ("response") in 33%, but among the patients with nootropic drugs the acceleration was seen in 66%. In patients without nootropics the mean delta power increased, patients additionally treated showed a reduction of delta. In cases of high L-dopa dosage--associated with severe hyperkinetic side effects--more slow waves were registered. The non-nootropic treated patients were divided into two groups--non-responders and the responders: a) Non-responders (n = 10) showed a significant reduction of alpha and a significant increase of delta and theta, b) Responders (5 pat.) without nootropics had a significant reduction of theta and a increase of alpha, but the acceleration is less pronounced than in the responder group with nootropics. Without co-medication a high L-dopa dosage may provoke/facilitate an organic cerebral dysfunction. The nootropic-treated but non-responder group showed no significant changes (n = 13

  20. [Dementia and oral health].

    PubMed

    Wierink, C D; de Baat, C

    2009-02-01

    The first part of this article is a translation of an editorial which appeared in the journal Gerodontology. The author warns that a great increase is expected in the number of dementia patients in the United Kingdom and he argues that care for these patients be given a high place on the national agenda. Dementia was also a major issue at the meeting of the International Association for Dental Research in March 2007. Several international studies presented there indicated that elderly people with dementia constitute a group at risk with respect to oral health. In the evaluation of the editorial, the situation in The Netherlands is described. There is also serious concern in The Netherlands about the statistics with respect to dementia. Due to the growing number of frail elderly people having a natural dentition, the need for professional oral care will increase. General practitioners have the important task of providing adequate oral health care for elderly people suffering from dementia who are still living at home. Guidelines for Oral Care, having to do with the improvement of oral care in institutions, appeared recently. With the guidelines, a good basis for developing adequate oral health care of frail elderly people is available. However, the implementation of these guidelines will require some attention. PMID:19280891

  1. Sleep Disturbances in Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    McCarter, Stuart J; St Louis, Erik K; Boeve, Bradley F

    2016-09-01

    Sleep disorders appear to be frequent comorbidities in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness commonly occur in patients with FTD and significantly contribute to caregiver burden and burnout. Sleep is severely fragmented in FTD patients, likely secondary to behavioral disturbances, other primary sleep disorders such as sleep disordered breathing and restless leg syndrome, and neurodegeneration of nuclei involved in sleep and wakefulness. Treatment of primary sleep disorders may improve excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep quality and may improve daytime cognitive functioning. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder is rare in FTD and may be confused with excessive nocturnal activity due to disturbed circadian rhythm. The relationship between FTD, sleep quality, and sleep disorders requires further study to better understand the contribution of disturbed sleep to daytime neurocognitive functioning and quality of life in FTD. Further, future studies should focus on comparing sleep disturbances between different FTD syndromes, especially behavioral variant FTD and primary progressive aphasia. Comorbid sleep disorders should be promptly sought and treated in patients with FTD to improve patient and caregiver quality of life. PMID:27485946

  2. Advances in the treatment of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Jennifer G; Weintraub, Daniel

    2015-09-15

    Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent complication, with significant interindividual variability in clinical symptoms, severity, timing, and neural substrates. Recent studies have focused not only on understanding PD dementia, but also mild cognitive impairment in PD, which may represent a prodromal stage for dementia. In recent years, there have been important advances regarding clinical characterizations, definitions, associated biomarkers, and risk factors for both mild cognitive impairment in PD and PD dementia. However, there is a paucity of effective therapies for cognitive impairment in PD, whether for mild symptoms or for moderate to severe dementia. At present, only rivastigmine is U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved for PD dementia, an indication received nearly a decade ago. Given the frequency of PD cognitive impairment and its substantial impact on both patients and families, the lack of available and effective treatments represents a striking gap in the field, especially when compared to the large number of available therapies for PD motor symptoms and complications. Improved symptomatic therapies, as well as potential disease-modifying agents, for PD cognitive impairment are needed. Most therapeutic trials for PD dementia and mild cognitive impairment in PD have focused on drugs developed for and tested in Alzheimer's disease, such as cholinesterase inhibitors and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, memantine, though recent and ongoing trials examine the effects of pharmacological agents affecting other neurotransmitters, as well as nonpharmacological therapies, including mental and physical exercise and neurostimulation. This review summarizes the design and outcomes of trials for PD cognitive impairment published since 2013 and highlights future therapeutic research opportunities and challenges.

  3. Dementia as a cultural metaphor.

    PubMed

    Zeilig, Hannah

    2014-04-01

    This article contributes to debates about the category "dementia," which until recently has been dominated by biomedical models. The perspectives of critical gerontology are pertinent for extending knowledge about dementia and guiding this analysis. These perspectives encourage examination of cultural and historical influences and thus question how societies have constructed and defined dementia. This article queries the stories told about dementia and the language that we use to tell these stories. Central to the article is an analysis of some of the stories about dementia that are contained within and framed by contemporary culture. A number of films, TV documentaries, news reports, theatre, memoirs, novels, and poems that portray some of the experiences associated with dementia are interrogated. These representations are examined as they either perpetrate or challenge stereotypes about living with dementia. Analysis of these representations demonstrates the sociocultural construction of dementia and the extent to which dementia is a diachronic phenomenon. Above all, the article considers (a) the social and political dimensions of dementia, (b) the ways in which the metaphors persistently used to explain dementia shape our consciousness about this condition, and (c) the extent to which dementia is an inherent part of contemporary life. PMID:23408265

