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Sample records for parkinson neurospect del

  1. Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Keener, Adrienne M; Bordelon, Yvette M

    2016-08-01

    Parkinsonism is a clinical syndrome, which is characterized by bradykinesia, rigidity, rest tremor, and postural instability. Idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) is the most common cause of this syndrome, though there are several other important etiologies that must be considered. These include the atypical Parkinsonian disorders multiple system atrophy (MSA), dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal syndrome (CBS); as well as secondary causes of parkinsonism. These various disease entities may be distinguished based on key clinical features, which is critical for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:27643900

  2. Secondary parkinsonism

    MedlinePlus

    Parkinsonism - secondary; Atypical Parkinson disease ... to be less responsive to medical therapy than Parkinson disease. ... Unlike Parkinson disease, some types of secondary parkinsonism may stabilize or even improve if the underlying cause is treated. Brain ...

  3. James Parkinson: Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2013-11-01

    Parkinson's disease is a condition that anyone with a modicum of medical knowledge can recognise in the street--as indeed how it was studied by James Parkinson himself. Its three characteristic features are: 1. Increase in the tone of the voluntary muscles (rigidity). 2. Slowness of movement (bradykinesis). 3. Tremor (the characteristic 'pill rolling' movements of the fingers).

  4. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Marxreiter, F; Winkler, J

    2016-07-01

    Parkinsonism may result from cerebral vascular disorders that feature white matter lesions and small vessel pathology. Vascular Parkinsonism typically presents as lower body Parkinsonism with predominant gait impairment. Urinary incontinence and cognitive decline are additional features of the disease. There is a considerable overlap between vascular Parkinsonism and vascular dementia. We review the clinical characteristics of vascular Parkinsonism and discuss the current treatment approaches, as well as the role of brain imaging for the diagnostic workup. . PMID:27299942

  5. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... results in reduction of a critical neurotransmitter called dopamine, a chemical responsible for transmitting messages to parts ... that coordinate muscle movement. Parkinson's patients have less dopamine. Studies have shown that the symptoms of Parkinson's ...

  6. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Playfer, J R

    1997-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common disabling disease of old age. The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on clinical signs and has poor sensitivity, with about 25% of patients confidently diagnosed as having the disease actually having other conditions such as multi-system atrophy and other parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Benign essential tremor and arteriosclerotic pseudo-parkinsonism can easily be confused with Parkinson's disease. The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown. Speculative research highlights the role of oxidative stress and free radical mediated damage to dopaminergic cells. Parkinson's disease is the one neurodegenerative disorder in which drugs have been demonstrated to be of value. There is now a wide variety of drugs and formulations available, including anticholinergics, amantidine, L-dopa, dopamine agonists including apomorphine, selegiline and soon to be available catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors. Disabling side-effects of treatment, fluctuations, dyskinesias and psychiatric problems require strategic use of the drugs available. There is an increasing potential for neurosurgical intervention. PMID:9196696

  7. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells make and use a brain chemical called dopamine (say: DOH-puh-meen) to send messages to ... coordinate body movements. When someone has Parkinson's disease, dopamine levels are low. So, the body doesn't ...

  9. Hitler's parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Lillian B; Bonney, Phillip A; Smitherman, Adam D; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Of the multitude of medical and psychiatric conditions ascribed to Hitler both in his lifetime and since his suicide in April 1945, few are more substantiated than parkinsonism. While the timeline of the development of this condition, as well as its etiology, are debated, there is clear evidence for classic manifestations of the disease, most prominently a resting tremor but also stooped posture, bradykinesia, micrographia, and masked facial expressions, with progression steadily seen over his final years. Though ultimately speculation, some have suggested that Hitler suffered from progressive cognitive and mood disturbances, possibly due to parkinsonism, that affected the course of events in the war. Here, the authors discuss Hitler's parkinsonism in the context of the Third Reich and its eventual destruction, maintaining that ultimately his disease had little effect on the end result. PMID:26126407

  10. Hitler's parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Lillian B; Bonney, Phillip A; Smitherman, Adam D; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Of the multitude of medical and psychiatric conditions ascribed to Hitler both in his lifetime and since his suicide in April 1945, few are more substantiated than parkinsonism. While the timeline of the development of this condition, as well as its etiology, are debated, there is clear evidence for classic manifestations of the disease, most prominently a resting tremor but also stooped posture, bradykinesia, micrographia, and masked facial expressions, with progression steadily seen over his final years. Though ultimately speculation, some have suggested that Hitler suffered from progressive cognitive and mood disturbances, possibly due to parkinsonism, that affected the course of events in the war. Here, the authors discuss Hitler's parkinsonism in the context of the Third Reich and its eventual destruction, maintaining that ultimately his disease had little effect on the end result.

  11. Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Terzakis, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects one million people in the United States. This article reviews the etiology and pathophysiology of PD, risk factors, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of this common disease. Implications for home care clinicians are included.

  12. Viral Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Haeman; Boltz, David A.; Webster, Robert G.; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a debilitating neurological disorder characterized that affects 1-2% of the adult population over 55 years of age. For the vast majority of cases, the etiology of this disorder is unknown, although it is generally accepted that there is a genetic susceptibility to any number of environmental agents. One such agent may be viruses. It has been shown that numerous viruses can enter the nervous system, i.e. they are neurotropic, and induce a number of encephalopathies. One of the secondary consequences of these encephalopathies can be parkinsonism, that is both transient as well as permanent. One of the most highlighted and controversial cases of viral parkinsonism is that which followed the 1918 influenza outbreak and the subsequent induction of von Economo's encephalopathy. In this review, we discuss the neurological sequelae of infection by influenza virus as well as that of other viruses known to induce parkinsonism including Coxsackie, Japanese encephalitis B, St. Louis, West Nile and HIV viruses. PMID:18760350

  13. Progression of Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want ... out daily activities, and treatment complications. Severity of Parkinson's Below are some descriptions of mild, moderate and ...

  14. Parkinson disease - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads to ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may come ...

  15. Parkinson disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Parkinson disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Parkinson disease : The Michael J. Fox Foundation -- www.michaeljfox.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  16. Hereditary Parkinson s Disease Natural History Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Parkinson Disease 6, Early-Onset; Parkinson Disease (Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset) 7, Human; Parkinson Disease Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset; Parkinson Disease, Autosomal Recessive Early-Onset, Digenic, Pink1/Dj1

  17. Parkinson's Disease Foundation Newsletter

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters These include monthly e-newsletters and quarterly science-specific e-newsletters. Read the latest issue below or browse the archives. National Parkinson Foundation and the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation Complete Merger to ...

  18. [Parkinson disease and cognition].

    PubMed

    Kulisevsky, J; Pascual-Sedano, B

    1999-05-01

    Parkinson's Disease patients may have cognitive deficits, which may vary from mild focal specific deficits to global dementia. Executive functions, working memory, visuoespatial functions and internal control of attention are the main affected cognitive areas. The dopaminergic hypothesis suggests that dopaminergic transmission is involved in most altered cognitive processes. However, other neuronal systems are probably implicated, and the improvement of the cognitive function after dopaminergic replacement is incomplete and not seen in all cognitive tasks. The prevalence of dementia in Parkinson's disease is estimated in 15-25%. The pathologic hallmarks may be similar to that seen in Alzheimer's disease. However, in Parkinson's disease patients pure subcortical alterations are able to produce a severe cognitive impairment, such as lost of dopaminergic neurones from substantia nigra to caudate nucleus and frontal areas. Comprehension of the relationship between depression and dementia in Parkinson's disease patients is incomplete. Parkinson's disease patients with depression show poor neuropsychological performance, especially in frontal tasks, but it is unclear whether depression can be considered a risk factor for the development of dementia in Parkinson's disease.

  19. Serotonin in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Politis, Marios; Niccolini, Flavia

    2015-01-15

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the motor symptoms of bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity and postural instability. However, non-motor symptoms such as chronic fatigue, depression, dementia and sleep disturbances are also frequent and play a significant role with negative consequences in the quality of life of patients with Parkinson's disease. Although the progressive dopaminergic denervation is the cardinal pathology in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease, others systems such as the serotonergic are affected as well. Over the last decade, several lines of evidence suggest that a progressive and non-linear loss of serotonergic terminals takes place in Parkinson's disease, though this is at a slower pace compared to the dopaminergic loss. Several studies have indicated that serotonergic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease is associated with the development of motor and non-motor symptoms and complications. Here, we aim to review the current evidence with regards to the serotonergic pathology in Parkinson's disease and its relevance to the development of clinical symptoms. We are primarily revising in vivo human studies from research with positron emission tomography molecular imaging.

  20. How Is Parkinson's Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help make life better for people with Parkinson's General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day ® Team Hope ... can help make life better for people with Parkinson's General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day ® Team Hope ...

  1. Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Kramberger, Milica G

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis.

  2. Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Kramberger, Milica G

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis. PMID:27502301

  3. Imaging in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Gennaro; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2016-08-01

    The clinical presentation of Parkinson's disease (PD) is heterogeneous and overlaps with other conditions, including the parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and essential tremor. Imaging of the brain in patients with parkinsonism has the ability to increase the accuracy of differential diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) allow brain imaging of structural, functional and molecular changes in vivo in patients with PD. Structural MRI is useful to differentiate PD from secondary and atypical forms of parkinsonism. 123I-ioflupane (DaTSCAN(TM)) SPECT is a valid tool in the differential diagnosis between PD and non-degenerative tremors, while cardiac 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine SPECT and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET are valid in the differential diagnosis between PD and atypical parkinsonism (MSA-P, PSP). However, despite significant evidence for the utility of neuroimaging in assessing parkinsonian patients, none of the neuroimaging techniques are specifically recommended for routine use in clinical practice. Hopefully, future larger trials will help to demonstrate additional evidence for the clinical utility of neuroimaging and will include an analysis of the financial benefits for the NHS in the longer term management of the patients. PMID:27481384

  4. Young-Onset Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... idiopathic, or typical, PD. Understanding the roles of environment and genes will ultimately allow us to identify the multiple causes of PD. Is Medication Treatment Different for Young-Onset PD? Medical management of young-onset Parkinson's disease requires an understanding ...

  5. Living with Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips from the Health Care Team Finding Resources Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want ... resources & more. Order Free Materials Today Living with Parkinson’s “Parkinson’s is a part of my life, but ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF®), a division of the Parkinson's Foundation, seeks research proposals for emerging ideas to help solve, treat and end the disease. PDF investments of $2.7 million are part of its comprehensive strategy to mobilize ... Initiatives Research We Fund Results Apply ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients and Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find People About NINDS Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients & Caregivers Parkinson's Disease Highlights for Patients & ... and progression biomarkers for PD. NINDS Parkinson's Disease Information Parkinson's Disease Information Page Parkinson's Disease: Hope Through ...

  8. RNA metabolism in the pathogenesis of Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bingwei; Gehrke, Stephan; Wu, Zhihao

    2014-10-10

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson׳s disease are progressive disorders of the nervous system that affect the function and maintenance of specific neuronal populations. While most disease cases are sporadic with no known cause, a small percentage of disease cases are caused by inherited genetic mutations. The identification of genes associated with the familial forms of the diseases and subsequent studies of proteins encoded by the disease genes in cellular or animal models have offered much-needed insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis. Recent studies of the familial Parkinson׳s disease genes have emphasized the importance of RNA metabolism, particularly mRNA translation, in the disease process. It is anticipated that continued studies on the role of RNA metabolism in Parkinson׳s disease will offer unifying mechanisms for understanding the cause of neuronal dysfunction and degeneration and facilitate the development of novel and rational strategies for treating this debilitating disease.

  9. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Thanvi, B R; Lo, T C N; Harsh, D P

    2005-10-01

    Psychosis is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly in its later stages. The symptoms range from comparatively minor illusions, vivid dreams, and occasional, non-disturbing visual hallucinations to frank psychosis. The pathogenesis of psychosis in PD is not fully known. Management of psychosis in PD requires a multidisciplinary approach. Some of the newer atypical antipsychotics are effective against psychosis with no significant worsening of PD. Psychosis in PD is associated with poor quality of life for patients and the carers.

  10. Barium stone impaction in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Erhan, Y; Koyuncu, A; Osmanoglu, N

    1995-06-01

    Autonomic symptoms such as orthostatic hypotension, abnormal sweating and constipation occur frequently in Parkinson's disease. In our case, barium meal used for upper gastrointestinal study caused barium stone formation and a paralytic-ileus-like syndrome. Therefore, attention should be paid while using barium meal for diagnostic purpose in Parkinsonism. PMID:7474296

  11. Opioid hypofunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Gillman, M A

    1985-02-01

    Loss of dopaminergic neuronal function has been the most consistent biochemical abnormality found in Parkinson's disease. Hypofunction of other transmitter systems has also been demonstrated in this disease. Recently, an opioid-dopamine link has been demonstrated. This paper provides evidence supporting an opioid system hypofunction in Parkinson's disease.

  12. Parkinson's disease and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ylikoski, Ari; Martikainen, Kirsti; Sieminski, Mariusz; Partinen, Markku

    2015-11-01

    There is a broad spectrum of sleep disturbances observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). The prevalence of symptoms of insomnia and chronic inability to sleep and their association with other sleep disorders were studied. Altogether 1447 randomly selected Parkinson patients, aged 43-89 years, participated in a questionnaire study. A structured questionnaire with 207 items was based on the Basic Nordic Sleep questionnaire. Questions on demographics, PD, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, and other issues were included. The response rate was 59 % (N = 854), and of these 81 % returned fully answered questionnaire (N = 689). Prevalence of chronic inability to sleep was 36.9 % (95 % CI 33.3-40.5). Difficulty of initiating sleep was 18.0 % (95 % CI 15.1-20.9), disrupted sleep 81.54 % (78.5-84.4), awakenings during night 31.3 % (27.8-34.8), early morning awakenings 40.4 % (36.8-44.1) and non-restorative sleep 38.5 % (34.8-42.1). In the logistic regression models, poor quality of life and restless legs syndrome correlated significantly with chronic insomnia disorder. Disrupted sleep and early morning awakenings were the most common insomnia symptoms. PD patients do not seem to have difficulties in sleep initiation. Insomnia symptoms including disruptive sleep and non-restorative sleep are common in patients with Parkinson's disease. Inability to sleep is more common as comorbidity than a single sleep problem. PMID:26099862

  13. [Parkinson's disease and psychoses].

    PubMed

    Bizzarri, Jacopo Vittoriano; Giupponi, Giancarlo; Maniscalco, Ignazio; Schroffenegger, Patrizia; Conca, Andreas; Kapfhammer, Hans Peter

    2015-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and are associated with increased disability, worsened quality of life, and poor long-term prognosis. In this article, clinical features, hypotheses on pathogenesis, and current treatment strategies for Parkinson's disease psychosis (PDP) are reviewed. According to epidemiological studies, the prevalence of PDP is between 20 to 40 %. Complex visual hallucinations are the most common psychotic symptoms and are present in 17-72 % of the patients. Other sensory disturbances encompass tactile hallucinations and minor hallucinatory phenomena, such as sense of presence and visual illusions. Hallucinations are often accompanied by delusions, whose most frequent themes are persecution and jealousy. The pathophysiology of PDP remains unclear. Different factors have been implicated, including Levo-dopa and dopaminergic medications, neurotransmitter imbalances, neuroanatomic alterations, abnormal visuospatial processes, and genetic predisposition. The first-line strategy in the treatment of persistent and problematic PDP is represented by reduction in anti-PD medications. Second-generation antipsychotics are the treatment of choice, with clozapine being demonstrated as the most effective and tolerable drug for PD patients. PMID:25586068

  14. Occupational exposures and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Caudle, W Michael

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the contribution of exposure to environmental toxicants has been recognized as a significant contributor to the etiopathogenesis of parkinsonism. Of these toxicants, exposure to pesticides, metals, solvents used in manufacturing processes, as well as flame-retardant chemicals used in consumer and commercial products, has received the greatest attention as possible risk factors. Related to this, individuals who are exposed to these compounds at high concentrations or for prolonged periods of time in an occupational setting appear to be one of the more vulnerable populations to these effects. Our understanding of which compounds are involved and the potential molecular pathways that are susceptible to these chemicals and may underlie the pathogenesis has greatly improved. However, there are still hundreds of chemicals that we are exposed to in the environment for which we do not have any information on their potential neurotoxicity on the nigrostriatal dopamine system. Thus, using our past accomplishments as a blueprint, future endeavors should focus on elaborating upon these initial findings in order to identify specific and relevant chemical toxicants in our environment that can impact the risk of parkinsonism and work towards a means to attenuate or abolish their effects on the human population. PMID:26563792

  15. Atypical parkinsonism: an update

    PubMed Central

    Stamelou, Maria; Hoeglinger, Guenter U.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review This update discusses novel aspects on genetics, diagnosis, and treatments of atypical parkinsonism published over the past 2 years. Recent findings A genome-wide association study identified new genetic risk factors for progressive supranuclear palsy and new genetic conditions presenting with atypical parkinsonism have been described. The clinical criteria for diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration have been revised, and for progressive supranuclear palsy are under revision. Novel molecular techniques to identify possible biomarkers, as in other neurodegenerative disorders, have started being studied on atypical parkinsonian conditions, and although preliminary results seem promising, further studies are urgently warranted. Therapeutic trials based on disease-specific targets have shown no clinical improvement. Summary The knowledge obtained recently on atypical parkinsonian conditions points out the major deficits in this field. With the expanding phenotypical spectrum of atypical parkinsonian conditions, the early identification of patients has become difficult. The inability of conventional methods to identify these disorders earlier and better than clinicians, and the recent failure of promising therapeutic compounds, highlight the fact that the lack of biomarkers is probably the greatest limitation for developing treatments for these disorders. Thus, current and future research in this direction will be crucial. PMID:23812308

  16. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ransmayr, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. There is significantly elevated risk of cognitive decline and associated neuropsychiatric symptoms. Dementia may develop insidiously several years after manifestation of Parkinson motor symptoms (dementia associated with Parkinson's disease; Parkinson's disease dementia) or in close temporal relationship (within one year) after onset of motor symptoms (Dementia with Lewy bodies). There are clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutic similarities between these two conditions. Men are more frequently affected than women. Risk factor or indicators are advanced age at disease onset, disease duration, rigidity, akinesia and posture and gait impairment and falls as opposed to tremor dominance, and associated neuropsychiatric symptoms (depression, apathy, hallucinosis, delirium). Dementia is treatable with cholinesterase inhibitors (rivastigmine, donepezil), memantine, and adjustment of the pharmacological regimen of parkinsonian motor symptoms. Concomitant autonomic nervous system symptoms and neuropsychiatric complications warrant early clinical awareness and are accessible to pharmacological therapy. PMID:26609664

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Parkinson disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many Parkinson disease symptoms occur when nerve cells (neurons) in the substantia nigra die or become impaired. ... produce smooth physical movements. When these dopamine-producing neurons are damaged or die, communication between the brain ...

  18. [Depression in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Shin; Nagayama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Depression affects Parkinson's disease (PD) patient's QOL. Although it changes with the diagnostic criteria used, the frequency of depression in PD is approximately 10-30%. Anhedonia is characteristic in PD. According to research on anhedonia in PD using the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS), the positive ratio of anhedonia is high in PD. The SHAPS score significantly correlates with the severity of PD and duration of the disease. An examination of the literature on depression before the development of motor symptoms of PD revealed that the risk of PD is high in patients with a history of depression. Pathologically, the substantia nigra is affected in the later stages and raphe nuclei are affected in the early stages. This suggests that depression is a prodromal symptom of PD.

  19. Parkinson's disease and dementia.

    PubMed

    Padovani, A; Costanzi, C; Gilberti, N; Borroni, B

    2006-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, affecting about 1% of the population over the age of 60. In addition to motor abnormalities, there are several non-motor signs and symptoms that may create a considerable burden for patients and care-givers. Dementia is common and affects approximately 40% of PD patients during the course of the disease, the risk for the development of dementia being 6 times higher than in non-PD age-matched controls. In most cases, PD patients with dementia (PDD) display a dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial deficits, while memory is relatively unaffected. The overlap between PDD and dementia with Lewy bodies suggests that they likely share similar underlying neuropathological processes.

  20. [Biotherapies and Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Cesaro, P; Fenelon, G; Remy, P

    2009-11-01

    In the last years, several experimental biotherapies have been developed to treat Parkinson's disease. Initially, fetal dopaminergic transplants were proposed. Although a proof of concept and encouraging results have been provided, limitations of this treatment emerged over the years and the failure of controlled trials have conducted to a pause in the development of strategies based on fetal cells. Alternative approaches such as the use of retinal pigmented cells recently provided disappointing results in patients and much hope has now been reported on other sources of dopaminergic neurons such as those originating from stem cells. This strategy is however not yet ready for clinical trials in patients. Eventually, gene therapy is a new original experimental technique which has elicited several trials in the last few years some of them being promising.

  1. Niacin metabolism and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological surveys suggest an important role for niacin in the causes of Parkinson's disease, in that niacin deficiency, the nutritional condition that causes pellagra, appears to protect against Parkinson's disease. Absorbed niacin is used in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) in the body, and in the metabolic process NAD releases nicotinamide by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, the activation of which has been reported to mediate 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced Parkinson's disease. Recently nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (EC2.1.1.1) activity has been discovered in the human brain, and the released nicotinamide may be methylated to 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA), via this enzyme, in the brain. A deficiency in mitochondrial NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex 1) activity is believed to be a critical factor in the development of Parkinson's disease. MNA has been found to destroy several subunits of cerebral complex 1, leading to the suggestion that MNA is concerned in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Based on these findings, it is hypothesized that niacin is a causal substance in the development of Parkinson's disease through the following processes: NAD produced from niacin releases nicotinamide via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, activated by the hydroxyl radical. Released excess nicotinamide is methylated to MNA in the cytoplasm, and superoxides formed by MNA via complex I destroy complex 1 subunits directly, or indirectly via mitochondrial DNA damage. Hereditary or environmental factors may cause acceleration of this cycle, resulting in neuronal death.

  2. Homotaurine in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Lucia; De Nigris, Francesca; Specchia, Alessandro; Fasano, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Homotaurine is a natural compound of red algae, which has been demonstrated to have a neuroprotective effect and has been evaluated as a possible therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease. This was a single blind, randomized, controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of homotaurine in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and cognitive impairment. Patients were evaluated at baseline and 6 months later. Assessments included, the evaluation of: motor and non-motor conditions and complications (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, UPDRS); disability and quality of life; depression; excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue. An extensive neuropsychological tests battery was administered evaluating specific cognitive domains: memory, phonemic verbal fluency, executive functions and selective visual attention. After baseline testing, patients were allocated to one of the two groups: (A) treatment group: patients treated with homotaurine 100 mg; (B) control group: patients not treated with homotaurine. Forty-seven patients were evaluated at baseline, 24 (51 %) completed the study (PD-homotaurine: n = 11; 44 % and PD-controls: n = 13; 59 %); discontinuation rate was similar across subjects (p = 1.0). Intention to treat analyses to evaluate homotaurine safety showed mild side effects (gastrointestinal upsetting) in 3 patients. Per protocol analyses of homotaurine efficacy showed no difference between groups. Within group analyses showed that PD-homotaurine patients had better score at UPDRS-I at the end of the study compared to baseline (p = 0.017) and at Epworth Sleepiness Scale (p = 0.01). No other differences were found. No significant difference arose for the PD-ctrl group. Homotaurine is a safe drug. Our data suggest a beneficial effect of homotaurine on excessive sleepiness. Future studies are encouraged to confirm this promising role of homotaurine in promoting the sleep/awake cycle in patients with PD.

  3. Homotaurine in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Lucia; De Nigris, Francesca; Specchia, Alessandro; Fasano, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Homotaurine is a natural compound of red algae, which has been demonstrated to have a neuroprotective effect and has been evaluated as a possible therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease. This was a single blind, randomized, controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of homotaurine in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and cognitive impairment. Patients were evaluated at baseline and 6 months later. Assessments included, the evaluation of: motor and non-motor conditions and complications (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, UPDRS); disability and quality of life; depression; excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue. An extensive neuropsychological tests battery was administered evaluating specific cognitive domains: memory, phonemic verbal fluency, executive functions and selective visual attention. After baseline testing, patients were allocated to one of the two groups: (A) treatment group: patients treated with homotaurine 100 mg; (B) control group: patients not treated with homotaurine. Forty-seven patients were evaluated at baseline, 24 (51 %) completed the study (PD-homotaurine: n = 11; 44 % and PD-controls: n = 13; 59 %); discontinuation rate was similar across subjects (p = 1.0). Intention to treat analyses to evaluate homotaurine safety showed mild side effects (gastrointestinal upsetting) in 3 patients. Per protocol analyses of homotaurine efficacy showed no difference between groups. Within group analyses showed that PD-homotaurine patients had better score at UPDRS-I at the end of the study compared to baseline (p = 0.017) and at Epworth Sleepiness Scale (p = 0.01). No other differences were found. No significant difference arose for the PD-ctrl group. Homotaurine is a safe drug. Our data suggest a beneficial effect of homotaurine on excessive sleepiness. Future studies are encouraged to confirm this promising role of homotaurine in promoting the sleep/awake cycle in patients with PD. PMID:25894843

  4. Cellular Defect May Be Linked to Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160862.html Cellular Defect May Be Linked to Parkinson's: Study Abnormality might apply to all forms of ... that may be common to all forms of Parkinson's disease. The defect plays a major role in ...

  5. Stimulus Timing by People with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearden, J. H.; Smith-Spark, J. H.; Cousins, Rosanna; Edelstyn, N. M. J.; Cody, F. W. J.; O'Boyle, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that Parkinson's disease is marked by deficits in timed behaviour. However, the majority of studies of central timing mechanisms in patients with Parkinson's disease have used timing tasks with a motor component. Since the motor abnormalities are a defining feature of the condition, the status of timing in Parkinson's…

  6. Free-water imaging in Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Planetta, Peggy J; Ofori, Edward; Pasternak, Ofer; Burciu, Roxana G; Shukla, Priyank; DeSimone, Jesse C; Okun, Michael S; McFarland, Nikolaus R; Vaillancourt, David E

    2016-02-01

    Conventional single tensor diffusion analysis models have provided mixed findings in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease, but recent work using a bi-tensor analysis model has shown more promising results. Using a bi-tensor model, free-water values were found to be increased in the posterior substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease compared with controls at a single site and in a multi-site cohort. Further, free-water increased longitudinally over 1 year in the posterior substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease. Here, we test the hypothesis that other parkinsonian disorders such as multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy have elevated free-water in the substantia nigra. Equally important, however, is whether the bi-tensor diffusion model is able to detect alterations in other brain regions beyond the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy and to accurately distinguish between these diseases. Free-water and free-water-corrected fractional anisotropy maps were compared across 72 individuals in the basal ganglia, midbrain, thalamus, dentate nucleus, cerebellar peduncles, cerebellar vermis and lobules V and VI, and corpus callosum. Compared with controls, free-water was increased in the anterior and posterior substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy. Despite no other changes in Parkinson's disease, we observed elevated free-water in all regions except the dentate nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, and corpus callosum of multiple system atrophy, and in all regions examined for progressive supranuclear palsy. Compared with controls, free-water-corrected fractional anisotropy values were increased for multiple system atrophy in the putamen and caudate, and increased for progressive supranuclear palsy in the putamen, caudate, thalamus, and vermis, and decreased in the superior cerebellar peduncle and corpus callosum. For all disease

  7. Hallucinations in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; Fénelon, Gilles; Stebbins, Glenn; Goetz, Christopher G

    2009-06-01

    Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) can experience hallucinations (spontaneous aberrant perceptions) and illusions (misinterpretations of real perceptual stimuli). Of such phenomena, visual hallucinations (VHs) and illusions are the most frequently encountered, although auditory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations can also occur. In cross-sectional studies, VHs occur in approximately one-third of patients, but up to three-quarters of patients might develop VHs during a 20-year period. Hallucinations can have substantial psychosocial effects and, historically, were the main reason for placing patients in nursing homes. Concomitant or overlapping mechanisms are probably active during VHs, and these include the following: central dopaminergic overactivity and an imbalance with cholinergic neurotransmission; dysfunction of the visual pathways, including specific PD-associated retinopathy and functional alterations of the extrastriate visual pathways; alterations of brainstem sleep-wake and dream regulation; and impaired attentional focus. Possible treatments include patient-initiated coping strategies, a reduction of antiparkinson medications, atypical neuroleptics and, potentially, cholinesterase inhibitors. Evidence-based studies, however, only support the use of one atypical neuroleptic, clozapine, and only in patients without dementia. Better phenomenological discrimination, combined with neuroimaging tools, should refine therapeutic options and improve prognosis. The aim of this Review is to present epidemiological, phenomenological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of hallucinations in PD. PMID:19498436

  8. Depression and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Matthias R; Fuchs, Gerd; Gemende, Irene; Herting, Birgit; Oehlwein, Christian; Reichmann, Heinz; Rieke, Jürgen; Volkmann, Jens

    2004-09-01

    Depression occurs in approximately 45% of all patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), reduces quality of life independent of motor symptoms and seems to be underrated and undertreated. Characteristics of symptoms differ from major depression. Because of overlapping clinical symptoms, diagnosis is based on subjectively experienced anhedonia and feeling of emptiness. Available rating scales for major depression may not be adequate to correctly measure severity of depression in PD. Anxiety and depression may manifest as first symptoms of PD many years before motor symptoms. Serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic mechanisms play key roles in the etiology of depression in PD. Tricyclic and newer, selective antidepressants including serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SSRI, SNRI) appear to be effective in treating depression in PD. Selective reuptake inhibitors seem to have a favorable side effect profile. Recent controlled studies show antidepressant effects of pramipexole in bipolar II depression. New dopamine agonists pramipexole and ropinirole appear to ameliorate depressive symptoms in PD in addition to effects on motor symptoms. There is a lack of appropriate rating scales and controlled studies regarding depression in PD.

