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Sample records for parkinson disease association

  1. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Parkinson's Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Parkinson's Disease A A ... symptoms of something called Parkinson's disease. What Is Parkinson's Disease? You may have seen the actor Michael ...

  2. Association between Parkinson's Disease and Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Oğuz, Sıdıka

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) is a common infection of the gastrointestinal system that is usually related to peptic ulcers. However, recent studies have revealed relationships between HP and many other diseases. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, HP can prevent the absorption of certain drugs. A high prevalence of HP has been found in patients with Parkinson's disease, and this bacterium causes motor fluctuations by affecting the absorption of levodopa, which is the main drug used to treat Parkinson's disease. Eradicating HP from patients with Parkinson's disease by applying antibiotic treatment will increase the absorption of levodopa and decrease their motor fluctuations. PMID:26932258

  3. Associations between B Vitamins and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang

    2015-08-27

    B vitamins may correlate with Parkinson's disease (PD) through regulating homocysteine level. However, there is no comprehensive assessment on the associations between PD and B vitamins. The present study was designed to perform a meta-analytic assessment of the associations between folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 and PD, including the status of B vitamins in PD patients compared with controls, and associations of dietary intakes of B vitamins and risk of PD. A literature search using Medline database obtained 10 eligible studies included in the meta-analyses. Stata 12.0 statistical software was used to perform the meta-analysis. Pooled data revealed that there was no obvious difference in folate level between PD patients and healthy controls, and PD patients had lower level of vitamin B12 than controls. Available data suggested that higher dietary intake of vitamin B6 was associated with a decreased risk of PD (odds ratio (OR) = 0.65, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = (0.30, 1.01)), while no significant association was observed for dietary intake of folate and vitamin B12 and risk of PD. PD patients had lower level of vitamin B12 and similar level of folate compared with controls. Dietary intake of vitamin B6 exhibited preventive effect of developing PD based on the available data. As the number of included studies is limited, more studies are needed to confirm the findings and elucidate the underpinning underlying these associations.

  4. Problems associated with fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nyhlén, Jakob; Constantinescu, Radu; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2010-10-01

    This article focuses on biochemical markers that may be used in the diagnostics of Parkinson's disease and associated disorders, and to identify early cases and stratify patients into subgroups. We present an updated account of some currently available candidate fluid biomarkers, and discuss their diagnostic performance and limitations. We also discuss some of the general problems with Parkinson's disease biomarkers and possible ways of moving forward. It may be concluded that a diagnostically useful fluid biomarker for Parkinson's disease is yet to be identified. However, some interesting candidates exist and may prove useful in the future, alone or when analyzed together in patterns.

  5. No allelic association between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3, and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nanko, S.; Hattori, M.; Dai, X.Y.

    1994-12-15

    Parkinson`s disease is thought to be caused by a combination of unknown environmental, genetic, and degenerative factors. Evidence from necropsy brain samples and pharmacokinetics suggests involvement of dopamine receptors in the pathogenesis or pathophysiology of Parkinson`s disease. Genetic association studies between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3 and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms were conducted. The polymorphism was examined in 71 patients with Parkinson`s disease and 90 controls. There were no significant differences between two groups in allele frequencies at the D2, D3, and D4 dopamine receptor loci. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that susceptibility to Parkinson`s disease is associated with the dopamine receptor polymorphisms examined. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Association of Parkinsonism or Parkinson Disease with Polypharmacy in the Year Preceding Diagnosis: A Nested Case-Control Study in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Young; Park, Ji-Won; Sohn, Hyun Soon; Kwon, Jin-Won

    2017-06-20

    Published studies on the association between polypharmacy and parkinsonism or Parkinson disease are very limited. The objective of this study was to investigate whether polypharmacy is associated with parkinsonism or Parkinson disease in elderly patients. From a South Korean national health insurance sample cohort database for 2002-2013, we matched parkinsonism cases (defined by diagnosis codes for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease) and Parkinson disease cases (patients who had records for both Parkinson disease diagnosis and anti-Parkinson disease drug prescriptions) with controls. Logistic regression analysis evaluated the associations of parkinsonism/Parkinson disease with polypharmacy (i.e., five or more prescribed daily drugs) during the year preceding parkinsonism/Parkinson disease diagnosis, medications potentially associated with parkinsonism, and comorbidity status (using the Charlson Comorbidity Index score and hospitalization records). The study population included 6209 cases and 24,836 controls for parkinsonism and 1331 cases and 5324 controls for Parkinson disease. In univariate logistic regression, odds ratios for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease increased significantly with increased polypharmacy, medications potentially associated with parkinsonism, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, or prior hospitalizations. In multiple logistic regression, odds ratios for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease (adjusted for medications potentially associated with parkinsonism and comorbidities) also increased with increased polypharmacy. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for Parkinson disease were higher than those for parkinsonism with stronger statistical significance: 1.41 (1.28-1.55) and 2.17 (1.84-2.57) for parkinsonism and 2.87 (2.30-3.58) and 4.75 (3.39-6.66) for Parkinson disease for between five and ten prescribed daily drugs and ten or more drugs, respectively. Polypharmacy in the year preceding diagnosis may be associated with an increased risk for parkinsonism/Parkinson

  7. Sleep Disturbances Associated with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Iwanami, Masaoki; Hirata, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common problems affecting the quality life of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and are often underestimated. The causes of sleep disturbances are multifactorial and include nocturnal motor disturbances, nocturia, depressive symptoms, and medication use. Comorbidity of PD with sleep apnea syndrome, restless legs syndrome, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, or circadian cycle disruption also results in impaired sleep. In addition, the involvement of serotoninergic, noradrenergic, and cholinergic neurons in the brainstem as a disease-related change contributes to impaired sleep structures. Excessive daytime sleepiness is not only secondary to nocturnal disturbances or dopaminergic medication but may also be due to independent mechanisms related to impairments in ascending arousal system and the orexin system. Notably, several recent lines of evidence suggest a strong link between rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as PD. In the present paper, we review the current literature concerning sleep disorders in PD. PMID:21876839

  8. Treatment of dysautonomia associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mostile, Giovanni; Jankovic, Joseph

    2009-12-01

    Non-motor symptoms are increasingly recognized to adversely impact on the quality of life of patients with in Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly as the disease progresses. Autonomic symptom severity in patients with PD seems to correlate with older age, greater disease severity, psychiatric complications, sleep disorders, and higher doses of dopaminergic medication. The following therapeutic strategies are frequently used in the treatment of PD-related dysautonomia: 1. Orthostatic hypotension: fludrocortisone, midodrine, and droxidopa; 2. Sialorrhea: glycopyrrolate and botulinun toxin injections; 3. Constipation: symbiotic yogurt and bulking agents, macrogol, lubiprostone, mosapride citrate and tegaserod, pyridostigmine bromide, botulinum toxin injections and sacral nerve stimulation; 4. Urinary frequency: oxybutynin, tolterodine, solifenacin, darifenacin, botulinum toxin injections; 5. Erectile dysfunction: sildenafil and other phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. More effective symptomatic and pathogenesis-targeted therapies are needed to ameliorate the non-motor symptoms of PD that usually do not respond well to dopaminergic medications.

  9. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may have seen the actor Michael J. Fox on TV talking about Parkinson's disease. He has ... and help find a cure. Mostly adults (like Fox and boxer Muhammad Ali) get Parkinson's disease. It's ...

  10. Imaging prodromal Parkinson disease: the Parkinson Associated Risk Syndrome Study.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Danna; Siderowf, Andrew; Stern, Matthew; Seibyl, John; Eberly, Shirley; Oakes, David; Marek, Kenneth

    2014-11-04

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relative risk of abnormal dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging for subjects with and without hyposmia and the feasibility of acquiring a large, community-based, 2-tiered biomarker assessment strategy to detect prodromal Parkinson disease (PD). In this observational study, individuals without a diagnosis of PD, recruited through 16 movement disorder clinics, underwent tier 1 assessments (olfactory testing, questionnaires). Tier 2 assessments (neurologic examination, DAT imaging, and other biomarker assessments) were completed by 303 subjects. The main outcome of the study is to compare age-expected [(123)I]β-CIT striatal binding ratio in hyposmic and normosmic subjects. Tier 1 assessments were mailed to 9,398 eligible subjects and returned by 4,999; 669 were hyposmic. Three hundred three subjects (203 hyposmic, 100 normosmic) completed baseline evaluations. DAT deficit was present in 11% of hyposmic subjects compared with 1% of normosmic subjects. Multiple logistic regression demonstrates hyposmia (odds ratio [OR] 12.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6, 96.1), male sex (OR 5.5; 95% CI 1.7, 17.2), and constipation (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.6, 11.6) as factors predictive of DAT deficit. Combining multiple factors (hyposmia, male sex, and constipation) increased the percentage of subjects with a DAT deficit to >40%. Subjects with DAT deficit who do not meet criteria for a diagnosis of PD can be identified by olfactory testing. Sequential biomarker assessment may identify those at risk of PD. Selecting hyposmic individuals enriches the population for DAT deficit, and combining hyposmia with other potential risk factors (male sex, constipation) increases the percentage of subjects with a DAT deficit compatible with prodromal PD. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. James Parkinson: Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2013-11-01

    Parkinson's disease is a condition that anyone with a modicum of medical knowledge can recognise in the street--as indeed how it was studied by James Parkinson himself. Its three characteristic features are: 1. Increase in the tone of the voluntary muscles (rigidity). 2. Slowness of movement (bradykinesis). 3. Tremor (the characteristic 'pill rolling' movements of the fingers).

  12. Factors Associated With Ambulatory Activity in De Novo Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Cory; Moore, Charity; Schenkman, Margaret; Kluger, Benzi; Kohrt, Wendy; Delitto, Anthony; Berman, Brian; Hall, Deborah; Josbeno, Deborah; Poon, Cynthia; Robichaud, Julie; Wellington, Toby; Jain, Samay; Comella, Cynthia; Corcos, Daniel; Melanson, Ed

    2017-04-01

    Objective ambulatory activity during daily living has not been characterized for people with Parkinson disease prior to initiation of dopaminergic medication. Our goal was to characterize ambulatory activity based on average daily step count and examine determinants of step count in nonexercising people with de novo Parkinson disease. We analyzed baseline data from a randomized controlled trial, which excluded people performing regular endurance exercise. Of 128 eligible participants (mean ± SD = 64.3 ± 8.6 years), 113 had complete accelerometer data, which were used to determine daily step count. Multiple linear regression was used to identify factors associated with average daily step count over 10 days. Candidate explanatory variable categories were (1) demographics/anthropometrics, (2) Parkinson disease characteristics, (3) motor symptom severity, (4) nonmotor and behavioral characteristics, (5) comorbidities, and (6) cardiorespiratory fitness. Average daily step count was 5362 ± 2890 steps per day. Five factors explained 24% of daily step count variability, with higher step count associated with higher cardiorespiratory fitness (10%), no fear/worry of falling (5%), lower motor severity examination score (4%), more recent time since Parkinson disease diagnosis (3%), and the presence of a cardiovascular condition (2%). Daily step count in nonexercising people recruited for this intervention trial with de novo Parkinson disease approached sedentary lifestyle levels. Further study is warranted for elucidating factors explaining ambulatory activity, particularly cardiorespiratory fitness, and fear/worry of falling. Clinicians should consider the costs and benefits of exercise and activity behavior interventions immediately after diagnosis of Parkinson disease to attenuate the health consequences of low daily step count.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A170).

  13. Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Poewe, Werner; Seppi, Klaus; Tanner, Caroline M; Halliday, Glenda M; Brundin, Patrik; Volkmann, Jens; Schrag, Anette-Eleonore; Lang, Anthony E

    2017-03-23

    Parkinson disease is the second-most common neurodegenerative disorder that affects 2-3% of the population ≥65 years of age. Neuronal loss in the substantia nigra, which causes striatal dopamine deficiency, and intracellular inclusions containing aggregates of α-synuclein are the neuropathological hallmarks of Parkinson disease. Multiple other cell types throughout the central and peripheral autonomic nervous system are also involved, probably from early disease onwards. Although clinical diagnosis relies on the presence of bradykinesia and other cardinal motor features, Parkinson disease is associated with many non-motor symptoms that add to overall disability. The underlying molecular pathogenesis involves multiple pathways and mechanisms: α-synuclein proteostasis, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, calcium homeostasis, axonal transport and neuroinflammation. Recent research into diagnostic biomarkers has taken advantage of neuroimaging in which several modalities, including PET, single-photon emission CT (SPECT) and novel MRI techniques, have been shown to aid early and differential diagnosis. Treatment of Parkinson disease is anchored on pharmacological substitution of striatal dopamine, in addition to non-dopaminergic approaches to address both motor and non-motor symptoms and deep brain stimulation for those developing intractable L-DOPA-related motor complications. Experimental therapies have tried to restore striatal dopamine by gene-based and cell-based approaches, and most recently, aggregation and cellular transport of α-synuclein have become therapeutic targets. One of the greatest current challenges is to identify markers for prodromal disease stages, which would allow novel disease-modifying therapies to be started earlier.

  14. Impulsive Behavior and Associated Clinical Variables in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abosch, Aviva; Gupte, Akshay; Eberly, Lynn E.; Tuite, Paul J.; Nance, Martha; Grant, Jon E.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative brain disorder accompanied by the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of motor and non-motor symptoms. We performed a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based analysis of impulsive behavior in our PD clinic population to assess prevalence and associated characteristics. We found a higher prevalence of impulsive behavior (29.7%) than previously reported, and found multiple, concurrent impulsive behaviors in 26% of subjects reporting impulsive behavior. Our findings contribute to the growing awareness of impulsive behavior in PD, and support the need for longitudinal studies to assess changes in impulsive behaviors in Parkinson's patients. PMID:21300194

  15. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

  16. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Playfer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common disabling disease of old age. The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on clinical signs and has poor sensitivity, with about 25% of patients confidently diagnosed as having the disease actually having other conditions such as multi-system atrophy and other parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Benign essential tremor and arteriosclerotic pseudo-parkinsonism can easily be confused with Parkinson's disease. The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown. Speculative research highlights the role of oxidative stress and free radical mediated damage to dopaminergic cells. Parkinson's disease is the one neurodegenerative disorder in which drugs have been demonstrated to be of value. There is now a wide variety of drugs and formulations available, including anticholinergics, amantidine, L-dopa, dopamine agonists including apomorphine, selegiline and soon to be available catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors. Disabling side-effects of treatment, fluctuations, dyskinesias and psychiatric problems require strategic use of the drugs available. There is an increasing potential for neurosurgical intervention. PMID:9196696

  17. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors. A full understanding of Parkinson's risk requires integrated efforts to study both genetic and environmental factors. ... Parkinson’s disease (December 2014) Australian researcher outlines an integrated approach for studying Parkinson’s (December 2014) Research on ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific part of your brain. The electrodes are connected to a generator implanted in your chest near ... with Parkinson's disease to improve their walking and speech. Participating in art therapy, such as painting or ...

  19. CSF biomarkers associated with disease heterogeneity in early Parkinson's disease: the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Mollenhauer, Brit; Coffey, Christopher S; Toledo, Jon B; Weintraub, Daniel; Galasko, Douglas R; Irwin, David J; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea; Waligórska, Teresa; Taylor, Peggy; Shah, Nirali; Pan, Sarah; Zero, Pawel; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Kenneth; Kieburtz, Karl; Jennings, Danna; Tanner, Caroline M; Simuni, Tanya; Singleton, Andrew; Toga, Arthur W; Chowdhury, Sohini; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M

    2016-06-01

    The development of biomarkers to predict the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) from its earliest stage through its heterogeneous course is critical for research and therapeutic development. The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is an ongoing international multicenter, prospective study to validate biomarkers in drug-naïve PD patients and matched healthy controls (HC). We quantified cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alpha-synuclein (α-syn), amyloid-beta1-42 (Aβ1-42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (p-tau) in 660 PPMI subjects at baseline, and correlated these data with measures of the clinical features of these subjects. We found that CSF α-syn, t-tau and p-tau levels, but not Aβ1-42, were significantly lower in PD compared with HC, while the diagnostic value of the individual CSF biomarkers for PD diagnosis was limited due to large overlap. The level of α-syn, but not other biomarkers, was significantly lower in PD patients with non-tremor-dominant phenotype compared with tremor-dominant phenotype. In addition, in PD patients the lowest Aβ1-42, or highest t-tau/Aβ1-42 and t-tau/α-syn quintile in PD patients were associated with more severe non-motor dysfunction compared with the highest or lowest quintiles, respectively. In a multivariate regression model, lower α-syn was significantly associated with worse cognitive test performance. APOE ε4 genotype was associated with lower levels of Aβ1-42, but neither with PD diagnosis nor cognition. Our data suggest that the measurement of CSF biomarkers in early-stage PD patients may relate to disease heterogeneity seen in PD. Longitudinal observations in PPMI subjects are needed to define their prognostic performance.

  20. Dropped head associated with amantadine in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Ueno, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The antiviral agent amantadine has been used to manage Parkinson's disease or levodopa-induced dyskinesias for nearly 5 decades. Amantadine is often associated with hallucinations as an adverse effect, but a long-term study reported no serious motor complications. We describe an unusual patient who had Parkinson's disease with dropped head syndrome (DHS) caused by amantadine. When the patient, who had DHS while receiving only 2 kinds of antiparkinsonian drugs, was rechallenged with amantadine, DHS developed, accompanied by increased muscle tone in the neck muscles on surface electromyogram. The DHS resolved after the withdrawal of amantadine. Moreover, an intravenous infusion of levodopa did not alter the DHS. These findings collectively suggest that the DHS in our patient was most likely caused directly by amantadine. Our findings suggest that amantadine may carry the risk of augmenting dystonic syndrome in humans.

  1. Parkinson's disease and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Vaserman, Nathalie

    2005-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with an increased risk of falls. The risk is greatest in patients with advanced disease. Because Parkinson's disease usually occurs late in life, the risk factors related to the neurological impairments add to those associated with aging. The incidence of fractures is high in patients with Parkinson's disease, with femoral neck fractures in older women being particularly common. Risk factors for fractures include a low body mass index, limited exposure to sunlight, an inadequate vitamin D intake with low 25-OH vitamin D levels, and bone loss. Several studies found decreased bone mineral density values at the femoral neck and lumbar spine in patients with Parkinson's disease. Although this decrease is ascribable in part to factors unrelated with Parkinson's disease, such as older age and female gender, Parkinson's disease itself also plays a role, most notably in patients with severe neurological impairments (Hoehn and Yahr stages III and IV).

  2. Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Terzakis, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects one million people in the United States. This article reviews the etiology and pathophysiology of PD, risk factors, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of this common disease. Implications for home care clinicians are included.

  3. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, E C; Calne, D B

    1989-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease there is degeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra, with consequent depletion of the neurotransmitter dopamine. The triad of tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia is the clinical hallmark. Drugs currently used for palliative therapy fall into three categories: anticholinergic agents, dopamine precursors (levodopa combined with extracerebral decarboxylase inhibitors) and artificial dopamine agonists. It has been argued, on theoretical grounds, that some drugs slow the progress of Parkinson's disease, although no firm evidence has supported this. Treatment must be individualized, and more than one type of drug can be given concurrently after a careful build-up in dosage. We review the adverse effects of various drugs and consider new developments such as slow-release preparations, selective D-1 and D-2 agonists and transplants of dopaminergic cells into the brain. The treatment of Parkinson's disease can be demanding, rewarding and sometimes frustrating, but it remains a most challenging exercise in pharmacotherapy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2563667

  4. Neuropsychiatric characteristics of GBA-associated Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Swan, Matthew; Doan, Nancy; Ortega, Robert A; Barrett, Matthew; Nichols, William; Ozelius, Laurie; Soto-Valencia, Jeannie; Boschung, Sarah; Deik, Andres; Sarva, Harini; Cabassa, Jose; Johannes, Brooke; Raymond, Deborah; Marder, Karen; Giladi, Nir; Miravite, Joan; Severt, William; Sachdev, Rivka; Shanker, Vicki; Bressman, Susan; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2016-11-15

    Mutations in GBA1 are a well-established risk factor for Parkinson disease (PD). GBA-associated PD (GBA-PD) may have a higher burden of nonmotor symptoms than idiopathic PD (IPD). We sought to characterize the relationship between GBA-PD and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Subjects were screened for common GBA1 mutations. GBA-PD (n=31) and non-carrier (IPD; n=55) scores were compared on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI). In univariate comparisons, GBA-PD had a greater prevalence of depression (33.3%) versus IPD (13.2%) (p<0.05). In regression models controlling for age, sex, disease duration, motor disability, and MoCA score, GBA-PD had an increased odds of depression (OR 3.66, 95% CI 1.13-11.8) (p=0.03). Post-hoc analysis stratified by sex showed that, among men, GBA-PD had a higher burden of trait anxiety and depression than IPD; this finding was sustained in multivariate models. Among women, GBA-PD did not confer greater psychiatric morbidity than IPD. These results suggest that GBA1 mutations confer greater risk of neuropsychiatric morbidity in PD, and that sex may affect this association.

  5. Exosomes-associated neurodegeneration and progression of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Russo, Isabella; Bubacco, Luigi; Greggio, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates the role of exosomes in a variety of physiological pathways as conveyors of biological materials from cell-to-cell. However the molecular mechanism(s) of secretion and their interaction with receiving cells are yet unclear. Recently, it is emerging that exosomes are involved in pathological processes as potential carriers in the progression of neurodegenerative pathologies associated with misfolded proteins. In the current review we will discuss some recent findings on the key role of exosomes in the spreading of the aggregated products of α-synuclein from neuron-to-neuron and of inflammatory response propagation from immune cell-to-cell; we will highlight the implication of exosomes in the neurodegeneration and progression of the disease and the their potential interplay with genes related to Parkinson's disease. Increasing our knowledge on the cell-to-cell transmissions might provide new insights into mechanism of disease onset and progression and identify novel strategies for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention in Parkinson and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Neurochemistry changes associated with mutations in familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Siddique, M M; Tan, E K

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the progressive loss of dopamine neurons and the accumulation of Lewy bodies and neurites. The exact role of genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of PD has frequently been debated. The association of MPTP (methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6- tetrahydropyridine) and toxins (such as rotenone) with parkinsonism highlights the potential etiologic role of environmental toxins in disease causation. The recent discoveries of monogenic (such as α-synuclein, Parkin, UCHL1, PINK1, DJ-1, LRRK2) forms of PD have provided considerable insights into its pathophysiology. Parkin, an ubiquitin protein ligase assists in the degradation of toxic substrates via the ubiquitin proteasome system. It can also mediate a nondegradative form of ubiquitination. PINK1 and LRRK2 are possibly involved in the phosphorylation of substrates important for various cellular functions. Some toxins could interact with α-synuclein, an endogenous protein that is implicated in pathology of PD. Increasing in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that deficits in mitochondrial function, oxidative and nitrosative stress, the accumulation of aberrant or misfolded proteins, and ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction underpin the pathogenesis of sporadic and familial forms of PD. Elucidation of the functions of the proteins encoded by the diseasecausing genes will provide an opportunity for identification of specific pathways that could be targeted in neurotherapeutics.

  7. Association of restless legs syndrome, pain, and mood disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Qureshi, Abdul Rehman M; Rahman, Labiba; Jesudasan, Ajantha; Hafez, Kevin K; Rana, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to analyze the association between Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, and to explore the relationship between mood disorder comorbidity (anxiety and depression), pain, and restless legs syndrome. This study included 123 Parkinson's disease patients and 123 non-Parkinson's disease patients matched for age and gender, and evaluated for anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence. This was performed using semi-structured interviews and a neurological examination through the restless legs syndrome diagnostic criteria and the following inventories; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Pain Disability Index. Parkinson's disease patients had significantly greater anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence in comparison to controls. In addition, Parkinson's disease patients' comorbid for anxiety and depression had significantly greater pain severity, pain interference, and pain disability, but not RLS prevalence, in comparison to Parkinson's disease only, Parkinson's disease anxiety, and Parkinson's disease depression patients. Pain interference, pain severity, and pain disability is greater among Parkinson's disease patients with anxiety and depression, in comparison to Parkinson's disease patients without anxiety and depression. On the contrary, the prevalence of restless legs syndrome was not found to be relevant.

  8. Impulsive-compulsive behaviors in parkin-associated Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Morgante, Francesca; Fasano, Alfonso; Ginevrino, Monia; Petrucci, Simona; Ricciardi, Lucia; Bove, Francesco; Criscuolo, Chiara; Moccia, Marcello; De Rosa, Anna; Sorbera, Chiara; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Barone, Paolo; De Michele, Giuseppe; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-10-04

    The aim of this multicenter, case-control study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICBs) in a cohort of patients with parkin-associated Parkinson disease (PD) compared to a group of patients without the mutation. We compared 22 patients with biallelic parkin mutations (parkin-PD) and 26 patients negative for parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, and GBA mutations (PD-NM), matched for age at onset, disease duration, levodopa, and dopamine agonist equivalent daily dose. A semistructured interview was used to diagnose each of the following ICBs: compulsive sexual behavior, compulsive buying, binge eating, punding, hobbyism, and compulsive medication use. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease-Rating Scale (QUIP-RS) was adopted to rate ICB severity. Frequency of patients with at least one ICB was comparable between parkin-PD and PD-NM. Nevertheless, when analyzing the distribution of specific ICBs, a higher frequency of compulsive shopping, binge eating, and punding/hobbyism was found in the parkin-PD group. Compared to PD-NM, parkin-PD patients with ICB had younger onset age and higher frequency of smokers; in 5 patients, ICB had predated PD onset. Total and partial (compulsive buying, compulsive sexual behavior, binge eating, hobbyism/punding) QUIP-RS scores were higher in patients with parkin-PD compared to patients with PD-NM. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of parkin mutations was associated with smoking status and higher QUIP-RS total score. Our data expand the parkin-associated phenotypic spectrum demonstrating higher frequency and severity of specific ICBs, and suggesting an association between the parkin genotype, smoking status, and ICB severity. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Genomewide association study for onset age in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Pankratz, Nathan; Dumitriu, Alexandra; Wilk, Jemma B; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pezzoli, Gianni; Mariani, Claudio B; DeStefano, Anita L; Halter, Cheryl; Gusella, James F; Nichols, William C; Myers, Richard H; Foroud, Tatiana

    2009-09-22

    Age at onset in Parkinson disease (PD) is a highly heritable quantitative trait for which a significant genetic influence is supported by multiple segregation analyses. Because genes associated with onset age may represent invaluable therapeutic targets to delay the disease, we sought to identify such genetic modifiers using a genomewide association study in familial PD. There have been previous genomewide association studies (GWAS) to identify genes influencing PD susceptibility, but this is the first to identify genes contributing to the variation in onset age. Initial analyses were performed using genotypes generated with the Illumina HumanCNV370Duo array in a sample of 857 unrelated, familial PD cases. Subsequently, a meta-analysis of imputed SNPs was performed combining the familial PD data with that from a previous GWAS of 440 idiopathic PD cases. The SNPs from the meta-analysis with the lowest p-values and consistency in the direction of effect for onset age were then genotyped in a replication sample of 747 idiopathic PD cases from the Parkinson Institute Biobank of Milan, Italy. Meta-analysis across the three studies detected consistent association (p < 1 x 10(-5)) with five SNPs, none of which reached genomewide significance. On chromosome 11, the SNP with the lowest p-value (rs10767971; p = 5.4 x 10(-7)) lies between the genes QSER1 and PRRG4. Near the PARK3 linkage region on chromosome 2p13, association was observed with a SNP (rs7577851; p = 8.7 x 10(-6)) which lies in an intron of the AAK1 gene. This gene is closely related to GAK, identified as a possible PD susceptibility gene in the GWAS of the familial PD cases. Taken together, these results suggest an influence of genes involved in endocytosis and lysosomal sorting in PD pathogenesis.

  10. Genomewide association study for onset age in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Pankratz, Nathan; Dumitriu, Alexandra; Wilk, Jemma B; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pezzoli, Gianni; Mariani, Claudio B; DeStefano, Anita L; Halter, Cheryl; Gusella, James F; Nichols, William C; Myers, Richard H; Foroud, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    Background Age at onset in Parkinson disease (PD) is a highly heritable quantitative trait for which a significant genetic influence is supported by multiple segregation analyses. Because genes associated with onset age may represent invaluable therapeutic targets to delay the disease, we sought to identify such genetic modifiers using a genomewide association study in familial PD. There have been previous genomewide association studies (GWAS) to identify genes influencing PD susceptibility, but this is the first to identify genes contributing to the variation in onset age. Methods Initial analyses were performed using genotypes generated with the Illumina HumanCNV370Duo array in a sample of 857 unrelated, familial PD cases. Subsequently, a meta-analysis of imputed SNPs was performed combining the familial PD data with that from a previous GWAS of 440 idiopathic PD cases. The SNPs from the meta-analysis with the lowest p-values and consistency in the direction of effect for onset age were then genotyped in a replication sample of 747 idiopathic PD cases from the Parkinson Institute Biobank of Milan, Italy. Results Meta-analysis across the three studies detected consistent association (p < 1 × 10-5) with five SNPs, none of which reached genomewide significance. On chromosome 11, the SNP with the lowest p-value (rs10767971; p = 5.4 × 10-7) lies between the genes QSER1 and PRRG4. Near the PARK3 linkage region on chromosome 2p13, association was observed with a SNP (rs7577851; p = 8.7 × 10-6) which lies in an intron of the AAK1 gene. This gene is closely related to GAK, identified as a possible PD susceptibility gene in the GWAS of the familial PD cases. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest an influence of genes involved in endocytosis and lysosomal sorting in PD pathogenesis. PMID:19772629

  11. [Repetitive impulse-associated behavioral disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Katzenschlager, R; Goerlich, K S; van Eimeren, T

    2012-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with a number of behavioral disorders which may cause considerable social, professional or financial problems. Impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as pathological gambling, binge eating, compulsive shopping and hypersexuality occur in approximately 13-14% of PD patients. Further behavioral disorders are the dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS), a substance dependence characterized by craving for dopaminergic substances and punding (prolonged repetitive activities which are not goal-oriented).Treatment-related risk factors are dopamine agonists for ICDs and a high total dopaminergic dose for DDS and punding. Shared risk factors are young age at onset, impulsive personality traits, depression and possibly dyskinesia. At the neuronal level these behavioral disorders seem to be associated with changes in the reward system and dysfunction of the orbitofrontal cortex. The evidence level for management strategies is at present insufficient. For ICDs current clinical practice consists of discontinuation or reduction of dopamine agonists.

  12. Impulsive-compulsive behaviors in parkin-associated Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Alfonso; Ginevrino, Monia; Petrucci, Simona; Ricciardi, Lucia; Bove, Francesco; Criscuolo, Chiara; Moccia, Marcello; De Rosa, Anna; Sorbera, Chiara; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Barone, Paolo; De Michele, Giuseppe; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Valente, Enza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this multicenter, case-control study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICBs) in a cohort of patients with parkin-associated Parkinson disease (PD) compared to a group of patients without the mutation. Methods: We compared 22 patients with biallelic parkin mutations (parkin-PD) and 26 patients negative for parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, and GBA mutations (PD-NM), matched for age at onset, disease duration, levodopa, and dopamine agonist equivalent daily dose. A semistructured interview was used to diagnose each of the following ICBs: compulsive sexual behavior, compulsive buying, binge eating, punding, hobbyism, and compulsive medication use. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease–Rating Scale (QUIP-RS) was adopted to rate ICB severity. Results: Frequency of patients with at least one ICB was comparable between parkin-PD and PD-NM. Nevertheless, when analyzing the distribution of specific ICBs, a higher frequency of compulsive shopping, binge eating, and punding/hobbyism was found in the parkin-PD group. Compared to PD-NM, parkin-PD patients with ICB had younger onset age and higher frequency of smokers; in 5 patients, ICB had predated PD onset. Total and partial (compulsive buying, compulsive sexual behavior, binge eating, hobbyism/punding) QUIP-RS scores were higher in patients with parkin-PD compared to patients with PD-NM. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of parkin mutations was associated with smoking status and higher QUIP-RS total score. Conclusions: Our data expand the parkin-associated phenotypic spectrum demonstrating higher frequency and severity of specific ICBs, and suggesting an association between the parkin genotype, smoking status, and ICB severity. PMID:27590295

  13. Advances in GBA-associated Parkinson's disease--Pathology, presentation and therapies.

    PubMed

    Barkhuizen, Melinda; Anderson, David G; Grobler, Anne F

    2016-02-01

    GBA mutations are to date the most common genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The GBA gene encodes the lysomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase. Whilst bi-allelic GBA mutations cause Gaucher disease, both mono- and bi-allelic mutations confer risk for Parkinson's disease. Clinically, Parkinson's disease patients with GBA mutations resemble idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients. However, these patients have a modest reduction in age-of-onset of disease and a greater incidence of cognitive decline. In some cases, GBA mutations are also responsible for familial Parkinson's disease. The accumulation of α-synuclein into Lewy bodies is the central neuropathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease. Pathologic GBA mutations reduce enzymatic function. A reduction in glucocerebrosidase function increases α-synuclein levels and propagation, which in turn inhibits glucocerebrosidase in a feed-forward cascade. This cascade is central to the neuropathology of GBA-associated Parkinson's disease. The lysosomal integral membrane protein type-2 is necessary for normal glucocerebrosidase function. Glucocerebrosidase dysfunction also increases in the accumulation of β-amyloid and amyloid-precursor protein, oxidative stress, neuronal susceptibility to metal ions, microglial and immune activation. These factors contribute to neuronal death. The Mendelian Parkinson's disease genes, Parkin and ATP13A2, intersect with glucocerebrosidase. These factors sketch a complex circuit of GBA-associated neuropathology. To clinically interfere with this circuit, central glucocerebrosidase function must be improved. Strategies based on reducing breakdown of mutant glucocerebrosidase and increasing the fraction that reaches the lysosome has shown promise. Breakdown can be reduced by interfering with the ability of heat-shock proteins to recognize mutant glucocerebrosidase. This underlies the therapeutic efficacy of certain pharmacological chaperones and histone deacetylase inhibitors. These

  14. DNAJC6 Mutations Associated With Early-Onset Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Olgiati, Simone; Quadri, Marialuisa; Fang, Mingyan; Rood, Janneke P M A; Saute, Jonas A; Chien, Hsin Fen; Bouwkamp, Christian G; Graafland, Josja; Minneboo, Michelle; Breedveld, Guido J; Zhang, Jianguo; Verheijen, Frans W; Boon, Agnita J W; Kievit, Anneke J A; Jardim, Laura Bannach; Mandemakers, Wim; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Rieder, Carlos R M; Leenders, Klaus L; Wang, Jun; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2016-02-01

    DNAJC6 mutations were recently described in two families with autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (onset age < 11), prominent atypical signs, poor or absent response to levodopa, and rapid progression (wheelchair-bound within ∼10 years from onset). Here, for the first time, we report DNAJC6 mutations in early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). The DNAJC6 open reading frame was analyzed in 274 patients with early-onset sporadic or familial PD. Selected variants were followed up by cosegregation, homozygosity mapping, linkage analysis, whole-exome sequencing, and protein studies. We identified two families with different novel homozygous DNAJC6 mutations segregating with PD. In each family, the DNAJC6 mutation was flanked by long runs of homozygosity within highest linkage peaks. Exome sequencing did not detect additional pathogenic variants within the linkage regions. In both families, patients showed severely decreased steady-state levels of the auxilin protein in fibroblasts. We also identified a sporadic patient carrying two rare noncoding DNAJC6 variants possibly effecting RNA splicing. All these cases fulfilled the criteria for a clinical diagnosis of early-onset PD, had symptoms onset in the third-to-fifth decade, and slow disease progression. Response to dopaminergic therapies was prominent, but, in some patients, limited by psychiatric side effects. The phenotype overlaps that of other monogenic forms of early-onset PD. Our findings delineate a novel form of hereditary early-onset PD. Screening of DNAJC6 is warranted in all patients with early-onset PD compatible with autosomal recessive inheritance. Our data provide further evidence for the involvement of synaptic vesicles endocytosis and trafficking in PD pathogenesis. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  15. Inverse Association of Parkinson Disease With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Nationwide Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Te-Yu; Shen, Chih-Hao; Chou, Yu-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-01

    The effects of the inflammatory mediators involved in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) on subsequent Parkinson disease have been reported, but no relevant studies have focused on the association between the 2 diseases. This nationwide population-based study evaluated the risk of Parkinson disease in patients with SLE.We identified 12,817 patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance database diagnosed with SLE between 2000 and 2010 and compared the incidence rate of Parkinson disease among these patients with that among 51,268 randomly selected age and sex-matched non-SLE patients. A Cox multivariable proportional-hazards model was used to evaluate the risk factors of Parkinson disease in the SLE cohort.We observed an inverse association between a diagnosis of SLE and the risk of subsequent Parkinson disease, with the crude hazard ratio (HR) being 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.45-0.79) and adjusted HR being 0.68 (95% confidence interval 0.51-0.90). The cumulative incidence of Parkinson disease was 0.83% lower in the SLE cohort than in the non-SLE cohort. The adjusted HR of Parkinson disease decreased as the follow-up duration increased and was decreased among older lupus patients with comorbidity.We determined that patients with SLE had a decreased risk of subsequent Parkinson disease. Further research is required to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  16. LINGO1 rs9652490 is associated with essential tremor and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Ross, Owen A; Wider, Christian; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Cobb, Stephanie A; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Kachergus, Jennifer M; Keeling, Brett H; Dachsel, Justus C; Melrose, Heather L; Behrouz, Bahareh; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J; Aasly, Jan O; Rajput, Alex; Farrer, Matthew J

    2010-02-01

    Recently, a variant in LINGO1 (rs9652490) was found to associate with increased risk of essential tremor. We set out to replicate this association in an independent case-control series of essential tremor from North America. In addition, given the clinical and pathological overlap between essential tremor and Parkinson disease, we also evaluate the effect of LINGO1 rs9652490 in two case-control series of Parkinson disease. Our study demonstrates a significant association between LINGO1 rs9652490 and essential tremor (P = 0.014) and Parkinson disease (P = 0.0003), thus providing the first evidence of a genetic link between both diseases.

  17. Association between Parkinson's disease and risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xin; Luo, Xiaoguang; Xie, Mingliang

    2017-02-01

    Growing evidence has reported that gut microbiota is involved in pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and colorectal cancer (CRC), and the association between PD and CRC does not reach a consensus. In order to explore their correlation, herein we summarize the epidemiological evidence and included relevant studies to perform a meta-analysis. A comprehensive literature search for relevant articles published was performed in Medline, Web of Science and Embase up to June 30, 2016. The pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) was used to estimate the effects and calculated using the method of generic inverse variance with the Random-effects model. Thirteen studies were included and analyzed in this meta-analysis. The pooled result of 11 cohort studies and 2 case-control studies comprising 343,226 PD patients showed that patients with PD had a decreased risk of CRC (RR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.66-0.93, P = 0.006). Further subgroup analyses performed in Western population revealed that the significant inverse association between PD and risk of CRC was not undermined by many factors, including study design, tumor location, gender and quality of the study. Patients with PD was significantly associated with a decreased risk of CRC in Western population. Future studies are warranted to further clarify this association in Asian population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Association Between Autonomic Impairment and Structural Deficit in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Pei-Chin; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Yang, I-Hsiao; Yu, Chiun-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Che

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) have impaired autonomic function and altered brain structure. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship of gray matter volume (GMV) determined by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to autonomic impairment in patients with PD. Whole-brain VBM analysis was performed on 3-dimensional T1-weighted images in 23 patients with PD and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. The relationship of cardiovascular autonomic function (determined by survey) to baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) (determined from changes in heart rate and blood pressure during the early phase II of the Valsalva maneuver) was tested using least-squares regression analysis. The differences in GMV, autonomic parameters, and clinical data were correlated after adjusting for age and sex. Compared with controls, patients with PD had low BRS, suggesting worse cardiovascular autonomic function, and smaller GMV in several brain locations, including the right amygdala, left hippocampal formation, bilateral insular cortex, bilateral caudate nucleus, bilateral cerebellum, right fusiform, and left middle frontal gyri. The decreased GMVs of the selected brain regions were also associated with increased presence of epithelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the circulation. In patients with PD, decrease in cardiovascular autonomic function and increase in circulating EPC level are associated with smaller GMV in several areas of the brain. Because of its possible role in the modulation of the circulatory EPC pool and baroreflex control, the left hippocampal formation may be a bio-target for disease-modifying therapy and treatment monitoring in PD. PMID:26986144

  19. Parkinson's Disease: Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Research Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Parkinson's Patient Active as Research Advocate Joel Grace Photo courtesy of Parkinson's Disease ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Foundation Newsletter

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  1. Associations between Early Markers of Parkinson's Disease and Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Drey, Michael; Hasmann, Sandra E.; Krenovsky, Jan-Peter; Hobert, Markus A.; Straub, Stefanie; Elshehabi, Morad; von Thaler, Anna-Katharina; Fallgatter, Andreas J.; Eschweiler, Gerhard W.; Suenkel, Ulrike; Berg, Daniela; Maetzler, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Sarcopenia and Parkinson's disease (PD) are both common age-related syndromes, and there is preliminary evidence that the probability of the co-occurrence of these syndromes within one individual is higher than expected. However, it is unclear to date whether one of the syndromes induces the other, or whether there may be common underlying causes. This pilot study thus aimed at investigating the association of the features of increased risk for PD with early stage sarcopenia (ESS). Method: Two hundred and fifty-five community-dwelling individuals were recruited from the Tübinger evaluation of Risk factors for Early detection of NeuroDegeneration (TREND) study. The following features that are associated with an increased risk for future PD were evaluated: the motor part of the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS-III), hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra, prevalence of lifetime depression, hyposmia, REM sleep behavior disorder and the recently introduced probability score for prodromal PD. Sarcopenia was defined according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People, which was adapted to this cohort of healthy adults. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to identify associations of PD-related features with ESS. Results: The UPDRS-III score was significantly associated with ESS. The result remained significant after the adjustment for age, gender and physical activity. No association was found between the other PD-related features and ESS. Conclusion: The significant association of the UPDRS-III score with ESS in this cohort might indicate a common and early pathway in both diseases and supports the existence of an “extended neurodegenerative overlap syndrome.” Moreover, the potential of EES to serve as a prodromal marker of PD should be evaluated in future studies. PMID:28326036

  2. Groundwater pesticide levels and the association with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    James, Katherine A; Hall, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether exposure to environmentally relevant levels of pesticides in groundwater is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between PD and pesticide levels in groundwater. This cross-sectional study included 332 971 Medicare beneficiaries, including 4207 prevalent cases of PD from the 2007 Colorado Medicare Beneficiary Database. Residential pesticide levels were estimated from a spatial model based on 286 well water samples with atrazine, simazine, alachlor, and metolachlor measurements. A logistic regression model with known PD risk factors was used to assess the association between residential groundwater pesticide levels and prevalent PD. We found that for every 1.0 µg/L of pesticide in groundwater, the risk of PD increases by 3% (odds ratio = 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.04) while adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and gender suggesting that higher age-standardized PD prevalence ratios are associated with increasing levels of pesticides in groundwater.

  3. Apathy and associated factors in Mexican patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; González-Latapi, Paulina; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Martínez-Ramírez, Daniel; Velázquez-Osuna, Salvador; Camacho-Ordoñez, Azyadeh

    2014-05-01

    Apathy is one of the most common behavioral disturbances in Parkinson's disease (PD) with a reported prevalence of 17-51 %. Apathy has been associated with depression, cognitive deficits, and poor quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of apathy in Mexican subjects with PD and its correlation with clinical and demographic characteristics. A cross-sectional, descriptive, and analytic study was carried out. Consecutive subjects with PD attending the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City were included. Demographic and other relevant clinical data were collected. The Apathy Scale was applied to all subjects. A cut-off score of ≥ 14 was used. A total of 241 non-demented patients (52.7 % male) were included. Apathy was found in 43 % of subjects. Lower body mass index, older age of PD onset, cognitive decline and disease severity were all related to apathy. The use of dopamine agonists or rasagiline was more common in patients with low apathy scores. Our results show that the prevalence of apathy in Mexican subjects with PD is similar to other reports.

  4. Cortical gray and subcortical white matter associations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Nicholas W; Du, Guangwei; Lewis, Mechelle M; Swavely, Steven; Kong, Lan; Styner, Martin; Huang, Xuemei

    2017-01-01

    Cortical atrophy has been documented in both Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy aging, but its relationship to changes in subcortical white matter is unknown. This was investigated by obtaining T1- and diffusion-weighted images from 76 PD and 70 controls at baseline and 18 and 36 months, from which cortical volumes and underlying subcortical white matter axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and fractional anisotropy (FA) were determined. Twelve of 69 cortical subregions had significant group differences, and for these, underlying subcortical white matter was explored. At baseline, higher cortical volumes were significantly correlated with lower underlying subcortical white matter AD, RD, and higher FA (ps ≤ 0.017) in PD. Longitudinally, higher rates of cortical atrophy in PD were associated with increased rates of change in AD RD, and FA values (ps ≤ 0.0013) in 2 subregions explored. The significant gray-white matter associations were not found in controls. Thus, unlike healthy aging, cortical atrophy and subcortical white matter changes may not be independent events in PD.

  5. Visual short-term memory deficits associated with GBA mutation and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zokaei, Nahid; McNeill, Alisdair; Proukakis, Christos; Beavan, Michelle; Jarman, Paul; Korlipara, Prasad; Hughes, Derralynn; Mehta, Atul; Hu, Michele T M; Schapira, Anthony H V; Husain, Masud

    2014-08-01

    Individuals with mutation in the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene are at significantly high risk of developing Parkinson's disease with cognitive deficit. We examined whether visual short-term memory impairments, long associated with patients with Parkinson's disease, are also present in GBA-positive individuals-both with and without Parkinson's disease. Precision of visual working memory was measured using a serial order task in which participants observed four bars, each of a different colour and orientation, presented sequentially at screen centre. Afterwards, they were asked to adjust a coloured probe bar's orientation to match the orientation of the bar of the same colour in the sequence. An additional attentional 'filtering' condition tested patients' ability to selectively encode one of the four bars while ignoring the others. A sensorimotor task using the same stimuli controlled for perceptual and motor factors. There was a significant deficit in memory precision in GBA-positive individuals-with or without Parkinson's disease-as well as GBA-negative patients with Parkinson's disease, compared to healthy controls. Worst recall was observed in GBA-positive cases with Parkinson's disease. Although all groups were impaired in visual short-term memory, there was a double dissociation between sources of error associated with GBA mutation and Parkinson's disease. The deficit observed in GBA-positive individuals, regardless of whether they had Parkinson's disease, was explained by a systematic increase in interference from features of other items in memory: misbinding errors. In contrast, impairments in patients with Parkinson's disease, regardless of GBA status, was explained by increased random responses. Individuals who were GBA-positive and also had Parkinson's disease suffered from both types of error, demonstrating the worst performance. These findings provide evidence for dissociable signature deficits within the domain of visual short

  6. Associations of welding and manganese exposure with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Amy R.; Nelson, Lorene M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine associations of welding and manganese exposure with Parkinson disease (PD) using meta-analyses of data from cohort, case-control, and mortality studies. Methods: Epidemiologic studies related to welding or manganese exposure and PD were identified in a PubMed search, article references, published reviews, and abstracts. Inclusion criteria were 1) cohort, case-control, or mortality study with relative risk (RR), odds ratio (OR), or mortality OR (MOR) and 95 confidence intervals (95% CI); 2) RR, OR, and MOR matched or adjusted for age and sex; 3) valid study design and analysis. When participants of a study were a subgroup of those in a larger study, only results of the larger study were included to assure independence of datasets. Pooled RR/OR estimates and 95% CIs were obtained using random effects models; heterogeneity of study effects were evaluated using the Q statistic and I2 index in fixed effect models. Results: Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria for the welding meta-analysis and 3 studies for the manganese exposure meta-analysis. The pooled RR for the association between welding and PD for all study designs was 0.86 (95% CI 0.80–0.92), with absence of between-study heterogeneity (I2 = 0.0). Effect measures for cohort, case-control, and mortality studies were similar (0.91, 0.82, 0.87). For the association between manganese exposure and PD, the pooled OR was 0.76 (95% CI 0.41–1.42). Conclusions: Welding and manganese exposure are not associated with increased PD risk. Possible explanations for the inverse association between welding and PD include confounding by smoking, healthy worker effect, and hormesis. PMID:22965675

  7. Association between cognitive impairment and urinary dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tkaczynska, Zuzanna; Pilotto, Andrea; Becker, Sara; Gräber-Sultan, Susanne; Berg, Daniela; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga

    2017-02-17

    Urinary dysfunction (UD) is a common non-motor feature of Parkinson's disease (PD), and might be secondary to neurodegeneration involving cortical and subcortical brain areas. The possible link between UD and cognitive deficits has never been examined in frontal cortex impairment, and is still not completely understood in PD. In the present study, 94 PD patients underwent a comprehensive motor, cognitive and non-motor assessment. It was shown that 55.3% of patients reported UD, of which 17% needed specific urological treatment. Patients who reported UD performed worse on global cognition (PANDA, p = .05), visuo-constructive functions (CERAD/praxis, p = .03; and Figure Test, p = .03), and instrumental activities of daily living functions (IADL, p = .03), than patients without UD. The group with UD medication performed worse on global cognition (PANDA, p = .02) and visuo-constructive functions (CERAD/praxis, p = .05; CERAD/praxis recall, p = .05) than the UD group without medication, independent of anticholinergic treatment effect. Our findings suggest an association between cognitive impairment and UD in PD independent from symptomatic treatment.

  8. Association of cumulative lead exposure with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weisskopf, Marc G; Weuve, Jennifer; Nie, Huiling; Saint-Hilaire, Marie-Helene; Sudarsky, Lewis; Simon, David K; Hersh, Bonnie; Schwartz, Joel; Wright, Robert O; Hu, Howard

    2010-11-01

    Research using reconstructed exposure histories has suggested an association between heavy metal exposures, including lead, and Parkinson's disease (PD), but the only study that used bone lead, a biomarker of cumulative lead exposure, found a nonsignificant increase in risk of PD with increasing bone lead. We sought to assess the association between bone lead and PD. Bone lead concentrations were measured using 109Cd excited K-shell X-ray fluorescence from 330 PD patients (216 men, 114 women) and 308 controls (172 men, 136 women) recruited from four clinics for movement disorders and general-community cohorts. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for PD were calculated using logistic regression. The average age of cases and controls at bone lead measurement was 67 (SD = 10) and 69 (SD = 9) years of age, respectively. In primary analyses of cases and controls recruited from the same groups, compared with the lowest quartile of tibia lead, the OR for PD in the highest quartile was 3.21 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.17-8.83]. Results were similar but slightly weaker in analyses restricted to cases and controls recruited from the movement disorders clinics only (fourth-quartile OR = 2.57; 95% CI, 1.11-5.93) or when we included controls recruited from sites that did not also contribute cases (fourth-quartile OR = 1.91; 95% CI, 1.01-3.60). We found no association with patella bone lead. These findings, using an objective biological marker of cumulative lead exposure among typical PD patients seen in our movement disorders clinics, strengthen the evidence that cumulative exposure to lead increases the risk of PD.

  9. Associative reinstatement memory measures hippocampal function in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Melanie; Giannoylis, Irene; De Belder, Maya; Saint-Cyr, Jean A; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2016-09-01

    In Parkinson's Disease (PD), hippocampal atrophy is associated with rapid cognitive decline. Hippocampal function is typically assessed using memory tests but current clinical tools (e.g., free recall) also rely on executive functions or use material that is not optimally engaging hippocampal memory networks. Because of the ubiquity of executive dysfunction in PD, our ability to detect true memory deficits is suboptimal. Our previous behavioural and neuroimaging work in other populations suggests that an experimental memory task - Associative Reinstatement Memory (ARM) - may prove useful in investigating hippocampal function in PD. In this study, we investigated whether ARM is compromised in PD and we assessed its convergent and divergent validity by comparing it to standardized measures of memory and of attention and executive functioning in PD, respectively. Using fMRI, we also investigated whether performance in PD relates to degree of hippocampal engagement. Fifteen participants with PD and 13 age-matched healthy controls completed neuropsychological testing as well as an ARM fMRI recognition paradigm in which they were instructed to identify word pairs comprised of two studied words (intact or rearranged pairs) and those containing at least one new word (new or half new pairs). ARM is measured by the differences in hit rates between intact and rearranged pairs. Behaviourally, ARM was poorer in PD relative to controls and was correlated with verbal memory measures, but not with attention or executive functioning in the PD group. Hippocampal activation associated with ARM was reduced in PD relative to controls and covaried with ARM scores in both groups. To conclude, ARM is a sensitive measure of hippocampal memory function that is unaffected by attention or executive dysfunction in PD. Our study highlights the benefit of integrating cognitive neuroscience frameworks and novel experimental tasks to improve the practice of clinical neuropsychology in PD

  10. The skin in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Flint, A

    1977-09-01

    The characteristic oily skin in individuals with parkinsonism has long been observed by clinicians. The oiliness seems to be associated with periods when the disease is most active. This seborrhea has been observed particularly in post-encephalitic parkinsonism, as well as in idiopathic paralysis agitans. It also occurs in phenothiazine-induced parkinsonism.

  11. Sleep benefit in Parkinson's disease is associated with short sleep times.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Eskender; Valko, Philipp O; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Baumann, Christian R

    2014-01-01

    Sleep benefit in Parkinson's disease is characterized by restoration of mobility upon awakening from sleep and prior to drug intake. With this study, we aimed at assessing clinical and nocturnal sleep correlates of this phenomenon. We recorded motor and non-motor symptoms in 131 Parkinson patients with and without sleep benefit, as assessed by questionnaires. Polysomnography recordings were performed in 60 of these patients. Thirty-nine Parkinson patients (30%) reported sleep benefit. Motor symptoms, measures of sleepiness, fatigue, depression, anxiety, sleep-wake disorders, and dopaminergic treatment were not associated with sleep benefit, and most polysomnography measures were similar between both groups. However, Parkinson patients with sleep benefit had shorter total sleep times and longer sleep latencies at nocturnal polysomnography. The link between the occurrence of sleep benefit and shorter nocturnal sleep in Parkinson's disease remains unclear.

  12. Restless legs syndrome and its associated risk factors in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Azmin, Shahrul; Khairul Anuar, Abdul Manaf; Nafisah, Wan Yahya; Tan, Hui Jan; Raymond, Azman Ali; Hanita, Othman; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Norlinah, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Restless legs syndrome has been shown to negatively impact the quality of life of patients. Studies have shown an association between restless legs syndrome and Parkinson's disease. We attempted to investigate the prevalence of restless legs syndrome in Parkinson's disease patients and to identify associated risk factors. Method. This was a cross-sectional study among patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Exclusion criterion was a Mini Mental State Examination score of less than 21/30. The International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group criterion was used to identify patients with restless legs syndrome. Results. A total of 113 patients were recruited. The prevalence rate of restless legs syndrome in our cohort was 9.7% and was significantly associated with a younger onset of Parkinson's disease (P = 0.023), male gender (P = 0.045), higher Mini Mental State Examination score (P = 0.004), and less advanced Hoehn & Yahr stage (P = 0.014). Conclusion. The prevalence rate of restless legs syndrome in our Parkinson's disease population is in keeping with other studies published worldwide. The significance of the association between a younger onset of Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome needs to be further investigated.

  13. Parkinson disease - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may ...

  14. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Benninger, David H

    2013-01-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses therapeutic challenges. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in noninvasive brain stimulation as an alternative therapeutic tool. The rationale for its use draws from the concept that reversing abnormalities in brain activity and physiology thought to cause the clinical deficits may restore normal functioning. Currently the best evidence in support of this concept comes from DBS, which improves motor deficits, and modulates brain activity and motor cortex physiology, although whether a causal interaction exists remains largely undetermined. Most trials of noninvasive brain stimulation in PD have applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), targeting the motor cortex. Current studies suggest a possible therapeutic potential for rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but clinical effects so far have been small and negligible with regard to functional independence and quality of life. Approaches to potentiate the efficacy of rTMS include increasing stimulation intensity and novel stimulation parameters that derive their rationale from studies on brain physiology. These novel parameters are intended to simulate normal firing patterns or to act on the hypothesized role of oscillatory activity in the motor cortex and basal ganglia with regard to motor control and its contribution to the pathogenesis of motor disorders. Noninvasive brain stimulation studies will enhance our understanding of PD pathophysiology and might provide further evidence for potential therapeutic applications.

  15. Parkinson disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to destroy brain tissue that causes Parkinson symptoms. Stem cell transplant and other procedures are being studied. LIFESTYLE ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  16. Estimating the direct and indirect costs associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Blázquez, Carmen; Forjaz, Maria João; Lizán, Luis; Paz, Silvia; Martínez-Martín, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder whose symptoms and manifestations greatly deteriorate the health, functional status and quality of life of patients, has severe consequences on their families and caregivers and supposes a challenge for the healthcare system and society. The aim of this paper is to comprehensively and descriptively review studies on the economic impact of the disease and interventions, analyzing major contributing factors to direct and indirect costs in PD. Cost-of-illness studies have shown that costs of PD are high, mainly due to drug, hospitalization and productivity loss, and tend to increase as the disease progresses. Studies on PD treatment have suggested that therapies for advanced PD (levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel and apomorphine) and surgical procedures are cost-effective and cost saving, despite their high expenditures; however, further research such as on the economic impact of non-motor manifestations or on the cost-effectiveness of non-medical interventions is still needed.

  17. Impulse control disorders are associated with multiple psychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, Elina; Kaasinen, Valtteri; Siri, Chiara; Martikainen, Kirsti; Cilia, Roberto; Niemelä, Solja; Joutsa, Juho

    2014-01-01

    Impulse control disorders can have serious adverse consequences to the life of a patient with Parkinson's disease. Although impulse control disorders are common, a possible psychiatric comorbidity has not been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychiatric symptoms exhibited by Parkinson's disease patients with impulse control disorders. The study was conducted as a postal survey to patients in the registry of the Finnish Parkinson Association. A total of 290 Parkinson's disease patients were evaluated for impulse control disorders using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease. Psychiatric symptoms were systematically screened using the Symptom Checklist 90. We found that 108 of the evaluated patients had one or more impulse control disorders. Patients with impulse control disorders had markedly higher scores for symptoms of psychoticism (Bonferroni corrected p < 0.001), interpersonal sensitivity (p < 0.001), obsessive-compulsive disorder (p < 0.001), and depression (p = 0.01) when compared with patients without impulse control disorders. Impulse control disorders were shown to be independently associated with these symptoms. Patients with multiple impulse control disorders had higher scores for depression and obsessive-compulsive symptoms when compared with patients that exhibited only one impulse control disorder. COUNCLUSIONS: Our results confirm the previous observations that impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease are linked with multiple psychiatric symptoms, including psychoticism, interpersonal sensitivity, obsessive-compulsive symptoms and depression. Clinicians treating these patients should acknowledge the concomitant psychiatric symptoms.

  18. Parkinson disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Parkinson disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Parkinson disease : The Michael J. Fox Foundation -- www.michaeljfox.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  19. Investigation of Genetic Variants Associated with Alzheimer Disease in Parkinson Disease Cognition.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Matthew J; Koeppel, Alexander F; Flanigan, Joseph L; Turner, Stephen D; Worrall, Bradford B

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies have implicated multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and associated genes with Alzheimer disease. The role of these SNPs in cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease (PD) remains incompletely evaluated. The objective of this study was to test alleles associated with risk of Alzheimer disease for association with cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease (PD). Two datasets with PD subjects accessed through the NIH database of Genotypes and Phenotypes contained both single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and mini-mental state exam (MMSE) scores. Genetic data underwent rigorous quality control and we selected SNPs for genes associated with AD other than APOE. We constructed logistic regression and ordinal regression models, adjusted for sex, age at MMSE, and duration of PD, to assess the association between selected SNPs and MMSE score. In one dataset, PICALM rs3851179 was associated with cognitive impairment (MMSE <  24) in PD subjects > 70 years old (OR = 2.3; adjusted p-value = 0.017; n = 250) but not in PD subjects ≤ 70 years old. Our finding suggests that PICALM rs3851179 could contribute to cognitive impairment in older patients with PD. It is important that future studies consider the interaction of age and genetic risk factors in the development of cognitive impairment in PD.

  20. Association between α-synuclein blood transcripts and early, neuroimaging-supported Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Locascio, Joseph J; Eberly, Shirley; Liao, Zhixiang; Liu, Ganqiang; Hoesing, Ashley N; Duong, Karen; Trisini-Lipsanopoulos, Ana; Dhima, Kaltra; Hung, Albert Y; Flaherty, Alice W; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Hayes, Michael T; Wills, Anne-Marie; Shivraj Sohur, U; Mejia, Nicte I; Selkoe, Dennis J; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Dong, Xianjun; Marek, Ken; Zheng, Bin; Ivinson, Adrian; Hyman, Bradley T; Growdon, John H; Sudarsky, Lewis R; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Ravina, Bernard; Scherzer, Clemens R

    2015-09-01

    There are no cures for neurodegenerative diseases and this is partially due to the difficulty of monitoring pathogenic molecules in patients during life. The Parkinson's disease gene α-synuclein (SNCA) is selectively expressed in blood cells and neurons. Here we show that SNCA transcripts in circulating blood cells are paradoxically reduced in early stage, untreated and dopamine transporter neuroimaging-supported Parkinson's disease in three independent regional, national, and international populations representing 500 cases and 363 controls and on three analogue and digital platforms with P < 0.0001 in meta-analysis. Individuals with SNCA transcripts in the lowest quartile of counts had an odds ratio for Parkinson's disease of 2.45 compared to individuals in the highest quartile. Disease-relevant transcript isoforms were low even near disease onset. Importantly, low SNCA transcript abundance predicted cognitive decline in patients with Parkinson's disease during up to 5 years of longitudinal follow-up. This study reveals a consistent association of reduced SNCA transcripts in accessible peripheral blood and early-stage Parkinson's disease in 863 participants and suggests a clinical role as potential predictor of cognitive decline. Moreover, the three independent biobank cohorts provide a generally useful platform for rapidly validating any biological marker of this common disease.

  1. Elevated Cystatin C Levels Are Associated with Cognitive Impairment and Progression of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei-Dong; Chen, Jing; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Feng, Ping; Yang, Ya-Ping; Luo, Wei-Feng; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the relationship between serum cystatin C (CysC) levels and cognitive dysfunction and disease progression in patients with Parkinson disease. Previous studies have reported altered CysC levels in neurodegenerative disorders, but only a few studies have explored the role of CysC and its relationship to cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson disease. We measured serum levels of CysC, creatinine, urea, and uric acid in 142 patients with Parkinson disease and 146 healthy controls. We assessed disease progression using the Hoehn and Yahr scale, and cognitive function using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (Beijing version). The patients with Parkinson disease had significantly higher CysC levels than the controls (P<0.001). CysC level correlated significantly with age (r=0.494, P<0.001), sex (r=0.150, P=0.011), and serum creatinine level (r=0.377, P<0.001), but not with levels of urea or uric acid (P>0.05). CysC level was a significant independent predictor of Parkinson disease (odds ratio=23.143, 95% confidence interval: 5.485-97.648, P<0.001) in multivariate logistic regression analysis. In the Parkinson disease group, a higher CysC level was associated with a more advanced Hoehn and Yahr stage (r=0.098, P<0.05) and a lower Montreal Cognitive Assessment score (r=-0.381, P=0.003). Serum CysC levels can predict disease severity and cognitive dysfunction in patients with Parkinson disease. The exact role of CysC remains to be determined.

  2. The yin and yang of α-synuclein-associated epigenetics in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pavlou, Maria Angeliki S; Pinho, Raquel; Paiva, Isabel; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2017-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder. The main neuropathological hallmarks of the disease are the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the accumulation of protein inclusions known as Lewy bodies. Recently, great attention has been given to the study of genes associated with both familial and sporadic forms of Parkinson's disease. Among them, the α-synuclein gene is believed to play a central role in the disease and is, therefore, one of the most studied genes. Parkinson's disease is a complex disorder and, as such, derives from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Here, we offer an update on the landscape of epigenetic-mediated regulation of gene expression that has been linked with α-synuclein and associated with Parkinson's disease. We also provide an overview of how epigenetic modifications can influence the transcription and/or translation of the α-synuclein gene and, on the other hand, how α-synuclein function/dysfunction can, per se, affect the epigenetic landscape. Finally, we discuss how a deeper understanding of the epigenetic profile of α-synuclein may enable the development of novel therapeutic approaches for Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Hypokinesia of associated movement in Parkinson's disease: a symptom in early stages of the disease.

    PubMed

    Hoshiyama, M; Kaneoke, Y; Koike, Y; Takahashi, A; Watanabe, S

    1994-08-01

    We compared the degrees of impairment between intended voluntary movement and its simultaneous automatic associated movement in Parkinson's disease (PD). We studied wrist dorsiflexion as a movement associated with grip in 20 patients with PD and in 20 normal controls. The patients showed a significantly smaller dorsiflexion as compared with the controls. The decrease in associated movement was related to the severity of clinical stage of the disease, while gripping was performed well in each stage. The temporal relationship between grip and associated movement was the same for both groups of subjects. The patients showed no disturbance of amplitude or velocity for a single motor act of wrist dorsiflexion. Persons with PD have a greater reduction of automatic associated movement than intended voluntary movement. This may be one of the bases of clinical symptoms of PD patients in early stages of the disease.