  4. Dementia as a cultural metaphor.

    PubMed

    Zeilig, Hannah

    2014-04-01

    This article contributes to debates about the category "dementia," which until recently has been dominated by biomedical models. The perspectives of critical gerontology are pertinent for extending knowledge about dementia and guiding this analysis. These perspectives encourage examination of cultural and historical influences and thus question how societies have constructed and defined dementia. This article queries the stories told about dementia and the language that we use to tell these stories. Central to the article is an analysis of some of the stories about dementia that are contained within and framed by contemporary culture. A number of films, TV documentaries, news reports, theatre, memoirs, novels, and poems that portray some of the experiences associated with dementia are interrogated. These representations are examined as they either perpetrate or challenge stereotypes about living with dementia. Analysis of these representations demonstrates the sociocultural construction of dementia and the extent to which dementia is a diachronic phenomenon. Above all, the article considers (a) the social and political dimensions of dementia, (b) the ways in which the metaphors persistently used to explain dementia shape our consciousness about this condition, and (c) the extent to which dementia is an inherent part of contemporary life.

  5. Pharmacological recommendations for the symptomatic treatment of dementia: the Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While there have been no new medications approved for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other dementias in Canada since 2004, the Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia (CCCDTD) reviewed and updated the clinical practice guidelines on the pharmacological management of dementia that were published previously. Methods This review focused on the literature for the pharmacological treatment of dementia based on studies published since the third CCCDTD in 2006. A literature search of English-language medical databases was preformed for studies pertaining to the pharmacological treatment of AD and other dementias that examined the management of cognitive and functional impairment, as well as neuropsychiatric symptoms. All previous recommendations were reviewed, and only those that required updating based on new published studies were revised. Several new recommendations were also added. Recommendations were rated for quality of evidence and were approved by consensus. Results There were 15 revised or new recommendations approved by consensus. The revised recommendations included acknowledging that cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) possess a class effect and any of the agents can be used for AD across the spectrum of severity and with co-existing cerebrovascular disease. There was insufficient evidence to recommend for or against the use of ChEIs in combination with memantine for the primary indication of treating neuropsychiatric symptoms, or for the treatment of vascular dementia. Recommendations for the discontinuation of cognitive enhancers were revised and clarified, as well as the risks associated with discontinuing these drugs. ChEIs were recommended as a treatment option for dementia with Parkinson's disease. Risks associated with use of antipsychotics for neuropsychiatric symptoms were strengthened, and guidelines regarding the use of antidepressants for affective disturbances in dementia were weakened, and

  6. Serum uric acid level and association with cognitive impairment and dementia: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aamir A; Quinn, Terence J; Hewitt, Jonathan; Fan, Yuhua; Dawson, Jesse

    2016-02-01

    Serum uric acid (sUA) level may be associated with cognitive impairment/dementia. It is possible this relationship varies with dementia subtype, particularly between vascular dementias (VaD) and Alzheimer's (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PDD)-related dementia. We aimed to present a synthesis of all published data on sUA and relationship with dementia/cognition through systematic review and meta-analysis. We included studies that assessed the association between sUA and any measure of cognitive function or a clinical diagnosis of dementia. We pre-defined subgroup analyses for patients with AD, VaD, PDD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and mixed or undifferentiated. We assessed risk of bias/generalizability, and where data allowed, we performed meta-analysis to describe pooled measures of association across studies. From 4811 titles, 46 papers (n = 16,688 participants) met our selection criteria. Compared to controls, sUA was lower in dementia (SDM -0.33 (95%CI)). There were differences in association by dementia type with apparent association for AD (SDM -0.33 (95%CI)) and PDD (SDM -0.67 (95%CI)) but not in cases of mixed dementia (SDM 0.19 (95%CI)) or VaD (SDM -0.05 (95%CI)). There was no correlation between scores on Mini-Mental State Examination and sUA level (summary r 0.08, p = 0.27), except in patients with PDD (r 0.16, p = 0.003). Our conclusions are limited by clinical heterogeneity and risk of bias in studies. Accepting this caveat, the relationship between sUA and dementia/cognitive impairment is not consistent across all dementia groups and in particular may differ in patients with VaD compared to other dementia subtypes.

  7. Auditory hedonic phenotypes in dementia: A behavioural and neuroanatomical analysis.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Phillip D; Downey, Laura E; Golden, Hannah L; Clark, Camilla N; Slattery, Catherine F; Paterson, Ross W; Schott, Jonathan M; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Rossor, Martin N; Warren, Jason D

    2015-06-01

    Patients with dementia may exhibit abnormally altered liking for environmental sounds and music but such altered auditory hedonic responses have not been studied systematically. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 73 patients representing major canonical dementia syndromes (behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic dementia (SD), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) amnestic Alzheimer's disease (AD)) using a semi-structured caregiver behavioural questionnaire and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of patients' brain MR images. Behavioural responses signalling abnormal aversion to environmental sounds, aversion to music or heightened pleasure in music ('musicophilia') occurred in around half of the cohort but showed clear syndromic and genetic segregation, occurring in most patients with bvFTD but infrequently in PNFA and more commonly in association with MAPT than C9orf72 mutations. Aversion to sounds was the exclusive auditory phenotype in AD whereas more complex phenotypes including musicophilia were common in bvFTD and SD. Auditory hedonic alterations correlated with grey matter loss in a common, distributed, right-lateralised network including antero-mesial temporal lobe, insula, anterior cingulate and nucleus accumbens. Our findings suggest that abnormalities of auditory hedonic processing are a significant issue in common dementias. Sounds may constitute a novel probe of brain mechanisms for emotional salience coding that are targeted by neurodegenerative disease.