  9. Melatonin and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Juan C; Sainz, Rosa M; Tan, Dun-Xian; Antolín, Isaac; Rodríguez, Carmen; Reiter, Russel J

    2005-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. It is characterized by a progressive loss of dopamine in the substantia nigra and striatum. However, over 70% of dopaminergic neuronal death occurs before the first symptoms appear, which makes either early diagnosis or effective treatments extremely difficult. Only symptomatic therapies have been used, including levodopa (l-dopa), to restore dopamine content; however, the use of l-dopa leads to some long-term pro-oxidant damage. In addition to a few specific mutations, oxidative stress and generation of free radicals from both mitochondrial impairment and dopamine metabolism are considered to play critical roles in PD etiology. Thus, the use of antioxidants as an important co-treatment with traditional therapies for PD has been suggested. Melatonin, or N-acetyl-5-methoxy-tryptamine, an indole mainly produced in the pineal gland, has been shown to have potent endogenous antioxidant actions. Because neurodegenerative disorders are mainly caused by oxidative damage, melatonin has been tested successfully in both in vivo and in vitro models of PD. The present review provides an up-to-date account of the findings and mechanisms involved in neuroprotection of melatonin in PD.

  10. Hallucinations in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; Fénelon, Gilles; Stebbins, Glenn; Goetz, Christopher G

    2009-06-01

    Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) can experience hallucinations (spontaneous aberrant perceptions) and illusions (misinterpretations of real perceptual stimuli). Of such phenomena, visual hallucinations (VHs) and illusions are the most frequently encountered, although auditory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations can also occur. In cross-sectional studies, VHs occur in approximately one-third of patients, but up to three-quarters of patients might develop VHs during a 20-year period. Hallucinations can have substantial psychosocial effects and, historically, were the main reason for placing patients in nursing homes. Concomitant or overlapping mechanisms are probably active during VHs, and these include the following: central dopaminergic overactivity and an imbalance with cholinergic neurotransmission; dysfunction of the visual pathways, including specific PD-associated retinopathy and functional alterations of the extrastriate visual pathways; alterations of brainstem sleep-wake and dream regulation; and impaired attentional focus. Possible treatments include patient-initiated coping strategies, a reduction of antiparkinson medications, atypical neuroleptics and, potentially, cholinesterase inhibitors. Evidence-based studies, however, only support the use of one atypical neuroleptic, clozapine, and only in patients without dementia. Better phenomenological discrimination, combined with neuroimaging tools, should refine therapeutic options and improve prognosis. The aim of this Review is to present epidemiological, phenomenological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of hallucinations in PD.

  11. Nutraceuticals in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hang, Liting; Basil, Adeline Henry; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2016-09-01

    Current pharmacological strategies for Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common neurological movement disorder worldwide, are predominantly symptom relieving and are often plagued with undesirable side effects after prolonged treatment. Despite this, they remain as the mainstay treatment for PD due to the lack of better alternatives. Nutraceuticals are compounds derived from natural food sources that have certain therapeutic value and the advent of which has opened doors to the use of alternative strategies to tackle neurodegenerative diseases such as PD. Notably, nutraceuticals are able to position themselves as a "safer" strategy due to the fact that they are naturally derived compounds, therefore possibly having less side effects. Significant efforts have been put into better comprehending the role of nutraceuticals in PD, and we will look at some of them in this review. Broadly speaking, these compounds execute their positive effects via modulating signalling pathways, inhibiting oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis, as well as regulating mitochondrial homoeostasis. Importantly, we will highlight how a component of green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), confers neuroprotection in PD via its ability to activate AMP kinase and articulate how its beneficial effects in PD are possibly due to enhancing mitochondrial quality control. PMID:27147525

  12. [Quantitative gait analysis in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Villadoniga, M; San Millan, A; Cabanes-Martinez, L; Aviles-Olmos, I; Del Alamo-De Pedro, M; Regidor, I

    2016-08-01

    Objetivo. Describir las alteraciones de la marcha e inestabilidad postural en un grupo de pacientes con enfermedad de Parkinson (EP) avanzada. Pacientes y metodos. Se analizo la marcha de pacientes con EP en estadio avanzado on medicacion. Por medio de un sistema de analisis computarizado del movimiento, se estudiaron las variables cinematicas: cadencia, numero de ciclos con apoyo correcto (ciclos HFPS), numero de ciclos totales, duracion de las fases del ciclo, electromiografia, y goniometria de rodilla y tobillo. La valoracion clinica del equilibrio y la inestabilidad postural se completo con los tests Tinetti y Timed Up and Go. Resultados. El analisis mostro alteraciones en los parametros espaciotemporales con respecto a los rangos de normalidad: disminucion de los ciclos HFPS, aumento del numero total de ciclos y alteracion de la cadencia en muchos pacientes, y conservacion de la cadencia media dentro de los limites de la normalidad, aumento de la duracion de la fase de apoyo, disminucion del apoyo monopodal y alteracion del rango articular de la rodilla y el tobillo. Asimismo, se observo una alteracion en las puntuaciones obtenidas en las escalas clinicas, que mostraban un aumento del factor de riesgo de caidas y dependencia leve. Conclusion. La cuantificacion mediante analisis objetivo de las variables cineticas y cinematicas en los pacientes con EP puede emplearse como herramienta para establecer la influencia de las distintas alternativas terapeuticas en el trastorno de la marcha.

  13. Parkinsonism in poets and writers.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease is a severe degenerative disease, which is bewildering for its array of clinical features. Writers for the past five centuries have described the associated symptoms. Before the nineteenth century, Miguel de Cervantes wrote Don Quixote de la Mancha and William Shakespeare wrote several tragedies dealing with neurological manifestations that are characteristic of Parkinson disease. From the nineteenth century onward, writers including Charles Dickens, Samuel Beckett, Galway Kinnell, and Harold Pinter among others have showcased in their works classic manifestations of Parkinson disease. This literary attention has led to a greater awareness on the part of the general public regarding this disease and, in turn, has opened the doors to a better understanding of and a better respect for the patients affected by this disease. PMID:24290476

  14. Vaccination strategies for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Ramos, Marina; von Euler Chelpin, Marianne; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the world, but there is currently no available cure for it. Current treatments only alleviate some of the symptoms for a few years, but they become ineffective in the long run and do not stop the disease. Therefore it is of outmost importance to develop therapeutic strategies that can prevent, stop, or cure Parkinson disease. A very promising target for these therapies is the peripheral immune system due to its probable involvement in the disease and its potential as a tool to modulate neuroinflammation. But for such strategies to be successful, we need to understand the particular state of the peripheral immune system during Parkinson disease in order to avoid its weaknesses. In this review we examine the available data regarding how dopamine regulates the peripheral immune system and how this regulation is affected in Parkinson disease; the specific cytokine profiles observed during disease progression and the alterations documented to date in patients’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also review the different strategies used in Parkinson disease animal models to modulate the adaptive immune response to salvage dopaminergic neurons from cell death. After analyzing the evidence, we hypothesize the need to prime the immune system to restore natural tolerance against α-synuclein in Parkinson disease, including at the same time B and T cells, so that T cells can reprogram microglia activation to a beneficial pattern and B cell/IgG can help neurons cope with the pathological forms of α-synuclein. PMID:24670306

  15. Parkinson disease: sialorrhea and Parkinson disease--novel treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Troche, Michelle S; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2010-08-01

    Sialorrhea is a common and often debilitating, socially isolating and embarrassing symptom for patients with Parkinson disease (PD). The treatment of sialorrhea involves the management of saliva production, and is complicated in this disease by the risk of aspiration. Two novel approaches to the treatment of this symptom in PD have recently been published.

  16. Camptocormia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Eldad; Djaldetti, Ruth

    2006-12-01

    Camptocormia is defined as an abnormal, severe and involuntary forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine, which becomes manifest during standing and walking and subsides in the recumbent position. It was originally described as a psychogenic disorder, particularly in soldiers involved in long-term trench service during World War 1. It is becoming increasingly recognized as a prominent and disabling phenomenon during the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). In our experience, there is no clear correlation between camptocormia and levodopa treatment. In a few patients, the abnormal posture improved and in others it was unaltered or even became worse following levodopa administration. In a minority of fluctuating patients, there was a temporary deterioration during the "off" periods, but in most, the severity of camptocormia was unchanged during the "on" and "off" phases. In some patients it is associated with back pains, whereas in others it is painless. It occurs in sporadic PD as well as in postencephalitic and parkin-gene mutation PD and in other parkinsonian syndromes such as MSA. The pathogenesis of this striking clinical sign is unknown. It is definitely not due to a primary vertebral disease causing kyphosis such as ankylosing spondylitis, as the bent spine disappears when the patient lies on his back. The muscles involved may be the abdominal, paravertebral or both. It may by due to a peculiar dystonia or to an extreme form of rigidity. Local myopathic changes were suggested as a possible cause, but these may rather be a secondary phenomenon. Treatment is currently unsatisfactory in most cases. Occasional patients may benefit from intramuscular botulinum toxin injections or from deep brain stimulation.

  17. Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Suttrup, Inga; Warnecke, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    More than 80 % of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop dysphagia during the course of their disease. Swallowing impairment reduces quality of life, complicates medication intake and leads to malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. Although the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood, it has been shown that dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the development of dysphagia in PD. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in PD patients is challenging and often delivers unreliable results. A modified water test assessing maximum swallowing volume is recommended to uncover oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD. PD-specific questionnaires may also be useful to identify patients at risk for swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and videofluoroscopic swallowing study are both considered to be the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. In addition, high-resolution manometry may be a helpful tool. These instrumental methods allow a reliable detection of aspiration events. Furthermore, typical patterns of impairment during the oral, pharyngeal and/or esophageal swallowing phase of PD patients can be identified. Therapy of dysphagia in PD consists of pharmacological interventions and swallowing treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs). Fluctuating dysphagia with deterioration during the off-state should be treated by optimizing dopaminergic medication. The methods used during swallowing treatment by SLTs shall be selected according to the individual dysphagia pattern of each PD patient. A promising novel method is an intensive training of expiratory muscle strength. Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinical relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. The goal of this review is giving an overview on current stages of epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of PD-associated dysphagia, which might be helpful for neurologists

  18. Primitive reflexes in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vreeling, F W; Verhey, F R; Houx, P J; Jolles, J

    1993-01-01

    A standardised protocol for the examination of 15 primitive reflexes in which the amplitude and the persistence were scored separately, was applied to 25 patients with Parkinson's disease and an equal number of healthy matched control subjects. Most reflexes were found considerably more often in the patients than in the control subjects, especially the snout, the glabellar tap, and its variant, the nasopalpebral reflex. Only the mouth open finger spread reflex was present more often in the control subjects. For all reflexes except this last, the scores for amplitude and persistence of the reflexes for the control group never exceeded the scores for the patient group. Reflexes persisted more often in the patients than in the control subjects. Parkinsonism alone can explain a large number of primitive reflexes, irrespective of the severity or duration of the disease. In contrast, the number of reflexes was related more closely to cognitive scales. It is concluded that such reflexes may be helpful in diagnosing Parkinson's disease. In addition, a standardised protocol for eliciting and scoring is essential for the study of these reflexes in parkinsonism and other neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:8270937

  19. [The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP)].

    PubMed

    Oertel, Wolfgang H; Deuschl, Guenther; Eggert, Karla

    2016-04-01

    The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP) is a research infrastructure for disease-oriented translational and clinical research in the field of Parkinson syndromes (PS). It was initiated in 1999 and funded until 2008 by the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF). The CNP created a highly frequented website with information on PS for the general public and for experts. The CNP designed and established one of the first electronic internet-based data entry systems (secuTrial®) - fulfilling the legal standards of data safety and security - a material bank for genetic research on Parkinson's disease (PD), implemented and investigated new methods for early diagnosis of PD and related atypical PS including in vivo dopamine transporter imaging (DAT SPECT), established the German Parkinson Study Group (GPS-Pharma) with 40 certified trial centres for pharmacotherapeutical trials and the German interdisciplinary Parkinson Study Group (neurology and neurosurgery) for deep brain stimulation (GPS-DBS), and carried out several pharmacoeconomic and health care studies on PD in Germany. Sustainability of the infrastructure CNP has in part been achieved in form of the GPS-Pharma and the GPS-DBS, as well as in the German Study Group on REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder (RBD), a prodromal phase of PD. Part of the CNP activities, such as genetic research and research on cohorts of PD patients, have been incorporated into the German Center for Neurodegenerative Disorders (DZNE). Furthermore, topics such as health care research are funded within projects of the EU research program. The article describes problems in setting up a competence network from scratch and contains recommendations how to avoid them in the future.

  20. Parkinson's disease: Autoimmunity and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    De Virgilio, Armando; Greco, Antonio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; Gallo, Andrea; Conte, Michela; Rosato, Chiara; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that causes the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The resulting dopamine deficiency in the basal ganglia leads to a movement disorder that is characterized by classical parkinsonian motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease is recognized as the most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. PD ethiopathogenesis remains to be elucidated and has been connected to genetic, environmental and immunologic conditions. The past decade has provided evidence for a significant role of the immune system in PD pathogenesis, either through inflammation or an autoimmune response. Several autoantibodies directed at antigens associated with PD pathogenesis have been identified in PD patients. This immune activation may be the cause of, rather than a response to, the observed neuronal loss. Parkinsonian motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscular rigidity and resting tremor. The non-motor features include olfactory dysfunction, cognitive impairment, psychiatric symptoms and autonomic dysfunction. Microscopically, the specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies, which are brain deposits containing a substantial amount of α-synuclein, have been recognized. The progression of Parkinson's disease is characterized by a worsening of motor features; however, as the disease progresses, there is an emergence of complications related to long-term symptomatic treatment. The available therapies for Parkinson's disease only treat the symptoms of the disease. A major goal of Parkinson's disease research is the development of disease-modifying drugs that slow or stop the neurodegenerative process. Drugs that enhance the intracerebral dopamine concentrations or stimulate dopamine receptors remain the mainstay treatment for motor symptoms. Immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies aiming to attenuate PD neurodegeneration have become an attractive option and

  1. [The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP)].

    PubMed

    Oertel, Wolfgang H; Deuschl, Guenther; Eggert, Karla

    2016-04-01

    The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP) is a research infrastructure for disease-oriented translational and clinical research in the field of Parkinson syndromes (PS). It was initiated in 1999 and funded until 2008 by the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF). The CNP created a highly frequented website with information on PS for the general public and for experts. The CNP designed and established one of the first electronic internet-based data entry systems (secuTrial®) - fulfilling the legal standards of data safety and security - a material bank for genetic research on Parkinson's disease (PD), implemented and investigated new methods for early diagnosis of PD and related atypical PS including in vivo dopamine transporter imaging (DAT SPECT), established the German Parkinson Study Group (GPS-Pharma) with 40 certified trial centres for pharmacotherapeutical trials and the German interdisciplinary Parkinson Study Group (neurology and neurosurgery) for deep brain stimulation (GPS-DBS), and carried out several pharmacoeconomic and health care studies on PD in Germany. Sustainability of the infrastructure CNP has in part been achieved in form of the GPS-Pharma and the GPS-DBS, as well as in the German Study Group on REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder (RBD), a prodromal phase of PD. Part of the CNP activities, such as genetic research and research on cohorts of PD patients, have been incorporated into the German Center for Neurodegenerative Disorders (DZNE). Furthermore, topics such as health care research are funded within projects of the EU research program. The article describes problems in setting up a competence network from scratch and contains recommendations how to avoid them in the future. PMID:26961981

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a condition characterized by abnormal ...

  3. Adolf Hitler had post-encephalitic Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, A

    1996-04-01

    Adolf Hitler had Parkinson symptoms in 1934, at age 45 years. He may have had transient symptoms in 1923, at age 34 years. Young-onset parkinsonism, during the 1920s, favored a diagnosis of post-encephalitic rather than idiopathic parkinsonism. Hitler had oculogyric crises, phenomena only associated with post-encephalitic parkinsonism. In addition, he had dystonic facial spasms, palilalia and a sleep disorder, phenomena more likely to be associated with post-encephalitic than idiopathic parkinsonism. In November 1918, at age 29 years, Hitler may have had von Economo's encephalitis, while he was a patient in a hospital, recovering from poison gas. This paper looks at the possible relationship of von Economo's encephalitis to Hitler's asocial behavior; his obsessions and compulsions, his cruelty and rages. The influence of Hitler's parkinsonism on his conduct during World War II is discussed. PMID:18591024

  4. Adolf Hitler had post-encephalitic Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, A

    1996-04-01

    Adolf Hitler had Parkinson symptoms in 1934, at age 45 years. He may have had transient symptoms in 1923, at age 34 years. Young-onset parkinsonism, during the 1920s, favored a diagnosis of post-encephalitic rather than idiopathic parkinsonism. Hitler had oculogyric crises, phenomena only associated with post-encephalitic parkinsonism. In addition, he had dystonic facial spasms, palilalia and a sleep disorder, phenomena more likely to be associated with post-encephalitic than idiopathic parkinsonism. In November 1918, at age 29 years, Hitler may have had von Economo's encephalitis, while he was a patient in a hospital, recovering from poison gas. This paper looks at the possible relationship of von Economo's encephalitis to Hitler's asocial behavior; his obsessions and compulsions, his cruelty and rages. The influence of Hitler's parkinsonism on his conduct during World War II is discussed.

  5. Dementia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Karen E.

    2004-05-01

    One of the more recently recognized problems in treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is development of cognitive dysfunction and, in many cases, frank dementia. As patients with PD live longer, because of improved care and treatment of motor symptoms, dementia in PD is becoming a major contributor to morbidity in the illness. Prevalence studies suggest that up to 30% of patients with PD develop dementia. Dementia in PD patients is often a multifactorial condition. Neuropathologic changes caused by PD itself may cause memory loss. However, some patients with PD and memory decline also have pathologic changes that are more consistent with Alzheimer's disease. Many PD patients have a mix of the two types of pathology. Other factors, such as underlying illnesses, medication side effects, and interaction of therapeutic agents, may contribute to cognitive changes in PD patients. Predictors of development of dementia in PD include advancing age and severity of neurologic symptoms, which may interact with one another to produce this effect. Recent work suggests that tobacco use also may increase risk of PD dementia, despite its possible protective effect against development of PD itself. Presence of psychiatric illness, especially depression, may interfere with cognition and exacerbate memory loss. Reduction in the dose of dopaminergic agents and of other medications may be helpful in partially improving cognitive function in some cases. The balance between improvement of motor function and preservation of cognitive abilities must be weighed, and it is important for clinicians to discuss this trade-off with patients and their families. At this time, there is no US Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacologic treatment for dementia in PD. However, medication used to treat Alzheimer's disease, such as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, may slow progression of memory loss in some PD patients. Based on work from small double-blind studies, open-label trials

  6. Great shakes: famous people with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey M

    2004-12-01

    James Parkinson is credited with the first complete clinical description of the syndrome attributed to his name, Parkinson disease. It is recognized as the first syndrome defined after neurology became a specialty. Descriptions of Parkinson features are rare in antiquity, and famous people with this disorder have not been found before the 1800s. During the 20th century, more and more famous people appear to be afflicted with Parkinson, and this article reviews some of those who have withstood the "test of Time magazine," and examines some of the reasons why the syndrome is a relatively recent disorder. PMID:15646755

  7. Great shakes: famous people with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey M

    2004-12-01

    James Parkinson is credited with the first complete clinical description of the syndrome attributed to his name, Parkinson disease. It is recognized as the first syndrome defined after neurology became a specialty. Descriptions of Parkinson features are rare in antiquity, and famous people with this disorder have not been found before the 1800s. During the 20th century, more and more famous people appear to be afflicted with Parkinson, and this article reviews some of those who have withstood the "test of Time magazine," and examines some of the reasons why the syndrome is a relatively recent disorder.

  8. Occupational and environmental causes of parkinsonism

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, C.M. )

    1992-07-01

    Occupational causes of parkinsonism have usually been identified by direct temporal association of an exposure with disease symptoms, although recently a latent period between exposure and disease causation is being investigated. This review presents the definition of parkinsonism as contrasted with Parkinson's disease, notes the general concepts important to the consideration of toxic effects on the central nervous system, and addresses each group of agents known to cause parkinsonism, including common sources of exposure, clinical course, and proposed mechanisms of toxicity. Agents discussed include manganese, carbon disulfide, organic solvents, carbon monoxide, and MTPT and similar agents.58 references.

  9. Breathing in Parkinsonism in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Bialkowska, Monika; Boguszewski, Paweł; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Parkinsonism is underlain by dopamine (DA) deficiency in the mid-brain, a neurotransmitter innately involved with respiratory regulation. However, the state of respiration in parkinsonism is an unsettled issue. In this study we seek to determine ventilation and its responses to hypoxia in a reserpine--alpha-methyl-tyrosine model of parkinsonism in the rat. We also attempted to differentiate between the role of discrete brain and carotid body DA stores in the modulation of the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR). To this end we used domperidone, a peripheral D2 receptor antagonist, and levodopa, a central D2 receptor agonist. The HVRs to acute 12% and 8% hypoxia were studied in a whole body plethysmograph in the same rats before and after the induction of parkinsonic symptoms in conscious rats. We found that resting ventilation and the HVR were distinctly reduced in parkinsonism. The reduction was particularly evident in the peak hypoxic hyperpneic augmentation. Domperidone, which enhanced ventilation in the control healthy condition, failed to reverse the reduced parkinsonic HVR. In contrast, levodopa, which did not appreciably affected ventilation in the healthy condition, caused the parkinsonic HVR to return to and above the baseline healthy level. The findings demonstrate the predominance of a lack of the central DA stimulatory element and minimize the role of carotid body DA in the ventilatory impediment of parkinsonism. In conclusion, the study provides the pathophysiological savvy concerning the respiratory insufficiency of parkinsonism, a sequela which carries a risk of chronically impaired blood oxygenation, which may drive the disease worsening.

  10. Team management of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, J C

    1977-01-01

    This report describes a multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of Parkinson's disease. By using published sources, the disease process, clinical findings, and medical management of Parkinson's disease are reviewed. The continual change in the clinical picture as well as the therapeutic needs require that clinicians have a full understanding of the disease and drugs used. This is followed by a description of a group program, including the evaluation process, treatment goals, and individual and group activities employed. Rehabilitation services are needed as medical management alone is not sufficient to maintain patient's daily living skills. The occupational therapist is skilled in assessment and training of activities for daily living. As a result, occupational therapy can be an integral part of the treatment program.

  11. Neuropsychiatric Issues in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Jeffrey W; Stacy, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in Parkinson's Disease and may surpass motor symptoms as the major factors impacting patient quality of life. The symptoms may be broadly separated into those associated with the disease process and those that represent adverse effects of treatment. Symptoms attributed to the disease arise from pathologic changes within multiple brain regions and are not restricted to dysfunction in the dopaminergic system. Mood symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and apathy are common and may precede the development of motor symptoms by years, while other neuropsychiatric symptoms such as cognitive impairment, dementia, and psychosis are more common in later stages of the disease. Neuropsychiatric symptoms attributed to treatment include impulse control disorders, pathologic use of dopaminergic medications, and psychosis. This manuscript will review the current understanding of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's Disease. PMID:27048443

  12. Adolf Hitler and His Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B.

    2015-01-01

    Research works have suggested almost incontrovertibly, that Adolf Hitler suffered from Parkinsonism. However, the precise nature of his illness had always been controversial and post-encephalitic and idiopathic varieties were the ones which were most commonly thought as the possible etiology. He displayed features like oculogyric crisis, palilalia, and autonomic symptoms which strongly implicate post-encephalitic etiology in the genesis of his illness. Others on the contrary, observed premorbid personality traits like non-flinching mental rigidity, extreme inflexibility, and awesome pedantry; which are often observed in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Moreover, nonmotor symptoms like disturbed sleep, proneness to temper tantrums, phases of depression, suspiciousness, and lack of trust on colleagues have also been described by various authors. Additionally, he was prescribed methamphetamine by his personal doctor and that might have led to the development of some of the later traits in his personality. PMID:26713007

  13. Adolf Hitler and His Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B

    2015-01-01

    Research works have suggested almost incontrovertibly, that Adolf Hitler suffered from Parkinsonism. However, the precise nature of his illness had always been controversial and post-encephalitic and idiopathic varieties were the ones which were most commonly thought as the possible etiology. He displayed features like oculogyric crisis, palilalia, and autonomic symptoms which strongly implicate post-encephalitic etiology in the genesis of his illness. Others on the contrary, observed premorbid personality traits like non-flinching mental rigidity, extreme inflexibility, and awesome pedantry; which are often observed in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Moreover, nonmotor symptoms like disturbed sleep, proneness to temper tantrums, phases of depression, suspiciousness, and lack of trust on colleagues have also been described by various authors. Additionally, he was prescribed methamphetamine by his personal doctor and that might have led to the development of some of the later traits in his personality. PMID:26713007

  14. Adolf Hitler and His Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B

    2015-01-01

    Research works have suggested almost incontrovertibly, that Adolf Hitler suffered from Parkinsonism. However, the precise nature of his illness had always been controversial and post-encephalitic and idiopathic varieties were the ones which were most commonly thought as the possible etiology. He displayed features like oculogyric crisis, palilalia, and autonomic symptoms which strongly implicate post-encephalitic etiology in the genesis of his illness. Others on the contrary, observed premorbid personality traits like non-flinching mental rigidity, extreme inflexibility, and awesome pedantry; which are often observed in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Moreover, nonmotor symptoms like disturbed sleep, proneness to temper tantrums, phases of depression, suspiciousness, and lack of trust on colleagues have also been described by various authors. Additionally, he was prescribed methamphetamine by his personal doctor and that might have led to the development of some of the later traits in his personality.

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Fajardo, Humberto; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Llorens-Arenas, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Bermudez, Jesús; Ruiz-Chow, Ángel; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela

    2015-10-01

    Purpose To analyze the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy for the management of depression and/or psychosis refractory to drug therapy in patients with Parkinson disease.Methods A retrospective study was carried out including patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy during the period between 2002 and 2013. A review of the literature was performed.Results A total of 27 patients were included. In regards to the neuropsychiatric diagnosis, 14 patients had major depression, 12 patients had both psychosis and depression, and only one patient had isolated psychosis. The mean number of electroconvulsive therapy sessions was 12 ± 2.8. After electroconvulsive therapy, all patients showed a statistically significant improvement in the Brief Psychiatric Rating scale (reduction of 52% points) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (reduction of 50% points) independent of the presence of psychosis, depression or both.Conclusion Electroconvulsive therapy is effective for the treatment of refractory neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

  16. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Son, Andre Y; Biagioni, Milton C; Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49-85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association. PMID:27688919

  17. [Physical therapy for parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Hubert, M

    2011-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex neurologic and progressive incapacitating disease. Parkinson's disease severely threatens the quality of live and the number of patients worldwide is expected to rise considerably in the coming decade due to aging of the population. Even with optimal medical management using drugs or neurosurgery, patients are faced with progressively increasing impairments (e.g. in speech, mental and movement related functions), and restrictions in participation (e.g. domestic life and social activities). Physical therapy is often prescribed next to medical treatment but there is a lack of uniform treatment. A systematic literature search for guidelines, systematic reviews, trials, and expert opinions lead to a better understanding. The key question: Is physiotherapy able to optimally treat the Parkinson's disease symptoms? In which way, how and on which scientific bases can the physiotherapist participate to improve autonomy and to help them living independently and avoid, as long as possible, institutionalization? This article has integrated clinical research findings to provide clinicians with an overview to physical therapist management of disorders in people with Parkinson's disease. An Evidence-Based Physical Therapy Guideline providing practice recommendations was developed by the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF). Evidence from research was supplemented with clinical expertise and patients values. Randomized clinical trials reflect specific core areas of physical therapy, that is, transfer, posture, balance, reaching and grasping, gait and physical condition. Another aspect is that of educating patients (as well as their partners and family) about the disease process and the benefits of exercise therapy. Alternative therapies can be helpful like Tai Chi, virtual games, dancing, yoga, ball games for example. PMID:22034770

  18. The viral hypothesis in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Elizan, T S; Casals, J

    1983-01-01

    The most crucial unanswered question in Parkinson's disease is its fundamental cause. Since Carlsson's original suggestion that dopamine may be a transmitter in the central nervous system involved in the control of motor function and that it may be involved in the Parkinsonian syndrome (Carlsson, 1959), and the now-classic paper by Ehringer and Hornykiewicz (1960) which definitively showed the significant reduction of dopamine concentration in the neostriatum of cases of idiopathic Parkinson and postencephalitic parkinsonism, the vast amount of work on the subject has focused on the biochemical and pharmacologic correlates of this dopaminergic system failure involving particularly the nigrostriatal pathways. The concept of a specific neurotransmitter deficiency associated with a specific neurological syndrome potentially amenable to replacement therapy, has appropriately generated a considerable degree of clinical and research interest for over 20 years, but, with few exceptions, there has been hardly any focused or concerted research effort on looking at direct causal factors or primary initiating events in this disease process. As in Alzheimer's disease, another of the degenerative diseases of the brain of unknown origin with a specific biochemical substrate, any etiologic hypothesis for Parkinson's disease--whether a virus, an age-related immune system dysfunction, a genetic factor, a "trophic" substance, or a toxin--would have to explain the selective involvement of specific transmitter-defined neuronal pathways, the non-specificity of the brain lesions that define the disease, and the clinical involvement of a sizeable segment of the aging population. Of the several plausible hypotheses mentioned earlier, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive, we would like to critically consider the possibility of a viral cause. PMID:6583315

  19. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49–85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association. PMID:27688919

  20. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49–85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association.