  4. Respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, D; Torsney, K M

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory dysfunction has been associated with Parkinson's disease since it was first described in 1817. The respiratory symptoms observed in Parkinson's disease patients vary greatly. Most patients remain asymptomatic, whereas others present with acute shortness of breath and even stridor. In August 2016, an electronic literature search was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. Results were screened and studies reporting on respiratory dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease were included. Respiratory dysfunction is due to a combination of factors including restrictive changes, upper airway obstruction, abnormal ventilatory drive and response to medications. Much debate surrounds the mechanism underlying respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, its prevalence and the effect of levodopa on respiration. It is clear from this review that larger studies, comparing patients of similar disease duration and severity using the same pulmonary function parameters, are required to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology underlying respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

  5. Variation in GIGYF2 is not associated with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Nichols, W C; Kissell, D K; Pankratz, N; Pauciulo, M W; Elsaesser, V E; Clark, K A; Halter, C A; Rudolph, A; Wojcieszek, J; Pfeiffer, R F; Foroud, T

    2009-06-02

    A recent study reported that mutations in a gene on chromosome 2q36-37, GIGYF2, result in Parkinson disease (PD). We have previously reported linkage to this chromosomal region in a sample of multiplex PD families, with the strongest evidence of linkage obtained using the subset of the sample having the strongest family history of disease and meeting the strictest diagnostic criteria. We have tested whether mutations in GIGYF2 may account for the previously observed linkage finding. We sequenced the GIGYF2 coding region in 96 unrelated patients with PD used in our original study that contributed to the chromosome 2q36-37 linkage signal. Subsequently, we genotyped the entire sample of 566 multiplex PD kindreds as well as 1,447 controls to test whether variants in GIGYF2 are causative or increase susceptibility for PD. We detected three novel variants as well as one of the previously reported seven variants in a total of five multiple PD families; however, there was no consistent evidence that these variants segregated with PD in these families. We also did not find a significant increase in risk for PD among those inheriting variants in GIGYF2 (p = 0.28). We believe that variation in a gene other than GIGYF2 accounts for the previously reported linkage finding on chromosome 2q36-37.

  6. Mutations in the pantothenate kinase gene PANK2 are not associated with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Klopstock, Thomas; Elstner, Matthias; Lücking, Christoph B; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Gasser, Thomas; Botz, Evelyn; Lichtner, Peter; Hörtnagel, Konstanze

    2005-05-13

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) may serve as a model for Parkinson disease (PD) since many PKAN patients suffer from parkinsonism and both conditions lead to iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. We screened the gene coding for pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) for sequence variants in PD. We found no mutations in 67 PD patients with affected sibs or early-onset disease. Moreover, PANK2 polymorphisms were not associated with late-onset idiopathic PD in 339 patients. We conclude that PANK2 variants exert, if any, only a very small effect in the genetic risk of PD.

  7. Parkinson disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Gazewood, John D; Richards, D Roxanne; Clebak, Karl

    2013-02-15

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurologic disorder afflicting approximately 1 percent of Americans older than 60 years. The cardinal features of Parkinson disease are bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and postural instability. There are a number of neurologic conditions that mimic the disease, making it difficult to diagnose in its early stages. Physicians who rarely diagnose Parkinson disease should refer patients suspected of having it to physicians with more experience in making the diagnosis, and should periodically reevaluate the accuracy of the diagnosis. Treatment is effective in reducing motor impairment and disability, and should be started when a patient begins to experience functional impairment. The combination of carbidopa and levodopa is the most effective treatment, but dopamine agonists and monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors are also effective, and are less likely to cause dyskinesias. For patients taking carbidopa/levodopa who have motor complications, adjunctive therapy with a dopamine agonist, a monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor, or a catechol O-methyltransferase inhibitor will improve motor symptoms and functional status, but with an increase in dyskinesias. Deep brain stimulation is effective in patients who have poorly controlled symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Occupational, physical, and speech therapy improve patient function. Fatigue, sleep disturbances, dementia, and depression are common in patients with Parkinson disease. Although these conditions are associated with significantly lower quality of life, they may improve with treatment.

  8. Exploring the Association Between Rosacea and Parkinson Disease: A Danish Nationwide Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Egeberg, Alexander; Hansen, Peter Riis; Gislason, Gunnar H; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2016-05-01

    The pathogenesis of rosacea is unclear, but increased matrix metalloproteinase target tissue activity appears to play an important role. Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative disorders also display increased matrix metalloproteinase activity that contribute to neuronal loss. To investigate the risk of incident (new-onset) Parkinson disease in patients with rosacea. A nationwide cohort study of the Danish population was conducted using individual-level linkage of administrative registers. All Danish citizens 18 years or older from January 1, 1997, to December 31, 2011 (N = 5 472 745), were included. Data analysis was conducted from June 26 to July 27, 2015. The main outcome was a diagnosis of Parkinson disease. Incidence rates (IRs) per 10 000 person-years were calculated, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking, alcohol abuse, medication, and comorbidity were estimated by Poisson regression models. A total of 5 404 692 individuals were included in the reference population; of these, 22 387 individuals (9812 [43.8%] women; mean [SD] age at diagnosis, 75.9 [10.2] years) received a diagnosis of Parkinson disease during the study period and 68 053 individuals (45 712 [67.2%] women; mean age, 42.2 [16.5] years) were registered as having rosacea. The IRs of Parkinson disease per 10 000 person-years were 3.54 (95% CI, 3.49-3.59) in the reference population and 7.62 (95% CI, 6.78-8.57) in patients with rosacea. The adjusted IRR of Parkinson disease was 1.71 (95%, CI 1.52-1.92) in patients with rosacea compared with the reference population. There was a 2-fold increased risk of Parkinson disease in patients classified as having ocular rosacea (adjusted IRR, 2.03 [95% CI, 1.67-2.48]), and tetracycline therapy appeared to reduce the risk of Parkinson disease (adjusted IRR, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.97-0.99]). Rosacea constitutes an independent risk factor for Parkinson disease. This association could be due to shared

  9. Biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sherer, Todd B

    2011-04-20

    Biomarkers for detecting the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) could accelerate development of new treatments. Such biomarkers could be used to identify individuals at risk for developing PD, to improve early diagnosis, to track disease progression with precision, and to test the efficacy of new treatments. Although some progress has been made, there are many challenges associated with developing biomarkers for detecting PD in its earliest stages.

  10. Imaging changes associated with cognitive abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Koshimori, Yuko; Segura, Barbara; Christopher, Leigh; Lobaugh, Nancy; Duff-Canning, Sarah; Mizrahi, Romina; Hamani, Clement; Lang, Anthony E; Aminian, Kelly; Houle, Sylvain; Strafella, Antonio P

    2015-07-01

    The current study investigates both gray and white matter changes in non-demented Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with varying degrees of mild cognitive deficits and elucidates the relationships between the structural changes and clinical sequelae of PD. Twenty-six PD patients and 15 healthy controls (HCs) were enrolled in the study. Participants underwent T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scans. Their cognition was assessed using a neuropsychological battery. Compared with HCs, PD patients showed significant cortical thinning in sensorimotor (left pre- and postcentral gyri) and cognitive (left dorsolateral superior frontal gyrus [DLSFG]) regions. The DLSFG cortical thinning correlated with executive and global cognitive impairment in PD patients. PD patients showed white matter abnormalities as well, primarily in bilateral frontal and temporal regions, which also correlated with executive and global cognitive impairment. These results seem to suggest that both gray and white matter changes in the frontal regions may constitute an early pathological substrate of cognitive impairment of PD providing a sensitive biomarker for brain changes in PD.

  11. Parsing brain activity associated with acupuncture treatment in Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyejung; Kim, Hackjin; Kim, Chang-Hwan; Chang, Dae-Il; Kim, Kyung-Mi; Park, Hi-Joon

    2009-09-15

    Acupuncture, a common treatment modality within complementary and alternative medicine, has been widely used for Parkinson's disease (PD). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we explored the neural mechanisms underlying the effect of specific and genuine acupuncture treatment on the motor function in patients with PD. Three fMRI scans were performed in random order in a block design, one for verum acupuncture (VA) treatment, another one for a covert placebo (CP), and the third one for an overt placebo (OP) at the motor function implicated acupoint GB34 on the left foot of 10 patients with PD. We calculated the contrast that subtracts the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response for the acupuncture effect (VA vs. CP) and the placebo effect (CP vs. OP). We found a significant improvement in the motor function of the affected hand after acupuncture treatment. The putamen and the primary motor cortex were activated when patients with PD received the acupuncture treatment (VA vs. CP) and these activations correlated with individual enhanced motor function. Expectation towards acupuncture modality (CP vs. OP) elicited activation over the anterior cingulate gyrus, the superior frontal gyrus, and the superior temporal gyrus. These findings suggest that acupuncture treatment might facilitate improvement in the motor functioning of patients with PD via the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit.

  12. Classification and Characteristics of Pain Associated with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Young Blood, Marcelo Rezende; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms and pain are among the most common nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). The correlation between pain and PD has been recognized since its classic descriptions. Pain occurs in about 60% of PD patients, two to three times more frequent in this population than in age matched healthy individuals. It is an early and potentially disabling symptom that can precede motor symptoms by several years. The lower back and lower extremities are the most commonly affected areas. The most used classification for pain in PD defines musculoskeletal, dystonic, central, or neuropathic/radicular forms. Its different clinical characteristics, variable relationship with motor symptoms, and inconsistent response to dopaminergic drugs suggest that the mechanism underlying pain in PD is complex and multifaceted, involving the peripheral nervous system, generation and amplification of pain by motor symptoms, and neurodegeneration of areas related to pain modulation. Although pain in DP is common and a significant source of disability, its clinical characteristics, pathophysiology, classification, and management remain to be defined. PMID:27800210

  13. [Advances in the application of gene therapy for Parkinson's disease with adeno-associated virus].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Lü, Ying-Hui; Li, Zhao-Fa

    2014-05-01

    Vectors used to carry foreign genes play an important role in gene therapy, among which, the adeno-associated virus (AAV) has many advantages, such as nonpathogenicity, low immunogenicity, stable and long-term expression and multiple-tissue-type infection, etc. These advantages have made AAV one of the most potential vectors in gene therapy, and widely used in many clinical researches, for example, Parkinson's disease. This paper introduces the biological characteristics of AAV and the latest research progress of AAV carrying neurotrophic factor, dopamine synthesis related enzymes and glutamic acid decarboxylase gene in the gene therapy of Parkinson's disease.

  14. Seasonal temperature is associated with Parkinson's disease prescriptions: an ecological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowell, David; Nghiem, Son; Ramagopalan, Sreeram; Meier, Ute-Christiane

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to test what effect the weather may have on medications prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease. Twenty-three years of monthly time, series data was sourced from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). Data were available for eight states and territories and their corresponding capital cities. The dependent variable was the aggregate levodopa equivalent dose (LED) for 51 Parkinson's medications identified on the PBS. Two explanatory variables of interest, temperature and solar exposure, were identified in the BOM data set. Linear and cosinor models were estimated with fixed and random effects, respectively. The prescribed LED was 4.2% greater in January and 4.5% lower in July. Statistical analysis showed that temperature was associated with the prescription of Parkinson medications. Our results suggest seasonality exists in Parkinson's disease symptoms and this may be related to temperature. Further work is needed to confirm these findings and understand the underlying mechanisms as a better understanding of the causes of any seasonal variation in Parkinson's disease may help clinicians and patients manage the disease more effectively.

  15. Seasonal temperature is associated with Parkinson's disease prescriptions: an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Rowell, David; Nghiem, Son; Ramagopalan, Sreeram; Meier, Ute-Christiane

    2017-08-30

    The aim of this study is to test what effect the weather may have on medications prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease. Twenty-three years of monthly time, series data was sourced from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). Data were available for eight states and territories and their corresponding capital cities. The dependent variable was the aggregate levodopa equivalent dose (LED) for 51 Parkinson's medications identified on the PBS. Two explanatory variables of interest, temperature and solar exposure, were identified in the BOM data set. Linear and cosinor models were estimated with fixed and random effects, respectively. The prescribed LED was 4.2% greater in January and 4.5% lower in July. Statistical analysis showed that temperature was associated with the prescription of Parkinson medications. Our results suggest seasonality exists in Parkinson's disease symptoms and this may be related to temperature. Further work is needed to confirm these findings and understand the underlying mechanisms as a better understanding of the causes of any seasonal variation in Parkinson's disease may help clinicians and patients manage the disease more effectively.

  16. RNA metabolism in the pathogenesis of Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bingwei; Gehrke, Stephan; Wu, Zhihao

    2014-10-10

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson׳s disease are progressive disorders of the nervous system that affect the function and maintenance of specific neuronal populations. While most disease cases are sporadic with no known cause, a small percentage of disease cases are caused by inherited genetic mutations. The identification of genes associated with the familial forms of the diseases and subsequent studies of proteins encoded by the disease genes in cellular or animal models have offered much-needed insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis. Recent studies of the familial Parkinson׳s disease genes have emphasized the importance of RNA metabolism, particularly mRNA translation, in the disease process. It is anticipated that continued studies on the role of RNA metabolism in Parkinson׳s disease will offer unifying mechanisms for understanding the cause of neuronal dysfunction and degeneration and facilitate the development of novel and rational strategies for treating this debilitating disease.

  17. Loss of phosphodiesterase 10A expression is associated with progression and severity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Niccolini, Flavia; Foltynie, Thomas; Reis Marques, Tiago; Muhlert, Nils; Tziortzi, Andri C; Searle, Graham E; Natesan, Sridhar; Kapur, Shitij; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Gunn, Roger N; Piccini, Paola; Politis, Marios

    2015-10-01

    pallidal loss of PDE10A expression, which is associated with Parkinson's duration and severity of motor symptoms and complications. PDE10A is an enzyme that could be targeted with novel pharmacotherapy, and this may help improve dopaminergic signalling and striatal output, and therefore alleviate symptoms and complications of Parkinson's disease.

  18. Intonation Contrast in Cantonese Speakers with Hypokinetic Dysarthria Associated with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joan K.-Y.; Whitehill, Tara L.; So, Susanne Y.-S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Speech produced by individuals with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a number of features including impaired speech prosody. The purpose of this study was to investigate intonation contrasts produced by this group of speakers. Method: Speech materials with a question-statement contrast…

  19. Intonation Contrast in Cantonese Speakers with Hypokinetic Dysarthria Associated with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joan K.-Y.; Whitehill, Tara L.; So, Susanne Y.-S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Speech produced by individuals with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a number of features including impaired speech prosody. The purpose of this study was to investigate intonation contrasts produced by this group of speakers. Method: Speech materials with a question-statement contrast…

  20. Selective hyposmia in Parkinson disease: association with hippocampal dopamine activity.

    PubMed

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Gedela, Satyanarayana; Herath, Priyantha; Constantine, Gregory M; Moore, Robert Y

    2008-12-05

    Olfactory dysfunction is common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and has been attributed to early pathological deposition of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in primary olfactory centers. However, olfactory deficits do not always worsen over time despite progression of disease raising the possibility of additional pathobiological mechanisms contributing to olfactory functions in PD, such as changes in olfactory neurotransmitter functions. Neurotransmitter changes, such as altered dopaminergic status, may also better explain the selective nature of odor identification deficits in PD. Proper odor identification depends on higher order structures, such as the hippocampus, for olfactory cognitive or memory processing. Using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), we previously identified three odors (banana, licorice, dill pickle, labeled as UPSIT-3) that PD subjects most frequently failed to recognize compared to age- and gender-matched controls. We also identified six odors that were equally successfully identified by controls and PD subjects (NPD-Olf6). A ratio of UPSIT-3 divided by NPD-Olf6 scores provides another descriptor of selective hyposmia in PD ("olfactory ratio"). In this study we investigated the pathophysiology of hyposmia in PD using dopamine transporter (DAT) PET. Twenty-nine PD patients (Hoehn and Yahr stages I-III; 7f/22m; age 60.2+/-10.8) underwent olfactory testing using the UPSIT and [(11)C]beta-CFT DAT PET. DAT binding potentials (BP) were assessed in the hippocampus, amygdala, ventral and dorsal striatum. We found that correlation coefficients between total UPSIT scores and regional brain DAT BP were highest for the hippocampus (Rs=0.54, P=0.002) and lower for the amygdala (Rs=0.44, P=0.02), ventral (Rs=0.48, P=0.008) and dorsal striatum (Rs=0.39, P=0.03). Correlations were most significant for the selective hyposmia measures and hippocampal DAT: UPSIT-3 (Rs=0.65, P=0.0001) and the olfactory ratio (Rs=0.74, P<0

  1. Impaired finger dexterity in Parkinson's disease is associated with praxis function.

    PubMed

    Vanbellingen, T; Kersten, B; Bellion, M; Temperli, P; Baronti, F; Müri, R; Bohlhalter, S

    2011-10-01

    A controversial concept suggests that impaired finger dexterity in Parkinson's disease may be related to limb kinetic apraxia that is not explained by elemental motor deficits such as bradykinesia. To explore the nature of dexterous difficulties, the aim of the present study was to assess the relationship of finger dexterity with ideomotor praxis function and parkinsonian symptoms. Twenty-five patients with Parkinson's disease participated in the study. Their left and right arms were tested independently. Testing was done in an OFF and ON state as defined by a modified version of the Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS). Finger dexterity was assessed by a coin rotation (CR) task and ideomotor praxis using a novel test of upper limb apraxia (TULIA), in which the patients were requested to imitate and pantomime 48 meaningless, as well as communicative and tool-related gestures. Coin rotation significantly correlated with TULIA irrespective of the motor state and arm involved, but not with the MDS-UPDRS. This association was significantly influenced by Hoehn and Yahr stage. The strong association of finger dexterity with praxis function but not the parkinsonian symptoms indicates that impaired finger dexterity in Parkinson's disease may be indeed apraxic in nature, yet, predominantly in advanced stages of the disease when cortical pathology is expected to develop. The findings are discussed within a cognitive-motor model of praxis function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Methamphetamine and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Granado, Noelia; Ares-Santos, Sara; Moratalla, Rosario

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder predominantly affecting the elderly. The aetiology of the disease is not known, but age and environmental factors play an important role. Although more than a dozen gene mutations associated with familial forms of Parkinson's disease have been described, fewer than 10% of all cases can be explained by genetic abnormalities. The molecular basis of Parkinson's disease is the loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia (caudate/putamen) due to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which leads to the motor impairment characteristic of the disease. Methamphetamine is the second most widely used illicit drug in the world. In rodents, methamphetamine exposure damages dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, resulting in a significant loss of dopamine in the striatum. Biochemical and neuroimaging studies in human methamphetamine users have shown decreased levels of dopamine and dopamine transporter as well as prominent microglial activation in the striatum and other areas of the brain, changes similar to those observed in PD patients. Consistent with these similarities, recent epidemiological studies have shown that methamphetamine users are almost twice as likely as non-users to develop PD, despite the fact that methamphetamine abuse and PD have distinct symptomatic profiles. PMID:23476887

  3. Meta-analysis: Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoli; Yang, Huazhen; Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng; Jiang, Hong

    2017-10-01

    The results from observational studies on the relationship between helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and Parkinson's disease remain controversial. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between helicobacter pylori infection and Parkinson's disease. A comprehensive literature search was performed on relevant studies published from January 1983 to January 2017 in PubMed, Web of Science and EMBASE databases. The fixed or random effects model was used to pool the odds ratio with 95% confidence interval from individual studies. Publication bias was estimated by Egger's test and the funnel plot. Eight eligible studies involving 33 125 participants were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with the no helicobacter pylori infected person, the pooled odds ratio of Parkinson's disease in helicobacter pylori infected person was 1.59 (95% confidence interval: 1.37-1.85). In subgroup analyzes, the combined odds ratios were 1.96 (1.23-3.12) in Asia, 1.55 (1.32-1.82) in Europe, 1.59 (1.35-1.88) in case-control studies, 1.56 (1.01-2.39) in cross-sectional studies, 1.56 (1.32-1.85) in studies with confounders adjusted, and 1.71 (1.21-2.43) in studies with no confounder adjusted, respectively. This meta-analysis indicated that H. pylori infection might be associated with the risk of Parkinson's disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. l-Dopa responsiveness is associated with distinctive connectivity patterns in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Akram, Harith; Wu, Chengyuan; Hyam, Jonathan; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; De Vita, Enrico; Yousry, Tarek; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Hariz, Marwan; Behrens, Timothy; Ashburner, John; Zrinzo, Ludvic

    2017-06-01

    Neuronal loss and dopamine depletion alter motor signal processing between cortical motor areas, basal ganglia, and the thalamus, resulting in the motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Dopamine replacement therapy can reverse these manifestations with varying degrees of improvement. To evaluate functional connectivity in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and changes in functional connectivity in relation to the degree of response to l-dopa, 19 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in the on-medication state. Scans were obtained on a 3-Tesla scanner in 3 × 3 × 2.5 mm(3) voxels. Seed-based bivariate regression analyses were carried out with atlas-defined basal ganglia regions as seeds, to explore relationships between functional connectivity and improvement in the motor section of the UPDRS-III following an l-dopa challenge. False discovery rate-corrected P was set at < 0.05 for a 2-tailed t test. A greater improvement in UPDRS-III scores following l-dopa administration was characterized by higher resting-state functional connectivity between the prefrontal cortex and the striatum (P = 0.001) and lower resting-state functional connectivity between the pallidum (P = 0.001), subthalamic nucleus (P = 0.003), and the paracentral lobule (supplementary motor area, mesial primary motor, and primary sensory areas). Our findings show characteristic basal ganglia resting-state functional connectivity patterns associated with different degrees of l-dopa responsiveness in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. l-Dopa exerts a graduated influence on remapping connectivity in distinct motor control networks, potentially explaining some of the variance in treatment response. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  5. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome Information Page Leukodystrophy Information Page Lipid Storage Diseases Information Page Lipoid Proteinosis Information Page ... Career Awards Fellowships Summer Internships Diversity & Re-Entry Supplements Pre-Application Considerations Apply for Funding New Investigators ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... inherited and non-inherited PD and suggesting new strategies, now at various stages of testing, to slow the course of disease. Several studies suggest environmental influences on PD. Exposure to certain ...

  7. [Sleep disorders associated with essential tremor and Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Chen, Juping; Yao, Jianxin; Chen, Li; Miao, Hong; Mao, Chengjie; Liu, Chunfeng

    2015-01-20

    To evaluate the sleep quality and explore the manifestations of sleep disorders for 62 essential tremor (ET) patients, 60 normal controls and 62 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. A total of 62 ET patients, 60 normal controls and 62 PD patients from June 2009 to December 2013 were recruited. All of them were outpatients at Second Affiliated Hospital, Soochow University and Hospital of Changshu Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Sleep was assessed with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). The global PSQI score was 4.7 ± 2.5 in controls, 6.0 ± 4.0 in ET cases and 7.4 ± 3. 7 in PD cases. PD cases had the highest PSQI score, followed by ET (intermediate) and lowest scores in controls (F = 9.022, P = 0.000). A poor quality of sleep was observed in normal controls (23/62, 38.3%) compared to ET cases (34/62, 54.8%) and PD cases (40/62, 64.5%) (χ² = 8.555, P = 0.014 when comparing all three groups and χ² = 1.206, P = 0.272 when ET vs PD). The ESS score increased from normal controls (4.4 ± 2.5) to ET cases (6.3 ± 4.8) and PD cases (8.2 ± 4.2). An ESS score ≥ 10 (an indicator of greater than normal levels of daytime sleepiness) was observed in 6 (10.0%) normal controls, compared to ET cases (16, 25.8%) and PD cases (20, 32.3%) (χ² = 9.047, P = 0.011 when comparing all three groups and χ² = 0.626, P = 0.429 when ET vs PD). For normal controls, ET and PD patients, the factor scores of subjective sleep were 0.6 ± 0.7, 0.8 ± 0.8 and 1.1 ± 0.7; the factor scores of quality sleep latency 0.6 ± 0.7, 0.9 ± 0.9 and 1.1 ± 1.0; the factor scores of sleep duration 0.6 ± 0.8, 0.7 ± 1.0 and 1.0 ± 0.9; the factor scores of sleep efficiency 0.6 ± 0.8, 0.9 ± 0.9 and 1.0 ± 1.0; the factor scores of sleep disturbances 1.2 ± 0.6, 1.2 ± 0.5 and 1.7 ± 0.7; the factor scores of daytime dysfunction 1.2 ± 1.0, 1.3 ± 1.0 and 2.0 ± 1.1 respectively. There were inter-group statistical differences in subjective sleep (F = 7

  8. The Alzheimer disease BIN1 locus as a modifier of GBA-associated Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Gan-Or, Z; Amshalom, I; Bar-Shira, A; Gana-Weisz, M; Mirelman, A; Marder, K; Bressman, S; Giladi, N; Orr-Urtreger, A

    2015-11-01

    GBA mutations are among the most common genetic risk factors for Parkinson disease (PD) worldwide. We aimed to identify genetic modifiers of the age at onset (AAO) in GBA-associated PD. The study included a genome-wide discovery phase, including a cohort of 79 patients with the GBA p.N370S mutation, and candidate validation and replication analyses of 8 SNPs in patients with mild (n = 113) and severe (n = 41) GBA mutations. Genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix human SNP 6.0 array and TaqMan assays. In the genome-wide phase, none of the SNPs passed the genome-wide significance threshold. Eight SNPs were selected for further analysis from the top hits. In all GBA-associated PD patients (n = 153), the BIN1 rs13403026 minor allele was associated with an older AAO (12.4 ± 5.9 years later, p = 0.0001), compared to patients homozygous for the major allele. Furthermore, the AAO was 10.7 ± 6.8 years later in patients with mild GBA mutations, (p = 0.005, validation group), and 17.1 ± 2.5 years later in patients with severe GBA mutations (p = 0.01, replication). Our results suggest that alterations in the BIN1 locus, previously associated with Alzheimer disease, may modify the AAO of GBA-associated PD. More studies in other populations are required to examine the role of BIN1-related variants in GBA-associated PD.

  9. Parkinson's disease with camptocormia

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, F; Houeto, J L; du Montcel, S Tezenas; Bonneville, F; Etchepare, F; Welter, M L; Rivaud‐Pechoux, S; Hahn‐Barma, V; Maisonobe, T; Behar, C; Lazennec, J Y; Kurys, E; Arnulf, I; Bonnet, A M; Agid, Y

    2006-01-01

    Background Camptocormia is defined as an abnormal flexion of the trunk that appears when standing or walking and disappears in the supine position. The origin of the disorder is unknown, but it is usually attributed either to a primary or a secondary paravertebral muscle myopathy or a motor neurone disorder. Camptocormia is also observed in a minority of patients with parkinsonism. Objective To characterise the clinical and electrophysiological features of camptocormia and parkinsonian symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease and camptocormia compared with patients with Parkinson's disease without camptocormia. Methods Patients with parkinsonism and camptocormia (excluding patients with multiple system atrophy) prospectively underwent a multidisciplinary clinical (neurological, neuropsychological, psychological, rheumatological) and neurophysiological (electromyogram, ocular movement recording) examination and were compared with age‐matched patients with Parkinson's disease without camptocormia. Results The camptocormia developed after 8.5 (SD 5.3) years of parkinsonism, responded poorly to levodopa treatment (20%) and displayed features consistent with axial dystonia. Patients with camptocormia were characterised by prominent levodopa‐unresponsive axial symptoms (ie, axial rigidity, gait disorder and postural instability), along with a tendency for greater error in the antisaccade paradigm. Conclusion We suggest that (1) the salient features of parkinsonism observed in patients with camptocormia are likely to represent a specific form of Parkinson's disease and camptocormia is an axial dystonia and (2) both camptocormia and parkinsonism in these patients might result from additional, non‐dopaminergic neuronal dysfunction in the basal ganglia. PMID:16754693

  10. Impaired dual tasking in Parkinson's disease is associated with reduced focusing of cortico-striatal activity.

    PubMed

    Nieuwhof, Freek; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Reelick, Miriam F; Aarts, Esther; Maidan, Inbal; Mirelman, Anat; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Toni, Ivan; Helmich, Rick C

    2017-03-17

    Impaired dual tasking, namely the inability to concurrently perform a cognitive and a motor task (e.g. 'stops walking while talking'), is a largely unexplained and frequent symptom of Parkinson's disease. Here we consider two circuit-level accounts of how striatal dopamine depletion might lead to impaired dual tasking in patients with Parkinson's disease. First, the loss of segregation between striatal territories induced by dopamine depletion may lead to dysfunctional overlaps between the motor and cognitive processes usually implemented in parallel cortico-striatal circuits. Second, the known dorso-posterior to ventro-anterior gradient of dopamine depletion in patients with Parkinson's disease may cause a funnelling of motor and cognitive processes into the relatively spared ventro-anterior putamen, causing a neural bottleneck. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we measured brain activity in 19 patients with Parkinson's disease and 26 control subjects during performance of a motor task (auditory-cued ankle movements), a cognitive task (implementing a switch-stay rule), and both tasks simultaneously (dual task). The distribution of task-related activity respected the known segregation between motor and cognitive territories of the putamen in both groups, with motor-related responses in the dorso-posterior putamen and task switch-related responses in the ventro-anterior putamen. During dual task performance, patients made more motor and cognitive errors than control subjects. They recruited a striatal territory (ventro-posterior putamen) not engaged during either the cognitive or the motor task, nor used by controls. Relatively higher ventro-posterior putamen activity in controls was associated with worse dual task performance. These observations suggest that dual task impairments in Parkinson's disease are related to reduced spatial focusing of striatal activity. This pattern of striatal activity may be explained by a loss of functional segregation

  11. Parkinson's Disease Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... by which organisms grow and develop. Developmental biology studies in Parkinson's disease hold potential to identify therapeutic targets and new cell replacement strategies. Diagnosis Identification or naming of a disease by ...

  12. Predictive association of copper metabolism proteins with Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease: a preliminary perspective.

    PubMed

    Pal, Amit; Kumar, Ashok; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), constitute a major worldwide health problem. Several hypothesis have been put forth to elucidate the basis of onset and pathogenesis of AD and PD; however, till date, none of these seems to clearly elucidate the complex pathoetiology of these disorders. Notably, copper dyshomeostasis has been shown to underlie the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases including AD and PD. Numerous studies have concluded beyond doubt that imbalance in copper homeostatic mechanisms in conjunction with aging causes an acceleration in the copper toxicity elicited oxidative stress, which is detrimental to the central nervous system. Amyloid precursor protein and α-synuclein protein involved in AD and PD are copper binding proteins, respectively. In this review, we have discussed the possible association of copper metabolism proteins with AD and PD along with briefly outlining the expanding proportion of "copper interactome" in human biology. Using network biology, we found that copper metabolism proteins, superoxide dismutase 1 and ceruloplasmin may represent direct and indirect link with AD and PD, respectively.

  13. Flies with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vanhauwaert, Roeland; Verstreken, Patrik

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is an incurable neurodegenerative disease. Most cases of the disease are of sporadic origin, but about 10% of the cases are familial. The genes thus far identified in Parkinson's disease are well conserved. Drosophila is ideally suited to study the molecular neuronal cell biology of these genes and the pathogenic mutations in Parkinson's disease. Flies reproduce quickly, and their elaborate genetic tools in combination with their small size allow researchers to analyze identified cells and neurons in large numbers of animals. Furthermore, fruit flies recapitulate many of the cellular and molecular defects also seen in patients, and these defects often result in clear locomotor and behavioral phenotypes, facilitating genetic modifier screens. Hence, Drosophila has played a prominent role in Parkinson's disease research and has provided invaluable insight into the molecular mechanisms of this disease.

  14. Parkinson's disease. Team talk.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer

    2006-07-27

    Multidisciplinary working and co-ordination between different parts of the care pathway are key to improving services for Parkinson's disease patients. Benefits of this approach include care continuity and increased sharing of skills between professionals. Specialist Parkinson's nurses form a key part of the multidisciplinary workforce, and have formed peer networks to keep up to date on best practice.

  15. Association between REM sleep behaviour disorder and impulse control disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bellosta Diago, E; Lopez Del Val, L J; Santos Lasaosa, S; López Garcia, E; Viloria Alebesque, A

    2017-10-01

    The relationship between impulse control disorder (ICD) and REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) has not yet been clarified, and the literature reports contradictory results. Our purpose is to analyse the association between these 2 disorders and their presence in patients under dopaminergic treatment. A total of 73 patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and treated with a single dopamine agonist were included in the study after undergoing clinical assessment and completing the single-question screen for REM sleep behaviour disorder and the short version of the questionnaire for impulsive-compulsive behaviours in Parkinson's disease. Mean age was 68.88 ± 7.758 years. Twenty-six patients (35.6%) were classified as probable-RBD. This group showed a significant association with ICD (P=.001) and had a higher prevalence of non-tremor akinetic rigid syndrome and longer duration of treatment with levodopa and dopamine agonists than the group without probable-RBD. We found a significant correlation between the use of oral dopamine agonists and ICD. Likewise, patients treated with oral dopamine agonists demonstrated a greater tendency toward presenting probable-RBD than patients taking dopamine agonists by other routes; the difference was non-significant. The present study confirms the association between RBD and a higher risk of developing symptoms of ICD in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduced plasma taurine level in Parkinson's disease: association with motor severity and levodopa treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Yuan, Yongsheng; Tong, Qing; Jiang, Siming; Xu, Qinrong; Ding, Jian; Zhang, Lian; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Kezhong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the level of taurine in plasma, and its association with the severity of motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS) and chronic levodopa treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD). Plasma taurine level was measured in treated PD (tPD), untreated PD (ntPD) and control groups. Motor symptoms and NMS were assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, the Hamilton Depression Scale, the Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease for Autonomic Symptoms and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Longtime exposure to levodopa was indicated by its approximate cumulative dosage. The plasma taurine levels of PD patients were decreased when compared with controls and negatively associated with motor severity but not NMS. Moreover, tPD patients exhibited lower levels of plasma taurine than ntPD patients. Interestingly, plasma taurine levels negatively correlated with cumulative levodopa dosage in tPD. After controlling for potential confounders, the association between taurine and levodopa remained significant. Our study supports that taurine may play important roles in the pathophysiology of PD and the disturbances caused by chronic levodopa administration.

  17. Neuroinflammation as a Common Mechanism Associated with the Modifiable Risk Factors for Alzheimer's and Parkinson`s Diseases.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Jordan Alexander; Spielman, Lindsay J; Pointer, Caitlin B; Lowry, Jessica R; Bajwa, Ekta; Lee, Carolyn W; Klegeris, Andis

    2017-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are among the most common causes of dementia, which increasingly contribute to morbidity and mortality worldwide. A common hallmark in the pathogenesis of these two diseases is neuroinflammation, which is initially triggered by the presence of pathological structures associated with these disorders. Chronic neuroinflammation is sustained by persistent and aberrant microglial activation in the brain, which results in damage and death of neighboring cells, including neurons and glial cells. Two types of risk factors contribute to the development of AD and PD: non-modifiable risk factors and modifiable risk factors. Non-modifiable risk factors include genetic susceptibility that increases an individual's risk of developing the disease, whereas modifiable risk factors include a wide variety of health- and lifestyle-related factors that may be altered by changing individual behaviors. Exposure to environmental toxins could be viewed as a partially modifiable risk factor. This review focuses on four modifiable risk factors including physical inactivity, vascular disease-related conditions, obesity and type two diabetes mellitus, all of which have been identified as risk factors for the development of AD and PD. We highlight that control of the modifiable risk factors is a valid approach for managing the increased incidence of AD and PD. We describe neuroinflammatory mechanisms, which are common to AD and PD, that may link both these neurodegenerative diseases with the four common modifiable risk factors. Understanding these mechanisms could help identify novel therapeutic targets for combating these neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... The NINDS also collaborates with the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) on BioFIND , a ... an Art / Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease / Michael J. Fox: Spurring Research on Parkinson's / Diagnosis and Treatment / Research ...

  19. Postural instability and gait are associated with severity and prognosis of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    van der Heeden, Jorine F; Marinus, Johan; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Rodriguez-Blazquez, Carmen; Geraedts, Victor J; van Hilten, Jacobus J

    2016-06-14

    Differences in disease progression in Parkinson disease (PD) have variously been attributed to 2 motor subtypes: tremor-dominant (TD) and postural instability and gait difficulty (PIGD)-dominant (PG). We evaluated the role of these phenotypic variants in severity and progression of nondopaminergic manifestations of PD and motor complications. Linear mixed models were applied to data from the Profiling Parkinson's disease (PROPARK) cohort (n = 396) to evaluate the effect of motor subtype on severity and progression of cognitive impairment (Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease [SCOPA]-Cognition [SCOPA-COG]), depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), autonomic dysfunction (SCOPA-Autonomic [SCOPA-AUT]), excessive daytime sleepiness, psychotic symptoms (SCOPA-Psychiatric Complications [SCOPA-PC]), and motor complications. In first analyses, subtype as determined by the commonly used ratio of tremor over PIGD score was entered as a factor, whereas in second analyses separate tremor and PIGD scores were used. Results were verified in an independent cohort (Estudio Longitudinal de Pacientes con Enfermedad de Parkinson [ELEP]; n = 365). The first analyses showed that PG subtype patients had worse SCOPA-COG, HADS, SCOPA-AUT, SCOPA-PC, and motor complications scores, and exhibited faster progression on the SCOPA-COG. The second analyses showed that only higher PIGD scores were associated with worse scores for these variables; tremor score was not associated with severity or progression of any symptom. Analyses in the independent cohort yielded similar results. In contrast to PIGD, which consistently was associated with greater severity of nondopaminergic symptoms, there was no evidence of a benign effect of tremor. Our findings do not support the use of the TD subtype as a prognostic trait in PD. The results showed that severity of PIGD is a useful indicator of severity and prognosis in PD by itself. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Ambulation and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Amano, Shinichi; Roemmich, Ryan T; Skinner, Jared W; Hass, Chris J

    2013-05-01

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a variety of motor and nonmotor features. This article reviews the problems of postural instability and gait disturbance in persons with Parkinson disease through the discussion of (1) the neuropathology of parkinsonian motor deficits, (2) behavioral manifestations of gait and postural abnormalities observed in persons with Parkinson disease, and (3) pharmacologic, surgical, and physical therapy-based interventions to combat postural instability and gait disturbance. This article advances the treatment of postural instability and gait disturbance by condensing up-to-date knowledge and making it available to clinicians and rehabilitation professionals.

  1. [Inflammation and Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Barcia González, C; Herrero Ezquerro, M T

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with aging characterized by a motor extrapiramidal alteration secondary to the progressive death of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. The cause of this neuronal loss remains unknown but post mortem studies on brains of parkinsonian patients showed high index of inflammatory mechanism markers. This point has gone to open new lines of research in order to ascertain what role have these inflammatory process in neuronal degeneration and has opened new therapeutic possibilities to stop or at least to brake the neurodegenerative process.

  2. Early-onset Parkinson's Disease Associated with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oki, Mitsuaki; Hori, Shin-ichiro; Asayama, Shinya; Wate, Reika; Kaneko, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 43-year-old man with a 4-year history of resting tremor and akinesia. His resting tremor and rigidity were more prominent on the left side. He also presented retropulsion. His symptoms responded to the administration of levodopa. The patient also had a cleft lip and palate, cavum vergae, and hypoparathyroidism. A chromosome analysis disclosed a hemizygous deletion in 22q11.2, and he was diagnosed with early-onset Parkinson's disease associated with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the patient lacked autonomic nerve dysfunction, and his cardiac uptake of (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine was normal, indicating an underlying pathological mechanism that differed to that of sporadic Parkinson's disease.

  3. Distinct effects of dopamine vs STN stimulation therapies in associative learning and retention in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Ventre-Dominey, Jocelyne; Mollion, Hélène; Thobois, Stephane; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence has been provided in Parkinson's disease patients of cognitive impairments including visual memory and learning which can be partially compensated by dopamine medication or subthalamic nucleus stimulation. The effects of these two therapies can differ according to the learning processes involving the dorsal vs ventral part of the striatum. Here we aimed to investigate and compare the outcomes of dopamine vs stimulation treatment in Parkinson patient's ability to acquire and maintain over successive days their performance in visual working memory. Parkinson patients performed conditional associative learning embedded in visual (spatial and non spatial) working memory tasks over two consecutive days either ON or OFF dopaminergic drugs or STN stimulation depending on the group of patients studied. While Parkinson patients were more accurate and faster in memory tasks ON vs OFF stimulation independent of the day of testing, performance in medicated patients differed depending on the medication status during the initial task acquisition. Patients who learnt the task ON medication the first day were able to maintain or even improve their memory performance both OFF and ON medication on the second day after consolidation. These effects were observed only in patients with dopamine replacement with or without motor fluctuations. This enhancement in memory performance after having learnt under dopamine medication and not under STN stimulation was mostly significant in visuo-spatial working memory tasks suggesting that dopamine replacement in the depleted dorsal striatum is essential for retention and consolidation of learnt skill. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Association Between Sagittal Balance and Scoliosis in Patients with Parkinson Disease: A Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Bissolotti, Luciano; Donzelli, Sabrina; Gobbo, Massimiliano; Zaina, Fabio; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Negrini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the association between scoliosis and sagittal balance parameters in Parkinson disease patients. This is a cross-sectional study. Fifty percent of the cohort presented a scoliosis larger than 11 degrees; 84% of the patients with scoliosis presented a thoracolumbar curve, 10% presented a thoracic one, and 6% presented a lumbar one. The group with scoliosis curves presented a lower spinosacral angle (111.6 [21.9] degrees vs. 121.7 [9.8] degrees, P < 0.05), whereas thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and spinopelvic angle were similar. Pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, and sacral slope were not statistically different. In the scoliosis group, the authors found negative correlations for lumbar lordosis/spinopelvic angle, sacral slope/spinosacral angle, and lumbar lordosis/pelvic tilt. Moreover, the sacral slope/pelvic tilt correlation was positive in patients without scoliosis and negative in others. The two groups did not present differences regarding age, years of disease, Hoehn-Yahr score, and Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale-motor section. Pelvic parameters were similar in the two groups, whereas spinosacral angle was lower in patients with scoliosis. The prevalence of scoliosis in Parkinson disease was higher than what was previously described and the thoracolumbar spine was the mostly affected.

  5. Non-SMC condensin I complex, subunit D2 gene polymorphisms are associated with Parkinson's disease: a Han Chinese study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Liu, Ling; Huang, Jinsha; Shao, Liang; Wang, Hongcai; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have indicated that non-SMC condensin I complex, subunit D2 (NCAPD2), an important protein in chromosome condensation, gene polymorphisms are associated with Alzheimer's disease. But no study has shown the relationship between NCAPD2 polymorphisms and Parkinson's disease. Here, we conducted a case-control study to investigate the relationship between NCAPD2 polymorphisms and the risk of Parkinson's disease in a Han Chinese population. Two single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) of NCAPD2 (rs7311174 and rs2072374) showed significant p values (p = 0.046 and p = 0.043, respectively) in 265 patients and 267 controls. Further analysis showed an effect of age and gender on the relationship between the two SNPs and the risk for Parkinson's disease. The A allele of rs7311174 and the T allele of rs2072374 were protective in the male patients (p = 0.016 and p = 0.019, respectively). The frequencies of the T allele of rs7311174 and the C allele of rs2072374 were significantly associated with late-onset Parkinson's disease (p = 0.048 and p = 0.044, respectively). This research demonstrates a positive relationship between the NCAPD2 gene and the risk for Parkinson's disease in a Han Chinese population and provides a potential genetic marker for sporadic Parkinson's disease.

  6. Parkinson's disease and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ylikoski, Ari; Martikainen, Kirsti; Sieminski, Mariusz; Partinen, Markku

    2015-11-01

    There is a broad spectrum of sleep disturbances observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). The prevalence of symptoms of insomnia and chronic inability to sleep and their association with other sleep disorders were studied. Altogether 1447 randomly selected Parkinson patients, aged 43-89 years, participated in a questionnaire study. A structured questionnaire with 207 items was based on the Basic Nordic Sleep questionnaire. Questions on demographics, PD, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, and other issues were included. The response rate was 59 % (N = 854), and of these 81 % returned fully answered questionnaire (N = 689). Prevalence of chronic inability to sleep was 36.9 % (95 % CI 33.3-40.5). Difficulty of initiating sleep was 18.0 % (95 % CI 15.1-20.9), disrupted sleep 81.54 % (78.5-84.4), awakenings during night 31.3 % (27.8-34.8), early morning awakenings 40.4 % (36.8-44.1) and non-restorative sleep 38.5 % (34.8-42.1). In the logistic regression models, poor quality of life and restless legs syndrome correlated significantly with chronic insomnia disorder. Disrupted sleep and early morning awakenings were the most common insomnia symptoms. PD patients do not seem to have difficulties in sleep initiation. Insomnia symptoms including disruptive sleep and non-restorative sleep are common in patients with Parkinson's disease. Inability to sleep is more common as comorbidity than a single sleep problem.

  7. Prolidase-Associated Trace Elements (Mn, Zn, Co, and Ni) in the Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Verma, Akhilesh Kumar; Keshari, Anand Kumar; Raj, Janak; Kumari, Renu; Kumar, Tarun; Sharma, Vivek; Singh, Tej Bali; Srivastava, Shalabh; Srivastava, Ragini

    2016-05-01

    Micronutrients and trace elements have been identified to play an important role in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). In our previous study, we observed that prolidase activity is associated with oxidative stress and progression of PD. In present study, we aimed to study the association of prolidase-associated trace elements, such as Co, Mn, Ni, and Zn in the plasma of patients with PD by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. Plasma levels of Co, Mn, and Ni were significantly increased, whereas plasma levels of Zn was significantly decreased (all P < 0.05) in the patients with PD than healthy controls. Plasma prolidase activity was not correlated to its associated trace elements in PD. A positive, linear, and significant correlation was observed between age and Co, and Mn, and Ni while negative and non-significant between age and status of Zn in the patients. Co, Mn, and Ni were continually elevated with increase in age as well as duration of disease in the patients with PD, whereas status of Zn was continually decreased. Thus, the study concluded that trace elements Co, Ni, and Mn status were increased and Zn status was decreased in the plasma of patients with PD. It is also concluded that elevated Co, Mn, and Ni has been associated with progression of Parkinson's disease.

  8. Neuropsychological deficits associated with driving performance in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grace, Janet; Amick, Melissa M; D'Abreu, Anelyssa; Festa, Elena K; Heindel, William C; Ott, Brian R

    2005-10-01

    Neuropsychological and motor deficits in Parkinson's disease that may contribute to driving impairment were examined in a cohort study comparing patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to healthy elderly controls. Nondemented individuals with Parkinson's disease [Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) stage I-III], patients with Alzheimer's disease [Clinical Demetia Rating scale (CDR) range 0-1], and elderly controls, who were actively driving, completed a neuropsychological battery and a standardized road test administered by a professional driving instructor. On-road driving ability was rated on number of driving errors and a global rating of safe, marginal, or unsafe. Overall, Alzheimer's patients were more impaired drivers than Parkinson's patients. Parkinson's patients distinguished themselves from other drivers by a head-turning deficiency. Drivers with neuropsychological impairment were more likely to be unsafe drivers in both disease groups compared to controls. Compared to controls, unsafe drivers with Alzheimer's disease were impaired across all neuropsychological measures except finger tapping. Driving performance in Parkinson's patients was related to disease severity (H&Y), neuropsychological measures [Rey Osterreith Complex Figure (ROCF), Trails B, Hopkins Verbal List Learning Test (HVLT)-delay], and specific motor symptoms (axial rigidity, postural instability), but not to the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score. Multifactorial measures (ROCF, Trails B) were useful in distinguishing safe from unsafe drivers in both patient groups.

  9. Association of depressive symptoms with circadian blood pressure alterations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vetrano, Davide L; Pisciotta, Maria S; Lo Monaco, Maria R; Onder, Graziano; Laudisio, Alice; Brandi, Vincenzo; La Carpia, Domenico; Guglielmo, Mauro; Nacchia, Antonio; Fusco, Domenico; Ricciardi, Diego; Bentivoglio, Anna R; Bernabei, Roberto; Zuccalà, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    To assess whether among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) depression, a common non-motor symptom associated with reduced survival, is associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia. We enrolled 125 subjects with PD consecutively admitted to a geriatric day hospital. All participants underwent comprehensive evaluation, fasting blood sampling, and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The percent reduction in nocturnal blood pressure (dipping) was calculated. Depressive symptoms were assessed through the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS); a score ≥5 identified moderate to severe symptoms. Among participants (mean age 72.7 ± 7.8 years, 32 % women) 61 subjects (49 %) presented with a GDS score ≥ 5. When compared with other participants, subjects with a GDS score ≥ 5 had reduced adjusted levels of percent systolic (-2.6 ± 2.7 vs. 4.7 ± 2.5; p = 0.003), diastolic (0.6 ± 2.8 vs. 7.4 ± 2.6; p = 0.007), and mean blood pressure dipping (-0.7 ± 2.6 vs. 6.8 ± 2.5; p = 0.002). In separate logistic regression models, depressive symptoms were associated with reduced systolic (OR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.89; 0.98), diastolic (OR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.90; 0.99), and mean blood pressure dipping (OR 0.93; 95 % CI 0.89; 0.98), after adjusting for potential confounders. Depressive symptoms are prevalent, and independently associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia among patients with Parkinson's disease. This might explain the remarkable incidence of sudden death, as well as the association of depressive symptoms with reduced survival reported in these patients. The finding of depressive symptoms in subjects with Parkinson's disease should therefore prompt assessment of cardiovascular autonomic function.

  10. Characterisation of foot clearance during gait in people with early Parkinson׳s disease: Deficits associated with a dual task.

    PubMed

    Alcock, Lisa; Galna, Brook; Lord, Sue; Rochester, Lynn

    2016-09-06

    Tripping is a common cause of falls in older adults and people with Parkinson׳s disease (PD). Foot clearance during gait may be impaired when distracted by a dual task and thus inform trip risk. This study aimed to evaluate whether foot clearance is impaired in PD and is adversely affected by a dual task. 81 older adults and 76 PD walked at a comfortable pace for two minutes under single and dual task conditions (digit recall). Temporal spatial gait was measured using an instrumented walkway. Heel and toe trajectories were obtained bilaterally using 3-dimensional motion capture. Foot clearance was reduced in PD (p<.001) and under dual task (p<.027). The take-off (toe) gradient was reduced under dual task irrespective of group and the landing (heel) gradient was reduced in PD irrespective of task (p<.001). An increased proportion of unimodal toe distributions were observed for PD, particularly under dual task. Group differences were retained when controlling for step length (landing gradient and peak toe clearance in late swing) and gait velocity (landing gradient). Distinct differences in foot clearance were observed even in the early clinical stages of PD. Dual tasking may increase trip risk due to insufficient toe clearance (early swing) for both older adults and PD. Inadequate heel clearance (late swing) may increase falls risk in PD. Clearance deficits in PD are partially related to a reduced gait velocity and step length which may be targeted in tailored therapies. Further work is necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying this pathology-associated deficit.

  11. Biological networks in Parkinson's disease: an insight into the epigenetic mechanisms associated with this disease.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Paulami; Roy, Debjani; Bhattacharyya, Malay; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2017-09-12

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders in the world. Studying PD from systems biology perspective involving genes and their regulators might provide deeper insights into the complex molecular interactions associated with this disease. We have studied gene co-expression network obtained from a PD-specific microarray data. The co-expression network identified 11 hub genes, of which eight genes are not previously known to be associated with PD. Further study on the functionality of these eight novel hub genes revealed that these genes play important roles in several neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, we have studied the tissue-specific expression and histone modification patterns of the novel hub genes. Most of these genes possess several histone modification sites those are already known to be associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Regulatory network namely mTF-miRNA-gene-gTF involves microRNA Transcription Factor (mTF), microRNA (miRNA), gene and gene Transcription Factor (gTF). Whereas long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) mediated regulatory network involves miRNA, gene, mTF and lncRNA. mTF-miRNA-gene-gTF regulatory network identified a novel feed-forward loop. lncRNA-mediated regulatory network identified novel lncRNAs of PD and revealed the two-way regulatory pattern of PD-specific miRNAs where miRNAs can be regulated by both the TFs and lncRNAs. SNP analysis of the most significant genes of the co-expression network identified 20 SNPs. These SNPs are present in the 3' UTR of known PD genes and are controlled by those miRNAs which are also involved in PD. Our study identified eight novel hub genes which can be considered as possible candidates for future biomarker identification studies for PD. The two regulatory networks studied in our work provide a detailed overview of the cellular regulatory mechanisms where the non-coding RNAs namely miRNA and lncRNA, can act as epigenetic regulators of PD. SNPs identified in our

  12. Hereditary Parkinson s Disease Natural History Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Parkinson Disease 6, Early-Onset; Parkinson Disease (Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset) 7, Human; Parkinson Disease Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset; Parkinson Disease, Autosomal Recessive Early-Onset, Digenic, Pink1/Dj1

  13. Osteoporosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Invernizzi, Marco; Carda, Stefano; Viscontini, Giovanni Sguazzini; Cisari, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    Patients affected by Parkinson's disease are at a high risk for fractures, mainly of the hip. These fractures are caused by falls due to postural imbalance, neurological impairment and reduced bone mass. The purpose of this study was (1) to investigate the correlations and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying bone loss in Parkinson's disease and appraise bone loss or fracture risk reduction interventions; (2) to develop a research agenda that informs the design and development of risk reduction strategies. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are very common findings in patients with Parkinson's disease, affecting up to 91% of women and 61% of men. Reduced bone mass in Parkinsonian patients seems to be caused mainly by reduced mobility through a mechanism similar to that observed in other neurological diseases. Endocrine (such as vitamin D deficiency), nutritional and iatrogenic factors also play an important role in bone mass depletion. Female gender, disease duration and severity (Hoehn and Yahr stages III and IV), old age and low body mass index are related to more severe osteoporosis. Vitamin D supplementation and bisphosphonates seem to be effective in reducing the risk of nonvertebral fractures in patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Prevention and evaluation of osteoporosis through bone mass density assessment should be considered in all patients with Parkinson's disease.

  14. Insomnia and sleepiness in Parkinson disease: associations with symptoms and comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seockhoon; Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Albin, Roger L; Frey, Kirk A; Müller, Martijn L T M; Chervin, Ronald D

    2013-11-15

    Insomnia and daytime sleepiness are common complaints in Parkinson disease (PD), but the main causes remain unclear. We examined the potential impact of both motor and non-motor symptoms of PD on sleep problems. Patients with PD (n = 128) were assessed using the Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Fatigue Severity Scale, Survey of Autonomic Symptoms, and the 39-item Parkinson Disease Questionnaire. A subset of subjects (n = 38, 30%) also completed nocturnal polysomnography and a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Multivariate stepwise logistic regression models revealed that subjective insomnia was independently associated with depressed mood (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.01-3.19]), autonomic symptoms (1.77 [1.08-2.90]), fatigue (1.19 [1.02-1.38]), and age (0.61 [0.39-0.96]). Subjective daytime sleepiness was associated with dosage of dopaminergic medication (1.74 [1.08-2.80]) and fatigue (1.14 [1.02-1.28]). On polysomnography, longer sleep latency correlated with autonomic symptoms (rho = 0.40, p = 0.01) and part I (non-motor symptoms) of the Unified PD Rating Scale (rho = 0.38, p = 0.02). Decreased sleep efficiency correlated with autonomic symptoms (rho = -0.42, p < 0.0001). However, no significant difference emerged on polysomnography and MSLTs between patients with or without insomnia or daytime sleepiness. Higher rates of apneic events did predict shorter sleep latencies on the MSLTs. Non-motor symptoms appear to be associated with subjective insomnia, whereas fatigue and dopaminergic medication are associated with subjective daytime sleepiness. Objective sleep laboratory data provided little insight into complaints of insomnia and sleepiness, though obstructive sleep apnea predicted worsened sleepiness when measured objectively.

  15. Impulse-control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Joseph M; Stacy, Mark

    2008-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by bradykinesia, rigidity, postural instability, and resting tremor. Increasingly, Parkinson's disease has been associated with a broad spectrum of non-motor symptoms, such as olfactory loss, sleep disorders, autonomic dysfunction, cognitive impairment, psychosis, depression, anxiety, and apathy. In addition, a minority of Parkinson's disease patients develop compulsive behaviors while receiving dopamine-replacement therapy, including medication hoarding, pathological gambling, binge eating, hyperlibidinous behavior, compulsive shopping, and punding. These behaviors may result in psychosocial impairment for patients and therapeutic challenges for clinicians. This article reviews the anatomic substrates, behavioral spectrum, associated factors, and potential treatments for dopamine-replacement therapy-related compulsions in Parkinson's disease.

  16. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  17. Insomnia and Sleepiness in Parkinson Disease: Associations with Symptoms and Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seockhoon; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Albin, Roger L.; Frey, Kirk A.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Insomnia and daytime sleepiness are common complaints in Parkinson disease (PD), but the main causes remain unclear. We examined the potential impact of both motor and non-motor symptoms of PD on sleep problems. Methods: Patients with PD (n = 128) were assessed using the Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Fatigue Severity Scale, Survey of Autonomic Symptoms, and the 39-item Parkinson Disease Questionnaire. A subset of subjects (n = 38, 30%) also completed nocturnal polysomnography and a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Results: Multivariate stepwise logistic regression models revealed that subjective insomnia was independently associated with depressed mood (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.01-3.19]), autonomic symptoms (1.77 [1.08-2.90]), fatigue (1.19 [1.02-1.38]), and age (0.61 [0.39-0.96]). Subjective daytime sleepiness was associated with dosage of dopaminergic medication (1.74 [1.08-2.80]) and fatigue (1.14 [1.02-1.28]). On polysomnography, longer sleep latency correlated with autonomic symptoms (rho = 0.40, p = 0.01) and part I (non-motor symptoms) of the Unified PD Rating Scale (rho = 0.38, p = 0.02). Decreased sleep efficiency correlated with autonomic symptoms (rho = -0.42, p < 0.0001). However, no significant difference emerged on polysomnography and MSLTs between patients with or without insomnia or daytime sleepiness. Higher rates of apneic events did predict shorter sleep latencies on the MSLTs. Conclusions: Non-motor symptoms appear to be associated with subjective insomnia, whereas fatigue and dopaminergic medication are associated with subjective daytime sleepiness. Objective sleep laboratory data provided little insight into complaints of insomnia and sleepiness, though obstructive sleep apnea predicted worsened sleepiness when measured objectively. Citation: Chung S; Bohnen NI; Albin RL; Frey KA; Müller MLTM; Chervin RD

  18. Deletions at 22q11.2 in idiopathic Parkinson's disease: a combined analysis of genome-wide association data

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Kin Y; Sheerin, Una; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Salaka, Afnan; Chester, Lucy; Escott-Price, Valentina; Mantripragada, Kiran; Doherty, Karen M; Noyce, Alastair J; Mencacci, Niccolo E; Lubbe, Steven J; Williams-Gray, Caroline H; Barker, Roger A; van Dijk, Karin D; Berendse, Henk W; Heutink, Peter; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Cormier, Florence; Lesage, Suzanne; Brice, Alexis; Brockmann, Kathrin; Schulte, Claudia; Gasser, Thomas; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Morrison, Karen E; Clarke, Carl E; Sawcer, Stephen; Warner, Tom T; Lees, Andrew J; Morris, Huw R; Nalls, Mike A; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Abramov, Andrey Y; Plagnol, Vincent; Williams, Nigel M; Wood, Nicholas W

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Parkinson's disease has been reported in a small number of patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. In this study, we screened a series of large, independent Parkinson's disease case-control studies for deletions at 22q11.2. Methods We used data on deletions spanning the 22q11.2 locus from four independent case-control Parkinson's disease studies (UK Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2, Dutch Parkinson's Disease Genetics Consortium, US National Institute on Aging, and International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium studies), which were independent of the original reports of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. We did case-control association analysis to compare the proportion of 22q11.2 deletions found, using the Fisher's exact test for the independent case-control studies and the Mantel-Haenszel test for the meta-analyses. We retrieved clinical details of patients with Parkinson's disease who had 22q11.2 deletions from the medical records of these patients. Findings We included array-based copy number variation data from 9387 patients with Parkinson's disease and 13 863 controls. Eight patients with Parkinson's disease and none of the controls had 22q11.2 deletions (p=0·00082). In the 8451 patients for whom age at onset data were available, deletions at 22q11.2 were associated with Parkinson's disease age at onset (Mann-Whitney U test p=0·001). Age at onset of Parkinson's disease was lower in patients carrying a 22q11.2 deletion (median 37 years, 95% CI 32·0–55·5; mean 42·1 years [SD 11·9]) than in those who did not carry a deletion (median 61 years, 95% CI 60·5–61·0; mean 60·3 years [SD 12·8]). A 22q11.2 deletion was present in more patients with early-onset (p<0·0001) and late-onset Parkinson's disease (p=0·016) than in controls, and in more patients with early-onset than late-onset Parkinson's disease (p=0·005). Interpretation Clinicians should be alert to the possibility of 22q11.2 deletions in

  19. Medical management of levodopa-associated motor complications in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Joseph; Stacy, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects approximately 1% of people over the age of 60 years. Levodopa is standard, and often initial, therapy for patients with this condition; however, with continued treatment and as the disease progresses, up to 80% of patients experience 'wearing-off' symptoms, dyskinesias and other motor complications. These levodopa-associated problems may become disabling and profoundly affect quality of life. Medications commonly used to manage these symptoms include monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors, the NMDA receptor antagonist amantadine and dopamine receptor agonists. Agents that block MAO-B, such as rasagiline and selegiline, are used as both initial and adjunctive therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease. These medications increase concentrations of dopamine in the brain by blocking its reuptake from the synaptic cleft, a mechanism that can slow motor decline, increase 'on' time and improve symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Adverse events with these agents can include confusion, hallucination and orthostatic hypotension. MAO-B inhibition may elicit drug-drug interactions if administered with TCAs, SSRIs or SNRIs. Conventional oral selegiline is associated with potentially harmful plasma concentrations of three major amphetamine metabolites, although metabolite concentrations are significantly lower with a new orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) selegiline formulation. Selegiline ODT is also absorbed more efficiently and shows less pharmacokinetic variability than conventional oral selegiline.COMT mediates peripheral catabolism of levodopa. Therefore, agents that block COMT, such as tolcapone and entacapone, increase the elimination half-life of levodopa. Given adjunctively with levodopa, COMT inhibitors can decrease 'off' time and increase 'on' time, as well as lower the daily levodopa dose. Although more potent than entacapone, tolcapone requires

  20. Mitochondrial pathology in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Anthony H V

    2011-01-01

    The last 25 years have witnessed remarkable advances in our understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The ability to undertake detailed biochemical analyses of the Parkinson's disease postmortem brain enabled the identification of defects of mitochondrial and free-radical metabolism. The discovery of the first gene mutation for Parkinson's disease, in alpha-synuclein, ushered in the genetic era for the disease and the subsequent finding of several gene mutations causing parkinsonism, 15 at the time of writing. Technological advances both in sequencing technology and software analysis have allowed association studies of sufficiently large size accurately to describe genes conferring an increased risk for Parkinson's disease. What has been so surprising is the convergence of these 2 separate disciplines (biochemistry and genetics) in terms of reinforcing the importance of the same pathways (ie, mitochondrial dysfunction and free-radical metabolism). Other pathways are also important in pathogenesis, including protein turnover, inflammation, and post-translational modification, particularly protein phosphorylation and ubiquitination. However, even these additional pathways overlap with each other and with those of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. This review explores these concepts with particular relevance to mitochondrial involvement. © 2011 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  1. Parkinson's syndrome and Parkinson's disease in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2011-04-01

    In the majority of cases, mitochondrial disorders are multisystem conditions that most frequently affect the skeletal muscle, followed by the central nervous system. One of the clinical manifestations of central nervous system involvement is Parkinson's syndrome (PS). Evidence for an association of mitochondrial defects with PS comes from mitochondrial disorder patients who have developed Parkinson's syndrome and from Parkinson's syndrome patients who have developed a mitochondrial disorder. In addition, there are a number of patients with Parkinson's syndrome or Parkinson's disease (PD) who later develop subclinical immunohistological or biochemical indications of mitochondrial defects or accumulates mitochondrial DNA mutations within various cerebral regions. There are also Parkinson's syndrome patients who present with elevated cerebrospinal-fluid lactate by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Furthermore, it has been shown that mutations in genes causing PD, such as PINK1, parkin, DJ1, alpha-synuclein, and LRRK2, also cause mitochondrial dysfunction, which is one of the reasons why they are called mitochondrial nigropathies. Parkinson's syndrome in patients with a mitochondrial disorder may also result from oxidative stress or exogenous toxins. Treatment of mitochondrial Parkinson's syndrome is not at variance with the treatment of Parkinson's syndrome due to other causes, but because of the multisystem nature of mitochondrial disorders, mitochondrial Parkinson's syndrome requires additional therapeutic support.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Parkinson disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... are some genetic conditions more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Most cases of Parkinson disease probably ... Parkinson's disease: variation by age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jun 1;157(11): ...