  8. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases: Focus on mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2016-01-01

    The mild cognitive impairment (MCI) concept was developed to identify the earliest stages of cognitive impairment. MCI and, more specifically, amnestic MCI were initially proposed as transitional states that ultimately progress to full blown Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, MCI subjects do not uniformly progress to dementia (either AD or another) and may revert back to normal cognitive state. The MCI as concept has been borrowed from AD to other neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease (PD). However the operational definition of MCI may not adequately convey the intended concept. Additional modifications to the concept and its operationalization are needed in order to better identify patients with incipient cognitive impairment and to guide clinical and research practices. Patients with PD have a very high likelihood of developing dementia, insidiously over many years. Cognitive impairment may start even before other symptoms. No constellation of cognitive symptoms in an otherwise healthy individual will herald development of AD or indeed will progress to dementia, including PD-dementia, in high likelihood. At present, identification of subtle cognitive dysfunction even in a person with diagnosed PD does not benefit the patient and should be avoided, except for research purposes. PMID:26516060

  9. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases: Focus on mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2016-01-01

    The mild cognitive impairment (MCI) concept was developed to identify the earliest stages of cognitive impairment. MCI and, more specifically, amnestic MCI were initially proposed as transitional states that ultimately progress to full blown Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, MCI subjects do not uniformly progress to dementia (either AD or another) and may revert back to normal cognitive state. The MCI as concept has been borrowed from AD to other neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease (PD). However the operational definition of MCI may not adequately convey the intended concept. Additional modifications to the concept and its operationalization are needed in order to better identify patients with incipient cognitive impairment and to guide clinical and research practices. Patients with PD have a very high likelihood of developing dementia, insidiously over many years. Cognitive impairment may start even before other symptoms. No constellation of cognitive symptoms in an otherwise healthy individual will herald development of AD or indeed will progress to dementia, including PD-dementia, in high likelihood. At present, identification of subtle cognitive dysfunction even in a person with diagnosed PD does not benefit the patient and should be avoided, except for research purposes.

  10. Vascular Risk Factors and Cognition in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Andrea; Turrone, Rosanna; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Bianchi, Marta; Poli, Loris; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Premi, Enrico; Formenti, Anna; Bigni, Barbara; Cosseddu, Maura; Cottini, Elisabetta; Berg, Daniela; Padovani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Vascular risk factors have been associated with cognitive deficits and incident dementia in the general population, but their role on cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) is still unclear. The present study addresses the single and cumulative effect of vascular risk factors on cognition in PD patients, taking clinical confounders into account. Standardized neuropsychological assessment was performed in 238 consecutive PD patients. We evaluated the association of single and cumulative vascular risk factors (smoking, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and heart disease), with the diagnosis of PD normal cognition (PDNC, n = 94), mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI, n = 111), and dementia (PDD, n = 33). The association between single neuropsychological tests and vascular risk factors was evaluated with covariance analyses adjusted for age at onset, educational levels, gender, disease duration, and motor performance. Age, educational levels, disease duration, and motor function were significantly different between PDNC, PD-MCI, and PDD. Heart disease was the only vascular factor significantly more prevalent in PDD compared with PDNC in adjusted analyses. Performance of tests assessing executive and attention functions were significantly worse in patients with hypertension, heart disease, and/or diabetes (p <  0.05). Heart disease is associated with dementia in PD, suggesting a potential window of intervention. Vascular risk factors act especially on attention and executive functions in PD. Vascular risk stratification may be useful in order to identify PD patients with a greater risk of developing dementia. These findings need to be verified in longitudinal studies. PMID:26890741

  11. Strategies for molecular imaging dementia and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Bernhard J

    2008-01-01

    Dementia represents a heterogeneous term that has evolved to describe the behavioral syndromes associated with a variety of clinical and neuropathological changes during continuing degenerative disease of the brain. As such, there lacks a clear consensus regarding the neuropsychological and other constituent characteristics associated with various cerebrovascular changes in this disease process. But increasing this knowledge has given more insights into memory deterioration in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and other subtypes of dementia. The author reviews current knowledge of the physiological coupling between cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the light of state-of-the-art-imaging methods and its changes in dementia with special reference to Alzheimer’s disease. Different imaging techniques are discussed with respect to their visualizing effect of biochemical, cellular, and/or structural changes in dementia. The pathophysiology of dementia in advanced age is becoming increasingly understood by revealing the underlying basis of neuropsychological changes with current imaging techniques, genetic and pathological features, which suggests that alterations of (neuro) vascular regulatory mechanisms may lead to brain dysfunction and disease. The current view is that cerebrovascular deregulation is seen as a contributor to cerebrovascular pathologies, such as stroke, but also to neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease. The better understanding of these (patho) physiological mechanisms may open an approach to new interventional strategies in dementia to enhance neurovascular repair and to protect neurovascular coupling. PMID:18830391