  1. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Jeremy; Alty, Jane Elizabeth; Jamieson, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is a significant non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Longitudinal cohort studies have demonstrated that approximately 50% of those with PD develop dementia after 10 years, increasing to over 80% after 20 years. Deficits in cognition can be identified at the time of PD diagnosis in some patients and this mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) has been studied extensively over the last decade. Although PD-MCI is a risk factor for developing Parkinson's disease dementia there is evidence to suggest that PD-MCI might consist of distinct subtypes with different pathophysiologies and prognoses. The major pathological correlate of Parkinson's disease dementia is Lewy body deposition in the limbic system and neocortex although Alzheimer's related pathology is also an important contributor. Pathological damage causes alteration to neurotransmitter systems within the brain, producing behavioural change. Management of cognitive impairment in PD requires a multidisciplinary approach and accurate communication with patients and relatives is essential. PMID:25814509

  2. [Akinetic crisis in Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Bächli, E; Albani, C

    1994-06-11

    The akinetic crisis is an "off" state that lasts more than 48 hours with akinesia, rigidity and bradykinesia, occurring with signs of CNS dysregulation in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. 7 akinetic crises lasting 4 to 14 days (average 9.3) were observed in 744 hospitalizations over a period of 7 years. The age of the patients with akinetic crisis and the mean duration and the severity of the disease were significantly higher than in the other patients. While bradykinesia and rigor are the most relevant clinical signs in some 40% of parkinsonian patients, 6 of our 7 patients (86%) had an akinetic-rigid form of the disease. Levodopa withdrawal preceded the akinetic crisis in 4 patients: in 3 patients the akinetic crisis occurred despite adequate dopaminergic therapy, in one patient after benzodiazepine withdrawal, in another case after gastrointestinal bleeding, and in one case without known cause. Hyperthermia, tachycardia and sweating were the most common collateral manifestations. Apomorphine given subcutaneously was effective in four cases, apomorphine and amantidine were effective in one case, and one patient died during an akinetic crisis. The akinetic crisis is a distinct form of motor fluctuation in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease, with clinical signs resembling malignant neuroleptic syndrome (NMS). While NMS is related to dopaminergic receptor blockade or dopaminergic depletion, akinetic crisis can occur despite adequate dopaminergic therapy as a symptom of severe basal ganglia dysfunction related to the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. Outcome and therapy of akinetic crisis depend on the underlying causes. PMID:8023100

  3. Iron transport in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, E C

    2009-12-01

    Dopaminergic cell death in the substantia nigra (SN) is central to Parkinson's disease (PD) but the neurodegenerative mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. Iron accumulation in dopaminergic neurons and glial cells in the SN of PD patients may contribute to the generation of oxidative stress, protein aggregation and neuronal death. However, the mechanisms involved in iron accumulation remain unclear. In previous studies we excluded a role of transferrin and its receptor in iron accumulation while we showed that lactoferrin receptors were overexpressed in blood vessels and dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. We recently also described an increase in the expression of the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1/Nramp2/Slc11a2) in the SN of PD patients. Using the PD animal model of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) intoxication in mice, we showed that DMT1 expression increased in the ventral mesencephalon of intoxicated animals, concomitant with iron accumulation, oxidative stress and dopaminergic cell loss. A mutation in DMT1 that impairs iron transport protected rodents against parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxins MPTP and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). This study supports a critical role for DMT1 in iron-mediated neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:20082992

  4. Neuroleptic‐induced Parkinsonism: Clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Shuaib, Umar A.; Rajput, Ali H.; Robinson, Christopher A.; Rajput, Alex

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Drug‐induced parkinsonism is a well‐known complication of several different drugs—the most common being neuroleptic‐induced parkinsonism. However, very few autopsies have been reported in such cases. Methods Patients assessed at Movement Disorders Clinic Saskatchewan are offered brain autopsy. Detailed clinical records are kept. Results Brains were obtained from 7 drug‐induced parkinsonism patients with parkinsonian symptom onset coinciding with use of drugs known to produce parkinsonism. Six were on antipsychotics and 1 was on metoclopramide. Three cases were treated with levodopa for parkinsonism. In two cases, parkinsonian features reversed after stopping the offending agent. Both had autopsy evidence of preclinical PD. In 4 of the remaining 5, dopamine‐blocking drugs were continued until death. In 4 of those 5, brain histology revealed no cause for the parkinsonism, but 1 had mild SN neuronal loss without Lewy bodies. Conclusion This study shows that reversal of parkinsonism after discontinuing offending drugs does not indicate absence of underlying pathology. Neuroleptics can unmask preclinical PD in patients with insufficient SN damage for the disease to manifest clinically. Though the mechanism of sustained parkinsonian features after discontinuing neuroleptics remains to be established, it is unlikely that dopamine receptor block leads to retrograde SN neuronal degeneration. Furthermore, l‐dopa does not appear to be toxic to SN. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:26660063

  5. Asymmetrical Pedaling Patterns in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Penko, Amanda L.; Hirsch, Joshua R.; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Martin, Philip E.; Blackburn, Gordon; Alberts, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 million Americans are affected by Parkinson's disease [1] which includes the symptoms of postural instability and gait dysfunction. Currently, clinical evaluations of postural instability and gait dysfunction consist of a subjective rater assessment of gait patterns using items from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and assessments can be insensitive to the effectiveness of medical interventions. Current research suggests the importance of cycling for Parkinson's disease patients, and while Parkinson's gait has been evaluated in previous studies, little is known about lower extremity control during cycling. The purpose of this study is to examine the lower extremity coordination patterns of Parkinson's patients during cycling. Methods Twenty five participants, ages 44-72, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in an exercise test on a cycle ergometer that was equipped with pedal force measurements. Crank torque, crank angle and power produced by right and left leg were measured throughout the test to calculate Symmetry Index at three stages of exercise (20 Watt, 60 Watt, maximum performance). Findings Decreases in Symmetry Index were observed for average power output in Parkinson's patients as workload increased. Maximum power Symmetry Index showed a significant difference in symmetry between performance at both the 20 Watt and 60 Watt stage and the maximal resistance stage. Minimum power Symmetry Index did not show significant differences across the stages of the test. While lower extremity asymmetries were present in Parkinson's patients during pedaling, these asymmetries did not correlate to postural instability and gait dysfunction Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores. Interpretation This pedaling analysis allows for a more sensitive measure of lower extremity function than the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and may help to provide unique insight into current and

  6. [Deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease. Preliminary outcomes].

    PubMed

    Pérez-de la Torre, Ramiro Antonio; Calderón-Vallejo, Alejandra; Morales-Briceño, Hugo; Gallardo-Ceja, David; Carrera-Pineda, Raúl; Guinto-Balanzar, Gerardo; Magallón-Barajas, Eduardo; Corlay-Noriega, Irma; Cuevas-García, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la enfermedad de Parkinson puede justificar un procedimiento quirúrgico que consiste en la estimulación cerebral profunda. Se presentan resultados a mediano y largo plazo de una cohorte de 60 pacientes del Hospital de Especialidades del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI. Métodos: los pacientes fueron operados con una metodología estereotáctica convencional a través del protocolo FrameLink (Medtronics Inc.). La técnica consistió en la evaluación preoperatoria de los pacientes, la colocación de marco estereotáctico, la realización de estudios de imagen, la planeación preoperatoria, el microrregistro, la macroestimulación y la colocación de implantes, que estuvo conformada por electrodos y generador en dos fases. La escala unificada para la evaluación de la enfermedad de Parkinson (UPDRS) preoperatoria, a tres, 12, y 36 meses fue utilizada como medida estándar. Se analizaron los resultados y las complicaciones como variables de interés. Resultados: se operaron 60 pacientes (41 hombres y 19 mujeres), con edad promedio de 56.5 años (rango de 39-70). Se obtuvieron de buenos a excelentes resultados en la mayoría de los pacientes con UPDRS promedio en periodo preoperatorio, a 3, 12 y 36 meses de 79.57, 66.85, 65.29 y 58.75, respectivamente (p < 0.0001). Las complicaciones se presentaron en forma mínima (en nueve pacientes: 15 %) y fueron manejadas de forma conservadora. Conclusiones: hubo una mejoría progresiva en el UPDRS durante los 36 meses de seguimiento.

  7. The hypothalamus in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Iacono, R P; Bamford, C R

    1987-06-01

    It is currently believed that Parkinson disease (PD) is due to a degenerative process that independently damages multiple areas of the central and peripheral nervous system. Loss of nigrostriatal dopamine is now widely recognized as being directly related to the motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Parkinsonian patients also exhibit symptoms and signs suggestive of hypothalamic dysfunction (e.g. dysautonomia, impaired heat tolerance). The latter clinical features are supported by pathological, biochemical and endocrinological findings. Lewy body formation has been demonstrated in every nucleus of the hypothalamus, specifically the tuberomamillary and posterior hypothalamic. Preferential involvement of the hypothalamus was also noted in patients after post-encephalitic parkinsonism. Loss of dopamine (30-40%) in the hypothalamus of affected patients has been shown in recent studies, and is compatible with the reported abnormalities of growth hormone release in response to L-dopa administration, elevated plasma levels of MSH, and reduced CSF levels of somatostatin and beta-endorphins in these patients. Deranged immunological mechanisms have been found in PD patients including the presence of autoantibodies against sympathetic ganglia neurons, adrenal medulla and caudate nucleus. On the evidence of on pathological studies demonstrating the early vulnerability of the hypothalamus in aging and PD, and the known role of the hypothalamus in immune modulation, we expect that it will be shown that primary damage of the hypothalamus leads to subsequent secondary degeneration of structures receiving direct projections from the hypothalamus. Within this framework, the dopaminergic systems may be damaged, since striatal dopamine synthesis and receptor sensitivity have been shown to be regulated by ACTH and alpha-MSH through direct arcuate nucleus-striatal projections.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Targeting delivery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Newland, Ben; Dunnett, Stephen B; Dowd, Eilís

    2016-08-01

    Disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD), with the potential to halt the neurodegenerative process and to stimulate the protection, repair, and regeneration of dopaminergic neurons, remain a vital but unmet clinical need. Targeting the delivery of current and new therapeutics directly to the diseased brain region (in particular the nigrostriatal pathway) could result in greater improvements in the motor functions that characterise PD. Here, we highlight some of the opportunities and challenges facing the development of the next generation of therapies for patients with PD. PMID:27312875

  9. [Perioperative management of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Mariscal, A; Medrano, I Hernández; Cánovas, A Alonso; Lobo, E; Loinaz, C; Vela, L; Espiga, P García-Ruiz; Castrillo, J C Martínez

    2012-01-01

    One of the particular characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the wide clinical variation as regards the treatment that can be found in the same patient. This occurs with specific treatment for PD, as well as with other drug groups that can make motor function worse. For this reason, the perioperative management of PD requires experience and above all appropriate planning. In this article, the peculiarities of PD and its treatment are reviewed, and a strategy is set out for the perioperative management of these patients.

  10. [Music therapy on Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Côrte, Beltrina; Lodovici Neto, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    This study is a result of a qualitative research, in the Gerontology and Music therapy scenario. It was analyzed the importance of alternative practices like playing an instrument (piano, violin, etc.), singing, or practicing a guided musical exercise as a therapy activity for elder people with Parkinson Disease. The analysis, systematization and interpretation of the data pointed: music therapy is an excellent way to improve the life of the patient that becomes more sociable, decreasing physical and psychological symptoms ('symptomatology') and the subject change for a singular and own position in the relation with your disease and the people around. PMID:20069199

  11. [Sleep disturbance in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Nomura, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) complain about sleep disturbances. These symptoms originate from motor symptoms, nocturnal problems, psychiatric symptoms, and other sleep disorders including Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), Restless legs syndrome (RLS), and Sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). Especially, RBD is paid attention to prodromal symptoms of PD. Also, one third of patients with PD have RBD symptoms. Moreover, RBD is one of aggravating factors of motor symptoms, autonomic dysfunctions, and dementia. Now, the evidence based medicine for sleep disturbances is lack in patients with PD. We need to evaluate various causes of sleep disturbances in detail and deal with individuals.

  12. Parkinson's Disease: A Pharmacological Update

    PubMed Central

    Chater, Susan; Montgomery, Pat

    1985-01-01

    The primary biochemical defect in Parkinsonism is dopamine depletion. Anticholinergics (except in the elderly) and amantadine are useful in treating early symptomatic disease. L-dopa remains the most effective drug, but experience has led to more modest use due to its late complications, particularly dyskinesias. Bromocriptine, a dopamine agonist, is relatively effective, but when it should be used is undecided. Beta-blockers may control tremor. Treatment should be tailored to each patient, and focus on functional motor ability. Dyskinesias and neuropsychiatric complications are the major limiting factors with most of these drugs. Several drugs are under investigation. PMID:21274036

  13. Normal CAG and CCG repeats in the Huntington`s disease genes of Parkinson`s disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J.; Barton, D.E.

    1995-04-24

    The clinical features of Parkinson`s disease, particularly rigidity and bradykinesia and occasionally tremor, are seen in juvenile-onset Huntington`s disease. Therefore, the CAG and CCG repeats in the Huntington`s disease gene were investigated in 45 Parkinson`s disease patients and compared to 40 control individuals. All of the Parkinson`s disease chromosomes fell within the normal size ranges. In addition, the distributions of the two repeats in the Parkinson`s disease patients did not differ significantly from those of the control population. Therefore, abnormalities of these trinucleotide repeats in the Huntington`s disease gene are not likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson`s disease. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  14. No allelic association between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3, and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nanko, S.; Hattori, M.; Dai, X.Y.

    1994-12-15

    Parkinson`s disease is thought to be caused by a combination of unknown environmental, genetic, and degenerative factors. Evidence from necropsy brain samples and pharmacokinetics suggests involvement of dopamine receptors in the pathogenesis or pathophysiology of Parkinson`s disease. Genetic association studies between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3 and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms were conducted. The polymorphism was examined in 71 patients with Parkinson`s disease and 90 controls. There were no significant differences between two groups in allele frequencies at the D2, D3, and D4 dopamine receptor loci. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that susceptibility to Parkinson`s disease is associated with the dopamine receptor polymorphisms examined. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Thiazolidinediones and Parkinson Disease: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Connolly, John G; Bykov, Katsiaryna; Gagne, Joshua J

    2015-12-01

    Thiazolidinediones, a class of medications indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, reduce inflammation and have been shown to provide a therapeutic benefit in animal models of Parkinson disease. We examined the association between treatment with thiazolidinediones and the onset of Parkinson disease in older individuals. We performed a cohort study of 29,397 Medicare patients enrolled in state pharmaceutical benefits programs who initiated treatment with thiazolidinediones or sulfonylureas during the years 1997 through 2005 and had no prior diagnosis of Parkinson disease. New users of thiazolidinediones were propensity score matched to new users of sulfonylureas and followed to determine whether they were diagnosed with Parkinson disease. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compare time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease in the propensity score-matched populations. To assess the association with duration of use, we performed several analyses that required longer continuous use of medications. In the primary analysis, thiazolidinedione users had a hazard ratio for a diagnosis of Parkinson disease of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 0.71, 1.66) when compared with sulfonylurea users. Increasing the duration-of-use requirements to 10 months did not substantially change the association; the hazard ratios ranged from 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.49, 2.05) to 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 0.60, 2.25). Thiazolidinedione use was not associated with a longer time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease than was sulfonylurea use, regardless of duration of exposure.

  16. Parkinson's disease as a result of aging.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Manuel; Rodriguez-Sabate, Clara; Morales, Ingrid; Sanchez, Alberto; Sabate, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    It is generally considered that Parkinson's disease is induced by specific agents that degenerate a clearly defined population of dopaminergic neurons. Data commented in this review suggest that this assumption is not as clear as is often thought and that aging may be critical for Parkinson's disease. Neurons degenerating in Parkinson's disease also degenerate in normal aging, and the different agents involved in the etiology of this illness are also involved in aging. Senescence is a wider phenomenon affecting cells all over the body, whereas Parkinson's disease seems to be restricted to certain brain centers and cell populations. However, reviewed data suggest that Parkinson's disease may be a local expression of aging on cell populations which, by their characteristics (high number of synaptic terminals and mitochondria, unmyelinated axons, etc.), are highly vulnerable to the agents promoting aging. The development of new knowledge about Parkinson's disease could be accelerated if the research on aging and Parkinson's disease were planned together, and the perspective provided by gerontology gains relevance in this field.

  17. Parkinson's disease as a result of aging

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Manuel; Rodriguez-Sabate, Clara; Morales, Ingrid; Sanchez, Alberto; Sabate, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    It is generally considered that Parkinson's disease is induced by specific agents that degenerate a clearly defined population of dopaminergic neurons. Data commented in this review suggest that this assumption is not as clear as is often thought and that aging may be critical for Parkinson's disease. Neurons degenerating in Parkinson's disease also degenerate in normal aging, and the different agents involved in the etiology of this illness are also involved in aging. Senescence is a wider phenomenon affecting cells all over the body, whereas Parkinson's disease seems to be restricted to certain brain centers and cell populations. However, reviewed data suggest that Parkinson's disease may be a local expression of aging on cell populations which, by their characteristics (high number of synaptic terminals and mitochondria, unmyelinated axons, etc.), are highly vulnerable to the agents promoting aging. The development of new knowledge about Parkinson's disease could be accelerated if the research on aging and Parkinson's disease were planned together, and the perspective provided by gerontology gains relevance in this field. PMID:25677794

  18. [Proteomic biomarkers in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Bandrés, Sara; Durán, Raquel; Barrero, Francisco; Ramírez, Manuel; Vives, Francisco

    2014-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement and is caused by the death of the dopaminergic neurons in the compact part of the substantia nigra. Its diagnosis is essentially clinical, but although the signs and symptoms of PD are well known, the rate of diagnostic error is relatively high. It is estimated that 10-30% of patients initially diagnosed with PD are later reclassified. This disease has a high prevalence beyond the age of 60, and one of its biggest problems is that it is diagnosed when the degenerative process is already at a very advanced stage. Therefore, it is necessary to look for other biomarkers that make it possible to carry out an early diagnosis of PD, follow up its development, distinguish it from other related pathologies (parkinsonisms) and help monitor the effect of novel therapies. The fact that there are mutations that lead to PD, as well as polygenetic combinations that can act as risk factors, suggests the possibility of measuring the proteins resulting from the expression of these genes in peripheral tissues. And once their sensitivity and specificity have been proved they could be used as biomarkers for PD, even in the early phases of the disease. The aim of this work is to focus on a detailed review of the main candidate proteomic biomarkers researched to date by discussing the most recent literature.

  19. Bromocriptine treatment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, J D; Marsden, C D; Donaldson, I; Galea-Debono, A; Walters, J; Kennedy, G; Asselman, P

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-one patients with Parkinson's disease were treated with the ergot alkaloid bromocriptine, a drug which stimulates dopamine receptors. Bromocriptine had a slight therapeutic effect in patients on no other treatment and an additional effect in patients on levodopa. The mean optimum dosage of bromocriptine, established over a 12 week period, was 26 mg daily. In 20 patients bromocriptine was compared with placebo in a double-blind controlled trial. Active treatment caused a significant (P less than 0.02) reduction in total disability and akinesia scores. The least disabled patients showed the greatest response. Side-effects of bromocriptine--nausea, vomiting, hallucinations, and abnormal involuntary movements--were similar to nature to those of levodopa. In most normal subjects, bromocriptine causes an increase in plasma growth hormone concentration. This was determined in 20 patients with Parkinson's disease after 1-15 mg bromocriptine. Only a single patient showed an obvious increase up to 120 minutes after dosage. Bromocriptine was not effective treatment in two patients who had not previously responded to levodopa and replacement of this drug by bromocriptine in patients with end-of-dose akinesia after chronic levodopa treatment did not totally abolish response swings. PMID:772175

  20. Interventional trials in atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Eschlböck, S; Krismer, F; Wenning, G K

    2016-01-01

    Atypical parkinson disorders (APD) are rapidly progressive neurodegenerative diseases with a variable clinical presentation that may even mimic Parkinson's disease. Multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) are commonly summarized under this umbrella term. Significant developments in research have expanded knowledge and have broadened available symptomatic treatments, particularly for the treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension. Nonetheless, symptomatic support still remains limited in all of these disorders. Currently, there exists no effective treatment to delay disease progression and disease-modifying trials have failed to provide coherent and convincing results. Recent trials of rasagiline (in MSA), rifampicin (in MSA), tideglusib (in PSP) and davunetide (in PSP) reported negative results. Nevertheless, large cohorts of patients were recruited for interventional studies in the last few years which improved our understanding of trial methodology in APDs immensely. In addition, remarkable progress in basic research has been reported recently and will provide a solid foundation for future therapeutic trials. In this review, we will summarize published randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in APDs. Additionally, the design of ongoing and unpublished interventions will be presented.

  1. Reciprocal inhibition in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C H; Chen, R S; Lu, C S

    1997-01-01

    We studied the inhibition of median H-reflex by conditioning stimuli on the radial nerve in 14 normal controls, 6 patients with unilateral and 1 patient with predominantly left-sided Parkinson's disease. In normal controls, the electrophysiological studies were performed on their right hands, yet both hands were examined in patient group. In the controls, we identified three inhibitory phases, with maximal inhibition at conditioning-test intervals of 0 ms (41.66 +/- 4.73%), 20 ms (45.19 +/- 4.33%), and 100 ms (44.55 +/- 6.84%), respectively. In the less- or a- symptomatic side of the patient group, the inhibitory patterns are similar to those of the controls. However, in the symptomatic arms, loss of inhibition, or even mild potentiation, was observed in the third inhibitory phase. When the symptomatic and asymptomatic sides of patients were compared, in contrast to the striking phenomenon found between symptomatic side and the controls, no difference was observed in the third phase. The current results imply that, although no obvious rigidity can be detected on the asymptomatic sides, subtle functional corruption may have occurred within the contralateral basal ganglia in patients with unilateral Parkinson's disease. The remarkable change of the third phase on the symptomatic sides of patients suggests the perturbation of the polysynaptic long latency reflex pathway may somehow play a role in the rigidity pathogenesis.

  2. [Cell therapy for Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Shin-ichi

    2009-11-01

    Advances in the field of stem cell research have raised hopes of creating novel cell replacement therapies for Parkinson disease (PD), although double-blinded clinical trials have met with controversial success in patients implanted with fetal midbrain tissue and autopsy results have shown that some of the grafted fetal neurons displayed pathological changes typical of PD. Dopaminergic neurons have been efficiently derived from stem cells using various methods, and beneficial effects after transplantation have been demonstrated in animal models of PD. Some obstacles remain to be overcome before stem cell therapy can be routinely and safely used to treat PD in humans. A widely used prodrug/suicide gene therapy would be applied to stem cells to reduce risk of tumor formation. Since grafts were transplanted ectopically into the striatum instead of the substantia nigra in most current protocols, surviving dopaminergic neurons would not have to be the same subtype as the nigral cells. If the main mechanism underlying any functional recovery achieved by cell therapies is restoration of dopaminergic neurotransmission, then viral vector-mediated gene delivery of dopamine-synthesizing enzymes represents a more straightforward approach. Future targets for cell therapy should include some types of Parkinsonism with degeneration of striatal neurons.

  3. Parkinsonism Associated with Glucocerebrosidase Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Mun-Kyung; Kim, Seung-Min; Lee, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Background Gaucher's disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the β-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA). There is increasing evidence that GBA mutations are a genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We report herein a family of Koreans exhibiting parkinsonism-associated GBA mutations. Case Report A 44-year-old woman suffering from slowness and paresthesia of the left arm for the previous 1.5years, visited our hospital to manage known invasive ductal carcinoma. During a preoperative evaluation, she was diagnosed with Gaucher's disease and double mutations of S271G and R359X in GBA. Parkinsonian features including low amplitude postural tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia and shuffling gait were observed. Genetic analysis also revealed that her older sister, who had also been diagnosed with PD and had been taking dopaminergic drugs for 8-years, also possessed a heterozygote R359X mutation in GBA. 18F-fluoropropylcarbomethoxyiodophenylnortropane positron-emission tomography in these patients revealed decreased uptake of dopamine transporter in the posterior portion of the bilateral putamen. Conclusions This case study demonstrates Korean familial cases of PD with heterozygote mutation of GBA, further supporting the association between PD and GBA mutation. PMID:21779299

  4. New treatment of depression in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tetsuhiro

    2003-01-01

    Anhedonia and apathy are the main symptoms of depression generally associated with Parkinson's disease. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been used to treat depression associated with Parkinson's disease. However, the poor tolerance of TCA and the worsening of the motor function by SSRI have favoured other therapeutic approaches. Some studies have shown that agents stimulating the noradrenergic system were able to improve depression in parkinsonian patients. The serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, milnacipran, has become available recently in Japan. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of milnacipran to alleviate depressive symptoms in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease, particularly the symptoms anhedonia and apathy.

  5. Association between Parkinson's Disease and Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Oğuz, Sıdıka

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) is a common infection of the gastrointestinal system that is usually related to peptic ulcers. However, recent studies have revealed relationships between HP and many other diseases. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, HP can prevent the absorption of certain drugs. A high prevalence of HP has been found in patients with Parkinson's disease, and this bacterium causes motor fluctuations by affecting the absorption of levodopa, which is the main drug used to treat Parkinson's disease. Eradicating HP from patients with Parkinson's disease by applying antibiotic treatment will increase the absorption of levodopa and decrease their motor fluctuations. PMID:26932258

  6. Imaging Systemic Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Borghammer, Per; Knudsen, Karoline; Brooks, David J

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease is now widely recognized to be a multisystem disorder affecting the brain and peripheral autonomic nerves. Extensive pathology is present in both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system and the intrinsic gastrointestinal plexuses in patients. Autonomic pathology and symptoms such as constipation can predate the clinical diagnosis by years or decades. Imaging studies have contributed greatly to our understanding of Parkinson's disease but focused primarily on imaging cerebral pathology. However, given the importance of understanding the nature, chronology, and functional consequences of peripheral pathology, there has been renewed interest in imaging peripheral organs in Parkinson's disease. Suitable imaging tools can be divided into two types: radiotracer studies that directly estimate loss of sympathetic or parasympathetic nerve terminals, and imaging modalities to quantitate dysphagia, gastric emptying, esophageal and intestinal transit times, and anorectal dyssynergia. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about peripheral imaging in Parkinson's disease. PMID:27072951

  7. Gambling, Sex, and…Parkinson's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are spent, browse our financial information. Learn More Gambling, Sex, and…Parkinson's Disease? By Laura Marsh, M. ... elevated, expansive, grandiose or irritable mood states. Pathological gambling Pathological gambling refers to recurrent, maladaptive gambling behaviors, ...

  8. Parkinson's Rates Rising Among American Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159464.html Parkinson's Rates Rising Among American Men Smoking is known to help shield against the ... disease may be on the rise for U.S. men over the past three decades, and the trend ...