  3. Mitochondria-Associated Membranes (MAMs): Overview and Its Role in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arribas, M; Yakhine-Diop, S M S; Pedro, J M Bravo-San; Gómez-Suaga, P; Gómez-Sánchez, R; Martínez-Chacón, G; Fuentes, J M; González-Polo, R A; Niso-Santano, M

    2016-10-06

    Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are structures that regulate physiological functions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in order to maintain calcium signaling and mitochondrial biogenesis. Several proteins located in MAMs, including those encoded by PARK genes and some of neurodegeneration-related proteins (huntingtin, presenilin, etc.), ensure this regulation. In this regard, MAM alteration is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's (PD), Alzheimer's (AD), and Huntington's diseases (HD) and contributes to the appearance of the pathogenesis features, i.e., autophagy dysregulation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and lately, neuronal death. Moreover,, ER stress and/or damaged mitochondria can be the cause of these disruptions. Therefore, ER-mitochondria contact structure and function are crucial to multiple cellular processes. This review is focused on the molecular interaction between ER and mitochondria indispensable to MAM formation and on MAM alteration-induced etiology of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49–85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association. PMID:27688919

  5. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Son, Andre Y; Biagioni, Milton C; Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49-85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association.

  6. Mutations in GBA are associated with familial Parkinson disease susceptibility and age at onset.

    PubMed

    Nichols, W C; Pankratz, N; Marek, D K; Pauciulo, M W; Elsaesser, V E; Halter, C A; Rudolph, A; Wojcieszek, J; Pfeiffer, R F; Foroud, T

    2009-01-27

    To characterize sequence variation within the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene in a select subset of our sample of patients with familial Parkinson disease (PD) and then to test in our full sample whether these sequence variants increased the risk for PD and were associated with an earlier onset of disease. We performed a comprehensive study of all GBA exons in one patient with PD from each of 96 PD families, selected based on the family-specific lod scores at the GBA locus. Identified GBA variants were subsequently screened in all 1325 PD cases from 566 multiplex PD families and in 359 controls. Nine different GBA variants, five previously reported, were identified in 21 of the 96 PD cases sequenced. Screening for these variants in the full sample identified 161 variant carriers (12.2%) in 99 different PD families. An unbiased estimate of the frequency of the five previously reported GBA variants in the familial PD sample was 12.6% and in the control sample was 5.3% (odds ratio 2.6; 95% confidence interval 1.5-4.4). Presence of a GBA variant was associated with an earlier age at onset (p = 0.0001). On average, those patients carrying a GBA variant had onset with PD 6.04 years earlier than those without a GBA variant. This study suggests that GBA is a susceptibility gene for familial Parkinson disease (PD) and patients with GBA variants have an earlier age at onset than patients with PD without GBA variants.

  7. Metabolic Imaging in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Meles, Sanne K; Teune, Laura K; de Jong, Bauke M; Dierckx, Rudi A; Leenders, Klaus L

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on recent human (18)F-FDG PET studies in Parkinson disease. First, an overview is given of the current analytic approaches to metabolic brain imaging data. Next, we discuss how (18)F-FDG PET studies have advanced understanding of the relation between distinct brain regions and associated symptoms in Parkinson disease, including cognitive decline. In addition, the value of (18)F-FDG PET studies in differential diagnosis, identifying prodromal patients, and the evaluation of treatment effects are reviewed. Finally, anticipated developments in the field are addressed. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  8. Psychosis associated to Parkinson's disease in the early stages: relevance of cognitive decline and depression.

    PubMed

    Morgante, Letterio; Colosimo, Carlo; Antonini, Angelo; Marconi, Roberto; Meco, Giuseppe; Pederzoli, Massimo; Pontieri, Francesco E; Cicarelli, Giulio; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Zappulla, Salvatore; Ramat, Silvia; Manfredi, Michela; Bottacchi, Edo; Abrignani, Michele; Berardelli, Alfredo; Cozzolino, Autilia; Paradiso, Claudio; De Gaspari, Danilo; Morgante, Francesca; Barone, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of psychosis associated with Parkinson's disease (PSY-PD) in its early stages, its incidence over a 24 month follow-up period and the association with motor and non-motor clinical features. PRIAMO is a 2 year longitudinal observational study that has enrolled patients with parkinsonism in 55 Italian centres. A cohort of 495 patients with early disease stage PD (baseline Hoehn and Yahr score ≤ 2, disease's duration (median) 3.4 years) were followed for 2 years. PSY-PD was evaluated by means of a clinician rated questionnaire and defined as the presence of at least one of the following symptoms occurring for at least 1 month: illusions, hallucinations, jealousy ideas and persecutory ideas. Patients with and without PSY-PD were compared on several clinical variables, encompassing motor and non-motor features. The prevalence of PSY-PD at baseline was 3%; the incidences at 12 and 24 months were 5.2% and 7.7%, respectively. Longer disease duration and prescription of dopamine agonists at baseline were associated with the development of PSY-PD over the 24 month period. At this follow-up time, worse disease severity, decline in cognitive performances, presence of depressive symptoms and anxiety were more frequently observed in PSY-PD. Psychotic type symptoms may occur in the early stages of PD although less frequently than in later stages. Beyond dopaminergic treatment, there are disease related factors, such as disease severity and the occurrence of cognitive and depressive symptoms, which may underlie the onset of psychotic type symptoms from the earliest stages.

  9. Parkinson Disease Psychosis: Update

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms are common in drug treated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Visual hallucinations occur in about 30% and delusions, typically paranoid in nature, occur in about 5%. These problems, particularly the delusions, cause great distress for patient and caregivers, and are among the most important precipitants for nursing home placement. Psychotic symptoms carry a poor prognosis. They often herald dementia, and are associated with increased mortality. These symptoms often abate with medication reductions, but this may not be tolerated due to worsened motor function. Only clozapine has level A evidence to support its use in PD patients with psychosis (PDP), whether demented or not. While quetiapine has been recommended by the American Academy of Neurology for “consideration,” double blind placebo controlled trials have demonstrated safety but not efficacy. Other antipsychotic drugs have been reported to worsen motor function and data on the effectiveness of cholinesterase inhibitors is limited. PDP remains a serious problem with limited treatment options. PMID:23242358

  10. Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Kramberger, Milica G

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Reckless generosity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Sean S; Evans, Andrew H; Quinn, Niall P; Lawrence, Andrew D; Lees, Andrew J

    2010-01-30

    There is an increasing awareness of impulsive-compulsive phenomena in patients treated for Parkinson's disease (PD). We describe another, potentially related phenomenon putatively associated with the use of dopamine agonists in 3 patients with PD, characterized by excessive and inappropriate philanthropy. (c) 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

  12. HLA-DRA is associated with Parkinson's disease in Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, J; Movafagh, A; Emamalizadeh, B; Zare Bidoki, A; Manafi, A; Ghasemi Firouzabadi, S; Shahidi, G-A; Kazeminasab, S; Petramfar, P; Fazeli, A; Motallebi, M; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, S A; Kowsari, A; Jafarian, Z; Darvish, H

    2014-12-01

    The rs3129882, a noncoding variant in HLA-DR, was found to be associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) using several genome-wide association studies. The aim of this replication study was to explore the relationship between this variant and PD in Iranian population. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples, and the rs3129882 SNP was genotyped using a PCR-RFLP method in 520 PD patients and 520 healthy Iranian controls. Significant differences were found in allele frequencies between patients and controls (χ(2) = 4.64, P = 0.031). Under additive and dominant models, the association of the SNP with PD risk is significant, where the A allele was observed to be protective. The results suggest that rs3129882 polymorphism may be a risk factor for PD in Iranian. This is the first study reporting such an association in this population. More replication studies are needed to confirm this data. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Visual dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weil, Rimona S; Schrag, Anette E; Warren, Jason D; Crutch, Sebastian J; Lees, Andrew J; Morris, Huw R

    2016-07-13

    Patients with Parkinson's disease have a number of specific visual disturbances. These include changes in colour vision and contrast sensitivity and difficulties with complex visual tasks such as mental rotation and emotion recognition. We review changes in visual function at each stage of visual processing from retinal deficits, including contrast sensitivity and colour vision deficits to higher cortical processing impairments such as object and motion processing and neglect. We consider changes in visual function in patients with common Parkinson's disease-associated genetic mutations including GBA and LRRK2 We discuss the association between visual deficits and clinical features of Parkinson's disease such as rapid eye movement sleep behavioural disorder and the postural instability and gait disorder phenotype. We review the link between abnormal visual function and visual hallucinations, considering current models for mechanisms of visual hallucinations. Finally, we discuss the role of visuo-perceptual testing as a biomarker of disease and predictor of dementia in Parkinson's disease. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  14. Parkinson's disease: Autoimmunity and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    De Virgilio, Armando; Greco, Antonio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; Gallo, Andrea; Conte, Michela; Rosato, Chiara; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that causes the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The resulting dopamine deficiency in the basal ganglia leads to a movement disorder that is characterized by classical parkinsonian motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease is recognized as the most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. PD ethiopathogenesis remains to be elucidated and has been connected to genetic, environmental and immunologic conditions. The past decade has provided evidence for a significant role of the immune system in PD pathogenesis, either through inflammation or an autoimmune response. Several autoantibodies directed at antigens associated with PD pathogenesis have been identified in PD patients. This immune activation may be the cause of, rather than a response to, the observed neuronal loss. Parkinsonian motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscular rigidity and resting tremor. The non-motor features include olfactory dysfunction, cognitive impairment, psychiatric symptoms and autonomic dysfunction. Microscopically, the specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies, which are brain deposits containing a substantial amount of α-synuclein, have been recognized. The progression of Parkinson's disease is characterized by a worsening of motor features; however, as the disease progresses, there is an emergence of complications related to long-term symptomatic treatment. The available therapies for Parkinson's disease only treat the symptoms of the disease. A major goal of Parkinson's disease research is the development of disease-modifying drugs that slow or stop the neurodegenerative process. Drugs that enhance the intracerebral dopamine concentrations or stimulate dopamine receptors remain the mainstay treatment for motor symptoms. Immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies aiming to attenuate PD neurodegeneration have become an attractive option and

  15. Polymorphisms in dopamine-associated genes and cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bäckström, D; Eriksson Domellöf, M; Granåsen, G; Linder, J; Mayans, S; Elgh, E; Zetterberg, H; Blennow, K; Forsgren, L

    2017-09-04

    Cognitive decline is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the underlying mechanisms for this complication are incompletely understood. Genotypes affecting dopamine transmission may be of importance. This study investigates whether genotypes associated with reduced prefrontal dopaminergic tone and/or reduced dopamine D2-receptor availability (Catechol-O-methyltransferase [COMT] Val(158) Met genotype and DRD2 C(957) T genotype) affect the development of cognitive deficits in PD. One hundred and 34 patients with idiopathic PD, participating in a regional, population-based study of incident parkinsonism, underwent genotyping. After extensive baseline investigations (including imaging and biomarker analyses), the patients were followed prospectively during 6-10 years with neuropsychological evaluations, covering six cognitive domains. Cognitive decline (defined as the incidence of either Parkinson's disease mild cognitive impairment [PD-MCI] or dementia [PDD], diagnosed according to published criteria and blinded to genotype) was studied as the primary outcome. Both genotypes affected cognition, as shown by Cox proportional hazards models. While the COMT (158) Val/Val genotype conferred an increased risk of mild cognitive impairment in patients with normal cognition at baseline (hazard ratio: 2.13, P = .023), the DRD2 (957) T/T genotype conferred an overall increased risk of PD dementia (hazard ratio: 3.22, P < .001). The poorer cognitive performance in DRD2 (957) T/T carriers with PD occurred mainly in episodic memory and attention. The results favor the hypothesis that dopamine deficiency in PD not only relate to mild cognitive deficits in frontostriatal functions, but also to a decline in memory and attention. This could indicate that dopamine deficiency impairs a wide network of brain areas. © 2017 The Authors. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Blood Biomarkers Associated with Cognitive Decline in Early Stage and Drug-Naive Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Jose A; Potashkin, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) continues to be a major challenge in the field. The lack of a robust biomarker to detect early stage PD patients has considerably slowed the progress toward the development of potential therapeutic agents. We have previously evaluated several RNA biomarkers in whole blood from participants enrolled in two independent clinical studies. In these studies, PD patients were medicated, thus, expression of these biomarkers in de novo patients remains unknown. To this end, we tested ten RNA biomarkers in blood samples from 99 untreated PD patients and 101 HC nested in the cross-sectional Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative by quantitative real-time PCR. One biomarker out of ten, COPZ1 trended toward significance (nominal p = 0.009) when adjusting for age, sex, and educational level. Further, COPZ1, EFTUD2 and PTBP1 mRNAs correlated with clinical features in PD patients including the Hoehn and Yahr scale, Movement Disorder Society revision of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score. Levels of EFTUD2 and PTBP1 were significantly higher in cognitively normal PD patients (PD-CN) compared to cognitively impaired PD patients (PD-MCI). Interestingly, blood glucose levels were significantly higher in PD and PD-MCI patients (≥ 100 mg/dL, pre-diabetes) compared to HC. Collectively, we report the association of three RNA biomarkers, COPZ1, EFTUD2 and PTBP1 with clinical features including cognitive decline in early drug-naïve PD patients. Further, our results show that drug-naïve PD and PD-MCI patients have glucose levels characteristic of pre-diabetes patients, suggesting that impaired glucose metabolism is an early event in PD. Evaluation of these potential biomarkers in a larger longitudinal study is warranted.

  17. Aldehyde dehydrogenase variation enhances effect of pesticides associated with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Cockburn, Myles; Ritz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether environmental and genetic alterations of neuronal aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes were associated with increased Parkinson disease (PD) risk in an epidemiologic study. Methods: A novel ex vivo assay was developed to identify pesticides that can inhibit neuronal ALDH activity. These were investigated for PD associations in a population-based case-control study, the Parkinson's Environment & Genes (PEG) Study. Common variants in the mitochondrial ALDH2 gene were genotyped to assess effect measure modification (statistical interaction) of the pesticide effects by genetic variation. Results: All of the metal-coordinating dithiocarbamates tested (e.g., maneb, ziram), 2 imidazoles (benomyl, triflumizole), 2 dicarboxymides (captan, folpet), and 1 organochlorine (dieldrin) inhibited ALDH activity, potentially via metabolic byproducts (e.g., carbon disulfide, thiophosgene). Fifteen screened pesticides did not inhibit ALDH. Exposures to ALDH-inhibiting pesticides were associated with 2- to 6-fold increases in PD risk; genetic variation in ALDH2 exacerbated PD risk in subjects exposed to ALDH-inhibiting pesticides. Conclusion: ALDH inhibition appears to be an important mechanism through which environmental toxicants contribute to PD pathogenesis, especially in genetically vulnerable individuals, suggesting several potential interventions to reduce PD occurrence or slow or reverse its progression. PMID:24491970

  18. Replication of association between ELAVL4 and Parkinson disease: the GenePD study

    PubMed Central

    DeStefano, Anita L.; Latourelle, Jeanne; Lew, Mark F.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Klein, Christine; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Mark, Margery H.; Growdon, John H.; Wooten, G. Fredrick; Watts, Ray; Guttman, Mark; Racette, Brad A.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Marlor, Lynn; Shill, Holly A.; Singer, Carlos; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pezzoli, Gianni; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Hendricks, Audrey E.; Gower, Adam; Williamson, Sally; Nagle, Michael W.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Massood, Tiffany; Huskey, Karen W.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Itin, Ilia; Litvan, Irene; Nicholson, Garth; Corbett, Alastair; Nance, Martha; Drasby, Edward; Isaacson, Stuart; Burn, David J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Al-hinti, Jomana; Moller, Anette T.; Ostergaard, Karen; Sherman, Scott J.; Roxburgh, Richard; Snow, Barry; Slevin, John T.; Cambi, Franca; Gusella, James F.; Myers, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic variants in embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, Drosophila-like 4 (ELAVL4) have been reported to be associated with onset age of Parkinson disease (PD) or risk for PD affection in Caucasian populations. In the current study we genotyped three single nucleotide polymorphisms in ELAVL4 in a Caucasian study sample consisting of 712 PD patients and 312 unrelated controls from the GenePD study. The minor allele of rs967582 was associated with increased risk of PD (odds ratio = 1.46, nominal P value = 0.011) in the GenePD population. The minor allele of rs967582 was also the risk allele for PD affection or earlier onset age in the previously studied populations. This replication of association with rs967582 in a third cohort further implicates ELAVL4 as a PD susceptibility gene. PMID:18587682

  19. SLC1A2 variant associated with essential tremor but not Parkinson disease in Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eng-King; Foo, Jia-Nee; Tan, Louis; Au, Wing-Lok; Prakash, Kumar M; Ng, Ebonne; Ikram, M Kamran; Wong, Tien-Yin; Liu, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Yi

    2013-04-23

    Essential tremor (ET) is characterized by postural and action tremor.(1-3) A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified a LINGO1 gene variant to be associated with ET.(4) Subsequent GWAS further identified an intronic variant (rs3794087) of the main glial glutamate transporter (SLC1A2) gene to be associated with ET with an odds ratio (OR) of approximately 1.4.(5) We conducted a case-control study to examine the SLC1A2 gene variant in an Asian cohort of ET. In addition, we also investigated the variant in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) because the GWAS LINGO1 variant has been implicated in both ET and PD and etiologic links between the conditions have been suggested.(6.)

  20. [Pramipexole in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Shindriaeva, N N; Gankina, O A; Levin, O S

    2015-01-01

    Pramipexole is non-ergoline dopamine receptor agonist. There is accumulating evidence for the efficacy of pramipexole in treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Authors have summarized the results concerning the optimal start treatment, the using of pramipexole in early and advanced PD stages, effects of pramipexole on tremor, cognitive impairment, affective functions and safety pramipexole.

  1. Association of serum carotenoid, retinol, and tocopherol concentrations with the progression of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Jinah; Shim, Eugene; Chung, Eun-Jung; Jang, Sung Hee; Koh, Seong-Beom

    2017-04-01

    A pivotal role of oxidative stress has been emphasized in the pathogenesis as well as in the disease progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed at investigating serum levels of antioxidant vitamins and elucidating whether they could be associated with the pathogenesis and progression of PD. Serum levels of retinol, α- and γ-tocopherols, α- and β-carotenes, lutein, lycopene, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin were measured and compared between 104 patients with idiopathic PD and 52 healthy controls matched for age and gender. In order to examine the relationship between antioxidant vitamins and the disease progression, multiple group comparisons were performed among the early PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage I and II, N = 47), advanced PD (stage III and IV, N = 57) and control groups. Separate correlation analyses were performed between the measured antioxidant vitamins and clinical variables, such as Hoehn and Yahr stage and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score. Compared to controls, PD patients had lower levels of α- and β-carotenes and lycopene. α-carotene, β-carotene and lycopene levels were significantly reduced in advanced PD patients relative to early PD patients and were negatively correlated with Hoehn and Yahr stage and UPDRS motor score in PD patients. No significant differences were found in serum levels of retinol, α- and γ-tocopherols, and other carotenoids between PD patients and controls. No significant correlations were found between these vitamin levels and clinical variables in PD patients. We found that serum levels of some carotenoids, α-carotene, β-carotene and lycopene, were lower in PD patients, and that these carotenoids inversely correlated with clinical variables representing disease progression. Our findings suggest that decreases in serum α-carotene, β-carotene and lycopene may be associated with the pathogenesis as well as progression of PD.

  2. Association of serum carotenoid, retinol, and tocopherol concentrations with the progression of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Hwang, Jinah; Shim, Eugene; Chung, Eun-Jung; Jang, Sung Hee

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES A pivotal role of oxidative stress has been emphasized in the pathogenesis as well as in the disease progression of Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed at investigating serum levels of antioxidant vitamins and elucidating whether they could be associated with the pathogenesis and progression of PD. MATERIALS/METHODS Serum levels of retinol, α- and γ-tocopherols, α- and β-carotenes, lutein, lycopene, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin were measured and compared between 104 patients with idiopathic PD and 52 healthy controls matched for age and gender. In order to examine the relationship between antioxidant vitamins and the disease progression, multiple group comparisons were performed among the early PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage I and II, N = 47), advanced PD (stage III and IV, N = 57) and control groups. Separate correlation analyses were performed between the measured antioxidant vitamins and clinical variables, such as Hoehn and Yahr stage and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score. RESULTS Compared to controls, PD patients had lower levels of α- and β-carotenes and lycopene. α-carotene, β-carotene and lycopene levels were significantly reduced in advanced PD patients relative to early PD patients and were negatively correlated with Hoehn and Yahr stage and UPDRS motor score in PD patients. No significant differences were found in serum levels of retinol, α- and γ-tocopherols, and other carotenoids between PD patients and controls. No significant correlations were found between these vitamin levels and clinical variables in PD patients. CONCLUSIONS We found that serum levels of some carotenoids, α-carotene, β-carotene and lycopene, were lower in PD patients, and that these carotenoids inversely correlated with clinical variables representing disease progression. Our findings suggest that decreases in serum α-carotene, β-carotene and lycopene may be associated with the pathogenesis as well as progression of PD

  3. Advanced Parkinson's disease effect on goal-directed and habitual processes involved in visuomotor associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila; Benatru, Isabelle; Brovelli, Andrea; Klinger, Hélène; Thobois, Stéphane; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Boussaoud, Driss; Meunier, Martine

    2013-01-01

    The present behavioral study re-addresses the question of habit learning in Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients were early onset, non-demented, dopa-responsive, candidates for surgical treatment, similar to those we found earlier as suffering greater dopamine depletion in the putamen than in the caudate nucleus. The task was the same conditional associative learning task as that used previously in monkeys and healthy humans to unveil the striatum involvement in habit learning. Sixteen patients and 20 age- and education-matched healthy control subjects learned sets of 3 visuo-motor associations between complex patterns and joystick displacements during two testing sessions separated by a few hours. We distinguished errors preceding vs. following the first correct response to compare patients' performance during the earliest phase of learning dominated by goal-directed actions with that observed later on, when responses start to become habitual. The disease significantly retarded both learning phases, especially in patients under 60 years of age. However, only the late phase deficit was disease severity-dependent and persisted on the second testing session. These findings provide the first corroboration in Parkinson patients of two ideas well-established in the animal literature. The first is the idea that associating visual stimuli to motor acts is a form of habit learning that engages the striatum. It is confirmed here by the global impairment in visuo-motor learning induced by PD. The second idea is that goal-directed behaviors are predominantly caudate-dependent whereas habitual responses are primarily putamen-dependent. At the advanced PD stages tested here, dopamine depletion is greater in the putamen than in the caudate nucleus. Accordingly, the late phase of learning corresponding to the emergence of habitual responses was more vulnerable to the disease than the early phase dominated by goal-directed actions. PMID:23386815

  4. Heterodimerization of Lrrk1-Lrrk2: Implications for LRRK2-associated Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Dachsel, Justus C.; Nishioka, Kenya; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Lincoln, Sarah J.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Kachergus, Jennifer; Hinkle, Kelly M.; Heckman, Michael G.; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Taylor, Julie P.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Gibson, Rachel A.; Hentati, Faycal; Ross, Owen A.; Farrer, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    LRRK2 mutations are recognized as the most frequent genetic cause of both familial and sporadic parkinsonism identified to date. A remarkable feature of this form of parkinsonism is the variable penetrance of symptom manifestation resulting in a wide range of age-at-onset in patients. Herein we use a functional approach to identify the Lrrk1 protein as a potential disease modifier demonstrating an interaction and heterodimer formation with Lrrk2. In addition, evaluation of LRRK1 variants in our large Lrrk2 p.G2019S-parkinsonism series from a Tunisian (n=145) identified a missense mutation (p.L416M) resulting in an average 6.2 years younger age at disease onset. In conclusion we show for the first time that the interaction of Lrrk1-Lrrk2 can form protein dimers and this interaction may influence the age of symptomatic manifestation in Lrrk2-parkinsonism patients. PMID:20144646

  5. Weight gain is associated with medial contact site of subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Filip; Jech, Robert; Nováková, Lucie; Urgošík, Dušan; Vymazal, Josef; Růžička, Evžen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess changes in body-weight in relation to active electrode contact position in the subthalamic nucleus. Regular body weight measurements were done in 20 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease within a period of 18 months after implantation. T1-weighted (1.5T) magnetic resonance images were used to determine electrode position in the subthalamic nucleus and the Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS-III) was used for motor assessment. The distance of the contacts from the wall of the third ventricle in the mediolateral direction inversely correlated with weight gain (r = -0.55, p<0.01) and with neurostimulation-related motor condition expressed as the contralateral hemi-body UPDRS-III (r = -0.42, p<0.01). Patients with at least one contact within 9.3 mm of the wall experienced significantly greater weight gain (9.4 ± (SD)4.4 kg, N = 11) than those with both contacts located laterally (3.9 ± 2.7 kg, N = 9) (p<0.001). The position of the active contact is critical not only for motor outcome but is also associated with weight gain, suggesting a regional effect of subthalamic stimulation on adjacent structures involved in the central regulation of energy balance, food intake or reward.

  6. Impulse control disorders and dopamine dysregulation syndrome associated with dopamine agonist therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fenu, Sandro; Wardas, Jadwiga; Morelli, Micaela

    2009-09-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged linking disorders in the impulsive-compulsive spectrum in Parkinson's disease to dopamine receptor agonist treatment. These disorders include hypersexuality, gambling and, to a minor extent, compulsive shopping and eating, as well as dopamine dysregulation syndrome, characterized by an addictive pattern toward dopamine replacement therapy and stereotyped behaviors, such as punding. These syndromes, which have only recently been recognized and are still underdiagnosed, have deleterious social consequences that warrant interventions at the clinical level and promotion of research at the preclinical level. In this review, we first provide a summary of features of Parkinson's disease and current pharmacological therapies associated with the development of dopamine dysregulation syndrome and impulsive-compulsive disorders. We also examine the dopamine receptors and brain areas important in reward and compulsive behaviors. We then critically examine the neuroadaptations in dopaminergic circuitries and the literature concerning gambling, hypersexuality, and other addictive behaviors in parkinsonian patients. Finally, we focus on suggestions pointing to a role for dopamine D(3) receptors and sensitization phenomena as the main factors which may be the origin of these disorders.

  7. Parkinson's disease: emerging pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Strecker, Karl; Schwarz, Johannes

    2008-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. The prevalence is increasing with age and averages approximately 0.3% in the entire population. The clinical picture is dominated by the cardinal motor symptoms such as tremor at rest, bradykinesia, muscular rigidity, stooped posture and postural instability. Psychiatric comorbidity is common, comprising dementia, depression, anxiety and psychosis. Although many drugs have been developed and introduced into the market to provide symptomatic treatment, there is still no cure for PD and not even solid evidence for disease-modifying strategies. In addition, motor complications in advanced stages of the disease, side effects of the dopaminergic therapy, and non-motor symptoms remain huge challenges during long-term therapy. Thus, new therapeutic agents are desperately needed. Here, we describe current therapies and possible future developments that we hope will contribute to sustaining quality of life in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease for many years.

  8. Parkinson's disease: gene therapies.

    PubMed

    Coune, Philippe G; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    With the recent development of effective gene delivery systems, gene therapy for the central nervous system is finding novel applications. Here, we review existing viral vectors and discuss gene therapy strategies that have been proposed for Parkinson's disease. To date, most of the clinical trials were based on viral vectors to deliver therapeutic transgenes to neurons within the basal ganglia. Initial trials used genes to relieve the major motor symptoms caused by nigrostriatal degeneration. Although these new genetic approaches still need to prove more effective than existing symptomatic treatments, there is a need for disease-modifying strategies. The investigation of the genetic factors implicated in Parkinson's disease is providing precious insights in disease pathology that, combined with innovative gene delivery systems, will hopefully offer novel opportunities for gene therapy interventions to slow down, or even halt disease progression.

  9. REM sleep behavior disorder: association with motor complications and impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Eun; Jeon, Beom S; Yang, Hui-Jun; Ehm, Gwanhee; Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Jong-Min

    2014-10-01

    Clinical phenotypes such as old age, longer disease duration, motor disability, akineto-rigid type, dementia and hallucinations are known to be associated with REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the relationship between motor fluctuations/impulse control and related behaviors (ICRB) and RBD is not clear. We designed this study to elucidate the clinical manifestations associated with RBD to determine the implications of RBD in PD. In a cross-sectional study, a total of 994 patients with PD were interviewed to determine the presence of RBD and their associated clinical features including motor complications and ICRB. Of the 944 patients, 578 (61.2%) had clinical RBD. When comparing the clinical features between patients with RBD (RBD group) and without RBD (non-RBD group), older age, longer disease duration, higher Hoehn and Yahr stage (H&Y stage), higher levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD), and the existence of wearing off, dyskinesia, freezing, and ICRB, especially punding, were associated with the RBD group compared to the non-RBD group (P < .05 in all). Multivariate analysis showed that motor complications including wearing off, peak dose dyskinesia, and diphasic dyskinesia were the only relevant factors for RBD after adjusting for age and disease duration. Motor complications and ICRB are more frequent in patients with RBD than in patients without RBD. In addition, motor complications are related to RBD even after adjusting for age and disease duration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of a BACE1 Gene Polymorphism with Parkinson's Disease in a Norwegian Population.

    PubMed

    Lange, Johannes; Lunde, Kristin Aaser; Sletten, Camilla; Møller, Simon Geir; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Alves, Guido; Larsen, Jan Petter; Maple-Grødem, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) share pathological features, including amyloid-beta pathology. Amyloid-beta peptide is generated by sequential proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP), and genetic variations in the processing pathway genes have been found to increase the risk of AD; however, the contribution in PD is unknown. Methods. The aim of this study was to investigate whether candidate polymorphisms in five genes (ADAM10, BACE1, BACE2, PSEN2, and CLU) involved in the APP processing pathway affect PD risk in a population-based cohort of patients with incident PD and control subjects from the Norwegian ParkWest study. Results. We found an association of rs638405 in BACE1 with increased risk of PD, thus providing a novel link, at the genetic level, between amyloid-beta pathology and PD.

  11. Association of a BACE1 Gene Polymorphism with Parkinson's Disease in a Norwegian Population

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Johannes; Lunde, Kristin Aaser; Sletten, Camilla; Møller, Simon Geir; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Alves, Guido; Larsen, Jan Petter; Maple-Grødem, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) share pathological features, including amyloid-beta pathology. Amyloid-beta peptide is generated by sequential proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP), and genetic variations in the processing pathway genes have been found to increase the risk of AD; however, the contribution in PD is unknown. Methods. The aim of this study was to investigate whether candidate polymorphisms in five genes (ADAM10, BACE1, BACE2, PSEN2, and CLU) involved in the APP processing pathway affect PD risk in a population-based cohort of patients with incident PD and control subjects from the Norwegian ParkWest study. Results. We found an association of rs638405 in BACE1 with increased risk of PD, thus providing a novel link, at the genetic level, between amyloid-beta pathology and PD. PMID:26788404

  12. Patterns of cortical thickness associated with impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Biundo, Roberta; Weis, Luca; Facchini, Silvia; Formento-Dojot, Patrizia; Vallelunga, Annamaria; Pilleri, Manuela; Weintraub, Daniel; Antonini, Angelo

    2015-04-15

    Previous functional neuroimaging studies in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with impulse control disorders (ICDs) demonstrated dysfunction of the reward network, although the extent of anatomical changes is unclear. The aim of this study was to measure brain cortical thickness and subcortical volumes, and to assess their relationship with presence and severity of symptoms, in PD patients with and without ICDs. We studied 110 PD patients (N=58 with ICDs) and 33 healthy controls (all negative for ICDs) who underwent an extensive neurological, neuropsychological, and behavioral assessment as well as structural 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Between-group differences in brain cortical thickness and subcortical volumes, assessed with the FreeSurfer 5.1 tool, were analyzed. In patients with ICDs, we found significant cortical thinning in fronto-striatal circuitry, specifically in the right superior orbitofrontal, left rostral middle frontal, bilateral caudal middle frontal region, and corpus callosum, as well as volume reduction in the right accumbens and increase in the left amygdala. Finally, we observed a positive association relationship between severity of impulsive symptoms and left rostral middle frontal, inferior parietal, and supramarginal areas. These results support the involvement of both reward and response inhibition networks in PD patients with ICDs. Moreover, their severity is associated with alterations in brain regions linked with reward and top-down control networks. Increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying impulsive and compulsive behaviors might help improve therapeutic strategies for these important disorders. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Inverse associations of outdoor activity and vitamin D intake with the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Liu, Gui-you; Lv, Zheng; Wen, Shi-rong; Bi, Sheng; Wang, Wei-zhi

    2014-10-01

    Early studies had suggested that vitamin D intake was inversely associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. However, the associations of vitamin D intake and outdoor activities with Parkinson's disease (PD) are still unclear, so this study is to evaluate these relationships from a case-control study in elderly Chinese. The study population involved 209 cases with new onsets of PD and 210 controls without neurodegenerative diseases. The data on dietary vitamin D and outdoor activities were collected using a food-frequency questionnaire and self-report questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between dietary outdoor activities, vitamin D intake and PD. Adjustment was made for sex, age, smoking, alcohol use, education, and body mass index (BMI). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for PD in quartiles for outdoor physical activity were 1 (reference), 0.739 (0.413, 1.321), 0.501 (0.282, 0.891), and 0.437 (0.241, 0.795), respectively (P=0.002 for trend). Adjusted ORs for PD in quartiles for total vitamin D intake were 1 (reference), 0.647 (0.357, 1.170), 0.571 (0.318, 1.022), and 0.538 (0.301, 0.960), respectively (P=0.011 for trend). Our study suggested that outdoor activity and total vitamin D intake were inversely associated with PD, and outdoor activity seems to be more significantly associated with decreased risk for PD.

  14. Amantadine use associated with impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease in cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Daniel; Sohr, Mandy; Potenza, Marc N; Siderowf, Andrew D; Stacy, Mark; Voon, Valerie; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Wunderlich, Glen R; Lang, Anthony E

    2010-12-01

    A recent controlled clinical trial suggested a role for amantadine as a treatment for pathological gambling in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Analyzing data from a large cross-sectional study of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in PD, amantadine use (n = 728), vs no amantadine use (n = 2,357), was positively associated with a diagnosis of any ICD (17.6% vs 12.4%, p < 0.001) and compulsive gambling specifically (7.4% vs 4.2%, p < 0.001). This amantadine association remained after controlling for covariates of amantadine use, including both dopamine agonist use and levodopa dosage. Further research, including larger clinical trials, is needed to assess the role of amantadine in the development and treatment of ICDs in PD.

  15. Heterogeneity among patients with Parkinson's disease: cluster analysis and genetic association.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling-Yan; Chan, Piu; Gu, Zhu-Qin; Li, Fang-Fei; Feng, Tao

    2015-04-15

    The clinical heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals the presence of several PD subtypes. The objectives of this study were to identify PD subtypes using cluster analysis (CA) and to determine the association between the subtypes and the polymorphisms in LRRK2 (G2385R and R1628P) and GBA (L444P) genes. A k-means CA of demographics, disease progression, motor and non-motor symptoms was performed from 1,510 Chinese PD patients from the Chinese National Consortium on Neurodegenerative Diseases. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to eliminate uninformative characteristics. Blood samples from 852 patients were obtained for genetic analysis of LRRK2 and GBA. Genotypic associations between various subtypes and genetic variants were examined using chi-square test. We identified four different subtypes: subtype 1 was non-tremor dominant (NTD, n=469; 31.1%); subtype 2 had a rapid disease progression with late onset (RDP-LO, n=67; 4.4%); subtype 3 had benign pure motor characteristics (BPM, n=778; 51.5%) without non-motor disturbances; and subtype 4 was tremor dominant with slow disease progression (TD-SP, n=196; 13.0%). Subtypes 1, 2, and 4 had similar mean age of onset. No associations were identified between polymorphisms in LRRK2 (R1628P) and GBA (L444P) genes and the four subtypes (P>0.05).

  16. Favorable effects of VEGF gene transfer on a rat model of Parkinson disease using adeno-associated viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Tian, You-yong; Tang, Cui-Ju; Wang, Jia-ning; Feng, Yuan; Chen, Xiao-wu; Wang, Lan; Qiao, Xian; Sun, Sheng-gang

    2007-06-29

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a specific angiogenic peptide, which has been identified to play a critical role in neurodegeneration, and has beneficial effects on neurons. In this study, we investigated whether neurodegeneration in a rat model of Parkinson disease could be prevented by VEGF gene transfer mediated by adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Our results demonstrated that a single injection of a VEGF-expressing AAV vector into striatum improved the rotational behavior of rat Parkinson disease models, and promoted the survival of dopaminergic neurons and fibers. Meanwhile, AAV-VEGF injection significantly increased the reactive astrocytes and the levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in striatum, but did not induce extra angiogenesis and remarkable disorder of blood-brain barrier. We thus conclude that intrastriatal delivery of VEGF gene mediated by AAV has favorable effects on the dopaminergic neurons in a rat Parkinson disease model.

  17. Blood dendritic cell frequency declines in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and is associated with motor symptom severity.

    PubMed

    Ciaramella, Antonio; Salani, Francesca; Bizzoni, Federica; Pontieri, Francesco E; Stefani, Alessandro; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Assogna, Francesca; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Bossù, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The role of inflammation in Parkinson's Disease (PD) is well appreciated, but its underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Our objective was to determine whether dendritic cells (DC), a unique type of migratory immune cells that regulate immunological response and inflammation have an impact on PD. In a case-control study including 80 PD patients and 80 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects, the two main blood subsets of plasmacytoid and myeloid DC were defined by flow cytometry analysis. Clinical evaluation of subjects consisting of cognition and depression assessment was performed using the Mini Mental State Examination and the Beck Depression Inventory. The severity of motor symptoms was measured using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Part III. Comparison between patient and control DC measures and their relationships with clinical assessments were evaluated.The following main results were obtained: 1) the level of circulating DC (mainly the myeloid subset) was significantly reduced in PD patients in comparison with healthy controls; 2) after controlling for depressive and cognitive characteristics, the frequency of myeloid DC was confirmed as one of the independent determinants of PD; 3) the number of both myeloid and plasmacytoid DC was negatively associated with motor symptom severity. Overall, the decline of blood DC, perhaps due to the recruitment of immune cells to the site of disease-specific lesions, can be considered a clue of the immune alteration that characterizes PD, suggesting innovative exploitations of DC monitoring as a clinically significant tool for PD treatment. Indeed, this study suggests that reduced peripheral blood DC are a pathologically-relevant factor of PD and also displays the urgency to better understand DC role in PD for unraveling the immune system contribution to disease progression and thus favoring the development of innovative therapies ideally based on immunomodulation.

  18. Homocysteine is not associated with global motor or cognitive measures in nondemented older Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Camicioli, Richard M; Bouchard, Thomas P; Somerville, Martin J

    2009-01-30

    Levodopa (L-dopa) treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with elevated homocysteine (Hcy). To examine the relationship between Hcy, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms (MTHFR: 677C/T; 1298A/C), and B-vitamins in older PD patients and whether Hcy or MTHFR polymorphisms were associated with clinical measures. MTHFR polymorphisms, B-vitamin intake, and blood concentrations of Hcy, vitamin B12 and folate, and creatinine were determined and compared between groups (PD and controls). The relationship of Hcy to clinical measures was examined in PD. Among 51 patients [30M/21F, mean age (SD): 71.5 (4.7)] and 50 controls [29M/21F, 71.5 (4.8)], Hcy was higher in PD [13.6 (3.8); controls: 10.5 (2.5), P < 0.0005]. Hcy was associated with B-vitamin intake [F = 21.7, P < 0.0005], folate level (R = 0.31, P = 0.035), and the interaction of intake with MTHFR 677T (F = 5.2, P = 0.007), but not MTHFR 1298C genotype. Hcy did not correlate with global measures of cognition, mood, or parkinsonism in PD or with dyskinesias, fluctuations, or freezing. Higher vitamin B12 levels were associated with lower dyskinesia risk. Hcy was influenced by PD, MTHFR 677 genotype, and vitamin use, but not by the MTHFR 1298 genotype. There was no clear association with motor or cognitive measures, but dyskinesias were less likely with higher B12.

  19. Speech and Pause Characteristics Associated with Voluntary Rate Reduction in Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate how speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) accomplish voluntary reductions in speech rate. A group of talkers with no history of neurological disease was included for comparison. This study was motivated by the idea that knowledge of how speakers with dysarthria…

  20. Speech and Pause Characteristics Associated with Voluntary Rate Reduction in Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate how speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) accomplish voluntary reductions in speech rate. A group of talkers with no history of neurological disease was included for comparison. This study was motivated by the idea that knowledge of how speakers with dysarthria…

  1. The economic and quality of life burden associated with Parkinson's disease: a focus on symptoms.

    PubMed

    Boland, Deborah F; Stacy, Mark

    2012-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) imposes a significant economic burden on the healthcare system. As the population continues to age and shifts to include a larger proportion of persons 65 years and older, the economic burden related to PD will continue to escalate. Clinicians should be mindful of striving for efficiency, making prudent choices, and allocating resources appropriately. The majority of treatment costs in PD are associated with advancing disease; specifically, the costs related to increasing need for care. Early identification of motor and non-motor signs and symptoms of disease allows for earlier treatment. Through early treatment strategies, symptom control is improved and patients will likely have less need for care. This leads to improvements in quality of life (QoL) and functional independence and reduced caregiver burden and thus results in decreased costs. In addition, although research thus far has not clearly demonstrated the ability of an agent to provide disease modification, as new, potentially neuroprotective therapeutic interventions are developed and become available as treatment options, the recognition of early disease will be more important. If earlier treatment with neuroprotective agents leads to slowing of disease progression, the result may be less need for care and decreased costs for patients with PD. This may have a measurable impact by improving QoL measures for both the patient and caregivers.

  2. Association of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Tau Gene With Late-Onset Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Eden R.; Scott, William K.; Nance, Martha A.; Watts, Ray L.; Hubble, Jean P.; Koller, William C.; Lyons, Kelly; Pahwa, Rajesh; Stern, Matthew B.; Colcher, Amy; Hiner, Bradley C.; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William G.; Allen, Fred H.; Goetz, Christopher G.; Small, Gary W.; Masterman, Donna; Mastaglia, Frank; Laing, Nigel G.; Stajich, Jeffrey M.; Ribble, Robert C.; Booze, Michael W.; Rogala, Allison; Hauser, Michael A.; Zhang, Fengyu; Gibson, Rachel A.; Middleton, Lefkos T.; Roses, Allen D.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Scott, Burton L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Vance, Jeffery M.

    2013-01-01

    Context The human tau gene, which promotes assembly of neuronal microtubules, has been associated with several rare neurologic diseases that clinically include parkinsonian features. We recently observed linkage in idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) to a region on chromosome 17q21 that contains the tau gene. These factors make tau a good candidate for investigation as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic PD, the most common form of the disease. Objective To investigate whether the tau gene is involved in idiopathic PD. Design, Setting, and Participants Among a sample of 1056 individuals from 235 families selected from 13 clinical centers in the United States and Australia and from a family ascertainment core center, we tested 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the tau gene for association with PD, using family-based tests of association. Both affected (n = 426) and unaffected (n = 579) family members were included; 51 individuals had unclear PD status. Analyses were conducted to test individual SNPs and SNP haplotypes within the tau gene. Main Outcome Measure Family-based tests of association, calculated using asymptotic distributions. Results Analysis of association between the SNPs and PD yielded significant evidence of association for 3 of the 5 SNPs tested: SNP 3, P = .03; SNP 9i, P = .04; and SNP 11, P = .04. The 2 other SNPs did not show evidence of significant association (SNP 9ii, P = .11, and SNP 9iii, P = .87). Strong evidence of association was found with haplotype analysis, with a positive association with one haplotype (P = .009) and a negative association with another haplotype (P = .007). Substantial linkage disequilibrium (P<.001) was detected between 4 of the 5 SNPs (SNPs 3,9i, 9ii, and 11). Conclusions This integrated approach of genetic linkage and positional association analyses implicates tau as a susceptibility gene for idiopathic PD. PMID:11710889

  3. Using epigenetic networks for the analysis of movement associated with levodopa therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Turner, Alexander P; Lones, Michael A; Trefzer, Martin A; Smith, Stephen L; Jamieson, Stuart; Alty, Jane E; Cosgrove, Jeremy; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2016-08-01

    Levodopa is a drug that is commonly used to treat movement disorders associated with Parkinson's disease. Its dosage requires careful monitoring, since the required amount changes over time, and excess dosage can lead to muscle spasms known as levodopa-induced dyskinesia. In this work, we investigate the potential for using epiNet, a novel artificial gene regulatory network, as a classifier for monitoring accelerometry time series data collected from patients undergoing levodopa therapy. We also consider how dynamical analysis of epiNet classifiers and their transitions between different states can highlight clinically useful information which is not available through more conventional data mining techniques. The results show that epiNet is capable of discriminating between different movement patterns which are indicative of either insufficient or excessive levodopa.

  4. Attentional deficits affect activities of daily living in dementia‐associated with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bronnick, K; Ehrt, U; Emre, M; De Deyn, P P; Wesnes, K; Tekin, S; Aarsland, D

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of attentional deficits on activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with dementia associated with Parkinson's disease (PDD). Method 461 patients were assessed neuropsychologically. Factor analyses were used to differentiate attention from other cognitive functions and to differentiate different aspects of ADL functions. The effects of the attentional measure on ADL were examined using sequential multiple regression, controlling for age, sex, education, severity of motor symptoms and other cognitive functions. Results Three cognitive factors were identified, with one factor emerging as a measure of vigilance and focused attention. This factor predicted different aspects of ADL status even after controlling for motor functions and other cognitive factors. The attention factor was the single strongest cognitive predictor of ADL status, matching the strength of the effects of motor functions on ADL status. Conclusion Impaired attention is an important determinant of ADL functions in patients with PDD. PMID:16801351

  5. Charcot Spine and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loriaut, Philippe; Rozenberg, Sylvie; Boyer, Patrick; Dallaudière, Benjamin; Khiami, Frederic; Sariali, Elhadi; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    Charcot spine is rare condition whose association with Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been reported yet. The authors reported the cases of two patients with PD who developed Charcot spine. Both patients presented with a history of back pain and bilateral radicular leg pain. They had complete clinical and radiological assessment. Lumbar spine was involved in both patients. Clinical features and response to treatment were described. In the first case, circumferential fusion and stabilization were performed on the dislocated vertebral levels. A solid and stable fusion of the spine was obtained with satisfactory clinical outcome. Surgical treatment has been recommended to the other patient. In both cases, no other neurological etiology was found to account for Charcot spine. In conclusion, Charcot spine is associated with several neurological affections but has not previously been reported in association with Parkinson's disease. PMID:25165591

  6. [Genetics and present therapy options in Parkinson's disease: a review].

    PubMed

    Bereznai, Benjamin; Molnar, Mária Judit

    2009-05-30

    In the past years, six monogenic forms of Parkinson disease have clearly been associated with this movement disorder. The most frequent forms are LRRK2- and Parkin-associated Parkinson disease. Currently, a genetic diagnosis does not change the therapy, the genes involved in genetic Parkinson disease help to understand the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of Parkinson disease. Beside the overview of the molecular-genetic basis, we give a review about genetic testing, pharmacological and other multidisciplinary treatment options.

  7. Apathy and related executive syndromes in dementia associated with Parkinson's disease and in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Dario; Santangelo, Gabriella; Barbarulo, Anna Maria; Vitale, Carmine; Castaldo, Giovanna; Proto, Maria Grazia; Siano, Pietro; Barone, Paolo; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Apathy is defined as a lack of motivation and has been reported to be common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). To explore the neuropsychological correlates of apathy in patients with PD related dementia (PDD) and AD and to identify the specific cognitive profile of apathy in the two forms of neurodegenerative disease, 61 non-depressed patients (29 PDD and 32 AD) were selected. Out of these, 29 patients (47.5%) were detected as apathetic (14 PDD-A+ and 15 AD-A+), and 32 patients as non-apathetic (15 PDD-A- and 17 AD-A-). All patients underwent cognitive tasks tapping memory, visuospatial and executive functions, behavioral rating scales and Clinical Judgment for Apathy Syndrome (CJ-AS), an inventory developed to measure severity of apathy. The four subgroups differed significantly on memory and frontal tasks. The PDD-A+ performed significantly worse than PDD-A- on frontal tasks. The AD-A+ had poorer performance than AD-A- on frontal tasks. Last, PDD-A+ achieved significantly higher scores than AD-A+ on memory tasks. The four groups differed significantly on CJ-AS and behavioral rating scales.The results showed that apathetic patients with both forms of dementia showed a common neuropsychological and behavioral picture, characterized by defects on frontal tasks, thus strongly supporting the existence of an 'apathetic syndrome', characterized by specific cognitive and psychological symptoms.

  8. Treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Aminoff, M J

    1994-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy with levodopa for Parkinson's disease provides symptomatic benefit, but fluctuations in (or loss of) response may eventually occur. Dopamine agonists are also helpful and, when taken with low doses of levodopa, often provide sustained benefit with fewer side effects; novel agonists and new methods for their administration are therefore under study. Other therapeutic strategies are being explored, including the use of type B monoamine oxidase inhibitors to reduce the metabolic breakdown of dopamine, catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors to retard the breakdown of levodopa, norepinephrine precursors to compensate for deficiency of this neurotransmitter, glutamate antagonists to counteract the effects of the subthalamic nucleus, and various neurotrophic factors to influence dopaminergic nigrostriatal cells. Surgical procedures involving pallidotomy are sometimes helpful. Those involving cerebral transplantation of adrenal medullary or fetal mesencephalic tissue have yielded mixed results; benefits may relate to the presence of growth factors in the transplanted tissue. The transplantation of genetically engineered cell lines will probably become the optimal transplantation procedure. The cause of Parkinson's disease may relate to oxidant stress and the generation of free radicals. It is not clear whether treatment with selegiline hydrochloride (a type B monoamine oxidase inhibitor) delays the progression of Parkinson's disease, because the drug also exerts a mild symptomatic effect. Daily treatment with vitamin E (a scavenger of free radicals) does not influence disease progression, perhaps because of limited penetration into the brain. Images PMID:7975571

  9. Speech and pause characteristics associated with voluntary rate reduction in Parkinson's disease and Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Greg

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate how speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) accomplish voluntary reductions in speech rate. A group of talkers with no history of neurological disease was included for comparison. This study was motivated by the idea that knowledge of how speakers with dysarthria voluntarily accomplish a reduced speech rate would contribute toward a descriptive model of speaking rate change in dysarthria. Such a model has the potential to assist in identifying rate control strategies to receive focus in clinical treatment programs and also would advance understanding of global speech timing in dysarthria. All speakers read a passage in Habitual and Slow conditions. Speech rate, articulation rate, pause duration, and pause frequency were measured. All speaker groups adjusted articulation time as well as pause time to reduce overall speech rate. Group differences in how voluntary rate reduction was accomplished were primarily one of quantity or degree. Overall, a slower-than-normal rate was associated with a reduced articulation rate, shorter speech runs that included fewer syllables, and longer more frequent pauses. Taken together, these results suggest that existing skills or strategies used by patients should be emphasized in dysarthria training programs focusing on rate reduction. Results further suggest that a model of voluntary speech rate reduction based on neurologically normal speech shows promise as being applicable for mild to moderate dysarthria. The reader will be able to: (1) describe the importance of studying voluntary adjustments in speech rate in dysarthria, (2) discuss how speakers with Parkinson's disease and Multiple Sclerosis adjust articulation time and pause time to slow speech rate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurotoxicity of the Parkinson Disease-Associated Pesticide Ziram Is Synuclein-Dependent in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Aaron; Barnhill, Lisa; Bitan, Gal; Ivanova, Magdalena I.; Nguyen, Binh; O’Donnell, Kelley; Stahl, Mark C.; Yamashiro, Chase; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Sagasti, Alvaro; Bronstein, Jeff M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to the commonly used dithiocarbamate (DTC) pesticides is associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson disease (PD), although the mechanisms by which they exert their toxicity are not completely understood. Objective: We studied the mechanisms of ziram’s (a DTC fungicide) neurotoxicity in vivo. Methods: Zebrafish (ZF) embryos were utilized to determine ziram’s effects on behavior, neuronal toxicity, and the role of synuclein in its toxicity. Results: Nanomolar-range concentrations of ziram caused selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and impaired swimming behavior. Because ziram increases α-synuclein (α-syn) concentrations in rat primary neuronal cultures, we investigated the effect of ziram on ZF γ-synuclein 1 (γ1). ZF express 3 synuclein isoforms, and ZF γ1 appears to be the closest functional homologue to α-syn. We found that recombinant ZF γ1 formed fibrils in vitro, and overexpression of ZF γ1 in ZF embryos led to the formation of neuronal aggregates and neurotoxicity in a manner similar to that of α-syn. Importantly, knockdown of ZF γ1 with morpholinos and disruption of oligomers with the molecular tweezer CLR01 prevented ziram’s DA toxicity. Conclusions: These data show that ziram is selectively toxic to DA neurons in vivo, and this toxicity is synuclein-dependent. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms by which pesticides may cause PD. Citation: Lulla A, Barnhill L, Bitan G, Ivanova MI, Nguyen B, O’Donnell K, Stahl MC, Yamashiro C, Klärner FG, Schrader T, Sagasti A, Bronstein JM. 2016. Neurotoxicity of the Parkinson disease-associated pesticide ziram is synuclein-dependent in zebrafish embryos. Environ Health Perspect 124:1766–1775; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP141 PMID:27301718

  11. Association of Parkinson disease-related protein PINK1 with Alzheimer disease and multiple sclerosis brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmus, Micha M M; van der Pol, Susanne M A; Jansen, Quentin; Witte, Maarten E; van der Valk, Paul; Rozemuller, Annemieke J M; Drukarch, Benjamin; de Vries, Helga E; Van Horssen, Jack

    2011-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are hallmarks of various neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer disease (AD), and Parkinson disease (PD). Mutations in PINK1, a mitochondrial kinase, have been linked to the occurrence of early onset parkinsonism. Currently, various studies support the notion of a neuroprotective role for PINK1, as it protects cells from stress-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Because information about the distribution pattern of PINK1 in neurological diseases other than PD is scarce, we here investigated PINK1 expression in well-characterized brain samples derived from MS and AD individuals using immunohistochemistry. In control gray matter PINK1 immunoreactivity was observed in neurons, particularly neurons in layers IV-VI. Astrocytes were the most prominent cell type decorated by anti-PINK1 antibody in the white matter. In addition, PINK1 staining was observed in the cerebrovasculature. In AD, PINK1 was found to colocalize with classic senile plaques and vascular amyloid depositions, as well as reactive astrocytes associated with the characteristic AD lesions. Interestingly, PINK1 was absent from neurofibrillary tangles. In active demyelinating MS lesions we observed a marked astrocytic PINK1 immunostaining, whereas astrocytes in chronic lesions were weakly stained. Taken together, we observed PINK1 immunostaining in both AD and MS lesions, predominantly in reactive astrocytes associated with these lesions, suggesting that the increase in astrocytic PINK1 protein might be an intrinsic protective mechanism to limit cellular injury. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thiazolidinediones and Parkinson Disease: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Connolly, John G; Bykov, Katsiaryna; Gagne, Joshua J

    2015-12-01

    Thiazolidinediones, a class of medications indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, reduce inflammation and have been shown to provide a therapeutic benefit in animal models of Parkinson disease. We examined the association between treatment with thiazolidinediones and the onset of Parkinson disease in older individuals. We performed a cohort study of 29,397 Medicare patients enrolled in state pharmaceutical benefits programs who initiated treatment with thiazolidinediones or sulfonylureas during the years 1997 through 2005 and had no prior diagnosis of Parkinson disease. New users of thiazolidinediones were propensity score matched to new users of sulfonylureas and followed to determine whether they were diagnosed with Parkinson disease. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compare time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease in the propensity score-matched populations. To assess the association with duration of use, we performed several analyses that required longer continuous use of medications. In the primary analysis, thiazolidinedione users had a hazard ratio for a diagnosis of Parkinson disease of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 0.71, 1.66) when compared with sulfonylurea users. Increasing the duration-of-use requirements to 10 months did not substantially change the association; the hazard ratios ranged from 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.49, 2.05) to 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 0.60, 2.25). Thiazolidinedione use was not associated with a longer time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease than was sulfonylurea use, regardless of duration of exposure.

  13. The neuromythology of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Calne, Donald B; Mizuno, Yoshikuni

    2004-07-01

    Over the last century three central points have become the orthodox dogma accepted and taught by those who study Parkinson's Disease. These are: Parkinson's Disease is one disease. Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra are an acceptable hallmark of Parkinson's Disease. Lewy bodies are responsible for the death of nigral neurons in Parkinson's Disease. Each of these tenets now present difficulties, and we are beginning to enter an era in which we must look critically at the current evidence to decide whether each dictum can be sustained.

  14. Hallucinations in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; Fénelon, Gilles; Stebbins, Glenn; Goetz, Christopher G

    2009-06-01

    Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) can experience hallucinations (spontaneous aberrant perceptions) and illusions (misinterpretations of real perceptual stimuli). Of such phenomena, visual hallucinations (VHs) and illusions are the most frequently encountered, although auditory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations can also occur. In cross-sectional studies, VHs occur in approximately one-third of patients, but up to three-quarters of patients might develop VHs during a 20-year period. Hallucinations can have substantial psychosocial effects and, historically, were the main reason for placing patients in nursing homes. Concomitant or overlapping mechanisms are probably active during VHs, and these include the following: central dopaminergic overactivity and an imbalance with cholinergic neurotransmission; dysfunction of the visual pathways, including specific PD-associated retinopathy and functional alterations of the extrastriate visual pathways; alterations of brainstem sleep-wake and dream regulation; and impaired attentional focus. Possible treatments include patient-initiated coping strategies, a reduction of antiparkinson medications, atypical neuroleptics and, potentially, cholinesterase inhibitors. Evidence-based studies, however, only support the use of one atypical neuroleptic, clozapine, and only in patients without dementia. Better phenomenological discrimination, combined with neuroimaging tools, should refine therapeutic options and improve prognosis. The aim of this Review is to present epidemiological, phenomenological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of hallucinations in PD.

  15. Familial associations of Alzheimer disease and essential tremor with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Costello, S; Bordelon, Y; Bronstein, J; Ritz, B

    2010-06-01

    We constructed a cohort of first-degree relatives of participants in a population-based case-control study of Parkinson disease (PD) and compared the occurrence of Alzheimer disease (AD) and essential tremor (ET) in relatives of PD cases and controls. We relied on proband interviews to assess family history in 372 probands with incident PD confirmed by a movement disorder specialist and 404 controls from three rural California counties. Overall, for the 2980 first-degree relatives of PD cases, the risk of AD was not increased compared with the 2981 relatives of controls. But relatives of younger onset PD cases (

  16. Progression of Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seminars Parkinson's News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  17. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seminars Parkinson's News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  18. Association between MAPT haplotype and memory function in patients with Parkinson's disease and healthy aging individuals.

    PubMed

    Winder-Rhodes, Sophie E; Hampshire, Adam; Rowe, James B; Peelle, Jonathan E; Robbins, Trevor W; Owen, Adrian M; Barker, Roger A

    2015-03-01

    Genetic variation is associated with differences in the function of the brain as well as its susceptibility to disease. The common H1 haplotypic variant of the microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) has been related to an increased risk for Parkinson's disease (PD). Furthermore, among PD patients, H1 homozygotes have an accelerated progression to dementia. We investigated the neurocognitive correlates of MAPT haplotypes using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Thirty-seven nondemented patients with PD (19 H1/H1, 18 H2 carriers) and 40 age-matched controls (21 H1/H1, 19 H2 carriers) were scanned during performance of a picture memory encoding task. Behaviorally, H1 homozygosity was associated with impaired picture recognition memory in PD patients and control subjects. These impairments in the H1 homozygotes were accompanied by an altered blood-oxygen level-dependent response in the medial temporal lobe during successful memory encoding. Additional age-related differences in blood-oxygen level-dependent response were observed in the medial temporal lobes of H1 homozygotes with PD. These results suggest that common variation in MAPT is not only associated with the dementia of PD but also differences in the neural circuitry underlying aspects of cognition in normal aging.

  19. Association of LRRK2 exonic variants with susceptibility to Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ross, Owen A; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Heckman, Michael G; Aasly, Jan O; Abahuni, Nadine; Annesi, Grazia; Bacon, Justin A; Bardien, Soraya; Bozi, Maria; Brice, Alexis; Brighina, Laura; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Carr, Jonathan; Chartier-Harlin, Marie-Christine; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Dickson, Dennis W; Diehl, Nancy N; Elbaz, Alexis; Ferrarese, Carlo; Ferraris, Alessandro; Fiske, Brian; Gibson, J Mark; Gibson, Rachel; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Hattori, Nobutaka; Ioannidis, John P A; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Jeon, Beom S; Kim, Yun Joong; Klein, Christine; Kruger, Rejko; Kyratzi, Elli; Lesage, Suzanne; Lin, Chin-Hsien; Lynch, Timothy; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Mellick, George D; Mutez, Eugénie; Nilsson, Christer; Opala, Grzegorz; Park, Sung Sup; Puschmann, Andreas; Quattrone, Aldo; Sharma, Manu; Silburn, Peter A; Sohn, Young Ho; Stefanis, Leonidas; Tadic, Vera; Theuns, Jessie; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Uitti, Ryan J; Valente, Enza Maria; van de Loo, Simone; Vassilatis, Demetrios K; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; White, Linda R; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Farrer, Matthew J

    2011-10-01

    Background The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) harbours highly penetrant mutations that are linked to familial parkinsonism. However, the extent of its polymorphic variability in relation to risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been assessed systematically. We therefore assessed the frequency of LRRK2 exonic variants in individuals with and without PD, to investigate the role of the variants in PD susceptibility. LRRK2 was genotyped in patients with PD and controls from three series (white, Asian, and Arab-Berber) from sites participating in the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium. Genotyping was done for exonic variants of LRRK2 that were identified through searches of literature and the personal communications of consortium members. Associations with PD were assessed by use of logistic regression models. For variants that had a minor allele frequency of 0·5% or greater, single variant associations were assessed, whereas for rarer variants information was collapsed across variants. 121 exonic LRRK2 variants were assessed in 15 540 individuals: 6995 white patients with PD and 5595 controls, 1376 Asian patients and 962 controls, and 240 Arab-Berber patients and 372 controls. After exclusion of carriers of known pathogenic mutations, new independent risk associations were identified for polymorphic variants in white individuals (M1646T, odds ratio 1·43, 95% CI 1·15-1·78; p=0·0012) and Asian individuals (A419V, 2·27, 1·35-3·83; p=0·0011). A protective haplotype (N551K-R1398H-K1423K) was noted at a frequency greater than 5% in the white and Asian series, with a similar finding in the Arab-Berber series (combined odds ratio 0·82, 0·72-0·94; p=0·0043). Of the two previously reported Asian risk variants, G2385R was associated with disease (1·73, 1·20-2·49; p=0·0026), but no association was noted for R1628P (0·62, 0·36-1·07; p=0·087). In the Arab-Berber series, Y2189C showed potential evidence of risk association with

  20. Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Suttrup, Inga; Warnecke, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    More than 80 % of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop dysphagia during the course of their disease. Swallowing impairment reduces quality of life, complicates medication intake and leads to malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. Although the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood, it has been shown that dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the development of dysphagia in PD. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in PD patients is challenging and often delivers unreliable results. A modified water test assessing maximum swallowing volume is recommended to uncover oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD. PD-specific questionnaires may also be useful to identify patients at risk for swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and videofluoroscopic swallowing study are both considered to be the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. In addition, high-resolution manometry may be a helpful tool. These instrumental methods allow a reliable detection of aspiration events. Furthermore, typical patterns of impairment during the oral, pharyngeal and/or esophageal swallowing phase of PD patients can be identified. Therapy of dysphagia in PD consists of pharmacological interventions and swallowing treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs). Fluctuating dysphagia with deterioration during the off-state should be treated by optimizing dopaminergic medication. The methods used during swallowing treatment by SLTs shall be selected according to the individual dysphagia pattern of each PD patient. A promising novel method is an intensive training of expiratory muscle strength. Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinical relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. The goal of this review is giving an overview on current stages of epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of PD-associated dysphagia, which might be helpful for neurologists

  1. Paraquat and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Berry, C; La Vecchia, C; Nicotera, P

    2010-07-01

    As evidence emerges that complex gene alterations are involved in the onset of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of environmental chemicals in the pathogenesis of this disease becomes intensely debated. Although it is undisputed that acute exposure to certain chemicals such as 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) is sufficient to cause human parkinsonism, the evidence that the risk for PD increases because of environmental exposure is generally weaker. Several studies have suggested that pesticide exposure and life in rural areas are significant risks factors for PD. Among other pesticides, paraquat (PQ) has been linked to PD by epidemiological studies and experimental work in rodents, in which it causes lesions in the substantia nigra, pars compacta. However, the evidence that human exposure to the chemical results in an increased risk for PD is rather limited and based on insufficient epidemiological data. This review critically analyses the evidence that implicates PQ in parkinsonism and discusses the limitations of chemical modelling of PD.