  12. Physiological imaging with PET and SPECT in Dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J. . Dept. of Neurology Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-10-01

    Dementia is a medical problem of increasingly obvious importance. The most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) accounts for at least 50% of all cases of dementia, with multi-infarct dementia the next most common cause of the syndrome. While the accuracy of diagnosis of AD may range from 80 to 90%, there is currently no laboratory test to confirm the diagnosis. Functional imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offer diagnostic advantages since brain function is unequivocally disturbed in all dementing illnesses. Both PET and SPECT have been utilized in the study of dementia. While both techniques rely on principles of emission tomography to produce three dimensional maps of injected radiotracers, the differences between positron and single photon emission have important consequences for the practical applications of the two procedures. This briefly reviews the technical differences between PET and SPECT, and discusses how both techniques have been used in our laboratory to elucidate the pathophysiology of dementia. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Global epidemiology of dementia: Alzheimer's and vascular types.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Liara; Rosset, Idiane; Roriz-Cruz, Matheus

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia varies substantially worldwide. This is partially attributed to the lack of methodological uniformity among studies, including diagnostic criteria and different mean population ages. However, even after considering these potential sources of bias, differences in age-adjusted dementia prevalence still exist among regions of the world. In Latin America, the prevalence of dementia is higher than expected for its level of population aging. This phenomenon occurs due to the combination of low average educational attainment and high vascular risk profile. Among developed countries, Japan seems to have the lowest prevalence of dementia. Studies that evaluated the immigration effect of the Japanese and blacks to USA evidenced that acculturation increases the relative proportion of AD cases compared to VaD. In the Middle East and Africa, the number of dementia cases will be expressive by 2040. In general, low educational background and other socioeconomic factors have been associated with high risk of obesity, sedentarism, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome, all of which also raise the risk of VaD and AD. Regulating these factors is critical to generate the commitment to make dementia a public health priority. PMID:25089278

  14. Global Epidemiology of Dementia: Alzheimer's and Vascular Types

    PubMed Central

    Rosset, Idiane; Roriz-Cruz, Matheus

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia varies substantially worldwide. This is partially attributed to the lack of methodological uniformity among studies, including diagnostic criteria and different mean population ages. However, even after considering these potential sources of bias, differences in age-adjusted dementia prevalence still exist among regions of the world. In Latin America, the prevalence of dementia is higher than expected for its level of population aging. This phenomenon occurs due to the combination of low average educational attainment and high vascular risk profile. Among developed countries, Japan seems to have the lowest prevalence of dementia. Studies that evaluated the immigration effect of the Japanese and blacks to USA evidenced that acculturation increases the relative proportion of AD cases compared to VaD. In the Middle East and Africa, the number of dementia cases will be expressive by 2040. In general, low educational background and other socioeconomic factors have been associated with high risk of obesity, sedentarism, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome, all of which also raise the risk of VaD and AD. Regulating these factors is critical to generate the commitment to make dementia a public health priority. PMID:25089278

  15. Neurobiology of Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Enciu, Ana-Maria; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Popescu, Laurenţiu M.; Mureşanu, Dafin F.; Popescu, Bogdan O.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular dementia is, in its current conceptual form, a distinct type of dementia with a spectrum of specific clinical and pathophysiological features. However, in a very large majority of cases, these alterations occur in an already aged brain, characterized by a milieu of cellular and molecular events common for different neurodegenerative diseases. The cell signaling defects and molecular dyshomeostasis might lead to neuronal malfunction prior to the death of neurons and the alteration of neuronal networks. In the present paper, we explore some of the molecular mechanisms underlying brain malfunction triggered by cerebrovascular disease and risk factors. We suggest that, in the age of genetic investigation and molecular diagnosis, the concept of vascular dementia needs a new approach. PMID:21876809

  16. Nutrition in Severe Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pivi, Glaucia Akiko Kamikado; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique Ferreira; Schultz, Rodrigo Rizek

    2012-01-01

    An increasing proportion of older adults with Alzheimer's disease or other dementias are now surviving to more advanced stages of the illness. Advanced dementia is associated with feeding problems, including difficulty in swallowing and respiratory diseases. Patients become incompetent to make decisions. As a result, complex situations may arise in which physicians and families decide whether artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) is likely to be beneficial for the patient. The objective of this paper is to present methods for evaluating the nutritional status of patients with severe dementia as well as measures for the treatment of nutritional disorders, the use of vitamin and mineral supplementation, and indications for ANH and pharmacological therapy. PMID:22645608

  17. [Psychosocial interventions in dementia].

    PubMed

    Kurz, A

    2013-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions improve cognitive abilities (cognitive stimulation, cognitive training), enhance emotional well-being (activity planning, reminiscence), reduce behavioral symptoms (aromatherapy, music therapy) and promote everyday functioning (occupational therapy). Through these effects they reinforce and augment pharmacological treatments for dementia. In addition, psychosocial interventions complement the treatment of patients by supporting family caregivers (educational groups, support programs). The potential of psychosocial interventions in dementia needs to be explored further in studies using improved methodology to determine effective components, clinical relevance and duration of effects, predictors of individual treatment response and health-economic implications. PMID:23306213

  18. [Psychosocial interventions in dementia].