  9. [Problem of alternative medicine in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Ken-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    I asked about the usage of alternative medicine to 300 outpatients with Parkinson's disease. 163 patients (54.3%) had experience with health appliance and 128 patients (42.7%) had experience with supplements. There is no health appliance or supplement whose efficacy for Parkinson's disease is approved publicly. Most of the patients understood it but some patients who purchased the goods believed to be effective in Parkinson's disease. In addition some patients feel affected because the purchase price is abnormally high. Continuous usage rate is generally high in supplements, relatively high in massage machine, but significantly low in equipment to move the body, such as muscle training equipment of various types or exercise bike. It seems important to inform this fact to Parkinson's disease patients. PMID:24291878

  10. Dream Robber: Living with Parkinson's disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... wistfully. Diagnosed with the disease in 1998, actor Michael J. Fox perhaps best captured the dramatic impact ... Parkinson's patients may experience onset before 40, like Michael J. Fox when he was diagnosed. Even for ...

  11. Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms Causes Diagnosis Questions Dyskinesia Dystonia Prognosis Symptoms Smell Loss Español Life with Parkinson's Anxiety & Depression Diet Dexterity Driving Exercise Fatigue Navigating the System Books & Resources Employment Issues Finding the Right Doctor ...

  12. Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease: What Matters Most?

    MedlinePlus

    ... information. Learn More Nutrition and Parkinson's Disease: What Matters Most? Note from PDF: Are you interested in ... calcium-fortified soy-based beverages, orange juice and dark leafy greens), calcium from non-dairy sources may ...

  13. Environmental risk factors for Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism: the Geoparkinson study

    PubMed Central

    Dick, F D; De Palma, G; Ahmadi, A; Scott, N W; Prescott, G J; Bennett, J; Semple, S; Dick, S; Counsell, C; Mozzoni, P; Haites, N; Wettinger, S Bezzina; Mutti, A; Otelea, M; Seaton, A; Söderkvist, P; Felice, A

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the associations between Parkinson's disease and other degenerative parkinsonian syndromes and environmental factors in five European countries. Methods A case–control study of 959 prevalent cases of parkinsonism (767 with Parkinson's disease) and 1989 controls in Scotland, Italy, Sweden, Romania and Malta was carried out. Cases were defined using the United Kingdom Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank criteria, and those with drug‐induced or vascular parkinsonism or dementia were excluded. Subjects completed an interviewer‐administered questionnaire about lifetime occupational and hobby exposure to solvents, pesticides, iron, copper and manganese. Lifetime and average annual exposures were estimated blind to disease status using a job‐exposure matrix modified by subjective exposure modelling. Results were analysed using multiple logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, country, tobacco use, ever knocked unconscious and family history of Parkinson's disease. Results Adjusted logistic regression analyses showed significantly increased odds ratios for Parkinson's disease/parkinsonism with an exposure–response relationship for pesticides (low vs no exposure, odds ratio (OR) = 1.13, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.57, high vs no exposure, OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.88) and ever knocked unconscious (once vs never, OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.68, more than once vs never, OR = 2.53, 95% CI 1.78 to 3.59). Hypnotic, anxiolytic or antidepressant drug use for more than 1 year and a family history of Parkinson's disease showed significantly increased odds ratios. Tobacco use was protective (OR = 0.50, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.60). Analyses confined to subjects with Parkinson's disease gave similar results. Conclusions The association of pesticide exposure with Parkinson's disease suggests a causative role. Repeated traumatic loss of consciousness is associated with increased risk. PMID:17332139

  14. Aggravation of Parkinson's disease by cinnarizine.

    PubMed Central

    Martí Massó, J F; Obeso, J A; Carrera, N; Martínez-Lage, J M

    1987-01-01

    The effect of cinnarizine on motor function in Parkinson's disease was evaluated in a randomised double-blind parallel study of 20 patients. Both groups were comparable in age, duration of the disease, dose of levodopa and degree of disability. A significant worsening of mobility was observed in patients treated with cinnarizine (75 mg bd), whilst no change was recorded in patients receiving placebo. Cinnarizine should be added to the list of drugs capable of aggravating Parkinson's disease. PMID:3302112

  15. UK Parkinson's Excellence Network: empowering service improvement across the UK.

    PubMed

    Burn, David

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's UK, together with leading Parkinson's professionals, has set up the UK Parkinson's Excellence Network to bring together the passion and expertise of leading clinicians with the strategic leadership and resources of Parkinson's UK underpinned by the voice of people affected by Parkinson's. Launched in London in February 2015, the Excellence Network aims to drive sustainable improvements in health and social care services. It will provide a more strategic approach to clinical development so that Parkinson's services across health and social care can be transformed to provide the best quality care across the UK.

  16. Parkinson's Disease and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the “primed” microglia into an “active” state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease. PMID:21403862

  17. Cholinergic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martijn L T M; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2013-09-01

    There is increasing interest in the clinical effects of cholinergic basal forebrain and tegmental pedunculopontine complex (PPN) projection degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent evidence supports an expanded role beyond cognitive impairment, including effects on olfaction, mood, REM sleep behavior disorder, and motor functions. Cholinergic denervation is variable in PD without dementia and may contribute to clinical symptom heterogeneity. Early in vivo imaging evidence that impaired cholinergic integrity of the PPN associates with frequent falling in PD is now confirmed by human post-mortem evidence. Brainstem cholinergic lesioning studies in primates confirm the role of the PPN in mobility impairment. Degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic projections correlates with decreased walking speed. Cumulatively, these findings provide evidence for a new paradigm to explain dopamine-resistant features of mobility impairments in PD. Recognition of the increased clinical role of cholinergic system degeneration may motivate new research to expand indications for cholinergic therapy in PD. PMID:23943367

  18. Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Thorpy, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    Depression, dementia, and physiologic changes contribute to the high prevalence of sleep disturbances in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Antiparkinsonian drugs also play a role in insomnia by increasing daytime sleepiness and affecting motor symptoms and depression. Common types of sleep disturbances in PD patients include nocturnal sleep disruption and excessive daytime sleepiness, restless legs syndrome, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep apnea, sleep walking and sleep talking, nightmares, sleep terrors, and panic attacks. A thorough assessment should include complete medical and psychiatric histories, sleep history, and a 1- to 2-week sleep diary or Epworth Sleepiness Scale evaluation. Polysomnography or actigraphy may also be indicated. Treatment should address underlying factors such as depression or anxiety. Hypnotic therapy for sleep disturbances in PD patients should be approached with care because of the risks of falling, agitation, drowsiness, and hypotension. Behavioral interventions may also be useful. PMID:15259535

  19. Nuclear microscopy in Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Lee, T.; Thong, P. S. P.; Tang, S. M.

    1995-09-01

    Rats have been subjected to unilateral lesioning with the selective neurotoxin 6-OHDA in order to induce Parkinsonism. Analysis using the NUS Nuclear Microscope facility have shown that iron levels are raised by an average of 26% in the lesioned subtantia nigra region of the brain compared with the non-lesioned side. In addition the background tissue level of iron is also elevated by 31% in the lesioned side, indicating that there is a general increase in iron levels as a result of the lesioning. This result is consistent with the other observations that other diseases of the brain are frequently associated with altered iron levels (eg. progressive nuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis).

  20. [Autonomic features in Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshimasa; Tamura, Naotoshi

    2012-04-01

    Nonmotor symptoms such as autonomic and neuropsychiatric dysfunctions, are commonly seen in Parkinson disease (PD). Recent studies have shown that PD is accompanied by cardiac sympathetic denervation and constipation even in the early stage. Neuropathological studies confirmed changes in the cardiac sympathetic nerves and the gastrointestinal tract. These findings suggest that PD neuropathology may occur first in the peripheral autonomic pathways and extend to the central autonomic pathways, in agreement with the "Braak theory". This article will reviews the symptoms and pathophysiology of gastrointestinal dysfunction, urinary disturbance, sexual dysfunction, sweating dysfunction, pupillary autonomic dysfunction, and orthostatic and postprandial hypotension in PD patients, and discuss to organ selectiveness in autonomic dysfunction in PD. PMID:22481512

  1. Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rinalduzzi, Steno; Missori, Paolo; Fattapposta, Francesco; Currà, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stability and mobility in functional motor activities depend on a precise regulation of phasic and tonic muscular activity that is carried out automatically, without conscious awareness. The sensorimotor control of posture involves a complex integration of multisensory inputs that results in a final motor adjustment process. All or some of the components of this system may be dysfunctional in Parkinsonian patients, rendering postural instability one of the most disabling features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Balance control is critical for moving safely in and adapting to the environment. PD induces a multilevel impairment of this function, therefore worsening the patients' physical and psychosocial disability. In this review, we describe the complex ways in which PD impairs posture and balance, collecting and reviewing the available experimental evidence. PMID:25654100

  2. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Aarsland, D.; Marsh, L.; Schrag, A.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in Parkinson's disease, even at the earliest stages, and have important consequences for quality of life and daily functioning, are associated with increased carer burden and increased risk for nursing home admission. In addition to cognitive impairment, a wide range of neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported. In this paper, the epidemiology, clinical course, diagnosis, and management of some of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD are discussed: depression, anxiety, apathy, fatigue and psychotic symptoms. Although much is known regarding the prevalence and course of these symptoms, the empirical evidence for how to manage these symptoms is limited at best. There is thus an urgent need for systematic studies for the pharmacological and non-pharmacological management of these symptoms. PMID:19768724

  3. Therapeutic directions for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The focus on disease-modifying treatments and cures for Parkinson's disease (PD) has raised expectations for quantum leaps and overshadowed incremental gains that have been slowly achieved. Large multi-center clinical trials such as DATATOP and PRECEPT keep on generating new knowledge that is relevant to clinical care as well as experimental therapeutics. The largely unforeseen relationship between circulating uric acid and the occurrence and progression of PD was developed and confirmed in these clinical trials. Systematic follow-up of clinical trial cohorts after conclusion of the interventional phase provides added value that continues to inform about natural history, state and trait biomarkers, and genotype-phenotype relationships. These efforts are enhanced by data mining, public reporting, and timely sharing of data and biological samples. PMID:20187232

  4. Parkinson's disease and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Carina C; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-02-22

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the "primed" microglia into an "active" state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease.

  5. Aspartame use in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Karstaedt, P J; Pincus, J H

    1993-03-01

    The artificial sweetener aspartame (NutraSweet) is hydrolyzed in the gut as phenylalanine (PA), a large neutral amino acid (LNAA). LNAAs compete with levodopa for uptake into the brain. To determine the effect of aspartame on levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, we studied 18 PD patients with protein-sensitive motor fluctuations by administering in a double-blind and single-crossover design, on alternate days, aspartame (600 or 1,200 mg) and placebo. Every hour, we performed a motor examination and drew blood to estimate plasma LNAA, PA, and levodopa levels. Six-hundred mg of aspartame had no effect on plasma PA or motor status. Although 1,200 mg of aspartame significantly increased plasma PA, motor performance did not deteriorate. Aspartame consumption in amounts well in excess of what would be consumed by heavy users of aspartame-sweetened products has no adverse effect on PD patients.

  6. Therapeutic directions for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The focus on disease-modifying treatments and cures for Parkinson's disease (PD) has raised expectations for quantum leaps and overshadowed incremental gains that have been slowly achieved. Large multi-center clinical trials such as DATATOP and PRECEPT keep on generating new knowledge that is relevant to clinical care as well as experimental therapeutics. The largely unforeseen relationship between circulating uric acid and the occurrence and progression of PD was developed and confirmed in these clinical trials. Systematic follow-up of clinical trial cohorts after conclusion of the interventional phase provides added value that continues to inform about natural history, state and trait biomarkers, and genotype-phenotype relationships. These efforts are enhanced by data mining, public reporting, and timely sharing of data and biological samples.

  7. Proteomics in human Parkinson's disease research.

    PubMed

    Licker, Virginie; Kövari, Enikö; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Burkhard, Pierre R

    2009-11-01

    During the last decades, considerable advances in the understanding of specific mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease have been achieved, yet neither definite etiology nor unifying sequence of molecular events has been formally established. Current unmet needs in Parkinson's disease research include exploring new hypotheses regarding disease susceptibility, occurrence and progression, identifying reliable diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers, and translating basic research into appropriate disease-modifying strategies. The most popular view proposes that Parkinson's disease results from the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors and mechanisms believed to be at work include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, iron deposition and inflammation. More recently, a plethora of data has accumulated pinpointing an abnormal processing of the neuronal protein alpha-synuclein as a pivotal mechanism leading to aggregation, inclusions formation and degeneration. This protein-oriented scenario logically opens the door to the application of proteomic strategies to this field of research. We here review the current literature on proteomics applied to Parkinson's disease research, with particular emphasis on pathogenesis of sporadic Parkinson's disease in humans. We propose the view that Parkinson's disease may be an acquired or genetically-determined brain proteinopathy involving an abnormal processing of several, rather than individual neuronal proteins, and discuss some pre-analytical and analytical developments in proteomics that may help in verifying this concept.

  8. Vascular parkinsonism--characteristics, pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson disease is a primary degenerative disease of the brain, but parkinsonism can also result from a variety of vascular disorders. Vascular parkinsonism (VP) most frequently presents as lower body parkinsonism, a condition that is accompanied by the development of white matter lesions (WMLs) and lacunes in the brain. Patients with lower body parkinsonism exhibit gait impairment and go on to develop urinary incontinence, abnormal pyramidal responses and cognitive decline. However, WMLs and lacunes are also common observations among elderly individuals who do not have parkinsonism, which causes difficulty in determining the pathogenetic mechanisms that lead to VP. In addition, imaging studies suggest that many pathological and clinical features are common to VP and Binswanger disease, a type of small vessel vascular dementia. This Review summarizes current understanding of the clinical characteristics of VP, as well as knowledge gained from neuroimaging and nuclear imaging of the pathological features of VP. The lack of current treatment options, and the emergence of new therapies such as cerebrospinal fluid drainage, are also discussed. Finally, consideration is given to whether the overlap between VP and Binswanger disease means that these two disorders should be considered as part of the same disease entity. PMID:25917706

  9. A case of Parkinson's disease following dystonia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Chiharu; Takei, Takanobu; Uozumi, Takenori; Toyota, Tomoko; Yuhi, Tomoaki; Adachi, Hiroaki

    2016-09-29

    Parkinsonism and dystonia are both disorders of the extrapyramidal motor system, and some patients exhibit a complex of the two symptoms. Although several reports have referred to the coexistence of these disorders as parkinsonian disorders with dystonia, in the majority of cases, dystonia appeared after parkinsonism. DAT-scan is useful for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other types of parkinsonism such as dementia with Lewy bodies. This case report describes a 67-year old woman diagnosed with axial dystonia without parkinsonism 6 years previously, which had worsened despite treatment with Botulinum toxin injections, and hindered the patient's gait. The patient visited the hospital because of gait disturbances and DAT-scan showed a levodopa transducer decrease in the putamen. A few weeks later, she was re-admitted to hospital and exhibited Parkinsonism. Levodopa improved the gait disturbances but axial dystonia was unchanged, and a clinical diagnosis of PD was made. In the authors' opinion, this was a rare case of parkinsonian disorders with dystonia, characterized by the development of PD after dystonia. DAT-scan may be helpful for the diagnosis of patients with parkinsonian disorders with dystonia. PMID:27498816

  10. Scientists Zero in On Brain Area Linked to 'Parkinson's Gait'

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scientists Zero in on Brain Area Linked to 'Parkinson's Gait' Discovery could lead to new treatments for ... play a role in walking difficulties that afflict Parkinson's disease patients, new research suggests. The prefrontal cortex ...

  11. Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise for Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159834.html Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise for Parkinson's Disease Medication was generally found safe, and study ... initial signs of promise for advanced cases of Parkinson's disease, researchers are reporting. Experts stressed that the ...

  12. Study Links Severe Head Injury to Parkinson's Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159811.html Study Links Severe Head Injury to Parkinson's Risk Researchers only found an association, could not ... of consciousness may increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease, new research suggests. "It could be that ...

  13. Neuropsychological prediction of dementia in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahieux, F.; Fenelon, G.; Flahault, A.; Manifacier, M.; Michelet, D.; Boller, F.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To identify neuropsychological characteristics predictive of later dementia in Parkinson's disease.
METHODS—A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery was administered to a cohort of 89 initially non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease consecutively enrolled at a specialised Parkinson's disease clinic. They were reassessed after a mean of 3.5 years for the diagnosis of dementia. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify baseline characteristics predictive of dementia.
RESULTS—Only four of the baseline clinical characteristics of Parkinson's disease and neuropsychological variables remained independently linked to subsequent development of dementia: the age of onset of Parkinson's disease (>60 years; relative risk (RR) 4.1, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.8-24.0, p<0.03), the picture completion subtest of the Wechsler adult intelligence scale (score<10; RR 4.9, 95% CI 1.0-24.1, p<0.02), the interference section of the Stroop test (score<21; RR 3.8, p=0.08), and a verbal fluency task (score<9; RR 2.7, 95% CI 0.8-9.1, p=0.09). Depressive symptoms and the severity of motor impairment were not predictive of dementia.
CONCLUSION—These features are different from the neuropsychological characteristics predictive of Alzheimer's dementia in healthy elderly people (mainly memory and language performance). They are in keeping with the well known specificity of the impairments in Parkinson's disease for visuospatial abilities and difficulties in inhibiting irrelevant stimuli. It is postulated that the composite nature of the picture completion subtest, involving several cognitive abilities impaired in Parkinson's disease, explains its sensitivity.

 PMID:9489527

  14. [Genetics and present therapy options in Parkinson's disease: a review].

    PubMed

    Bereznai, Benjamin; Molnar, Mária Judit

    2009-05-30

    In the past years, six monogenic forms of Parkinson disease have clearly been associated with this movement disorder. The most frequent forms are LRRK2- and Parkin-associated Parkinson disease. Currently, a genetic diagnosis does not change the therapy, the genes involved in genetic Parkinson disease help to understand the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of Parkinson disease. Beside the overview of the molecular-genetic basis, we give a review about genetic testing, pharmacological and other multidisciplinary treatment options. PMID:19579663

  15. Moving Parkinson care to the home.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, E Ray; Vlaanderen, Floris P; Engelen, Lucien Jlpg; Kieburtz, Karl; Zhu, William; Biglan, Kevin M; Faber, Marjan J; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-09-01

    In many ways, the care of individuals with Parkinson disease does not meet their needs. Despite the documented benefits of receiving care from clinicians with Parkinson disease expertise, many patients (if not most) do not. Moreover, current care models frequently require older individuals with impaired mobility, cognition, and driving ability to be driven by overburdened caregivers to large, complex urban medical centers. Moving care to the patient's home would make Parkinson disease care more patient-centered. Demographic factors, including aging populations, and social factors, such as the splintering of the extended family, will increase the need for home-based care. Technological advances, especially the ability to assess and deliver care remotely, will enable the transition of care back to the home. However, despite its promise, this next generation of home-based care will have to overcome barriers, including outdated insurance models and a technological divide. Once these barriers are addressed, home-based care will increase access to high quality care for the growing number of individuals with Parkinson disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27501323

  16. Moving Parkinson care to the home.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, E Ray; Vlaanderen, Floris P; Engelen, Lucien Jlpg; Kieburtz, Karl; Zhu, William; Biglan, Kevin M; Faber, Marjan J; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-09-01

    In many ways, the care of individuals with Parkinson disease does not meet their needs. Despite the documented benefits of receiving care from clinicians with Parkinson disease expertise, many patients (if not most) do not. Moreover, current care models frequently require older individuals with impaired mobility, cognition, and driving ability to be driven by overburdened caregivers to large, complex urban medical centers. Moving care to the patient's home would make Parkinson disease care more patient-centered. Demographic factors, including aging populations, and social factors, such as the splintering of the extended family, will increase the need for home-based care. Technological advances, especially the ability to assess and deliver care remotely, will enable the transition of care back to the home. However, despite its promise, this next generation of home-based care will have to overcome barriers, including outdated insurance models and a technological divide. Once these barriers are addressed, home-based care will increase access to high quality care for the growing number of individuals with Parkinson disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Environmental Exposures and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nandipati, Sirisha; Litvan, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects millions around the world. The Braak hypothesis proposes that in PD a pathologic agent may penetrate the nervous system via the olfactory bulb, gut, or both and spreads throughout the nervous system. The agent is unknown, but several environmental exposures have been associated with PD. Here, we summarize and examine the evidence for such environmental exposures. We completed a comprehensive review of human epidemiologic studies of pesticides, selected industrial compounds, and metals and their association with PD in PubMed and Google Scholar until April 2016. Most studies show that rotenone and paraquat are linked to increased PD risk and PD-like neuropathology. Organochlorines have also been linked to PD in human and laboratory studies. Organophosphates and pyrethroids have limited but suggestive human and animal data linked to PD. Iron has been found to be elevated in PD brain tissue but the pathophysiological link is unclear. PD due to manganese has not been demonstrated, though a parkinsonian syndrome associated with manganese is well-documented. Overall, the evidence linking paraquat, rotenone, and organochlorines with PD appears strong; however, organophosphates, pyrethroids, and polychlorinated biphenyls require further study. The studies related to metals do not support an association with PD. PMID:27598189

  18. Pulmonary function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hovestadt, A; Bogaard, J M; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-03-01

    Pulmonary function was investigated in 31 consecutive patients with relatively severe Parkinson's disease. Clinical disability was assessed by Hoehn and Yahr scale, Northwestern University Disability Scale and Websterscore. All patients were on levodopa substitution therapy and used anticholinergics. Pulmonary function was investigated by spirography, determination of a maximal inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume curve and, when possible, maximal static mouth pressures were determined. Peak inspiratory and expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and maximal static mouth pressures were significantly below normal values. Vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and vital capacity were relatively normal. Nine patients had upper airway obstruction (UAO) as judged by abnormal values for peak inspiratory flow, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow and the ratio of maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow at 50%. Flow-volume curves were normal in eight patients; four patients demonstrated flow decelerations and accelerations (type A) and 16 had a rounded off flow-volume curve (type B). Type A can be explained by UAO and type B by a combination of decreased effective muscle strength and possible UAO. Overall results of pulmonary function tests in patients without any clinical signs or symptoms of pulmonary disease point to subclinical upper airway obstruction and decreased effective muscle strength in a significant proportion of patients.

  19. Epigenetic regulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Catherine; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Ross, Owen A

    2016-10-01

    Recent efforts have shed new light on the epigenetic mechanisms driving gene expression alterations associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. Changes in gene expression are a well-established cause of PD, and epigenetic mechanisms likely play a pivotal role in regulation. Studies in families with PD harboring duplications and triplications of the SNCA gene have demonstrated that gene dosage is associated with increased expression of both SNCA mRNA and protein, and correlates with a fulminant disease course. Furthermore, it is postulated that even subtle changes in SNCA expression caused by common variation is associated with disease risk. Of note, genome-wide association studies have identified over 30 loci associated with PD with most signals located in non-coding regions of the genome, thus likely influencing transcript expression levels. In health, epigenetic mechanisms tightly regulate gene expression, turning genes on and off to balance homeostasis and this, in part, explains why two cells with the same DNA sequence will have different RNA expression profiles. Understanding this phenomenon will be crucial to our interpretation of the selective vulnerability observed in neurodegeneration and specifically dopaminergic neurons in the PD brain. In this review, we discuss epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, involved in regulating the expression of genes relevant to PD, RNA-based mechanisms, as well as the effect of toxins and potential epigenetic-based treatments for PD.

  20. Genetic comorbidities in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Mike A.; Saad, Mohamad; Noyce, Alastair J.; Keller, Margaux F.; Schrag, Anette; Bestwick, Jonathan P.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G.; Cookson, Mark R.; Morris, Huw R.; Williams, Nigel; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a number of known genetic risk factors. Clinical and epidemiological studies have suggested the existence of intermediate factors that may be associated with additional risk of PD. We construct genetic risk profiles for additional epidemiological and clinical factors using known genome-wide association studies (GWAS) loci related to these specific phenotypes to estimate genetic comorbidity in a systematic review. We identify genetic risk profiles based on GWAS variants associated with schizophrenia and Crohn's disease as significantly associated with risk of PD. Conditional analyses adjusting for SNPs near loci associated with PD and schizophrenia or PD and Crohn's disease suggest that spatially overlapping loci associated with schizophrenia and PD account for most of the shared comorbidity, while variation outside of known proximal loci shared by PD and Crohn's disease accounts for their shared genetic comorbidity. We examine brain methylation and expression signatures proximal to schizophrenia and Crohn's disease loci to infer functional changes in the brain associated with the variants contributing to genetic comorbidity. We compare our results with a systematic review of epidemiological literature, while the findings are dissimilar to a degree; marginal genetic associations corroborate the directionality of associations across genetic and epidemiological data. We show a strong genetically defined level of comorbidity between PD and Crohn's disease as well as between PD and schizophrenia, with likely functional consequences of associated variants occurring in brain. PMID:24057672

  1. Physical anhedonia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Isella, V; Iurlaro, S; Piolti, R; Ferrarese, C; Frattola, L; Appollonio, I; Melzi, P; Grimaldi, M

    2003-09-01

    Anhedonia is the inability to experience physical or social pleasure. Its physical component is hypothesised to be due to dysfunction of a dopaminergic frontotemporal-subcortical circuit and has never been investigated as a possible affective complication of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to formally assess prevalence and correlates of physical anhedonia in PD patients compared with normal controls. Twenty five people with PD and 25 matched controls were administered a psychometric battery exploring mainly executive functions and mood. Hedonic tone was assessed using Chapman's Physical Anhedonia Scale. PD patients also underwent MRI linear measurement of frontal structures. Anhedonia levels were significantly higher in PD patients with respect to controls, although not extremely elevated; prevalence rate was 40% for parkinsonians, while no anhedonics were found among controls. Clinical, neuropsychological, and quantitative neuroradiological features did not show any significant correlation with physical anhedonia. Physical anhedonia appears to be a relatively frequent, although mild, affective disturbance of PD, independent from neurological, frontal, and depressive aspects.

  2. Depressive symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lemke, M R

    2008-04-01

    Depression occurs in approximately 45% of all patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), does not correlate with the stage of motor deficits, reduces quality of life independently of motor symptoms and appears to be underrated and undertreated. Anxiety and depression are the risk factors for the development of PD and may be present many years before the appearance of motor symptoms. Studies using functional imaging techniques indicate a primary relationship between depression and PD. Because of overlapping clinical symptoms, the diagnosis is mainly based on subjectively experienced anhedonia and feelings of emptiness. Serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic mechanisms play key roles in the aetiology of depression in PD. Tricyclic and newer selective antidepressants including serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors appear to be effective in treating depression in PD. Selective reuptake inhibitors seem to be better tolerated because of their favourable side-effect profile. Experimental and clinical investigations indicate antidepressive effects for pramipexole. Placebo-controlled studies showed antidepressant effects of pramipexole in patients with different forms of depression. Various studies show that pramipexole improves depression in addition to motor symptoms in patients with PD. Because of the data available as well as clinical reasoning, pramipexole may be used as a first-line treatment in patients with PD and depression.

  3. [Postmortal diagnosis of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Sandmann-Keil, D; Braak, H

    2005-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is a continuously progressive degenerative disorder of the central, peripheral and enteric human nervous systems. Not only the substantia nigra, but also a number of other components of the motor and limbic systems, as well as the autonomic regulation, suffer heavy damages. Only a few of the many types of nerve cells in the human central nervous system develop the characteristic Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. They are composed primarily of aggregated alpha-synuclein and lead to the premature destruction of the affected neurons. Due to the selective neuronal vulnerability, a distinctive distribution of changes occurs within the central nervous system, leading to a corresponding loss of functionality in many systems. The changes occur in an ordered timely fashion. The ascending pathological process begins within the brain at the glossopharyngeal and vagal areas, nearly destroys the substantia nigra, and reaches the mesocortex of the gray matter. From here it expands to further areas of the neocortex, thereby marking the end phase of the disease.