  2. Inverse association between yerba mate consumption and idiopathic Parkinson's disease. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Emilia Mabel; Melcon, Carlos; Parisi, Virginia L; Bartoloni, Leonardo; Gonzalez, Claudio D

    2015-09-15

    Yerba mate tea is a very common beverage in some countries of South America. We conducted a case-control study on an individual basis using hospital records to investigate the association between Parkinson's disease (PD) and yerba mate intake. A case was defined as an age of ≥ 40 years with ≥ 1 year of PD. Each case was individually matched by two controls. Exposure was measured by yerba mate consumption, coffee, tea, and alcohol intake and smoking status. The sample consisted of 223 PD patients (mean age 68 years and mean disease duration 7.3 years) and 406 controls. There was an inverse association between yerba mate "bombilla" consumption and PD (OR 0.64, 95% CI: 0.54-0.76, p=0.00001). A multivariate analysis with a logistic regression adjusted by sex, alcohol intake and smoking provided the following results: yerba mate (OR 0.63, 95% CI: 0.53-0.76), tea (OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.42-0.86), coffee (OR 0.51, 95% CI: 0.35-0.73). We found an inverse association between yerba mate consumption and PD. These results led us to hypothesize that yerba mate may have a potential protective role in the development of PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Systematic review of factors associated with depression and anxiety disorders among older adults with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sagna, Atami; Gallo, Joseph J; Pontone, Gregory M

    2014-07-01

    Depression and anxiety disorders have a substantial impact on the quality of life, the functioning and mortality of older adults with Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the factors associated with the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders among individuals with PD aged 60 years and older. Following a literature search in PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and EMBASE, 5 articles met the inclusion criteria (adults aged 60 years and older, individuals with PD, and with depression and anxiety disorders, and English-language peer reviewed articles) and were included in this review. These studies were conducted in the U.S (n = 3), in Italy (n = 1) and the U.K (n = 1). Findings indicated that autonomic symptoms, motor fluctuations, severity and frequency of symptoms, staging of the disease, and PD onset and duration were associated with the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders among older adults suffering from PD. Despite the limited number of studies included in the review, depression and anxiety disorders are often unrecognized and untreated and the comorbidity greatly exacerbates PD symptoms. The identification of factors associated with the development of depression and anxiety disorders could help in designing preventive interventions that would decrease the risk and burden of depression and anxiety disorders among older adults with PD.

  4. Synaptotagmin XI in Parkinson's disease: New evidence from an association study in Spain and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sesar, Angel; Cacheiro, Pilar; López-López, Marisol; Camiña-Tato, Montserrat; Quintáns, Beatriz; Monroy-Jaramillo, Nancy; Alonso-Vilatela, María-Elisa; Cebrián, Ernesto; Yescas-Gómez, Petra; Ares, Begoña; Rivas, María-Teresa; Castro, Alfonso; Carracedo, Angel; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2016-03-15

    The pathophysiology of PD (Parkinson's disease) has been related to the ubiquitin proteasome system and oxidative stress. Parkin acts as ubiquitin ligase on several substrates. Because genetic variants often have different frequencies across populations, population specific analyses are necessary to complement and validate results from genome-wide association studies. We carried out an association study with genes coding for parkin substrates and cellular stress components in the Galician population (Northern Spain). SNCA and MAPT SNPs were also analyzed. We studied 75 SNPs in a discovery sample of 268 PD patients and 265 controls from Galicia. A replication sample of 271 patients and 260 controls was recruited from Mexico City. We observed significant association between PD and SNPs in MAPT. Nominal p-values<0.05 were obtained in the Galician cohort for SNPs in SYT11, coding for synaptotagmin XI. These results were replicated in the Mexican sample. The associated markers lie within a ~140kb strong linkage disequilibrium segment that harbors several candidate genes, including SYT11. SNPs from the GBA-SYT11-RAB25 region have been previously associated with PD, however the functionally relevant variants remain unknown. Our data support a likely role of genetic factors within 1q22 in PD susceptibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impaired Finger Dexterity in Parkinson's Disease Is Associated with Praxis Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanbellingen, T.; Kersten, B.; Bellion, M.; Temperli, P.; Baronti, F.; Muri, R.; Bohlhalter, S.

    2011-01-01

    A controversial concept suggests that impaired finger dexterity in Parkinson's disease may be related to limb kinetic apraxia that is not explained by elemental motor deficits such as bradykinesia. To explore the nature of dexterous difficulties, the aim of the present study was to assess the relationship of finger dexterity with ideomotor praxis…

  6. Impaired Finger Dexterity in Parkinson's Disease Is Associated with Praxis Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanbellingen, T.; Kersten, B.; Bellion, M.; Temperli, P.; Baronti, F.; Muri, R.; Bohlhalter, S.

    2011-01-01

    A controversial concept suggests that impaired finger dexterity in Parkinson's disease may be related to limb kinetic apraxia that is not explained by elemental motor deficits such as bradykinesia. To explore the nature of dexterous difficulties, the aim of the present study was to assess the relationship of finger dexterity with ideomotor praxis…

  7. Abnormal corticomuscular coherence is associated with the small amplitude cortical myoclonus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Caviness, John N; Adler, Charles H; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Connor, Donald J; Hernandez, Jose L; Lagerlund, Terrence D

    2003-10-01

    Coherence is the degree of time-locked correlation between two signals as a function of frequency. The purpose of this study was to test the following hypotheses: (1) corticomuscular coherence is abnormally increased in those Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with small amplitude cortical myoclonus, and (2) corticomuscular coherence peaks around the time of the myoclonus electromyographic (EMG) discharge. We studied Parkinson's disease patients with and without myoclonus and controls. The data were digitally collected and processed off-line with EMG rectification, creation of 511-msec epochs, Fast-Fourier transform, and coherence analysis. In the 12 to 30 Hz frequency band, but not at 30 to 60 Hz or above, coherence peaks were observed in the PD subjects with myoclonus that were significantly greater than in the control subjects (P < 0.001) and in PD subjects without myoclonus (P < 0.001). The abnormal coherence values are evidence for abnormal rhythmic activity in cortical motor areas in those Parkinson's disease patients with myoclonus. In combination with previous findings on back-averaging, our results show that this myoclonus occurs when neuronal populations are driven to an extreme amount of synchronous activity with higher corticomuscular coherence values. These results have mechanistic implications for cortical dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and for cortical myoclonus in general.

  8. [Clinical and psychopathological factors associated with impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Sáez-Francàs, N; Martí Andrés, G; Ramírez, N; de Fàbregues, O; Álvarez-Sabín, J; Casas, M; Hernández-Vara, J

    2016-05-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICD) constitute a complication that may arise during the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). Several factors have been linked to the development of these disorders, and their associated severe functional impairment requires specific and multidisciplinary management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of ICDs and the clinical and psychopathological factors associated with the appearance of these disorders. Cross-sectional, descriptive, and analytical study of a sample of 115 PD patients evaluated to determine the presence of an ICD. Clinical scales were administered to assess disease severity, personality traits, and presence of psychiatric symptoms at the time of evaluation. Of the 115 patients with PD, 27 (23.48%) displayed some form of ICD; hypersexuality, exhibited by 14 (12.2%), and binge eating, present in 12 (10.1%), were the most common types. Clinical factors associated with ICD were treatment with dopamine agonists (OR: 13.39), earlier age at disease onset (OR: 0.92), and higher score on the UPDRS-I subscale; psychopathological factors with a significant association were trait anxiety (OR: 1.05) and impulsivity (OR: 1.13). ICDs are frequent in PD, and treatment with dopamine agonists is the most important risk factor for these disorders. High impulsivity and anxiety levels at time of evaluation, and younger age at disease onset, were also linked to increased risk. However, presence of these personality traits prior to evaluation did not increase risk of ICD. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. In patient's with Parkinson disease, autonomic symptoms are frequent and associated with other non-motor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Arnao, Valentina; Cinturino, Antonio; Valentino, Francesca; Perini, Valentina; Mastrilli, Sergio; Bellavia, Gabriele; Savettieri, Giovanni; Realmuto, Sabrina; D'Amelio, Marco

    2015-10-01

    Autonomic symptoms and sleep disorders are common non-motor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD), which are correlated with poor quality of life for patients. To assess the frequency of autonomic symptoms in a consecutive series of PD patients and to correlate them with other motor and non-motor symptoms. All consecutive non-demented PD patients who underwent an extensive evaluation including Hoehn and Yahr staging, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Beck's Depression Inventory, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, PDQ-39 Scale, the Parkinson's diseases Sleep Scale, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and SCOPA-AUT scale were enrolled. Comorbidity has been also considered. Supine to standing position blood pressure and cardiac frequency changes were also measured. 135 PD patients were included (mean age at interview 67.7; mean disease duration: 5.3 years). Patients were stratified according to mean SCOPA-AUT scale score (13.1). Those with higher SCOPA-AUT scale score were significantly older, had longer disease duration, worse disease stage, worse quality of sleep, were more severely affected, and were also taking a higher dosage of levodopa. At multivariate analysis, older age, longer disease duration, and worse quality of sleep were independently associated with higher SCOPA-AUT scale scores. Our results remark the role of autonomic symptoms in PD. In our patient population, characterized by mild to moderate disease severity, most of the patients complained of autonomic nervous system involvement (84%). A significant association between autonomic symptoms and sleep disorders was also observed.

  10. A Review of the Association Between Parkinson Disease and Malignant Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Disse, Max; Reich, Hilary; Lee, Peter K; Schram, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    An association between melanoma and Parkinson disease (PD) has been hinted at in the neurology and oncology literature since the 1970s after the initiation of levodopa (L-DOPA) therapy for PD. Given that L-DOPA is a substrate in melanin synthesis, there existed a concern that this therapy might cause melanoma. The objective was to research possible etiological links to explain the connection between PD and melanoma. A PubMed and Google Scholar literature search was performed using access provided by the University of Minnesota biomedical library. Patients with PD have an overall decreased risk of cancer diagnoses. However, breast cancer and melanoma have an uncharacteristically high rate of co-occurrence with PD. Family history of melanoma and lighter hair and skin color confer a higher risk of developing PD, and having a first-degree relative with either disease conveys a significantly increased risk of developing the other. Other possible connections that have been explored include pigmentation genes in neural-derived cells, pesticides, MC1R polymorphisms, and abnormal cellular autophagy. Although a link between PD and melanoma exists, the etiology of this link continues to be elusive. Both PD and melanoma are likely multifactorial diseases involving genetic and environmental risk factors.

  11. Association of MTHFR, MTR, and MTRR polymorphisms with Parkinson's disease among ethnic Chinese in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chin-Shih; Shyu, Hann-Yeh; Shieh, Jia-Ching; Fu, Yi-Ping; Chin, Ting-Yu; Wang, Hsiao-Wei; Cheng, Chun-Wen

    2011-01-30

    Influence of folate/homocysteine conversion is considered to be important in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, association of the folate metabolic pathway gene polymorphisms with PD susceptibility remains unclear. To test this possibility in PD, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study constituting 211 patients and 218 age- and sex-matched controls of ethnic Chinese in Taiwan. Genotyping assay was performed to screen for polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T), methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (MTR A2756G), and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase reductase (MTRR A1049G and C1783T) genes and assess the association between these genotype polymorphisms and PD risk using logistic regression analysis. Of these four non-synonymous polymorphisms, the MTRR 1049GG variant was significantly associated with PD susceptibility (OR=3.17, 95%CI=1.08-9.35). Furthermore, we stratified our patients based on the MTHFR 677TT genotype in different strata, a significant association between the joint effect of polymorphisms and PD risk was observed in those patients whose genotypes were MTRR A1049G/MTR A2756G or MTRR C1783T/MTR A2756G (P<0.05). Our findings provide support for the synergistic effects of polymorphisms in the folate metabolic pathway genes in PD susceptibility; the increased PD risk would be more significant in carriers with the polymorphisms of MTHFR, MTR, and MTRR genes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuemei; Chen, Honglei; Miller, William C; Mailman, Richard B; Woodard, Jennifer L; Chen, Peter C; Xiang, Dong; Murrow, Richard W; Wang, Yi-Zhe; Poole, Charles

    2007-02-15

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon2 allele has been associated with both Parkinson's disease (PD) and lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). We tested the hypothesis that lower LDL-C may be associated with PD. This case-control study used fasting lipid profiles obtained from 124 PD cases and 112 controls. The PD cases were recruited from consecutive cases presenting at our tertiary Movement Disorder Clinic, and the controls were recruited from the spouse populations of the same clinic. Multivariate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from unconditional logistic regressions, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and use of cholesterol-lowering agents. Lower LDL-C concentrations were associated with a higher occurrence of PD. Compared with participants with the highest LDL-C (> or =138 mg/dL), the OR was 2.2 (95% CI = 0.9-5.1) for participants with LDL-C of 115 to 137, 3.5 (95% CI = 1.6-8.1) for LDL-C of 93 to 114, and 2.6 (95% CI = 1.1-5.9) for LDL-C of < or = 92. Interestingly, use of either cholesterol-lowering drugs, or statins alone, was related to lower PD occurrence. Thus, our data provide preliminary evidence that low LDL-C may be associated with higher occurrence of PD, and/or that statin use may lower PD occurrence, either of which finding warrants further investigation.

  13. Association between gene polymorphism and depression in Parkinson's disease: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinhua; Yang, Xinglong; Zhao, Quanzhen; Tian, Sijia; Huang, Hongyan; Chen, Yalan; Xu, Yanming

    2017-04-15

    To investigate possible associations of Parkinson's disease (PD) with polymorphism in depression-related genes and in the alpha-synuclein (SNCA) gene. A consecutive series of patients with PD were divided into those with depression and those without it. Patients (330) were genotyped at four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genes previously associated with depression, as well as four SNPs in the PD-associated SNCA gene. Of 330 patients, 125 (37.9%) had depression and 205 (62.1%) did not. Univariate analysis revealed significant differences between the two groups in minor allele frequency at the SNP rs1545843 in the SLC6A15 gene (p<0.05), as well as in frequencies of genotypes and minor alleles at rs78162420 in the TPH2 gene (all p<0.05). Logistic regression identified the following risk factors for depression among patients with PD: Hoehn and Yahr stage>2 (OR 1.759, 95%CI 1.035-2.989, p=0.037), AA genotype at rs1545843 (OR 1.866, 95%CI 1.017-3.426, p=0.044), and AC genotype at rs78162420 (OR 5.036, 95%CI 1.451-17.484, p=0.011). Among patients with PD, depression is associated with polymorphism at rs78162420 and rs1545843, both previously linked with depression. Our results may help clarify the pathogenesis of depression in PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Life satisfaction and associated factors in persons with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Lina; Brogårdh, Christina; Jacobsson, Lars; Lexell, Jan

    2016-06-23

    Life satisfaction (LS) is an overall goal in the long-term management and rehabilitation of persons with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, very little is known about LS in persons with PD and no study has examined factors associated with their LS. To describe LS in persons with mild to moderate PD and to evaluate the association with gender, age, years since diagnosis, and sense of coherence, perceived participation, and mental and emotional status. Eighty persons with mild to moderate PD (46 men and 34 women, mean age 70.1 years, mean time since diagnosis 7.4 years) responded to a postal survey with the Swedish versions of the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), the Sense of Coherence scale (SOC-13), the Reintegration to Normal Living Index (RNLI) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-20). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to evaluate the association with LS. The mean SWLS total score was 21.8 points, and 45% rated themselves as satisfied to highly satisfied with their lives. SOC and years since diagnosis explained 36% of the variance, where a strong SOC, indicating a person's capacity to adapt to the overall strains of the disease, showed the strongest association with a high LS. Persons with mild to moderate PD seem to be generally satisfied with their lives but LS may decrease as the disease progresses. The strong association with SOC implies that LS may increase through rehabilitation that support persons with PD to understand and confront the nature of problems arising in their lives as a result of their PD.

  15. Hypothalamic volume loss is associated with reduced melatonin output in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nombela, Cristina; Vuono, Romina; Jones, P. Simon; Fisher, Kate; Burn, David J.; Brooks, David J.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.; Rowe, James B.; Barker, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Recent studies have suggested that melatonin—a hormone produced by the pineal gland under circadian control—contributes to PD‐related sleep dysfunction. We hypothesized that degenerative changes to the neural structures controlling pineal function (especially the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the anterior hypothalamus) may be responsible for reduced melatonin output in these patients. We compared hypothalamic volumes in PD patients with matched controls and determined whether volume loss correlated with reduced melatonin output in the PD group. Methods A total of 12 PD patients and 12 matched controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging to determine hypothalamic volume. In addition, PD patients underwent 24‐hour blood sampling in a controlled environment to determine serum melatonin concentrations using enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assays. Results PD patients had significantly reduced hypothalamic gray matter volume when compared with matched controls. Melatonin levels were significantly associated with hypothalamic gray matter volume and disease severity in PD patients. Conclusion Melatonin levels are associated with hypothalamic gray matter volume loss and disease severity in PD patients. This provides anatomical and physiological support for an intrinsic sleep and circadian phenotype in PD. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:26971528

  16. Association of body mass index and the depletion of nigrostriatal dopamine in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Jung; Oh, Jungsu S; Ham, Jee H; Lee, Dong H; Lee, Injoo; Sohn, Young H; Kim, Jae S; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2016-02-01

    Several antecedent studies had reported close relationship between low body weight and Parkinson's disease (PD). However, there have been few investigations about the role of body weight to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration. This study enrolled 398 de novo patients with PD whom underwent [18F] N-(3-Fluoropropyl)-2β-carbon ethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane positron emission tomography scan and body mass index (BMI) measurement. The relationships between BMI and dopamine transporter (DAT) activity were analyzed using linear regression analysis. A multivariate analysis adjusted for age, gender, disease duration, smoking status, coffee and tea consumption, and residence area revealed that BMI remained independently and significantly associated with DAT activity in all striatal subregions. Moreover, multiple logistic regression analyses showed that BMI was a significant predictor for the lowest quartile of DAT activity in the anterior putamen, ventral striatum, caudate nucleus, and total striatum. The present findings suggest that a low BMI might be closely associated with low density of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in PD, which could support the evidence for the role of low body weight to PD-related pathologies.

  17. Factors associated with cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease: an urban study.

    PubMed

    Rosdinom, R; Fazli, A; Ruzyanei, N J Nik; Azlin, B; Srijit, D

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer disease. Besides motor presentations, cognitive impairment is among the other likely complications as the illness progresses. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of cognitive impairment in PD and the factors associated with the cognitive impairment. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on all PD patients at different stages of their illness, in two major tertiary hospitals in Malaysia with their caregivers, over a three month period in 2002. Patients' cognitive functions were tested using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Important sociodemographic data and relevant clinical information of the patients as well as caregivers' information on income, duration of care-giving, relationship with the patient, and other relevant variables were gathered. Patients' level of functioning was assessed using the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) index. Staging of illness was done based on the Hoehn and Yahr Scale. Out of 115 eligible patients, 35% were in the 60-69 age group with 57% in stage 2 of illness, A total of 29% of patients experienced various degrees of cognitive impairment , with almost half (47%) in the stage 3 and 4 exhibiting MMSE scores <24. Factors which were significantly associated with impaired cognitions were race, educational level and stage of illness. Cognitive impairment was fairly common in PD and the severity of impairment in cognition and physical functioning increased with the advancement of the illness.

  18. Protective glove use and hygiene habits modify the associations of specific pesticides with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Melissa; Tanner, Caroline M; Goldman, Samuel M; Bhudhikanok, Grace S; Blair, Aaron; Chade, Anabel; Comyns, Kathleen; Hoppin, Jane A; Kasten, Meike; Korell, Monica; Langston, J William; Marras, Connie; Meng, Cheryl; Richards, Marie; Ross, G Webster; Umbach, David M; Sandler, Dale P; Kamel, Freya

    2015-02-01

    Pesticides have been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), and protective gloves and workplace hygiene can reduce pesticide exposure. We assessed whether use of gloves and workplace hygiene modified associations between pesticides and PD. The Farming and Movement Evaluation (FAME) study is a nested case-control study within the Agricultural Health Study. Use of protective gloves, other PPE, and hygiene practices were determined by questionnaire (69 cases and 237 controls were included). We considered interactions of gloves and hygiene with ever-use of pesticides for all pesticides with ≥5 exposed and unexposed cases and controls in each glove-use stratum (paraquat, permethrin, rotenone, and trifluralin). 61% of respondents consistently used protective gloves and 87% consistently used ≥2 hygiene practices. Protective glove use modified the associations of paraquat and permethrin with PD: neither pesticide was associated with PD among protective glove users, while both pesticides were associated with PD among non-users (paraquat OR 3.9 [95% CI 1.3, 11.7], interaction p=0.15; permethrin OR 4.3 [95% CI 1.2, 15.6] interaction p=0.05). Rotenone was associated with PD regardless of glove use. Trifluralin was associated with PD among participants who used <2 hygiene practices (OR 5.5 [95% CI 1.1, 27.1]) but was not associated with PD among participants who used 2 or more practices (interaction p=0.02). Although sample size was limited in the FAME study, protective glove use and hygiene practices appeared to be important modifiers of the association between pesticides and PD and may reduce risk of PD associated with certain pesticides.

  19. [Neuropsychologic evaluation in Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Allegri, R F; Ranalli, C G; de Daras, A; Fascetto, V; Gallegos, M; Scarlatti, A; Tamaroff, L

    1992-01-01

    For decades Parkinson's disease has been considered to be limited to disturbed motor functions and its association with a cognitive deterioration is very recent. The frequency of cognitive decline varies according to the authors between 3% and 93% depending on the different criteria of evaluation. Owing to the discrepancy among the previous studies our object has been to determine the existence of cognitive changes of statistical significance, since even nowadays the relation between neuropsychology and physiopathology has been misunderstood. A total of 50 patients between 52 and 85 years old with Parkinson's disease have been neurological and neuropsychologically evaluated and the results correlated with 50 healthy controls. Patients, who presented clinical signs of demence according to the criteria of DSM III or any other neurological or general disease were excluded because of possible side effects on the motor cognitive phase. For the neuropsychological study Signoret's Battery of Cognitive Efficiency test (BEC 96) was used, it evaluates: the attention, orientation, thinking, memory, recognition, serial learning, fluency, naming and constructional functions. It was observed that all the patients with Parkinson's disease performed these tests worse than the controls, except for attention. From the statistical point of view the differences are highly significant (p < 0.001) for serial learning and constructional tests and significant (p < 0.05) for orientation, thinking fluency and naming. In the area of mnesic functions the patients with Parkinson's disease show an alteration that predominates significantly on serial learning, however, it is less important for logical memory. All the alterations correspond to the long term memory.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. [Neurochemistry of Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism plus].

    PubMed

    Pascual, J; Misiego, M

    1997-08-01

    The neurochemistry of Parkinson's disease and other degenerative parkinsonisms is reviewed, emphasizing the changes described in the dopaminergic system. Presynaptic dopaminergic markers are reduced over the striatum in all these degenerative parkinsonisms, dopamine receptor changes being more heterogeneous. While in Parkinson's disease D1 and D2 receptors remain preserved as compared to controls, in progressive supranuclear palsy there is a loss of nigral D1 receptors and of striatal D2 receptors. This finding has also been described in striatonigral degeneration. There are no clear data about the status of D3, D4 and D5 dopamine receptors in these conditions. The alterations in other neurotransmission systems, cholinegic, adrenergic, serotoninergic and peptidergic are, in general, less dramatic, although they have not been studied in detail. To conclude, further studies are necessary in these field, in these moment, however, the preservation of striatal D2 dopamine receptors is the neurochemical finding with the best correlation with the response to levodopa or other dopaminergic agonists.

  1. The association between alterations of eye movement control and cerebral intrinsic functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gorges, Martin; Müller, Hans-Peter; Lulé, Dorothée; Pinkhardt, Elmar H; Ludolph, Albert C; Kassubek, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) present with eye movement disturbances that accompany the cardinal motor symptoms. Previous studies have consistently found evidence that large-scale functional networks are critically involved in eye movement control. We challenged the hypothesis that altered eye movement control in patients with PD is closely related to alterations of whole-brain functional connectivity in association with the neurodegenerative process. Saccadic and pursuit eye movements by video-oculography and 'resting-state' functional MRI (3 Tesla) were recorded from 53 subjects, i.e. 31 patients with PD and 22 matched healthy controls. Video-oculographically, a broad spectrum of eye movement impairments was demonstrated in PD patients vs. controls, including interrupted smooth pursuit, hypometric saccades, and a high distractibility in anti-saccades. Significant correlations between altered oculomotor parameters and functional connectivity measures were observed, i.e. the worse the oculomotor performance was, the more the regional functional connectivity in cortical, limbic, thalamic, cerebellar, and brainstem areas was decreased. Remarkably, decreased connectivity between major nodes of the default mode network was tightly correlated with the prevalence of saccadic intrusions as a measure for distractability. In conclusion, dysfunctional eye movement control in PD seems to be primarily associated with (cortical) executive deficits, rather than being related to the ponto-cerebellar circuits or the oculomotor brainstem nuclei. Worsened eye movement performance together with the potential pathophysiological substrate of decreased intrinsic functional connectivity in predominantly oculomotor-associated cerebral functional networks may constitute a behavioral marker in PD.

  2. Association between nocturnal/supine hypertension and restless legs syndrome in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yoon-Sang; Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, In-Seok; Song, In-Uk; Son, Young-Min; Park, Jeong-Wook; Yang, Dong-Won; Kim, Hee-Tae; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2014-09-15

    Autonomic disturbances and sleep problems are common non-motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension (SH), and nocturnal hypertension (NH) are inter-related in patients with PD. These abnormalities might be associated with restless legs syndrome (RLS), which occurs predominantly at rest or during sleep. Few reports have suggested an association between circadian blood pressure disturbances and RLS in the general population. We evaluated the relationship between neurocardiovascular blood pressure alterations and RLS in patients with early PD. A total of 225 patients, newly diagnosed with PD, were included in the study. RLS was diagnosed by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group's diagnostic criteria. Orthostatic vital signs and ambulatory 24-h blood pressure were monitored and recorded. Thirty-six (16.0%) participating patients had RLS. SH and NH were more frequent in the PD+RLS group than in the group without RLS. Supine blood pressure, orthostatic decline in blood pressure, nighttime blood pressure, and the standard deviation of systolic blood pressure were significantly higher in the PD+RLS group than in the group without RLS. RLS is related to nocturnal/supine hypertension and blood pressure fluctuations, suggesting a neuropathological association between autonomic and sleep dysfunctions in patients with PD. RLS may be a determinant of neurocirculatory abnormalities. Detecting and effectively treating RLS might slow the rate of pressure-related neurocardiovascular damage in dysautonomic patients with PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of Parkinson Disease with Structural and Regulatory Variants in the HLA Region

    PubMed Central

    Wissemann, William T.; Hill-Burns, Erin M.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Factor, Stewart A.; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos; Hoglund, Bryan; Holcomb, Cherie; Donahue, Ryan J.; Thomson, Glenys; Erlich, Henry; Payami, Haydeh

    2013-01-01

    Historically, association of disease with the major histocompatibility complex (HLA) genes has been tested with HLA alleles that encode antigen-binding affinity. The association with Parkinson disease (PD), however, was discovered with noncoding SNPs in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). We show here that several HLA-region SNPs that have since been associated with PD form two blocks tagged by rs3129882 (p = 9 × 10−11) and by rs9268515 and/or rs2395163 (p = 3 × 10−11). We investigated whether these SNP-associations were driven by HLA-alleles at adjacent loci. We imputed class I and class II HLA-alleles for 2000 PD cases and 1986 controls from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium GWAS and sequenced a subset of 194 cases and 204 controls. We were therefore able to assess accuracy of two imputation algorithms against next-generation-sequencing while taking advantage of the larger imputed data sets for disease study. Additionally, we imputed HLA alleles for 843 cases and 856 controls from another GWAS for replication. PD risk was positively associated with the B∗07:02_C∗07:02_DRB5∗01_DRB1∗15:01_DQA1∗01:02_DQB1∗06:02 haplotype and negatively associated with the C∗03:04, DRB1∗04:04 and DQA1∗03:01 alleles. The risk haplotype and DQA1∗03:01 lost significance when conditioned on the SNPs, but C∗03:04 (OR = 0.72, p = 8 × 10−6) and DRB1∗04:04 (OR = 0.65, p = 4 × 10−5) remained significant. Similarly, rs3129882 and the closely linked rs9268515 and rs2395163 remained significant irrespective of HLA alleles. rs3129882 and rs2395163 are expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ (9 × 10−5 ≥ PeQTL ≥ 2 × 10−79), suggesting that HLA gene expression might influence PD. Our data suggest that PD is associated with both structural and regulatory elements in HLA. Furthermore, our study demonstrates that noncoding SNPs in the HLA region can be associated with disease irrespective of HLA alleles, and that

  4. Plasma urate and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weisskopf, M G; O'Reilly, E; Chen, H; Schwarzschild, M A; Ascherio, A

    2007-09-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to dopaminergic neuron degeneration in Parkinson's disease. Urate, a potent antioxidant, could be neuroprotective. To determine whether higher plasma concentrations of urate predict a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease, the authors conducted a nested case-control study among participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a cohort comprising over 18,000 men who provided blood samples in 1993-1995. Eighty-four incident cases of Parkinson's disease were diagnosed through 2000, and each was randomly matched to two controls by year of birth, race, and time of blood collection. Rate ratios of Parkinson's disease according to quartile of uricemia were estimated by use of conditional logistic regression. The mean urate concentration was 5.7 mg/dl among cases and 6.1 mg/dl among controls (p = 0.01). After adjustment for age, smoking, and caffeine, the rate ratio of Parkinson's disease for the highest quartile of uricemia compared with the lowest was 0.43 (95% confidence interval: 0.18, 1.02; p(trend) = 0.017). This association was stronger in analyses excluding cases diagnosed within 4 years (median) from blood collection (rate ratio = 0.17, 95% confidence interval: 0.04, 0.69; p(trend) = 0.010). These results suggest that high plasma urate concentrations may decrease the risk of Parkinson's disease, and they raise the possibility that interventions to increase plasma urate may reduce the risk and delay the progression of Parkinson's disease.

  5. Association of Deep Brain Stimulation Washout Effects With Parkinson Disease Duration

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Scott E.; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Fernandez, Hubert H.; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improves symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD), including bradykinesia. When stimulation ceases abruptly, bradykinesia returns gradually. The duration of the gradual, slow washout varies across patients, and although the origin of this variability is unclear, it is hypothesized to be related to 1 or more clinical characteristics of patients. Objective To determine if a correlation exists between clinical characteristics of patients with Parkinson disease (age, age at disease onset, disease severity, disease duration, medication dose, or time since surgery) and the washout rate for bradykinesia when STN DBS is discontinued. Design Serial quantitative assessments of bradykinesia were performed during a defined period following cessation of STN DBS. Setting Academic research. Patients Twenty-four patients with Parkinson disease who underwent STN DBS were enrolled in the study. Patients were assessed while off medication (medication had been discontinued 10½ to 16½ hours before testing), and stimulator settings were unchanged for a mean (median) of 20 (14) months. Main Outcome Measures We measured bradykinesia in the dominant hand by assessing finger tapping (item 23 on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale), which was quantified using an angular velocity transducer strapped on the index finger. Finger tapping was assessed every 2 minutes for 20 seconds at a time. This was performed during a 20-minute period with DBS on (baseline period), during a 50-minute period following discontinuation of STN DBS for the dominant hand, and again during a 20-minute period after turning on the device. Results When STN DBS was turned off, an initial fast but partial loss of benefit was observed, which was followed by a further slow washout of the residual therapeutic effect. The half-life of the slow washout phase varied significantly across patients, and this variation was strongly related to disease

  6. [Neurorehabilitation in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Möller, Jens Carsten; Menig, Alexandra; Oechsner, Matthias

    2016-03-30

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease which is characterized by the cardinal symptoms akinesia, rigidity, rest tremor and postural instability. Besides PD features also a wide range of non-motor symptoms. Physical activity is recommended for all stages of PD and may hypothetically even have a positive influence on the course of the disease. Rehabilitative treatments become increasingly important in the advanced stage of the disease and include mainly physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy. Neurorehabilitation is arguably most important for the treatment of axial symptoms such as freezing, hypophonia, dysphagia, postural instability and postural disturbances that respond poorly to drug therapy. This article provides an overview of current developments in the field of neurorehabilitation in PD.

  7. Corneal nerve microstructure in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Misra, Stuti L; Kersten, Hannah M; Roxburgh, Richard H; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; McGhee, Charles N J

    2017-03-03

    Ocular surface changes and blink abnormalities are well-established in Parkinson's disease. Blink rate may be influenced by corneal sub-basal nerve density, however, this relationship has not yet been investigated in Parkinson's disease. This case-control study examined the ocular surface in patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease, including confocal microscopy of the cornea. Fifteen patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease (modified Hoehn and Yahr grade 3 or 4) and fifteen control participants were recruited. Ophthalmic assessment included slit-lamp examination, blink rate assessment, central corneal aesthesiometry and in vivo corneal confocal microscopy. The effect of disease laterality was also investigated. Of the 15 patients with Parkinson's disease, ten were male and the mean age was 65.5±8.6years. The corneal sub-basal nerve plexus density was markedly reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease (7.56±2.4mm/mm(2)) compared with controls (15.91±2.6mm/mm(2)) (p<0.0001). Corneal sensitivity did not differ significantly between the patients with Parkinson's disease (0.79±1.2mBAR) and the control group (0.26±0.35mBAR), p=0.12. Sub-basal nerve density was not significantly different between the eye ipsilateral to the side of the body with most-severe motor symptoms, and the contralateral eye. There was a significant positive correlation between ACE-R scores and sub-basal corneal nerve density (R(2)=0.66, p=0.02). This is the first study to report a significant reduction in corneal sub-basal nerve density in Parkinson's disease and demonstrate an association with cognitive dysfunction. These results provide further evidence to support the involvement of the peripheral nervous system in Parkinson's disease, previously thought to be a central nervous system disorder.

  8. Epidemiology of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrea; Gilbert, Rebecca M

    2016-11-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a common progressive neurodegenerative condition, causing both motor and non motor symptoms. Motor symptoms include stiffness, slowness, rest tremor and poor postural reflexes, whereas nonmotor symptoms include abnormalities of mood, cognition, sleep and autonomic function. Affected patients show cell loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and accumulation of aggregated alpha-synuclein into intracellular structures called Lewy bodies, within specific brain regions. The main known non modifiable risk factor is age. The neuroepidemiology of PD is complex with susceptibility genes and a number of modifiable risk factors that can increase and others that can mitigate risk and outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutational screening of PARKIN identified a 3' UTR variant (rs62637702) associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    de Mena, Lorena; Samaranch, L Luís; Coto, Eliecer; Cardo, Lucía F; Ribacoba, René; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Pastor, Pau; Wang, Li; Irigoyen, Jaione; Mata, Ignacio F; Díaz, Marta; Moris, Germán; Menéndez, Manuel; Corao, Ana I; Lorenzo, Elena; Alvarez, Victoria

    2013-06-01

    PRKN mutations have been linked to Parkinson's disease (PD). Most of the mutational screenings have focused on the coding exons. The 3' untranslated region (UTR) could also harbor functionally relevant nucleotide changes. We performed a mutational screening of PRKN in a cohort of early-onset PD patients (n = 235) from Spain. We found 16 mutations (five new): 16 patients (7 %) carried two mutations and only one mutation was found in 28 (12 %). Patients with two mutations had significantly lower mean age (30 ± 9 years) compared to patients with one (40 ± 7) or no mutation (42 ± 7). We found a total of 15 nucleotide variants (three new) in the 3' UTR region. The frequency of carriers of the rare rs62637702 G allele (*94A/G) was significantly lower among the patients compared to healthy controls (n = 418) (0.03 vs. 0.004; p < 0.001), suggesting a protective role for this allele. In order to investigate the basal effect of this variant, we performed luciferase assays. No different basal activity was observed between the two alleles. In conclusion, the rs62637702 polymorphism was associated with PD. This could be a surrogate marker for disease risk, in linkage disequilibrium with other non-identified functional variant.

  10. Neuropsychological Characteristics and Their Association with Higher-Level Functional Capacity in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kayoko; Matsui, Mie; Takashima, Shutaro; Tanaka, Kortaro

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Little is known about the relationship between cognitive functions and higher-level functional capacity (e.g. intellectual activity, social role, and social participation) in Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to clarify neuropsychological characteristics and their association with higher-level functional capacity in PD patients. Methods Participants were 31 PD patients and 23 demographically matched healthy controls. Neuropsychological tests were conducted. One year later, a questionnaire survey evaluated higher-level functional capacity in daily living. Results The PD group scored significantly lower than the control group in all cognitive domains, particularly executive function and processing. Executive function, processing speed, language, and memory were significantly correlated with higher-level functional capacity in PD patients. Stepwise regression showed that only executive function (Trail Making Test-B), together with disease severity (HY stage), predicted the higher-level functional capacity. Conclusion Our findings provide evidence of a relationship between executive function and higher-level functional capacity in patients with PD. PMID:26273243

  11. Synchronous pattern distinguishes resting tremor associated with essential tremor from rest tremor of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nisticò, R; Pirritano, D; Salsone, M; Novellino, F; Del Giudice, F; Morelli, M; Trotta, M; Bilotti, G; Condino, F; Cherubini, A; Valentino, P; Quattrone, A

    2011-01-01

    Rest tremor associated with essential tremor (ET) is a condition that poses challenges in diagnosing Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated tremor parameters in PD and ET patients with rest tremor. Fifteen patients with PD and 15 patients with ET underwent electrophysiological examination to evaluate characteristics of muscle bursting in rest postures. Rest tremor amplitude of PD patients was significantly higher than that of patients with ET (p = 0.002), whereas burst duration and frequency were significantly higher in ET than in PD group (p = 0.002, p < 0.001, respectively). Patients with PD, however, showed some overlap of these electrophysiological values with values from patients with ET. By contrast, rest tremor pattern showed no overlap between the two diseases, because all patients with ET presented a synchronous pattern whereas PD patients had an alternating pattern (p < 0.001), a finding that differentiated the patients on an individual basis. The electromyographic pattern of rest tremor may help to differentiate PD from ET.

  12. Parkinson's disease-associated mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 augment kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    West, Andrew B.; Moore, Darren J.; Biskup, Saskia; Bugayenko, Artem; Smith, Wanli W.; Ross, Christopher A.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) cause late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD) with a clinical appearance indistinguishable from idiopathic PD. Initial studies suggest that LRRK2 mutations are the most common yet identified determinant of PD susceptibility, transmitted in an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance. Herein, we characterize the LRRK2 gene and transcript in human brain and subclone the predominant ORF. Exogenously expressed LRRK2 protein migrates at ≈280 kDa and is present largely in the cytoplasm but also associates with the mitochondrial outer membrane. Familial-linked mutations G2019S or R1441C do not have an obvious effect on protein steady-state levels, turnover, or localization. However, in vitro kinase assays using full-length recombinant LRRK2 reveal an increase in activity caused by familial-linked mutations in both autophosphorylation and the phosphorylation of a generic substrate. These results suggest a gain-of-function mechanism for LRRK2-linked disease with a central role for kinase activity in the development of PD. PMID:16269541

  13. Association Between Early-Onset Parkinson Disease and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Nancy J.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Chow, Eva W. C.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Lang, Anthony E.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Clinical case reports of parkinsonism co-occurring with hemizygous 22q11.2 deletions and the associated multisystem syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), suggest that 22q11.2 deletions may lead to increased risk of early-onset Parkinson disease (PD). The frequency of PD and its neuropathological presentation remain unknown in this common genetic condition. OBJECTIVE To evaluate a possible association between 22q11.2 deletions and PD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational study of the occurrence of PD in the world’s largest cohort of well-characterized adults with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis of 22q11.2DS (n = 159 [6 with postmortem tissue]; age range, 18.1–68.6 years) was conducted in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Rare postmortem brain tissue from individuals with 22q11.2DS and a clinical history of PD was investigated for neurodegenerative changes and compared with that from individuals with no history of a movement disorder. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES A clinical diagnosis of PD made by a neurologist and neuropathological features of PD. RESULTS Adults with 22q11.2DS had a significantly elevated occurrence of PD compared with standard population estimates (standardized morbidity ratio = 69.7; 95% CI, 19.0–178.5). All cases showed early onset and typical PD symptom pattern, treatment response, and course. All were negative for family history of PD and known pathogenic PD-related mutations. The common use of antipsychotics in patients with 22q11.2DS to manage associated psychiatric symptoms delayed diagnosis of PD by up to 10 years. Postmortem brain tissue revealed classic loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in all 3 postmortem 22q11.2DS-PD cases. Typical α-synuclein–positive Lewy bodies were present in the expected distribution in 2 cases but absent in another. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings suggest that 22q11.2 deletions represent a novel genetic risk factor for early-onset PD with variable neuropathological

  14. Subcortical atrophy is associated with cognitive impairment in mild Parkinson disease: a combined investigation of volumetric changes, cortical thickness, and vertex-based shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Mak, E; Bergsland, N; Dwyer, M G; Zivadinov, R; Kandiah, N

    2014-12-01

    The involvement of subcortical deep gray matter and cortical thinning associated with mild Parkinson disease remains poorly understood. We assessed cortical thickness and subcortical volumes in patients with Parkinson disease without dementia and evaluated their associations with cognitive dysfunction. The study included 90 patients with mild Parkinson disease without dementia. Neuropsychological assessments classified the sample into patients with mild cognitive impairment (n = 25) and patients without cognitive impairment (n = 65). Volumetric data for subcortical structures were obtained by using the FMRIB Integrated Registration and Segmentation Tool while whole-brain, gray and white matter volumes were estimated by using Structural Image Evaluation, with Normalization of Atrophy. Vertex-based shape analyses were performed to investigate shape differences in subcortical structures. Vertex-wise group differences in cortical thickness were also assessed. Volumetric comparisons between Parkinson disease with mild cognitive impairment and Parkinson disease with no cognitive impairment were performed by using ANCOVA. Associations of subcortical structures with both cognitive function and disease severity were assessed by using linear regression models. Compared with Parkinson disease with no cognitive impairment, Parkinson disease with mild cognitive impairment demonstrated reduced volumes of the thalamus (P = .03) and the nucleus accumbens (P = .04). Significant associations were found for the nucleus accumbens and putamen with performances on the attention/working memory domains (P < .05) and nucleus accumbens and language domains (P = .04). The 2 groups did not differ in measures of subcortical shape or in cortical thickness. Patients with Parkinson disease with mild cognitive impairment demonstrated reduced subcortical volumes, which were associated with cognitive deficits. The thalamus, nucleus accumbens, and putamen may serve as potential biomarkers for

  15. Association of blood pressure and hypertension with the risk of Parkinson disease: the National FINRISK Study.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chengxuan; Hu, Gang; Kivipelto, Miia; Laatikainen, Tiina; Antikainen, Riitta; Fratiglioni, Laura; Jousilahti, Pekka; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2011-06-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus and central obesity, have been associated with Parkinson disease (PD), but data on blood pressure and PD are lacking. We sought to examine the association of blood pressure and hypertension with the risk of PD among men and women. This study consisted of 7 surveys (1972-2002) on representative samples of the general population in Finland (National FINRISK Study). A total number of 59 540 participants (age 25 to 74 years; 51.8% women) who were free of PD and stroke at baseline were prospectively followed until December 31, 2006, to identify incident PD cases using the National Social Insurance Register database. Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to estimate the hazard ratio of PD associated with blood pressure. During a mean follow-up period of 18.8 years (SD: 10.2 years), 423 men and 371 women were ascertained to have developed PD. In women, compared with normotensive subjects (<130/80 mm Hg), the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of PD associated with high-normal blood pressure (130 to 139/80 to 89 mm Hg) and hypertension (≥140/90 mm Hg or use of antihypertensive agents) were 1.63 (95% CI: 1.07 to 2.47) and 1.62 (95% CI: 1.09 to 2.42). There was no significant association between blood pressure and PD risk in men. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of PD associated with use of antihypertensive agents were 1.08 (95% CI: 0.79 to 1.48) in men and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.76 to 1.38) in women. This study suggests that, in women, above-optimal blood pressure, including high-normal blood pressure and hypertension, is associated with an increased risk of PD. Optimal control of blood pressure in women may reduce the incidence of PD.

  16. Systematic analysis of microarray datasets to identify Parkinson's disease-associated pathways and genes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yinling; Wang, Xuefeng

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate commonly disturbed genes and pathways in various brain regions of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), microarray datasets from previous studies were collected and systematically analyzed. Different normalization methods were applied to microarray datasets from different platforms. A strategy combining gene co-expression networks and clinical information was adopted, using weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to screen for commonly disturbed genes in different brain regions of patients with PD. Functional enrichment analysis of commonly disturbed genes was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). Co-pathway relationships were identified with Pearson's correlation coefficient tests and a hypergeometric distribution-based test. Common genes in pathway pairs were selected out and regarded as risk genes. A total of 17 microarray datasets from 7 platforms were retained for further analysis. Five gene coexpression modules were identified, containing 9,745, 736, 233, 101 and 93 genes, respectively. One module was significantly correlated with PD samples and thus the 736 genes it contained were considered to be candidate PD-associated genes. Functional enrichment analysis demonstrated that these genes were implicated in oxidative phosphorylation and PD. A total of 44 pathway pairs and 52 risk genes were revealed, and a risk gene pathway relationship network was constructed. Eight modules were identified and were revealed to be associated with PD, cancers and metabolism. A number of disturbed pathways and risk genes were unveiled in PD, and these findings may help advance understanding of PD pathogenesis. PMID:28098893

  17. The association between impaired turning and normal straight walking in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Crenna, P; Carpinella, I; Rabuffetti, M; Calabrese, E; Mazzoleni, P; Nemni, R; Ferrarin, M

    2007-07-01

    Turning whilst walking was investigated by gait analysis in a group of Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients with mild clinical impairment and no significant abnormalities in stride parameters and kinematics of steady-state, linear walking. Comparison with age-matched controls demonstrated that patients approached turns with a slower step and completed turning with a greater number of steps. Moreover, the normal cranio-caudal sequence, whereby rotation of the head toward the intended direction of travel is followed by rotation of the trunk, was replaced by nearly simultaneous rotation of head and trunk and decreased relative head excursion after the second turning step. The evidence of abnormal inter-segmental coordination during turning in mildly affected, normally walking patients suggests that task-specific pathophysiological mechanisms, not necessary related to basic locomotor deficits, underlie disturbed directional changes in PD. Furthermore, turning-related neural systems may be more vulnerable to functional impairments associated with PD, as compared with linear walking. Hierarchically higher control levels involved in the turning ability may explain the observed unexpected association.

  18. Parkinson's disease-associated mutant VPS35 causes mitochondrial dysfunction by recycling DLP1 complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenzhang; Wang, Xinglong; Fujioka, Hisashi; Hoppel, Charles; Whone, Alan L; Caldwell, Maeve A; Cullen, Peter J; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction represents a critical step during the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), and increasing evidence suggests abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and quality control as important underlying mechanisms. The VPS35 gene, which encodes a key component of the membrane protein-recycling retromer complex, is the third autosomal-dominant gene associated with PD. However, how VPS35 mutations lead to neurodegeneration remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that PD-associated VPS35 mutations caused mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death in cultured neurons in vitro, in mouse substantia nigra neurons in vivo and in human fibroblasts from an individual with PD who has the VPS35(D620N) mutation. VPS35-induced mitochondrial deficits and neuronal dysfunction could be prevented by inhibition of mitochondrial fission. VPS35 mutants showed increased interaction with dynamin-like protein (DLP) 1, which enhanced turnover of the mitochondrial DLP1 complexes via the mitochondria-derived vesicle-dependent trafficking of the complexes to lysosomes for degradation. Notably, oxidative stress increased the VPS35-DLP1 interaction, which we also found to be increased in the brains of sporadic PD cases. These results revealed a novel cellular mechanism for the involvement of VPS35 in mitochondrial fission, dysregulation of which is probably involved in the pathogenesis of familial, and possibly sporadic, PD.

  19. Direct medical costs associated with Parkinson's disease: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Leibson, Cynthia L; Long, Kirsten Hall; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Bower, James H; Ransom, Jeanine E; O'Brien, Peter C; Rocca, Walter A

    2006-11-01

    The objective was to provide population-based estimates of incremental medical costs associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) from onset forward. All Olmsted County, Minnesota, residents with confirmed PD onset from 1987 through 1995 (n = 92) and one age- and sex-matched non-PD referent subject per case were identified with retrospective record review and followed in provider-linked billing data for direct medical costs (excluding outpatient pharmaceutical costs) from 1 year before index (i.e., year of symptom onset) through 10 years after index. Costs for each referent subject were subtracted from those for his/her matched case. Tests for statistical significance used Wilcoxon signed ranks. Preindex costs were similar [median difference in annual costs (MD) = -3 dollars; P = 0.59]. One year post index, PD subjects exhibited borderline significantly higher costs compared to referent subjects (MD = 581 dollars; P = 0.052); the difference diminished over 5 years (MD = 118 dollars; P = 0.82). By 5 to 10 years, however, PD subjects exhibited significantly higher costs (MD = 1,146 dollars; P = 0.01). Over the full 10 years, excess costs were concentrated among PD subjects without rest tremor (MD = 2,261 dollars, P < 0.01, for those without tremor and -229 dollars, P = 0.99, for those with tremor). These population-based estimates of PD-associated direct medical costs from onset forward can uniquely inform policy decisions and cost-effectiveness research.

  20. Impulsivity in Parkinson's disease is associated with altered subthalamic but not globus pallidus internus activity.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Peter Justin; Shute, Jonathan B; Opri, Enrico; Molina, Rene; Peden, Corinna; Castellanos, Oscar; Foote, Kelly D; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2017-08-19

    A significant subset of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) suffer from impulse control disorders (ICDs). A hallmark feature of many ICDs is the pursuit of rewarding behaviours despite negative consequences. Recent evidence implicates the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus internus (GPi) in reward and punishment processing, and deep brain stimulation (DBS) of these structures has been associated with changes in ICD symptoms. We tested the hypothesis that in patients with PD diagnosed with ICD, neurons in the STN and GPi would be more responsive to reward-related stimuli and less responsive to loss-related stimuli. We studied a cohort of 43 patients with PD (12 with an ICD and 31 without) undergoing DBS electrode placement surgery. Patients performed a behavioural task in which their action choices were motivated by the potential for either a monetary reward or a monetary loss. During task performance, the activity of individual neurons was recorded in either the STN (n=100) or the GPi (n=100). The presence of an ICD was associated with significantly greater proportions of reward responsive neurons (p<0.01) and significantly lower proportions of loss responsive neurons (p<0.05) in the STN, but not in the GPi. These findings provide further evidence of STN involvement in impulsive behaviour in the PD population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Association of cognitive dysfunction with neurocirculatory abnormalities in early Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yoon-Sang; Lee, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Yeong-In; Yang, Dong-Won

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive impairment and neurocirculatory abnormalities such as orthostatic hypotension (OH), supine hypertension (SH), and failure to decrease blood pressure at night (nondipping) occur relatively commonly in Parkinson disease (PD); however, whether cognitive dysfunction in early PD is related to neurocirculatory abnormalities has not been established. Cognitive dysfunction in PD is associated with white matter hyperintensities on MRI. We report results of an analysis of neuropsychological and hemodynamic parameters in patients with early PD. Methods: Among 87 patients, 25 had normal cognition, 48 had mild cognitive impairment, and 14 had dementia, based on comprehensive neuropsychological tests. Orthostatic vital signs and ambulatory 24-hour blood pressure monitoring were recorded, and brain magnetic resonance scans were obtained for all patients. Results: Cognitive impairment was associated with OH, SH, and white matter hyperintensities but not with nondipping. Dementia and white matter hyperintensities were common in SH. Of 13 patients with OH + SH, every one had mild cognitive impairment or dementia. Conclusions: Cognitive dysfunction is related to neurocirculatory abnormalities, especially OH + SH, in early PD, raising the possibility that early detection and effective treatment of those abnormalities might slow the rate of cognitive decline. PMID:22972639

  2. Genomewide association study for susceptibility genes contributing to familial Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Pankratz, Nathan; Wilk, Jemma B; Latourelle, Jeanne C; DeStefano, Anita L; Halter, Cheryl; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Doheny, Kimberly F; Gusella, James F; Nichols, William C; Foroud, Tatiana; Myers, Richard H

    2009-01-01

    Five genes have been identified that contribute to Mendelian forms of Parkinson disease (PD); however, mutations have been found in fewer than 5% of patients, suggesting that additional genes contribute to disease risk. Unlike previous studies that focused primarily on sporadic PD, we have performed the first genomewide association study (GWAS) in familial PD. Genotyping was performed with the Illumina HumanCNV370Duo array in 857 familial PD cases and 867 controls. A logistic model was employed to test for association under additive and recessive modes of inheritance after adjusting for gender and age. No result met genomewide significance based on a conservative Bonferroni correction. The strongest association result was with SNPs in the GAK/DGKQ region on chromosome 4 (additive model: p = 3.4 x 10(-6); OR = 1.69). Consistent evidence of association was also observed to the chromosomal regions containing SNCA (additive model: p = 5.5 x 10(-5); OR = 1.35) and MAPT (recessive model: p = 2.0 x 10(-5); OR = 0.56). Both of these genes have been implicated previously in PD susceptibility; however, neither was identified in previous GWAS studies of PD. Meta-analysis was performed using data from a previous case-control GWAS, and yielded improved p values for several regions, including GAK/DGKQ (additive model: p = 2.5 x 10(-7)) and the MAPT region (recessive model: p = 9.8 x 10(-6); additive model: p = 4.8 x 10(-5)). These data suggest the identification of new susceptibility alleles for PD in the GAK/DGKQ region, and also provide further support for the role of SNCA and MAPT in PD susceptibility.

  3. Genomewide association study for susceptibility genes contributing to familial Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Wilk, Jemma B.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; DeStefano, Anita L.; Halter, Cheryl; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Gusella, James F.; Nichols, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Five genes have been identified that contribute to Mendelian forms of Parkinson disease (PD); however, mutations have been found in fewer than 5% of patients, suggesting that additional genes contribute to disease risk. Unlike previous studies that focused primarily on sporadic PD, we have performed the first genomewide association study (GWAS) in familial PD. Genotyping was performed with the Illumina HumanCNV370Duo array in 857 familial PD cases and 867 controls. A logistic model was employed to test for association under additive and recessive modes of inheritance after adjusting for gender and age. No result met genomewide significance based on a conservative Bonferroni correction. The strongest association result was with SNPs in the GAK/DGKQ region on chromosome 4 (additive model: p = 3.4 × 10−6; OR = 1.69). Consistent evidence of association was also observed to the chromosomal regions containing SNCA (additive model: p = 5.5 × 10−5; OR = 1.35) and MAPT (recessive model: p = 2.0 × 10−5; OR = 0.56). Both of these genes have been implicated previously in PD susceptibility; however, neither was identified in previous GWAS studies of PD. Meta-analysis was performed using data from a previous case–control GWAS, and yielded improved p values for several regions, including GAK/DGKQ (additive model: p = 2.5 × 10−7) and the MAPT region (recessive model: p = 9.8 × 10−6; additive model: p = 4.8 × 10−5). These data suggest the identification of new susceptibility alleles for PD in the GAK/DGKQ region, and also provide further support for the role of SNCA and MAPT in PD susceptibility. PMID:18985386

  4. Postural control in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Jackeline Yumi; Quitschal, Rafaela Maia; Doná, Flávia; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloísa Helena

    2014-01-01

    Postural instability is one of the most disabling features of Parkinson's disease. To evaluate postural balance in Parkinson's disease. Thirty patients with Parkinson's disease were compared with controls using Tetrax™ interactive balance system posturography. For different positions, patients with Parkinson's disease showed a significantly higher weight distribution index, fall index, Fourier transformation at low-medium frequencies (F2-F4), and significantly lower right/left and toe/heel synchronization versus controls. Postural imbalance in Parkinson's disease patients is characterized by the abnormalities of weight distribution index, synchronization index, Fourier transformation index, and fall index as measured by Tetrax™ posturography. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Morgan, John C; Mehta, Shyamal H; Sethi, Kapil D

    2010-11-01

    Biomarkers are objectively measured characteristics that are indicators of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or responses to therapeutic interventions. To date, clinical assessment remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and clinical rating scales are well established as the gold standard for tracking progression of PD. Researchers have identified numerous potential biomarkers that may aid in the differential diagnosis of PD and/or tracking disease progression. Clinical, genetic, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics), and neuroimaging biomarkers may provide useful tools in the diagnosis of PD and in measuring disease progression and response to therapies. Some potential biomarkers are inexpensive and do not require much technical expertise, whereas others are expensive or require specialized equipment and technical skills. Many potential biomarkers in PD show great promise; however, they need to be assessed for their sensitivity and specificity over time in large and varied samples of patients with and without PD.

  6. Genome-wide association study of Parkinson's disease in East Asians.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jia Nee; Tan, Louis C; Irwan, Ishak D; Au, Wing-Lok; Low, Hui Qi; Prakash, Kumar-M; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Bei, Jinxin; Chan, Anne Yy; Chen, Chiung Mei; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chung, Sun Ju; Deng, Hao; Lim, Shen-Yang; Mok, Vincent; Pang, Hao; Pei, Zhong; Peng, Rong; Shang, Hui-Fang; Song, Kyuyoung; Tan, Ai Huey; Wu, Yih-Ru; Aung, Tin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chew, Fook Tim; Chew, Soo-Hong; Chong, Siow-Ann; Ebstein, Richard P; Lee, Jimmy; Saw, Seang-Mei; Seow, Adeline; Subramaniam, Mythily; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Heng, Khai Koon; Meah, Wee-Yang; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Liu, Jianjun; Tan, Eng-King

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on Parkinson's disease (PD) have mostly been done in Europeans and Japanese. No study has been done in Han Chinese, which make up nearly a fifth of the world population. We conducted the first Han Chinese GWAS analysing a total of 22,729 subjects (5,125 PD cases and 17,604 controls) from Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Korea, mainland China and Taiwan. We performed imputation, merging and logistic regression analyses of 2,402,394 SNPs passing quality control filters in 779 PD cases, 13,227 controls, adjusted for the first three principal components. 90 SNPs with association P < 10-4 were validated in 9 additional sample collections and the results were combined using fixed-effects inverse-variance meta-analysis. We observed strong associations reaching genome-wide significance at SNCA, LRRK2 and MCCC1, confirming their important roles in both European and Asian PD. We also identified significant (P < 0.05) associations at 5 loci (DLG2, SIPA1L2, STK39, VPS13C and RIT2), and observed the same direction of associations at 9 other loci including BST1 and PARK16. Allelic heterogeneity was observed at LRRK2 while European risk SNPs at 6 other loci including MAPT and GBA-SYT11 were non-polymorphic or very rare in our cohort. Overall, we replicate associations at SNCA, LRRK2, MCCC1 and 14 other European PD loci but did not identify Asian-specific loci with large effects (OR > 1.45) on PD risk. Our results also demonstrate some differences in the genetic contribution to PD between Europeans and Asians. Further pan-ethnic meta-analysis with European GWAS cohorts may unravel new PD loci.

  7. Nonmotor Features in Parkinson's Disease: What Are the Most Important Associated Factors?

    PubMed

    Kadastik-Eerme, Liis; Muldmaa, Mari; Lilles, Stella; Rosenthal, Marika; Taba, Nele; Taba, Pille

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the frequency and severity of nonmotor symptoms and their correlations with a wide range of demographic and clinical factors in a large cohort of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. 268 PD patients were assessed using the validated Movement Disorders Society's Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), the Hoehn and Yahr scale (HY), the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (SE-ADL) Scale, and the Minimental State Examination (MMSE). Results. Nonmotor symptoms had a strong positive relationship with depression and lower quality of life. Also, age, duration and severity of PD, cognitive impairment, daily dose, and duration of levodopa treatment correlated with the burden of nonmotor symptoms. Patients with postural instability and gait disorder (PIGD) dominance or with the presence of motor complications had higher MDS-UPDRS Part I scores expressing the load of nonmotor features, compared to participants with other disease subtypes or without motor complications. Conclusions. Though the severity of individual nonmotor symptoms was generally rated by PD patients as "mild" or less, we found a significant cumulative effect of nonmotor symptoms on patients' mood, daily activities, and quality of life.

  8. Nonmotor Features in Parkinson's Disease: What Are the Most Important Associated Factors?

    PubMed Central

    Kadastik-Eerme, Liis; Muldmaa, Mari; Lilles, Stella; Rosenthal, Marika; Taba, Nele; Taba, Pille

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the frequency and severity of nonmotor symptoms and their correlations with a wide range of demographic and clinical factors in a large cohort of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. 268 PD patients were assessed using the validated Movement Disorders Society's Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), the Hoehn and Yahr scale (HY), the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (SE-ADL) Scale, and the Minimental State Examination (MMSE). Results. Nonmotor symptoms had a strong positive relationship with depression and lower quality of life. Also, age, duration and severity of PD, cognitive impairment, daily dose, and duration of levodopa treatment correlated with the burden of nonmotor symptoms. Patients with postural instability and gait disorder (PIGD) dominance or with the presence of motor complications had higher MDS-UPDRS Part I scores expressing the load of nonmotor features, compared to participants with other disease subtypes or without motor complications. Conclusions. Though the severity of individual nonmotor symptoms was generally rated by PD patients as “mild” or less, we found a significant cumulative effect of nonmotor symptoms on patients' mood, daily activities, and quality of life. PMID:27195172

  9. Parkinson's disease tremor: pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Mark

    2012-01-01

    There are a number of tremors that may affect patients with Parkinson's disease, but the classic is tremor-at-rest. The tremor is also seen during postural action after a short pause, and is often called re-emergent tremor although it appears that the physiology is the same. As a manifestation of Parkinson's disease, it is separate from bradykinesia and rigidity as the magnitude of tremor is not related to dopamine deficiency nor does it respond readily to dopamine treatment. Cellular activity in the different basal ganglia nuclei can be coherent with tremor, but cellular activity in the VIM nucleus of the thalamus, a cerebellar relay nucleus, is more coherent than cellular activity in basal ganglia. It is also notable that different body parts may have similar tremor frequencies, but are generally not exactly the same and are not phase locked. This suggests that each body part has a separate tremor generator. The ability to stay separate may be due to the somatotopic segregation of basal ganglia loops. Analysis of cellular behavior in the thalamus shows that the thalamus is not the generator of tremor. New data suggest that the basal ganglia trigger a cerebellar circuit to produce the tremor.

  10. Presymptomatic detection of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jenner, P

    1993-01-01

    Presymptomatic detection of Parkinson's disease is necessary if neuroprotective therapies are to be utilized in its treatment. Various methods (PET, electrophysiology, enzyme assays, olfactory function) may be applicable but none has been rigorously evaluated. Other possible approaches are now considered. Plasma HVA levels (pHVA) in the presence of debrisoquine may reflect cerebral dopamine function. However, there are no detectable differences in pHVA between newly diagnosed and untreated parkinsonian patients and control subjects. Compensatory increases in dopamine turnover may mask a decrease in pHVA in the early stages of the disease. So, at present this technique could not be used as a diagnostic tool. Post-mortem studies of brain in Parkinson's disease may provide clues to biochemical markers indicative of nigral pathology. Mitochondrial complex I activity is reduced in substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease and it was reported also to be markedly reduced in blood platelets. However, subsequent studies suggest that the difference in platelet complex I activity is too small to be diagnostic of Parkinson's disease. There are also selective reductions in brain glutathione levels in Parkinson's disease restricted to substantia nigra, which do not occur in other neurodegenerative disorders and are not due to drug treatment. Importantly, in incidental Lewy body disease (preclinical Parkinson's disease) nigral glutathione levels are reduced to the same degree as in advanced Parkinson's disease. So, some peripheral index of altered glutathione function may be valuable in the early detection of the disease process.