    PubMed

    Kurz, A

    2013-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions improve cognitive abilities (cognitive stimulation, cognitive training), enhance emotional well-being (activity planning, reminiscence), reduce behavioral symptoms (aromatherapy, music therapy) and promote everyday functioning (occupational therapy). Through these effects they reinforce and augment pharmacological treatments for dementia. In addition, psychosocial interventions complement the treatment of patients by supporting family caregivers (educational groups, support programs). The potential of psychosocial interventions in dementia needs to be explored further in studies using improved methodology to determine effective components, clinical relevance and duration of effects, predictors of individual treatment response and health-economic implications.

  19. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.; Shu, Huidy; Haman, Aissa; Sejvar, James J.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with more common dementing conditions that typically develop over years, rapidly progressive dementias can develop subacutely over months, weeks, or even days and be quickly fatal. Because many rapidly progressive dementias are treatable, it is paramount to evaluate and diagnose these patients quickly. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the major categories of RPD and outlines efficient approaches to the diagnosis of the various neurodegenerative, toxic-metabolic, infectious, autoimmune, neoplastic, and other conditions that may progress rapidly. PMID:18668637

  20. Distinct behavioural profiles in frontotemporal dementia and semantic dementia

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, J; Bathgate, D; Varma, A; Blackshaw, A; Gibbons, Z; Neary, D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To test predictions that frontotemporal dementia and semantic dementia give rise to distinct patterns of behavioural change.
METHODS—An informant based semistructured behavioural interview, covering the domains of basic and social emotions, social and personal behaviour, sensory behaviour, eating and oral behaviour, repetitive behaviours, rituals, and compulsions, was administered to carers of 41 patients with semantic dementia and with apathetic (FTD-A) and disinhibited (FTD-D) forms of frontotemporal dementia.
RESULTS—Consistent with prediction, emotional changes differentiated FTD from semantic dementia. Whereas lack of emotional response was pervasive in FTD, it was more selective in semantic dementia, affecting particularly the capacity to show fear. Social avoidance occurred more often in FTD and social seeking in semantic dementia. Patients with FTD showed reduced response to pain, whereas patients with semantic dementia more often showed exaggerated reactions to sensory stimuli. Gluttony and indiscriminate eating were characteristic of FTD, whereas patients with semantic dementia were more likely to exhibit food fads. Hyperorality, involving inedible objects, was unrelated to gluttony, indicating different underlying mechanisms. Repetitive behaviours were common in both FTD and semantic dementia, but had a more compulsive quality in semantic dementia. Behavioural differences were greater between semantic dementia and FTD-A than FTD-D. A logistic regression analysis indicated that emotional and repetitive, compulsive behaviours discriminated FTD from semantic dementia with 97% accuracy.
CONCLUSION—The findings confirm predictions regarding behavioural differences in frontotemporal and semantic dementia and point to differential roles of the frontal and temporal lobes in affect, social functioning, eating, and compulsive behaviour.

 PMID:11181853

  1. Dementia resulting from traumatic brain injury: what is the pathology?

    PubMed

    Shively, Sharon; Scher, Ann I; Perl, Daniel P; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2012-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the earliest illnesses described in human history and remains a major source of morbidity and mortality in the modern era. It is estimated that 2% of the US population lives with long-term disabilities due to a prior TBI, and incidence and prevalence rates are even higher in developing countries. One of the most feared long-term consequences of TBIs is dementia, as multiple epidemiologic studies show that experiencing a TBI in early or midlife is associated with an increased risk of dementia in late life. The best data indicate that moderate and severe TBIs increase risk of dementia between 2- and 4-fold. It is less clear whether mild TBIs such as brief concussions result in increased dementia risk, in part because mild head injuries are often not well documented and retrospective studies have recall bias. However, it has been observed for many years that multiple mild TBIs as experienced by professional boxers are associated with a high risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a type of dementia with distinctive clinical and pathologic features. The recent recognition that CTE is common in retired professional football and hockey players has rekindled interest in this condition, as has the recognition that military personnel also experience high rates of mild TBIs and may have a similar syndrome. It is presently unknown whether dementia in TBI survivors is pathophysiologically similar to Alzheimer disease, CTE, or some other entity. Such information is critical for developing preventive and treatment strategies for a common cause of acquired dementia. Herein, we will review the epidemiologic data linking TBI and dementia, existing clinical and pathologic data, and will identify areas where future research is needed.

  2. Creativity and dementia: a review.

    PubMed

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Di Giacomo, Dina; Passafiume, Domenico

    2012-08-01

    In these last years, creativity was found to play an important role for dementia patients in terms of diagnosis and rehabilitation strategies. This led us to explore the relationships between dementia and creativity. At the aim, artistic creativity and divergent thinking are considered both in non-artists and artists affected by different types of dementia. In general, artistic creativity can be expressed in exceptional cases both in Alzheimer's disease and Frontotemporal dementia, whereas divergent thinking decreases in dementia. The creation of paintings or music is anyway important for expressing emotions and well-being. Yet, creativity seems to emerge when the right prefrontal cortex, posterior temporal, and parietal areas are relatively intact, whereas it declines when these areas are damaged. However, enhanced creativity in dementia is not confirmed by controlled studies conducted in non-artists, and whether artists with dementia can show creativity has to be fully addressed. Future research directions are suggested.