  4. Respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, L K

    1994-12-01

    The parkinsonian syndromes include idiopathic Parkinson's disease, parkinsonian syndromes secondary to several known causative agents, and parkinsonian syndromes associated with more widespread CNS lesions and extensive neurologic deficits. They constitute movement disorders with a similar constellation of symptoms: rigidity, tremor, bradykinesia, gait impairment, and postural instability. All of the parkinsonian syndromes are associated with excess morbidity and mortality from respiratory causes, and all can produce the pattern of pulmonary function impairment consistent with neuromuscular disease. In addition, the parkinsonian syndromes can produce upper airway obstruction and abnormalities of ventilatory control, both of which can be life-threatening in those with MSA. The medications used to treat these disorders can also produce respiratory disease. A syndrome of L-dopa-induced respiratory dysfunction has been described, which may be a heterogeneic disorder of choreiform movements of the respiratory muscles, rigidity-akinesis of the respiratory muscles, or abnormal central control of ventilation, all related to the drug. In addition, the ergot-derived dopamine agonists can cause pleural and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:7867286

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qingsong; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the formation of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in surviving DA neurons in most cases. Although the cause of PD is still unclear, the remarkable advances have been made in understanding the possible causative mechanisms of PD pathogenesis. Numerous studies showed that dysfunction of mitochondria may play key roles in DA neuronal loss. Both genetic and environmental factors that are associated with PD contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction and PD pathogenesis. The induction of PD by neurotoxins that inhibit mitochondrial complex I provides direct evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction to PD. Decrease of mitochondrial complex I activity is present in PD brain and in neurotoxin- or genetic factor-induced PD cellular and animal models. Moreover, PINK1 and parkin, two autosomal recessive PD gene products, have important roles in mitophagy, a cellular process to clear damaged mitochondria. PINK1 activates parkin to ubiquitinate outer mitochondrial membrane proteins to induce a selective degradation of damaged mitochondria by autophagy. In this review, we summarize the factors associated with PD and recent advances in understanding mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. PMID:27453777

  6. Gut dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Adreesh; Biswas, Atanu; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Early involvement of gut is observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) and symptoms such as constipation may precede motor symptoms. α-Synuclein pathology is extensively evident in the gut and appears to follow a rostrocaudal gradient. The gut may act as the starting point of PD pathology with spread toward the central nervous system. This spread of the synuclein pathology raises the possibility of prion-like propagation in PD pathogenesis. Recently, the role of gut microbiota in PD pathogenesis has received attention and some phenotypic correlation has also been shown. The extensive involvement of the gut in PD even in its early stages has led to the evaluation of enteric α-synuclein as a possible biomarker of early PD. The clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal dysfunction in PD include malnutrition, oral and dental disorders, sialorrhea, dysphagia, gastroparesis, constipation, and defecatory dysfunction. These conditions are quite distressing for the patients and require relevant investigations and adequate management. Treatment usually involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. One important aspect of gut dysfunction is its contribution to the clinical fluctuations in PD. Dysphagia and gastroparesis lead to inadequate absorption of oral anti-PD medications. These lead to response fluctuations, particularly delayed-on and no-on, and there is significant relationship between levodopa pharmacokinetics and gastric emptying in patients with PD. Therefore, in such cases, alternative routes of administration or drug delivery systems may be required. PMID:27433087

  7. [Psychotic symptoms in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Fénelon, Gilles

    2006-12-01

    About one third of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience hallucinations, mostly of a complex visual type, less often auditory or tactile. Minor hallucinatory phenomena, including sense of presence, passage hallucinations and visual illusions are frequent. Hallucinations primarily occur in a context of clear sensorium in patients with longstanding PD. They are more frequent in the evening or during the night. Insight in the hallucinatory nature of the phenomenon may be retained, partial, fluctuating, or abolished. An altered insight is common when cognitive impairment is present, and may be associated with delusions and (or) delusional misidentifications. Pharmacological factors such as dopaminergic treatment clearly trigger or increase the occurence of hallucinations in PD. However, in the recent years, emphasis has been made on disease-related factors including cognitive impairment, diurnal somnolence, visual disorders (either contrast and color discrimination impairment due to PD, or coincident ocular disorders), long duration of PD, late onset, severe axial impairment and autonomic dysfunction. The pathophysiology of hallucinations of PD is poorly understood but is likely to be multifactorial. The first steps of the treatment consist in giving information and reassurance to the patient and his/her caregiver, re-evaluating the antiparkinsonian treatment and associated medications, and evaluating the patient for mood disorder, visual impairment, and cognitive impairment. Cholinesterase inhibitors, when prescribed for associated cognitive impairment, may be beneficial on hallucinations. In the more severe forms, clozapine has been proved to be safe and effective.

  8. Pulmonary function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hovestadt, A; Bogaard, J M; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-01-01

    Pulmonary function was investigated in 31 consecutive patients with relatively severe Parkinson's disease. Clinical disability was assessed by Hoehn and Yahr scale, Northwestern University Disability Scale and Websterscore. All patients were on levodopa substitution therapy and used anticholinergics. Pulmonary function was investigated by spirography, determination of a maximal inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume curve and, when possible, maximal static mouth pressures were determined. Peak inspiratory and expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and maximal static mouth pressures were significantly below normal values. Vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and vital capacity were relatively normal. Nine patients had upper airway obstruction (UAO) as judged by abnormal values for peak inspiratory flow, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow and the ratio of maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow at 50%. Flow-volume curves were normal in eight patients; four patients demonstrated flow decelerations and accelerations (type A) and 16 had a rounded off flow-volume curve (type B). Type A can be explained by UAO and type B by a combination of decreased effective muscle strength and possible UAO. Overall results of pulmonary function tests in patients without any clinical signs or symptoms of pulmonary disease point to subclinical upper airway obstruction and decreased effective muscle strength in a significant proportion of patients. PMID:2926415

  9. Safinamide for symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, T

    2015-11-01

    Chronic and slow progression of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is responsible for an altered neurotransmission of various biogenic amines, such as dopamine. Therefore, an individually different pronounced heterogeneity of motor and nonmotor symptoms characterizes each Parkinson's disease patient. Ideal candidates for the balance of these neurotransmitter deficits are compounds like safinamide with broad mechanisms of action such as reversible monoamine oxidase type B inhibition, blockage of voltage-dependent sodium channels, modulation of calcium channels and of glutamate release. Safinamide is administered one time daily with oral doses ranging from 50 to 100 mg. Safinamide was well tolerated and safe, ameliorated motor symptoms when combined with dopamine agonist only or additional levodopa in clinical trials. Safinamide is a novel instrument for the drug therapy of Parkinson's disease with better safety and tolerability particularly concerning diarrhea than inhibitors of catechol-O-methyltransferase, like entacapone, according to an indirect comparison within a meta-analysis with entacapone. PMID:26744740

  10. Drugs of abuse and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mursaleen, Leah R; Stamford, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    The term "drug of abuse" is highly contextual. What constitutes a drug of abuse for one population of patients does not for another. It is therefore important to examine the needs of the patient population to properly assess the status of drugs of abuse. The focus of this article is on the bidirectional relationship between patients and drug abuse. In this paper we will introduce the dopaminergic systems of the brain in Parkinson's and the influence of antiparkinsonian drugs upon them before discussing this synergy of condition and medication as fertile ground for drug abuse. We will then examine the relationship between drugs of abuse and Parkinson's, both beneficial and deleterious. In summary we will draw the different strands together and speculate on the future merit of current drugs of abuse as treatments for Parkinson's disease.

  11. Left-sided hemihypomimia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Crosiers, David; Maréchal, Emke; van Ael, Yannick; Cras, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is known to present and mostly persist as an asymmetrical movement disorder in most cases. The asymmetry is mainly described in motor features such as bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor in upper and lower limbs. Unilateral hypomimia however, has only been reported in 14 patients, all of whom showed right-sided hemihypomimia. In this case report we describe the symptoms of a 51-year-old man with predominant left-sided Parkinson's disease in whom we discovered a left-sided hemihypomimia. We also briefly review the literature concerning hemihypomimia in Parkinson's disease. We conclude that a larger case series needs to be studied to further elucidate the pathophysiology and clinical implications of this observation.

  12. Visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Muller, Alana J; Shine, James M; Halliday, Glenda M; Lewis, Simon J G

    2014-11-01

    One of the most challenging tasks in neuroscience is to be able to meaningfully connect information across the different levels of investigation, from molecular or structural biology to the resulting behavior and cognition. Visual hallucinations are a frequent occurrence in Parkinson's disease and significantly contribute to the burden of the disease. Because of the widespread pathological processes implicated in visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease, a final common mechanism that explains their manifestation will require an integrative approach, in which consideration is taken across all complementary levels of analysis. This review considers the leading hypothetical frameworks for visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease, summarizing the key aspects of each in an attempt to highlight the aspects of the condition that such a unifying hypothesis must explain. These competing hypotheses include implications of dream imagery intrusion, deficits in reality monitoring, and impairments in visual perception and attention.

  13. The genetic basis of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Foltynie, T; Sawcer, S; Brayne, C; Barker, R

    2002-01-01

    Although the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease are not fully understood, considerable evidence suggests that genetic factors can influence susceptibility to the disease. In this article, we critically review this evidence and examine studies estimating patterns of inheritance. In a few families, Parkinson's disease is clearly inherited in a Mendelian fashion, and in some of these the disease causing genes have already been identified. Possible pathogenic mechanisms by which these genes cause Parkinson's disease are discussed. Further candidate genes and systematic efforts to identify genes influencing susceptibility to the disease in general are also summarised. The identification of such susceptibility genes will eventually enable us to more accurately classify this complex disease. PMID:12235301

  14. Grammatical abilities in Parkinson's disease: evidence from written sentences.

    PubMed

    Small, J A; Lyons, K; Kemper, S

    1997-12-01

    This study examined the grammatical content of written sentences elicited from 96 Parkinson's patients, 30 Parkinson's with dementia patients and 167 control subjects. Parkinson's patients without dementia or with mild dementia presented no impairments in sentence length, syntactic complexity or amount of information content. Moderately demented Parkinson's patients showed reduced sentence length and information content but normal syntactic complexity. This pattern of results provides evidence that lexical-semantic content is more susceptible to decline than syntactic structure with the progression of dementia in Parkinson's disease.

  15. [Cabergoline in the treatment of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Pastor, P; Tolosa, E

    2003-05-01

    Cabergoline (1-[(6-allelylergolin-8 beta-yl)carbonyl]-1-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-3-ethyl-urea) is a new agonist of the D2 dopaminergic receptors used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Cabergoline is characterized by unique pharmacologic properties, such as its long plasma half-life (about 68 hours), which allows for once a day administration. Cabergoline is well tolerated, as has been shown in several clinical trials. Based on the information available, we suggest that cabergoline produces an improvement in the symptoms of Parkinson's disease similar to those produced by other dopaminergic agonists. Cabergoline monotherapy, when used in previously untreated patients, is an appropriate option for the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. Cabergoline improves motor symptoms, delays the presentation of levodopa-induced motor complications, and diminishes the amount of levodopa required for the control of the symptoms. We suggest that cabergoline is an adequate adjuvant treatment for Parkinson' disease. There is improvement in motor symptoms (without substantially increased dyskinesias), reduced severity and duration of the wearing-off period, and diminished need for levodopa. Cabergoline can also be useful in the treatment of sleep disturbances associated with advanced Parkinson's disease such as nocturnal akinesia and dystonia. However, additional studies on cabergoline's effects in nocturnal disturbances associated with Parkinson's disease are still required. Cabergoline is a well tolerated drug. Its side effects are seen mainly in the digestive and nervous system (central and peripheral). The efficacy of cabergoline in comparison to other dopaminergic agonists should be tested in future clinical studies.

  16. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: epidemiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shlomo, Y; Sieradzan, K

    1995-01-01

    Since the introduction of levodopa therapy for idiopathic Parkinson's disease over 20 years ago, there has been an awakening of research interest in this chronic neuro-degenerative disorder. This paper describes current understanding of the role of genetic and environmental factors in the aetiology of idiopathic Parkinson's disease and problems associated with both diagnosis and management. It briefly outlines both pharmacological and non-pharmacological options for treatment. Despite an increasing armoury of available treatments, the optimum management for this condition remains controversial. PMID:7619574

  17. [Management of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Crespo-Burillo, José A; Alarcia-Alejos, Raquel

    2015-04-16

    Autonomic dysfunction is a common manifestation in patients with in Parkinson's disease, which can sometimes precede motor impairment. It can be expressed as orthostatic and postprandial hypotension, supine hypertension, hypersalivation, constipation, delayed gastric emptying, dyshidrosis, bladder and sexual dysfunction. It impairs the quality of life of patients and complicates the management of motor symptoms. Evidence available to treat complications is low. Our aim is to review the pathophysiology and clinical features of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and provide a practical approach to handling the available evidence.

  18. [Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Joutsa, Juho; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2013-01-01

    Of the patients having Parkinson's disease, up to third encounters some degree of impulse control problems and one out of seven suffers from true impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping and binge eating. Dopaminergic drugs used in anti-Parkinson therapy, especially dopamine agonists, increase the risk of these disorders. Impulse control disorders are associated with a relatively more active dopamine-mediated neurotransmission of the mesolimbic and mesocortical system. Discontinuation of dopamine agonist medication can thus be considered as the first line treatment of these disorders. PMID:24397147

  19. Myopathy and parkinsonism in phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Evangelia; Greene, Paul; Krishna, Sindu; Hirano, Michio; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2010-05-01

    A 25-year-old man with exertional myoglobinuria had no evidence of hemolytic anemia, but he had severe parkinsonism that was responsive to levodopa. Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) activity was markedly decreased in muscle, and molecular analysis of the PGK1 gene identified the p.T378P mutation that was recently reported in a patient with isolated myopathy. This case reinforces the concept that PGK deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous disorder and raises the question of a relationship between PGK deficiency and idiopathic juvenile Parkinson disease. PMID:20151463

  20. Oxidative Stress in Genetic Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Varçin, Mustafa; Bentea, Eduard; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence in Parkinson's disease of a link between oxidative stress and some of the monogenically inherited Parkinson's disease-associated genes. This paper focuses on the importance of this link and potential impact on neuronal function. Basic mechanisms of oxidative stress, the cellular antioxidant machinery, and the main sources of cellular oxidative stress are reviewed. Moreover, attention is given to the complex interaction between oxidative stress and other prominent pathogenic pathways in Parkinson's disease, such as mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, an overview of the existing genetic mouse models of Parkinson's disease is given and the evidence of oxidative stress in these models highlighted. Taken into consideration the importance of ageing and environmental factors as a risk for developing Parkinson's disease, gene-environment interactions in genetically engineered mouse models of Parkinson's disease are also discussed, highlighting the role of oxidative damage in the interplay between genetic makeup, environmental stress, and ageing in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22829959

  1. Transcranial sonography findings in welding-related Parkinsonism in comparison to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Walter, Uwe; Dressler, Dirk; Lindemann, Christian; Slachevsky, Andrea; Miranda, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenetic relationship of welding-related Parkinsonism (WP) and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is a matter of debate. In the present study, we compared transcranial sonography (TCS) findings in patients with WP and PD. Two male patients with WP, who had developed levodopa-resistant akinetic-rigid Parkinsonism without ongoing progression after having worked as welders for many years in Chilean mines in confined spaces without adequate ventilation, and three age-matched male patients with clinically definite akinetic-rigid PD were studied with TCS in a random order by two investigators blind to clinical diagnoses. In both WP patients, normal echogenicity of substantia nigra was found whereas all PD patients exhibited marked substantia nigra hyperechogenicity, previously reported as a characteristic TCS finding in idiopathic PD. In contrast, lenticular nucleus was hyperechogenic in both WP patients but only in one of the PD patients. TCS findings suggest a different pathophysiology of Parkinsonism in WP and PD patients.

  2. Parkinsonism in FMR1 premutation carriers may be indistinguishable from Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Deborah A.; Howard, Katherine; Hagerman, Randi; Leehey, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Premutation carriers of repeat expansions in the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene develop kinetic tremor and ataxia or the ‘fragile X associated tremor/ataxia syndrome’ (FXTAS). Affected FMR1 premutation carriers also have parkinsonism, but have not been reported to meet criteria for Parkinson disease. This case series illustrates that some patients who are FMR1 premutation carriers may appear by history and examination to have idiopathic Parkinson disease. Based on previous studies, it is likely that the genetic mutation and parkinsonism are associated. Although screening all PD patients is likely to be low yield, genetic testing of FMR1 in individuals with PD and a family history of fragile X syndrome, autism or developmental delay, or other related FMR1 phenotypes is warranted. PMID:18565783

  3. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Somaiya, Mansi; Kumar, Santhosh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is essentially characterized by the motor symptoms in the form of resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, over the years it has been recognized that motor symptoms are just the “tip of the iceberg” of clinical manifestations of PD. Besides motor symptoms, PD characterized by many non-motor symptoms, which include cognitive decline, psychiatric disturbances (depression, psychosis and impulse control), sleep difficulties, autonomic failures (gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, urinary, thermoregulation) and pain syndrome. This review evaluates the various aspects of psychiatric disorders including cognitive decline and sleep disturbances in patients with PD. The prevalence rate of various psychiatric disorders is high in patients with PD. In terms of risk factors, various demographic, clinical and treatment-related variables have been shown to be associated with higher risk of development of psychiatric morbidity. Evidence also suggests that the presence of psychiatric morbidity is associated with poorer outcome. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD are meager. Available evidence suggests that tricyclic antidepressants like desipramine and nortriptyline are efficacious for management of depression. Among the antipsychotics, clozapine is considered to be the best choice for management of psychosis in patients with PD. Among the various cognitive enhancers, evidence suggest efficacy of rivastigmine in management of dementia in patients with PD. To conclude, this review suggests that psychiatric morbidity is highly prevalent in patients with PD. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach must be followed to improve the overall outcome of PD. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of various other measures for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD. PMID:25552854

  4. Adult neurogenesis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marxreiter, Franz; Regensburger, Martin; Winkler, Jürgen

    2013-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, affects 1-2 % of humans aged 60 years and older. The diagnosis of PD is based on motor symptoms such as bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and postural instability associated with the striatal dopaminergic deficit that is linked to neurodegenerative processes in the substantia nigra (SN). In the past, cellular replacement strategies have been evaluated for their potential to alleviate these symptoms. Adult neurogenesis, the generation of new neurons within two proliferative niches in the adult brain, is being intensively studied as one potential mode for cell-based therapies. The subventricular zone provides new neurons for the olfactory bulb functionally contributing to olfaction. The subgranular zone of the hippocampus produces new granule neurons for the dentate gyrus, required for memory formation and proper processing of anxiety provoking stimuli. Recent years have revealed that PD is associated with non-motor symptoms such as hyposmia, anhedonia, lack of novelty seeking behavior, depression, and anxiety that are not directly associated with neurodegenerative processes in the SN. This broad spectrum of non-motor symptoms may partly rely on proper olfactorial processing and hippocampal function. Therefore, it is conceivable that some non-motor deficits in PD are related to defective adult neurogenesis. Accordingly, in animal models and postmortem studies of PD, adult neurogenesis is severely affected, although the exact mechanisms and effects of these changes are not yet fully understood or are under debate due to conflicting results. Here, we review the current concepts related to the dynamic interplay between endogenous cellular plasticity and PD-associated pathology.

  5. [Placebo effect in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hideto

    2007-02-01

    "Placebo" is Latin for "I shall please". The placebo effect has been widely documented by randomized placebo-controlled drug studies. One of the best examples of placebo effectiveness is that have been shown in clinical trials of anti-parkinsonian drugs. The placebo effect is observable not only in drug trials but also with deep brain stimulation. Recent advances in research on the placebo effect in Parkinson's disease (PD) have suggested that motor symptoms of PD can be essentially improved by placebo. A recent study using positron emission tomography (PET) with raclopride demonstrated that release of endogeneous dopamine in the dorsal striatum occurs in placebo-responsive patients with PD. This suggests that placebo-induced expectation of clinical improvement may activate endogenous dopamine in the striatum, and that placebo effectiveness is thus achieved by endogenous dopamine supplementation. Indeed, decreased neuronal activities in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), that were recorded during surgery to implant deep brain stimulation electrodes, correlated well with placebo-induced clinical improvement in patients with PD. Although the detailed pathophysiological mechanism underlying the placebo effects remains uncertain, theoretically, the placebo effect has generally been explained by two different mechanisms: one is conditioning theory (pavlovian conditioning), and the other is cognitive theory (expectation of clinical improvement). Although both mechanisms may contribute to placebo effects, the placebo effect in PD may be attributed more to cognitive mechanisms such as expectation of improvement, because the placebo effect can be obtained in de novo PD patients. There have been accumulating findings that suggest a functional relationship between dopamine and the expectation of clinical improvement (reward). Further basic studies are required to clarify the complex link between dopamine and the reward system, but such findings will contribute to a better

  6. Parkinson disease and smoking revisited

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei-Chen; Lassen, Christina F.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether being able to quit smoking is an early marker of Parkinson disease (PD) onset rather than tobacco being “neuroprotective,” we analyzed information about ease of quitting and nicotine substitute use. Methods: For this case-control study, we identified 1,808 patients with PD diagnosed between 1996 and 2009 from Danish registries, matched 1,876 population controls on sex and year of birth, and collected lifestyle information. We estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals with logistic regression adjusting for matching factors and confounders. Results: Fewer patients with PD than controls ever established a smoking habit. Among former smokers, those with greater difficulty quitting or using nicotine substitutes were less likely to develop PD, with the risk being lowest among those reporting “extremely difficult to quit” compared with “easy to quit.” Nicotine substitute usage was strongly associated with quitting difficulty and duration of smoking, i.e., most strongly among current smokers, followed by former smokers who had used nicotine substitutes, and less strongly among former smokers who never used substitutes. Conclusions: Our data support the notion that patients with PD are able to quit smoking more easily than controls. These findings are compatible with a decreased responsiveness to nicotine during the prodromal phase of PD. We propose that ease of smoking cessation is an aspect of premanifest PD similar to olfactory dysfunction, REM sleep disorders, or constipation and suggests that the apparent “neuroprotective” effect of smoking observed in epidemiologic studies is due to reverse causation. PMID:25217056

  7. Connectivity Changes in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cerasa, Antonio; Novellino, Fabiana; Quattrone, Aldo

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder of the central nervous system characterized by widespread alterations in several non-motor aspects such as mood, sleep, olfactory, and cognition in addition to motor dysfunctions. Advanced neuroimaging using functional connectivity reconstruction of the human brain has provided a vast knowledge on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disorder, but this, however, does not cover the overall inter-/intra-individual variability of PD phenotypes. The present review is aimed at discussing to what extent the evidence provided by group-based neuroimaging analysis in this field of study (using seed-based, network-based, or graph theory approaches) may be generalized. In particular, we summarized the literature on the application of resting-state functional connectivity studies to explore different neural correlates of motor and non-motor symptoms of PD and the neural mechanisms involved in treatment effects: effects of levodopa or deep brain stimulation. The lesson learnt from one decade of studies provides consistent evidence on the role of the altered communication between the striato-frontal pathways as a marker of PD-related motor degeneration, whereas in the non-motor domain, several missing pieces of a complex puzzle are provided. However, the main target is to present a new era of intelligent neuroimaging applications, where automated multivariate analysis of functional connectivity data may be used for moving from group-level statistical results to personalized predictions in a clinical setting. Although in its relative infancy, the evidence gathered so far suggests a new era of clinical neuroimaging is starting. PMID:27568202

  8. Cognitive training in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Isabella H.K.; Walton, Courtney C.; Hallock, Harry; Lewis, Simon J.G.; Valenzuela, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the effects of cognitive training (CT) on cognitive and behavioral outcome measures in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We systematically searched 5 databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CT in patients with PD reporting cognitive or behavioral outcomes. Efficacy was measured as standardized mean difference (Hedges g) of post-training change. Results: Seven studies encompassing 272 patients with Hoehn & Yahr Stages 1–3 were included. The overall effect of CT over and above control conditions was small but statistically significant (7 studies: g = 0.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.014–0.44, p = 0.037). True heterogeneity across studies was low (I2 = 0%) and there was no evidence of publication bias. Larger effect sizes were noted on working memory (4 studies: g = 0.74, CI 0.32–1.17, p = 0.001), processing speed (4 studies: g = 0.31, CI 0.01–0.61, p = 0.04), and executive function (5 studies: g = 0.30, CI 0.01–0.58, p = 0.042), while effects on measures of global cognition (4 studies), memory (5 studies), visuospatial skills (4 studies), and depression (5 studies), as well as attention, quality of life, and instrumental activities of daily living (3 studies each), were not statistically significant. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions: Though still small, the current body of RCT evidence indicates that CT is safe and modestly effective on cognition in patients with mild to moderate PD. Larger RCTs are necessary to examine the utility of CT for secondary prevention of cognitive decline in this population. PMID:26519540

  9. Prevalence of Parkinson's disease and other types of Parkinsonism in Al Kharga district, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Tallawy, Hamdy N; Farghaly, Wafaa M; Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Rageh, Tarek A; Hakeem, Nabil M Abdel; Hamed, Mohamed Abd Al; Badry, Reda

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder in older people. The prevalence of PD varies among ethnic and geographic groups around the world. In this study, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of PD and other types of Parkinsonism in persons aged ≥40 years in the Al Kharga district of Egypt. The study was conducted on the total population of Al Kharga district (62,583 persons) between 2005 and 2009 and involved three neurology specialists and 15 female social workers undertaking a door-to-door survey. Suspected cases of Parkinsonism were subjected to meticulous clinical and neurological examination by three neurology staff members from Assiut University hospital who carried out their examinations separately. Of the total population surveyed, 15,482 persons were aged ≥40 years and 49 of these were identified as having Parkinsonism (prevalence: 316.50 per 100,000 people [95% confidence interval {CI} 240.21-404.98]). Of the 49, 33 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for PD, giving a prevalence rate of 213.15/100,000 (95% CI 150.51-285.80) while 14 fulfilled those for vascular Parkinsonism, with a prevalence rate of 90.43/100,000 (95% CI 49.60-137.78). Postencephalitic and unspecified Parkinsonism each had a prevalence rate of 6.46/100,000. The prevalence of Parkinsonism was found to increase steadily with age, and the prevalence of all types of Parkinsonism was statistically higher in rural compared with urban communities, with no significant difference between men and women. PMID:24379673

  10. Neurochemical Approaches in the Laboratory Diagnosis of Parkinson and Parkinson Dementia Syndromes: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jesse, Sarah; Steinacker, Petra; Lehnert, Stefan; Gillardon, Frank; Hengerer, Bastian; Otto, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) is rendered on the basis of clinical parameters, whereby laboratory chemical tests or morphological imaging is only called upon to exclude other neurodegenerative diseases. The differentiation between PD and other diseases of the basal ganglia, especially the postsynaptic Parkinson syndromes multisystem atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), is of decisive importance, on the one hand, for the response to an appropriate therapy, and on the other hand, for the respective prognosis of the disease. However, particularly at the onset of symptoms, it is difficult to precisely distinguish these diseases from each other, presenting with an akinetic-rigid syndrome. It is not yet possible to conduct a neurochemical differentiation of Parkinson syndromes. Therefore, a reliable biomarker is still to be found that might predict the development of Parkinson dementia. Since this situation is currently the subject of various different studies, the following synopsis is intended to provide a brief summary of the investigations addressing the field of the early neurochemical differential diagnosis of Parkinson syndromes and the early diagnosis of Parkinson dementia, from direct α-synuclein detection to proteomic approaches. In addition, an overview of the tested biomarkers will be given with regard to their possible introduction as a screening method. PMID:19298613

  11. [Parkinson's disease in literature, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, Roberto; Carrillo, Jesús M

    2014-02-01

    INTRODUCTION. Since James Parkinson published what can be considered the first treaty on the disease that bears his name in 1817, the scientific literature on this pathology has not ceased to grow. But the illness has also been represented in literature, the cinema and on television, where the symptoms, treatment and socio-familial context of the disease have often been examined very closely. AIM. To address the cases in which Parkinson's disease appears in literature, cinema and television, as well as to reflect on the image of the condition presented in those contexts. DEVELOPMENT. We reviewed some of the most important works in the literature dealing with Parkinson's disease from any period of history and many of them were found to offer very faithful portrayals of the disease. Likewise, we also reviewed major films and TV series that sometimes offer the general public a close look at the vision and the impact of the disease on patients or their relatives. CONCLUSIONS. Literature, cinema and television have helped provide a realistic view of both Parkinson's disease and the related healthcare professionals, and there are many examples that portray the actual experiences of the patients themselves, while also highlighting the importance of healthcare and socio-familial care. PMID:24469940

  12. Voice Onset Time in Parkinson Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Emily; Goberman, Alexander M.

    2010-01-01

    Research has found that speaking rate has an effect on voice onset time (VOT). Given that Parkinson disease (PD) affects speaking rate, the purpose of this study was to examine VOT with the effect of rate removed (VOT ratio), along with the traditional VOT measure, in individuals with PD. VOT and VOT ratio were examined in 9 individuals with PD…

  13. Emotion and Object Processing in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Henri; Gagne, Marie-Helene; Hess, Ursula; Pourcher, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    The neuropsychological literature on the processing of emotions in Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals conflicting evidence about the role of the basal ganglia in the recognition of facial emotions. Hence, the present study had two objectives. One was to determine the extent to which the visual processing of emotions and objects differs in PD. The…

  14. [Is Parkinson's disease a prion disease?].