  11. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Team Finding Resources Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  12. Managing Your Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Team Finding Resources Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Foundation News

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  14. Factors associated with falling in early, treated Parkinson's disease: The NET-PD LS1 cohort.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kelvin L; Elm, Jordan J; Wielinski, Catherine L; Simon, David K; Aminoff, Michael J; Christine, Chadwick W; Liang, Grace S; Hauser, Robert A; Sudarsky, Lewis; Umeh, Chizoba C; Voss, Tiffini; Juncos, Jorge; Fang, John Y; Boyd, James T; Bodis-Wollner, Ivan; Mari, Zoltan; Morgan, John C; Wills, Anne-Marie; Lee, Stephen L; Parashos, Sotirios A

    2017-06-15

    Recognizing the factors associated with falling in Parkinson's disease (PD) would improve identification of at-risk individuals. To examine frequency of falling and baseline characteristics associated with falling in PD using the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Exploratory Trials in PD Long-term Study-1 (NET-PD LS-1) dataset. The LS-1 database included 1741 early treated PD subjects (median 4year follow-up). Baseline characteristics were tested for a univariate association with post-baseline falling during the trial. Significant variables were included in a multivariable logistic regression model. A separate analysis using a negative binomial model investigated baseline factors on fall rate. 728 subjects (42%) fell during the trial, including at baseline. A baseline history of falls was the factor most associated with post-baseline falling. Men had lower odds of post-baseline falling compared to women, but for men, the probability of a post-baseline fall increased with age such that after age 70, men and women had similar odds of falling. Other baseline factors associated with a post-baseline fall and increased fall rate included the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) Activities of Daily Living (ADL) score, total functional capacity (TFC), baseline ambulatory capacity score and dopamine agonist monotherapy. Falls are common in early treated PD. The biggest risk factor for falls in PD remains a history of falling. Measures of functional ability (UPDRS ADL, TFC) and ambulatory capacity are novel clinical risk factors needing further study. A significant age by sex interaction may help to explain why age has been an inconsistent risk factor for falls in PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Associations between Anticholinergic Burden and Adverse Health Outcomes in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crispo, James A. G.; Willis, Allison W.; Thibault, Dylan P.; Fortin, Yannick; Hays, Harlen D.; McNair, Douglas S.; Bjerre, Lise M.; Kohen, Dafna E.; Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Mattison, Donald R.; Krewski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Elderly adults should avoid medications with anticholinergic effects since they may increase the risk of adverse events, including falls, delirium, and cognitive impairment. However, data on anticholinergic burden are limited in subpopulations, such as individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). The objective of this study was to determine whether anticholinergic burden was associated with adverse outcomes in a PD inpatient population. Methods Using the Cerner Health Facts® database, we retrospectively examined anticholinergic medication use, diagnoses, and hospital revisits within a cohort of 16,302 PD inpatients admitted to a Cerner hospital between 2000 and 2011. Anticholinergic burden was computed using the Anticholinergic Risk Scale (ARS). Primary outcomes were associations between ARS score and diagnosis of fracture and delirium. Secondary outcomes included associations between ARS score and 30-day hospital revisits. Results Many individuals (57.8%) were prescribed non-PD medications with moderate to very strong anticholinergic potential. Individuals with the greatest ARS score (≥4) were more likely to be diagnosed with fractures (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.56, 95% CI: 1.29–1.88) and delirium (AOR: 1.61, 95% CI: 1.08–2.40) relative to those with no anticholinergic burden. Similarly, inpatients with the greatest ARS score were more likely to visit the emergency department (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 1.32, 95% CI: 1.10–1.58) and be readmitted (AHR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.01–1.33) within 30-days of discharge. Conclusions We found a positive association between increased anticholinergic burden and adverse outcomes among individuals with PD. Additional pharmacovigilance studies are needed to better understand risks associated with anticholinergic medication use in PD. PMID:26939130

  16. Associations of welding and manganese exposure with Parkinson disease: review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, James A; Borenstein, Amy R; Nelson, Lorene M

    2012-09-11

    To examine associations of welding and manganese exposure with Parkinson disease (PD) using meta-analyses of data from cohort, case-control, and mortality studies. Epidemiologic studies related to welding or manganese exposure and PD were identified in a PubMed search, article references, published reviews, and abstracts. Inclusion criteria were 1) cohort, case-control, or mortality study with relative risk (RR), odds ratio (OR), or mortality OR (MOR) and 95 confidence intervals (95% CI); 2) RR, OR, and MOR matched or adjusted for age and sex; 3) valid study design and analysis. When participants of a study were a subgroup of those in a larger study, only results of the larger study were included to assure independence of datasets. Pooled RR/OR estimates and 95% CIs were obtained using random effects models; heterogeneity of study effects were evaluated using the Q statistic and I(2) index in fixed effect models. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria for the welding meta-analysis and 3 studies for the manganese exposure meta-analysis. The pooled RR for the association between welding and PD for all study designs was 0.86 (95% CI 0.80-0.92), with absence of between-study heterogeneity (I(2) = 0.0). Effect measures for cohort, case-control, and mortality studies were similar (0.91, 0.82, 0.87). For the association between manganese exposure and PD, the pooled OR was 0.76 (95% CI 0.41-1.42). Welding and manganese exposure are not associated with increased PD risk. Possible explanations for the inverse association between welding and PD include confounding by smoking, healthy worker effect, and hormesis.

  17. Regulation of the Neurodegenerative Process Associated to Parkinson's Disease by CD4+ T-cells.

    PubMed

    González, Hugo; Contreras, Francisco; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Neuroinflammation constitutes a fundamental process involved in the physiopathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Microglial cells play a central role in the outcome of neuroinflammation and consequent neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Current evidence indicates that CD4+ T-cells infiltrate the central nervous system (CNS) in PD, where they play a critical role determining the functional phenotype of microglia, thus regulating the progression of the neurodegenerative process. Here, we first analysed the pathogenic role of inflammatory phenotypes and the beneficial role of anti-inflammatory phenotypes of encephalitogenic CD4+ T-cells involved in the physiopathology of PD. Next, we discussed how alterations of neurotransmitter levels observed in the basal ganglia throughout the time course of PD progression could be strongly affecting the behaviour of encephalitogenic CD4+ T-cells and thereby the outcome of the neuroinflammatory process and the consequent neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Afterward, we integrated the evidence indicating the involvement of an antigen-specific immune response mediated by T-cells and B-cells against CNS-derived self-constituents in PD. Consistent with the involvement of a relevant autoimmune component in PD, we also reviewed the polymorphisms of both, class I and class II major histocompatibility complexes, associated to the risk of PD. Overall, this study gives an overview of how an autoimmune component involved in PD plays a fundamental role in the progression of the neurodegenerative process.

  18. Resting-state functional connectivity of dentate nucleus is associated with tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huizi; Chen, Huimin; Fang, Jinping; Gao, Liyan; Ma, Lingyan; Wu, Tao; Hou, Yanan; Zhang, Jiarong; Feng, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit has been indicated important for tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the role of dentate nucleus (DN) in parkinsonian tremor remains unclear. To investigate whether DN plays a role in PD tremor, we recruited 50 PD and 29 age-matched health controls (HC). The patients were divided into tremor-dominant (TD) and non-tremor-dominant (NTD) groups. We collected resting-state fMRIs data for each subject. The bilateral DN was then chosen as the region of interest to examine PD tremor-related network changes, as well as its correlation with tremor severity. Voxel-wise functional connectivity analysis revealed that the bilateral DN had higher connectivity with the bilateral cerebellar anterior lobe, and had lower connectivity with the bilateral prefrontal cortex in TD compared to the HC and NTD groups. Functional connectivity of the bilateral DN with the bilateral cerebellar posterior lobe was also higher in TD than NTD group. Functional connectivity between the bilateral DN and the bilateral cerebellar posterior lobe showed positive correlation with tremor severity, while that between the bilateral DN and the bilateral prefrontal cortex displayed negative correlation. Our study demonstrates higher dentato-cerebellar connectivity and lower dentato-prefrontal connectivity in TD patients, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of PD tremor. And we conclude that DN might be associated with the pathogenesis of PD tremor.

  19. Sexual dysfunction is associated with postural instability gait difficulty subtype of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiao; Xiao, Bin; Li, Hui-Hua; Lo, Yew-Long; Chew, Lai-Mun; Prakash, Kumar M; Tan, Eng-King

    2015-11-01

    The pathophysiology of the postural instability gait difficulty (PIGD) subtype of Parkinson's disease (PD) is unclear. Information on the spectrum of non-motor symptoms (NMS) in PIGD phenotype is limited. Our objective is to compare the spectrum of NMS in PIGD subtype compared to non-PIGD subgroup in PD patients and to determine predictive factors that are associated with PIGD phenotype. A total of 432 PD patients comprising 158 PIGD and 274 non-PIGD patients were recruited. NMS burden (frequency and severity) was assessed using non-motor symptom scale (NMSS). In the univariable analysis, NMSS total score (P = 0.0132), NMSS domain 3 (mood/apathy) score (P = 0.0108), NMSS domain 5 (attention/memory) score (P = 0.0048) and NMSS domain 8 (sexual function) score (P = 0.0052) were significantly higher in the PIGD group than in the non-PIGD group. Using multivariable logistic regression, UPDRS tremor score, UPDRS PIGD score, H&Y staging score and NMSS domain 8 (sexual function) score were found to be significantly different in the PIGD group compared to the non-PIGD group. We disclosed for the first time that PIGD patients demonstrated a greater overall NMS burden and sexual dysfunction and was an independent predictor of PIGD phenotype. Early intervention of sexual dysfunction symptoms in PIGD patients may improve their clinical management.

  20. Age and dementia-associated atrophy predominates in the hippocampal head and amygdala in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Thomas P; Malykhin, Nikolai; Martin, W R Wayne; Hanstock, Christopher C; Emery, Derek J; Fisher, Nancy J; Camicioli, Richard M

    2008-07-01

    The hippocampus (HC) and amygdala (AG) decrease in volume with age and in Parkinson's disease (PD) with (PDD) and without dementia. We compared 44 PD to 44 age, sex and education-matched subjects without PD (non-PD) and 13 PDD subjects. T1-weighted MR images were used to manually segment the head, body and tail of the HC and the AG. HC volumes, corrected to intracranial volume, were smaller in PDD than non-PD (p=0.04), reflected predominantly by head atrophy. Right AG volumes were smaller in PD compared to non-PD (p=0.03). HC volumes in older (>70), but not younger, non-demented PD differed from non-PD (HC, p=0.02; head, p=0.03). Age correlated negatively with overall HC (r=-0.43, p=0.004) and head (r=-0.48, p=0.001) in PD, but not in non-PD. In PD, left HC head volumes correlated with recall, but not recognition scores on the CVLT-II (r=0.35, p=0.02) and BVMT-R (r=0.35, p=0.02); AG volumes correlated with CVLT-II recall (r=0.35, p=0.02). No correlations were found in non-PD (p>0.4). In conclusion, functionally meaningful age-associated hippocampal and amygdala atrophy occurs in PD.

  1. Complaints about impairments in executive functions in Parkinson's disease: the association with neuropsychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Koerts, Janneke; van Beilen, Marije; Leenders, Klaus L; Brouwer, Wiebo H; Tucha, Lara; Tucha, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Impairments in executive functions are frequently reported in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about patients' experience regarding these impairments. This knowledge is crucial because if patients do not experience their cognitive impairments they do not report them to their attending neurologist. Consequently, patients might not get appropriate treatment. This study investigated if patients with a mild to moderate PD experience impairments in executive functions in daily life and whether these correspond with impairments as measured in neuropsychological assessments. Forty-three PD patients and 25 healthy participants were included. Groups did not differ in age, sex and education. All participants and their closest relatives completed a standardized questionnaire measuring executive functions in daily life. Furthermore, all participants were assessed with a test battery measuring executive functions. PD patients reported significantly more problems with executive functions in daily life than healthy participants. Furthermore, co-morbid depression had a negative impact on the number of problems with executive functions in daily life as reported by PD patients. The experienced daily life problems in executive functions were not associated with the patients' performance on objective cognitive measures. In conclusion, PD patients were aware of problems with executive functions in daily life and reported considerably more problems than healthy controls. These problems were however not reflected by neuropsychological tests and may indicate a lack of ecological validity of neuropsychological assessment.

  2. Intonation contrast in Cantonese speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Joan K-Y; Whitehill, Tara L; So, Susanne Y-S

    2010-08-01

    Speech produced by individuals with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a number of features including impaired speech prosody. The purpose of this study was to investigate intonation contrasts produced by this group of speakers. Speech materials with a question-statement contrast were collected from 14 Cantonese speakers with PD. Twenty listeners then classified the productions as either questions or statements. Acoustic analyses of F0, duration, and intensity were conducted to determine which acoustic cues distinguished the production of questions from statements, and which cues appeared to be exploited by listeners in identifying intonational contrasts. The results show that listeners identified statements with a high degree of accuracy, but the accuracy of question identification ranged from 0.56% to 96% across the 14 speakers. The speakers with PD used similar acoustic cues as nondysarthric Cantonese speakers to mark the question-statement contrast, although the contrasts were not observed in all speakers. Listeners mainly used F0 cues at the final syllable for intonation identification. These data contribute to the researchers' understanding of intonation marking in speakers with PD, with specific application to the production and perception of intonation in a lexical tone language.

  3. Phonatory and articulatory changes associated with increased vocal intensity in Parkinson disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Dromey, C; Ramig, L O; Johnson, A B

    1995-08-01

    This study examined changes in voice and speech production in a patient with Parkinson disease as he increased vocal intensity following 1 month of intensive voice treatment. Phonatory function and articulatory acoustic measures were made before and after treatment as well as 6 and 12 months later. Pre- to post-treatment increases were documented in sound pressure level in sustained phonation, syllable repetition, reading, and monologue. Consistent with mechanisms of intensity change reported in normal speakers, corresponding improvements were measured in estimated subglottal pressure, maximum flow declination rate, laryngeal airway resistance, open quotient, EGGW-25, harmonic-spectral slope, and maximum vowel duration. Measures of phonatory stability in sustained phonation and semitone standard deviation in reading and speaking showed changes accompanying increased vocal intensity. In addition, changes were measured in articulatory acoustic parameters (vowel and whole word duration, transition duration, extent and rate, and frication duration and rise time) in single-word productions. These findings indicate that this patient increased his vocal intensity using phonatory mechanisms that have been associated with the nondisordered larynx. In addition, the increased vocal intensity led to changes in articulation that were not targeted in treatment.

  4. Orthostatic hypotension is associated with decreased cerebrospinal fluid levels of chromogranin A in early stage of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Kaiserova, Michaela; Prikrylova Vranova, Hana; Galuszka, Jan; Stejskal, David; Mensikova, Katerina; Zapletalova, Jana; Mares, Jan; Kanovsky, Petr

    2015-10-01

    An association between the CSF chromogranin A (CgA) and orthostatic blood pressure changes was investigated in 20 patients in the early stage of Parkinson disease (PD). There was a positive correlation between the CSF CgA and diastolic blood pressure change, when CSF CgA levels were lower in patients with orthostatic hypotension (OH). Decreased CSF CgA may be useful in predicting OH in the early stage of PD.

  5. Misperceptions and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Joseph H

    2017-03-15

    Most of the neurobehavioral aspects of Parkinson's disease have been well established and studied, but many are not well known, and hardly studied. This article focuses on several behavioral abnormalities that are common, and frequently cause difficulty for the patient and family due to lack of recognition as part of the disease. While it is well known that L-Dopa dyskinesias are frequently not recognized or under appreciated by patients, a similar lack of recognition may affect the patient's own speech volume, where their center of gravity is located, whether they are tilted to one side, and their under-recognition of others' emotional displays. In addition, PD patients are often misperceived by others incorrect impression of their emotional and cognitive state based purely on facial expression. These changes and others are briefly reviewed.

  6. Serum uric acid is associated with apathy in early, drug-naïve Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Picillo, Marina; Santangelo, Gabriella; Moccia, Marcello; Erro, Roberto; Amboni, Marianna; Prestipino, Elio; Longo, Katia; Vitale, Carmine; Spina, Emanuele; Orefice, Giuseppe; Barone, Paolo; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa

    2016-04-01

    Both low serum uric acid (UA) levels and apathy are considered biomarkers of cognitive decline and dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD). There is an urgent need to combine different biomarkers to predict disease course in PD. Data on the relationship between serum UA levels and apathy in PD are lacking. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between serum UA levels and pure apathy in early, drug-naïve PD patients. Forty-nine early, drug-naïve PD patients were enrolled and stratified into two groups using the median serum UA levels at diagnosis (Group 1 serum UA ≤ 4.8 mg/dl; Group 2 serum UA > 4.8 mg/dl). The cohort was followed for the first 2 years of disease. Apathy was evaluated with the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES). Patients with lower serum UA levels presented significant higher AES score compared to patients with higher serum UA levels. Regression analysis showed that baseline serum UA levels were significant determinants of AES scores at both baseline and 2-year follow up, irrespective of gender, age, attention/executive functions and dopamine replacement therapy when applicable. This is the first study showing a link between serum UA levels and apathy in non-demented, non-depressed, early, drug-naïve PD, being lower serum UA levels associated with greater apathy. Further follow up of our patients and replication of this observation in independent cohorts are needed to establish if this combination of biomarkers may help in characterizing a subgroup of PD patients at diagnosis.

  7. Learning and switching between stimulus-saccade associations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Timothy L; Sumner, Petroc; Molyva, Dimitra; Sheridan, Ray; Kennard, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Making flexible associations between what we see and what we do is important for many everyday tasks. Previous work in patients with focal lesions has shown that the control of saccadic eye movements in such contexts relies on a network of areas in the frontal cerebral cortex. These regions are reciprocally connected with structures in the basal ganglia although the contribution of these sub-cortical structures to oculomotor control in complex tasks is not well understood. We report the performance of patients with idiopathic Parkinsons disease (PDs) in a test which required learning and switching between arbitrary cue-saccade rules. In Experiment 1 feedback was given following each response which reliably indicated which of the two possible rules was correct. PDs were slower to learn the first cue-saccade association presented, but did not show increased error or reaction time switch costs when switching between two rules within blocks. In a follow up experiment the feedback given by the computer was adjusted to be probabilistic such that executing a response based upon the "correct" rule only resulted in positive feedback on 80% of trials. Under these conditions patients were impaired in terms of response latencies and number of errors. In all conditions PDs showed multi-stepping/hypometria of saccades consistent with a motoric deficit in executing actions based on cognitive cues. The findings are consistent with a role for the nigrostriatal dopamine system in the reinforcement of saccade-response-outcome associations. Intact performance of PDs when associations are not stochastically reinforced suggests that striatal learning systems are complemented by cognitive representations of task rules which are unaffected in the early stages of PD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Associations between neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognition in Chinese idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyan; Song, Wei; Chen, Ke; Chen, XuePing; Zheng, Zhenzhen; Cao, Bei; Huang, Rui; Zhao, Bi; Wu, Ying; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2015-03-01

    The associations between neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognition, frontal lobe function and frontal behavioral changes in the Chinese idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) population are largely unknown. This study included 348 idiopathic PD patients from southwest China. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were investigated using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (NPI), and cognition was assessed using Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R). The Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) was used to evaluate frontal function and the Frontal Behavior Inventory (FBI) was used to assess frontal behavioral changes. The mean (± standard deviation) age of the PD patients was 60.24 ± 12.07 years, and the mean disease duration was 3.88 ± 3.34 years. The mean NPI score was 3.49 ± 4.00. The mean score of ACE-R was 76.82 ± 16.73. The mean score of FAB was 15.27 ± 2.90, and the mean score of FBI was 3.18 ± 5.17. Weak negative correlations between the NPI and ACE-R scores as well as FAB score were found in the total sample, the male patient subgroup, the early onset PD subgroup and the late onset PD subgroup. Strong positive correlations were found between the NPI and FBI scores in the total sample (r=0.661, p<0.001), the male patient subgroup (r=0.789, p<0.001) and the late onset PD subgroup (r=0.749, p<0.001). Moderate positive correlations were found between the NPI and FBI scores in the female patient subgroup (r=0.536, p<0.001) and the early onset PD subgroup (r=0.462, p<0.001). Neuropsychiatric symptoms were closely associated with frontal behavioral changes but were not closely related with worse cognition and frontal lobe function in the Chinese idiopathic PD population.

  9. Parkinson's Disease and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Tang, Bei-Sha; Guo, Ji-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by the hallmarks of motor symptoms, such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability. However, through clinical investigations in patients and experimental findings in animal models of Parkinson's disease for years, it is now well recognized that Parkinson's disease is more than just a motor-deficit disorder. The majority of Parkinson's disease patients suffer from nonmotor disabilities, for instance, cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, sensory dysfunction, and sleep disorder. So far, anti-PD prescriptions and surgical treatments have been mainly focusing on motor dysfunctions, leaving cognitive impairment a marginal clinical field. Within the nonmotor symptoms, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and significant aspects of Parkinson's disease, and cognitive deficits such as dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial disturbances could seriously affect the quality of life, reduce life expectancy, prolong the duration of hospitalization, and therefore increase burdens of caregiver and medical costs. In this review, we have done a retrospective study of the recent related researches on epidemiology, clinical manifestation and diagnosis, genetics, and potential treatment of cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease, aiming to provide a summary of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and make it easy for clinicians to tackle this challenging issue in their future practice.

  10. Parkinson's Disease and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bei-sha

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by the hallmarks of motor symptoms, such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability. However, through clinical investigations in patients and experimental findings in animal models of Parkinson's disease for years, it is now well recognized that Parkinson's disease is more than just a motor-deficit disorder. The majority of Parkinson's disease patients suffer from nonmotor disabilities, for instance, cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, sensory dysfunction, and sleep disorder. So far, anti-PD prescriptions and surgical treatments have been mainly focusing on motor dysfunctions, leaving cognitive impairment a marginal clinical field. Within the nonmotor symptoms, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and significant aspects of Parkinson's disease, and cognitive deficits such as dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial disturbances could seriously affect the quality of life, reduce life expectancy, prolong the duration of hospitalization, and therefore increase burdens of caregiver and medical costs. In this review, we have done a retrospective study of the recent related researches on epidemiology, clinical manifestation and diagnosis, genetics, and potential treatment of cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease, aiming to provide a summary of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and make it easy for clinicians to tackle this challenging issue in their future practice. PMID:28058128

  11. Parkinson's disease between internal medicine and neurology.

    PubMed

    Csoti, Ilona; Jost, Wolfgang H; Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    General medical problems and complications have a major impact on the quality of life in all stages of Parkinson's disease. To introduce an effective treatment, a comprehensive analysis of the various clinical symptoms must be undertaken. One must distinguish between (1) diseases which arise independently of Parkinson's disease, and (2) diseases which are a direct or indirect consequence of Parkinson's disease. Medical comorbidity may induce additional limitations to physical strength and coping strategies, and may thus restrict the efficacy of the physical therapy which is essential for treating hypokinetic-rigid symptoms. In selecting the appropriate medication for the treatment of any additional medical symptoms, which may arise, its limitations, contraindications and interactions with dopaminergic substances have to be taken into consideration. General medical symptoms and organ manifestations may also arise as a direct consequence of the autonomic dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease. As the disease progresses, additional non-parkinsonian symptoms can be of concern. Furthermore, the side effects of Parkinson medications may necessitate the involvement of other medical specialists. In this review, we will discuss the various general medical aspects of Parkinson's disease.

  12. Factors associated with motor fluctuations and dyskinesia in Parkinson Disease: potential role of a new melevodopa plus carbidopa formulation (Sirio).

    PubMed

    Stocchi, Fabrizio; Marconi, Stefano

    2010-07-01

    Parkinson disease is a progressive movement disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Of unknown etiology, Parkinson disease is characterized by 4 cardinal symptoms: tremor at rest, bradykinesia, postural instability, and rigidity. The current criterion-standard drug used in the management of parkinsonian symptoms is levodopa (l-dopa). However, long-term l-dopa therapy is associated with the development of motor complications; approximately 50% to 80% of patients will develop motor complications within 5 to 10 years of l-dopa treatment initiation. Motor complications can be divided into motor fluctuations, caused largely through pulsatile dopamine stimulation and low l-dopa concentrations, and dyskinesia, associated more often with peak l-dopa concentrations. Ultimately, the main goal was to provide steady l-dopa concentrations, without peaks and troughs. Empirical investigations using parenteral infusions of l-dopa and highly soluble l-dopa prodrugs have shown that there is benefit in ameliorating the peaks and troughs associated with traditional oral l-dopa formulations. Recently, the development of highly soluble oral l-dopa prodrugs has facilitated rapid, regular, and reliable l-dopa availability. This review evaluates some of the pharmacologic strategies in the management of motor complications in Parkinson disease and therapy optimization, with a focus on the use of CHF 1512 (Sirio), a combination of melevodopa (l-dopa methylester, a highly soluble prodrug of l-dopa) plus carbidopa in an effervescent tablet formulation.

  13. Cerebral small vessel disease and incident parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    van der Holst, Helena M.; van Uden, Inge W.M.; Tuladhar, Anil M.; de Laat, Karlijn F.; van Norden, Anouk G.W.; Norris, David G.; van Dijk, Ewoud J.; Esselink, Rianne A.J.; Platel, Bram

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relation between baseline cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) and the risk of incident parkinsonism using different MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures. Methods: In the Radboud University Nijmegen Diffusion Tensor and Magnetic Resonance Cohort (RUN DMC) study, a prospective cohort study, 503 elderly participants with SVD and without parkinsonism were included in 2006. During follow-up (2011–2012), parkinsonism was diagnosed according to UK Brain Bank criteria. Cox regression analysis was used to investigate the association between baseline imaging measures and incident all-cause parkinsonism and vascular parkinsonism (VP). Tract-based spatial statistics analysis was used to identify differences in baseline DTI measures of white matter (WM) tracts between participants with VP and without parkinsonism. Results: Follow-up was available from 501 participants (mean age 65.6 years; mean follow-up duration 5.2 years). Parkinsonism developed in 20 participants; 15 were diagnosed with VP. The 5-year risk of (any) parkinsonism was increased for those with a high white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume (hazard ratio [HR] 1.8 per SD increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–2.4) and a high number of lacunes (HR 1.4 per number increase, 95% CI 1.1–1.8) at baseline. For VP, this risk was also increased by the presence of microbleeds (HR 5.7, 95% CI 1.9–16.8) and a low gray matter volume (HR 0.4 per SD increase, 95% CI 0.2–0.8). Lower fractional anisotropy values in bifrontal WM tracts involved in movement control were observed in participants with VP compared to participants without parkinsonism. Conclusions: SVD at baseline, especially a high WMH volume and a high number of lacunes, is associated with incident parkinsonism. Our findings favor a role of SVD in the etiology of parkinsonism. PMID:26446068

  14. Regional brain amyloid-β accumulation associates with domain-specific cognitive performance in Parkinson disease without dementia.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Rizwan S; Xie, Sharon X; Chen, Yin J; Rick, Jacqueline; Gross, Rachel G; Nasrallah, Ilya M; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Trojanowski, John Q; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Hurtig, Howard I; Siderowf, Andrew D; Dubroff, Jacob G; Weintraub, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease patients develop clinically significant cognitive impairment at variable times over their disease course, which is often preceded by milder deficits in memory, visuo-spatial, and executive domains. The significance of amyloid-β accumulation to these problems is unclear. We hypothesized that amyloid-β PET imaging by 18F-florbetapir, a radiotracer that detects fibrillar amyloid-β plaque deposits, would identify subjects with global cognitive impairment or poor performance in individual cognitive domains in non-demented Parkinson disease patients. We assessed 61 non-demented Parkinson disease patients with detailed cognitive assessments and 18F-florbetapir PET brain imaging. Scans were interpreted qualitatively (positive or negative) by two independent nuclear medicine physicians blinded to clinical data, and quantitatively by a novel volume-weighted method. The presence of mild cognitive impairment was determined through an expert consensus process using Level 1 criteria from the Movement Disorder Society. Nineteen participants (31.2%) were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and the remainder had normal cognition. Qualitative 18F-florbetapir PET imaging was positive in 15 participants (24.6%). Increasing age and presence of an APOE ε4 allele were associated with higher composite 18F-florbetapir binding. In multivariable models, an abnormal 18F-florbetapir scan by expert rating was not associated with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. However, 18F-florbetapir retention values in the posterior cingulate gyrus inversely correlated with verbal memory performance. Retention values in the frontal cortex, precuneus, and anterior cingulate gyrus retention values inversely correlated with naming performance. Regional cortical amyloid-β amyloid, as measured by 18F-florbetapir PET, may be a biomarker of specific cognitive deficits in non-demented Parkinson disease patients.

  15. Genetic comorbidities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Saad, Mohamad; Noyce, Alastair J; Keller, Margaux F; Schrag, Anette; Bestwick, Jonathan P; Traynor, Bryan J; Gibbs, J Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G; Cookson, Mark R; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B

    2014-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a number of known genetic risk factors. Clinical and epidemiological studies have suggested the existence of intermediate factors that may be associated with additional risk of PD. We construct genetic risk profiles for additional epidemiological and clinical factors using known genome-wide association studies (GWAS) loci related to these specific phenotypes to estimate genetic comorbidity in a systematic review. We identify genetic risk profiles based on GWAS variants associated with schizophrenia and Crohn's disease as significantly associated with risk of PD. Conditional analyses adjusting for SNPs near loci associated with PD and schizophrenia or PD and Crohn's disease suggest that spatially overlapping loci associated with schizophrenia and PD account for most of the shared comorbidity, while variation outside of known proximal loci shared by PD and Crohn's disease accounts for their shared genetic comorbidity. We examine brain methylation and expression signatures proximal to schizophrenia and Crohn's disease loci to infer functional changes in the brain associated with the variants contributing to genetic comorbidity. We compare our results with a systematic review of epidemiological literature, while the findings are dissimilar to a degree; marginal genetic associations corroborate the directionality of associations across genetic and epidemiological data. We show a strong genetically defined level of comorbidity between PD and Crohn's disease as well as between PD and schizophrenia, with likely functional consequences of associated variants occurring in brain.

  16. Genetic comorbidities in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Mike A.; Saad, Mohamad; Noyce, Alastair J.; Keller, Margaux F.; Schrag, Anette; Bestwick, Jonathan P.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G.; Cookson, Mark R.; Morris, Huw R.; Williams, Nigel; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a number of known genetic risk factors. Clinical and epidemiological studies have suggested the existence of intermediate factors that may be associated with additional risk of PD. We construct genetic risk profiles for additional epidemiological and clinical factors using known genome-wide association studies (GWAS) loci related to these specific phenotypes to estimate genetic comorbidity in a systematic review. We identify genetic risk profiles based on GWAS variants associated with schizophrenia and Crohn's disease as significantly associated with risk of PD. Conditional analyses adjusting for SNPs near loci associated with PD and schizophrenia or PD and Crohn's disease suggest that spatially overlapping loci associated with schizophrenia and PD account for most of the shared comorbidity, while variation outside of known proximal loci shared by PD and Crohn's disease accounts for their shared genetic comorbidity. We examine brain methylation and expression signatures proximal to schizophrenia and Crohn's disease loci to infer functional changes in the brain associated with the variants contributing to genetic comorbidity. We compare our results with a systematic review of epidemiological literature, while the findings are dissimilar to a degree; marginal genetic associations corroborate the directionality of associations across genetic and epidemiological data. We show a strong genetically defined level of comorbidity between PD and Crohn's disease as well as between PD and schizophrenia, with likely functional consequences of associated variants occurring in brain. PMID:24057672

  17. Cellular models for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Falkenburger, Björn H; Saridaki, Theodora; Dinter, Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    Developing new therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease requires cellular models. Current models reproduce the two most salient changes found in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease: The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the existence of protein aggregates consisting mainly of α-synuclein. Cultured cells offer many advantages over studying Parkinson's disease directly in patients or in animal models. At the same time, the choice of a specific cellular model entails the requirement to focus on one aspect of the disease while ignoring others. This article is intended for researchers planning to use cellular models for their studies. It describes for commonly used cell types the aspects of Parkinson's disease they model along with technical advantages and disadvantages. It might also be helpful for researchers from other fields consulting literature on cellular models of Parkinson's disease. Important models for the study of dopaminergic neuron degeneration include Lund human mesencephalic cells and primary neurons, and a case is made for the use of non-dopaminergic cells to model pathogenesis of non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. With regard to α-synuclein aggregates, this article describes strategies to induce and measure aggregates with a focus on fluorescent techniques. Cellular models reproduce the two most salient changes of Parkinson's disease, the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the existence of α-synuclein aggregates. This article is intended for researchers planning to use cellular models for their studies. It describes for commonly used cell types and treatments the aspects of Parkinson's disease they model along with technical advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this article describes strategies to induce and measure aggregates with a focus on fluorescent techniques. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease.

  18. Genetics of Parkinson disease and essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Wider, Christian; Ross, Owen A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Elucidating the genetic background of Parkinson disease and essential tremor is crucial to understand the pathogenesis and improve diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Recent findings A number of approaches have been applied including familial and association studies, and studies of gene expression profiles to identify genes involved in susceptibility to Parkinson disease. These studies have nominated a number of candidate Parkinson disease genes and novel loci including Omi/HtrA2, GIGYF2, FGF20, PDXK, EIF4G1 and PARK16. A recent notable finding has been the confirmation for the role of heterozygous mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA) as risk factors for Parkinson disease. Finally, association studies have nominated genetic variation in the leucine-rich repeat and Ig containing 1 gene (LINGO1) as a risk for both Parkinson disease and essential tremor, providing the first genetic evidence of a link between the two conditions. Summary Although undoubtedly genes remain to be identified, considerable progress has been achieved in the understanding of the genetic basis of Parkinson disease. This same effort is now required for essential tremor. The use of next-generation high-throughput sequencing and genotyping technologies will help pave the way for future insight leading to advances in diagnosis, prevention and cure. PMID:20489616

  19. Erectile function and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Chen, Honglei; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Glasser, Dale B; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Rimm, Eric B; Ascherio, Alberto

    2007-12-15

    Erectile dysfunction is common among individuals with Parkinson's disease, but it is unknown whether it precedes the onset of the classic features of Parkinson's disease. To address this question, the authors examined whether erectile dysfunction was associated with Parkinson's disease risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Analyses included 32,616 men free of Parkinson's disease at baseline in 1986 who in 2000 completed a retrospective questionnaire with questions on erectile dysfunction in different time periods. Relative risks were computed using Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for age, smoking, caffeine intake, history of diabetes, and other covariates. Among men who reported their erectile function before 1986, 200 were diagnosed with Parkinson's disease during 1986-2002. Men with erectile dysfunction before 1986 were 3.8 times more likely to develop Parkinson's disease during the follow-up than were those with very good erectile function (relative risk = 3.8, 95% confidence interval: 2.4, 6.0; p < 0.0001). Multivariate-adjusted relative risks of Parkinson's disease were 2.7, 3.7, and 4.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.4, 11.1; p = 0.008) for participants with first onset of erectile dysfunction (before 1986) at 60 or more, 50-59, and less than 50 years of age, respectively, relative to those without erectile dysfunction. In conclusion, in this retrospective analysis in a large cohort of men, the authors observed that erectile dysfunction was associated with a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease.

  20. Bupropion as the treatment of choice in depression associated with Parkinson's disease and it's various treatments.

    PubMed

    Raskin, Sergey; Durst, Rimona

    2010-12-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic progressive degenerative disorder that affects over 6 million people worldwide. It is manifested by motor and psychiatric signs. The latter inflicts up to 88% of PD patients. With the prolongation of life expectancy, it is presumed that the prevalence of PD will further rise, together with comorbid depression. As a result, the need for an adequate therapeutic answer for compounded PD with depression is called for urgently. Several theories try to explain the trigger of depression in PD patients by impaired activity in dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin systems. Various treatment to combat depressive symptoms in PD patients were proposed and are in use, with ambiguous results and disturbing side effects. These anti-depressive modalities include SSRI's, SNRI, TCA, NRI and ECT. Dopamine agonists showed some anti-depressant activity in several studies in depressive PD, but may cause side effects such as dizziness, somnolence, confusion and even hallucinations. The role of dopamine agonists in the treatment of depression is still being explored because of no sufficient number of controlled studies in this area. Our hypothesis is to suggest NDRI - Bupropion - as the first line of treatment in PD patients with depression, in PD induced depression and/or in depression triggered by one of the treatments given for PD. Dual norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibition is associated with unique clinical profile that compounds together anti-depressant efficacy without serotonin associated side effects such as weight gain, sedation, sexual dysfunction. Bupropion, as mainly dopaminergic and noradrenergic anti-depressant can alleviate therapeutically depressive symptoms associated with PD. Clinical controlled studies on Bupropion use in PD depressed patients are required to support this hypothesis.

  1. Central cholinergic dysfunction could be associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia in early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Duck; Koo, Jung Hoi; Song, Sun Hong; Jo, Kwang Deog; Lee, Moon Kyu; Jang, Wooyoung

    2015-11-01

    Dysphagia is an important issue in the prognosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several studies have reported that oropharyngeal dysphagia may be associated with cognitive dysfunction, the exact relationship between cortical function and swallowing function in PD patients is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between an electrophysiological marker of central cholinergic function, which reflected cognitive function, and swallowing function, as measured by videofluoroscopic studies (VFSS). We enrolled 29 early PD patients. Using the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire (SDQ), we divided the enrolled patients into two groups: PD with dysphagia and PD without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was applied to explore the nature of the dysphagia. To assess central cholinergic dysfunction, short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was evaluated. We analyzed the relationship between central cholinergic dysfunction and oropharyngeal dysphagia and investigated the characteristics of the dysphagia. The SAI values were significantly different between the two groups. The comparison of each VFSS component between the PD with dysphagia group and the PD without dysphagia group showed statistical significance for most of the oral phase components and for a single pharyngeal phase component. The total score on the VDS was higher in the PD with dysphagia group than in the PD without dysphagia group. The Mini-Mental State Examination and SAI values showed significant correlations with the total score of the oral phase components. According to binary logistic regression analysis, SAI value independently contributed to the presence of dysphagia in PD patients. Our findings suggest that cholinergic dysfunction is associated with dysphagia in early PD and that an abnormal SAI value is a good biomarker for predicting the risk of dysphagia in PD patients.

  2. Artistic occupations are associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Haaxma, Charlotte A; Borm, George F; van der Linden, Dimitri; Kappelle, Arnoud C; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is preceded by a premotor phase of unknown duration. Dopaminergic degeneration during this phase may lead to subtle cognitive and behavioural changes, such as decreased novelty seeking. Consequently, premotor subjects might be most comfortable in jobs that do not require optimal dopamine levels, leading to an overrepresentation in structured and predictable occupations, or an underrepresentation in artistic occupations. In a case-control study, 750 men with PD (onset ≥40 years) and 1300 healthy men completed a validated questionnaire about their lifetime occupational status. Occupations were classified using the RIASEC model. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for the conventional and artistic categories, both for the most recent occupation before symptom onset, and for the very first occupation. Because farming has been associated with a PD risk, ORs were calculated separately for farming. A reduced risk of PD was found for men with an artistic occupation late in life (OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.04-0.53), while an artistic first occupation did not prevent PD (OR 0.72, CI 0.32-1.59). Conventional occupations showed no increased risk (recent: OR 1.07, CI 0.70-1.64; first: OR 1.14, CI 0.77-1.71). In support of previous reports, farming was associated with an increased risk of PD (recent: OR 2.6, CI 1.4-4.6; first: OR 2.7, CI 1.6-4.5). PD patients were older than controls, but various statistical corrections for age all lead to similar results. Artistic occupations late in life are associated with a reduced risk of subsequent PD, perhaps because this reflects a better preserved dopaminergic state. No initial occupation predicted PD, suggesting that the premotor phase starts later in life.

  3. Association between SNCA rs2736990 polymorphism and Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jinni; Hou, Binghui; Liu, Hongxin; Zhang, Xiaona; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Chang; Xie, Anmu

    2017-08-24

    Emerging evidence suggests that the SNP rs2736990 of SNCA is a susceptibility factor for idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) in different populations, but the studies which examined the association have provided inconsistent results. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of some case-control studies to obtain a more exact estimation of there associations. All the relevant studies were extracted from PubMed, Embase, EBSCO, Chineses national knowledge infrastructure, Google Scholar and Wanfang databases (up to February 2017). A total of six studies with 2525 PD cases and 2165 controls were eventually enrolled in the present meta-analysis based on the strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. The pooled analysis showed that there is a significant association between rs2736990 polymorphism and PD susceptibility in all genetic models (T vs. C: OR=0.772, 95%CI: 0.709-0.840, P=0.001; TT vs. CC: OR=0.586, 95%CI: 0.490-0.701, P=0.001; TC vs. CC: OR=0.814, 95%CI: 0.716-0.925, P=0.002; TT+TC vs. CC: OR=0.752, 95%CI: 0.666-0.848, P=0.001; TT vs. TC+CC: OR=0.658, 95%CI: 0.561-0.772, P=0.001). Our meta-analysis provides evidence that the T allele, TT and TC genotype of rs2736990(C/T) polymorphism may decrease the risk of PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The single nucleotide polymorphism Rs12817488 is associated with Parkinson's disease in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ri-li; Guo, Ji-feng; Wang, Ya-qin; Liu, Zhen-hua; Sun, Zhan-fang; Su, Li; Zhang, Yuan; Yan, Xin-xiang; Tang, Bei-sha

    2015-06-01

    A recent meta-analysis of datasets from five of the published Parkinson's disease (PD) genome-wide association studies implicated the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs12817488 in coiled-coil domain containing 62 (CCDC62)/huntingtin interacting protein 1 related (HIP1R) as a risk factor for PD. We conducted a case-control study to evaluate the possible association between rs12817488 and PD in Chinese people. All patients (515 PD patients and 518 age and sex-matched controls) were successfully genotyped using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. We observed that the rs12817488 polymorphism is associated with PD (p=0.003) and that the genotype and allele frequencies showed a difference between late-onset PD patients and male controls (p=0.025 and p=0.007, respectively). However, there was no difference in the early-onset PD patients and controls. We found a difference in the genotype and allele frequencies between the male PD patients and the male controls (p=0.034 and p=0.017, respectively). However, there was no difference in females. Patients with the A allele were susceptible to PD in both dominant (GA+AA versus GG; odds ratio [OR] 1.365, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.041-1.788) and recessive (AA versus GG+GA; OR 1.606, 95% CI 1.194-2.158) models. Therefore, our findings support the conclusion that the rs12817488 in CCDC62/HIP1R polymorphism may increase the risk of PD in the Chinese Han population.

  5. Noradrenaline and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Delaville, Claire; Deurwaerdère, Philippe De; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and motor symptoms including bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor at rest. These symptoms are exhibited when striatal dopamine concentration has decreased by around 70%. In addition to motor deficits, PD is also characterized by the non-motor symptoms. However, depletion of DA alone in animal models has failed to simultaneously elicit both the motor and non-motor deficits of PD, possibly because the disease is a multi-system disorder that features a profound loss in other neurotransmitter systems. There is growing evidence that additional loss of noradrenaline (NA) neurons of the locus coeruleus, the principal source of NA in the brain, could be involved in the clinical expression of motor as well as in non-motor deficits. In the present review, we analyze the latest evidence for the implication of NA in the pathophysiology of PD obtained from animal models of parkinsonism and from parkinsonian patients. Recent studies have shown that NA depletion alone, or combined with DA depletion, results in motor as well as in non-motor dysfunctions. In addition, by using selective agonists and antagonists of noradrenaline alpha receptors we, and others, have shown that α2 receptors are implicated in the control of motor activity and that α2 receptor antagonists can improve PD motor symptoms as well as l-Dopa-induced dyskinesia. In this review we argue that the loss of NA neurons in PD has an impact on all PD symptoms and that the addition of NAergic agents to dopaminergic medication could be beneficial in the treatment of the disease. PMID:21647359

  6. Homotaurine in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Lucia; De Nigris, Francesca; Specchia, Alessandro; Fasano, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Homotaurine is a natural compound of red algae, which has been demonstrated to have a neuroprotective effect and has been evaluated as a possible therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease. This was a single blind, randomized, controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of homotaurine in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and cognitive impairment. Patients were evaluated at baseline and 6 months later. Assessments included, the evaluation of: motor and non-motor conditions and complications (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, UPDRS); disability and quality of life; depression; excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue. An extensive neuropsychological tests battery was administered evaluating specific cognitive domains: memory, phonemic verbal fluency, executive functions and selective visual attention. After baseline testing, patients were allocated to one of the two groups: (A) treatment group: patients treated with homotaurine 100 mg; (B) control group: patients not treated with homotaurine. Forty-seven patients were evaluated at baseline, 24 (51 %) completed the study (PD-homotaurine: n = 11; 44 % and PD-controls: n = 13; 59 %); discontinuation rate was similar across subjects (p = 1.0). Intention to treat analyses to evaluate homotaurine safety showed mild side effects (gastrointestinal upsetting) in 3 patients. Per protocol analyses of homotaurine efficacy showed no difference between groups. Within group analyses showed that PD-homotaurine patients had better score at UPDRS-I at the end of the study compared to baseline (p = 0.017) and at Epworth Sleepiness Scale (p = 0.01). No other differences were found. No significant difference arose for the PD-ctrl group. Homotaurine is a safe drug. Our data suggest a beneficial effect of homotaurine on excessive sleepiness. Future studies are encouraged to confirm this promising role of homotaurine in promoting the sleep/awake cycle in patients with PD.

  7. [The Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: A metabolic disease?].

    PubMed

    Rieu, I; Boirie, Y; Morio, B; Derost, P; Ulla, M; Marques, A; Debilly, B; Bannier, S; Durif, F

    2010-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by motor impairments (tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability) associated or not with non-motor complications (cognitive disorders, dysautonomia). Most of patients loose weight during evolution of their disease. Dysregulations of hypothalamus, which is considered as the regulatory center of satiety and energy metabolism, could play a major role in this phenomenon. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (NST) is an effective method to treat patients with advanced Parkinson's disease providing marked improvement of motor impairments. This chirurgical procedure also induces a rapid and strong body weight gain and sometimes obesity. This post-operative weight gain, which exceeds largely weight lost recorded in non-operated patient, could be responsible of metabolic disorders (such as diabetes) and cardiovascular diseases. This review describes body weight variations generated by Parkinson' disease and deep brain stimulation of the NST, and focuses on metabolic disorders capable to explain them. Finally, this review emphasizes on the importance of an adequate nutritional follow up care for parkinsonian patient.

  8. Phenotype, genotype, and worldwide genetic penetrance of LRRK2-associated Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Healy, Daniel G; Falchi, Mario; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Durr, Alexandra; Bressman, Susan; Brice, Alexis; Aasly, Jan; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Goldwurm, Stefano; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Tolosa, Eduardo; Kay, Denise M; Klein, Christine; Williams, David R; Marras, Connie; Lang, Anthony E; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Berciano, Jose; Schapira, Anthony H V; Lynch, Timothy; Bhatia, Kailash P; Gasser, Thomas; Lees, Andrew J; Wood, Nicholas W

    2008-07-01

    Mutations in LRRK2, the gene that encodes leucine-rich repeat kinase 2, are a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). The International LRRK2 Consortium was established to answer three key clinical questions: can LRRK2-associated PD be distinguished from idiopathic PD; which mutations in LRRK2 are pathogenic; and what is the age-specific cumulative risk of PD for individuals who inherit or are at risk of inheriting a deleterious mutation in LRRK2? Researchers from 21 centres across the world collaborated on this study. The frequency of the common LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was estimated on the basis of data from 24 populations worldwide, and the penetrance of the mutation was defined in 1045 people with mutations in LRRK2 from 133 families. The LRRK2 phenotype was defined on the basis of 59 motor and non-motor symptoms in 356 patients with LRRK2-associated PD and compared with the symptoms of 543 patients with pathologically proven idiopathic PD. Six mutations met the consortium's criteria for being proven pathogenic. The frequency of the common LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was 1% of patients with sporadic PD and 4% of patients with hereditary PD; the frequency was highest in the middle east and higher in southern Europe than in northern Europe. The risk of PD for a person who inherits the LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was 28% at age 59 years, 51% at 69 years, and 74% at 79 years. The motor symptoms (eg, disease severity, rate of progression, occurrence of falls, and dyskinesia) and non-motor symptoms (eg, cognition and olfaction) of LRRK2-associated PD were more benign than those of idiopathic PD. Mutations in LRRK2 are a clinically relevant cause of PD that merit testing in patients with hereditary PD and in subgroups of patients with PD. However, this knowledge should be applied with caution in the diagnosis and counselling of patients. UK Medical Research Council; UK Parkinson's Disease Society; UK Brain Research Trust; Internationaal Parkinson Fonds; Volkswagen Foundation

  9. Phenotype, genotype, and worldwide genetic penetrance of LRRK2-associated Parkinson's disease: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Daniel G; Falchi, Mario; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Durr, Alexandra; Bressman, Susan; Brice, Alexis; Aasly, Jan; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Goldwurm, Stefano; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Tolosa, Eduardo; Kay, Denise M; Klein, Christine; Williams, David R; Marras, Connie; Lang, Anthony E; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Berciano, Jose; Schapira, Anthony HV; Lynch, Timothy; Bhatia, Kailash P; Gasser, Thomas; Lees, Andrew J; Wood, Nicholas W

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Mutations in LRRK2, the gene that encodes leucine-rich repeat kinase 2, are a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). The International LRRK2 Consortium was established to answer three key clinical questions: can LRRK2-associated PD be distinguished from idiopathic PD; which mutations in LRRK2 are pathogenic; and what is the age-specific cumulative risk of PD for individuals who inherit or are at risk of inheriting a deleterious mutation in LRRK2? Methods Researchers from 21 centres across the world collaborated on this study. The frequency of the common LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was estimated on the basis of data from 24 populations worldwide, and the penetrance of the mutation was defined in 1045 people with mutations in LRRK2 from 133 families. The LRRK2 phenotype was defined on the basis of 59 motor and non-motor symptoms in 356 patients with LRRK2-associated PD and compared with the symptoms of 543 patients with pathologically proven idiopathic PD. Findings Six mutations met the consortium's criteria for being proven pathogenic. The frequency of the common LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was 1% of patients with sporadic PD and 4% of patients with hereditary PD; the frequency was highest in the middle east and higher in southern Europe than in northern Europe. The risk of PD for a person who inherits the LRRK2 Gly2019Ser mutation was 28% at age 59 years, 51% at 69 years, and 74% at 79 years. The motor symptoms (eg, disease severity, rate of progression, occurrence of falls, and dyskinesia) and non-motor symptoms (eg, cognition and olfaction) of LRRK2-associated PD were more benign than those of idiopathic PD. Interpretation Mutations in LRRK2 are a clinically relevant cause of PD that merit testing in patients with hereditary PD and in subgroups of patients with PD. However, this knowledge should be applied with caution in the diagnosis and counselling of patients. Funding UK Medical Research Council; UK Parkinson's Disease Society; UK Brain Research

  10. Association of PGC-1alpha polymorphisms with age of onset and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Joanne; Reddy, Sonika; Zheng, Kangni; Betensky, Rebecca A; Simon, David K

    2011-05-19

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator (PGC)-1α is a transcriptional co-activator of antioxidant genes and a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction and recent work suggests a role for PGC-1α. We hypothesized that the rs8192678 PGC-1α single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may influence risk or age of onset of PD. The A10398G mitochondrial SNP has been inversely associated with risk of PD in some studies. In the current study we analyzed whether rs8192678 or other PGC-1α SNPs affect PD risk or age of onset, singularly or in association with the A10398G SNP. Genomic DNA samples from 378 PD patients and 173 age-matched controls were analyzed by multiplexed probe sequencing, followed by statistical analyses of the association of each SNP, alone or in combination, with risk or age of onset of PD. Adjustments were made for age of onset being less than the age of sampling, and for the observed dependence between these two ages. The PD samples were obtained as two separate cohorts, therefore statistical methods accounted for different sampling methods between the two cohorts, and data were analyzed using Cox regression adjusted for sampling in the risk set definition and in the model. The rs8192678 PGC-1α SNP was not associated with the risk of PD. However, an association of the PGC-1α rs8192678 GG variant with longevity was seen in control subjects (p=0.019). Exploratory studies indicated that the CC variant of rs6821591 was associated with risk of early onset PD (p=0.029), with PD age of onset (p=0.047), and with longevity (p=0.022). The rs2970848 GG allele was associated with risk of late onset PD (p=0.027). These data reveal possible associations of the PGC-1α SNPs rs6821591 and rs2970848 with risk or age of onset of PD, and of the PGC-1α rs8192678 GG and the rs6821591 CC variants with longevity. If replicated in other datasets, these findings may

  11. Diabetes mellitus is independently associated with more severe cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Kotagal, Vikas; Müller, Martijn L.T.M; Koeppe, Robert A; Scott, Peter J.H.; Albin, Roger L.; Frey, Kirk A; Petrou, Myria

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in interactions between metabolic syndromes and neurodegeneration. Diabetes mellitus (DM) contributes to cognitive impairment in the elderly but its effect in Parkinson disease (PD) is not well studied. Objective To investigate effects of comorbid DM on cognition in PD independent from PD-specific primary neurodegenerations. Methods Cross-sectional study. Patients with PD (n=148; age 65.6±7.4 years, Hoehn and Yahr stage 2.4±0.6, with (n=15) and without (n=133) comorbid type II DM, underwent [11C]methyl-4-piperidinyl propionate (PMP) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) PET imaging to assess cortical cholinergic denervation, [11C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) PET imaging to assess nigrostriatal denervation, and neuropsychological assessments. A global cognitive Z-score was calculated based on normative data. Analysis of covariance was performed to determine cognitive differences between subjects with and without DM while controlling for nigrostriatal denervation, cortical cholinergic denervation, levodopa equivalent dose and education covariates. Results There were no significant differences in age, gender, Hoehn and Yahr stage or duration of disease between diabetic and non-diabetic PD subjects. There was a non-significant trend toward lower years of education in the diabetic PD subjects compared with non-diabetic PD subjects. PD diabetics had significantly lower mean (±SD) global cognitive Z-scores (−0.98±1.01) compared to the non-diabetics (−0.36±0.91; F=7.78, P=0.006) when controlling for covariate effects of education, striatal dopaminergic denervation, and cortical cholinergic denervation (total model F=8.39, P<0.0001). Conclusion Diabetes mellitus is independently associated with more severe cognitive impairment in PD likely through mechanisms other than diseasespecific neurodegenerations. PMID:25454317

  12. Symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    2011-10-26

    Most people with Parkinson's disease (PD) have some non-motor symptoms such as sleep disturbance. Some will have impulse control disorders manifested as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, binge eating or compulsive shopping. Others show lack of initiative, indifference and lack of emotional response. This apathy, which is distinct from depression, has been reported to be present in 70 per cent of people with PD. This study examined 99 non-demented people with PD and found that quality of life was reduced in those with either of these impulse control disorders. The behavioural changes put a strain on relationships, and apathy resulted in a withdrawal from relationships and hobbies. The authors emphasise the need to diagnose and manage complications in a timely manner.

  13. Neurorehabilitation in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Neil; Miller, Nick; Rochester, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second commonest neurodegenerative disorder in the UK with an increasing prevalence in our aging population. The clinical features of PD are varied with a variety of "motor" and "nonmotor" symptoms and the condition is best thought of as a multisystem neurodegenerative disorder rather than as a "pure" movement disorder. Although the mainstay of treatment is pharmacological, nonpharmacological interventions are vital as part of a multidisciplinary approach to the disorder. Neurorehabilitative interventions have been used for some time in the treatment of PD but, until recently, there has been little evidence to support the clinical impression that physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech and language therapy have a positive impact on both motor and nonmotor symptoms. This chapter will review the current evidence base for neurorehabilitation in PD and discuss the challenges of service provision within healthcare systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Stereotactic surgery in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Linazasoro, G; Guridi, J; Vela, L; Gorospe, A; Rodríguez, M C; Aguilar, M; Ramos, E; Tolosa, E; Obeso, J A

    1997-10-01

    Stereotactic surgery for Parkinson's disease (PD) has regained interest due to the recently described hyperactivity of the subthalamic-pallidal pathway. Many patients suffering from complications associated with the chronic use of levodopa may benefit from surgical treatments. There are different surgical targets and techniques (ablative and deep brain stimulation). The choice of one particular target and technique relies on the clinical symptoms of the patient. The risk/benefit ratio of surgery is related to the careful selection of patients and the technical accuracy. Intraoperative microrecording is considered the best method to avoid side effects and partial results. A series of patient's selection and follow-up assessment criteria are proposed.

  15. Vitamin D from different sources is inversely associated with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyong; Evatt, Marian L; Maldonado, Lizmarie G; Perry, William R; Ritchie, James C; Beecham, Gary W; Martin, Eden R; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Vance, Jeffery M; Scott, William K

    2015-04-01

    An inverse association between Parkinson disease (PD) and total vitamin D levels has been reported, but whether vitamin D from different sources, that is, 25(OH)D2 (from diet and supplements) and 25(OH)D3 (mainly from sunlight exposure), all contribute to the association is unknown. Plasma total 25(OH)D, 25(OH)D2, and 25(OH)D3 levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in PD patients (n = 478) and controls (n = 431). Total 25(OH)D was categorized by clinical insufficiency or deficiency; 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 were analyzed in quartiles. Vitamin D deficiency (total 25[OH]D < 20 ng/mL) and vitamin D insufficiency (total 25[OH]D < 30 ng/mL) are associated with PD risk (odds ratio [OR] = 2.6 [deficiency] and 2.1 [insufficiency]; P < 0.0001), adjusting for age, sex, and sampling season. Both 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 levels are inversely associated with PD (P(trend) < 0.0001). The association between 25(OH)D2 and PD risk is largely confined to individuals with low 25(OH)D3 levels (P(trend) = 0.0008 and 0.12 in individuals with 25[OH]D3 < 20 ng/mL and 25[OH]D3 ≥ 20 ng/mL, respectively). Our data confirm the association between vitamin D deficiency and PD, and for the first time demonstrate an inverse association of 25(OH)D2 with PD. Given that 25(OH)D2 concentration is independent of sunlight exposure, this new finding suggests that the inverse association between vitamin D levels and PD is not simply attributable to lack of sunlight exposure in PD patients with impaired mobility. The current study, however, cannot exclude the possibility that gastrointestinal dysfunction, a non-motor PD symptom, contributes to the lower vitamin D2 levels in PD patients.

  16. Greater striatal responses to medication in Parkinson׳s disease are associated with better task-switching but worse reward performance.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Esther; Nusselein, Abraham A M; Smittenaar, Peter; Helmich, Rick C; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Cools, Roshan

    2014-09-01

    Dopaminergic medication in Parkinson's disease has been proposed to improve cognitive processing by modulating the severely depleted dorsal striatum, while impairing reward processing by modulating the relatively intact ventral striatum. However, there is no direct (neural) evidence for this hypothesis. Here we fill this gap by scanning Parkinson's disease patients (n=15) ON and relatively OFF their dopaminergic medication using functional magnetic resonance imaging. During scanning, patients performed a task that enabled the simultaneous measurement of task-switching and reward-related processing. Brain-behavior correlations revealed that medication-related increases (ON-OFF) in switch-related BOLD signal (switch-repeat) in the dorsomedial striatum were associated, on an individual basis, with improvements in task-switching (i.e. a decreased switch cost). Conversely, medication-related increases (ON-OFF) in reward-related BOLD signal (high-low) in the ventromedial striatum were associated, on an individual basis, with impairments in performance in anticipation of reward (i.e. an increased reward cost). Linear regression analyses demonstrated that the positive relationship between medication-related changes in BOLD and the reward cost was unique to the ventromedial striatum, whereas the negative relationship between medication-related changes in BOLD and the switch cost was not unique to the dorsomedial striatum. These findings extend the dopamine overdose hypothesis, according to which dopamine-induced changes in dorsal and ventral striatal processing lead to cognitive improvement and impairment respectively.

  17. Mentally stimulating activities associate with better cognitive performance in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Bohnen, Jeffrey L B; Müller, Martijn L T M; Haugen, Jacob; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2017-07-19

    Subjects at risk of dementia benefit from participation in mentally stimulating activities, but no prior studies have investigated similar associations in Parkinson disease (PD). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between times spent engaging in mentally stimulating activities and cognitive functions in PD while accounting for the degree of primary neurodegenerations. PD patients (N = 41, 33 males; age 68.5 ± 7.2; Hoehn and Yahr stage 2.6 ± 0.6) completed the Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors questionnaire, mini-mental state examination (MMSE), and [(11)C]dihydrotetrabenazine dopaminergic and [(11)C]piperidinyl propionate acetylcholinesterase PET imaging. The subset of mentally stimulating activity items of the Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors questionnaire was used to develop a rating scale as primary outcome variable in this study. Findings showed that mean rating scale score of time spent in mentally stimulating activities over a 4-week timespan was 20.0 ± 8.3 h and mean MMSE score was 28.4 ± 1.9. Regression analysis showed that duration of participation in mentally stimulating activities was a significant predictor of MMSE scores (standardized β = 0.39, t = 2.8, p = 0.009; total model: F (6,34) = 3.5, p = 0.005) independent from significant effects for cortical cholinergic activity (β = 0.35, t = 2.4, p = 0.024). Caudate nucleus dopaminergic activity, age, education, or duration of disease were not significant regressors. Post hoc analysis did not show significant effects of motor disease severity or level of physical activities. We conclude that engagement in mentally stimulating activities is associated with better cognitive abilities in PD, independent of education, severity of motor disease, nigrostriatal dopaminergic and cortical cholinergic degenerations.

  18. [Problem solving care models for Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Csóka, Mária; Molnár, Sándorné; Kellős, Éva; Domján, Gyula

    2016-05-29

    Parkinson's disease affects more than 6,3 million people worldwide. Most patients and relatives are left alone to struggle with the symptoms associated with fluctuations in drug levels and the psychotic side effects of the anti-Parkinson's medications. Moreover, quite often even health providers may find difficult to interpret and manage the problems that have been encountered. The aims of the authors were to analyze systematically the biopsychosocial needs of Parkinson's patients, and to develop a complex, evidence-based Parkinson's-nursing-care model. Patients' needs were assessed based on an observational study involving an old patient with Parkinson's disease for more than 28 years. The model has been specified as a multidisciplinary care framework adapted to the special characteristics of Parkinson's disease which transcends the limitations of different standard nursing models. The elaborated model contains a detailed description of cooperative problem solving, which is organized around individual patients along with recommendations for addressing various potential problems that might be encountered. Implementation of the presented model can improve the life quality of Parkinson's patients and can facilitate the life of affected families provided that these families are well aware about the potential benefits of the novel care delivery system.

  19. Aberrant reward processing in Parkinson's disease is associated with dopamine cell loss.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Esther; Helmich, Rick C; Janssen, Marcel J R; Oyen, Wim J G; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Cools, Roshan

    2012-02-15

    Dopamine has been implicated in reward-related impulsivity, but the exact relationship between dopamine, reward and impulsivity in humans remains unknown. We address this question in Parkinson's disease (PD), which is characterized by severe dopamine depletion. PD is associated primarily with motor and cognitive inflexibility, but can also be accompanied by reward-related impulsivity. This paradoxical symptom of PD has often been attributed to dopaminergic overstimulation by antiparkinson medication, which is necessary to relieve the motor and cognitive inflexibility. However, factors other than medication may also contribute to aberrant impact of reward. Here we assess whether cognitive inflexibility and aberrant reward impact in PD are two sides of the same coin, namely dopamine cell loss. To measure dopamine cell loss, we employed (123)I-FP-CIT Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) in 32 PD patients (10 never-medicated patients and 22 patients after withdrawal of all medication for >12h) and related the values to behavior on a rewarded task-switching paradigm. Dopamine cell loss was associated not only with cognitive inflexibility (under low reward), but also with aberrant impact of reward. These effects could not be attributed to medication use. Relative to controls (n=26), aberrant reward processing in PD was particularly expressed as reduced capacity to maintain (i.e., repeat) the current task-set under high reward. Our findings demonstrate that factors intrinsically related to PD may underlie the paradoxical symptoms of inflexibility and reward-related impulsivity in PD. The present results concur with observations that low baseline dopamine states predispose to drug and other addictions.

  20. Apathy in Parkinson's disease is associated with nucleus accumbens atrophy: a magnetic resonance imaging shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Carriere, Nicolas; Besson, Pierre; Dujardin, Kathy; Duhamel, Alain; Defebvre, Luc; Delmaire, Christine; Devos, David

    2014-06-01

    Apathy is characterized by lack of interest, loss of initiative, and flattening of affect. It is a frequent, very disabling nonmotor complication of Parkinson's disease (PD). The condition may notably occur when dopaminergic medications are tapered after the initiation of subthalamic stimulation and thus can be referred to as "dopaminergic apathy." Even in the absence of tapering, some patients may develop a form of apathy as PD progresses. This form is often related to cognitive decline and does not respond to dopaminergic medications (dopa-resistant apathy). We aimed at determining whether dopa-resistant apathy in PD is related to striatofrontal morphological changes. We compared the shape of the striatum (using spherical harmonic parameterization and sampling in a three-dimensional point distribution model [SPHARM-PDM]), cortical thickness, and fractional anisotropy (using tract-based spatial statistics) in 10 consecutive patients with dopamine-refractory apathy, 10 matched nonapathetic PD patients and 10 healthy controls. Apathy in PD was associated with atrophy of the left nucleus accumbens. The SPHARM-PDM analysis highlighted (1) a positive correlation between the severity of apathy and atrophy of the left nucleus accumbens, (2) greater atrophy of the dorsolateral head of the left caudate in apathetic patients than in nonapathetic patients, and (3) greater atrophy in the bilateral nucleus accumbens in apathetic patients than in controls. There were no significant intergroup differences in cortical thickness or fractional anisotropy. Dopa-resistant apathy in PD was associated with atrophy of the left nucleus accumbens and the dorsolateral head of the left caudate.

  1. Brain Connectivity Alterations Are Associated with the Development of Dementia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Josie-Anne; McIntosh, Anthony R; Postuma, Ronald B; Kovacevic, Natasha; Latreille, Véronique; Panisset, Michel; Chouinard, Sylvain; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Dementia affects a high proportion of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and poses a burden on caregivers and healthcare services. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a common nonevasive and nonexpensive technique that can easily be used in clinical settings to identify brain functional abnormalities. Only few studies had identified EEG abnormalities that can predict PD patients at higher risk for dementia. Brain connectivity EEG measures, such as multiscale entropy (MSE) and phase-locking value (PLV) analyses, may be more informative and sensitive to brain alterations leading to dementia than previously used methods. This study followed 62 dementia-free PD patients for a mean of 3.4 years to identify cerebral alterations that are associated with dementia. Baseline resting state EEG of patients who developed dementia (N = 18) was compared to those of patients who remained dementia-free (N = 44) and of 37 healthy subjects. MSE and PLV analyses were performed. Partial least squares statistical analysis revealed group differences associated with the development of dementia. Patients who developed dementia showed higher signal complexity and lower PLVs in low frequencies (mainly in delta frequency) than patients who remained dementia-free and controls. Conversely, both patient groups showed lower signal variability and higher PLVs in high frequencies (mainly in gamma frequency) compared to controls, with the strongest effect in patients who developed dementia. These findings suggest that specific disruptions of brain communication can be measured before PD patients develop dementia, providing a new potential marker to identify patients at highest risk of developing dementia and who are the best candidates for neuroprotective trials.