  3. Parkinsonism as a Complication of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Walaa A.; Hashel, Jasem Y. Al; Kilany, Ayman; Altailji, Samira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between Parkinsonism and BS has already been reported in only three patients worldwide. CASE SUMMARY: We report a 39-years old Kuwaiti female who presented with parkinsonian features and mononeuropathy (carpal tunnel syndrome) 3 years after a vertical sleeve gastrectomy operation. CONCLUSION: We conclude that with the increasing popularity of bariatric surgery, clinicians will need to recognize and manage neurologic complications that may appear soon after or years to decades later. Thorough evaluation is essential for any patient who has undergone bariatric surgery and develops neurologic symptoms. PMID:27275313

  4. [Dependence on serum cortisol level or the severity of intellectual impairment in primary degenerative dementias].

    PubMed

    Bilikiewicz, A; Bidzan, L

    1990-01-01

    Basal serum cortisol level was measured in patients with primary degenerative dementia. The diagnosis of primary degenerative dementia was made by the DSM-III-R criteria, and the severity of dementia was measured by use the Rosen et. al. scale. Additionally, the presence of depressive and paraphrenia syndromes was evaluated. The Hamilton scale was used for the evaluation of depression severity. Cortisol level was measured by radioimmune assay. Sixty three patients, 39 female and 24 male, were evaluated. The mean age for women was 69.54 and for men 71 years. Patients were divided into 3 groups: I--simple dementia, II--dementia with depression, III--dementia with paraphrenia. Positive correlation was found between basal cortisol level and the severity of dementia only in group I. Mean cortisol level in patients from group II and III was significantly different than in group I. Among female patients with depression the negative correlation between cortisol level and severity of dementia was found; no other correlations were proved. No correlation was found between the cortisol level and severity of dementia in Hamilton's scale. PMID:2284355

  5. Dementia and Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Joan; Perez, Rosa; Forester, Brent

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This article presents an overview of what is known about dementia services in assisted living settings and suggests areas for future research. Design and Methods: We undertook a search of Medline, the "Journals of Gerontology," and "The Gerontologist." We then organized publications dealing with the target subject into 10 topic areas and…

  6. Dementia and driving.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, D; Neubauer, K; Boyle, M; Gerrard, J; Surmon, D; Wilcock, G K

    1992-04-01

    Many European countries test cars, but not their drivers, as they age. There is evidence to suggest that human factors are more important than vehicular factors as causes of motor crashes. The elderly also are involved in more accidents per distance travelled than middle-aged drivers. As the UK relies on self-certification of health by drivers over the age of 70 years, we examined the driving practices of patients with dementia attending a Memory Clinic. Nearly one-fifth of 329 patients with documented dementia continued to drive after the onset of dementia, and impaired driving ability was noted in two-thirds of these. Their families experienced great difficulty in persuading patients to stop driving, and had to invoke outside help in many cases. Neuropsychological tests did not help to identify those who drove badly while activity of daily living scores were related to driving ability. These findings suggest that many patients with dementia drive in an unsafe fashion after the onset of the illness. The present system of self-certification of health by the elderly for driver-licensing purposes needs to be reassessed.

  7. Diet and dementia.

    PubMed

    Whalley, Lawrence J; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J

    2004-09-01

    The ageing brain adapts to the accumulation of damage caused by oxidative stress and inflammation. Adaptive processes include neuroprotective and neurorestorative mechanisms. Individual differences in susceptibility to dementia arise when these mechanisms are impaired or are overwhelmed by the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Neuroprotection relies upon extrinsic and intrinsic defences. An adequate intake of antioxidant micronutrients (eg, vitamin C and vitamin E) and anti-inflammatory macronutrients (eg, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) forms an essential component of extrinsic defences against brain ageing. There are many epidemiological data to support an association between an inadequate intake of antioxidants and/or fish oils (an important source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) and a greater than expected incidence of late onset dementia. These associations are confounded by established links between poverty, poor diet and failing health, especially in old age. Such links may be sufficient to explain some of the effects of an inadequate diet on the retention of cognitive function and increased risk of dementia in old age. More compelling is the association between increased plasma homocysteine concentration and later increased risk of dementia. This association is possibly caused by an inadequate intake of vitamin B(12)/folate.

  8. Psychiatric symptoms typical of patients with dementia with Lewy bodies - similarity to those of levodopa-induced psychosis.

    PubMed

    Iseki, Eizo; Marui, Wami; Nihashi, Namiko; Kosaka, Kenji

    2002-10-01

    We examined psychiatric symptoms in eight cases with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), which included visual hallucination of persons or small animals, visual illusion, metamorphosia, leibhaftige Bewusstheit, personal or topographical misidentification, Capgras' syndrome and reduplicative paramnesia as well as depressive state and delusion of persecution. These psychiatric symptoms are identical to those of levodopa-induced psychosis, although these symptoms appeared before medication with anti-Parkinson drugs. The hypersensitivity of the dopamine receptor in the meso-limbic dopaminergic system has been presumed in levodopa-induced psychosis. We previously showed disturbance of the nigro-amygdaloid dopaminergic connections in DLB brains on pathological studies. Hypoperfusion or glucose hypometabolism in the occipital lobe has been demonstrated in DLB patients using SPECT or PET. The amygdala has reciprocal connections with the visual cortex in the occipital lobe. From these findings, it is supposed that the disturbance of the nigro-amygdaloid connections induces hypersensitivity of the dopamine receptor in the amygdala, causing psychiatric symptoms with dysfunction of the visuo-amygdaloid connections.