    PubMed

    Brandel, J-P; Corbillé, A-G; Derkinderen, P; Haïk, S

    2015-12-01

    The accumulation of a specific protein in aggregated form is a common phenomenon in human neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, this protein is α-synuclein which is a neuronal protein of 143 amino acids. With a monomeric conformation in solution, it also has a natural capacity to aggregate into amyloid structures (dimers, oligomers, fibrils and Lewy bodies or neurites). It therefore fulfils the characteristics of a prion protein (different conformations, seeding and spreading). In vitro and in vivo experimental evidence in transgenic and wild animals indicates a prion-like propagation of Parkinson's disease. The sequential and predictive distribution of α-synuclein demonstrated by Braak et al. and its correlation with non-motor signs are consistent with the prion-like progression. Although the triggering factor causing the misfolding and aggregation of the target protein is unknown, Parkinson's disease is a highly relevant model for the study of these mechanisms and also to test specific treatments targeting the assemblies of α-synuclein and propagation from pre-motor phase of the disease. Despite this prion-like progression, there is currently no argument indicating a risk of human transmission of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26563663

  15. Midlife migraine and late-life parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Ross, G. Webster; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Garcia, Melissa; Gudmundsson, Larus S.; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Sigurlaug; Wagner, Amy K.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that having migraine in middle age is related to late-life parkinsonism and a related disorder, restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease (WED). Methods: The AGES-Reykjavik cohort (born 1907–1935) has been followed since 1967. Headaches were classified based on symptoms assessed in middle age. From 2002 to 2006, 5,764 participants were reexamined to assess symptoms of parkinsonism, diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD), family history of PD, and RLS/WED. Results: Subjects with midlife migraine, particularly migraine with aura (MA), were in later life more likely than others to report parkinsonian symptoms (odds ratio [OR]MA = 3.6 [95% CI 2.7–4.8]) and diagnosed PD (ORMA = 2.5 [95% CI 1.2–5.2]). Women with MA were more likely than others to have a parent (ORMA = 2.26 [95% CI 1.3–4.0]) or sibling (ORMA = 1.78 [95% CI 1.1–2.9]) with PD. Late-life RLS/WED was increased for headache generally. Associations were independent of cardiovascular disease and MRI-evident presumed ischemic lesions. Conclusions: These findings suggest there may be a common vulnerability to, or consequences of, migraine and multiple indicators of parkinsonism. Additional genetic and longitudinal observational studies are needed to identify candidate pathways that may account for the comorbid constellation of symptoms. PMID:25230997

  16. Parkinson's Disease: A Thalamostriatal Rebalancing Act?

    PubMed

    Tritsch, Nicolas X; Carter, Adam G

    2016-02-17

    Motor impairments in Parkinson's disease are thought to result from hypoactivation of striatal projection neurons in the direct pathway. In this issue of Neuron, Parker et al. (2016) report that dopamine depletion selectively weakens thalamic but not cortical afferents onto these neurons, implicating the thalamus as playing a key role in Parkinsonian motor symptoms. PMID:26889806

  17. [Parkinson's disease in literature, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, Roberto; Carrillo, Jesús M

    2014-02-01

    INTRODUCTION. Since James Parkinson published what can be considered the first treaty on the disease that bears his name in 1817, the scientific literature on this pathology has not ceased to grow. But the illness has also been represented in literature, the cinema and on television, where the symptoms, treatment and socio-familial context of the disease have often been examined very closely. AIM. To address the cases in which Parkinson's disease appears in literature, cinema and television, as well as to reflect on the image of the condition presented in those contexts. DEVELOPMENT. We reviewed some of the most important works in the literature dealing with Parkinson's disease from any period of history and many of them were found to offer very faithful portrayals of the disease. Likewise, we also reviewed major films and TV series that sometimes offer the general public a close look at the vision and the impact of the disease on patients or their relatives. CONCLUSIONS. Literature, cinema and television have helped provide a realistic view of both Parkinson's disease and the related healthcare professionals, and there are many examples that portray the actual experiences of the patients themselves, while also highlighting the importance of healthcare and socio-familial care.

  18. [James Parkinson (1755-1824) revisited].

    PubMed

    Poirier, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    The name of Parkinson is universally famous because of the eponymous disease. But as a man, James Parkinson (1755-1824), is poorly known. He was born, married and passed away in his St-Leonard parish in Shoreditch (London). After having studied Latin, Greek, natural philosophy, and stenography (shorthand), which he considered as the basic tools of any doctor, he studied for six months at the London Hospital Medical College, and served his apprenticeship as an apothecary-surgeon with his father for six years. Then he was qualified as a surgeon in 1784 at the age of 29 years. His activity has been deployed in three areas: 1) medicine, 2) political activism and social reformism, 3) paleontology and oryctology. As a physician, Parkinson has published several books, the most important concerned paralysis agitans (future Parkinson's disease), gout, complications of lightning (future Lichtenberg figures and keraunoparalysis), acute appendicitis (with his son John Parkinson) and hernias (diagnosis, development, dangers of hernia ruptures, and design of a simple truss). Its ideological and political commitment was manifested by joining two secret societies and publishing numerous pamphlets, many of which are signed by the pseudonym Old Hubert; he campaigned for a better representation of the people in Parliament, for greater social justice, for the defense and recognition of the rights of the poor, the insane, the children, and against children abuse. He published a small compendium of chemistry, he was one of the thirteen members who create the British Geological Society and is recognized as one of the founders of paleontology; as was Georges Cuvier (1769-1832), he remained a strong supporter of creationism and catastrophism. Distinguished oryctologist, he gave his name to several fossils, mainly molluscs. PMID:23508322

  19. [Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common finding in Parkinson's disease (PD), even in the early stages. The concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in PD was recently formalized with diagnosis being reached after impairments in neuropsychological tasks become significant in at least one domain. The brain profile of cognitive deficits involves executive functions (e. g., planning, set shifting, set maintenance, problem solving), attention and memory function. Memory deficits are characterized by impairments in delayed recall, temporal ordering and conditional associate learning. PD patients demonstrate relatively preserved recognition. Visuospatial dysfunctions have also been reported, while language is largely preserved. The existence of two distinct mild cognitive syndromes has also been suggested. One of these affects mainly the frontostriatal executive deficits that are modulated by dopaminergic medications and by a genetically determined level of prefrontal cortex dopamine release. The other affects the more-posterior cortical abilities, such as visuospatial and memory functions, and is suggested to be associated with an increased risk for conversion to dementia. Cross-sectional studies have commonly reported dementia in 20-30% of PD patients, although the 8-year cumulative incidence of dementia may be as high as 78%. Factors associated with dementia in PD are age at onset, age at the time of examination, akinetic-rigid form PD, depression, hallucination, rapid eye movement sleep behavioral disorder and severe olfactory deficits. Clinical features generally involve the same type of deficits as those found in MCI patients, which are more severe and more extensive. The phenomenology of the dementia syndrome is similar to that seen in dementia with Lewy bodies, and clinicopathological correlation studies have revealed varying results with regard to neurochemical deficits and the pathological substrate underlying cognitive impairment and dementia. Early cognitive

  20. Identification of TMEM230 mutations in familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Han-Xiang; Shi, Yong; Yang, Yi; Ahmeti, Kreshnik B; Miller, Nimrod; Huang, Cao; Cheng, Lijun; Zhai, Hong; Deng, Sheng; Nuytemans, Karen; Corbett, Nicola J; Kim, Myung Jong; Deng, Hao; Tang, Beisha; Yang, Ziquang; Xu, Yanming; Chan, Piu; Huang, Bo; Gao, Xiao-Ping; Song, Zhi; Liu, Zhenhua; Fecto, Faisal; Siddique, Nailah; Foroud, Tatiana; Jankovic, Joseph; Ghetti, Bernardino; Nicholson, Daniel A; Krainc, Dimitri; Melen, Onur; Vance, Jeffery M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Ma, Yong-Chao; Rajput, Ali H; Siddique, Teepu

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatment. It is generally sporadic with unknown etiology. However, genetic studies of rare familial forms have led to the identification of mutations in several genes, which are linked to typical Parkinson's disease or parkinsonian disorders. The pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease remains largely elusive. Here we report a locus for autosomal dominant, clinically typical and Lewy body-confirmed Parkinson's disease on the short arm of chromosome 20 (20pter-p12) and identify TMEM230 as the disease-causing gene. We show that TMEM230 encodes a transmembrane protein of secretory/recycling vesicles, including synaptic vesicles in neurons. Disease-linked TMEM230 mutants impair synaptic vesicle trafficking. Our data provide genetic evidence that a mutant transmembrane protein of synaptic vesicles in neurons is etiologically linked to Parkinson's disease, with implications for understanding the pathogenic mechanism of Parkinson's disease and for developing rational therapies.

  1. Identification of TMEM230 mutations in familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Han-Xiang; Shi, Yong; Yang, Yi; Ahmeti, Kreshnik B; Miller, Nimrod; Huang, Cao; Cheng, Lijun; Zhai, Hong; Deng, Sheng; Nuytemans, Karen; Corbett, Nicola J; Kim, Myung Jong; Deng, Hao; Tang, Beisha; Yang, Ziquang; Xu, Yanming; Chan, Piu; Huang, Bo; Gao, Xiao-Ping; Song, Zhi; Liu, Zhenhua; Fecto, Faisal; Siddique, Nailah; Foroud, Tatiana; Jankovic, Joseph; Ghetti, Bernardino; Nicholson, Daniel A; Krainc, Dimitri; Melen, Onur; Vance, Jeffery M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Ma, Yong-Chao; Rajput, Ali H; Siddique, Teepu

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatment. It is generally sporadic with unknown etiology. However, genetic studies of rare familial forms have led to the identification of mutations in several genes, which are linked to typical Parkinson's disease or parkinsonian disorders. The pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease remains largely elusive. Here we report a locus for autosomal dominant, clinically typical and Lewy body-confirmed Parkinson's disease on the short arm of chromosome 20 (20pter-p12) and identify TMEM230 as the disease-causing gene. We show that TMEM230 encodes a transmembrane protein of secretory/recycling vesicles, including synaptic vesicles in neurons. Disease-linked TMEM230 mutants impair synaptic vesicle trafficking. Our data provide genetic evidence that a mutant transmembrane protein of synaptic vesicles in neurons is etiologically linked to Parkinson's disease, with implications for understanding the pathogenic mechanism of Parkinson's disease and for developing rational therapies. PMID:27270108

  2. Parkinsonism and occupational exposure to pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Engel, L; Checkoway, H; Keifer, M; Seixas, N; Longstreth, W; Scott, K; Hudnell, K; Anger, W; Camicioli, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the risk of parkinsonism related to lifetime occupational exposure to pesticides among a cohort of men, mostly orchardists, in Washington State.
METHODS—All 310 subjects in this study had previously participated in a cohort study of men occupationally exposed to pesticides. Subjects were given a structured neurological examination and completed a self administered questionnaire which elicited detailed information on pesticide (insecticide, herbicide, and fungicide) use throughout their working careers. Demographic characteristics were also sought. Subjects had a mean age of 69.6 years (range 49-96, SD 8.1). There were 238 (76.8%) subjects who reported some occupational exposure to pesticides, whereas 72 (23.2%) reported none. Parkinsonism was defined by the presence of two or more of rest tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and impairment of postural reflexes in subjects not on antiparkinsonian medication, or the presence of at least one sign if they were on such medication. Parkinson's disease was not studied explicitly because of the difficulty in distinguishing it from other parkinsonian syndromes. A generalised linear model was used to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) for parkinsonism relative to history of farming, pesticide use, and use of well water.
RESULTS—A PR of 2.0 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.0 to 4.2) was found for subjects in the highest tertile of years of exposure to pesticides; a similarly increased, non-significant, PR was found for the middle tertile (1.9 (95% CI 0.9 to 4.0)), although a trend test did not show a significant exposure-response relation. No increased risks were found associated with specific pesticides or pesticide classes, nor with a history of farming or use of well water.
CONCLUSION—Parkinsonism may be associated with long term occupational exposure to pesticides, although no associations with specific pesticides could be detected. This finding is consistent with most of the

  3. A mixed-methods study into ballet for people living with Parkinson's1

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Sara; McGill, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Background: Parkinson's is a neurological disease that is physically debilitating and can be socially isolating. Dance is growing in popularity for people with Parkinson's and claims have been made for its benefits. The paper details a mixed-methods study that examined a 12-week dance project for people with Parkinson's, led by English National Ballet. Methods: The effects on balance, stability and posture were measured through the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale and a plumb-line analysis. The value of participation and movement quality were interpreted through ethnographic methods, grounded theory and Effort analysis. Results: Triangulation of results indicates that people were highly motivated, with 100% adherence, and valued the classes as an important part of their lives. Additionally, results indicated an improvement in balance and stability, although not in posture. Conclusions: Dancing may offer benefit to people with Parkinson's through its intellectual, artistic, social and physical aspects. The paper suggests that a range of research methods is fundamental to capture the importance of multifaceted activity, such as dance, to those with Parkinson's. PMID:23805165

  4. Is the Parkinson Anxiety Scale comparable across raters?

    PubMed

    Forjaz, Maria João; Ayala, Alba; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Dujardin, Kathy; Pontone, Gregory M; Starkstein, Sergio E; Weintraub, Daniel; Leentjens, Albert F G

    2015-04-01

    The Parkinson Anxiety Scale is a new scale developed to measure anxiety severity in Parkinson's disease specifically. It consists of three dimensions: persistent anxiety, episodic anxiety, and avoidance behavior. This study aimed to assess the measurement properties of the scale while controlling for the rater (self- vs. clinician-rated) effect. The Parkinson Anxiety Scale was administered to a cross-sectional multicenter international sample of 362 Parkinson's disease patients. Both patients and clinicians rated the patient's anxiety independently. A many-facet Rasch model design was applied to estimate and remove the rater effect. The following measurement properties were assessed: fit to the Rasch model, unidimensionality, reliability, differential item functioning, item local independency, interrater reliability (self or clinician), and scale targeting. In addition, test-retest stability, construct validity, precision, and diagnostic properties of the Parkinson Anxiety Scale were also analyzed. A good fit to the Rasch model was obtained for Parkinson Anxiety Scale dimensions A and B, after the removal of one item and rescoring of the response scale for certain items, whereas dimension C showed marginal fit. Self versus clinician rating differences were of small magnitude, with patients reporting higher anxiety levels than clinicians. The linear measure for Parkinson Anxiety Scale dimensions A and B showed good convergent construct with other anxiety measures and good diagnostic properties. Parkinson Anxiety Scale modified dimensions A and B provide valid and reliable measures of anxiety in Parkinson's disease that are comparable across raters. Further studies are needed with dimension C.

  5. Metabolic Syndrome: An Important Risk Factor for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is becoming commoner due to a rise in obesity rates among adults. Generally speaking, a person with metabolic syndrome is twice as likely to develop cardiovascular disease and five times as likely to develop diabetes as someone without metabolic syndrome. Increasing oxidative stress in metabolic syndrome and Parkinson's disease is mentioned in the comprehensive articles; however, the system review about clear relation between metabolic syndrome and Parkinson's disease is deficient. In this review, we will focus on the analysis that the metabolic syndrome may be a risk factor for Parkinson's disease and the preventions that reduce the incident of Parkinson's disease by regulating the oxidative stress. PMID:24955210

  6. Spinal Surgery Complications and Failures in Patients with Parkinsons Disease.

    PubMed

    Sapkas, George S; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papastathis, Elias; Tsiavos, Kostas; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Galanopoulos, Ioannis; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system affecting the substantia nigra in the midbrain. It accounts for 1.5% of the population in Europe over 60 years of age. Recent advances in the medical treatment of Parkinson's disease have improved the quality of life and life expectancy of the patients. However, it remains a debilitating disease. Spinal disorders are frequent in these patients, and as the population ages, more patients with Parkinson's disease are expected to require spinal surgery. Spinal surgery in patients with Parkinson's disease has been associated with an exceptionally high rate of complications; failures and reoperations are common, and patient outcomes are dismal.

  7. Increased risk of parkinsonism associated with welding exposure

    PubMed Central

    Racette, Brad A.; Criswell, Susan R.; Lundin, Jessica I.; Hobson, Angela; Seixas, Noah; Kotzbauer, Paul T.; Evanoff, Bradley A.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Zhang, Jing; Sheppard, Lianne; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Objective Manganese (Mn), an established neurotoxicant, is a common component of welding fume. The neurological phenotype associated with welding exposures has not been well described. Prior epidemiologic evidence linking occupational welding to parkinsonism is mixed, and remains controversial. Methods This was a cross-sectional and nested case–control study to investigate the prevalence and phenotype of parkinsonism among 811 shipyard and fabrication welders recruited from trade unions. Two reference groups included 59 non-welder trade workers and 118 newly diagnosed, untreated idiopathic PD patients. Study subjects were examined by a movement disorders specialist using the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor subsection 3 (UPDRS3). Parkinsonism cases were defined as welders with UPDRS3 score ≥15. Normal was defined as UPDRS3 < 6. Exposure was classified as intensity adjusted, cumulative years of welding. Adjusted prevalence ratios for parkinsonism were calculated in relation to quartiles of welding years. Results The overall prevalence estimate of parkinsonism was 15.6% in welding exposed workers compared to 0% in the reference group. Among welders, we observed a U-shaped dose–response relation between weighted welding exposure-years and parkinsonism. UPDRS3 scores for most domains were similar between welders and newly diagnosed idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) patients, except for greater frequency of rest tremor and asymmetry in PD patients. Conclusion This work-site based study among welders demonstrates a high prevalence of parkinsonism compared to nonwelding-exposed workers and a clinical phenotype that overlaps substantially with PD. PMID:22975422

  8. Naturally- and experimentally-designed restorations of the Parkin gene deficit in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Hirohide; Hirano, Makito; Kiriyama, Takao; Ikeda, Masanori; Ueno, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Intranuclear events due to mutations in the Parkin gene remain elusive in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP). We identified a mutant PARKIN protein in fibroblast cultures from a pair of siblings with ARJP who were homozygous for the exon 4-deleted Parkin gene. Disease was mild in one patient and debilitating in the other. The detected mutant, encoded by a transcript lacking exon 3 as well as exon 4, is an in-frame deletion that removes 121 aa, resulting in a 344-aa protein (PaDel3,4). Cell culture and transfection studies revealed negative correlations between expression levels of PaDel3,4 and those of cell cycle proteins, including cyclin E, CDK2, ppRb, and E2F-1, and demonstrated that GFP-PaDel3,4 entered nucleus and ubiquitinated cyclin E as a part of SCF{sup hSel-10} ligase complex in the patient cells. In addition, nuclear localization signal-tagged PaDel3,4 expressed in the transfected patient cells most effectively ubiquitinated cyclin E and reduced DNA damage, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Antisense-oligonucleotide treatment promoted skipping of exon 3 and thus generated PaDel3,4, increasing cell survival. Collectively, we propose that naturally- and experimentally-induced exon skipping at least partly restores the mutant Parkin gene deficit, providing a molecular basis for the development of therapeutic exon skipping.

  9. Atropinic (Anticholinergic) Burden in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    De Germay, Sibylle; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Rousseau, Vanessa; Chebane, Leila; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle; Moulis, Florence; Durrieu, Genevieve; Bagheri, Haleh; Rascol, Olivier; Pariente, Antoine; Bégaud, Bernard; Montastruc, François

    2016-05-01

    Use of atropinic drugs remains controversial in Parkinson's disease (PD) because there is insufficient evidence about their efficacy and they can induce serious adverse drug reactions. Atropinic risk scales were developed to help to identify atropinic drugs in prescription forms and to evaluate their burden in clinical practice. In the present review, we discuss the few studies investigating atropinic burden in PD and present the results of our study indicating that atropinic drugs are still widely prescribed in PD (almost 3 of 5 prescriptions) with a clinically significant atropinic burden in around 1 of 6 PD patients. Drugs mainly responsible for high values of atropinic burden were those used for nonmotor symptoms. Clinically significant atropinic burdens were mainly induced by associations of several "low-risk" drugs. Physicians must be aware that in addition to classical atropinic antiparkinsonian drugs, many others (psychotropics) can contribute to increased atropinic burden in PD patients. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27028036

  10. Recall and recognition memory in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Breen, E K

    1993-03-01

    This study is concerned with recall and recognition memory in patients with Parkinson's disease. The results show that the Parkinson group was significantly impaired on tests of free recall compared to a group of age matched controls. By contrast, when given tests of recognition memory for the same items their performance was practically identical. In recall, significant main effects are reported for serial position and list presentation but no qualitative differences were observed between the two groups on these measures, both of which showed a primacy and recency effect. However, the control subjects recalled significantly more words in their original order of presentation than the patient group, a difference which appears to have occurred at the level of input. It was concluded that although the patient group was able to adopt and use similar strategies to the control subjects, they were less efficient in using these, a difficulty which was attributed to limited capacity due to mental slowness.

  11. Diagnosing Parkinson's Diseases Using Fuzzy Neural System

    PubMed Central

    Abiyev, Rahib H.; Abizade, Sanan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the design of the recognition system that will discriminate between healthy people and people with Parkinson's disease. A diagnosing of Parkinson's diseases is performed using fusion of the fuzzy system and neural networks. The structure and learning algorithms of the proposed fuzzy neural system (FNS) are presented. The approach described in this paper allows enhancing the capability of the designed system and efficiently distinguishing healthy individuals. It was proved through simulation of the system that has been performed using data obtained from UCI machine learning repository. A comparative study was carried out and the simulation results demonstrated that the proposed fuzzy neural system improves the recognition rate of the designed system. PMID:26881009

  12. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Doraiswamy, M; Martin, W; Metz, A; Deveaugh-Geiss, J

    1995-09-01

    1. This article reviews the prevalence, diagnosis, pathophysiology and management of psychosis in Parkinson's disease. 2. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease has been associated with all antiparkinsonian medications. The most common symptoms are vivid disturbing dreams, visual hallucinations and paranoid delusions. 3. The emergence of psychosis reduces the patient's functional capacity and increases caregiver burden. It also poses a therapeutic dilemma because effective treatment of psychotic symptoms may result in worsening of motor symptoms and vice versa. 4. Increased physician awareness is essential for proper diagnosis and management. Withdrawal of anticholinergic medications and amantadine followed by levodopa dose adjustment is effective in many patients. 5. Atypical neuroleptics, in low doses, may be successful when other measures have failed. However, these agents are not approved for treating Parkinsonian psychosis and must be considered as investigational therapies.

  13. When did Ray Kennedy's Parkinson's disease begin?

    PubMed

    Lees, A J

    1992-01-01

    Ray Kennedy's Parkinson's disease probably began during his distinguished career as a professional soccer player at least 10 years before the first unequivocal physical signs and 14 years before the diagnosis was finally made, when he was 35-years old. Early prodromal symptoms included intermittent subtle disturbances of movement and posture affecting the right arm and leg, mild facial immobility, episodes of profound malaise and lack of energy, inner feelings of tremulousness, excessive unprovoked bouts of perspiration, and accompanying feelings of heat. Abnormalities of movement in the right arm can be seen in video footage of soccer games up to 8 years before his disability came to medical attention. Many of his premorbid personality traits are characteristic of those believed to be associated with the subsequent development of the malady. At least in some patients with Parkinson's disease, the search for instigating aetiological factors should focus 10-20 years before the cardinal signs can be recognised with certainty.

  14. Protective Mechanisms of Flavonoids in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magalingam, Kasthuri Bai; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic, debilitating neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta region in human midbrain. To date, oxidative stress is the well accepted concept in the etiology and progression of Parkinson's disease. Hence, the therapeutic agent is targeted against suppressing and alleviating the oxidative stress-induced cellular damage. Within the past decades, an explosion of research discoveries has reported on the protective mechanisms of flavonoids, which are plant-based polyphenols, in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease using both in vitro and in vivo models. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature on the neuroprotective mechanisms of flavonoids in protecting the dopaminergic neurons hence reducing the symptoms of this movement disorder. The mechanism reviewed includes effect of flavonoids in activation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, suppressing the lipid peroxidation, inhibition of inflammatory mediators, flavonoids as a mitochondrial target therapy, and modulation of gene expression in neuronal cells. PMID:26576219

  15. Anhedonia in Parkinson's disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Loas, Gwenolé; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Godefroy, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of anhedonia, the lowered ability to experience pleasure, in Parkinson's disease (PD). The definition, measurement, relationships with depression and apathy in PD, treatment, and hyperhedonia related to impulse-control disorder are presented and discussed. The authors present the value of a more circumscribed definition of anhedonia taking into account the distinction between anticipatory and consummatory anhedonia and propose various research approaches.

  16. Small intestine dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Justyna; Szlufik, Stanisław; Nieciecki, Michał; Charzyńska, Ingeborga; Królicki, Leszek; Smektała, Piotr; Friedman, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the small bowel transit time in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten patients with PD with no gastrointestinal complaints and ten healthy control subjects were investigated using single photon emission computed tomography fused with computed tomography after swallowing of a specially prepared capsule containing technetium 99m, which allowed visualization of the passage in the intestines. Preliminary results show that the small intestine passage in PD patients was prolonged compared to controls.

  17. MDS clinical diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Postuma, Ronald B; Berg, Daniela; Stern, Matthew; Poewe, Werner; Olanow, C Warren; Oertel, Wolfgang; Obeso, José; Marek, Kenneth; Litvan, Irene; Lang, Anthony E; Halliday, Glenda; Goetz, Christopher G; Gasser, Thomas; Dubois, Bruno; Chan, Piu; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Adler, Charles H; Deuschl, Günther

    2015-10-01

    This document presents the Movement Disorder Society Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Parkinson's disease (PD). The Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria are intended for use in clinical research but also may be used to guide clinical diagnosis. The benchmark for these criteria is expert clinical diagnosis; the criteria aim to systematize the diagnostic process, to make it reproducible across centers and applicable by clinicians with less expertise in PD diagnosis. Although motor abnormalities remain central, increasing recognition has been given to nonmotor manifestations; these are incorporated into both the current criteria and particularly into separate criteria for prodromal PD. Similar to previous criteria, the Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria retain motor parkinsonism as the core feature of the disease, defined as bradykinesia plus rest tremor or rigidity. Explicit instructions for defining these cardinal features are included. After documentation of parkinsonism, determination of PD as the cause of parkinsonism relies on three categories of diagnostic features: absolute exclusion criteria (which rule out PD), red flags (which must be counterbalanced by additional supportive criteria to allow diagnosis of PD), and supportive criteria (positive features that increase confidence of the PD diagnosis). Two levels of certainty are delineated: clinically established PD (maximizing specificity at the expense of reduced sensitivity) and probable PD (which balances sensitivity and specificity). The Movement Disorder Society criteria retain elements proven valuable in previous criteria and omit aspects that are no longer justified, thereby encapsulating diagnosis according to current knowledge. As understanding of PD expands, the Movement Disorder Society criteria will need continuous revision to accommodate these advances.

  18. Parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam.

    PubMed

    Steele, John C

    2005-08-01

    On Guam and in two other Pacific locales, indigenous residents and immigrants are prone to familial neurodegeneration that manifests as atypical parkinsonism, dementia, motor neuron disease, or a combination of these three phenotypes. This progressive and fatal disease of the Mariana islands, the Kii peninsula of Japan, and the coastal plain of West New Guinea is similar and the pathological features have close affiliation with universal tauopathies, including progressive supranuclear palsy, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The Chamorros of Guam call the disease lytico-bodig, and neuroscientists refer to it as the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism-dementia complex. During recent decades, its prevalence has declined progressively, and the age at onset has steadily increased. In 2004, motor neuron disease, once 100 times more common than elsewhere is rare, atypical parkinsonism is declining, and only dementia remains unusually common in elderly females. The cause of this obscure malady remains uncertain, despite 60 years of international research, but its ending implicates environmental influences rather than genetic predisposition.

  19. Instruments for holistic assessment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martin, Pablo

    2013-04-01

    Assessment of Parkinson's disease is a complex matter as a consequence of the variety of manifestations and complications that can be present in a patient. Although a really holistic assessment is probably a utopia, a comprehensive evaluation is possible using a combination of measures completed by health professionals, patients and/or caregivers. In PD, main domains requiring assessment include motor impairment, motor complications, non-motor symptoms, disability, and patient-reported outcomes. Such scales like the Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the battery of Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease (SCOPA) provide a wide information on the most relevant aspects of the disease. Hoehn and Yahr staging, global impression, and quality of life measures furnish summarized whole evaluations and comprehensive non-motor symptom assessments help to identify and evaluate this kind of manifestations. This article shows a pragmatic review of common instruments (rating scales and questionnaires) usable for a comprehensive assessment of PD and provides information about sources for guiding the selection of measures and outcome analyses. PMID:23474821

  20. Instruments for holistic assessment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martin, Pablo

    2013-04-01

    Assessment of Parkinson's disease is a complex matter as a consequence of the variety of manifestations and complications that can be present in a patient. Although a really holistic assessment is probably a utopia, a comprehensive evaluation is possible using a combination of measures completed by health professionals, patients and/or caregivers. In PD, main domains requiring assessment include motor impairment, motor complications, non-motor symptoms, disability, and patient-reported outcomes. Such scales like the Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the battery of Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease (SCOPA) provide a wide information on the most relevant aspects of the disease. Hoehn and Yahr staging, global impression, and quality of life measures furnish summarized whole evaluations and comprehensive non-motor symptom assessments help to identify and evaluate this kind of manifestations. This article shows a pragmatic review of common instruments (rating scales and questionnaires) usable for a comprehensive assessment of PD and provides information about sources for guiding the selection of measures and outcome analyses.