  2. Oxidative Stress in Genetic Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Varçin, Mustafa; Bentea, Eduard; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence in Parkinson's disease of a link between oxidative stress and some of the monogenically inherited Parkinson's disease-associated genes. This paper focuses on the importance of this link and potential impact on neuronal function. Basic mechanisms of oxidative stress, the cellular antioxidant machinery, and the main sources of cellular oxidative stress are reviewed. Moreover, attention is given to the complex interaction between oxidative stress and other prominent pathogenic pathways in Parkinson's disease, such as mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, an overview of the existing genetic mouse models of Parkinson's disease is given and the evidence of oxidative stress in these models highlighted. Taken into consideration the importance of ageing and environmental factors as a risk for developing Parkinson's disease, gene-environment interactions in genetically engineered mouse models of Parkinson's disease are also discussed, highlighting the role of oxidative damage in the interplay between genetic makeup, environmental stress, and ageing in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22829959

  3. [Neuropsychological characteristics of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Ostrosky-Solis, F

    Form part of the clinical symptoms of Parkinson's disease. These disorders may present in varying degrees: whilst in some patients a clinical picture of dementia is seen, in others there are only specific symptoms. In this article we consider three of the most controversial aspects currently dominating study of the neuropsychology of Parkinson's disease. The first relates to the pathophysiological basis and neurotransmitters involved. The second deals with the distinction between subcortical-type and Alzheimer-type dementia, and the third with the pathophysiological basis underlying the cognitive profile of the subgroups of patients with Parkinson's disease who do not present dementia. The relation between the factors causing the disease, neuropathology, individual variables and the presence of these subgroups requires precise systematic investigation of the neuropsychology shown by patients with Parkinson's disease.

  4. Association Between Change in Body Mass Index, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Scores, and Survival Among Persons With Parkinson Disease: Secondary Analysis of Longitudinal Data From NINDS Exploratory Trials in Parkinson Disease Long-term Study 1.

    PubMed

    Wills, Anne-Marie A; Pérez, Adriana; Wang, Jue; Su, Xiao; Morgan, John; Rajan, Suja S; Leehey, Maureen A; Pontone, Gregory M; Chou, Kelvin L; Umeh, Chizoba; Mari, Zoltan; Boyd, James

    2016-03-01

    Greater body mass index (BMI, calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) is associated with improved survival among persons with Huntington disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Weight loss is common among persons with Parkinson disease (PD) and is associated with worse quality of life. To explore the association between change in BMI, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor and total scores, and survival among persons with PD and to test whether there is a positive association between BMI at randomization and survival. Secondary analysis (from May 27, 2014, to October 13, 2015) of longitudinal data (3-6 years) from 1673 participants who started the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Exploratory Trials in PD Long-term Study-1 (NET-PD LS-1). This was a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of creatine monohydrate (10 g/d) that was performed at 45 sites throughout the United States and Canada. Participants with early (within 5 years of diagnosis) and treated (receiving dopaminergic therapy) PD were enrolled from March 2007 to May 2010 and followed up until September 2013. Change across time in motor UPDRS score, change across time in total UPDRS score, and time to death. Generalized linear mixed models were used to estimate the effect of BMI on the change in motor and total UPDRS scores after controlling for covariates. Survival was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models of time to death. A participant's BMI was measured at randomization, and BMI trajectory groups were classified according to whether participants experienced weight loss ("decreasing BMI"), weight stability ("stable BMI"), or weight gain ("increasing BMI") during the study. Of the 1673 participants (mean [SD] age, 61.7 [9.6] years; 1074 [64.2%] were male), 158 (9.4%) experienced weight loss (decreasing BMI), whereas 233 (13.9%) experienced weight gain (increasing BMI). After adjusting for covariates, we

  5. Reaction time in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Evarts, E V; Teräväinen, H; Calne, D B

    1981-03-01

    Both reaction time and movement time tend to be prolonged in Parkinson's disease, but they are often impaired independently of each other. Prolongation of RT is relatively slight, while MT undergoes more substantial and consistent disturbance. Choice RT and kinaesthetic RT do not have any advantage over simple visual RT as measurements of neurological deficit in parkinsonism, since they are all impaired to the same extent. MT is more useful than RT as an objective indicator of therapeutic efficacy, but further studies of RT (with tests requiring programming of displacement, velocity, and accuracy) may provide insights into the nature of the central motor disorder in Parkinson's disease.

  6. Argentine tango in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    2016-10-28

    This article reports on a meta-analysis of 13 studies of the effects of Argentine tango (AT) as a music-based movement therapy for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Nine studies involved randomised controlled trials.

  7. Corpus callosal atrophy and associations with cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Jennifer G; Bledsoe, Ian O; Merkitch, Doug; Dinh, Vy; Bernard, Bryan; Stebbins, Glenn T

    2017-03-28

    To investigate atrophy of the corpus callosum on MRI in Parkinson disease (PD) and its relationship to cognitive impairment. One hundred patients with PD and 24 healthy control participants underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluations and structural MRI brain scans. Participants with PD were classified as cognitively normal (PD-NC; n = 28), having mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI; n = 47), or having dementia (PDD; n = 25) by Movement Disorder Society criteria. Cognitive domain (attention/working memory, executive function, memory, language, visuospatial function) z scores were calculated. With the use of FreeSurfer image processing, volumes for total corpus callosum and its subsections (anterior, midanterior, central, midposterior, posterior) were computed and normalized by total intracranial volume. Callosal volumes were compared between participants with PD and controls and among PD cognitive groups, covarying for age, sex, and PD duration and with multiple comparison corrections. Regression analyses were performed to evaluate relationships between callosal volumes and performance in cognitive domains. Participants with PD had reduced corpus callosum volumes in midanterior and central regions compared to healthy controls. Participants with PDD demonstrated decreased callosal volumes involving multiple subsections spanning anterior to posterior compared to participants with PD-MCI and PD-NC. Regional callosal atrophy predicted cognitive domain performance such that central volumes were associated with the attention/working memory domain; midposterior volumes with executive function, language, and memory domains; and posterior volumes with memory and visuospatial domains. Notable volume loss occurs in the corpus callosum in PD, with specific neuroanatomic distributions in PDD and relationships of regional atrophy to different cognitive domains. Callosal volume loss may contribute to clinical manifestations of PD cognitive impairment. © 2017 American

  8. Factors associated with fear of falling in people with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Beata; Hagell, Peter; Hansson, Oskar; Nilsson, Maria H

    2014-01-24

    This study aimed to comprehensibly investigate potential contributing factors to fear of falling (FOF) among people with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). The study included 104 people with PD. Mean (SD) age and PD-duration were 68 (9.4) and 5 (4.2) years, respectively, and the participants' PD-symptoms were relatively mild. FOF (the dependent variable) was investigated with the Swedish version of the Falls Efficacy Scale, i.e. FES(S). The first multiple linear regression model replicated a previous study and independent variables targeted: walking difficulties in daily life; freezing of gait; dyskinesia; fatigue; need of help in daily activities; age; PD-duration; history of falls/near falls and pain. Model II included also the following clinically assessed variables: motor symptoms, cognitive functions, gait speed, dual-task difficulties and functional balance performance as well as reactive postural responses. Both regression models showed that the strongest contributing factor to FOF was walking difficulties, i.e. explaining 60% and 64% of the variance in FOF-scores, respectively. Other significant independent variables in both models were needing help from others in daily activities and fatigue. Functional balance was the only clinical variable contributing additional significant information to model I, increasing the explained variance from 66% to 73%. The results imply that one should primarily target walking difficulties in daily life in order to reduce FOF in people mildly affected by PD. This finding applies even when considering a broad variety of aspects not previously considered in PD-studies targeting FOF. Functional balance performance, dependence in daily activities, and fatigue were also independently associated with FOF, but to a lesser extent. Longitudinal studies are warranted to gain an increased understanding of predictors of FOF in PD and who is at risk of developing a FOF.

  9. Association of soil selenium, strontium, and magnesium concentrations with Parkinson's disease mortality rates in the USA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongbing

    2017-02-07

    Among the 41 soil elements analyzed from 4856 sites across the contiguous 48 states, average Parkinson's disease (PD) mortality rates between 1999 and 2014 have the most significant positive correlation with the average soil strontium (Sr) concentrations (correlation r = 0.47, significance level p = 0.00), and average PD mortality rates have the most significant inverse correlation with the average soil selenium (Se) concentrations (r = -0.44, p = 0.00). Multivariate regression models indicate that soil Sr and Se concentrations can explain 35.4% of spatial disparities of the state average PD mortality rates between 1999 and 2014 (R (2) = 0.354). When the five outlier states were removed from the model, concentrations of soil Sr and Se can explain 62.4% (R (2) = 0.624) of the spatial disparities of PD mortality rates of the 43 remaining states. The results also indicate that high soil magnesium (Mg) concentrations suppressed the growth rate of the PD mortality rates between 1999 and 2014 in the 48 states (r = -0.42, p = 0.000). While both Se and Sr have been reported to affect the nervous system, this study is the first study that reported the statistically significant association between the PD mortality rates and soil concentrations of Se, Sr, and Mg in the 48 states. Given that soil elemental concentration in a region is broad indicator of the trace element intake from food, water, and air by people, implications of the results are that high soil Se and Mg concentrations helped reduce the PD mortality rates and benefited the PD patients in the 48 states.

  10. Polyneuropathy associated with duodenal infusion of levodopa in Parkinson's disease: features, pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Uncini, Antonino; Eleopra, Roberto; Onofrj, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) treated with oral levodopa have a higher prevalence of chronic, prevalently sensory, usually mild axonal polyneuropathy (PNP). Several studies showed a positive association among PNP, cumulative levodopa dosage, low serum B12 and high-homocysteine and methylmalonic acid level. Anecdotal severe acute or subacute PNPs thought to be Guillain-Barré syndrome have been reported in patients receiving continuous intraduodenal infusion of levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG). We report an additional acute case and by a systematic literature search we also reviewed the clinical and laboratory features of 13 other acute and 21 subacute PNP cases occurring during LCIG treatment. In series with at least nine patients, the mean frequency of acute and subacute PNP is 13.6% and the mortality rate at 6 months in acute cases is 14%. The great majority of PNP cases displayed axonal sensory-motor and reduced vitamin B12 levels, and alterations of metabolites of 1-carbon pathway were found in most patients. We discuss the possible role of high-levodopa dosage, vitamin B12, B6 and folate deficiency and accumulation of homocysteine and methylmalonic acid in the pathogenesis to conclude that there is enough, although circumstantial, evidence that alterations of 1-carbon pathway are implicated also in acute and subacute PNP during LCIG usage. There is no solid proof for a dysimmune pathogenesis and in our opinion acute, subacute and chronic PNP, either after oral levodopa or LCIG, represent a continuum. Finally, we propose recommendations for prevention and management of PNP occurring during LCIG treatment.

  11. What can rodent models tell us about apathy and associated neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Magnard, R; Vachez, Y; Carcenac, C; Krack, P; David, O; Savasta, M; Boulet, S; Carnicella, S

    2016-01-01

    In addition to classical motor symptoms, Parkinson's disease (PD) patients display incapacitating neuropsychiatric manifestations, such as apathy, anhedonia, depression and anxiety. These hitherto generally neglected non-motor symptoms, have gained increasing interest in medical and scientific communities over the last decade because of the extent of their negative impact on PD patients' quality of life. Although recent clinical and functional imaging studies have provided useful information, the pathophysiology of apathy and associated affective impairments remains elusive. Our aim in this review is to summarize and discuss recent advances in the development of rodent models of PD-related neuropsychiatric symptoms using neurotoxin lesion-based approaches. The data collected suggest that bilateral and partial lesions of the nigrostriatal system aimed at inducing reliable neuropsychiatric-like deficits while avoiding severe motor impairments that may interfere with behavioral evaluation, is a more selective and efficient strategy than medial forebrain bundle lesions. Moreover, of all the different classes of pharmacological agents, D2/D3 receptor agonists such as pramipexole appear to be the most efficient treatment for the wide range of behavioral deficits induced by dopaminergic lesions. Lesion-based rodent models, therefore, appear to be relevant tools for studying the pathophysiology of the non-motor symptoms of PD. Data accumulated so far confirm the causative role of dopaminergic depletion, especially in the nigrostriatal system, in the development of behavioral impairments related to apathy, depression and anxiety. They also put forward D2/D3 receptors as potential targets for the treatment of such neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD. PMID:26954980

  12. Tremor Reduction by Deep Brain Stimulation Is Associated With Gamma Power Suppression in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beudel, Martijn; Little, Simon; Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Bogdanovic, Marko; Cheeran, Binith; Green, Alexander L.; Aziz, Tipu; Thevathasan, Wesley

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Rest tremor is a cardinal symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD), and is readily suppressed by deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The therapeutic effect of the latter on bradykinesia and rigidity has been associated with the suppression of exaggerated beta (13–30 Hz) band synchronization in the vicinity of the stimulating electrode, but there is no correlation between beta suppression and tremor amplitude. In the present study, we investigate whether tremor suppression is related to suppression of activities at other frequencies. Materials and Methods We recorded hand tremor and contralateral local field potential (LFP) activity from DBS electrodes during stimulation of the STN in 15 hemispheres in 11 patients with PD. DBS was applied with increasing voltages starting at 0.5 V until tremor suppression was achieved or until 4.5 V was reached. Results Tremor was reduced to 48.9% ± 10.9% of that without DBS once stimulation reached 2.5–3 V (t14 = −4.667, p < 0.001). There was a parallel suppression of low gamma (31–45 Hz) power to 92.5% ± 3% (t14 = −2.348, p = 0.034). This was not seen over a band containing tremor frequencies and their harmonic (4–12 Hz), or over the beta band. Moreover, low gamma power correlated with tremor severity (mean r = 0.43 ± 0.14, p = 0.008) within subjects. This was not the case for LFP power in the other two bands. Conclusions Our findings support a relationship between low gamma oscillations and PD tremor, and reinforce the principle that the subthalamic LFP is a rich signal that may contain information about the severity of multiple different Parkinsonian features. PMID:25879998

  13. Axial rotation in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaugoyeau, M; Viallet, F; Aurenty, R; Assaiante, C; Mesure, S; Massion, J

    2006-01-01

    Aims To investigate the ability of patients with Parkinson's disease to perform a rotation around the longitudinal axis of the body. Three questions were raised. Is body rotation impaired in Parkinson's disease? Is there a level of the kinematic chain from the head to the foot at which the impairment is more severe? Is the deficit related to the general slowness of movement in Parkinson's disease? Methods Kinematic data were recorded. The temporal organisation of body rotation during gait initiation was analysed in 10 patients with Parkinson's disease, who were all at an advanced stage of the disease and had all experienced falls and freezing during their daily life, and in five controls. The latency of the onset of the rotation of each segment was measured by taking the onset of the postural phase of step initiation as reference value. Locomotor variables were also analysed. Results Body rotation was found to be impaired in patients with Parkinson's disease, as the delay in the onset of the rotation of each segment is greater than that in controls. Moreover, a specific uncoupling in the onset of shoulder and pelvis segment rotation was seen in patients. This impairment of rotation is not related only to the general slowness of movements. Conclusion Patients with Parkinson's disease were found to have an impairment of posturo‐kinetic coordination and impaired capacity to exert appropriate ground reaction forces to orient the pelvis in space. PMID:16574736

  14. Systematic Review and Critical Analysis of Cost Studies Associated with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bovolenta, Tânia M.; de Azevedo Silva, Sônia Maria Cesar; Arb Saba, Roberta; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease worldwide, affecting more than four million people. Typically, it affects individuals above 45, when they are still productive, compromising both aging and quality of life. Therefore, the cost of the disease must be identified, so that the use of resources can be rational and efficient. Additionally, in Brazil, there is a lack of research on the costs of neurodegenerative diseases, such as PD, a gap addressed in this study. This systematic review critically addresses the various methodologies used in original research around the world in the last decade on the subject, showing that costs are hardly comparable. Nonetheless, the economic and social impacts are implicit, and important information for public health agents is provided. PMID:28357150

  15. Biotherapies for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Remy, P

    2014-12-01

    The clinical use of biotherapies in Parkinson disease already has 30 years' history. The transplantation of dopamine fetal cells in the striatum of advanced patients has proved to be relevant in some patients but randomized efficacy trials in the US have provided disappointing results. However, cell therapies might come back on stage with the use of stem cells in the future. Gene therapy is a more recent strategy relying on viral vectors able to transduce genes coding either for the enzymes that can increase neurotransmitters production or genes for trophic factors. Several approaches have been developed in PD and have been experimented in patients. Although, some of the studies have evidenced insufficient clinical benefit, other programs, such as those using dopamine replacement techniques are promising. We find fresh hope in this field that might be the future of PD treatment. It remains however that advanced PD might not be the ideal condition to properly benefit from biotherapies and there is a need of studies at earlier stages of the disease, a time where major change in the disease course might be expected.

  16. Parkinson disease and exercise.

    PubMed

    Earhart, Gammon M; Falvo, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative movement disorder. PD was originally attributed to neuronal loss within the substantia nigra pars compacta, and a concomitant loss of dopamine. PD is now thought to be a multisystem disorder that involves not only the dopaminergic system, but other neurotransmitter systems whose role may become more prominent as the disease progresses (189). PD is characterized by four cardinal symptoms, resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability, all of which are motor. However, PD also may include any combination of a myriad of nonmotor symptoms (195). Both motor and nonmotor symptoms may impact the ability of those with PD to participate in exercise and/or impact the effects of that exercise on those with PD. This article provides a comprehensive overview of PD, its symptoms and progression, and current treatments for PD. Among these treatments, exercise is currently at the forefront. People with PD retain the ability to participate in many forms of exercise and generally respond to exercise interventions similarly to age-matched subjects without PD. As such, exercise is currently an area receiving substantial research attention as investigators seek interventions that may modify the progression of the disease, perhaps through neuroprotective mechanisms.

  17. Association Analysis of Proteasome Subunits and Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing on Chinese Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Ming-Shu; Huang, Wei; Sun, Cong-Cong; Zhang, Li-Min; Cen, Luan; Xiao, You-Sheng; Li, Guo-Fei; Yang, Xin-Ling; Qu, Shao-Gang; Xu, Ping-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proteasome subunits (PSMB) and transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) loci are located in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) Class II region play important roles in immune response and protein degradation in neurodegenerative diseases. This study aimed to explore the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PSMB and TAP and Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: A case–control study was conducted by genotyping SNPs in PSMB8, PSMB9, TAP1, and TAP2 genes in the Chinese population. Subjects included 542 sporadic patients with PD and 674 healthy controls. Nine identified SNPs in PSMB8, PSMB9, TAP1, and TAP2 were genotyped through SNaPshot testing. Results: The stratified analysis of rs17587 was specially performed on gender. Data revealed that female patients carry a higher frequency of rs17587-G/G versus (A/A + G/A) compared with controls. But there was no significant difference with respect to the genotypic frequencies of the SNPs in PSMB8, TAP1, and TAP2 loci in PD patients. Conclusion: Chinese females carrying the rs17587-G/G genotype in PSMB9 may increase a higher risk for PD, but no linkage was found between other SNPs in HLA Class II region and PD. PMID:27098790

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bose, Anindita; Beal, M Flint

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. About 2% of the population above the age of 60 is affected by the disease. The pathological hallmarks of the disease include the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies that are made of α-synuclein. Several theories have been suggested for the pathogenesis of PD, of which mitochondrial dysfunction plays a pivotal role in both sporadic and familial forms of the disease. Dysfunction of the mitochondria that is caused by bioenergetic defects, mutations in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA gene mutations linked to mitochondria, and changes in dynamics of the mitochondria such fusion or fission, changes in size and morphology, alterations in trafficking or transport, altered movement of mitochondria, impairment of transcription, and the presence of mutated proteins associated with mitochondria are implicated in PD. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the mechanisms that can cause mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. We bring to the forefront, new signaling pathways such as the retromer-trafficking pathway and its implication in the disease and also provide a brief overview of therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial defects in PD. Bioenergetic defects, mutations in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA gene mutations, alterations in mitochondrial dynamics, alterations in trafficking/transport and mitochondrial movement, abnormal size and morphology, impairment of transcription and the presence of mutated proteins associated with mitochondria are implicated in PD. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction in PD and bring to the forefront new signaling pathways that may be involved in PD. We also provide an overview of therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial defects in PD. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  19. Postural tremor of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J M; Yiannikas, C; Morris, J G; Einstein, R; Jackson, D; Byth, K

    1994-06-01

    Previous studies have reported the resting tremor (RT) of Parkinson's disease to occur at frequencies between 3-7 Hz and to be characterised by an alternating pattern of electromyographic (EMG) bursting activity between opposing muscles. A postural tremor (PT), of higher frequency (> 6 Hz) and with a synchronous pattern of EMG activity, has also been previously described in Parkinson's disease. We investigated the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of both the RT and PT of 11 patients with Parkinson's disease and 10 patients with essential tremor in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of L-Dopa/benserazide and propranolol. Tremor amplitude and frequency were assessed via bidirectional accelerometry, and the pattern of activation of the antagonist muscles of the forearm was determined with use of surface EMG. In the Parkinson's disease group studied, the frequency, EMG pattern of bursts, and response to L-Dopa were similar for the two tremors (median improvement of RT by 70% and PT by 61%). Despite some overlap between the Parkinson's disease and essential tremor groups in the electrophysiology of the tremor, there was no such dramatic pharmacological response in the latter group. These results suggest that the RT and PT of Parkinson's disease share a common pathophysiology and are distinct from essential tremor.

  20. Parkinson's disease and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Carina C; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-02-22

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the "primed" microglia into an "active" state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease.

  1. Parkinson's Disease and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the “primed” microglia into an “active” state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease. PMID:21403862

  2. Inflammation and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wersinger, Christophe; Sidhu, Anita

    2002-09-01

    Numerous recent findings indicate the possible involvement of an immune mechanism in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. The immune reaction could either act as a primary event, generating changes leading to cell death, or could be a secondary response to neuronal injury. In various neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's or Pick's disease, Down's syndrome, multiple sclerosis and the AIDS-dementia complex, the inflammatory pathomechanism is strongly supported by experimental and clinical studies. Such inflammatory mechanisms have also been postulated in Parkinson's disease (PD). This review summarizes some generalities about inflammation and immune reactions in the context of the brain, and provides clinical, epidemiological and experimental data showing that inflammation and immunity, or even auto-immunity, could be implicated in PD, either in its initial step or in its progression. Different experimental models useful for studying the role(s) of inflammation and (auto)immunity in the neurodegenerative process of the dopaminergic neurons in PD are examined. The major similarities and differences between PD and other neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  3. A single-center, cross-sectional prevalence study of impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: association with dopaminergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Michele; Logi, Chiara; Lucetti, Claudio; Del Dotto, Paolo; Baldacci, Filippo; Vergallo, Andrea; Ulivi, Martina; Del Sarto, Simone; Rossi, Giuseppe; Ceravolo, Roberto; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2013-10-01

    The current study aimed at establishing the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and their association with demographic, drug-related, and disease-related characteristics. We performed a single-center cross-sectional study of 805 PD patients. Impulse control disorders were investigated with the Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease; also comorbid neuropsychiatric complications (dementia, delusions, visual hallucinations) were investigated with clinical interviews and ad hoc instruments (Parkinson Psychosis Questionnaire and Neuropsychiatry Inventory). Impulse control disorders were identified in 65 patients (prevalence, 8.1%), with pathological gambling and hypersexuality the most frequent. Impulse control disorders were present in 57 of 593 cognitively preserved patients (prevalence, 9.6%) and in 8 of 212 demented patients (prevalence, 3.8%). Impulse control disorders were significantly associated with dopamine agonists (odds ratio [OR], 5.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.60-12.46; P < 0.0001) and levodopa (OR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.06-6.35; P = 0.034). Impulse control disorders frequency was similar for pramipexole and ropinirole (16.6% vs 12.5%; OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.79-2.74; P = 0.227). Additional variables associated with ICDs were male sex and younger age. These findings suggested that dopaminergic treatments in PD are associated with increased odds of having an ICD, but also other demographic and clinical variables are associated with ICDs, suggesting the multifactorial nature of the ICD phenomenon in PD.

  4. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology. PMID:24672633

  5. Copper and copper proteins in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Montes, Sergio; Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  6. Default mode network connectivity patterns associated with visual processing at different stages of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rektorova, Irena; Krajcovicova, Lenka; Marecek, Radek; Novakova, Marie; Mikl, Michal

    2014-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN) decreases its activity when switching from a resting state to a cognitive task condition, while activity of the network engaged in the given task increases. Visual processing is typically disturbed in Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). Using functional MRI, we studied the DMN effective connectivity patterns in PDD as compared with cognitively normal patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy controls (HC) when switching from baseline to a visual cognitive task condition. In all, 14 PDD, 18 PD, and 18 age-matched healthy controls participated in this functional MRI study. We used a psychophysiological interaction analysis with the precuneus (PCu) as a seed. The threshold was set at p(FWE) <0.05. The healthy controls showed greater PCu connectivity with the bilateral middle temporal/middle occipital gyri at baseline than during the task condition. The correlation direction changed from positive to negative. Both PD and PDD showed disturbed DMN connectivity with the brain regions that are involved in bottom-up visual processing. In PD, we also found impaired integration of the areas engaged in the ventral attentional network, which might reflect specific attentional deficits observed during the early course of PD. In mild PDD, we detected increased engagement of areas involved in the dorsal attentional network, which corresponds to increased top-down control in this patient group as compared to the healthy controls. Our results show impaired dynamic interplay between large scale brain networks in PD that spread far beyond the motor system.

  7. Prevalence and associated features of self-reported freezing of gait in Parkinson disease: The DEEP FOG study.

    PubMed

    Amboni, M; Stocchi, F; Abbruzzese, G; Morgante, L; Onofrj, M; Ruggieri, S; Tinazzi, M; Zappia, M; Attar, M; Colombo, D; Simoni, L; Ori, A; Barone, P; Antonini, A

    2015-06-01

    Freezing of Gait (FOG) is a common and disabling symptom in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). The relationship between FOG and dopaminergic medication is complex. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of self-reported FOG, its associated clinical features, and its relationship with wearing-off in a wide PD population. This is an observational multicenter study of 634 consecutive non-demented PD patients. Patients were identified either as freezers or non-freezers based on item-3 of the Freezing of Gait-Questionnaire. FOG was then classified as on, off and onoff freezing based on its relationship with wearing-off. Patients were assessed with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Hoehn and Yahr scale, 8-item Parkinson's disease Questionnaire, Mini-Mental State Examination. Data from 593 patients were analyzed, 325 (54.3%) were freezers of whom 200 (61.6%) experienced FOG only during off state (off-freezers), 6 (1.8%) only during on state and 119 (36.6%) either in on and off states or independently of dopaminergic response-related symptoms (onoff-freezers). Overall, freezers vs non-freezers had longer disease duration, more advanced disease and greater disability. Moreover, freezers more frequently reported wearing-off and experienced worse quality of life. Onoff-freezers vs off-freezers were older, more severely disabled, less likely to experience wearing-off, treated with lower levodopa equivalent daily dose and with poorer cognitive performance. Self-reported FOG is mainly recognizable in advanced PD and is associated with more disability and worse quality of life. Onoff-FOG may represent the result of under-treatment or rather interpretable as a distinct clinical entity.

  8. Glutamate and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Blandini, F; Porter, R H; Greenamyre, J T

    1996-02-01

    Altered glutamatergic neurotransmission and neuronal metabolic dysfunction appear to be central to the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). The substantia nigra pars compacta--the area where the primary pathological lesion is located--is particularly exposed to oxidative stress and toxic and metabolic insults. A reduced capacity to cope with metabolic demands, possibly related to impaired mitochondrial function, may render nigral highly vulnerable to the effects of glutamate, which acts as a neurotoxin in the presence of impaired cellular energy metabolism. In this way, glutamate may participate in the pathogenesis of PD. Degeneration of dopamine nigral neurons is followed by striatal dopaminergic denervation, which causes a cascade of functional modifications in the activity of basal ganglia nuclei. As an excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate plays a pivotal role in normal basal ganglia circuitry. With nigrostriatal dopaminergic depletion, the glutamatergic projections from subthalamic nucleus to the basal ganglia output nuclei become overactive and there are regulatory changes in glutamate receptors in these regions. There is also evidence of increased glutamatergic activity in the striatum. In animal models, blockade of glutamate receptors ameliorates the motor manifestations of PD. Therefore, it appears that abnormal patterns of glutamatergic neurotransmission are important in the symptoms of PD. The involvement of the glutamatergic system in the pathogenesis and symptomatology of PD provides potential new targets for therapeutic intervention in this neurodegenerative disorder.

  9. Parkinson's Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women & PD Initiative Raise Awareness Fundraise as a PDF Champion Find Community Events Get Creative Display the ... Your Story Go Global: World Parkinson Congress Supporting PDF Make a Donation Make a Memorial or Honor ...

  10. Nuclear microscopy in Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Lee, T.; Thong, P. S. P.; Tang, S. M.

    1995-09-01

    Rats have been subjected to unilateral lesioning with the selective neurotoxin 6-OHDA in order to induce Parkinsonism. Analysis using the NUS Nuclear Microscope facility have shown that iron levels are raised by an average of 26% in the lesioned subtantia nigra region of the brain compared with the non-lesioned side. In addition the background tissue level of iron is also elevated by 31% in the lesioned side, indicating that there is a general increase in iron levels as a result of the lesioning. This result is consistent with the other observations that other diseases of the brain are frequently associated with altered iron levels (eg. progressive nuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis).

  11. Placebo influences on dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Christopher G; Laska, Eugene; Hicking, Christine; Damier, Philippe; Müller, Thomas; Nutt, John; Warren Olanow, C; Rascol, Olivier; Russ, Hermann

    2008-04-15

    Clinical features that are prognostic indicators of placebo response among dyskinetic Parkinson's disease patients were determined. Placebo-associated improvements occur in Parkinsonism, but responses in dyskinesia have not been studied. Placebo data from two multicenter studies with identical design comparing sarizotan to placebo for treating dyskinesia were accessed. Sarizotan (2 mg/day) failed to improve dyskinesia compared with placebo, but both treatments improved dyskinesia compared with baseline. Stepwise regression identified baseline characteristics that influenced dyskinesia response to placebo, and these factors were entered into a logistic regression model to quantify their influence on placebo-related dyskinesia improvements and worsening. Because placebo-associated improvements in Parkinsonism have been attributed to heightened dopaminergic activity, we also examined the association between changes in Parkinsonism and dyskinesia. Four hundred eighty-four subjects received placebo treatment; 178 met criteria for placebo-associated dyskinesia improvement and 37 for dyskinesia worsening. Older age, lower baseline Parkinsonism score, and lower total daily levodopa doses were associated with placebo-associated improvement, whereas lower baseline dyskinesia score was associated with placebo-associated worsening. Placebo-associated dyskinesia changes were not correlated with Parkinsonism changes, and all effects in the sarizotan group were statistically explained by the placebo-effect regression model. Dyskinesias are affected by placebo treatment. The absence of correlation between placebo-induced changes in dyskinesia and Parkinsonism argues against a dopaminergic activation mechanism to explain placebo-associated improvements in dyskinesia. The magnitude and variance of placebo-related changes and the factors that influence them can be helpful in the design of future clinical trials of antidyskinetic agents.

  12. Web-Based Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Two Novel Loci and a Substantial Genetic Component for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Do, Chuong B.; Tung, Joyce Y.; Dorfman, Elizabeth; Kiefer, Amy K.; Drabant, Emily M.; Francke, Uta; Mountain, Joanna L.; Goldman, Samuel M.; Tanner, Caroline M.; Langston, J. William; Wojcicki, Anne; Eriksson, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Although the causes of Parkinson's disease (PD) are thought to be primarily environmental, recent studies suggest that a number of genes influence susceptibility. Using targeted case recruitment and online survey instruments, we conducted the largest case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS) of PD based on a single collection of individuals to date (3,426 cases and 29,624 controls). We discovered two novel, genome-wide significant associations with PD–rs6812193 near SCARB2 (, ) and rs11868035 near SREBF1/RAI1 (, )—both replicated in an independent cohort. We also replicated 20 previously discovered genetic associations (including LRRK2, GBA, SNCA, MAPT, GAK, and the HLA region), providing support for our novel study design. Relying on a recently proposed method based on genome-wide sharing estimates between distantly related individuals, we estimated the heritability of PD to be at least 0.27. Finally, using sparse regression techniques, we constructed predictive models that account for 6%–7% of the total variance in liability and that suggest the presence of true associations just beyond genome-wide significance, as confirmed through both internal and external cross-validation. These results indicate a substantial, but by no means total, contribution of genetics underlying susceptibility to both early-onset and late-onset PD, suggesting that, despite the novel associations discovered here and elsewhere, the majority of the genetic component for Parkinson's disease remains to be discovered. PMID:21738487

  13. [Cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Abe, Nobuhito; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-04-01

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting in motor symptoms and cognitive deficits. Neuropsychological studies have suggested that patients with Parkinson disease exhibit a broad range of cognitive deficits even in the early stages of the disease. In this review, we discuss the neuropsychological evidence for cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease, outlining the different domains of cognitive disturbance. First, we review previous findings on executive dysfunction, which is associated with a disruption in frontostriatal circuitry mainly driven by dopaminergic dysmodulation. Executive dysfunction is the core symptom in the cognitive deficits in Parkinson disease. Second, we focus on impairment in different domains of memory function, such as short-term and long-term memory. Third, we discuss the pattern of cognitive deficits in visuospatial ability, ranging from basic perceptual processes to rather complex motor skills. Next, we summarize the profile of cognitive deficits in language, although previous findings are mixed and hence this topic is relatively controversial. Finally, we introduce several recent findings on social cognitive deficits, which is a new area of research that has emerged in the past decade. We also discuss the possible neural mechanisms underlying each domain of cognitive deficits in patients with Parkinson disease.

  14. Placebo-associated improvements in motor function: comparison of subjective and objective sections of the UPDRS in early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Christopher G; Leurgans, Sue; Raman, Rema

    2002-03-01

    The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is primarily composed of an investigator-derived objective rating of motor function and a patient-derived assessment of activities of daily living (ADL). Using a stringent definition of placebo effect, we examined the frequency, temporal development, and stability of improvements during placebo treatment over 6 months in a large placebo-controlled trial of deprenyl and tocopherol in early Parkinson's disease (DATATOP). One hundred ninety-nine subjects received placebo treatment in the randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled DATATOP study. We compared the baseline UPDRS motor section scores with follow-up scores at 4, 13, and 26 weeks. Placebo-associated improvement was defined as an improvement over baseline score in motor UPDRS of at least 50% or a change in at least two motor items at any one visit by two or more points. Seventeen percent of the 185 subjects who qualified for analysis met the placebo response criteria. The group prevalence of response was steady (7% to 10%) at any one visit without a marked predominance of an early study effect. Older subjects with more motor impairment at baseline were most likely to show a placebo-associated improvement. ADL scores were low throughout the study, and ADL improvements did not identify the subjects with objectively defined placebo-associated improvement. Prominent improvements in investigator-derived objective measures of Parkinson's disease motor impairment occur during clinical trials, including one that was not aimed at showing improved short-term efficacy. Although the notion of placebo effect often implies patient-based perceptions, we found subjective changes to be infrequent in placebo-treated patients, suggesting that either: (1) the placebo effect was rater-driven; (2) the ADL questionnaire is insensitive to transient but objectively demonstrable motor changes; or (3) that the objective changes, albeit major, are within the realm of natural

  15. Camptocormia in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kazuo; Uchida, Yutaka; Notani, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Abnormalities of posture represent one of the main features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Among them, camptocormia has been considered as rare in PD. We investigated frequency and clinical features of camptocormia in PD patients. Methods. 153 PD patients (mean 68.5 ± 10.7 years old, duration 5.9 ± 2.4 years) outpatiently recruited. After neurologic examination, patients were rated on the Unified PD Rating Scale motor scale (UPDRS Part III), minimental state examination (MMSE). Also we evaluated patients with camptocormia by MRI. Of the 153 PD patients, 27 had camptocormia (mean age, 67.9 ± 7.9 years old; disease duration, 6.1 ± 3.9 years). For further evaluation, we recruited age- and sex-matched 27 PD patients without camptocormia (11 men and 16 women; mean age ±  SD, 69.2 ± 10.1 years, duration 6.0 ± 2.7 years) These selected 54 patients completed several self-assessments. Lumbar and thoracic paraspinal muscles were studied by EMG. Results. There were no significant differences in age, duration, severity, and drug dose between patients with and without camptocormia. Analysis of NMSS subitems indicated that PD patients tended to show lower scores for sleep/fatigue, attention/memory, and miscellaneous items. Conclusions. We found significant differences concerning nonmotor signs and symptoms evaluated by FAB, PDQ-8, FSQ, VAS-F, and NMSS between patients with and without camptocormia. Our findings indicate that camptocormia is a relatively common sign in PD and that patients with camptocormia scores on the PDQ-8 compared with PD patients without camptocormia. This suggests that improvements in camptocormia of PD patients may improve their QOL. PMID:20948888

  16. Olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, C H; Shephard, B C; Daniel, S E

    1997-05-01

    To evaluate olfactory function in Parkinson's disease. A standardised odour identification test was used, together with an evoked potential assessment with hydrogen sulphide. In addition, histological analysis was performed on the olfactory bulbs of cadavers who died from Parkinson's disease. Over 70% of patients studied (71 of 96) were outside the 95% limit of normal on the identification test in an age matched sample and there was an unusual pattern of selective loss to certain odours, not hitherto described. The evoked potentials were significantly delayed but of comparable amplitude to a control matched population. Of the 73 patients studied only 37 had a technically satisfactory record containing a clear response to both gases and of these, 12 were delayed. For H2S there was more delay on stimulating the right nostril than the left. Some patients with normal smell identification test scores had delayed evoked potentials. In the pathological examination of olfactory bulbs from eight brains, changes characteristic of Parkinson's disease (Lewy bodies) were seen in every olfactory bulb, particularly in the anterior olfactory nucleus, and were sufficiently distinct to allow a presumptive diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Olfactory damage in Parkinson's disease is consistent and severe and may provide an important clue to the aetiology of the disease.

  17. Olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, C H; Shephard, B C; Daniel, S E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate olfactory function in Parkinson's disease. METHODS: A standardised odour identification test was used, together with an evoked potential assessment with hydrogen sulphide. In addition, histological analysis was performed on the olfactory bulbs of cadavers who died from Parkinson's disease. RESULTS: Over 70% of patients studied (71 of 96) were outside the 95% limit of normal on the identification test in an age matched sample and there was an unusual pattern of selective loss to certain odours, not hitherto described. The evoked potentials were significantly delayed but of comparable amplitude to a control matched population. Of the 73 patients studied only 37 had a technically satisfactory record containing a clear response to both gases and of these, 12 were delayed. For H2S there was more delay on stimulating the right nostril than the left. Some patients with normal smell identification test scores had delayed evoked potentials. In the pathological examination of olfactory bulbs from eight brains, changes characteristic of Parkinson's disease (Lewy bodies) were seen in every olfactory bulb, particularly in the anterior olfactory nucleus, and were sufficiently distinct to allow a presumptive diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. CONCLUSIONS: Olfactory damage in Parkinson's disease is consistent and severe and may provide an important clue to the aetiology of the disease. Images PMID:9153598

  18. Low adherence to antidepressants is associated with increased mortality in Parkinson disease patients.

    PubMed

    Shoval, Gal; Stubbs, Brendon; Balicer, Ran D; Feldman, Becca; Hoshen, Moshe; Zalsman, Gil; Sagy, Roi; Hochman, Eldar; Weizman, Abraham; Krivoy, Amir

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between adherence to antidepressants (AD) and all-cause mortality in a population-based cohort of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD). From a database of more than 4 million people, 8553 patients with PD who purchased an AD at least once between the years 2008-2011 were retrospectively followed for all-cause mortality over 4-years. Adherence was measured as a ratio between dispensed and prescribed durations and was modeled as: non-adherence (<20%, n = 1566), poor (20%-50%, n = 1184), moderate (50%-80%, n = 1584), and good (>80%, n = 4219) adherence. Multivariable survival analyses adjusted for demographic and clinical variables including physical comorbidities known to influence mortality were conducted, however there was no adjustment for other psychiatric disorders and medications. Unadjusted mortality rates were 20.4%, 25.1%, 23.4% and 25.6% in those classified as non-adherent, poor, moderate and good adherence respectively (χ2 = 18.45, p < 0.0001). The non-adherent and poor adherence groups had significantly increased adjusted mortality hazard ratios (HR) of 1.43 (CI: 1.26-1.62) and 1.26 (CI: 1.1-1.44) respectively compared to the good adherence group. Using the same model, the adjusted HR for death among males was 1.49 [95% CI: 1.36-1.62] compared to females. People with PD and Charslon's Comorbidity Index score of 3-4 (HR 1.3, P < 0.001) and 5+ (HR 1.78, P < 0.001) were more likely to die than those with 0-2 comorbidities. Our findings suggest that poor adherence to AD is associated with increased all-cause mortality in people with PD. Given the high prevalence of depression and AD effectiveness, efforts to promote adherence should be prioritized in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Vaccination strategies for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Ramos, Marina; von Euler Chelpin, Marianne; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the world, but there is currently no available cure for it. Current treatments only alleviate some of the symptoms for a few years, but they become ineffective in the long run and do not stop the disease. Therefore it is of outmost importance to develop therapeutic strategies that can prevent, stop, or cure Parkinson disease. A very promising target for these therapies is the peripheral immune system due to its probable involvement in the disease and its potential as a tool to modulate neuroinflammation. But for such strategies to be successful, we need to understand the particular state of the peripheral immune system during Parkinson disease in order to avoid its weaknesses. In this review we examine the available data regarding how dopamine regulates the peripheral immune system and how this regulation is affected in Parkinson disease; the specific cytokine profiles observed during disease progression and the alterations documented to date in patients’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also review the different strategies used in Parkinson disease animal models to modulate the adaptive immune response to salvage dopaminergic neurons from cell death. After analyzing the evidence, we hypothesize the need to prime the immune system to restore natural tolerance against α-synuclein in Parkinson disease, including at the same time B and T cells, so that T cells can reprogram microglia activation to a beneficial pattern and B cell/IgG can help neurons cope with the pathological forms of α-synuclein. PMID:24670306

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies candidate genes for Parkinson's disease in an Ashkenazi Jewish population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinmin; Cheng, Rong; Verbitsky, Miguel; Kisselev, Sergey; Browne, Andrew; Mejia-Sanatana, Helen; Louis, Elan D; Cote, Lucien J; Andrews, Howard; Waters, Cheryl; Ford, Blair; Frucht, Steven; Fahn, Stanley; Marder, Karen; Clark, Lorraine N; Lee, Joseph H

    2011-08-03

    To date, nine Parkinson disease (PD) genome-wide association studies in North American, European and Asian populations have been published. The majority of studies have confirmed the association of the previously identified genetic risk factors, SNCA and MAPT, and two studies have identified three new PD susceptibility loci/genes (PARK16, BST1 and HLA-DRB5). In a recent meta-analysis of datasets from five of the published PD GWAS an additional 6 novel candidate genes (SYT11, ACMSD, STK39, MCCC1/LAMP3, GAK and CCDC62/HIP1R) were identified. Collectively the associations identified in these GWAS account for only a small proportion of the estimated total heritability of PD suggesting that an 'unknown' component of the genetic architecture of PD remains to be identified. We applied a GWAS approach to a relatively homogeneous Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population from New York to search for both 'rare' and 'common' genetic variants that confer risk of PD by examining any SNPs with allele frequencies exceeding 2%. We have focused on a genetic isolate, the AJ population, as a discovery dataset since this cohort has a higher sharing of genetic background and historically experienced a significant bottleneck. We also conducted a replication study using two publicly available datasets from dbGaP. The joint analysis dataset had a combined sample size of 2,050 cases and 1,836 controls. We identified the top 57 SNPs showing the strongest evidence of association in the AJ dataset (p < 9.9 × 10(-5)). Six SNPs located within gene regions had positive signals in at least one other independent dbGaP dataset: LOC100505836 (Chr3p24), LOC153328/SLC25A48 (Chr5q31.1), UNC13B (9p13.3), SLCO3A1(15q26.1), WNT3(17q21.3) and NSF (17q21.3). We also replicated published associations for the gene regions SNCA (Chr4q21; rs3775442, p = 0.037), PARK16 (Chr1q32.1; rs823114 (NUCKS1), p = 6.12 × 10(-4)), BST1 (Chr4p15; rs12502586, p = 0.027), STK39 (Chr2q24.3; rs3754775, p = 0.005), and LAMP3 (Chr3; rs

  1. Genome-Wide association study identifies candidate genes for Parkinson's disease in an Ashkenazi Jewish population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To date, nine Parkinson disease (PD) genome-wide association studies in North American, European and Asian populations have been published. The majority of studies have confirmed the association of the previously identified genetic risk factors, SNCA and MAPT, and two studies have identified three new PD susceptibility loci/genes (PARK16, BST1 and HLA-DRB5). In a recent meta-analysis of datasets from five of the published PD GWAS an additional 6 novel candidate genes (SYT11, ACMSD, STK39, MCCC1/LAMP3, GAK and CCDC62/HIP1R) were identified. Collectively the associations identified in these GWAS account for only a small proportion of the estimated total heritability of PD suggesting that an 'unknown' component of the genetic architecture of PD remains to be identified. Methods We applied a GWAS approach to a relatively homogeneous Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population from New York to search for both 'rare' and 'common' genetic variants that confer risk of PD by examining any SNPs with allele frequencies exceeding 2%. We have focused on a genetic isolate, the AJ population, as a discovery dataset since this cohort has a higher sharing of genetic background and historically experienced a significant bottleneck. We also conducted a replication study using two publicly available datasets from dbGaP. The joint analysis dataset had a combined sample size of 2,050 cases and 1,836 controls. Results We identified the top 57 SNPs showing the strongest evidence of association in the AJ dataset (p < 9.9 × 10-5). Six SNPs located within gene regions had positive signals in at least one other independent dbGaP dataset: LOC100505836 (Chr3p24), LOC153328/SLC25A48 (Chr5q31.1), UNC13B (9p13.3), SLCO3A1(15q26.1), WNT3(17q21.3) and NSF (17q21.3). We also replicated published associations for the gene regions SNCA (Chr4q21; rs3775442, p = 0.037), PARK16 (Chr1q32.1; rs823114 (NUCKS1), p = 6.12 × 10-4), BST1 (Chr4p15; rs12502586, p = 0.027), STK39 (Chr2q24.3; rs3754775, p = 0

  2. Vocal tract characteristics in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gillivan-Murphy, Patricia; Carding, Paul; Miller, Nick

    2016-06-01

    Voice tremor is strongly linked to the Parkinson's disease speech-voice symptom complex. Little is known about the underlying anatomic source(s) of voice tremor when it occurs. We review recent literature addressing this issue. Additionally we report findings from a study we conducted employing rating of vocal tract structures viewed using nasolaryngoscopy during vocal and nonspeech tasks. In Parkinson's disease, using laryngeal electromyography, tremor has not been identified in muscles in the vocal folds even when perceived auditorily. Preliminary findings using nasolaryngoscopy suggest that Parkinson's disease voice tremor is not associated with the vocal folds and may involve the palate, the global larynx, and the arytenoids. Tremor in the vertical larynx on /a/, and tremor in the arytenoid cartilages on /s/ differentiated patients with Parkinson's disease from neurologically healthy controls. Visual reliable detection of tremor when it is absent or borderline present, is challenging. Parkinson's disease voice tremor is likely to be related to oscillatory movement in structures across the vocal tract rather than just the vocal folds. To progress clinical practice, more refined tools for the visual rating of tremor would be beneficial. How far voice tremor represents a functionally significant factor for speakers would also add to the literature.

  3. Freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease is associated with functional decoupling between the cognitive control network and the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Shine, James M; Matar, Elie; Ward, Philip B; Frank, Michael J; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Pearson, Mark; Naismith, Sharon L; Lewis, Simon J G

    2013-12-01

    Recent neuroimaging evidence has led to the proposal that freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease is due to dysfunctional interactions between frontoparietal cortical regions and subcortical structures, such as the striatum. However, to date, no study has employed task-based functional connectivity analyses to explore this hypothesis. In this study, we used a data-driven multivariate approach to explore the impaired communication between distributed neuronal networks in 10 patients with Parkinson's disease and freezing of gait, and 10 matched patients with no clinical history of freezing behaviour. Patients performed a virtual reality gait task on two separate occasions (once ON and once OFF their regular dopaminergic medication) while functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected. Group-level independent component analysis was used to extract the subject-specific time courses associated with five well-known neuronal networks: the motor network, the right- and left cognitive control networks, the ventral attention network and the basal ganglia network. We subsequently analysed both the activation and connectivity of these neuronal networks between the two groups with respect to dopaminergic state and cognitive load while performing the virtual reality gait task. During task performance, all patients used the left cognitive control network and the ventral attention network and in addition, showed increased connectivity between the bilateral cognitive control networks. However, patients with freezing demonstrated functional decoupling between the basal ganglia network and the cognitive control network in each hemisphere. This decoupling was also associated with paroxysmal motor arrests. These results support the hypothesis that freezing behaviour in Parkinson's disease is because of impaired communication between complimentary yet competing neural networks.

  4. The association between clinically relevant anxiety and other non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Si-Ming; Yuan, Yong-Sheng; Tong, Qing; Zhang, Li; Xu, Qin-Rong; Ding, Jian; Zhang, Ke-Zhong

    2015-11-01

    Anxiety disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are often missed due to an overlap with other non-motor symptoms. The relationships between anxiety and other non-motor symptoms in PD still remain unclear. We used the Hamilton anxiety rating scale and the Non-motor Symptoms Questionnaire to measure anxiety and the complex range of non-motor symptoms in 99 PD patients. The relationships between anxiety and other PD-related non-motor symptoms were examined through regression analyses. 25 % of PD patients were diagnosed with clinically relevant anxiety. Non-motor symptoms were more prominent in patients with anxiety. Depression, urinary disorders, and sleep disruption were the factors most likely to influence anxiety in PD. Our findings have revealed a strong interplay between anxiety and other non-motor symptoms of PD and have highlighted the need for a holistic approach towards the clinical treatment of this disabling condition.

  5. Auditory musical hallucinations associated with extended-release pramipexole in an elderly patient with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Ueno, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Auditory musical hallucinations (AMHs) are rare complex auditory hallucinations in Parkinson's disease (PD) that have been limited previously. The characteristics of AMHs in PD remain uncertain. We describe a 72-year-old woman with PD who presented with AMHs. The AMHs occurred after immediate-release pramipexole was switched to extended-release pramipexole. The AMHs were a quiet piano or often songs on a loud radio or background music over other sounds. The music was unpleasant, but not objectionable, threatening, or ego-syntonic, and it did not interrupt her daily activities. AMHs in PD were non-threatening, and dopaminergic treatment may predispose patients to AMHs or be a unique possible cause of AMHs. The hallucinations can occur after immediate-release pramipexole was switched to extended-release pramipexole.

  6. Auditory Musical Hallucinations Associated With Extended-Release Pramipexole in an Elderly Patient With Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Ueno, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Auditory musical hallucinations (AMHs) are rare complex auditory hallucinations in Parkinson's disease (PD) that have been limited previously. The characteristics of AMHs in PD remain uncertain. We describe a 72-year-old woman with PD who presented with AMHs. The AMHs occurred after immediate-release pramipexole was switched to extended-release pramipexole. The AMHs were a quiet piano or often songs on a loud radio or background music over other sounds. The music was unpleasant, but not objectionable, threatening, or ego-syntonic, and it did not interrupt her daily activities. AMHs in PD were non-threatening, and dopaminergic treatment may predispose patients to AMHs or be a unique possible cause of AMHs. The hallucinations can occur after immediate-release pramipexole was switched to extended-release pramipexole. PMID:25501095

  7. The Parkinson's disease sleep scale: a new instrument for assessing sleep and nocturnal disability in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, K; Pal, S; DiMarco, A; Whately-Smith, C; Bridgman, K; Mathew, R; Pezzela, F; Forbes, A; Hogl, B; Trenkwalder, C

    2002-01-01

    Background: No formal instruments are available for quantifying sleep problems in Parkinson's disease. Objective: To develop a new sleep scale to quantify the various aspects of nocturnal sleep problems in Parkinson's disease, which may occur in up to 96% of affected individuals. Methods: Employing a multidisciplinary team approach, a visual analogue scale was devised addressing 15 commonly reported symptoms associated with sleep disturbance in Parkinson's disease—the Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS). In all, 143 patients with Parkinson's disease completed the PDSS, covering the entire spectrum of disease from newly diagnosed to advanced stage. As controls, 137 age healthy matched subjects also completed the scale. Test–retest reliability was assessed in a subgroup of subjects. The Epworth sleepiness scale was also satisfactorily completed by 103 of the patients with Parkinson's disease. Results: PDSS scores in the Parkinson group were significantly different from the healthy controls. Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease had impaired scores compared with early/moderate disease. Individual items of the scale showed good discriminatory power between Parkinson's disease and healthy controls. Relevant items of the PDSS correlated with excessive daytime sleepiness. The scale showed robust test–retest reliability. Conclusions: This appears to be the first description of a simple bedside screening instrument for evaluation of sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease. A combination of subitems may help identify specific aspects of sleep disturbance, which in turn may help target treatment. PMID:12438461

  8. Verbal fluency in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and major depression

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Narahyana Bom; Barca, Maria Lage; Engedal, Knut; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire; Deslandes, Andrea Camaz; Laks, Jerson

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare verbal fluency among Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and major depression and to assess the sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with the disease severity. METHODS: Patients from an outpatient university center with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or major depression were studied. Severity was staged using the Hoehn & Yahr scale, the Hamilton Depression scale and the Clinical Dementia Rating for Parkinson's disease, major depression, and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. All subjects were tested with the Mini-Mental State Examination, the digit span test, and the verbal fluency test (animals). We fit four types of regression models for the count variable: Poisson model, negative binomial model, zero-inflated Poisson model, and zero-inflated negative binomial model. RESULTS: The mean digit span and verbal fluency scores were lower in patients with Alzheimer's disease (n = 34) than in patients with major depression (n = 52) or Parkinson's disease (n = 17) (p<0.001). The average number of words listed was much lower for Alzheimer's disease patients (7.2 words) compared to the patients presenting with major depression (14.6 words) or Parkinson's disease (15.7 words) (KW test = 32.4; p<0.01). Major depression and Parkinson's disease groups listed 44% (ROM = 1.44) and 48% (ROM = 1.48) more words, respectively, compared to those patients with Alzheimer's disease; these results were independent of age, education, disease severity and attention. Independently of diagnosis, age, and education, severe disease showed a 26% (ROM = 0.74) reduction in the number of words listed when compared to mild cases. CONCLUSIONS: Verbal fluency provides a better characterization of Alzheimer's disease, major depression, and Parkinson's disease, even at later stages. PMID:21655757

  9. Factors associated with the quality of life of subjects with Parkinson's disease and burden on their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Violante, M; Camacho-Ordoñez, A; Cervantes-Arriaga, A; González-Latapí, P; Velázquez-Osuna, S

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson's disease affects the quality of life of the individual with the disease in addition to creating a burden on the caregiver. Factors related to these effects include motor and non-motor aspects of the disease, as well as traits inherent to the caregiver. We evaluated subjects with Parkinson's disease using the following instruments: Quality of Life Questionnaire PDQ-8, Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale part i to iv (MDS-UPDRS), and Hoehn and Yahr staging. The Zarit Burden Inventory was used to assess all primary caregivers. Major demographic and clinical variables were also recorded. A total of 250 subjects with Parkinson's disease were included, of whom 201 had a primary caregiver. In the multivariate analysis, predictors of poor quality of life for a subject with Parkinson's disease were the MDS-UPDRS I score (β=.39, P<.001), MDS-UPDRS II score (β=.21, P<.001), and MDS-UPDRS III score (β=.07, P=.004). Regarding caregiver burden, the MDS-UPDRS II score (β=.54, P=.007) was the most influential factor. The present study shows a relationship between quality of life for the subject with Parkinson's disease and the caregiver's perceived burden. However, the factors that determine each situation appear to be distinct. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Imaging prodromal Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Siderowf, Andrew; Stern, Matthew; Seibyl, John; Eberly, Shirley; Oakes, David; Marek, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relative risk of abnormal dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging for subjects with and without hyposmia and the feasibility of acquiring a large, community-based, 2-tiered biomarker assessment strategy to detect prodromal Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: In this observational study, individuals without a diagnosis of PD, recruited through 16 movement disorder clinics, underwent tier 1 assessments (olfactory testing, questionnaires). Tier 2 assessments (neurologic examination, DAT imaging, and other biomarker assessments) were completed by 303 subjects. The main outcome of the study is to compare age-expected [123I]β-CIT striatal binding ratio in hyposmic and normosmic subjects. Results: Tier 1 assessments were mailed to 9,398 eligible subjects and returned by 4,999; 669 were hyposmic. Three hundred three subjects (203 hyposmic, 100 normosmic) completed baseline evaluations. DAT deficit was present in 11% of hyposmic subjects compared with 1% of normosmic subjects. Multiple logistic regression demonstrates hyposmia (odds ratio [OR] 12.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6, 96.1), male sex (OR 5.5; 95% CI 1.7, 17.2), and constipation (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.6, 11.6) as factors predictive of DAT deficit. Combining multiple factors (hyposmia, male sex, and constipation) increased the percentage of subjects with a DAT deficit to >40%. Conclusion: Subjects with DAT deficit who do not meet criteria for a diagnosis of PD can be identified by olfactory testing. Sequential biomarker assessment may identify those at risk of PD. Selecting hyposmic individuals enriches the population for DAT deficit, and combining hyposmia with other potential risk factors (male sex, constipation) increases the percentage of subjects with a DAT deficit compatible with prodromal PD. PMID:25298306

  11. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Pankratz, Nathan; Lill, Christina M; Do, Chuong B; Hernandez, Dena G; Saad, Mohamad; DeStefano, Anita L; Kara, Eleanna; Bras, Jose; Sharma, Manu; Schulte, Claudia; Keller, Margaux F; Arepalli, Sampath; Letson, Christopher; Edsall, Connor; Stefansson, Hreinn; Liu, Xinmin; Pliner, Hannah; Lee, Joseph H; Cheng, Rong; Ikram, M Arfan; Ioannidis, John P A; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Bis, Joshua C; Martinez, Maria; Perlmutter, Joel S; Goate, Alison; Marder, Karen; Fiske, Brian; Sutherland, Margaret; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Myers, Richard H; Clark, Lorraine N; Stefansson, Kari; Hardy, John A; Heutink, Peter; Chen, Honglei; Wood, Nicholas W; Houlden, Henry; Payami, Haydeh; Brice, Alexis; Scott, William K; Gasser, Thomas; Bertram, Lars; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Singleton, Andrew B

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of Parkinson's disease genome-wide association studies using a common set of 7,893,274 variants across 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls. Twenty-six loci were identified as having genome-wide significant association; these and 6 additional previously reported loci were then tested in an independent set of 5,353 cases and 5,551 controls. Of the 32 tested SNPs, 24 replicated, including 6 newly identified loci. Conditional analyses within loci showed that four loci, including GBA, GAK-DGKQ, SNCA and the HLA region, contain a secondary independent risk variant. In total, we identified and replicated 28 independent risk variants for Parkinson's disease across 24 loci. Although the effect of each individual locus was small, risk profile analysis showed substantial cumulative risk in a comparison of the highest and lowest quintiles of genetic risk (odds ratio (OR) = 3.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.55-4.30; P = 2 × 10(-16)). We also show six risk loci associated with proximal gene expression or DNA methylation.

  12. Could Parkinson's Disease Raise Stroke Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163751.html Could Parkinson's Disease Raise Stroke Risk? Or is the link the other way ... link between Parkinson's disease and the risk for stroke. However, the study can't prove that one ...

  13. Identifying the Association Between Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease Using Genome-Wide Association Studies and Protein-Protein Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiyou; Bao, Xinjie; Jiang, Yongshuai; Liao, Mingzhi; Jiang, Qinghua; Feng, Rennan; Zhang, Liangcai; Ma, Guoda; Chen, Zugen; Wang, Guangyu; Wang, Renzhi; Zhao, Bin; Li, Keshen

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the first and second most common neurodegenerative diseases in the elderly. Shared clinical and pathological features have been reported. Recent large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted and reported a number of AD and PD variants. Until now, the underlying genetic mechanisms for all these newly identified PD variants as well as the association between AD and PD are still unclear exactly. We think that PD variants may contribute to AD and PD by influence on brain gene expression. Here, we conducted a systems analysis using (1) AD and PD variants (P < 5.00E-08) identified by the published GWAS; (2) four brain expression GWAS datasets using expression quantitative trait loci from the cerebellum and temporal cortex; (3) large-scale AD GWAS from the Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC); (4) a protein-protein interaction network. Our results indicated that PD variants around the 17q21 were associated with gene expression and suggestive AD risk. We also identified significant interaction among AD and PD susceptibility genes. We believe that our findings may explain the underlying genetic mechanisms for newly identified PD variants in PD and AD, as well as the association between AD and PD, which may be very useful for future genetic studies for both diseases.

  14. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: epidemiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shlomo, Y; Sieradzan, K

    1995-01-01

    Since the introduction of levodopa therapy for idiopathic Parkinson's disease over 20 years ago, there has been an awakening of research interest in this chronic neuro-degenerative disorder. This paper describes current understanding of the role of genetic and environmental factors in the aetiology of idiopathic Parkinson's disease and problems associated with both diagnosis and management. It briefly outlines both pharmacological and non-pharmacological options for treatment. Despite an increasing armoury of available treatments, the optimum management for this condition remains controversial. PMID:7619574

  15. Parkinson's disease: A risk factor for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Malochet-Guinamand, Sandrine; Durif, Franck; Thomas, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease. On the long term, it may be complicated by various musculoskeletal problems, such as osteoporotic fractures, that have significant socioeconomic consequences. Indeed, patients suffering from Parkinson's disease have a higher fracture risk, particularly hip fracture risk, than other subjects of the same age because of both a higher risk of falls and lower bone mineral density. Bone loss in Parkinson's disease may be associated with the severity and duration of the disease. We review here the different suspected mechanisms of accelerated bone loss in Parkinson's disease, amongst which weight loss and reduced mobility appear to play key roles. Antiparkinsonian drugs, particularly levodopa, may also be associated with decreased bone mineral density as a result of hyperhomocysteinaemia. We discuss the role of other nutritional deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, folate or vitamin K. In conclusion, it seems necessary to screen for and treat osteoporosis in this at-risk population, while actions to prevent falls are still disappointing. A better understanding of the factors explaining bone loss in this population would help implementing preventive actions.

  16. Parkinson's disease and oral care.

    PubMed

    Fiske, J; Hyland, K

    2000-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is a relatively common, progressive, neurological disorder. Its key features of resting tremor, bradykinesia, akinesia, restricted mobility and postural instability militate against independence for daily living, mobility, good nutrition and oral health. The successful management of the disease requires a multi-disciplinary approach in which the dietician, speech therapist, nurse and dental staff are pivotal members of the care team.

  17. International Conference on Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Partial Contents: Description of Parkinson’s Disease as a Clinical Syndrome. Physiology and Pathophysiology of Parkinson’s Disease . PET Studies on...the Function of Dopamine in Health and Parkinson’s Disease . Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons: Determination of Their Developmental Fate by Transcription...Developmental Programmed Cell Death in Dopamine Neurons The Cast of Molecular Characters Parkinson’s Disease : Felons,Conspirators, and Suspects. Oxidative

  18. [Cabergoline in the treatment of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Pastor, P; Tolosa, E

    2003-05-01

    Cabergoline (1-[(6-allelylergolin-8 beta-yl)carbonyl]-1-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-3-ethyl-urea) is a new agonist of the D2 dopaminergic receptors used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Cabergoline is characterized by unique pharmacologic properties, such as its long plasma half-life (about 68 hours), which allows for once a day administration. Cabergoline is well tolerated, as has been shown in several clinical trials. Based on the information available, we suggest that cabergoline produces an improvement in the symptoms of Parkinson's disease similar to those produced by other dopaminergic agonists. Cabergoline monotherapy, when used in previously untreated patients, is an appropriate option for the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. Cabergoline improves motor symptoms, delays the presentation of levodopa-induced motor complications, and diminishes the amount of levodopa required for the control of the symptoms. We suggest that cabergoline is an adequate adjuvant treatment for Parkinson' disease. There is improvement in motor symptoms (without substantially increased dyskinesias), reduced severity and duration of the wearing-off period, and diminished need for levodopa. Cabergoline can also be useful in the treatment of sleep disturbances associated with advanced Parkinson's disease such as nocturnal akinesia and dystonia. However, additional studies on cabergoline's effects in nocturnal disturbances associated with Parkinson's disease are still required. Cabergoline is a well tolerated drug. Its side effects are seen mainly in the digestive and nervous system (central and peripheral). The efficacy of cabergoline in comparison to other dopaminergic agonists should be tested in future clinical studies.