  9. Psychiatric Symptoms in Adults with Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urv, Tiina K.; Zigman, Warren B.; Silverman, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Changes in psychiatric symptoms related to specific stages of dementia were investigated in 224 adults 45 years of age or older with Down syndrome. Findings indicate that psychiatric symptoms are a prevalent feature of dementia in the population with Down syndrome and that clinical presentation is qualitatively similar to that seen in Alzheimer's…

  10. Apraxias in Neurodegenerative Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Abbas, Mirza Masoom

    2015-01-01

    Background: Apraxia is a state of inability to carry out a learned motor act in the absence of motor, sensory or cerebellar defect on command processed through the Praxis circuit. Breakdown in default networking is one of the early dysfunction in cortical dementias and result in perplexity, awkwardness, omission, substitution errors, toying behavior and unrecognizable gestures in response to command with voluntary reflex dissociation where, when unobserved patient will carry out reflex movements normally. Awareness into the organicity of these phenomenas will help in early diagnosis, which will help in initiating appropriate treatment and slowing down the progression of the disease. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to look for the various kinds of apraxias in patients with dementia using appropriate simple tests. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients satisfying Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for dementia were evaluated in detail with mandatory investigations for dementia followed by testing for ideational, ideomotor, limb-kinetic, buccopharyngeal, dressing apraxia, constructional apraxia and gait apraxias in addition to recording of rare apraxias when present. Results: Alzheimer's disease showed maximum association with apraxias in all the phases of the disease ideational, ideomotor, dressing and constructional apraxias early and buccopharyngeal and gait apraxia late. Frontotemporal lobe dementia showed buccopharyngeal and gait apraxias late into the disease. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration showed limb apraxias and diffuse Lewy body disease showed more agnosias and less apraxias common apraxias seen was Ideational and Ideomotor. Conclusion: Recognition of the apraxias help in establishing organicity, categorization, caregiver education, early strategies for treatment, avoiding anti-psychotics and introducing disease modifying pharmacotherapeutic agents and also prognosticating. PMID:25722511

  11. Frontotemporal Dysfunction and Dementia in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Susan C; Strong, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Although amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is classically considered a disorder exclusively affecting motor neurons, there is substantial clinical, neuroimaging, and neuropathologic evidence that more than half of patients have an associated syndrome of frontotemporal dysfunction. These syndromes range from frontotemporal dementia to behavioral or cognitive syndromes. Neuroimaging and neuropathologic findings are consistent with frontotemporal lobar degeneration that underpins alterations in network connectivity. Future clinical trials need to be stratified based on the presence or absence of frontotemporal dysfunction on the disease course of ALS. PMID:26515622

  12. Alzheimer's disease pattern of brain atrophy predicts cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Daniel; Dietz, Nicole; Duda, John E; Wolk, David A; Doshi, Jimit; Xie, Sharon X; Davatzikos, Christos; Clark, Christopher M; Siderowf, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests overlap in brain regions undergoing neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. To assess the clinical significance of this, we applied a validated Alzheimer's disease-spatial pattern of brain atrophy to patients with Parkinson's disease with a range of cognitive abilities to determine its association with cognitive performance and decline. At baseline, 84 subjects received structural magnetic resonance imaging brain scans and completed the Dementia Rating Scale-2, and new robust and expanded Dementia Rating Scale-2 norms were applied to cognitively classify participants. Fifty-nine non-demented subjects were assessed annually with the Dementia Rating Scale-2 for two additional years. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were quantified using both a region of interest approach and voxel-based morphometry analysis, and a method for quantifying the presence of an Alzheimer's disease spatial pattern of brain atrophy was applied to each scan. In multivariate models, higher Alzheimer's disease pattern of atrophy score was associated with worse global cognitive performance (β = -0.31, P = 0.007), including in non-demented patients (β = -0.28, P = 0.05). In linear mixed model analyses, higher baseline Alzheimer's disease pattern of atrophy score predicted long-term global cognitive decline in non-demented patients [F(1, 110) = 9.72, P = 0.002], remarkably even in those with normal cognition at baseline [F(1, 80) = 4.71, P = 0.03]. In contrast, in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses there was no association between region of interest brain volumes and cognitive performance in patients with Parkinson's disease with normal cognition. These findings support involvement of the hippocampus and parietal-temporal cortex with cognitive impairment and long-term decline in Parkinson's disease. In addition, an Alzheimer's disease pattern of brain atrophy may be a preclinical biomarker of cognitive decline in