  1. Non-motor Parkinson's: integral to motor Parkinson's, yet often neglected

    PubMed Central

    Todorova, Antoniya; Jenner, Peter; Ray Chaudhuri, K

    2014-01-01

    Non-motor symptoms are a key component of Parkinson's disease, possibly representing a clinical biomarker of its premotor phase. The burden of non-motor symptoms can define a patient's health-related quality of life. Non-motor symptoms substantially increase the cost of care—requiring increased hospitalisation and treatment—and pose a major challenge to healthcare professionals. However, clinicians often regard non-motor symptoms and their management as peripheral to that of the motor symptoms. Here, we address the clinical issues and unmet needs of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. PMID:24699931

  2. The Effects of Levodopa on Word Intelligibility in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Letter, Miet; Santens, Patrick; Van Borsel, John

    2005-01-01

    Dysarthria is a common manifestation in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. This study investigated the effects of levodopa on intelligibility in patients with Parkinson's disease. Ten participants were tested during on- and off-states using the Yorkston and Beukelman intelligibility test (1980). Intelligibility as scored by a panel of…

  3. Clear Speech Variants: An Acoustic Study in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated how different variants of clear speech affect segmental and suprasegmental acoustic measures of speech in speakers with Parkinson's disease and a healthy control group. Method: A total of 14 participants with Parkinson's disease and 14 control participants served as speakers. Each speaker produced 18 different…

  4. Exercise Training and Parkinson's Disease: Placebo or Essential Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Iris; Engelhardt, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Exercise training is often recommended for people with Parkinson's disease, though there is debate about the pathophysiologic cause of impaired movement in Parkinsonism which makes it difficult to develop a specific exercise treatment for symptoms that include hypokinesia, tremor, and muscular rigidity. Most published studies show a benefit of…

  5. Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2011-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

  6. Inverse Association of Parkinson Disease With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Te-Yu; Shen, Chih-Hao; Chou, Yu-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effects of the inflammatory mediators involved in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) on subsequent Parkinson disease have been reported, but no relevant studies have focused on the association between the 2 diseases. This nationwide population-based study evaluated the risk of Parkinson disease in patients with SLE. We identified 12,817 patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance database diagnosed with SLE between 2000 and 2010 and compared the incidence rate of Parkinson disease among these patients with that among 51,268 randomly selected age and sex-matched non-SLE patients. A Cox multivariable proportional-hazards model was used to evaluate the risk factors of Parkinson disease in the SLE cohort. We observed an inverse association between a diagnosis of SLE and the risk of subsequent Parkinson disease, with the crude hazard ratio (HR) being 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.45–0.79) and adjusted HR being 0.68 (95% confidence interval 0.51–0.90). The cumulative incidence of Parkinson disease was 0.83% lower in the SLE cohort than in the non-SLE cohort. The adjusted HR of Parkinson disease decreased as the follow-up duration increased and was decreased among older lupus patients with comorbidity. We determined that patients with SLE had a decreased risk of subsequent Parkinson disease. Further research is required to elucidate the underlying mechanism. PMID:26579824

  7. "PINK1"-Linked Parkinsonism Is Associated with Lewy Body Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samaranch, Lluis; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Arbelo, Jose M.; Ferrer, Isidre; Lorenzo, Elena; Irigoyen, Jaione; Pastor, Maria A.; Marrero, Carmen; Isla, Concepcion; Herrera-Henriquez, Joanna; Pastor, Pau

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 gene mutations have been associated with autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease. To date, no neuropathological reports have been published from patients with Parkinson's disease with both phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 gene copies mutated. We analysed…

  8. Pink Light on Mitochondria in Autoimmunity and Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Mantegazza, Adriana R; Marks, Michael S

    2016-07-12

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and T cell autoimmunity have been independently implicated in Parkinson disease pathogenesis. In a recent publication in Cell, Matheoud et al. (2016) link them by describing a new mechanism, activated in familial forms of Parkinson disease, in which mitochondrial proteins are processed for recognition by CD8+ T cells. PMID:27411006

  9. Parkinson's disease. Diagnosis and the initiation of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, V; Weiner, W J

    2005-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common cause of parkinsonism. Parkinsonism is characterized by resting tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and gait impairment. There is no specific diagnostic test for PD and it is important for clinicians to understand the clinical signs which help to distinguish PD from parkinsonism. It is equally important to be aware of the clinical signs which can be an indication that the diagnosis is not PD. These so-called Parkinson-plus syndromes include progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple systems atrophy (MSA), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), vascular parkinsonism (VP) and parkinsonism with dementia (Lewy body dementia, LBD). The differential diagnosis of parkinsonism will be discussed. Initiating pharmacologic therapy for PD must take into consideration the degree of dysfunction the patient is experiencing, the question of neuroprotection, the degree of motor response required, and the potential complications of long-term treatment. Neuropro-tective trials of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ), vitamin C, vitamin E, monoamine oxidase B inhibitors (MAO-I) and dopamine agonists do not support the use of any of these drugs for a neuroprotective effect. There is recent supportive evidence that levodopa may have a neuroprotective effect. Either dopamine agonists or levodopa may be initiated. Dopamine agonists are associated with fewer motor fluctuations and dyskinesias, while levodopa is associated with better motor performance. Initiation of therapy should be tailored to individual patients with the emphasis on symptom control, with the hope that new approaches to treatment of PD (including neuroprotection) will be forthcoming.

  10. Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... areas of its research: MedlinePlus . medlineplus.gov . Type "Parkinson's disease" in the Search box. NIHSeniorHealth —Parkinson's Disease http:// ...

  11. Technology in Parkinson's disease: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; Bonato, Paolo; Nahab, Fatta B; Maetzler, Walter; Dean, John M; Klucken, Jochen; Eskofier, Bjoern M; Merola, Aristide; Horak, Fay; Lang, Anthony E; Reilmann, Ralf; Giuffrida, Joe; Nieuwboer, Alice; Horne, Malcolm; Little, Max A; Litvan, Irene; Simuni, Tanya; Dorsey, E Ray; Burack, Michelle A; Kubota, Ken; Kamondi, Anita; Godinho, Catarina; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Mitsi, Georgia; Krinke, Lothar; Hausdorff, Jeffery M; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Papapetropoulos, Spyros

    2016-09-01

    The miniaturization, sophistication, proliferation, and accessibility of technologies are enabling the capture of more and previously inaccessible phenomena in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, more information has not translated into a greater understanding of disease complexity to satisfy diagnostic and therapeutic needs. Challenges include noncompatible technology platforms, the need for wide-scale and long-term deployment of sensor technology (among vulnerable elderly patients in particular), and the gap between the "big data" acquired with sensitive measurement technologies and their limited clinical application. Major opportunities could be realized if new technologies are developed as part of open-source and/or open-hardware platforms that enable multichannel data capture sensitive to the broad range of motor and nonmotor problems that characterize PD and are adaptable into self-adjusting, individualized treatment delivery systems. The International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society Task Force on Technology is entrusted to convene engineers, clinicians, researchers, and patients to promote the development of integrated measurement and closed-loop therapeutic systems with high patient adherence that also serve to (1) encourage the adoption of clinico-pathophysiologic phenotyping and early detection of critical disease milestones, (2) enhance the tailoring of symptomatic therapy, (3) improve subgroup targeting of patients for future testing of disease-modifying treatments, and (4) identify objective biomarkers to improve the longitudinal tracking of impairments in clinical care and research. This article summarizes the work carried out by the task force toward identifying challenges and opportunities in the development of technologies with potential for improving the clinical management and the quality of life of individuals with PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  12. DNAJC13 mutations in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Rajput, Alex; Milnerwood, Austen J.; Shah, Brinda; Szu-Tu, Chelsea; Trinh, Joanne; Yu, Irene; Encarnacion, Mary; Munsie, Lise N.; Tapia, Lucia; Gustavsson, Emil K.; Chou, Patrick; Tatarnikov, Igor; Evans, Daniel M.; Pishotta, Frederick T.; Volta, Mattia; Beccano-Kelly, Dayne; Thompson, Christina; Lin, Michelle K.; Sherman, Holly E.; Han, Heather J.; Guenther, Bruce L.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Bernard, Virginie; Ross, Colin J.; Appel-Cresswell, Silke; Stoessl, A. Jon; Robinson, Christopher A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ross, Owen A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Aasly, Jan O.; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Hentati, Faycal; Gibson, Rachel A.; McPherson, Peter S.; Girard, Martine; Rajput, Michele; Rajput, Ali H.; Farrer, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    A Saskatchewan multi-incident family was clinically characterized with Parkinson disease (PD) and Lewy body pathology. PD segregates as an autosomal-dominant trait, which could not be ascribed to any known mutation. DNA from three affected members was subjected to exome sequencing. Genome alignment, variant annotation and comparative analyses were used to identify shared coding mutations. Sanger sequencing was performed within the extended family and ethnically matched controls. Subsequent genotyping was performed in a multi-ethnic case–control series consisting of 2928 patients and 2676 control subjects from Canada, Norway, Taiwan, Tunisia, and the USA. A novel mutation in receptor-mediated endocytosis 8/RME-8 (DNAJC13 p.Asn855Ser) was found to segregate with disease. Screening of cases and controls identified four additional patients with the mutation, of which two had familial parkinsonism. All carriers shared an ancestral DNAJC13 p.Asn855Ser haplotype and claimed Dutch–German–Russian Mennonite heritage. DNAJC13 regulates the dynamics of clathrin coats on early endosomes. Cellular analysis shows that the mutation confers a toxic gain-of-function and impairs endosomal transport. DNAJC13 immunoreactivity was also noted within Lewy body inclusions. In late-onset disease which is most reminiscent of idiopathic PD subtle deficits in endosomal receptor-sorting/recycling are highlighted by the discovery of pathogenic mutations VPS35, LRRK2 and now DNAJC13. With this latest discovery, and from a neuronal perspective, a temporal and functional ecology is emerging that connects synaptic exo- and endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, endosomal recycling and the endo-lysosomal degradative pathway. Molecular deficits in these processes are genetically linked to the phenotypic spectrum of parkinsonism associated with Lewy body pathology. PMID:24218364

  13. Technology in Parkinson's disease: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; Bonato, Paolo; Nahab, Fatta B; Maetzler, Walter; Dean, John M; Klucken, Jochen; Eskofier, Bjoern M; Merola, Aristide; Horak, Fay; Lang, Anthony E; Reilmann, Ralf; Giuffrida, Joe; Nieuwboer, Alice; Horne, Malcolm; Little, Max A; Litvan, Irene; Simuni, Tanya; Dorsey, E Ray; Burack, Michelle A; Kubota, Ken; Kamondi, Anita; Godinho, Catarina; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Mitsi, Georgia; Krinke, Lothar; Hausdorff, Jeffery M; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Papapetropoulos, Spyros

    2016-09-01

    The miniaturization, sophistication, proliferation, and accessibility of technologies are enabling the capture of more and previously inaccessible phenomena in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, more information has not translated into a greater understanding of disease complexity to satisfy diagnostic and therapeutic needs. Challenges include noncompatible technology platforms, the need for wide-scale and long-term deployment of sensor technology (among vulnerable elderly patients in particular), and the gap between the "big data" acquired with sensitive measurement technologies and their limited clinical application. Major opportunities could be realized if new technologies are developed as part of open-source and/or open-hardware platforms that enable multichannel data capture sensitive to the broad range of motor and nonmotor problems that characterize PD and are adaptable into self-adjusting, individualized treatment delivery systems. The International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society Task Force on Technology is entrusted to convene engineers, clinicians, researchers, and patients to promote the development of integrated measurement and closed-loop therapeutic systems with high patient adherence that also serve to (1) encourage the adoption of clinico-pathophysiologic phenotyping and early detection of critical disease milestones, (2) enhance the tailoring of symptomatic therapy, (3) improve subgroup targeting of patients for future testing of disease-modifying treatments, and (4) identify objective biomarkers to improve the longitudinal tracking of impairments in clinical care and research. This article summarizes the work carried out by the task force toward identifying challenges and opportunities in the development of technologies with potential for improving the clinical management and the quality of life of individuals with PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27125836

  14. Evaluation of Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jagmag, Shail A.; Tripathi, Naveen; Shukla, Sunil D.; Maiti, Sankar; Khurana, Sukant

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. Animal models have contributed a large part to our understanding and therapeutics developed for treatment of PD. There are several more exhaustive reviews of literature that provide the initiated insights into the specific models; however a novel synthesis of the basic advantages and disadvantages of different models is much needed. Here we compare both neurotoxin based and genetic models while suggesting some novel avenues in PD modeling. We also highlight the problems faced and promises of all the mammalian models with the hope of providing a framework for comparison of various systems. PMID:26834536

  15. Parkinsonism as a Complication of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Walaa A.; Hashel, Jasem Y. Al; Kilany, Ayman; Altailji, Samira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between Parkinsonism and BS has already been reported in only three patients worldwide. CASE SUMMARY: We report a 39-years old Kuwaiti female who presented with parkinsonian features and mononeuropathy (carpal tunnel syndrome) 3 years after a vertical sleeve gastrectomy operation. CONCLUSION: We conclude that with the increasing popularity of bariatric surgery, clinicians will need to recognize and manage neurologic complications that may appear soon after or years to decades later. Thorough evaluation is essential for any patient who has undergone bariatric surgery and develops neurologic symptoms. PMID:27275313

  16. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, W R; Beckman, J H; Calne, D B; Adam, M J; Harrop, R; Rogers, J G; Ruth, T J; Sayre, C I; Pate, B D

    1984-02-01

    Local cerebral glucose utilization was measured in patients with predominantly unilateral Parkinson's disease using 18F-2-fluoro-deoxyglucose and positron emission tomography. Preliminary results indicate the presence of asymmetric metabolic rates in the inferior basal ganglia. The structure comprising the largest portion of basal ganglia at this level is globus pallidus. These findings are consistent with metabolic studies on animals with unilateral nigrostriatal lesions in which pallidal hypermetabolism on the lesioned side has been demonstrated. Increased pallidal activity is likely secondary to a loss of inhibitory dopaminergic input to the striatum from substantia nigra.

  17. Approach to the patient with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin E

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with motor, nonmotor, and behavioral findings. Imaging technology advances have allowed the characterization of the underlying pathologic changes to the brain and identification of specific lesions in dopaminergic neurons. Although certain imaging techniques allow for detection up to 20 years before the onset of motor symptoms, these advances have yet to produce meaningful treatments to halt the disease or reverse its course. Current treatments are directed at optimizing symptomatic management. Referral to a movement disorder specialist familiar with PD should be considered for providers with limited familiarity in diagnosis or treatment.

  18. Sialorrhea in Parkinson's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kelvin L; Evatt, Marian; Hinson, Vanessa; Kompoliti, Katie

    2007-12-01

    A significant number of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience sialorrhea. This problem can cause social embarrassment, and because saliva pools in the mouth, may lead to aspiration pneumonia. Sialorrhea in PD is thought to be caused by impaired or infrequent swallowing, rather than hypersecretion. Oral medications, botulinum toxin injections, surgical interventions, radiotherapy, speech therapy, and trials of devices may be used to treat sialorrhea in PD, but few controlled trials have been published. This article reviews current knowledge regarding the frequency, etiology, assessment, and treatment of sialorrhea in PD.

  19. Visual and spatial symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Davidsdottir, Sigurros; Cronin-Golomb, Alice; Lee, Alison

    2005-05-01

    The interaction of visual/visuospatial and motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) was investigated by means of a 31-item self-report questionnaire. The majority of 81 non-demented patients reported problems on non-motor tasks that depended on visual or visuospatial abilities. Over a third reported visual hallucinations, double vision and difficulty estimating spatial relations. Freezing of gait was associated with visual hallucinations, double vision and contrast sensitivity deficits. Visual strategies frequently were employed to overcome freezing. The results underscore the importance of investigating visual and visuospatial impairments in PD and their relation to motor symptoms, in order to help patients develop successful compensatory strategies.

  20. Complications of Therapy in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kofman, Oscar S.

    1983-01-01

    Despite several more effective combinations, the incidence of disability and intractable complications from levodopa therapy for Parkinson's disease is unchanged. Many of these appear to be related to the development of denervation hypersensitivity as well as to drug tolerance and loss of effect. They include dyskinesia, `wearing off' phenomenon, `on-off' phenomenon, and various psychic changes. More current forms of therapy with bromocriptine and drug holidays are described, emphasizing methods of preventing and controlling the incapacitating complications associated with long term drug therapy. Some future therapeutic considerations are also described. PMID:21286582

  1. Exercise for falls prevention in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Sherrington, Catherine; Lord, Stephen R.; Close, Jacqueline C.T.; Heritier, Stephane; Heller, Gillian Z.; Howard, Kirsten; Allen, Natalie E.; Latt, Mark D.; Murray, Susan M.; O'Rourke, Sandra D.; Paul, Serene S.; Song, Jooeun; Fung, Victor S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether falls can be prevented with minimally supervised exercise targeting potentially remediable fall risk factors, i.e., poor balance, reduced leg muscle strength, and freezing of gait, in people with Parkinson disease. Methods: Two hundred thirty-one people with Parkinson disease were randomized into exercise or usual-care control groups. Exercises were practiced for 40 to 60 minutes, 3 times weekly for 6 months. Primary outcomes were fall rates and proportion of fallers during the intervention period. Secondary outcomes were physical (balance, mobility, freezing of gait, habitual physical activity), psychological (fear of falling, affect), and quality-of-life measures. Results: There was no significant difference between groups in the rate of falls (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45–1.17, p = 0.18) or proportion of fallers (p = 0.45). Preplanned subgroup analysis revealed a significant interaction for disease severity (p < 0.001). In the lower disease severity subgroup, there were fewer falls in the exercise group compared with controls (IRR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.15–0.62, p < 0.001), while in the higher disease severity subgroup, there was a trend toward more falls in the exercise group (IRR = 1.61, 95% CI 0.86–3.03, p = 0.13). Postintervention, the exercise group scored significantly (p < 0.05) better than controls on the Short Physical Performance Battery, sit-to-stand, fear of falling, affect, and quality of life, after adjusting for baseline performance. Conclusions: An exercise program targeting balance, leg strength, and freezing of gait did not reduce falls but improved physical and psychological health. Falls were reduced in people with milder disease but not in those with more severe Parkinson disease. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with Parkinson disease, a minimally supervised exercise program does not reduce fall risk. This study lacked

  2. Transient and reversible parkinsonism after acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Arima, Hajime; Sobue, Kazuya; So, MinHye; Morishima, Tetsuro; Ando, Hirkoshi; Katsuya, Hirotada

    2003-01-01

    Parkinsonism is a rare complication in patients with organophosphate poisoning. To date there have been two cases of transient parkinsonism after acute and severe cholinergic crisis, both of which were successfully treated using amantadine, an anti-parkinsonism drug. We report on an 81-year-old woman who was admitted for the treatment of acute severe organophosphate poisoning. Although acute cholinergic crisis was treated successfully with large doses of atropine and 2-pyridine aldoxime methiodide (PAM), extrapyramidal manifestations were noticed on hospital day 6. The neurological symptoms worsened, and the diagnosis of parkinsonism was made by a neurologist on hospital day 9. Immediately, biperiden (5mg), an anti-parkinsonism drug, was administered intravenously, and her symptoms markedly improved. From the following day, biperiden (5 mg/day) was given intramuscularly for eight days. Subsequently, neurological symptoms did not relapse, and no drugs were required. Our patient is the third case of parkinsonism developing after an acute severe cholinergic crisis and the first case successfully treated with biperiden. Patients should be carefully observed for the presence of neurological signs in this kind of poisoning. If present, an anti-parkinsonism drug should be considered.

  3. Emerging preclinical pharmacological targets for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-05-17

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological condition caused by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia. It is the most prevalent form of Parkinsonism, categorized by cardinal features such as bradykinesia, rigidity, tremors, and postural instability. Due to the multicentric pathology of PD involving inflammation, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis, and protein aggregation, it has become difficult to pin-point a single therapeutic target and evaluate its potential application. Currently available drugs for treating PD provide only symptomatic relief and do not decrease or avert disease progression resulting in poor patient satisfaction and compliance. Significant amount of understanding concerning the pathophysiology of PD has offered a range of potential targets for PD. Several emerging targets including AAV-hAADC gene therapy, phosphodiesterase-4, potassium channels, myeloperoxidase, acetylcholinesterase, MAO-B, dopamine, A2A, mGlu5, and 5-HT-1A/1B receptors are in different stages of clinical development. Additionally, alternative interventions such as deep brain stimulation, thalamotomy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and gamma knife surgery, are also being developed for patients with advanced PD. As much as these therapeutic targets hold potential to delay the onset and reverse the disease, more targets and alternative interventions need to be examined in different stages of PD. In this review, we discuss various emerging preclinical pharmacological targets that may serve as a new promising neuroprotective strategy that could actually help alleviate PD and its symptoms. PMID:26988916

  4. Active music therapy and Parkinson's disease: methods.

    PubMed

    Pacchetti, C; Aglieri, R; Mancini, F; Martignoni, E; Nappi, G

    1998-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is an unconventional, multisensorial therapy poorly assessed in medical care but widely used to different ends in a variety of settings. MT has two branches: active and passive. In active MT the utilisation of instruments is structured to correspond to all sensory organs so as to obtain suitable motor and emotional responses. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the effects of MT in the neurorehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), a common degenerative disorder involving movement and emotional impairment. Sixteen PD patients took part in 13 weekly sessions of MT each lasting 2 hours. At the beginning and at the end of the session, every 2 weeks, the patients were evaluated by a neurologist, who assessed PD severity with UPDRS, emotional functions with Happiness Measures (HM) and quality of life using the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL). After every session a significant improvement in motor function, particularly in relation to hypokinesia, was observed both in the overall and in the pre-post session evaluations. HM, UPDRS-ADL and PDQL changes confirmed an improving effect of MT on emotional functions, activities of daily living and quality of life. In conclusion, active MT, operating at a multisensorial level, stimulates motor, affective and behavioural functions. Finally, we propose active MT as new method to include in PD rehabilitation programmes. This article describes the methods adopted during MT sessions with PD patients. PMID:9584875

  5. Optimizing diagnosis in Parkinson's disease: Radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Arena, Julieta E; Stoessl, A Jon

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and other disorders characterized by basal ganglia dysfunction are often associated with limited structural imaging changes that might assist in the clinical or research setting. Radionuclide imaging has been used to assess characteristic functional changes. Presynaptic dopaminergic dysfunction in PD can be revealed through the imaging of different steps in the process of dopamine synthesis and storage: L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity, Vesicular Monoamine Transporter type 2 (VMAT2) binding or its reuptake via the dopamine transporter (DAT). Postsynaptic dopamine dysfunction can also be studied with a variety of different tracers that primarily assess D2-like dopamine receptor availability. The function of other neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine, serotonin and acetylcholine can be imaged as well, giving important information about the underlying pathophysiologic process of PD and its complications. The imaging of metabolic activity and pathologic changes has also provided great advances in the field. Together, these techniques have allowed for a better understanding of PD, may be of aid for differentiating PD from other forms of parkinsonism and will undoubtedly be useful for the establishment of new therapeutic targets.

  6. Non motor subtypes and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Anna; Jenner, Peter; Todorova, Antoniya; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2016-01-01

    Non motor symptoms (NMS) represent a significant burden in Parkinson's disease (PD) with numerous studies highlighting the importance of NMS both in "pre-motor" phase of PD as well as throughout the course of disease. In part this has led the international Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (IPMDS) task force to attempt a re-definition of PD incorporating NMS and not base the diagnosis solely on motor symptoms. While motor subtypes within PD have been recognized and researched, recent clinical and neurobiological research suggests the existence of discrete non motor subtypes in PD, particularly in untreated (drug naïve) and early PD patients. Several independent observers have reported specific "clusters of NMS dominant PD" using a data driven approach in early and untreated PD patients while others have reported on the burden of NMS in untreated PD and specific NMS dominant phenotypes in untreated or treated PD using observational case series based data. In this review we report on specific NMS dominant phenotypes of PD as described in the literature using clinical observational studies and address pathophysiological concepts. A proposal for several NMS subtypes are reported combining clinical reports with, where possible, evidence base supporting probable biomarkers. PMID:26459660

  7. Parkinson's disease in Arabs: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Benamer, Hani T S; de Silva, Rajith; Siddiqui, Khurram A; Grosset, Donald G

    2008-07-15

    Studies of specific populations have provided invaluable knowledge about Parkinson's disease (PD), especially in the field of genetics. The present report systematically reviews the medical literature on PD in Arabs. Medline and Embase were searched, and 24 article were identified: genetic (n = 17), epidemiological (n = 3), and clinical series (n = 5). Both autosomal dominant and recessive forms of inherited PD are described, associated with four genes (Parkin, PINK1, LRRK2, and PARK9). The G2019S LRRK2 mutation is more common in both familial (37-42%) and apparently sporadic PD (41%) in North African Arabs than in Europeans and North Americans (2-3%). The incidence of PD is reported at 4.5 per 100,000 person-years and reported prevalence at 27 to 43 per 100,000 persons. Hospital-based clinical series suggest that parkinsonism is the commonest movement disorder. Clinical features of PD in Arabs are not significantly different from those reported elsewhere. PD was reported as the cause of dementia in around 7% of Arabs. The majority of studies relate to the role of genes in the etiology of PD in North African Arabs. Further genetic, epidemiological and clinical studies from the majority of Arabic countries may enhance our understanding of PD.

  8. [Neuropsychiatric non motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Peralta, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade we have witnessed substantial progress towards the understanding of Parkinson's disease. According to pathological and neuroimaging studies, the traditional view of Parkinson's disease that begins with the development of motor symptoms such as bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor, has begun to change. It is now understood that there would be a "premotor" or "preclinical" period in which the alphasynuclein pathology begins outside of the substantia nigra in the lower brainstem and autonomic nervous system. Although the pathophysiology of this phase is still unclear, it is currently thought that its symptoms would correspond to the so-called "non-motor symptoms". Hyposmia, depression, constipation and REM sleep disorders are one of the most relevant non-motor symptoms at this "premotor" stage. The spectrum of non-motor symptoms is very broad and covers the domains of neuropsychiatric, dysautonomic, gastrointestinal and sensory symptoms as well as sleep disorders. Neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, impulse control disorder, psychosis and dementia, are a major cause of disability as they are directly related to quality of life. PMID:23979552

  9. Parkinson's Disease: The Mitochondria-Iron Link.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Yorka; Carrasco, Carlos M; Campos, Joaquín D; Aguirre, Pabla; Núñez, Marco T

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage are conditions often found in damaged brain areas of Parkinson's disease. We propose that a causal link exists between these three events. Mitochondrial dysfunction results not only in increased reactive oxygen species production but also in decreased iron-sulfur cluster synthesis and unorthodox activation of Iron Regulatory Protein 1 (IRP1), a key regulator of cell iron homeostasis. In turn, IRP1 activation results in iron accumulation and hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. These three occurrences-mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage-generate a positive feedback loop of increased iron accumulation and oxidative stress. Here, we review the evidence that points to a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation as early events in the development of sporadic and genetic cases of Parkinson's disease. Finally, an attempt is done to contextualize the possible relationship between mitochondria dysfunction and iron dyshomeostasis. Based on published evidence, we propose that iron chelation-by decreasing iron-associated oxidative damage and by inducing cell survival and cell-rescue pathways-is a viable therapy for retarding this cycle. PMID:27293957

  10. Emerging preclinical pharmacological targets for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological condition caused by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia. It is the most prevalent form of Parkinsonism, categorized by cardinal features such as bradykinesia, rigidity, tremors, and postural instability. Due to the multicentric pathology of PD involving inflammation, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis, and protein aggregation, it has become difficult to pin-point a single therapeutic target and evaluate its potential application. Currently available drugs for treating PD provide only symptomatic relief and do not decrease or avert disease progression resulting in poor patient satisfaction and compliance. Significant amount of understanding concerning the pathophysiology of PD has offered a range of potential targets for PD. Several emerging targets including AAV-hAADC gene therapy, phosphodiesterase-4, potassium channels, myeloperoxidase, acetylcholinesterase, MAO-B, dopamine, A2A, mGlu5, and 5-HT-1A/1B receptors are in different stages of clinical development. Additionally, alternative interventions such as deep brain stimulation, thalamotomy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and gamma knife surgery, are also being developed for patients with advanced PD. As much as these therapeutic targets hold potential to delay the onset and reverse the disease, more targets and alternative interventions need to be examined in different stages of PD. In this review, we discuss various emerging preclinical pharmacological targets that may serve as a new promising neuroprotective strategy that could actually help alleviate PD and its symptoms. PMID:26988916

  11. [Neuropsychiatric non motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Peralta, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade we have witnessed substantial progress towards the understanding of Parkinson's disease. According to pathological and neuroimaging studies, the traditional view of Parkinson's disease that begins with the development of motor symptoms such as bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor, has begun to change. It is now understood that there would be a "premotor" or "preclinical" period in which the alphasynuclein pathology begins outside of the substantia nigra in the lower brainstem and autonomic nervous system. Although the pathophysiology of this phase is still unclear, it is currently thought that its symptoms would correspond to the so-called "non-motor symptoms". Hyposmia, depression, constipation and REM sleep disorders are one of the most relevant non-motor symptoms at this "premotor" stage. The spectrum of non-motor symptoms is very broad and covers the domains of neuropsychiatric, dysautonomic, gastrointestinal and sensory symptoms as well as sleep disorders. Neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, impulse control disorder, psychosis and dementia, are a major cause of disability as they are directly related to quality of life.