  19. Obesity, diabetes, and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Natalia; Gao, Xiang; McCullough, Marjorie L; Jacobs, Eric J; Patel, Alpa V; Mayo, Tinisha; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Ascherio, Alberto

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether obesity and diabetes are related to risk of Parkinson's disease. We prospectively followed 147,096 participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort from 1992 to 2005. Participants provided information on anthropometric variables and medical history at baseline and on waist circumference in 1997. Incident cases of Parkinson's disease (n = 656) were confirmed by treating neurologists and medical record review. Relative risks were estimated using proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, gender, smoking, and other risk factors. Neither body mass index nor waist circumference significantly predicted Parkinson's disease risk. Relative risk comparing individuals with a baseline body mass index of ≥ 30 to those with a body mass index <23 was 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.34; P trend: 0.79), and that comparing individuals with a waist circumference in the top category (≥ 40.3 inches in men and ≥ 35 inches in women) to those in the bottom category (<34.5 inches in men and <28 inches in women) was 1.35 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.93; P trend: 0.08). History of diabetes was not significantly associated with Parkinson's disease risk (combined relative risks = 0.88; 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 1.25; P heterogeneity = 0.96). In addition, neither body mass index at age 18 nor changes in weight between age 18 and baseline were significantly associated with Parkinson's disease risk. The results did not differ significantly by gender. Our results do not provide evidence for a relationship between body mass index, weight change, waist circumference, or baseline diabetes and risk of Parkinson's disease.

  20. Non-motor symptoms may herald Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Tien K; Burn, David J

    2009-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, after Alzheimer's disease. It predominantly affects the elderly. Age is the most clearly established risk factor and there is a male:female ratio of 1.5:1. Current incidence in the general population is 8.4-19 per 100,000 population per year with an approximate prevalence of 120 per 100,000 population. NICE recommends that patients with suspected Parkinson's disease should be referred untreated to a specialist with expertise in parkinsonian disorders. The diagnosis is primarily clinical. Parkinson's disease should be suspected in all patients presenting with bradykinesia (which is essential for the diagnosis of any form of parkinsonism, including Parkinson's disease), muscular rigidity, resting tremor (4-6 Hz) and postural instability not caused by a primary visual, vestibular, cerebellar, or proprioceptive dysfunction. At present, there are no specific biochemical, imaging or genetic tests to assist in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Structural brain imaging (MRI or CT) has no role in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease but may be useful to exclude cerebrovascular disease, hydrocephalus and Wilson's disease in selected cases. Parkinson's disease is a condition that results in both motor and non-motor symptoms. Morbidity associated with non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease is becoming increasingly recognised and some non-motor symptoms such as hyposmia, apathy, depression and REM sleep behaviour disorder may precede the onset of motor symptoms.

  1. [Geographical distribution of mortality by Parkinson's disease and its association with air lead levels in Spain].

    PubMed

    Santurtún, Ana; Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Villar, Alejandro; Riancho, Javier

    2016-12-02

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and the etiology of its sporadic form is unknown. The present study analyzes the temporal and spatial variations of mortality by PD in Spain over a period of 14 years and its relationship with lead concentration levels in the atmosphere. An ecological study was performed, in which deaths by PD and age group in 50 Spanish provinces between 2000 and 2013 were analyzed. The annual trend of PD mortality was assessed using the non-parametric Spearman's Rho test. Finally, the relationship between lead concentration levels in the air and mortality by PD was evaluated. Between 2000 and 2013, 36,180 patients with PD died in Spain. There is an increasing trend in mortality through PD over the study period (P<.0001). La Rioja, Asturias, Basque Country and the Lower Ebro valley were the regions with the highest values of PD mortality. Those regions with the highest lead concentrations also showed higher mortality by this disease in people over 64 (P=.02). Over our period of study, there has been an increase in mortality through PD in Spain, with the northernmost half of the country registering the highest values. Mortality in men was higher than mortality in women. Moreover, a direct correlation was found between lead levels in the air and mortality through PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Motor impulsivity in Parkinson disease: associations with COMT and DRD2 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, David A; Ashourian, Paymon; Wonderlick, Julien S; Sarokhan, Alison K; Prelec, Drazen; Scherzer, Clemens R; Corkin, Suzanne

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is an age-related degenerative disease of the brain, characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. Neurologists and neuroscientists now understand that several symptoms of the disease, including hallucinations and impulse control behaviors, stem from the dopaminergic medications used to control the motor aspects of PD. Converging evidence from animals and humans suggests that individual differences in the genes that affect the dopamine system influence the response of PD patients to dopaminergic medication. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that patients taking dopamine replacement therapy who carry candidate alleles that increase dopamine signaling, exhibit greater amounts of motor impulsivity. We examined the relation between inhibitory ability (measured by the Stop Signal Task) and polymorphisms of COMT Val158Met and DRD2 C957T in patients with idiopathic PD. On the Stop Signal Task, carriers of COMT Val/Met and Met/Met genotypes were more impulsive than Val/Val carriers, but we did not find a link between DRD2 polymorphisms and inhibitory ability. These results support the hypothesis that the Met allele of COMT confers an increased risk for behavioral impulsivity in PD patients, whereas DRD2 polymorphisms appear to be less important in determining whether PD patients exhibit a dopamine overdose in the form of motor impulsivity.

  3. Neuregulins, Neuroprotection and Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    Although the basic underlying mechanisms of Parkinson’s disease remain unknown, considerable efforts have centered on developing effective strategies...dopamine in the nigrostriatal system have the potential for overcoming the lack of dopamine neuronal function in Parkinson’s disease patients. Results...application of neuregulins to the treatment of neurotoxin-induced neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease .

  4. Development of Parkinson's disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Kumar M; Tan, Eng-King

    2010-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, affecting over 6 million people worldwide. It is anticipated that the number of affected individuals may increase significantly in the most populous nations by 2030. During the past 20 years, much progress has been made in identifying and assessing various potential clinical, biochemical, imaging and genetic biomarkers for PD. Despite the wealth of information, development of a validated biomarker for PD is still ongoing. It is hoped that reliable and well-validated biomarkers will provide critical clues to assist in the diagnosis and management of Parkinson's disease patients in the near future.

  5. Glutathione metabolism and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Smeyne, Michelle; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2013-09-01

    It has been established that oxidative stress, defined as the condition in which the sum of free radicals in a cell exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell, contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Glutathione is a ubiquitous thiol tripeptide that acts alone or in concert with enzymes within cells to reduce superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals, and peroxynitrites. In this review, we examine the synthesis, metabolism, and functional interactions of glutathione and discuss how these relate to the protection of dopaminergic neurons from oxidative damage and its therapeutic potential in Parkinson disease.

  6. The MC1R melanoma risk variant p.R160W is associated with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Tell-Marti, Gemma; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Potrony, Miriam; Badenas, Celia; Milà, Montserrat; Malvehy, Josep; Martí, María José; Ezquerra, Mario; Fernández-Santiago, Rubén; Puig, Susana

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported the co-occurrence of Parkinson disease (PD) and melanoma. Common genetic variants in the MC1R (melanocortin 1 receptor) gene, which determines skin and hair color, are associated with melanoma. Here we investigated whether genetic variants in MC1R modulate the risk of PD by sequencing the entire gene in 870 PD patients and 736 controls ascertained from Spain. We found that the MC1R variant p.R160W (rs1805008) is marginally associated with PD (odds ratio = 2.10, gender- and age-adjusted p = 0.009, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.063). Our results suggest that MC1R genetic variants modulate the risk of PD disease in the Spanish population.

  7. The Parkinson's disease-associated genes ATP13A2 and SYT11 regulate autophagy via a common pathway.

    PubMed

    Bento, Carla F; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Rubinsztein, David C

    2016-06-09

    Forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are associated with lysosomal and autophagic dysfunction. ATP13A2, which is mutated in some types of early-onset Parkinsonism, has been suggested as a regulator of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. However, little is known about the ATP13A2 effectors and how they regulate this pathway. Here we show that ATP13A2 depletion negatively regulates another PD-associated gene (SYT11) at both transcriptional and post-translational levels. Decreased SYT11 transcription is controlled by a mechanism dependent on MYCBP2-induced ubiquitination of TSC2, which leads to mTORC1 activation and decreased TFEB-mediated transcription of SYT11, while increased protein turnover is regulated by SYT11 ubiquitination and degradation. Both mechanisms account for a decrease in the levels of SYT11, which, in turn, induces lysosomal dysfunction and impaired degradation of autophagosomes. Thus, we propose that ATP13A2 and SYT11 form a new functional network in the regulation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway, which is likely to contribute to forms of PD-associated neurodegeneration.

  8. The Parkinson's disease-associated genes ATP13A2 and SYT11 regulate autophagy via a common pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Carla F.; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are associated with lysosomal and autophagic dysfunction. ATP13A2, which is mutated in some types of early-onset Parkinsonism, has been suggested as a regulator of the autophagy–lysosome pathway. However, little is known about the ATP13A2 effectors and how they regulate this pathway. Here we show that ATP13A2 depletion negatively regulates another PD-associated gene (SYT11) at both transcriptional and post-translational levels. Decreased SYT11 transcription is controlled by a mechanism dependent on MYCBP2-induced ubiquitination of TSC2, which leads to mTORC1 activation and decreased TFEB-mediated transcription of SYT11, while increased protein turnover is regulated by SYT11 ubiquitination and degradation. Both mechanisms account for a decrease in the levels of SYT11, which, in turn, induces lysosomal dysfunction and impaired degradation of autophagosomes. Thus, we propose that ATP13A2 and SYT11 form a new functional network in the regulation of the autophagy–lysosome pathway, which is likely to contribute to forms of PD-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:27278822

  9. Variables associated with physical health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease patients presenting for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Alexandre Paim; Freitas, Fernando Cini; de Oliveira Thais, Maria Emília; da Silva Areas, Fernando Zanela; Schwarzbold, Marcelo Liborio; Debona, Rodrigo; Nunes, Jean Costa; Guarnieri, Ricardo; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Walz, Roger

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) benefits Parkinson's disease (PD) patient's quality of life specially in domains as mobility, activities of daily living (ADL) and bodily discomfort (BD), but little is known about the variables associated with these HRQOL domains in patients presenting for DBS. The objective is to evaluate variables associated with of HRQOL in a Brazilian sample of PD patients presenting for DBS treatment, specifically in the domains related with motor symptoms. In a cross-sectional study of 59 PD patients evaluated at outpatient Unit for Movement Disorders, multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify independent variables associated with mobility, ADL and BD domains of the 39-item Parkinson's disease questionnaire (PDQ-39). UPDRS III "on" scores, duration of the disease, age, presence of comorbidities and anxiety and depressive symptoms quantified by hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), were the independent variables. In our results, HADS scores were independently associated to mobility domain: β coefficient 1.36 (95 % CI 0.55-2.15) and BD domain: β coefficient 1.57 (95 % CI 0.67-2.48). UPDRS III "on" scores were independently associated to mobility domain: 0.42 (95 % CI 0.03-0.81). The model of each multiple linear regression analysis explains 25 % of the mobility domain variability (p < 0.01) and 24 % of the BD domain variability (p < 0.01). Psychiatric symptoms were at least as relevant to quality of life as motor symptoms in PD patients presenting for DBS treatment. The effect of treating these psychiatric symptoms on patients' HRQOL deserves further investigation.

  10. N-Terminal Truncated UCH-L1 Prevents Parkinson's Disease Associated Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Kim, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Jae-Eun; Baek, Jeong Yeob; Jeong, Jaeho; Kim, Sun; Kim, Young-Mee; Kim, Youhwa; Nam, Jin Han; Huh, Sue Hee; Seo, Jawon; Jin, Byung Kwan; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) has been proposed as one of the Parkinson's disease (PD) related genes, but the possible molecular connection between UCH-L1 and PD is not well understood. In this study, we discovered an N-terminal 11 amino acid truncated variant UCH-L1 that we called NT-UCH-L1, in mouse brain tissue as well as in NCI-H157 lung cancer and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell lines. In vivo experiments and hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS) studies showed that NT-UCH-L1 is readily aggregated and degraded, and has more flexible structure than UCH-L1. Post-translational modifications including monoubiquitination and disulfide crosslinking regulate the stability and cellular localization of NT-UCH-L1, as confirmed by mutational and proteomic studies. Stable expression of NT-UCH-L1 decreases cellular ROS levels and protects cells from H2O2, rotenone and CCCP-induced cell death. NT-UCH-L1-expressing transgenic mice are less susceptible to degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons seen in the MPTP mouse model of PD, in comparison to control animals. These results suggest that NT-UCH-L1 may have the potential to prevent neural damage in diseases like PD. PMID:24959670

  11. Clinical profiles associated with LRRK2 and GBA mutations in Brazilians with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Camilla P; de M Abreu, Gabriella; Cabello Acero, Pedro H; Campos, Mário; Pereira, João S; de A Ramos, Sarah R; Nascimento, Caroline M; Voigt, Danielle D; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Araujo Leite, Marco A; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe R; Nicaretta, Denise H; Della Coletta, Marcus V; da Silva, Delson José; Gonçalves, Andressa P; Dos Santos, Jussara M; Calassara, Veluma; Valença, Débora Cristina T; de M Martins, Cyro J; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia B; Pimentel, Márcia M G

    2017-10-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by remarkable phenotypic variability. Accumulated evidence points that the manifestation of PD clinical signs might be differentially modified by genetic factors, as mutations in LRRK2 and GBA genes. In this sense, the clarification of the genotype-phenotype correlations in PD has important implications in predicting prognosis and can contribute to the development of specific therapeutic approaches. Here, we conducted the first comparative analysis of motor and non-motor features in 17 LRRK2 and 22 GBA mutation carriers and 93 non-carriers unrelated PD patients from Brazil, a highly admixed population. Significant differences were found between the three groups. LRRK2 PD patients presented more occurrence of familiar history. Resting tremor was observed in a lower frequency in GBA mutation carries. In contrast, gait freezing and dysautonomia was present in lower frequencies in LRRK2 carriers. Besides that, LRRK2 and GBA mutation carriers showed a higher incidence of depressive symptoms and a younger age at onset, when compared to non-carriers. Our results suggest that specific mutations in GBA and LRRK2 influence the clinical signs of the disease, with significant implications for handling of specific patient groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Parkinson's Disease-Associated Pathogenic VPS35 Mutation Causes Complex I Deficits.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Leping; Wang, Wenzhang; Hoppel, Charles; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2017-07-29

    Defect in the complex I of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain is a characteristic of Parkinson's disease (PD) which is thought to play a critical role in the disease pathogenesis. Mutations in vacuolar sorting protein 35 (VPS35) cause autosomal dominant PD and we recently demonstrated that pathogenic VPS35 mutations cause mitochondrial damage through enhanced mitochondrial fragmentation. In this study, we aimed to determine whether pathogenic VPS35 mutation impacts the activity of complex I and its underlying mechanism. Indeed, VPS35 D620N mutation led to decreased enzymatic activity and respiratory defects in complex I and II in patient fibroblasts. While no changes in the expression of the complex I and II subunits were noted, the level of assembled complex I and II as well as the supercomplex was significantly reduced in D620N fibroblasts. Importantly, inhibition of mitochondrial fission rescued the contents of assembled complexes as well as the functional defects in complex I and II. Overall, these results suggest that VPS35 D620N mutation-induced excessive mitochondrial fission leads to the defects in the assembled complex I and supercomplex and causes bioenergetics deficits. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Encephalopathy associated with metoclopramide use in a patient with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Kimberly A; Johnson, Brandon R; Khan, Malik A

    2012-08-01

    The case of a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) who experienced profound encephalopathy after short-term exposure to metoclopramide is described. A 79-year-old man with PD received metoclopramide (10 mg i.v. every six hours) for stimulation of gastric motility after a colon resection; the first of three doses of the drug was administered about 30 minutes after completion of the afternoon procedure. The evening after surgery, the patient appeared to be resting comfortably without pain, although he was somewhat agitated; two more metoclopramide doses were administered during the night. Over the next several hours his mental status deteriorated, and the next morning he was found to be unresponsive and could not be aroused. Although the patient had received minimal narcotics, naloxone was administered but failed to produce an improvement in the patient's mental status. The results of laboratory tests, computer tomography scanning, and other diagnostic studies ruled out cardiac ischemia, infectious disease, and other potential causes of the abrupt change in mental status. Within eight days of the discontinuation of metoclopramide use, the patient gradually returned to his baseline mental status. The application of the algorithm of Naranjo et al. in this case indicated a possible adverse reaction to metoclopramide as the cause of acute metabolic encephalopathy, with the patient's underlying PD and PD-related dementia suspected to have been contributing factors. A 79-year-old man with long-term PD developed acute encephalopathy after the administration of i.v. metoclopramide.

  14. Semantic profiles in mild cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Marco; Paciaroni, Lucia; Paolini, Susy; Scarpino, Osvaldo; Burn, David J

    2015-01-01

    The temporal and the prefrontal cortices have different roles in semantic information processing: the temporal lobe is where knowledge is stored (Graham and Hodges, 1997), whereas the prefrontal cortex is more specifically involved in executive aspects of semantic processing. Relatively little is known about the semantic profiles of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). This observational study investigated naming and semantic questionnaire performances in three groups of subjects: 10 patients with the amnestic-type MCI prodrome of AD (aMCI), 10 patients with early-stage executive-type MCI in PD (MCI-PD), and 10 normal subjects. The MCI-PD subjects demonstrated inferior performances on a semantic questionnaire, whereas the aMCI group displayed modest difficulties in a naming task. These differences may be explained by topographical differences in pathological involvement. Since the frontal areas are more functionally impaired in PD, we hypothesize that the semantic deficit may be a consequence of a deficiency in control of semantic processing. On the other hand, the semantic deficit in aMCI may be related to a lexical-semantic storage dysfunction resulting from pathological involvement of the temporal lobe.

  15. Association of L-DOPA with recovery following Ayurveda medication in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagashayana, N; Sankarankutty, P; Nampoothiri, M R; Mohan, P K; Mohanakumar, K P

    2000-06-15

    Ayurveda, the Indian system of traditional medicine, uses a concoction of several spices, herbs and minerals for the treatment of diseases. In a clinical prospective study we have evaluated the efficacy of Ayurveda treatment (a concoction in cow's milk of powdered Mucuna pruriens and Hyoscyamus reticulatus seeds and Withania somnifera and Sida cordifolia roots) in 18 clinically diagnosed (with a mean Hoen and Yahr value of 2.22) parkinsonian patients. As per Ayurveda principles, 13 patients underwent both cleansing (for 28 days) and palliative therapy (56 days), 5 patients underwent palliative therapy alone (84 days). Only the former group showed significant improvement in activities of daily living (ADL) and on motor examination as per UPDRS rating. Symptomatically, they exhibited better response in tremor, bradykinesia, stiffness and cramps as compared to the latter group. Excessive salivation worsened in both the groups. Analyses of powdered samples in milk, as administered in patients, revealed about 200 mg of L-DOPA per dose. The study establishes the necessity of cleansing therapy in Ayurveda medication prior to palliative therapy. It also reveals contribution of L-DOPA in the recovery as observed in Parkinson' disease following Ayurveda medication.

  16. Oxidative Damage in Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    of Parkinson’s Disease and the MPTP model of Parkinsonism. In the past year, we have developed a novel column switching assay for measurement of...oxidative damage to DNA in human body fluids. We have applied to this plasma samples of Parkinson’s Disease patients. We have also developed a novel...methodology. We have found a relatively high mutation rate and control samples and intend to apply this to Parkinson’s Disease . We have continued our

  17. Parkinson's disease motor subtypes and mood.

    PubMed

    Burn, David J; Landau, Sabine; Hindle, John V; Samuel, Michael; Wilson, Kenneth C; Hurt, Catherine S; Brown, Richard G

    2012-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is heterogeneous, both in terms of motor symptoms and mood. Identifying associations between phenotypic variants of motor and mood subtypes may provide clues to understand mechanisms underlying mood disorder and symptoms in Parkinson's disease. A total of 513 patients were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and separately classified into anxious, depressed, and anxious-depressed mood classes based on latent class analysis of a semistructured interview. Motor subtypes assessed related to age-of-onset, rate of progression, presence of motor fluctuations, lateralization of motor symptoms, tremor dominance, and the presence of postural instability and gait symptoms and falls. The directions of observed associations tended to support previous findings with the exception of lateralization of symptoms, for which there were no consistent or significant results. Regression models examining a range of motor subtypes together indicated increased risk of anxiety in patients with younger age-of-onset and motor fluctuations. In contrast, depression was most strongly related to axial motor symptoms. Different risk factors were observed for depressed patients with and without anxiety, suggesting heterogeneity within Parkinson's disease depression. Such association data may suggest possible underlying common risk factors for motor subtype and mood. Combined with convergent evidence from other sources, possible mechanisms may include cholinergic system damage and white matter changes contributing to non-anxious depression in Parkinson's disease, while situational factors related to threat and unpredictability may contribute to the exacerbation and maintenance of anxiety in susceptible individuals. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Aberrant structures of Parkinson's disease-associated ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 predicted by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Yuji; Kinjo, Tomohiro; Kuroki, Masato; Aoki, Shunsuke

    2012-05-01

    Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a neuron-specific deubiquitinating enzyme. Single amino acid changes (S18Y and I93M) within UCH-L1 are associated with decreased and increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), respectively. However, the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis in UCH-L1-associated PD remains to be elucidated. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of UCH-L1 variants. The simulation results show that I93M UCH-L1 is less stable than S18Y UCH-L1. In particular, the H7 and H8 α-helices in I93M UCH-L1 are partially denatured. Information regarding the aberrant UCH-L1 structures provides new insight into UCH-L1-associated PD.

  19. [Psychotic symptoms in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Fénelon, Gilles

    2006-12-01

    About one third of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience hallucinations, mostly of a complex visual type, less often auditory or tactile. Minor hallucinatory phenomena, including sense of presence, passage hallucinations and visual illusions are frequent. Hallucinations primarily occur in a context of clear sensorium in patients with longstanding PD. They are more frequent in the evening or during the night. Insight in the hallucinatory nature of the phenomenon may be retained, partial, fluctuating, or abolished. An altered insight is common when cognitive impairment is present, and may be associated with delusions and (or) delusional misidentifications. Pharmacological factors such as dopaminergic treatment clearly trigger or increase the occurence of hallucinations in PD. However, in the recent years, emphasis has been made on disease-related factors including cognitive impairment, diurnal somnolence, visual disorders (either contrast and color discrimination impairment due to PD, or coincident ocular disorders), long duration of PD, late onset, severe axial impairment and autonomic dysfunction. The pathophysiology of hallucinations of PD is poorly understood but is likely to be multifactorial. The first steps of the treatment consist in giving information and reassurance to the patient and his/her caregiver, re-evaluating the antiparkinsonian treatment and associated medications, and evaluating the patient for mood disorder, visual impairment, and cognitive impairment. Cholinesterase inhibitors, when prescribed for associated cognitive impairment, may be beneficial on hallucinations. In the more severe forms, clozapine has been proved to be safe and effective.

  20. Oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nikam, Shashikant; Nikam, Padmaja; Ahaley, S K; Sontakke, Ajit V

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the cascade, leading to dopamine cell degeneration in Parkinson's disease. However, oxidative stress is intimately linked to other components of the degenerative process, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, nitric oxide toxicity and inflammation. It is therefore difficult to determine whether oxidative stress leads to or is a consequence of, these events. Oxidative stress was assessed by estimating lipid peroxidation product in the form of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, nitric oxide in the form of nitrite & nitrate. Enzymatic antioxidants in the form of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin and non enzymatic antioxidant vitamins e.g. vitamin E and C in either serum or plasma or erythrocyte in 40 patients of Parkinson's disease in the age group 40-80 years. Trace elements e.g. copper, zinc and selenium were also estimated. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide levels were Significantly high but superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin, vitamin-E, vitamin-C, copper, zinc and selenium levels were significantly low in Parkinson's disease when compared with control subjects. Present study showed that elevated oxidative stress may be playing a role in dopaminergic neuronal loss in substentia nigra pars compacta and involved in pathogenesis of the Parkinson's disease.

  1. Disease modification in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Henchcliffe, Claire; Severt, W Lawrence

    2011-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related, progressive, multisystem neurodegenerative disorder resulting in significant morbidity and mortality, as well as a growing social and financial burden in an aging population. The hallmark of PD is loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta, leading to bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor. Current pharmacological treatment is therefore centred upon dopamine replacement to alleviate symptoms. However, two major problems complicate this approach: (i) motor symptoms continue to progress, requiring increasing doses of medication, which result in both short-term adverse effects and intermediate- to long-term motor complications; (ii) dopamine replacement does little to treat non-dopaminergic motor and non-motor symptoms, which are an important source of morbidity, including dementia, sleep disturbances, depression, orthostatic hypotension, and postural instability leading to falls. It is critical, therefore, to develop a broader and more fundamental therapeutic approach to PD, and major research efforts have focused upon developing neuroprotective interventions. Despite many encouraging preclinical data suggesting the possibility of addressing the underlying pathophysiology by slowing cell loss, efforts to translate this into the clinical realm have largely proved disappointing in the past. Barriers to finding neuroprotective or disease-modifying drugs in PD include a lack of validated biomarkers of progression, which hampers clinical trial design and interpretation; difficulties separating symptomatic and neuroprotective effects of candidate neuroprotective therapies; and possibly fundamental flaws in some of the basic preclinical models and testing. However, three recent clinical trials have used a novel delayed-start design in an attempt to overcome some of these roadblocks. While not examining markers of cell loss and function, which would determine neuroprotective effects, this trial design

  2. Stimulus Timing by People with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearden, J. H.; Smith-Spark, J. H.; Cousins, Rosanna; Edelstyn, N. M. J.; Cody, F. W. J.; O'Boyle, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that Parkinson's disease is marked by deficits in timed behaviour. However, the majority of studies of central timing mechanisms in patients with Parkinson's disease have used timing tasks with a motor component. Since the motor abnormalities are a defining feature of the condition, the status of timing in Parkinson's…

  3. Stimulus Timing by People with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearden, J. H.; Smith-Spark, J. H.; Cousins, Rosanna; Edelstyn, N. M. J.; Cody, F. W. J.; O'Boyle, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that Parkinson's disease is marked by deficits in timed behaviour. However, the majority of studies of central timing mechanisms in patients with Parkinson's disease have used timing tasks with a motor component. Since the motor abnormalities are a defining feature of the condition, the status of timing in Parkinson's…

  4. Motor, psychiatric and fatigue features associated with nutritional status and its effects on quality of life in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Ghazi, Ladan; Shafieesabet, Mahdiyeh; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Delbari, Ahmad; Lökk, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are more likely to develop impaired nutritional status because of the symptoms, medications and complications of the disease. However, little is known about the determinants and consequences of malnutrition in PD. This study aimed to investigate the association of motor, psychiatric and fatigue features with nutritional status as well as the effects of malnutrition on different aspects of quality of life (QoL) in PD patients. One hundred and fifty patients with idiopathic PD (IPD) were recruited in this study. A demographic checklist, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) were completed through face-to-face interviews and clinical examinations. The health-related QoL (HRQoL) was also evaluated by means of the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). For evaluation of nutritional status, the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) questionnaire was applied together with anthropometric measurements. Thirty seven (25.3%) patients were at risk of malnutrition and another 3 (2.1%) were malnourished. The total score of the UPDRS scale (r =  -0.613, P<0.001) and PD duration (r =  -0.284, P = 0.002) had a significant inverse correlation with the total MNA score. The median score of the Hoehn and Yahr stage was significantly higher in PD patients with abnormal nutritional status [2.5 vs. 2.0; P<0.001]. More severe anxiety [8.8 vs. 5.9; P = 0.002], depression [9.0 vs. 3.6; P<0.001] and fatigue [5.4 vs. 4.2; P<0.001] were observed in PD patients with abnormal nutritional status. Except for stigma, all other domains of the PDQ-39 were significantly correlated with the total score of the MNA. Our study demonstrates that disease duration, severity of motor and psychiatric symptoms (depression, anxiety) and fatigue are associated with nutritional status in PD. Different aspects of the HRQoL were affected by patients' nutritional status

  5. Ventral striatal dopaminergic defect is associated with hallucinations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jaakkola, E; Joutsa, J; Mäkinen, E; Johansson, J; Kaasinen, V

    2017-08-22

    Visual hallucinations (VHs) are a common complication of Parkinson's disease (PD). The pathogenesis of VHs in PD is still largely unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the dopaminergic mechanisms of VHs and specifically whether the degree of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) function or extrastriatal serotonin transporter (SERT) function can predict the appearance of VHs in patients with PD. Twenty-two PD patients scanned with [(123) I]FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography at an early stage of their disease who later developed VHs were identified and compared with 48 non-hallucinating PD patients. The groups were matched for age, medication, disease duration and motor symptom severity. Clinical follow-up after the scan was a median (range) of 6.9 (3.8-9.6) years. Imaging analyses were performed with both regions-of-interest-based and voxel-based (Statistical Parametric Mapping) methods for the striatal and extrastriatal regions. The median interval between the scan and the emergence of VHs was 4.8 years. Patients who developed VHs had 18.4% lower DAT binding in the right ventral striatum (P = 0.009), 16.7% lower binding in the left ventral striatum (P = 0.02) and 18.8% lower binding in the right putamen (P = 0.03) compared to patients who did not develop VHs. Low striatal DAT function may predispose PD patients to VHs, and the regional distribution of the findings suggests a particular role of the ventral striatum. This is in line with non-PD research that has implicated ventral striatal dysfunction in psychosis. © 2017 EAN.

  6. [Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Joutsa, Juho; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2013-01-01

    Of the patients having Parkinson's disease, up to third encounters some degree of impulse control problems and one out of seven suffers from true impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping and binge eating. Dopaminergic drugs used in anti-Parkinson therapy, especially dopamine agonists, increase the risk of these disorders. Impulse control disorders are associated with a relatively more active dopamine-mediated neurotransmission of the mesolimbic and mesocortical system. Discontinuation of dopamine agonist medication can thus be considered as the first line treatment of these disorders.

  7. Gambling, Sex, and…Parkinson's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... spent, browse our financial information. Learn More Gambling, Sex, and…Parkinson's Disease? By Laura Marsh, M.D. ... and, in people with Parkinson's, most typically involve sex, gambling and abuse of anti-parkinsonian medications. Pathological ...

  8. Parkinson's disease and driving ability

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajiv; Pentland, Brian; Hunter, John; Provan, Frances

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To explore the driving problems associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to ascertain whether any clinical features or tests predict driver safety. Methods The driving ability of 154 individuals with PD referred to a driving assessment centre was determined by a combination of clinical tests, reaction times on a test rig and an in‐car driving test. Results The majority of cases (104, 66%) were able to continue driving although 46 individuals required an automatic transmission and 10 others needed car modifications. Ability to drive was predicted by the severity of physical disease, age, presence of other associated medical conditions, particularly dementia, duration of disease, brake reaction, time on a test rig and score on a driving test (all p<0.001). The level of drug treatment and the length of driving history were not correlated. Discriminant analysis revealed that the most important features in distinguishing safety to drive were severe physical disease (Hoehn and Yahr stage 3), reaction time, moderate disease associated with another medical condition and high score on car testing. Conclusions Most individuals with PD are safe to drive, although many benefit from car modifications or from using an automatic transmission. A combination of clinical tests and in‐car driving assessment will establish safety to drive, and a number of clinical correlates can be shown to predict the likely outcome and may assist in the decision process. This is the largest series of consecutive patients seen at a driving assessment centre reported to date, and the first to devise a scoring system for on‐road driving assessment. PMID:17178820

  9. Impulse control disorders and compulsive behaviors associated with dopaminergic therapies in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Summary Impulse control disorders (ICD) (most commonly pathologic gambling, hypersexuality, and uncontrollable spending) and compulsive behaviors can be triggered by dopaminergic therapies in Parkinson disease (PD). ICD are especially prevalent in patients receiving a dopamine agonist as part of their treatment regimen for PD, and have also been reported when dopamine agonists are used for other indications (e.g., restless legs syndrome). Although these iatrogenic disorders are common, affecting 1 in 7 patients with PD on dopamine agonists, they often elude detection by the treating physician. ICD lead to serious consequences, causing significant financial loss and psychosocial morbidity for many patients and families. ICD can appear at any time during treatment with dopamine agonists, sometimes within the first few months, but most often after years of treatment, particularly when patients receive dopamine agonists and levodopa together. In most cases ICD resolve if the dopamine agonist is withdrawn, and PD motor symptoms are managed with levodopa monotherapy. Familiarity with the clinical aspects, risk factors, pathophysiology, and management of ICD is essential for physicians using dopaminergic therapies to treat PD and other disorders. PMID:23634371

  10. Reversible monoubiquitination regulates the Parkinson disease-associated ubiquitin hydrolase UCH-L1.

    PubMed

    Meray, Robin K; Lansbury, Peter T

    2007-04-06

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are negative regulators of protein ubiquitination and play an important role in ubiquitin-dependent processes. Recent studies have found that diverse cellular mechanisms are employed to control the activity of DUBs. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) is a highly expressed neuronal DUB linked to Parkinson disease; however, little is known about its specific functions or modes of regulation. Here, we demonstrate that UCH-L1 is post-translationally modified by monoubiquitin in cells, at lysine residues near the active site. This modification restricts enzyme activity by preventing binding to ubiquitinated targets, and permanent monoubiquitination, as mimicked by a ubiquitin-UCH-L1 fusion, inhibits UCH-L1 in its capacity to increase free ubiquitin levels in cells. Interestingly, UCH-L1 catalyzes its own deubiquitination in an intramolecular manner, thereby regulating the lifetime of this modification. Our results illustrate monoubiquitination as a reversible regulatory mechanism for DUB activity involving auto-deubiquitination.

  11. Cardiovascular dysfunction associated with neurodegeneration in an experimental model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Falquetto, Barbara; Tuppy, Marina; Potje, Simone R; Moreira, Thiago S; Antoniali, Cristina; Takakura, Ana C

    2017-02-15

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) exhibit both motor and non-motor symptoms. Among the non-motor symptoms, cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is frequently observed. Here, we evaluated baroreflex function, vascular reactivity and neuroanatomical changes in brainstem regions involved in the neural control of circulation in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) model of PD. Male Wistar rats received a bilateral injection of 6-OHDA or vehicle into the striatum. After 61days, baroreflex function and vascular reactivity were assessed. The 6-OHDA and vehicle groups showed similar increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to phenylephrine (PE). However, the bradycardia observed in the vehicle group was blunted in the 6-OHDA-treated rats. Injection of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) decreased hypotension, tachycardia and vascular relaxation in 6-OHDA-treated rats. Bilateral intrastriatal 6-OHDA led to massive degeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive neurons in the substantia nigra and to reductions in the numbers of A1/C1 and A5 catecholaminergic neurons while sparing A2 neurons within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). 6-OHDA-treated rats also showed decreases in Phox2b-expressing neurons in the NTS and in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity in the nucleus ambiguus. Altogether, our data suggest that this model of PD includes neuroanatomical and functional changes that lead to cardiovascular impairment.

  12. Parkinson's disease and occupation: differences in associations by case identification method suggest referral bias.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Kay; Marion, Stephen A; Tsui, Joseph K C; Shen, Hui; Rugbjerg, Kathrine; Harris, M Anne

    2014-02-01

    We used a population-based sample of 403 Parkinson's disease cases and 405 controls to examine risks by occupation. Results were compared to a previous clinic-based analysis. With censoring of jobs held within 10 years of diagnosis, the following had significantly or strongly increased risks: social science, law and library jobs (OR = 1.8); farming and horticulture jobs (OR = 2.0); gas station jobs (OR = 2.6); and welders (OR = 3.0). The following had significantly decreased risks: management and administration jobs (OR = 0.70); and other health care jobs (OR = 0.44). These results were consistent with other findings for social science and farming occupations. Risks for teaching, medicine and health occupations were not elevated, unlike our previous clinic-based study. This underscores the value of population-based over clinic-based samples. Occupational studies may be particularly susceptible to referral bias because social networks may spread preferentially via jobs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. "PINK1"-Linked Parkinsonism Is Associated with Lewy Body Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samaranch, Lluis; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Arbelo, Jose M.; Ferrer, Isidre; Lorenzo, Elena; Irigoyen, Jaione; Pastor, Maria A.; Marrero, Carmen; Isla, Concepcion; Herrera-Henriquez, Joanna; Pastor, Pau

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 gene mutations have been associated with autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease. To date, no neuropathological reports have been published from patients with Parkinson's disease with both phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 gene copies mutated. We analysed…

  14. "PINK1"-Linked Parkinsonism Is Associated with Lewy Body Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samaranch, Lluis; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Arbelo, Jose M.; Ferrer, Isidre; Lorenzo, Elena; Irigoyen, Jaione; Pastor, Maria A.; Marrero, Carmen; Isla, Concepcion; Herrera-Henriquez, Joanna; Pastor, Pau

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 gene mutations have been associated with autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease. To date, no neuropathological reports have been published from patients with Parkinson's disease with both phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 gene copies mutated. We analysed…

  15. Primitive reflexes in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vreeling, F W; Verhey, F R; Houx, P J; Jolles, J

    1993-01-01

    A standardised protocol for the examination of 15 primitive reflexes in which the amplitude and the persistence were scored separately, was applied to 25 patients with Parkinson's disease and an equal number of healthy matched control subjects. Most reflexes were found considerably more often in the patients than in the control subjects, especially the snout, the glabellar tap, and its variant, the nasopalpebral reflex. Only the mouth open finger spread reflex was present more often in the control subjects. For all reflexes except this last, the scores for amplitude and persistence of the reflexes for the control group never exceeded the scores for the patient group. Reflexes persisted more often in the patients than in the control subjects. Parkinsonism alone can explain a large number of primitive reflexes, irrespective of the severity or duration of the disease. In contrast, the number of reflexes was related more closely to cognitive scales. It is concluded that such reflexes may be helpful in diagnosing Parkinson's disease. In addition, a standardised protocol for eliciting and scoring is essential for the study of these reflexes in parkinsonism and other neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:8270937

  16. Direct Membrane Association Drives Mitochondrial Fission by the Parkinson Disease-associated Protein α-Synuclein*♦

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Ken; Nemani, Venu M.; Azarbal, Farnaz; Skibinski, Gaia; Levy, Jon M.; Egami, Kiyoshi; Munishkina, Larissa; Zhang, Jue; Gardner, Brooke; Wakabayashi, Junko; Sesaki, Hiromi; Cheng, Yifan; Finkbeiner, Steven; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Edwards, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The protein α-synuclein has a central role in Parkinson disease, but the mechanism by which it contributes to neural degeneration remains unknown. We now show that the expression of α-synuclein in mammalian cells, including neurons in vitro and in vivo, causes the fragmentation of mitochondria. The effect is specific for synuclein, with more fragmentation by α- than β- or γ-isoforms, and it is not accompanied by changes in the morphology of other organelles or in mitochondrial membrane potential. However, mitochondrial fragmentation is eventually followed by a decline in respiration and neuronal death. The fragmentation does not require the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and involves a direct interaction of synuclein with mitochondrial membranes. In vitro, synuclein fragments artificial membranes containing the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and this effect is specific for the small oligomeric forms of synuclein. α-Synuclein thus exerts a primary and direct effect on the morphology of an organelle long implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:21489994

  17. Cognitive decline in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Aarsland, Dag; Creese, Byron; Politis, Marios; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Ffytche, Dominic H; Weintraub, Daniel; Ballard, Clive

    2017-04-01

    Dementia is a frequent problem encountered in advanced stages of Parkinson disease (PD). In recent years, research has focused on the pre-dementia stages of cognitive impairment in PD, including mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Several longitudinal studies have shown that MCI is a harbinger of dementia in PD, although the course is variable, and stabilization of cognition - or even reversal to normal cognition - is not uncommon. In addition to limbic and cortical spread of Lewy pathology, several other mechanisms are likely to contribute to cognitive decline in PD, and a variety of biomarker studies, some using novel structural and functional imaging techniques, have documented in vivo brain changes associated with cognitive impairment. The evidence consistently suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid-β42, a marker of comorbid Alzheimer disease (AD), predict future cognitive decline and dementia in PD. Emerging genetic evidence indicates that in addition to the APOE*ε4 allele (an established risk factor for AD), GBA mutations and SCNA mutations and triplications are associated with cognitive decline in PD, whereas the findings are mixed for MAPT polymorphisms. Cognitive enhancing medications have some effect in PD dementia, but no convincing evidence that progression from MCI to dementia can be delayed or prevented is available, although cognitive training has shown promising results.

  18. Motor phenotypes, medication and mood: further associations with impulsive behaviours in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Catherine S; Alkufri, Fadi; Brown, Richard G; Burn, David J; Hindle, John V; Landau, Sabine; Wilson, Kenneth C; Samuel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic drugs are the primary risk factor for Impulse Control Behaviours (ICB) in Parkinson's disease (PD), others being early-onset disease and gender. This report further explores ICB symptom relationships with motor and mood phenotypes, the complex relationship with dopaminergic medications, and hypothesizes a model with potential clinical implications. Data from 500 PD patients were analyzed. Hypersexuality, gambling and shopping behaviour were assessed using selected questions from the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview questionnaire. Local questions assessed hobbyism. Motor characteristics considered were akinetic-rigid/gait disturbance (PIGD) and 'non-PIGD' phenotypes, motor severity, motor progression, and presence/absence of motor fluctuations. Other variables included anxiety, depression, current levodopa and agonist use, age, gender and cognition. Overall, ICB symptom frequency was 17.8%. There was no relationship between PIGD/non-PIGD motor phenotypes and ICB symptoms. Those with ICB symptoms had higher total combined levodopa/agonist equivalent intake, but not current agonist-only equivalent intake. ICB symptoms were reported by 23.1% of those taking combined levodopa and agonist compared to 19.2% on agonist monotherapy and 11.6% levodopa monotherapy. Compared with non-ICB patients, patients with ICB symptoms were more likely to show an anxious mood phenotype, reported more motor fluctuations, and were younger. Both PIGD and non-PIGD phenotypes are equally affected. Dose-related risk applies to total anti-parkinsonian medication and not just current agonist-only. Anxious mood phenotypes may carry increased risk. A role of anxiety, either as a marker of risk, indirect causal factor, or maintaining factor is incorporated into a preliminary model. We discuss implications for clinical management.

  19. Assessment of Parkinson Disease Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurologic condition that causes motor and non-motor manifestations. Treatment provides symptomatic benefit but no current treatment has been proven to slow disease progression. Research studies of PD require a means of rating the severity of disease by measurement of motor manifestations, assessment of ability to perform daily functional activities, and symptomatic response to medication. The most common rating scales are the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Hoehn and Yahr staging, and the Schwab and England rating of activities of daily living. Each of these rating scales are described, including detailed instructions on how to implement these ratings. Although these are the most widely applied rating scales of PD, there are still substantial limitations to these scales that must be considered when using them for research. Finally, some common applications of these scales are described. PMID:19802812

  20. Transcranial sonography and functional imaging in glucocerebrosidase mutation Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, MJ; Hagenah, J; Dhawan, V; Peng, S; Stanley, K; Raymond, D; Deik, A; Gross, SJ; Schreiber-Agus, N; Mirelman, A; Marder, K; Ozelius, LJ; Eidelberg, D; Bressman, SB; Saunders-Pullman, R

    2012-01-01

    Background Heterozygous glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations are the leading genetic risk factor for Parkinson disease, yet imaging correlates, particularly transcranial sonography, have not been extensively described. Methods To determine whether GBA mutation heterozygotes with Parkinson disease demonstrate hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra, transcranial sonography was performed in Ashkenazi Jewish Parkinson disease subjects, tested for the eight most common Gaucher disease mutations and the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, and in controls. [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose or [18F]-fluorodopa positron emission tomography is also reported from a subset of Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations. Results Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations (n=23) had a greater median maximal area of substantia nigral echogenicity compared to controls (n=34, aSNmax=0.30 vs. 0.18, p=0.007). There was no difference in median maximal area of nigral echogenicity between Parkinson disease groups defined by GBA and LRRK2 genotype: GBA heterozygotes; GBA homozygotes/compound heterozygotes (n=4, aSNmax=0.27); subjects without LRRK2 or GBA mutations (n=32, aSNmax=0.27); LRRK2 heterozygotes/homozyogotes without GBA mutations (n=27, aSNmax=0.28); and GBA heterozygotes/LRRK2 heterozygotes (n=4, aSNmax=0.32, overall p=0.63). In secondary analyses among Parkinson disease subjects with GBA mutations, maximal area of nigral echogenicity did not differ based on GBA mutation severity or mutation number. [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (n=3) and [18F]-fluorodopa (n=2) positron emission tomography in Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations was consistent with findings in idiopathic Parkinson disease. Conclusions Both transcranial sonography and positron emission tomography are abnormal in GBA mutation associated Parkinson disease, similar to other Parkinson disease subjects. PMID:23062841

  1. Mitochondrial Abnormality Associates with Type-Specific Neuronal Loss and Cell Morphology Changes in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pienaar, Ilse S.; Elson, Joanna L.; Racca, Claudia; Nelson, Glyn; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Morris, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic neuronal loss in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) associates with abnormal functions, including certain motor and nonmotor symptoms. This realization has led to low-frequency stimulation of the PPN for treating patients with Parkinson disease (PD) who are refractory to other treatment modalities. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PPN neuronal loss and the therapeutic substrate for the clinical benefits following PPN stimulation remain poorly characterized, hampering progress toward designing more efficient therapies aimed at restoring the PPN's normal functions during progressive parkinsonism. Here, we investigated postmortem pathological changes in the PPN of PD cases. Our study detected a loss of neurons producing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their output and glycinergic neurons, along with the pronounced loss of cholinergic neurons. These losses were accompanied by altered somatic cell size that affected the remaining neurons of all neuronal subtypes studied here. Because studies showed that mitochondrial dysfunction exists in sporadic PD and in PD animal models, we investigated whether altered mitochondrial composition exists in the PPN. A significant up-regulation of several mitochondrial proteins was seen in GABAergic and glycinergic neurons; however, cholinergic neurons indicated down-regulation of the same proteins. Our findings suggest an imbalance in the activity of key neuronal subgroups of the PPN in PD, potentially because of abnormal inhibitory activity and altered cholinergic outflow. PMID:24099985

  2. [Psychological and behavioural disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Fénelon, Gilles; Césaro, Pierre

    2010-10-01

    Psychological and behavioral disorders associated with Parkinson's disease can have a major impact on patients' and caregivers' quality of life. Depression, anxiety, psychotic symptoms (e.g hallucinations), apathy and impulse-control disorders raise questions as to the respective roles of premorbid vulnerability, disease-related factors, and drug adverse effects. These disorders are often difficult to manage, and there is an unmet need for controlled trials in this field.

  3. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor improves Parkinson's disease associated with co-morbid depression: An experimental exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ajay; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Medhi, Bikash

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disease characterized by muscle and movement disorder, often associated with depression. PD is very difficult to treat. Hence, the present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of G-CSF in PD associated with depression. Materials and Methods: Adult Wistar male rats weighing about 180-250 g were selected and divided into five groups in parallel designed method namely; control group (n = 5); sham operated group (n = 5); Vehicle group (n = 5); G-CSF group (70 μg/kg, s.c.) (n = 5) and L-DOPA group (n = 5). The rats were treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on day 0 and then treatment was continued for 14 day of L-DOPA/carbidopa, whereas G-CSF (70 μg/kg, s.c.) was given from day 1 to 6. Thereafter, adhesive removal and forced swim tests were conducted to evaluate the behavioral outcome of G-CSF treatment. The finding was correlated and analyzed with Nissl staining findings for the final conclusion. Results: The behavioral parameters were assessed and found to be ameliorate the symptoms of Parkinson's and reduced the depression like behavior in PD. The histological findings were supported the behavioral findings and showed pathological improvement. Conclusion: As a preliminary work, the present study first time suggested that G-CSF have a potential role in PD and associated depression. PMID:24347771

  4. Parkinson disease in the elderly adult.

    PubMed

    Willis, Allison W

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease is the second most neurodegenerative disease, after Alzheimer disease, that affects up to two million Americans, the overwhelming majority of whom are aged 60 and older. The changing demographics of the country place more Americans at risk for Parkinson disease (PD) than ever before. Primary care physicians treat the majority of PD patients in the United States. Here I review diagnosis and treatment strategies for idiopathic Parkinson disease in the elderly adult.

  5. No relevant association of kinematic gait parameters with Health-related Quality of Life in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bettecken, Kristina; Bernhard, Felix; Sartor, Jennifer; Hobert, Markus A; Hofmann, Marc; Gladow, Till; van Uem, Janet M T; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Maetzler, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Health-related Quality of Life (HrQoL) is probably the most important outcome parameter for the evaluation and management of chronic diseases. As this parameter is subjective and prone to bias, there is an urgent need to identify objective surrogate markers. Gait velocity has been shown to be associated with HrQoL in numerous chronic diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). With the development and wide availability of simple-to-use wearable sensors and sophisticated gait algorithms, kinematic gait parameters may soon be implemented in clinical routine management. However, the association of such kinematic gait parameters with HrQoL in PD has not been assessed to date. Kinematic gait parameters from a 20-meter walk from 43 PD patients were extracted using a validated wearable sensor system. They were compared with the Visual Analogue Scale of the Euro-Qol-5D (EQ-5D VAS) by performing a multiple regression analysis, with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) model as a framework. Use of assistive gait equipment, but no kinematic gait parameter, was significantly associated with HrQoL. The widely accepted concept of a positive association between gait velocity and HrQoL may, at least in PD, be driven by relatively independent parameters, such as assistive gait equipment.

  6. Probiotics and prebiotic fiber for constipation associated with Parkinson disease: An RCT.

    PubMed

    Barichella, Michela; Pacchetti, Claudio; Bolliri, Carlotta; Cassani, Erica; Iorio, Laura; Pusani, Chiara; Pinelli, Giovanna; Privitera, Giulia; Cesari, Ilaria; Faierman, Samanta Andrea; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Pezzoli, Gianni; Cereda, Emanuele

    2016-09-20

    Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of probiotics and prebiotics in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and constipation. We conducted a tertiary setting, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with PD with Rome III-confirmed constipation based on 2-week stool diary data at baseline. Patients (n = 120) were randomly assigned (2:1) to either a fermented milk, containing multiple probiotic strains and prebiotic fiber, or placebo, once daily for 4 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the increase in the number of complete bowel movements (CBMs) per week. The key secondary endpoints were 3 or more CBMs and an increase by one or more CBMs per week during weeks 3 and 4. For the primary endpoint, the consumption of a fermented milk containing probiotics and prebiotics resulted in a higher increase in the number of CBMs (mean 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8-1.6) than placebo (0.1, 95% CI -0.4% to 0.6%) (mean difference 1.1, 95% CI 0.4-1.8; p = 0.002). For the key secondary endpoints, a higher number of patients in the probiotics-prebiotics group vs the placebo group reported 3 or more CBMs (p = 0.030; 58.8% vs 37.5%; odds ratio = 2.4, 95% CI 1.1-5.2) and an increase by one or more CBMs (p = 0.004; 53.8% vs 25.0%; odds ratio = 3.5, 95% CI 1.8-8.1) during weeks 3 and 4. The consumption of a fermented milk containing multiple probiotic strains and prebiotic fiber was superior to placebo in improving constipation in patients with PD. NCT02459717. This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with PD who have constipation, fermented milk containing probiotics and prebiotics increases the frequency of CBMs. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Functional interaction of Parkinson's disease-associated LRRK2 with members of the dynamin GTPase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Stafa, Klodjan; Tsika, Elpida; Moser, Roger; Musso, Alessandra; Glauser, Liliane; Jones, Amy; Biskup, Saskia; Xiong, Yulan; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Moore, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in LRRK2 cause autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a multi-domain protein containing GTPase and kinase domains, and putative protein–protein interaction domains. Familial PD mutations alter the GTPase and kinase activity of LRRK2 in vitro. LRRK2 is suggested to regulate a number of cellular pathways although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To explore such mechanisms, it has proved informative to identify LRRK2-interacting proteins, some of which serve as LRRK2 kinase substrates. Here, we identify common interactions of LRRK2 with members of the dynamin GTPase superfamily. LRRK2 interacts with dynamin 1–3 that mediate membrane scission in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and with dynamin-related proteins that mediate mitochondrial fission (Drp1) and fusion (mitofusins and OPA1). LRRK2 partially co-localizes with endosomal dynamin-1 or with mitofusins and OPA1 at mitochondrial membranes. The subcellular distribution and oligomeric complexes of dynamin GTPases are not altered by modulating LRRK2 in mouse brain, whereas mature OPA1 levels are reduced in G2019S PD brains. LRRK2 enhances mitofusin-1 GTP binding, whereas dynamin-1 and OPA1 serve as modest substrates of LRRK2-mediated phosphorylation in vitro. While dynamin GTPase orthologs are not required for LRRK2-induced toxicity in yeast, LRRK2 functionally interacts with dynamin-1 and mitofusin-1 in cultured neurons. LRRK2 attenuates neurite shortening induced by dynamin-1 by reducing its levels, whereas LRRK2 rescues impaired neurite outgrowth induced by mitofusin-1 potentially by reversing excessive mitochondrial fusion. Our study elucidates novel functional interactions of LRRK2 with dynamin-superfamily GTPases that implicate LRRK2 in the regulation of membrane dynamics important for endocytosis and mitochondrial morphology. PMID:24282027

  8. Effect of resveratrol on mitochondrial function: implications in parkin-associated familiar Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferretta, Anna; Gaballo, Antonio; Tanzarella, Paola; Piccoli, Claudia; Capitanio, Nazzareno; Nico, Beatrice; Annese, Tiziana; Di Paola, Marco; Dell'aquila, Claudia; De Mari, Michele; Ferranini, Ermanno; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Pacelli, Consiglia; Cocco, Tiziana

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress occur in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the molecular mechanisms controlling these events are not completely understood. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator known as master regulator of mitochondrial functions and oxidative metabolism. Recent studies, including one from our group, have highlighted altered PGC-1α activity and transcriptional deregulation of its target genes in PD pathogenesis suggesting it as a new potential therapeutic target. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound proved to improve mitochondrial activity through the activation of several metabolic sensors resulting in PGC-1α activation. Here we have tested in vitro the effect of resveratrol treatment on primary fibroblast cultures from two patients with early-onset PD linked to different Park2 mutations. We show that resveratrol regulates energy homeostasis through activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and raise of mRNA expression of a number of PGC-1α's target genes resulting in enhanced mitochondrial oxidative function, likely related to a decrease of oxidative stress and to an increase of mitochondrial biogenesis. The functional impact of resveratrol treatment encompassed an increase of complex I and citrate synthase activities, basal oxygen consumption, and mitochondrial ATP production and a decrease in lactate content, thus supporting a switch from glycolytic to oxidative metabolism. Moreover, resveratrol treatment caused an enhanced macro-autophagic flux through activation of an LC3-independent pathway. Our results, obtained in early-onset PD fibroblasts, suggest that resveratrol may have potential clinical application in selected cases of PD-affected patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Imaging biomarkers in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David J; Pavese, Nicola

    2011-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons associated with intracellular Lewy inclusion bodies. The result is poverty of movement, increased muscle rigidity, and tremor at rest and on posture. Midbrain/nigral structural abnormalities can be demonstrated in vivo with both transcranial sonography (TCS) and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) while positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) ligands exist to demonstrate dopamine terminal dysfunction. These radiotracers are markers of dopamine storage capacity, vesicular monoamine and dopamine transporter availability. While loss of putamen dopaminergic function leads to motor disability, Lewy bodies not only target dopamine neurons but have also been observed in serotoninergic, noradrenergic, and cholinergic neurons. As a consequence, non-dopaminergic neurotransmission is also impaired resulting in non-motor symptoms including sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, dementia, and autonomic dysfunction. PET and SPECT ligands exist to interrogate the function of monoaminergic and cholinergic neurons. Cortical and limbic Lewy body disease is seen in more advanced PD and this can be detected with FDG PET as abnormal covariance between levels of resting brain metabolism in these regions. Additionally, widespread microglial activation can be detected in PD with PET. This review discusses the role of structural and functional imaging for understanding parkinsonian syndromes and aiding in their diagnosis and management.

  10. Parkinson's disease protects against smoking?

    PubMed

    Allam, Mohamed Farouk; Campbell, Michael J; Del Castillo, Amparo Serrano; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to estimate the pooled risk of current and former smoking for Parkinson's disease (PD). We have reviewed all observational studies that evaluated the association between PD risk and smoking habit. Twenty six studies were identified: 21 case-control, 4 cohort and 1 cross-sectional. The cross-sectional study did not compare former with never smokers. These studies were carried out between 1968 and 2000. There was an obvious protective effect of current smoking in the pooled estimate [risk estimate 0.37 (95% confidence interval 0.33 to 0.41)]. Former versus never smokers had pooled risk estimate of 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.76 to 0.92). Current and former smoking do not, therefore, exert the same protective effect against PD so that it is unnecessary to postulate a biological mechanism through which smoking protects against PD. The results show that the reverse direction of causation is a more probable explanation, i.e. movement disorders of PD protect against smoking. Another explanation is that failure to develop strong smoking habits in early adult life might be a prodromal symptom of the disease and could perhaps be its first clinical manifestation.

  11. Association of Parkinson's Disease and Its Subtypes with Agricultural Pesticide Exposures in Men: A Case-Control Study in France.

    PubMed

    Moisan, Frédéric; Spinosi, Johan; Delabre, Laurène; Gourlet, Véronique; Mazurie, Jean-Louis; Bénatru, Isabelle; Goldberg, Marcel; Weisskopf, Marc G; Imbernon, Ellen; Tzourio, Christophe; Elbaz, Alexis

    2015-11-01

    Pesticides have been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), but there are few data on important exposure characteristics such as dose-effect relations. It is unknown whether associations depend on clinical PD subtypes. We examined quantitative aspects of occupational pesticide exposure associated with PD and investigated whether associations were similar across PD subtypes. As part of a French population-based case-control study including men enrolled in the health insurance plan for farmers and agricultural workers, cases with clinically confirmed PD were identified through antiparkinsonian drug claims. Two controls were matched to each case. Using a comprehensive occupational questionnaire, we computed indicators for different dimensions of exposure (duration, cumulative exposure, intensity). We used conditional logistic regression to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) among exposed male farmers (133 cases, 298 controls). We examined the relation between pesticides and PD subtypes (tremor dominant/non-tremor dominant) using polytomous logistic regression. There appeared to be a stronger association with intensity than duration of pesticide exposure based on separate models, as well as a synergistic interaction between duration and intensity (p-interaction = 0.04). High-intensity exposure to insecticides was positively associated with PD among those with low-intensity exposure to fungicides and vice versa, suggesting independent effects. Pesticide exposure in farms that specialized in vineyards was associated with PD (OR = 2.56; 95% CI: 1.31, 4.98). The association with intensity of pesticide use was stronger, although not significantly (p-heterogeneity = 0.60), for tremor-dominant (p-trend < 0.01) than for non-tremor-dominant PD (p-trend = 0.24). This study helps to better characterize different aspects of pesticide exposure associated with PD, and shows a significant association of pesticides with tremor-dominant PD in men, the most

  12. [Physical therapy for parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Hubert, M

    2011-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex neurologic and progressive incapacitating disease. Parkinson's disease severely threatens the quality of live and the number of patients worldwide is expected to rise considerably in the coming decade due to aging of the population. Even with optimal medical management using drugs or neurosurgery, patients are faced with progressively increasing impairments (e.g. in speech, mental and movement related functions), and restrictions in participation (e.g. domestic life and social activities). Physical therapy is often prescribed next to medical treatment but there is a lack of uniform treatment. A systematic literature search for guidelines, systematic reviews, trials, and expert opinions lead to a better understanding. The key question: Is physiotherapy able to optimally treat the Parkinson's disease symptoms? In which way, how and on which scientific bases can the physiotherapist participate to improve autonomy and to help them living independently and avoid, as long as possible, institutionalization? This article has integrated clinical research findings to provide clinicians with an overview to physical therapist management of disorders in people with Parkinson's disease. An Evidence-Based Physical Therapy Guideline providing practice recommendations was developed by the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF). Evidence from research was supplemented with clinical expertise and patients values. Randomized clinical trials reflect specific core areas of physical therapy, that is, transfer, posture, balance, reaching and grasping, gait and physical condition. Another aspect is that of educating patients (as well as their partners and family) about the disease process and the benefits of exercise therapy. Alternative therapies can be helpful like Tai Chi, virtual games, dancing, yoga, ball games for example.

  13. Is there a risk of prion-like disease transmission by Alzheimer- or Parkinson-associated protein particles?

    PubMed

    Beekes, Michael; Thomzig, Achim; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Burger, Reinhard

    2014-10-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of endogenous proteins in the central nervous system is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as prion diseases. A molecular mechanism referred to as "nucleation-dependent aggregation" is thought to underlie this neuropathological phenomenon. According to this concept, disease-associated protein particles act as nuclei, or seeds, that recruit cellular proteins and incorporate them, in a misfolded form, into their growing aggregate structure. Experimental studies have shown that the aggregation of the AD-associated proteins amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, and of the PD-associated protein α-synuclein, can be stimulated in laboratory animal models by intracerebral (i.c.) injection of inocula containing aggregated species of the respective proteins. This has raised the question of whether AD or PD can be transmitted, like certain human prion diseases, between individuals by self-propagating protein particles potentially present on medical instruments or in blood or blood products. While the i.c. injection of inocula containing AD- or PD-associated protein aggregates was found to cause neuronal damage and clinical abnormalities (e.g., motor impairments) in some animal models, none of the studies published so far provided evidence for a transmission of severe or even fatal disease. In addition, available epidemiological data do not indicate a transmissibility of AD or PD between humans. The findings published so far on the effects of experimentally transmitted AD- or PD-associated protein seeds do not suggest specific precautionary measures in the context of hemotherapy, but call for vigilance in transfusion medicine and other medical areas.

  14. Reduced risk of Parkinson's disease associated with lower body mass index and heavy leisure-time physical activity.

    PubMed

    Sääksjärvi, Katri; Knekt, Paul; Männistö, Satu; Lyytinen, Jukka; Jääskeläinen, Tuija; Kanerva, Noora; Heliövaara, Markku

    2014-04-01

    The risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD) are not well established. We therefore examined the prediction of various lifestyle factors on the incidence of PD in a cohort drawn from the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey, conducted in 1973-1976. The study population comprised 6,715 men and women aged 50-79 years and free of PD at the baseline. All of the subjects completed a baseline health examination (including height and weight measurements) and a questionnaire providing information on leisure-time physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption. During a 22-year follow-up, 101 incident cases of PD occurred. The statistical analyses were based on Cox's model including age, sex, education, community density, occupation, coffee consumption, body mass index (BMI), leisure-time physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption as independent variables. At first, BMI was not associated with PD risk, but after exclusion of the first 15 years of follow-up, an elevated risk appeared at higher BMI levels (P for trend 0.02). Furthermore, subjects with heavy leisure-time physical activity had a lower PD risk than those with no activity [relative risk (RR) 0.27, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.90]. In variance with findings for other chronic diseases, current smokers had a lower PD risk than those who had never smoked (RR 0.23, 95 % CI 0.08-0.67), and individuals with moderate alcohol intake (at the level of <5 g/day) had an elevated PD risk compared to non-drinkers. The results support the hypothesis that lifestyle factors predict the occurrence of Parkinson's disease, but more research is needed.

  15. Using 'omics' to define pathogenesis and biomarkers of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Caudle, W Michael; Bammler, Theo K; Lin, Yvonne; Pan, Sheng; Zhang, Jing

    2010-06-01

    Although great effort has been put forth to uncover the complex molecular mechanisms exploited in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, a satisfactory explanation remains to be discovered. The emergence of several -omics techniques, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have been integral in confirming previously identified pathways that are associated with dopaminergic neurodegeneration and subsequently Parkinson's disease, including mitochondrial and proteasomal function and synaptic neurotransmission. Additionally, these unbiased techniques, particularly in the brain regions uniquely associated with the disease, have greatly enhanced our ability to identify novel pathways, such as axon-guidance, that are potentially involved in Parkinson's pathogenesis. A comprehensive appraisal of the results obtained by different -omics has also reconfirmed the increase in oxidative stress as a common pathway likely to be critical in Parkinson's development/progression. It is hoped that further integration of these techniques will yield a more comprehensive understanding of Parkinson's disease etiology and the biological pathways that mediate neurodegeneration.