  13. Parkinsonism and occupational exposure to pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Engel, L; Checkoway, H; Keifer, M; Seixas, N; Longstreth, W; Scott, K; Hudnell, K; Anger, W; Camicioli, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the risk of parkinsonism related to lifetime occupational exposure to pesticides among a cohort of men, mostly orchardists, in Washington State.
METHODS—All 310 subjects in this study had previously participated in a cohort study of men occupationally exposed to pesticides. Subjects were given a structured neurological examination and completed a self administered questionnaire which elicited detailed information on pesticide (insecticide, herbicide, and fungicide) use throughout their working careers. Demographic characteristics were also sought. Subjects had a mean age of 69.6 years (range 49-96, SD 8.1). There were 238 (76.8%) subjects who reported some occupational exposure to pesticides, whereas 72 (23.2%) reported none. Parkinsonism was defined by the presence of two or more of rest tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and impairment of postural reflexes in subjects not on antiparkinsonian medication, or the presence of at least one sign if they were on such medication. Parkinson's disease was not studied explicitly because of the difficulty in distinguishing it from other parkinsonian syndromes. A generalised linear model was used to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) for parkinsonism relative to history of farming, pesticide use, and use of well water.
RESULTS—A PR of 2.0 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.0 to 4.2) was found for subjects in the highest tertile of years of exposure to pesticides; a similarly increased, non-significant, PR was found for the middle tertile (1.9 (95% CI 0.9 to 4.0)), although a trend test did not show a significant exposure-response relation. No increased risks were found associated with specific pesticides or pesticide classes, nor with a history of farming or use of well water.
CONCLUSION—Parkinsonism may be associated with long term occupational exposure to pesticides, although no associations with specific pesticides could be detected. This finding is consistent with most of the

  14. The ALS/PDC syndrome of Guam and the cycad hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Steele, John C; McGeer, Patrick L

    2008-05-20

    There is a high incidence on Guam of a severe tauopathy known as the Parkinson- dementia complex (PDC). It is linked with an even more malignant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) syndrome. There is great interest in determining the cause, or causes, of the Guam ALS/PDC syndrome because insight might be gained regarding ALS and the more common tauopathies found throughout the world. Research into the disorder is stimulated by hypotheses as to cause. Such hypotheses should be compatible with the known epidemiology and pathology of the syndrome. These include a high, if not exclusive, restriction to the Chamorro population, familial occurrence, a regional variation on Guam itself, a definite persistence but with declining incidence, and a possible duplication in isolated villages on the Kii peninsula of Japan. Proposed causation factors should also be able to reproduce the syndrome in experimental systems. This includes induction of neurofibrillary tangles with a tau isoform distribution similar to that of Alzheimer disease and association of the lesions with TDP-43 and Lrrk2. A recurring hypothesis as to causation is exposure to Cycas micronesica, the false Sago palm known locally as fadang. We review the reasons why this hypothesis falls short of the minimal criteria needed for further serious consideration and discuss some other possibilities that should not be excluded.

  15. Imaging in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Gennaro; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2016-08-01

    The clinical presentation of Parkinson's disease (PD) is heterogeneous and overlaps with other conditions, including the parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and essential tremor. Imaging of the brain in patients with parkinsonism has the ability to increase the accuracy of differential diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) allow brain imaging of structural, functional and molecular changes in vivo in patients with PD. Structural MRI is useful to differentiate PD from secondary and atypical forms of parkinsonism. 123I-ioflupane (DaTSCAN(TM)) SPECT is a valid tool in the differential diagnosis between PD and non-degenerative tremors, while cardiac 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine SPECT and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET are valid in the differential diagnosis between PD and atypical parkinsonism (MSA-P, PSP). However, despite significant evidence for the utility of neuroimaging in assessing parkinsonian patients, none of the neuroimaging techniques are specifically recommended for routine use in clinical practice. Hopefully, future larger trials will help to demonstrate additional evidence for the clinical utility of neuroimaging and will include an analysis of the financial benefits for the NHS in the longer term management of the patients. PMID:27481384

  16. Young-Onset Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... idiopathic, or typical, PD. Understanding the roles of environment and genes will ultimately allow us to identify the multiple causes of PD. Is Medication Treatment Different for Young-Onset PD? Medical management of young-onset Parkinson's disease requires an understanding ...

  17. Living with Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips from the Health Care Team Finding Resources Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want ... resources & more. Order Free Materials Today Living with Parkinson’s “Parkinson’s is a part of my life, but ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF®), a division of the Parkinson's Foundation, seeks research proposals for emerging ideas to help solve, treat and end the disease. PDF investments of $2.7 million are part of its comprehensive strategy to mobilize ... Initiatives Research We Fund Results Apply ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients and Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find People About NINDS Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients & Caregivers Parkinson's Disease Highlights for Patients & ... and progression biomarkers for PD. NINDS Parkinson's Disease Information Parkinson's Disease Information Page Parkinson's Disease: Hope Through ...

  20. Neuronal RNA oxidation is a prominent feature of dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Chiba, Shigeru; Kosaka, Kenji; Takeda, Atsushi; Castellani, Rudy J; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George

    2002-11-15

    An approach was used to identify the oxidized nucleoside, 8-hydroxyguanosine in brains of dementia with Lewy bodies. Neurons with marked immunoreaction of 8-hydroxyguanosine in the cytoplasm were widely distributed in the hippocampal region and temporal neocortex. Relative intensity measurements of neuronal 8-hydroxyguanosine immunoreactivity showed that there was a significant increase in nucleic acid oxidation in dementia with Lewy bodies compared with controls. Treatment with nuclease (DNase or RNase) before the immunostaining demonstrated that RNA was a major site of nucleic acid oxidation. Together with the previously reported RNA oxidation in vulnerable neurons in Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, neuronal RNA oxidation in dementia with Lewy bodies might represent one of the fundamental abnormalities in age-associated neurodegenerative diseases.