  16. Association of Gait Characteristics and Depression in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Assessed in Goal-Directed Locomotion Task

    PubMed Central

    Kincses, Péter; Karádi, Kázmér; Feldmann, Ádám; Dorn, Krisztina; Aschermann, Zsuzsanna; Szolcsányi, Tibor; Csathó, Árpád

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. In the genesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) clinical phenomenology the exact nature of the association between bradykinesia and affective variables is unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the gait characteristics and level of depression in PD and healthy volunteers. Methods. Patients with PD (n = 48) and healthy controls (n = 52) were recruited for the present study. Walking speed, stride length, and cadence were compared between groups while participants completed a goal-directed locomotion task under visually controlled (VC) and visually noncontrolled conditions (VnC). Results. Significantly higher depression scores were found in PD comparing to healthy control groups. In PD, depression was associated with gait components in the VC wherein the place of the target was visible. In contrast, in healthy subjects the depression was associated with gait components in VnC wherein the location and image of the target were memorized and recalled. In patients with PD and depression, the visually deprived multitask augments the rate of cadence and diminishes stride length, while velocity remains relatively unchanged. The depression associated with gait characteristics as a comorbid affective factor in PD, and that impairs the coherence of gait pattern. Conclusion. The relationship between depression and gait parameters appears to indicate that PD not only is a neurological disease but also incorporates affective disturbances that associate with the regulation of gait characteristics. PMID:28293444

  17. Association of Gait Characteristics and Depression in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Assessed in Goal-Directed Locomotion Task.

    PubMed

    Kincses, Péter; Kovács, Norbert; Karádi, Kázmér; Feldmann, Ádám; Dorn, Krisztina; Aschermann, Zsuzsanna; Komoly, Sámuel; Szolcsányi, Tibor; Csathó, Árpád; Kállai, János

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. In the genesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) clinical phenomenology the exact nature of the association between bradykinesia and affective variables is unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the gait characteristics and level of depression in PD and healthy volunteers. Methods. Patients with PD (n = 48) and healthy controls (n = 52) were recruited for the present study. Walking speed, stride length, and cadence were compared between groups while participants completed a goal-directed locomotion task under visually controlled (VC) and visually noncontrolled conditions (VnC). Results. Significantly higher depression scores were found in PD comparing to healthy control groups. In PD, depression was associated with gait components in the VC wherein the place of the target was visible. In contrast, in healthy subjects the depression was associated with gait components in VnC wherein the location and image of the target were memorized and recalled. In patients with PD and depression, the visually deprived multitask augments the rate of cadence and diminishes stride length, while velocity remains relatively unchanged. The depression associated with gait characteristics as a comorbid affective factor in PD, and that impairs the coherence of gait pattern. Conclusion. The relationship between depression and gait parameters appears to indicate that PD not only is a neurological disease but also incorporates affective disturbances that associate with the regulation of gait characteristics.

  18. Swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mamolar Andrés, Sandra; Santamarina Rabanal, María Liliana; Granda Membiela, Carla María; Fernández Gutiérrez, María José; Sirgo Rodríguez, Paloma; Álvarez Marcos, César

    Parkinson's disease is a type of chronic neurodegenerative pathology with a typical movement pattern, as well as different, less studied symptoms such as dysphagia. Disease-related disorders in efficacy or safety in the process of swallowing usually lead to malnutrition, dehydration or pneumonias. The aim of this study was identifying and analyzing swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease. The initial sample consisted of 52 subjects with Parkinson's disease to whom the specific test for dysphagia SDQ was applied. Nineteen participants (36.5%) with some degree of dysphagia in the SDQ test were selected to be evaluated by volume-viscosity clinical exploration method and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Disorders in swallowing efficiency and safety were detected in 94.7% of the selected sample. With regards to efficiency, disorders were found in food transport (89.5%), insufficient labial closing (68.4%) and oral residues (47.4%), relating to duration of ingestion. Alterations in security were also observed: pharynx residues (52.7%), coughing (47.4%), penetration (31.64%), aspiration and decrease of SaO2 (5.3%), relating to the diagnosis of respiratory pathology in the previous year. The SDQ test detected swallowing disorders in 36.5% of the subjects with Parkinson's disease. Disorders in swallowing efficiency and safety were demonstrated in 94.7% of this subset. Disorders of efficiency were more frequent than those of safety, establishing a relationship with greater time in ingestion and the appearance of respiratory pathology and pneumonias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  19. Auditory hallucinations in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Inzelberg, R.; Kipervasser, S.; Korczyn, A.

    1998-01-01

    Whereas visual hallucinations are often found among patients with Parkinson's disease, the occurrence of auditory hallucinations has never been systematically documented. The occurrence, past and present, of auditory hallucinations has been studied in 121consecutive patients with Parkinson's disease attending a movement disorders clinic. The cognitive state was evaluated using the short mental test (SMT). Hallucinations were reported for 45patients (37%); 35 (29%) had only visual hallucinations and 10(8%) both visual and auditory hallucinations. No patient reported auditory hallucinations unaccompanied by visual hallucinations. The auditory hallucinations occurred repeatedly, consisting of human voices. They were non-imperative (n=9), non-paranoid (n=9), and often incomprehensible (n=5). They were not obviously influenced by the patients' age, duration of disease, or treatment with levodopa. Cognitive impairment was more common among hallucinating patients (64%, 50%, and 25% among patients with visual hallucinations, auditory hallucinations, and non-hallucinating parkinsonian patients respectively). Depression necessitating antidepressants was present in five of 10 and other psychotic features in six patients with auditory hallucinations. It is concluded that auditory hallucinations occur in Parkinson's disease, particularly in patients who also have visual hallucinations and are cognitively impaired.

 PMID:9576549

  20. A smaller amygdala is associated with anxiety in Parkinson's disease: a combined FreeSurfer-VBM study.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Chris; Boedhoe, Premika S W; Rutten, Sonja; Berendse, Henk W; van der Werf, Ysbrand D; van den Heuvel, Odile A

    2016-05-01

    Up to 50% of all patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) suffer from anxiety symptoms, a much higher percentage than in the general population. This suggests that PD associated pathological alterations partly underlie these symptoms, although empirical evidence is limited. Here we investigated the association between anxiety symptoms measured with the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and hippocampal and amygdalar volume in 110 early-stage patients with PD. Measures of anxiety in PD are often obscured by overlap with the somatic symptoms. We therefore also used a subscale of the BAI, established by our recent factor analysis, that reflects 'psychological' anxiety symptoms and is independent of the severity of PD-related motor and autonomic symptoms. We used FreeSurfer and voxel-based morphometry for the volumetric analyses. Both software packages showed a negative correlation between the 'psychological' subscale of the BAI, but not total BAI and volume of the left amygdala, independent of the severity of motor symptoms, autonomic dysfunction and dopaminergic or anxiolytic medication status. These results confirm studies in non-PD samples showing lower left amygdalar volume in anxious patients. The results also indicate that the 'psychological' BAI subscale is a better reflection of neural correlates of anxiety in PD. Whether the left amygdalar volume decrease constitutes a premorbid trait, a PD-associated neurobiological susceptibility to anxiety or arises as a consequence of chronic anxiety symptoms remains to be determined by future prospective longitudinal studies. Nonetheless, we speculate that the Parkinson pathology is responsible for the reduction in amygdalar volume and the concomitant development of anxiety symptoms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Addictive behaviors and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Witjas, T; Eusebio, A; Fluchère, F; Azulay, J-P

    2012-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, the degeneration of the dopaminergic system and the longstanding exposure to dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) may cause, in a group of vulnerable patients, dysregulation of the brain reward system. These patients develop DRT-related compulsions, which include addiction to levodopa or dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS), punding, and impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs or behavioral addiction reported in Parkinson's disease include pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive buying and binge eating. Although the underlying pathophysiology is still poorly understood, these behaviors are linked by their reward-based and repetitive nature. Such behaviors may result in devastating psychosocial impairment for the patients and are often hidden. The recognition of these behaviors is important and allows a better clinical management. Although the limited data do not permit particular therapeutic strategies, some approaches are worth considering: DRT reduction, trials of non-dopaminergic medications and subthalamic chronic stimulation. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Electroconvulsive therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Fajardo, Humberto; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Llorens-Arenas, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Bermudez, Jesús; Ruiz-Chow, Ángel; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela

    2015-10-01

    Purpose To analyze the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy for the management of depression and/or psychosis refractory to drug therapy in patients with Parkinson disease.Methods A retrospective study was carried out including patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy during the period between 2002 and 2013. A review of the literature was performed.Results A total of 27 patients were included. In regards to the neuropsychiatric diagnosis, 14 patients had major depression, 12 patients had both psychosis and depression, and only one patient had isolated psychosis. The mean number of electroconvulsive therapy sessions was 12 ± 2.8. After electroconvulsive therapy, all patients showed a statistically significant improvement in the Brief Psychiatric Rating scale (reduction of 52% points) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (reduction of 50% points) independent of the presence of psychosis, depression or both.Conclusion Electroconvulsive therapy is effective for the treatment of refractory neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

  3. Genetic association of RIT2 rs12456492 polymorphism and Parkinson's disease susceptibility in Asian populations: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjun; Liu, Wei; Tan, Kun; Peng, Jing; Zhu, Yaowu; Wang, Xiong

    2015-09-03

    Recent studies investigating the association of the Ras-like without CAAX 2 (RIT2) polymorphism, rs12456492, with Parkinson's disease (PD) are controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to study the association between rs12456492 and PD susceptibility in Asian populations. Literature searches of PubMed and Embase were performed up to June 3, 2015, and the strength of the association between rs12456492 and PD was evaluated by odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Four studies conducted between 2013 and 2015, comprising 2017 PD cases and 2010 controls, were included in the meta-analysis. Significant association of rs12456492 with PD was found in the dominant (GG + AG vs. AA: OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.20-1.44, P = 0.00) and additive models (GG vs. AA: OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.03-1.83, P = 0.030). Although sensitivity analysis found that the overall result was stable only in the dominant genetic model, a publication bias was also detected. Therefore, the results should be treated with caution. The current meta-analysis suggested that rs12456492 might be associated with increased PD risk in Asian populations, but studies using larger sample sizes and different ethnic populations will be needed to further confirm this association.

  4. Quantitative assessment of the association between GAK rs1564282 C/T polymorphism and the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ze-Gang; He, Feng; Xu, Jian

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the association between cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK) rs1564282 C/T polymorphism and Parkinson's disease (PD) susceptibility. GAK modifies α-synuclein expression levels and affects susceptibility to PD. Genetic variation in GAK may influence the risk of occurrence and progression of PD. Many studies have evaluated the association between GAK rs1564282 C/T polymorphism and the risk of PD. However, published data are still controversial. Nine case-control studies with a total of 8159 PD patients and 12,747 controls were included in the meta-analysis. The summary odds ratio with 95% confidence interval was calculated to estimate this association. Both the minor allele frequencies and the genotype distributions of rs1564282 within GAK were different between the two groups when all studies were pooled. Subgroup analysis by ethnicity showed GAK rs1564282 C/T polymorphism was significantly associated with increased risk in both Asian and Caucasian populations. This meta-analysis suggests that GAK rs1564282 C/T polymorphism is associated with increased susceptibility to PD.

  5. Gender differences in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Lisa M

    2007-03-01

    Because estrogen has numerous effects on dopamine neurotransmission, many researchers are interested in its possible use to either slow the progression or reduce the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). The incidence of PD is greater in men than in women. Gender differences in neurotoxicity have been observed, and basic research in experimental animals indicates that estrogen protects neurons from various forms of injury. However, the results of retrospective surveys of the neuroprotective effects of estrogen replacement in PD have been mixed, with some showing no effect on risk and others showing a reduction in risk. A mildly significant gender difference in disability and quality-of-life reporting has been noted, with women citing greater disability and reduced quality of life. Gender differences have been shown in response to treatment of PD, for example, in how levodopa is metabolized--women have greater levodopa bioavailability. In the Parkinson's Disease on Estrogen Therapy Replacement in the Menopause Years (POETRY) study, participants were found to have improved scores on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale. Based on the POETRY results, it is hypothesized that estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) may lead to improvement in PD symptoms and provide an opportunity to reduce the dosage of antiparkinsonian medication in women.

  6. Cognitive Training in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Walton, Courtney C; Naismith, Sharon L; Lampit, Amit; Mowszowski, Loren; Lewis, Simon J G

    2017-03-01

    Cognitive impairment is now widely accepted as a fundamental aspect of Parkinson's disease (PD). Given the prevalence of cognitive impairment and the associated impact on well-being, evidence-based interventions are needed. However, while research is continually accumulating in order to better understand the pathology and trajectory of cognitive changes, treatment options lag behind. Nonpharmacological approaches are of particular interest in this group, given the typical polypharmacy already present in PD patients. In this regard, cognitive training (CT) is a relatively new and prominent therapeutic option with accumulating scientific support and increasing public awareness. Research has now established benefits across many different populations, and trials investigating the use of CT specifically in PD are becoming more common. We offer a brief summary of CT and its efficacy in PD samples to date, as well as discuss areas requiring further exploration in this group. Crucially, we suggest that CT should be supported as a research priority in PD, given both proven and potential benefits as a noninvasive and well-tolerated behavioral intervention for cognitive impairment.

  7. Advances in the genetics of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Joanne; Farrer, Matt

    2013-08-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease that was long considered the result of environmental factors. In the past 15 years, however, a genetic aetiology for PD has begun to emerge. Here, we review results from linkage and next-generation sequencing studies of familial parkinsonism, as well as candidate gene and genome-wide association findings in sporadic PD. In these studies, many of the genetic findings overlap, despite different designs and study populations, highlighting novel therapeutic targets. The molecular results delineate a sequence of pathological events whereby deficits in synaptic exocytosis and endocytosis, endosomal trafficking, lysosome-mediated autophagy and mitochondrial maintenance increase susceptibility to PD. These discoveries provide the rationale, molecular insight and research tools to develop neuroprotective and disease-modifying therapies.

  8. Modeling anxiety in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Broen, Martijn P G; Köhler, Sebastian; Moonen, Anja J H; Kuijf, Mark L; Dujardin, Kathy; Marsh, Laura; Richard, Irene H; Starkstein, Sergio E; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Leentjens, Albert F G

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a model for anxiety in PD and compare the relative contributions of PD-specific and -nonspecific general population risk factors for anxiety in this model. Structural equation modeling of associations of risk factors with the anxiety outcome using a cross-sectional data set of 342 patients with PD were used. A model with acceptable to good fit was generated that explained 65% of the variance in anxiety scores. A previous history of depression and the severity of the depressive symptoms scored on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale were the only nonspecific variables with a direct effect on anxiety. The presence of motor fluctuations and disease-related decline in activities of daily living were PD-specific markers of anxiety. Nonspecific risk factors had a greater influence in the model than PD-specific risk factors. Standardized regression coefficients suggested that the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score was the most important contributor to the variation in anxiety. A post-hoc analysis showed that the effects of the following variables on anxiety levels were fully mediated by depression: sex; family history of depression; previous history of anxiety; cognitive status; difficulties in non-disease-specific activities of daily living; and severity of motor signs. In this cross-sectional study, we showed that nonspecific general population risk factors are more important markers for anxiety than PD-specific risk factors. Depression was the most prominent marker. PD-specific markers for anxiety appear to be more situational and related to off periods and disease-specific disturbances of activities of daily living. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. αSynuclein control of mitochondrial homeostasis in human-derived neurons is disrupted by mutations associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pozo Devoto, Victorio Martin; Dimopoulos, Nicolas; Alloatti, Matías; Pardi, María Belén; Saez, Trinidad M; Otero, María Gabriela; Cromberg, Lucas Eneas; Marín-Burgin, Antonia; Scassa, Maria Elida; Stokin, Gorazd B; Schinder, Alejandro F; Sevlever, Gustavo; Falzone, Tomás Luis

    2017-07-11

    The etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) converges on a common pathogenic pathway of mitochondrial defects in which α-Synuclein (αSyn) is thought to play a role. However, the mechanisms by which αSyn and its disease-associated allelic variants cause mitochondrial dysfunction remain unknown. Here, we analyzed mitochondrial axonal transport and morphology in human-derived neurons overexpressing wild-type (WT) αSyn or the mutated variants A30P or A53T, which are known to have differential lipid affinities. A53T αSyn was enriched in mitochondrial fractions, inducing significant mitochondrial transport defects and fragmentation, while milder defects were elicited by WT and A30P. We found that αSyn-mediated mitochondrial fragmentation was linked to expression levels in WT and A53T variants. Targeted delivery of WT and A53T αSyn to the outer mitochondrial membrane further increased fragmentation, whereas A30P did not. Genomic editing to disrupt the N-terminal domain of αSyn, which is important for membrane association, resulted in mitochondrial elongation without changes in fusion-fission protein levels, suggesting that αSyn plays a direct physiological role in mitochondrial size maintenance. Thus, we demonstrate that the association of αSyn with the mitochondria, which is modulated by protein mutation and dosage, influences mitochondrial transport and morphology, highlighting its relevance in a common pathway impaired in PD.

  10. No Association of Four Candidate Genetic Variants in MnSOD and SYNIII with Parkinson's Disease in Two Chinese Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Eng King; Cheng, Lan; Zhang, Jin Hong; Mao, Xue Ye; Chang, Xue Li; Zhao, Dong Mei; Liao, Qiao; Peng, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Background The manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene, which encodes a chief reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzyme, has been reported to be associated with the risk of developing sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) in some Asian races and the synapsin III (SYN3) gene with some neuropsychiatric diseases. Objective: To explore the associations between the MnSOD and SYN III variations and PD in two Chinese populations from mainland China and Singapore. Methods We recruited 2342 subjects including 1200 sporadic PD patients and 1142 healthy controls from two independent Asian countries. Using a case-control methodology, we genotyped the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in MnSOD (rs4880) and SYN III (rs3788470, rs3827336, rs5998557) to explore the associations with risk of PD. Results The results showed the genotype distributions and minor allele frequencies (MAF) of MnSOD (rs4880) and SYN III (rs3788470, rs3827336, rs5998557) were not significantly different between PD patients and healthy controls in mainland China and Singapore, as well as in merged populations. Conclusions The variations of MnSOD (rs4880) and SYN III (rs3788470, rs3827336, rs5998557) were not major risk factors for PD among Chinese, at least in our study populations. PMID:24586301

  11. Parkinson disease and comorbid cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nanhoe-Mahabier, Wandana; de Laat, Karlijn F; Visser, Jasper E; Zijlmans, Jan; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2009-10-01

    Optimal management of chronic diseases not only requires tackling of the primary disease processes, but also necessitates timely recognition and treatment of comorbid conditions. In this article, we illustrate this two-pronged approach for two common age-related disorders: Parkinson disease (PD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD). We first discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms that could provide a link between PD and CVD. Patients with PD have a series of risk factors that could promote development of CVD, but also have several protective factors. We then review the available clinical, radiological and neuropathological evidence to support an association between these two conditions. We conclude by discussing the potential implications for clinical practice, highlighting how comorbid CVD could alter the clinical presentation of PD and reviewing the possibilities for prevention and secondary prophylaxis. Additional research will be needed to fully evaluate the prevalence and clinical relevance of comorbid CVD in PD. Pending further evidence, we recommend that cerebral neuroimaging should be considered if patients with initially uncomplicated PD develop-either acutely or chronically-prominent and/or treatment-resistant gait impairment, postural instability, depression, cognitive decline, or urinary incontinence. Finding comorbid CVD in such patients could have prognostic implications, and could necessitate treatment to arrest further progression of CVD.

  12. Fatigue in Parkinson's disease: The contribution of cerebral metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang Soo; Aminian, Kelly; Li, Crystal; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Strafella, Antonio P

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue is a common and disabling non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease associated with a feeling of overwhelming lack of energy. The aim of this study was to identify the neural substrates that may contribute to the development of fatigue in Parkinson's disease. Twenty-three Parkinson's disease patients meeting UK Brain Bank criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease were recruited and completed the 2-[(18) F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET scan. The metabolic activities of Parkinson's disease patients with fatigue were compared to those without fatigue using statistical parametric mapping analysis. The Parkinson's disease group exhibiting higher level of fatigue showed anti-correlated metabolic changes in cortical regions associated with the salience (i.e., right insular region) and default (i.e., bilateral posterior cingulate cortex) networks. The metabolic abnormalities detected in these brain regions displayed a significant correlation with level of fatigue and were associated with a disruption of the functional correlations with different cortical areas. These observations suggest that fatigue in Parkinson's disease may be the expression of metabolic abnormalities and impaired functional interactions between brain regions linked to the salience network and other neural networks. Hum Brain Mapp 38:283-292, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients and Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Page Parkinson's Disease: Hope Through Research NINDS Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Strategic Plans NINDS ... Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia ...

  14. Moist smokeless tobacco (Snus) use and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ye, Weimin; Liu, Zhiwei; Norberg, Margareta; Forsgren, Lars; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva; Bellocco, Rino; Alfredsson, Lars; Knutsson, Anders; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Wennberg, Patrik; Galanti, Maria Rosaria; Lager, Anton C J; Araghi, Marzieh; Lundberg, Michael; Magnusson, Cecilia; Wirdefeldt, Karin

    2016-12-10

    Cigarette smoking is associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease. It is unclear what constituent of tobacco smoke may lower the risk. Use of Swedish moist smokeless tobacco (snus) can serve as a model to disentangle what constituent of tobacco smoke may lower the risk. The aim of this study was to determine whether snus use was associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease. Individual participant data were collected from seven prospective cohort studies, including 348 601 men. We used survival analysis with multivariable Cox regression to estimate study-specific relative risk of Parkinson's disease due to snus use, and random-effects models to pool estimates in a meta-analysis. The primary analyses were restricted to never-smokers to eliminate the potential confounding effect of tobacco smoking. During a mean follow-up time of 16.1 years, 1199 incident Parkinson's disease cases were identified. Among men who never smoked, ever-snus users had about 60% lower Parkinson's disease risk compared with never-snus users [pooled hazard ratio (HR) 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28-0.61]. The inverse association between snus use and Parkinson's disease risk was more pronounced in current (pooled HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.23-0.63), moderate-heavy amount (pooled HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19-0.90) and long-term snus users (pooled HR 0.44, 95% CI 0.24-0.83). Non-smoking men who used snus had a substantially lower risk of Parkinson's disease. Results also indicated an inverse dose-response relationship between snus use and Parkinson's disease risk. Our findings suggest that nicotine or other components of tobacco leaves may influence the development of Parkinson's disease. © The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  15. No genetic association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Parkinson's disease in nine ADHD candidate SNPs.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Julia M; Romanos, Marcel; Gerlach, Manfred; Berg, Daniela; Schulte, Claudia

    2017-02-07

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) involve pathological changes in brain structures such as the basal ganglia, which are essential for the control of motor and cognitive behavior and impulsivity. The cause of ADHD and PD remains unknown, but there is increasing evidence that both seem to result from a complicated interplay of genetic and environmental factors affecting numerous cellular processes and brain regions. To explore the possibility of common genetic pathways within the respective pathophysiologies, nine ADHD candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven genes were tested for association with PD in 5333 cases and 12,019 healthy controls: one variant, respectively, in the genes coding for synaptosomal-associated protein 25 k (SNAP25), the dopamine (DA) transporter (SLC6A3; DAT1), DA receptor D4 (DRD4), serotonin receptor 1B (HTR1B), tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), the norepinephrine transporter SLC6A2 and three SNPs in cadherin 13 (CDH13). Information was extracted from a recent meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies, in which 7,689,524 SNPs in European samples were successfully imputed. No significant association was observed after correction for multiple testing. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that candidate variants implicated in the pathogenesis of ADHD do not play a substantial role in PD.

  16. Association between the BDNF G196A and C270T polymorphisms and Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Limeng; Wang, Dongmei; Meng, Hui; Zhang, Kun; Fu, Liyuan; Wu, Yuanyuan; Bai, Yun

    2013-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have evaluated the associations between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) polymorphisms and Parkinson's disease (PD) risk. However, the results remain inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of published case-control studies to better understand these results. Systematic searches of electronic databases Embase, PubMed and Web of Science, as well as hand searching of the references of identified articles were performed. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. All the statistical tests were performed using Review Manager 5.1 and Stata 11.0. A total of 13 case-control studies were included, involving two polymorphisms (G196A and C270T) of BDNF gene and covering 3333 PD cases and 3418 controls. No significant associations were found on the overall analysis both G196A and C270T polymorphisms. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity (Caucasian, Asian and Mixed population), there were still no detectable associations. In conclusion, there is no enough evidence for associations between BDNF polymorphisms (G196A and C270T) and PD risk at present. Larger sample-size and multiethnicity studies with homogeneous PD patients and well-matched controls are needed in the future study.

  17. Analysis of genome-wide association studies of Alzheimer disease and of Parkinson disease to determine if these 2 diseases share a common genetic risk.

    PubMed

    Moskvina, Valentina; Harold, Denise; Russo, GianCarlo; Vedernikov, Alexey; Sharma, Manu; Saad, Mohamed; Holmans, Peter; Bras, Jose M; Bettella, Francesco; Keller, Margaux F; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Gibbs, J Raphael; Schulte, Claudia; Durr, Alexandra; Guerreiro, Rita; Hernandez, Dena; Brice, Alexis; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Majamaa, Kari; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B; Nalls, Michael A; Hardy, John; Owen, Michael J; O'Donovan, Michael C; Williams, Julie; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel M

    2013-10-01

    Despite Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) being clinically distinct entities, there is a possibility of a pathological overlap, with some genome-wide association (GWA) studies suggesting that the 2 diseases represent a biological continuum. The application of GWA studies to idiopathic forms of AD and PD have identified a number of loci that contain genetic variants that increase the risk of these disorders. To assess the genetic overlap between PD and AD by testing for the presence of potentially pleiotropic loci in 2 recent GWA studies of PD and AD. Combined GWA analysis. Data sets from the United Kingdom, Germany, France, and the United States. Thousands of patients with AD or PD and their controls. Meta-analysis of GWA studies of AD and PD. To identify evidence for potentially pleiotropic alleles that increased the risk for both PD and AD, we performed a combined PD-AD meta-analysis and compared the results with those obtained in the primary GWA studies.We also tested for a net effect of potentially polygenic alleles that were shared by both disorders by performing a polygenic score analysis. Finally, we also performed a gene-based association analysis that was aimed at detecting genes that harbor multiple disease-causing single-nucleotide polymorphisms, some of which confer a risk of PD and some a risk of AD. Detailed interrogation of the single-nucleotide polymorphism, polygenic, and gene-based analyses resulted in no significant evidence that supported the presence of loci that increase the risk of both PD and AD. Our findings therefore imply that loci that increase the risk of both PD and AD are not widespread and that the pathological overlap could instead be “downstream” of the primary susceptibility genes that increase the risk of each disease.

  18. FGF20 rs12720208 SNP and microRNA-433 variation: no association with Parkinson's disease in Spanish patients.

    PubMed

    de Mena, Lorena; Cardo, Lucía F; Coto, Eliecer; Miar, Ana; Díaz, Marta; Corao, Ana I; Alonso, Belén; Ribacoba, René; Salvador, Carlos; Menéndez, Manuel; Morís, Germán; Alvarez, Victoria

    2010-07-19

    DNA variation at the FGF20 gene has been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). In particular, SNP rs12720208 in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) was linked to PD-risk through a mechanism that would implicate a differential binding to microRNA-433 (miR-433). The reduction of the affinity of miR-433 to the 3' UTR would result in increased FGF20 expression and upregulation of alpha-synuclein, which could in turn promote dopaminergic neurons degeneration. We genotyped the rs12720208 SNP in a total of 512 PD patients and 258 healthy controls from Spain, and searched for miR-433 variants in the patients. We did not find significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies between patients and controls. None of the patients had miR-433 variants. In conclusion, our work did not confirm the association between rs12720208 and PD, or an effect of miR-433 variants on this disease. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The V81M variant of tyrosine hydroxylase is associated with more severe freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Izel; Carkaci-Salli, Nurgul; Lewis, Mechelle M.; Mailman, Richard B.; Huang, Xuemei; Vrana, Kent E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many of the symptoms and signs of Parkinson's disease (PD) arise from the death of midbrain dopamine neurons that utilize tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) as the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis. Methods We investigated whether the presence of a common TH polymorphism affects the clinical outcomes in 101 PD subjects. We further examined the effect of this polymorphism on the purified recombinant enzyme. Results PD subjects homozygous for the common V81M polymorphism, have higher overall freezing of gait scores after controlling for disease duration, although this polymorphism does not associate with the occurrence of PD or FOG. In vitro functional assays on pure recombinant wild type TH and V81M TH revealed that the Km of the mutant enzyme for tyrosine was twice that of the wild-type. This polymorphism, however, did not change the stability of the enzyme, nor did it affect the Vmax or Km for the co-substrate BH4. Conclusion The data suggest that presence of a homozygous V81M polymorphism is associated with more severe FOG, possibly due to lower catecholamine synthetic capacity. Further studies are warranted to investigate the role of subtle changes in catecholamine availability in the development of FOG. PMID:26732803

  20. O-GlcNAc modification blocks the aggregation and toxicity of the protein α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotta, Nicholas P.; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lewis, Yuka E.; Ambroso, Mark R.; Zaro, Balyn W.; Roth, Maxwell T.; Arnold, Don B.; Langen, Ralf; Pratt, Matthew R.

    2015-11-01

    Several aggregation-prone proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be modified by O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in vivo. One of these proteins, α-synuclein, is a toxic aggregating protein associated with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease. However, the effect of O-GlcNAcylation on α-synuclein is not clear. Here, we use synthetic protein chemistry to generate both unmodified α-synuclein and α-synuclein bearing a site-specific O-GlcNAc modification at the physiologically relevant threonine residue 72. We show that this single modification has a notable and substoichiometric inhibitory effect on α-synuclein aggregation, while not affecting the membrane binding or bending properties of α-synuclein. O-GlcNAcylation is also shown to affect the phosphorylation of α-synuclein in vitro and block the toxicity of α-synuclein that was exogenously added to cells in culture. These results suggest that increasing O-GlcNAcylation may slow the progression of synucleinopathies and further support a general function for O-GlcNAc in preventing protein aggregation.

  1. Genetic basis of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Tsimourtou, Vaïa; Kountra, Persa Maria; Paterakis, Konstantinos N; Kapsalaki, Eftychia Z; Fountas, Kostas N; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years, considerable progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of Parkinson disease (PD). Mutations in certain genes are found to cause monogenic forms of the disorder, with autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive inheritance. These genes include alpha-synuclein, parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, LRRK2, and ATP13A2. The monogenic variants are important tools in identifying cellular pathways that shed light on the pathogenesis of this disease. Certain common genetic variants are also likely to modulate the risk of PD. International collaborative studies and meta-analyses have identified common variants as genetic susceptibility risk/protective factors for sporadic PD.

  2. Study of familial Parkinson's disease in Russia, Uzbekistan, and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Atadzhanov, M; Zumla, A; Mwaba, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were (A) to determine inheritance patterns of familial Parkinson's disease in three different geographical areas (Russia, Uzbekistan, and Zambia); (B) compare clinical characteristics of familial with sporadic Parkinson's disease; and (C) assess whether there were ethnic differences in clinical manifestations of the disease. Methods: Fifty two index cases of familial Parkinson's disease in Moscow, 55 in Tashkent, and 27 in Lusaka were selected on the basis of the typical clinical features of Parkinson's disease with a familial history. The sex ratio, transmission patterns, and segregation ratio were determined by pedigree analysis. Results: Familial Parkinson's disease was found in all three countries (30 families in Russia, 12 in Uzbekistan, and seven in Zambia), and appeared more common in Russia. Both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive patterns of inheritance were seen, but autosomal dominance was more common in all countries. Conclusions: In all three countries men have a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease than women and there are ethnic differences in clinical manifestations of the disease. The onset of both familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease in Zambian patients occurs at a younger age and is associated with slow progression and a benign course, and generally responds well to levodopa treatment. PMID:15701745

  3. Regional expression of the MAPT gene is associated with loss of hubs in brain networks and cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease and progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Rittman, Timothy; Rubinov, Mikail; Vértes, Petra E; Patel, Ameera X; Ginestet, Cedric E; Ghosh, Boyd C P; Barker, Roger A; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Bullmore, Edward T; Rowe, James B

    2016-12-01

    Abnormalities of tau protein are central to the pathogenesis of progressive supranuclear palsy, whereas haplotype variation of the tau gene MAPT influences the risk of Parkinson disease and Parkinson's disease dementia. We assessed whether regional MAPT expression might be associated with selective vulnerability of global brain networks to neurodegenerative pathology. Using task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging in progressive supranuclear palsy, Parkinson disease, and healthy subjects (n = 128), we examined functional brain networks and measured the connection strength between 471 gray matter regions. We obtained MAPT and SNCA microarray expression data in healthy subjects from the Allen brain atlas. Regional connectivity varied according to the normal expression of MAPT. The regional expression of MAPT correlated with the proportionate loss of regional connectivity in Parkinson's disease. Executive cognition was impaired in proportion to the loss of hub connectivity. These effects were not seen with SNCA, suggesting that alpha-synuclein pathology is not mediated through global network properties. The results establish a link between regional MAPT expression and selective vulnerability of functional brain networks to neurodegeneration.

  4. Coherent and Contradictory Facts, Feats and Fictions Associated with Metal Accumulation in Parkinson's Disease: Epicenter or Outcome, Yet a Demigod Question.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Mohd Sami Ur; Tripathi, Sonam; Mishra, Saumya; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2016-08-01

    Unwarranted exposure due to liberal use of metals for maintaining the lavish life and to achieve the food demand for escalating population along with an incredible boost in the average human life span owing to orchestrated progress in rejuvenation therapy have gradually increased the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Etiology is albeit elusive; association of PD with metal accumulation has never been overlooked due to noteworthy similitude between metal-exposure symptoms and a few cardinal features of disease. Even though metals are entailed in the vital functions, a hysterical shift, primarily augmentation, escorts the stern nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration. An increase in the passage of metals through the blood brain barrier and impaired metabolic activity and elimination system could lead to metal accumulation in the brain, which eventually makes dopaminergic neurons quite susceptible. In the present article, an update on implication of metal accumulation in PD/Parkinsonism has been provided. Moreover, encouraging and paradoxical facts and fictions associated with metal accumulation in PD/Parkinsonism have also been compiled. Systematic literature survey of PD is performed to describe updated information if metal accumulation is an epicenter or merely an outcome. Finally, a perspective on the association of metal accumulation with pesticide-induced Parkinsonism has been explained to unveil the likely impact of the former in the latter.

  5. The Parkinson's Disease-Associated Mutation LRRK2-G2019S Impairs Synaptic Plasticity in Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Eric S.; Saunier-Rebori, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a major movement disorder characterized by the loss of dopamine neurons and formation of Lewy bodies. Clinical and pathological evidence indicates that multiple brain regions are affected in PD in a spatiotemporal manner and are associated with a variety of motor and nonmotor symptoms, including disturbances in mood, executive function, and memory. The common PD-associated gene for leucine-rich repeat kinase, leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), is highly expressed in brain regions that are involved with nonmotor functions, including the neocortex and hippocampus, but whether mutant LRRK2 contributes to neuronal dysfunction in these regions is unknown. Here, we use bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse models of LRRK2 to explore potential nonmotor mechanisms of PD. Through electrophysiological analysis of the Schaffer collateral–CA1 synapse in dorsal hippocampus, we find that overexpression of LRRK2-G2019S increases basal synaptic efficiency through a postsynaptic mechanism, and disrupts long-term depression. Furthermore, these effects of the G2019S mutation are age dependent and can be normalized by acute inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type LRRK2 has no effect under the same conditions, suggesting a specific phenotype for the G2019S mutation. These results identify a pathogenic function of LRRK2 in the hippocampus that may contribute to nonmotor symptoms of PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease (PD) is among the most common neurological diseases and is best known for its adverse effects on brain regions that control motor function, resulting in tremor, rigidity, and gait abnormalities. Less well appreciated are the psychiatric symptoms experienced by many PD patients, including depression and memory loss, which do not respond well to currently available treatments for PD. Here, we describe functional effects of a common PD-linked mutation of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 in

  6. Genetic Variants in MicroRNAs and Their Binding Sites Are Associated with the Risk of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Mohsen; Darweesh, Sirwan K L; de Looper, Hans W J; van Luijn, Marvin M; Hofman, Albert; Ikram, M Arfan; Franco, Oscar H; Erkeland, Stefan J; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that serve as key regulators of gene expression. They have been shown to be involved in a wide range of biological processes including neurodegenerative diseases. Genetic variants in miRNAs or miRNA-binding sites on their target genes could affect miRNA function and contribute to disease risk. Here, we investigated the association of miRNA-related genetic variants with Parkinson disease (PD) using data from the largest GWAS on PD. Of 243 miRNA variants, we identified rs897984:T>C in miR-4519 (P value = 1.3×10(-5) and OR = 0.93) and rs11651671:A>G in miR-548at-5p (P value = 1.1×10(-6) and OR = 1.09) to be associated with PD. We showed that the variant's mutant alleles change the secondary structure and decrease expression level of their related miRNAs. Subsequently, we highlighted target genes that might mediate the effects of miR-4519 and miR-548at-5p on PD. Among them, we experimentally showed that NSF is a direct target of miR-4519. Furthermore, among 48,844 miRNA-binding site variants, we found 32 variants (within 13 genes) that are associated with PD. Four of the host genes, CTSB, STX1B, IGSF9B, and HSD3B7, had not previously been reported to be associated with PD. We provide evidence supporting the potential impact of the identified miRNA-binding site variants on miRNA-mediated regulation of their host genes.

  7. Neurologist care in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Schootman, M.; Evanoff, B.A.; Perlmutter, J.S.; Racette, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the utilization of neurologist providers in the treatment of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) in the United States and determine whether neurologist treatment is associated with improved clinical outcomes. Methods: This was a retrospective observational cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries with PD in the year 2002. Multilevel logistic regression was used to determine which patient characteristics predicted neurologist care between 2002 and 2005 and compare the age, race, sex, and comorbidity-adjusted annual risk of skilled nursing facility placement and hip fracture between neurologist- and primary care physician–treated patients with PD. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the adjusted 6-year risk of death using incident PD cases, stratified by physician specialty. Results: More than 138,000 incident PD cases were identified. Only 58% of patients with PD received neurologist care between 2002 and 2005. Race and sex were significant demographic predictors of neurologist treatment: women (odds ratio [OR] 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76–0.80) and nonwhites (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.79–0.87) were less likely to be treated by a neurologist. Neurologist-treated patients were less likely to be placed in a skilled nursing facility (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.77–0.82) and had a lower risk of hip fracture (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.80–0.92) in logistic regression models that included demographic, clinical, and socioeconomic covariates. Neurologist-treated patients also had a lower adjusted likelihood of death (hazard ratio 0.78, 95% CI 0.77–0.79). Conclusions: Women and minorities with PD obtain specialist care less often than white men. Neurologist care of patients with PD may be associated with improved selected clinical outcomes and greater survival. PMID:21832214

  8. Workforce unavailability in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Timpka, J; Svensson, J; Nilsson, M H; Pålhagen, S; Hagell, P; Odin, P

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) become unavailable in the workforce earlier than comparable members of the general population. This may result in significant social insurance expenses, but as workforce participation can be a source for social interaction and a vital part of the personal identity, there are likely to be personal implications extending far beyond the economic aspects. This study aimed to identify aspects that may contribute to workforce unavailability in people with PD. This was a cross-sectional registry study using data from the Swedish national quality registry for PD and included persons with PD in Skåne County, Sweden who were younger than 65 years. Variables were selected from the registry based on earlier studies and clinical experience and were tested for association with unavailability in the workforce: first in a series of simple regression analyses and then in a multiple logistic regression analysis. A total of 99 persons with PD-of whom 59 were available and 40 were unavailable in the workforce-were included in the study. Age (OR per year: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.18-1.85; P < 0.01) and anxiety (OR: 6.81, 95% CI: 1.20-38.67; P = 0.03) were significant contributing factors for unavailability in the workforce. Based on the findings in this exploratory study, anxiety-a potentially modifiable factor-and age may be contributing factors for workforce unavailability in PD. However, prospective studies are warranted to confirm the findings and the causation of the association between anxiety and workforce unavailability needs to be clarified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Somaiya, Mansi; Kumar, Santhosh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is essentially characterized by the motor symptoms in the form of resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, over the years it has been recognized that motor symptoms are just the “tip of the iceberg” of clinical manifestations of PD. Besides motor symptoms, PD characterized by many non-motor symptoms, which include cognitive decline, psychiatric disturbances (depression, psychosis and impulse control), sleep difficulties, autonomic failures (gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, urinary, thermoregulation) and pain syndrome. This review evaluates the various aspects of psychiatric disorders including cognitive decline and sleep disturbances in patients with PD. The prevalence rate of various psychiatric disorders is high in patients with PD. In terms of risk factors, various demographic, clinical and treatment-related variables have been shown to be associated with higher risk of development of psychiatric morbidity. Evidence also suggests that the presence of psychiatric morbidity is associated with poorer outcome. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD are meager. Available evidence suggests that tricyclic antidepressants like desipramine and nortriptyline are efficacious for management of depression. Among the antipsychotics, clozapine is considered to be the best choice for management of psychosis in patients with PD. Among the various cognitive enhancers, evidence suggest efficacy of rivastigmine in management of dementia in patients with PD. To conclude, this review suggests that psychiatric morbidity is highly prevalent in patients with PD. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach must be followed to improve the overall outcome of PD. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of various other measures for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD. PMID:25552854

  10. Evaluation of the face validity of reserpine administration as an animal model of depression--Parkinson's disease association.

    PubMed

    Skalisz, Luana L; Beijamini, Vanessa; Joca, Samia L; Vital, Maria A B F; Da Cunha, Claudio; Andreatini, Roberto

    2002-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop an animal model for the study of depressive symptoms associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Mice treated intraperitoneally with reserpine (RES), 2.0 and 1.0 mg/kg, or its vehicle (VEHIC) were submitted to the sucrose solution (2%) consumption test (a model employed to mimic the depressive symptoms found in PD) and to the spontaneous locomotor activity test (a model employed to mimic the motor impairment found in PD). All animals were submitted to both tests. Twenty-four hours after treatment, only RES 2.0-treated animals showed a significantly decreased preference for the sucrose solution (mean +/- S.E.M. RES 2.0 = 54.4 +/- 4.1%, RES 1.0 = 68.5 +/- 2.5%, VEHIC = 62.3 +/- 4.1%). There was no significant difference among groups in water, sucrose or total fluid consumption. Locomotor activity was significantly decreased by both RES doses (number of beam interruptions: RES 2.0 = 59.9 +/- 11.4, RES 1.0 = 82.2 +/- 9.7, VEHIC = 116.8 +/- 8.2). Thus, RES 2.0 administration to mice induced depressive (anhedonia) and motor (decreased locomotor activity) symptoms of depression-PD association. This suggests that the RES model shows an important aspect of face validity for the depressive state associated with PD, i.e., phenomenological similarities between the model and the situation being modeled.

  11. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease are associated with dysfunction in stimulus valuation but not action valuation.

    PubMed

    Piray, Payam; Zeighami, Yashar; Bahrami, Fariba; Eissa, Abeer M; Hewedi, Doaa H; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2014-06-04

    A substantial subset of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients suffers from impulse control disorders (ICDs), which are side effects of dopaminergic medication. Dopamine plays a key role in reinforcement learning processes. One class of reinforcement learning models, known as the actor-critic model, suggests that two components are involved in these reinforcement learning processes: a critic, which estimates values of stimuli and calculates prediction errors, and an actor, which estimates values of potential actions. To understand the information processing mechanism underlying impulsive behavior, we investigated stimulus and action value learning from reward and punishment in four groups of participants: on-medication PD patients with ICD, on-medication PD patients without ICD, off-medication PD patients without ICD, and healthy controls. Analysis of responses suggested that participants used an actor-critic learning strategy and computed prediction errors based on stimulus values rather than action values. Quantitative model fits also revealed that an actor-critic model of the basal ganglia with different learning rates for positive and negative prediction errors best matched the choice data. Moreover, whereas ICDs were associated with model parameters related to stimulus valuation (critic), PD was associated with parameters related to action valuation (actor). Specifically, PD patients with ICD exhibited lower learning from negative prediction errors in the critic, resulting in an underestimation of adverse consequences associated with stimuli. These findings offer a specific neurocomputational account of the nature of compulsive behaviors induced by dopaminergic drugs.

  12. PET and SPECT studies in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brooks, D J

    1997-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) provide sensitive means for quantifying the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic fibres in Parkinson's disease and for detecting the presence of dopaminergic dysfunction in asymptomatic at-risk relatives and patients with isolated tremor. Functional imaging can also be used to follow the rate of disease progression objectively, determine the efficacy of putative neuroprotective agents, and monitor the viability of transplants of fetal tissue. Additionally, in vivo pharmacological changes associated with development of treatment complications (fluctuations, dyskinesias) can be studied. Loss of dopaminergic projections produces profound changes in resting and activated brain metabolism. PET and SPECT activation studies have suggested that the akinesia of Parkinson's disease is associated with failure to activate the supplementary motor and dorsal pre-frontal areas. Activation of these cortical areas is restored towards normal by the use of dopaminergic medication, striatal transplantation with fetal mesencephalic tissue, and pallidotomy. The aim of this chapter is to review the insight which functional imaging has given us into the pathophysiology of parkinsonism.

  13. Comorbid conditions associated with Parkinson's disease: A longitudinal and comparative study with Alzheimer disease and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Santos García, D; Suárez Castro, E; Expósito, I; de Deus, T; Tuñas, C; Aneiros, A; López Fernández, M; Núñez Arias, D; Bermúdez Torres, M

    2017-02-15

    To study what comorbid conditions were present at baseline and 3years later in a cohort of Spanish Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, to compare comorbidity with both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and control groups and to analyze the role of comorbidity as predictor of mortality. One hundred and forty-seven non-demented PD patients (57.1% males; 70.9±8.6years old) were included in this 36months follow-up (2012-2015), monocenter, evaluation study. The International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), Charlson Index (CI), Comorbidity-Polypharmacy Score (CPS) and Elixhauser Comorbidity Measure (ECM) were used to assess comorbidity at baseline and at 3years. Forty-four AD patients and 44 control subjects were included as comparator groups. Total number of comorbidities (ICD-10) and polypharmacy at baseline were higher in PD and AD patients than controls (4.4±2.3 vs 5.2±2.4 vs 3.4±1.9 [p=0.001] and 81.6% vs 75% vs 56.8% [p=0.003], respectively). Diseases of the circulatory system (ICD-10/chapter-IX) and endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (ICD-10/chapter-IV) were the most frequent in all groups. There was a significant increase in comorbidity (mean, +1.6±2.8) in all groups (p<0.0001) without differences between them. Seventeen patients died and 8 cases were did not follow-up. Comorbidity was a predictor of death in PD patients after adjust for other covariates (including age, sex, disease duration, disease stage, motor status and non-motor symptoms): ICD-10 (total number of comorbidities), hazard ratio 1.285 (95% confidence interval, 1.047-1.577; p=0.017); CI, hazard ratio 1.462 (95% confidence interval, 1.045-2.047; p=0.027). Comorbidity is frequent in PD patients, increases significantly over time and predicts mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Opara, J A; Brola, W; Leonardi, M; Błaszczyk, B

    2012-12-15

    In this review report, current possibilities of evaluation of quality of life in Parkinson's disease have been critically presented. Health Related Quality of Life (-HRQoL) comprises a wide spectrum of consequences of the disease. Measurement of quality of life has become increasingly relevant as an outcome parameter, especially in long-term trials. Most of the available QoL instruments depend on patient self-reports. The data can be collected by written questionnaires. There are universal questionnaires of QoL--for many diseases and the specific ones--specially created for one disease. Among universal questionnaires, the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Short-Form Health Status Survey (SF-36) are the most popular in Parkinson's disease. As for specific questionnaires: the Parkinson`s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL) have been described.

  15. Longitudinal Study of Gray Matter Changes in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Jia, X; Liang, P; Li, Y; Shi, L; Wang, D; Li, K

    2015-12-01

    The pathology of Parkinson disease leads to morphological brain volume changes. So far, the progressive gray matter volume change across time specific to patients with Parkinson disease compared controls remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate the pattern of gray matter changes in patients with Parkinson disease and to explore the progressive gray matter volume change specific to patients with Parkinson disease with disease progression by using voxel-based morphometry analysis. Longitudinal cognitive assessment and structural MR imaging of 89 patients with Parkinson disease (62 men) and 55 healthy controls (33 men) were from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative data base, including the initial baseline and 12-month follow-up data. Two-way analysis of covariance was performed with covariates of age, sex, years of education, imaging data from multiple centers, and total intracranial volume by using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra tool from SPM8 software. Gray matter volume changes for patients with Parkinson disease were detected with decreased gray matter volume in the frontotemporoparietal areas and the bilateral caudate, with increased gray matter volume in the bilateral limbic/paralimbic areas, medial globus pallidus/putamen, and the right occipital cortex compared with healthy controls. Progressive gray matter volume decrease in the bilateral caudate was found for both patients with Parkinson disease and healthy controls, and this caudate volume was positively associated with cognitive ability for both groups. The progressive gray matter volume increase specific to the patients with Parkinson disease was identified close to the left ventral lateral nucleus of thalamus, and a positive relationship was found between the thalamic volume and the tremor scores in a subgroup with tremor-dominant patients with Parkinson disease. The observed progressive changes in gray matter volume in Parkinson disease may provide

  16. Reproductive factors and Parkinson's disease risk in Danish women.

    PubMed

    Greene, N; Lassen, C F; Rugbjerg, K; Ritz, B

    2014-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is more common in men than women by a ratio of about 1.5:1 and yet there is no consensus to date as to whether female reproductive factors including hormone use affect Parkinson's disease risk. Our objective was to examine the relationship between Parkinson's disease and female reproductive factors in the largest population-based Parkinson's disease case-control study to date. Seven hundred and forty-three female Parkinson's disease cases diagnosed between 1996 and 2009 were selected from the Danish National Hospital Register, diagnoses confirmed by medical record review, and the cases were matched by birth year to 765 female controls randomly selected from the Danish Civil Registration System. Covariate information was collected in computer-assisted telephone interviews covering an extensive array of topics including reproductive and lifestyle factors. After adjusting for smoking, caffeine and alcohol use, education, age, and family Parkinson's disease history, inverse associations between Parkinson's disease and early menarche (first period at ≤11 years), oral contraceptives, high parity (≥4 children) and bilateral oophorectomy were found; adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence limits were respectively 0.68 (0.45-1.03) for early menarche, 0.87 (0.69-1.10) for oral contraceptives, 0.79 (0.59-1.06) for high parity and 0.65 (0.45-0.94) for bilateral oophorectomy. Little support for associations between Parkinson's disease and fertile life length, age at menopause or post-menopausal hormone treatment was found. Reproductive factors related to women's early- to mid-reproductive lives appear to be predictive of subsequent Parkinson's disease risk whereas factors occurring later in life seem less important. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  17. Genetic etiology of Parkinson disease associated with mutations in the SNCA, PARK2, PINK1, PARK7, and LRRK2 genes: a mutation update.

    PubMed

    Nuytemans, Karen; Theuns, Jessie; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2010-07-01

    To date, molecular genetic analyses have identified over 500 distinct DNA variants in five disease genes associated with familial Parkinson disease; alpha-synuclein (SNCA), parkin (PARK2), PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), DJ-1 (PARK7), and Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). These genetic variants include approximately 82% simple mutations and approximately 18% copy number variations. Some mutation subtypes are likely underestimated because only few studies reported extensive mutation analyses of all five genes, by both exonic sequencing and dosage analyses. Here we present an update of all mutations published to date in the literature, systematically organized in a novel mutation database (http://www.molgen.ua.ac.be/PDmutDB). In addition, we address the biological relevance of putative pathogenic mutations. This review emphasizes the need for comprehensive genetic screening of Parkinson patients followed by an insightful study of the functional relevance of observed genetic variants. Moreover, while capturing existing data from the literature it became apparent that several of the five Parkinson genes were also contributing to the genetic etiology of other Lewy Body Diseases and Parkinson-plus syndromes, indicating that mutation screening is recommendable in these patient groups. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. [Epidemiology and causes of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Lill, C M; Klein, C

    2017-03-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and has a growing socioeconomic impact due to demographic changes in the industrial nations. There are several forms of PD, a fraction of which (<5%) are monogenic, i. e. caused by mutations in single genes. At present, six genes have been established for the clinically classical form of parkinsonism including three autosomal dominantly (SNCA, LRRK2, VPS35) and three autosomal recessively inherited ones (Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1). In addition, there are a plethora of genes causing atypical forms of parkinsonism. In contrast, idiopathic PD is of a multifactorial nature. Genome-wide association studies have established a total of 26 genetic loci for this form of the disease; however, for most of these loci the underlying functional genetic variants have not yet been identified and the respective disease mechanisms remain unresolved. Furthermore, there are a number of environmental and life style factors that are associated with idiopathic PD. Exposure to pesticides and possibly a history of head trauma represent genuine risk factors. Other PD-associated factors, such as smoking and intake of coffee and alcohol may not represent risk factors per se and the cause-effect relationship has not yet been elucidated for most of these factors. A patient with a positive family history and/or an early age of disease onset should undergo counseling with respect to a possible monogenic form of the disease. Disease prediction based on genetic, environmental and life style factors is not yet possible for idiopathic PD and potential gene-specific therapies are currently in the development or early testing phase.

  19. Parkinson's disease and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, Ana María; Claramonte-Clausell, Berta; Sánchez-Andrés, Juan Vicente; Herrero, María Trinidad

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that a correlation between neurodegenerative disease and protein aggregation in the brain exists; however, a causal relationship has not been elucidated. In neurons, failure of autophagy may result in the accumulation of aggregate-prone proteins and subsequent neurodegeneration. Thus, pharmacological induction of autophagy to enhance the clearance of intracytoplasmic aggregate-prone proteins has been considered as a therapeutic strategy to ameliorate pathology in cell and animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. However, autophagy has also been found to be a factor in the onset of these diseases, which raises the question of whether autophagy induction is an effective therapeutic strategy, or, on the contrary, can result in cell death. In this paper, we will first describe the autophagic machinery, and we will consider the literature to discuss the neuroprotective effects of autophagy.

  20. Parkinson's Disease and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Pérez, Ana María; Claramonte-Clausell, Berta; Sánchez-Andrés, Juan Vicente; Herrero, María Trinidad

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that a correlation between neurodegenerative disease and protein aggregation in the brain exists; however, a causal relationship has not been elucidated. In neurons, failure of autophagy may result in the accumulation of aggregate-prone proteins and subsequent neurodegeneration. Thus, pharmacological induction of autophagy to enhance the clearance of intracytoplasmic aggregate-prone proteins has been considered as a therapeutic strategy to ameliorate pathology in cell and animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. However, autophagy has also been found to be a factor in the onset of these diseases, which raises the question of whether autophagy induction is an effective therapeutic strategy, or, on the contrary, can result in cell death. In this paper, we will first describe the autophagic machinery, and we will consider the literature to discuss the neuroprotective effects of autophagy. PMID:23125941

  1. Genome-wide association study confirms SNPs in SNCA and the MAPT region as common risk factors for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Todd L.; Scott, William K.; Almonte, Cherylyn; Burt, Amber; Powell, Eric H.; Beecham, Gary W.; Wang, Liyong; Züchner, Stephan; Konidari, Ioanna; Wang, Gaofeng; Singer, Carlos; Nahab, Fatta; Scott, Burton; Stajich, Jeffrey M.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Haines, Jonathan; Vance, Jeffery M.; Martin, Eden R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder with a cumulative prevalence of greater than one per thousand. To date three independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated the genetic susceptibility to PD. These studies have also implicated several genes as PD risk loci with strong, but not genome-wide significant, associations. In this study, we combined data from two previously published GWAS of Caucasian subjects with our GWAS of 604 cases and 619 controls for a joint analysis with a combined sample size of 1752 cases and 1745 controls. SNPs in SNCA (rs2736990, p-value = 6.7×10−8; genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0109, odds ratio (OR) = 1.29 [95% CI: 1.17–1.42] G vs. A allele, population attributable risk percent (PAR%) = 12%) and the MAPT region (rs11012, p-value = 5.6×10−8; genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0079, OR = 0.70 [95% CI: 0.62–0.79] T vs. C allele, PAR% = 8%) were genome-wide significant. No other SNPs were genome-wide significant in this analysis. This study confirms that SNCA and the MAPT region are major genes whose common variants are influencing risk of PD. PMID:20070850

  2. Deficiency of Parkinson's disease-related gene Fbxo7 is associated with impaired mitochondrial metabolism by PARP activation

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Camprubi, Marta; Esteras, Noemi; Soutar, Marc PM; Plun-Favreau, Helene; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2017-01-01

    The Parkinson's disease (PD)-related protein F-box only protein 7 (Fbxo7) is the substrate-recognition component of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. We have recently shown that PD-associated mutations in Fbxo7 disrupt mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), suggesting a role for Fbxo7 in modulating mitochondrial homeostasis. Here we report that Fbxo7 deficiency is associated with reduced cellular NAD+ levels, which results in increased mitochondrial NADH redox index and impaired activity of complex I in the electron transport chain. Under these conditions of compromised respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP contents are reduced, and cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is increased. ROS activates poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity in Fbxo7-deficient cells. PARP inhibitor restores cellular NAD+ content and redox index and ATP pool, suggesting that PARP overactivation is cause of decreased complex I-driven respiration. These findings bring new insight into the mechanism of Fbxo7 deficiency, emphasising the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. PMID:27689878

  3. Genome-wide association study confirms SNPs in SNCA and the MAPT region as common risk factors for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Todd L; Scott, William K; Almonte, Cherylyn; Burt, Amber; Powell, Eric H; Beecham, Gary W; Wang, Liyong; Züchner, Stephan; Konidari, Ioanna; Wang, Gaofeng; Singer, Carlos; Nahab, Fatta; Scott, Burton; Stajich, Jeffrey M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Haines, Jonathan; Vance, Jeffery M; Martin, Eden R

    2010-03-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder with a cumulative prevalence of greater than one per thousand. To date three independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated the genetic susceptibility to PD. These studies implicated several genes as PD risk loci with strong, but not genome-wide significant, associations. In this study, we combined data from two previously published GWAS of Caucasian subjects with our GWAS of 604 cases and 619 controls for a joint analysis with a combined sample size of 1752 cases and 1745 controls. SNPs in SNCA (rs2736990, p-value = 6.7 x 10(-8); genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0109, odds ratio (OR) = 1.29 [95% CI: 1.17-1.42] G vs. A allele, population attributable risk percent (PAR%) = 12%) and the MAPT region (rs11012, p-value = 5.6 x 10(-8); genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0079, OR = 0.70 [95% CI: 0.62-0.79] T vs. C allele, PAR%= 8%) were genome-wide significant. No other SNPs were genome-wide significant in this analysis. This study confirms that SNCA and the MAPT region are major genes whose common variants are influencing risk of PD.

  4. Hypometabolism in Posterior and Temporal Areas of the Brain is Associated with Cognitive Decline in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tard, Céline; Demailly, Franck; Delval, Arnaud; Semah, Franck; Defebvre, Luc; Dujardin, Kathy; Moreau, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Brain metabolic profiles of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and cognitive impairment or dementia are now available. It would be useful if data on brain metabolism were also predictive of the risk of a pejorative cognitive evolution - especially in the multidisciplinary management of advanced PD patients. The primary objective was to determine whether a specific brain metabolic pattern is associated with cognitive decline in PD. Sixteen advanced PD patients were screened for the absence of cognitive impairment (according to the Mattis dementia rating scale, MDRS) and underwent [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain imaging in the "off drug" state. The MDRS was scored again about two years later, categorizing patients as having significant cognitive decline (decliners) or not (stables). The two groups were then compared in terms of their brain metabolism at inclusion. There were six decliners and ten stables. Significant hypometabolism in the two precunei (Brodmann area (BA) 31), the left middle temporal gyrus (BA21) and the left fusiform gyrus (BA37) was found in the decliner group compared withthe stables. In advanced PD, a particular metabolic pattern may be associated with the onset of significant cognitive decline.

  5. Association of Parkinson's disease with altered serum levels of lead and transition metals among South Indian subjects.

    PubMed

    Kumudini, Nadella; Uma, Addepally; Devi, Yalavarthy Prameela; Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Mridula, Rukmini; Borgohain, Rupam; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have suggested an association between the Parkinson's disease (PD) and exposure to heavy metals, such as lead, iron, copper, manganese, etc. A growing body of evidence suggests that heavy metals stimulate free radical formation in the brain and can lead to neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated whether such association exists in PD cases from rural and urban areas in our study population. The plasma levels of copper, iron, manganese and lead in PD cases (n = 150) and controls (n = 170) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and correlated with the oxidative stress markers like malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl and total glutathione. Results indicated significant increase in the levels of copper (17.73 +/- 4.48 vs. 13.0 + 3.22 ng/ml) and iron (554.4 +/- 123.8 vs. 421.7 +/- 126.1 ng/ml) in PD cases compared to controls, whereas no significant differences in the levels of manganese and lead were observed. Further, the data based on urban or rural residence showed that plasma copper, iron, manganese levels were comparatively higher in rural subjects, whereas plasma lead levels were significantly higher in urban subjects. Increased plasma iron showed positive correlation with marker of lipid peroxidation (MDA), suggesting that increased iron levels induced oxidative stress in PD. These results substantiated the earlier observations about the role of environmental exposure and metal-induced oxidative stress in the etiology of PD.

  6. [Perioperative management of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Mariscal, A; Medrano, I Hernández; Cánovas, A Alonso; Lobo, E; Loinaz, C; Vela, L; Espiga, P García-Ruiz; Castrillo, J C Martínez

    2012-01-01

    One of the particular characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the wide clinical variation as regards the treatment that can be found in the same patient. This occurs with specific treatment for PD, as well as with other drug groups that can make motor function worse. For this reason, the perioperative management of PD requires experience and above all appropriate planning. In this article, the peculiarities of PD and its treatment are reviewed, and a strategy is set out for the perioperative management of these patients. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased risk of parkinsonism associated with welding exposure

    PubMed Central

    Racette, Brad A.; Criswell, Susan R.; Lundin, Jessica I.; Hobson, Angela; Seixas, Noah; Kotzbauer, Paul T.; Evanoff, Bradley A.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Zhang, Jing; Sheppard, Lianne; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Objective Manganese (Mn), an established neurotoxicant, is a common component of welding fume. The neurological phenotype associated with welding exposures has not been well described. Prior epidemiologic evidence linking occupational welding to parkinsonism is mixed, and remains controversial. Methods This was a cross-sectional and nested case–control study to investigate the prevalence and phenotype of parkinsonism among 811 shipyard and fabrication welders recruited from trade unions. Two reference groups included 59 non-welder trade workers and 118 newly diagnosed, untreated idiopathic PD patients. Study subjects were examined by a movement disorders specialist using the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor subsection 3 (UPDRS3). Parkinsonism cases were defined as welders with UPDRS3 score ≥15. Normal was defined as UPDRS3 < 6. Exposure was classified as intensity adjusted, cumulative years of welding. Adjusted prevalence ratios for parkinsonism were calculated in relation to quartiles of welding years. Results The overall prevalence estimate of parkinsonism was 15.6% in welding exposed workers compared to 0% in the reference group. Among welders, we observed a U-shaped dose–response relation between weighted welding exposure-years and parkinsonism. UPDRS3 scores for most domains were similar between welders and newly diagnosed idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) patients, except for greater frequency of rest tremor and asymmetry in PD patients. Conclusion This work-site based study among welders demonstrates a high prevalence of parkinsonism compared to nonwelding-exposed workers and a clinical phenotype that overlaps substantially with PD. PMID:22975422

  8. Past smoking and current dopamine agonist use show an independent and dose-dependent association with impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Valença, Guilherme T; Glass, Philip G; Negreiros, Nadja N; Duarte, Meirelayne B; Ventura, Lais M G B; Mueller, Mila; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies have described the association between dopamine replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease and impulse control disorders. A case-control study was performed to establish the prevalence of four of these behaviors in Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease on stable dopamine replacement therapy and the possible associated risk factors. We investigated 152 patients and 212 healthy controls for pathological gambling, compulsive sexual behavior and compulsive buying and eating. Overall, patients had more impulsive control disorders than controls (18.4% vs. 4.2%, P < 0.001). Impulse control disorders were more common in younger patients (P = 0.008) and in those taking dopamine agonist (P < 0.001) and levodopa (P = 0.02). Higher Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor score (P = 0.03) and past smoking (P = 0.02) were also associated in the univariate analysis. Variables independently associated with impulse control disorders were history of smoking (odds ratio = 1.059 for each year of smoking, P = 0.010) and current use of pramipexole (odds ratio = 2.551 for each increase in 1 mg, P < 0.001). Dopaminergic stimulation and previous exposure to smoking are independently associated with impulse control disorders in a dose-dependent manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Overview of mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bobela, Wojciech; Zheng, Lu; Schneider, Bernard L

    2014-09-03

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of neurons in specific regions of the nervous system, notably in the substantia nigra pars compacta and, in most cases, by the deposition of intraneuronal inclusions named Lewy bodies. These pathological alterations have profound effects on the brain function, leading to the progressive development of various symptoms, the most prominent being the impaired initiation of voluntary movements caused by the loss of dopamine signaling in the basal ganglia. Here, we provide an overview of the mouse models of Parkinson's disease, with the goal of guiding selection of the most appropriate model for studying the question at hand. Pharmacological approaches targeting dopamine signaling and toxins leading to selective degeneration of nigral neurons are used to validate symptomatic treatments that aim at restoring effective dopaminergic function for motor control. Alternative mouse models are based on genetic modifications that are meant to reproduce the inherited alterations