  12. Non motor subtypes and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Anna; Jenner, Peter; Todorova, Antoniya; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2016-01-01

    Non motor symptoms (NMS) represent a significant burden in Parkinson's disease (PD) with numerous studies highlighting the importance of NMS both in "pre-motor" phase of PD as well as throughout the course of disease. In part this has led the international Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (IPMDS) task force to attempt a re-definition of PD incorporating NMS and not base the diagnosis solely on motor symptoms. While motor subtypes within PD have been recognized and researched, recent clinical and neurobiological research suggests the existence of discrete non motor subtypes in PD, particularly in untreated (drug naïve) and early PD patients. Several independent observers have reported specific "clusters of NMS dominant PD" using a data driven approach in early and untreated PD patients while others have reported on the burden of NMS in untreated PD and specific NMS dominant phenotypes in untreated or treated PD using observational case series based data. In this review we report on specific NMS dominant phenotypes of PD as described in the literature using clinical observational studies and address pathophysiological concepts. A proposal for several NMS subtypes are reported combining clinical reports with, where possible, evidence base supporting probable biomarkers.

  13. Pragmatic Comprehension Deficit in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holtgraves, Thomas; McNamara, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing the specific speech act (Searle, 1969) that a speaker performs with an utterance is a fundamental feature of pragmatic competence. However, little is known about neurocognitive mediation of speech act comprehension. The present research examined the extent to which people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) comprehend specific speech acts. In the first experiment, participants read conversational utterances and then performed a lexical decision task (decide whether a target string of letters is a word). Consistent with past research, non-impaired participants performed this task more quickly when the target string was the speech act associated with the preceding utterance. In contrast, people with Parkinson's disease did not demonstrate this effect, suggesting that speech act activation is slowed or is not an automatic component of comprehension for people with PD. In a second study, participants were given unlimited time to indicate their recognition of the speech act performed with an utterance. PD participants were significantly poorer at this task than were control participants. We conclude that a previously undocumented language disorder exists in PD and that this disorder involves a selective deficit in speech act comprehension. Frontostriatal systems (the systems impaired in PD) likely contribute to normal speech act comprehension. PMID:19763993

  14. Parkinson's Disease: The Mitochondria-Iron Link.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Yorka; Carrasco, Carlos M; Campos, Joaquín D; Aguirre, Pabla; Núñez, Marco T

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage are conditions often found in damaged brain areas of Parkinson's disease. We propose that a causal link exists between these three events. Mitochondrial dysfunction results not only in increased reactive oxygen species production but also in decreased iron-sulfur cluster synthesis and unorthodox activation of Iron Regulatory Protein 1 (IRP1), a key regulator of cell iron homeostasis. In turn, IRP1 activation results in iron accumulation and hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. These three occurrences-mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage-generate a positive feedback loop of increased iron accumulation and oxidative stress. Here, we review the evidence that points to a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation as early events in the development of sporadic and genetic cases of Parkinson's disease. Finally, an attempt is done to contextualize the possible relationship between mitochondria dysfunction and iron dyshomeostasis. Based on published evidence, we propose that iron chelation-by decreasing iron-associated oxidative damage and by inducing cell survival and cell-rescue pathways-is a viable therapy for retarding this cycle.

  15. Parkinson's Disease: The Mitochondria-Iron Link

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Carlos M.; Núñez, Marco T.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage are conditions often found in damaged brain areas of Parkinson's disease. We propose that a causal link exists between these three events. Mitochondrial dysfunction results not only in increased reactive oxygen species production but also in decreased iron-sulfur cluster synthesis and unorthodox activation of Iron Regulatory Protein 1 (IRP1), a key regulator of cell iron homeostasis. In turn, IRP1 activation results in iron accumulation and hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. These three occurrences—mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage—generate a positive feedback loop of increased iron accumulation and oxidative stress. Here, we review the evidence that points to a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation as early events in the development of sporadic and genetic cases of Parkinson's disease. Finally, an attempt is done to contextualize the possible relationship between mitochondria dysfunction and iron dyshomeostasis. Based on published evidence, we propose that iron chelation—by decreasing iron-associated oxidative damage and by inducing cell survival and cell-rescue pathways—is a viable therapy for retarding this cycle. PMID:27293957

  16. Detection of preclinical Parkinson's disease with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Putamen 18F-dopa uptake of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is reduced by at least 35% at onset of symptoms; therefore, positron-emission tomography (PET) can be used to detect preclinical disease in clinically unaffected twins and relatives of patients with PD. Three out of 6 monozygotic and 2 out of 3 dizygotic unaffected PD co-twins have shown reduced putamen 18F-dopa uptake to date. In addition, an intact sibling and a daughter of 1 of 4 siblings with PD both had low putamen 18F-dopa uptake. These preliminary findings suggest there may be a familial component to the etiology of PD. PET can also be used to detect underlying nigral pathology in patients with isolated tremor and patients who become rigid taking dopamine-receptor blocking agents (DRBAs). Patients with familial essential tremor have normal, and those with isolated rest tremor have consistently low, putamen 18F-dopa uptake. Drug-induced parkinsonism is infrequently associated with underlying nigral pathology.

  17. Detection of preclinical Parkinson's disease with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Putamen 18F-dopa uptake of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is reduced by at least 35% at onset of symptoms; therefore, positron-emission tomography (PET) can be used to detect preclinical disease in clinically unaffected twins and relatives of patients with PD. Three out of 6 monozygotic and 2 out of 3 dizygotic unaffected PD co-twins have shown reduced putamen 18F-dopa uptake to date. In addition, an intact sibling and a daughter of 1 of 4 siblings with PD both had low putamen 18F-dopa uptake. These preliminary findings suggest there may be a familial component to the etiology of PD. PET can also be used to detect underlying nigral pathology in patients with isolated tremor and patients who become rigid taking dopamine-receptor blocking agents (DRBAs). Patients with familial essential tremor have normal, and those with isolated rest tremor have consistently low, putamen 18F-dopa uptake. Drug-induced parkinsonism is infrequently associated with underlying nigral pathology.

  18. Anchanling reduces pathology in a lactacystin- induced Parkinson's disease model☆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinghong; Wu, Zhengzhi; Gao, Xiaowei; Zhu, Qingwei; Jin, Yu; Wu, Anmin; Huang, Andrew C. J.

    2012-01-01

    A rat model of Parkinson's disease was induced by injecting lactacystin stereotaxically into the left mesencephalic ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. After rats were intragastrically perfused with Anchanling, a Chinese medicine, mainly composed of magnolol, for 5 weeks, when compared with Parkinson's disease model rats, tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased, α-synuclein and ubiquitin expression was decreased, substantia nigra cell apoptosis was reduced, and apomorphine-induced rotational behavior was improved. Results suggested that Anchanling can ameliorate Parkinson's disease pathology possibly by enhancing degradation activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:25767493

  19. Parkinsonism and transient bilateral ptosis in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, P. C.; Richard, A. T. Ng; Wong, P. K.

    1974-01-01

    Many neurological abnormalities have been described in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but transient bilateral ptosis and parkinsonism are rarely encountered. This paper describes a young Malay girl with SLE who develops psychosis, bilateral ptosis and parkinsonism during an exacerbation of her illness. These neurological features disappeared after adequate treatment with cyclophosphamide. Though the pathogenesis of these neurological abnormalities is not clearly known, it is likely that transient bilateral ptosis is due to myoneural dysfunction not unlike that of myasthenia gravis. As for parkinsonism, it can probably be explained on the basis of ‘vasculitis’ of the basal ganglia leading to microinfarcts and encephalomalacia. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2

  20. Visual contrast sensitivity in drug-induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed Central

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Wildt, G J; Keemink, C J

    1989-01-01

    The influence of stimulus orientation on contrast sensitivity function was studied in 10 patients with drug-induced Parkinsonism. Nine of the 10 patients had at least one eye with contrast sensitivity deficit for vertical and/or horizontal stimuli. Only generalised contrast sensitivity loss, observed in two eyes, was stimulus orientation independent. All spatial frequency-selective contrast deficits in 15 eyes were orientation dependent. The striking similarity between the pattern of contrast sensitivity loss in drug-induced Parkinsonism and that in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, suggests that generalised dopaminergic deficiency, from whatever cause, affects visual function in an analogous way. PMID:2926418

  1. Visual contrast sensitivity in drug-induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Wildt, G J; Keemink, C J

    1989-03-01

    The influence of stimulus orientation on contrast sensitivity function was studied in 10 patients with drug-induced Parkinsonism. Nine of the 10 patients had at least one eye with contrast sensitivity deficit for vertical and/or horizontal stimuli. Only generalised contrast sensitivity loss, observed in two eyes, was stimulus orientation independent. All spatial frequency-selective contrast deficits in 15 eyes were orientation dependent. The striking similarity between the pattern of contrast sensitivity loss in drug-induced Parkinsonism and that in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, suggests that generalised dopaminergic deficiency, from whatever cause, affects visual function in an analogous way.

  2. Magnetic resonance parkinsonism index in progressive supranuclear palsy and vascular parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Mostile, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Cicero, Calogero Edoardo; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Bruno, Elisa; Dibilio, Valeria; Luca, Antonina; Sciacca, Giorgia; Raciti, Loredana; Contrafatto, Donatella; Chiaramonte, Ignazio; Zappia, Mario

    2016-04-01

    To investigate accuracy of the magnetic resonance parkinsonism index (MRPI) in differentiating progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) from vascular parkinsonism (VP). We retrospectively analyzed radiological data of 12 PSP patients and 17 VP patients group-matched by age and sex who performed a standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Analysis of selected structures morphometry was performed to all study subjects and the MRPI was calculated for each selected patient. MRI midbrain area as well as superior cerebellar peduncle width were significantly lower in PSP patients compared to VP subjects. MRPI was significantly larger in PSP patients compared to VP subjects. MRPI value ≥13 distinguished the two groups with a sensitivity of 100 % (95 % CI 69.9-100) and a specificity of 100 % (95 % CI 77.1-100). MRPI may represent an accurate tool in differentiating PSP from VP. PMID:26820655

  3. Apolipoprotein E alleles in Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s patients

    SciTech Connect

    Poduslo, S.E.; Schwankhaus, J.D.

    1994-09-01

    A number of investigators have found an association between the apolipoprotein E4 allele and Alzheimer`s disease. The E4 allele appears at a higher frequency in late onset familial Alzheimer`s patients. In our studies we obtained blood samples from early and late onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer`s patients and spouses, as well as from Parkinson`s patients. The patients were diagnosed as probable Alzheimer`s patients after a neurological examination, extensive blood work, and a CAT scan. The diagnosis was made according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. The apolipoprotein E4 polymorphism was detected after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, restriction enzyme digestion with Hhal, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Ethidium bromide-stained bands at 91 bp were designated as allele 3, at 83 bp as allele 2, and at 72 bp as allele 4. Of the 84 probable Alzheimer`s patients (all of whom were Caucasian), 47 were heterozygous and 13 were homozygous for the E4 allele. There were 26 early onset patients; 13 were heterozygous and 7 homozygous for the E4 allele. The frequencies for the E4 allele for late onset familial patients was 0.45 and for sporadic patients was 0.37. We analyzed 77 spouses with an average age of 71.9 {plus_minus} 7.4 years as controls, and 15 were heterozygous for the E4 allele for an E4 frequency of 0.097. Of the 53 Parkinson`s patients, 11 had the E4 allele for a frequency of 0.113. Thus our findings support the association of the ApoE4 allele with Alzheimer`s disease.

  4. Ipsilateral coordination features for automatic classification of Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, Fernanda; Atehortúa, Angélica; Martínez, Fabio; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    A reliable diagnosis of the Parkinson Disease lies on the objective evaluation of different motor sub-systems. Discovering specific motor patterns associated to the disease is fundamental for the development of unbiased assessments that facilitate the disease characterization, independently of the particular examiner. This paper proposes a new objective screening of patients with Parkinson, an approach that optimally combines ipsilateral global descriptors. These ipsilateral gait features are simple upper-lower limb relationships in frequency and relative phase spaces. These low level characteristics feed a simple SVM classifier with a polynomial kernel function. The strategy was assessed in a binary classification task, normal against Parkinson, under a leave-one-out scheme in a population of 16 Parkinson patients and 7 healthy control subjects. Results showed an accuracy of 94;6% using relative phase spaces and 82;1% with simple frequency relations.

  5. The beneficial role of intensive exercise on Parkinson disease progression.

    PubMed

    Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Balbi, Pietro; Maestri, Roberto; Bertotti, Gabriella; Boveri, Natalia; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, a considerable number of articles has shown that exercise is effective in improving motor performance in Parkinson disease. In particular, recent studies have focused on the efficacy of intensive exercise in achieving optimal results in the rehabilitation of patients with Parkinson disease. The effects of intensive exercise in promoting cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in animal models are reported in a large cohort of studies, and these neuroplastic effects are probably related to increased expression of a variety of neurotrophic factors. The authors outline the relation between intensive exercises and neuroplastic activity on animal models of Parkinson disease and discuss the clinical results of different intensive strategies on motor performance and disease progression in patients with Parkinson disease.

  6. Understanding Parkinson Disease: A Complex and Multifaceted Illness.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishna, Apoorva; Alexander, Sheila A

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson disease is an incredibly complex and multifaceted illness affecting millions of people in the United States. Parkinson disease is characterized by progressive dopaminergic neuronal dysfunction and loss, leading to debilitating motor, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms. Parkinson disease is an enigmatic illness that is still extensively researched today to search for a better understanding of the disease, develop therapeutic interventions to halt or slow progression of the disease, and optimize patient outcomes. This article aims to examine in detail the normal function of the basal ganglia and dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system, the etiology and pathophysiology of Parkinson disease, related signs and symptoms, current treatment, and finally, the profound impact of understanding the disease on nursing care.

  7. Impaired levodopa response in Parkinson's disease during melanoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Merello, M; Esteguy, M; Perazzo, F; Leiguarda, R

    1992-02-01

    A patient with melanoma and sporadic positive melanuria developed Parkinson's disease. Treatment with levodopa failed to modify tumoral progress. However, during chemotherapy with dacarbazine, the patient experienced a significant impairment to levodopa response.

  8. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Egan, Sarah J; Laidlaw, Ken; Starkstein, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed demonstrating that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment of depression and anxiety in Parkinson's disease. The aims were to review the extant literature, specify a model of cognitive and behavioral maintenance factors in depression and anxiety in Parkinson's disease and provide a guide to treatment. It is argued that treatment should take into account specific cognitive and behavioral maintaining factors. Symptoms of depression and anxiety are highly prevalent in Parkinson's disease and therapists should consider how to augment the efficacy of CBT for patients with Parkinson's disease. Cognitive and behavioral interventions can help people overcome some of the challenges in living with PD by maximizing wellbeing and overall quality of life.

  9. Recognition and management of neuropsychiatric complications in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferreri, Florian; Agbokou, Catherine; Gauthier, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is primarily considered a motor disease characterized by rest tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural disturbances. However, neuropsychiatric complications, including mood and anxiety disorders, fatigue, apathy, psychosis, cognitive impairment, dementia, sleep disorders and addictions, frequently complicate the course of the illness. The pathophysiologic features of these complications are multifaceted and include neuropathophysiologic changes of a degenerative disease, exposure to antiparkinsonian treatments and emotional reactions to having a disabling chronic illness. Changes in mental status have profound implications for the well-being of patients with Parkinson's disease and of their caregivers. Treatment is often efficacious but becomes a challenge in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. In this article, we review the key clinical features of neuropsychiatric complications in Parkinson's disease as well as what is known about their epidemiologic characteristics, risk factors, pathophysiologic features and management. PMID:17146092

  10. The history of parkinsonism: descriptions in ancient Indian medical literature.

    PubMed

    Ovallath, Sujith; Deepa, P

    2013-05-01

    The clinical syndrome of parkinsonism was identified in ancient India even before the period of Christ and was treated methodically. The earliest reference to bradykinesia dates to 600 bc. Evidences prove that as early as 300 bc, Charaka proposed a coherent picture of parkinsonism by describing tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and gait disturbances as its components. The scenario was further developed by Madhava, Vagbhata, and Dalhana all through history. The 15th-century classic "Bhasava rajyam" introduced the term kampavata, which may be regarded as an ayurvedic analogue of parkinsonism. The pathogenesis of kampavata centered on the concept of imbalance in the vata factor, which controls psychomotor activities. The essential element in therapy was the administration of powdered seed of Mucuna pruriens, or atmagupta, which as per reports, contains 4%-6% of levodopa. In addition to proving the existence and identification of parkinsonism in ancient India, the study points to the significance of ancient Indian Sanskrit works in medical history. PMID:23483637

  11. Salivary Gland Biopsy Shows Promise to Helping to Diagnose Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Science News Salivary Gland Biopsy Shows Promise to Helping to Diagnose Parkinson’s - Mar ... team performed a procedure called a needle core biopsy of the submandibular glands in 15 people who ...

  12. Excessive daytime sleepiness in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Knie, Bettina; Mitra, M Tanya; Logishetty, Kartik; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2011-03-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is described as inappropriate and undesirable sleepiness during waking hours and is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease, affecting up to 50% of patients. EDS has a large impact on the quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients as well as of their caregivers, in some cases even more than the motor symptoms of the disease. Drug-induced EDS is a particular problem as many dopamine agonists used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease have EDS as an adverse effect. Dopaminergic treatment may also render a subset of Parkinson's disease patients at risk for sudden-onset sleep attacks that occur without warning and can be particularly hazardous if the patient is driving. This demonstrates the need for early recognition and management not only to increase health-related quality of life but also to ensure patient safety. There are many assessment tools for EDS, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), although only the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS) and the SCales for Outcomes in PArkinson's Disease-Sleep (SCOPA-S) are specifically validated for Parkinson's disease. Polysomnography can be used when necessary. Management comprises non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches. Non-pharmacological approaches can be the mainstay of treatment for mild to moderate EDS. Advice on good sleep hygiene is instrumental, as pharmacological approaches have yet to provide consistent and reliable results without significant adverse effects. The efficacy of pharmacological treatment of EDS in Parkinson's disease using wakefulness-promoting drugs such as modafinil remains controversial. Further areas of research are now also focusing on adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists, sodium oxybate and caffeine to promote wakefulness. A definitive treatment for the highly prevalent drug-induced EDS has not yet been found. PMID:21323392

  13. Imaging of genetic and degenerative disorders primarily causing Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David J

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter the structural and functional imaging changes associated with both genetic causes of Parkinson's disease and the sporadic condition are reviewed. The role of imaging for supporting diagnosis and detecting subclinical disease is discussed and the potential use and drawbacks of using imaging biomarkers for monitoring disease progression are debated. Additionally, the use of imaging for differentiating atypical parkinsonian syndromes from Parkinson's disease is presented. PMID:27432680

  14. Sleepiness in Idiopathic REM Sleep Behavior Disorder and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnulf, Isabelle; Neutel, Dulce; Herlin, Bastien; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Cochen de Cock, Valérie; Vidailhet, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether patients with idiopathic and symptomatic RBD were sleepier than controls, and if sleepiness in idiopathic RBD predicted earlier conversion to Parkinson disease. Methods: The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and its determinants were compared at the time of a video-polysomnography for an RBD diagnosis in patients with idiopathic RBD, in patients with Parkinson disease, and in controls. Whether sleepiness at time of RBD diagnosis predicted an earlier conversion to neurodegenerative diseases was retrospectively analyzed in the followed-up patients. Results: The 75 patients with idiopathic RBD were sleepier (ESS: 7.8 ± 4.6) at the time of RBD diagnosis than 74 age- and sex-matched controls (ESS: 5.0 ± 3.6, P < 0.0001). They reached the levels of 114 patients with Parkinson disease (ESS: 8.7 ± 4.8), whether they had (n = 78) or did not have (n = 36) concomitant RBD. The severity of sleepiness in idiopathic RBD correlated with younger age, but not with sleep measures. Among the 69 patients with idiopathic RBD who were followed up for a median 3 years (1–15 years), 16 (23.2%) developed parkinsonism (n = 6), dementia (n = 6), dementia plus parkinsonism (n = 2), and multiple system atrophy (n = 2). An ESS greater than 8 at time of RBD diagnosis predicted a shorter time to phenoconversion to parkinsonism and dementia, from RBD onset, and from RBD diagnosis (when adjusted for age and time between RBD onset and diagnosis). Conclusions: Sleepiness is associated with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder and predicts more rapid conversion to parkinsonism and dementia, suggesting it is an early marker of neuronal loss in brainstem arousal systems. Citation: Arnulf I, Neutel D, Herlin B, Golmard JL, Leu-Semenescu S, Cochen de Cock V, Vidailhet M. Sleepiness in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder and Parkinson disease. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1529–1535. PMID:26085299

  15. Parkin gene causing benign autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Nisipeanu, P; Inzelberg, R; Abo Mouch, S; Carasso, R L; Blumen, S C; Zhang, J; Matsumine, H; Hattori, N; Mizuno, Y

    2001-06-12

    Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP) is an early-onset parkinsonism caused by exonic deletions or point mutations in the parkingene. The relationship between the type of the genetic defect and the clinical presentation, the response to therapy, and the evolution have not been yet determined. The authors describe a single-basepair deletion at nucleotide 202 in exon 2 of the parkin gene in a kindred with a benign clinical course. PMID:11402119

  16. Are patients with Parkinson's disease blind to blindsight?

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; Stebbins, Glenn; Schiltz, Christine; Goetz, Christopher G

    2014-06-01

    In Parkinson's disease, visual dysfunction is prominent. Visual hallucinations can be a major hallmark of late stage disease, but numerous visual deficits also occur in early stage Parkinson's disease. Specific retinopathy, deficits in the primary visual pathway and the secondary ventral and dorsal pathways, as well as dysfunction of the attention pathways have all been posited as causes of hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. We present data from patients with Parkinson's disease that contrast with a known neuro-ophthalmological syndrome, termed 'blindsight'. In this syndrome, there is an absence of conscious object identification, but preserved 'guess' of the location of a stimulus, preserved reflexive saccades and motion perception and preserved autonomical and expressive reactions to negative emotional facial expressions. We propose that patients with Parkinson's disease have the converse of blindsight, being 'blind to blindsight'. As such they preserve conscious vision, but show erroneous 'guess' localization of visual stimuli, poor saccades and motion perception, and poor emotional face perception with blunted autonomic reaction. Although a large data set on these deficits in Parkinson's disease has been accumulated, consolidation into one specific syndrome has not been proposed. Focusing on neuropathological and physiological data from two phylogenetically old and subconscious pathways, the retino-colliculo-thalamo-amygdala and the retino-geniculo-extrastriate pathways, we propose that aberrant function of these systems, including pathologically inhibited superior colliculus activity, deficient corollary discharges to the frontal eye fields, dysfunctional pulvinar, claustrum and amygdaloid subnuclei of the amygdala, the latter progressively burdened with Lewy bodies, underlie this syndrome. These network impairments are further corroborated by the concept of the 'silent amygdala'. Functionally being 'blind to blindsight' may facilitate the highly

  17. Parkinson patients as partners in care.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Mark A; Sanjak, Mohammed; Englert, Danielle; Iyer, Sanjay; Quinlan, Margaret M

    2014-01-01

    Increasing physical activity, as part of an active lifestyle, is an important health goal for individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Exercise can positively impact health related quality of life. Given this, how can we promote physically active lifestyles among PD patients (most of whom are sedentary)? Here we suggest that health care professionals could significantly expand their impact by collaborating with PD patients and their spouses (or caregivers) as partners-in-care. We outline reasons why partners-in-care approaches are important in PD, including the need to increase social capital, which deals with issues of trust and the value of social networks in linking members of a community. We then present results of a qualitative study involving partners-in-care exercise beliefs among 19 PD patients and spouses, and conclude with our perspective on future benefits of this approach. PMID:24262175

  18. Nonpharmacological treatments for patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M; Ebersbach, Georg

    2015-09-15

    Since 2013, a number of studies have enhanced the literature and have guided clinicians on viable treatment interventions outside of pharmacotherapy and surgery. Thirty-three randomized controlled trials and one large observational study on exercise and physiotherapy were published in this period. Four randomized controlled trials focused on dance interventions, eight on treatment of cognition and behavior, two on occupational therapy, and two on speech and language therapy (the latter two specifically addressed dysphagia). Three randomized controlled trials focused on multidisciplinary care models, one study on telemedicine, and four studies on alternative interventions, including music therapy and mindfulness. These studies attest to the marked interest in these therapeutic approaches and the increasing evidence base that places nonpharmacological treatments firmly within the integrated repertoire of treatment options in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26274930

  19. [The cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Akira

    2004-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a slowly progressive disorder which begins with motor symptoms. Several cognitive deficits can be observed in nondemented patients with PD during their history. The core symptom in the cognitive deficits in PD is the executive dysfunction. Neuropsychological tests such as Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Trail Making Test are used to measure the degree of this dysfunction. Executive dysfunction is thought related to abnormalities in the dorsolateral prefrontal circuit which largely passes through the caudate nucleus. The dysfunction emerges as the pathology spreads to the nigrocaudate project corresponding to Hoehn & Yahr stage II-III. Effective therapy for cognitive dysfunction in PD remains elusive, however donepezil, Attention Process Training, Music therapy and Transcranial magnetic stimulation have been reported to have partial efficacy. PMID:15462384

  20. Visual hallucinations in photographs in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaou, Okeanis; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Friedman, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Visual hallucinations are reported in 16-37% of drug-treated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and are the most common hallucinations in PD. We report two patients with PD with symptoms that uniquely integrate visual hallucinations and delusions. We report two cases of patients with PD with visual hallucinations who saw the persistence of these hallucinations in photographs. These pictures were taken to prove the absence of these hallucinations. We believe this is the first description of this peculiar phenomenon, in which hallucinations or illusions could be replicated in photographs. Both patients had delusions associated with the images and we speculate that the images they saw in the photographs represent a further delusion, hence a 'delusional hallucination' or 'delusional illusion.' We believe that delusions fostering hallucinations are rare. PMID:23704424

  1. Parkinson's disease and issues related to driving.

    PubMed

    Uitti, Ryan J

    2009-12-01

    Driving a motor vehicle represents an important activity associated with personal independence and freedom. Being told that one can no longer drive is itself associated with loss of independence, depression, low self-esteem and reduced activities [1,2]. Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), therefore, understandably wish to continue to be able to maintain their ability to drive automobiles, motorcycles, airplanes, and boats, etc. The ability to determine if and when a PD patient is no longer fit to drive a motor vehicle is important for maintaining safety for the PD patient and the public. There are numerous requirements for being able to drive a motor vehicle safely. When any of these capacities deteriorate, the ability to drive safely may be lost. This review will concentrate upon common issues that would be peculiar to patients with PD.

  2. Depression in Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Costa, Flavio Henrique de Rezende; Rosso, Ana Lucia Zuma; Maultasch, Henryk; Nicaretta, Denise Hack; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2012-08-01

    The prevalence of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) is high. Depression varies from 20 to 50% of the PD patients, and is associated with increasing disability. The key characteristics of depression are anhedonia and low mood. The recommended scales for screening purposes are: HAM-D, BDI, HADS, MADRS and GDS. As for measurement of severity: HAM-D, MADRS, BDI and SDS. In cases with mild depression, non-pharmacological intervention is the treatment of choice. In moderate depression, antidepressants are required. The choice of an antidepressant should be based mainly on the comorbidities and unique features of the patient. Evidence for antidepressant effectiveness is seen mostly with amitriptyline and nortriptyline, but one should be cautious in elderly patients. Other antidepressants that can be prescribed are: citalopram, escitalopram, sertraline, bupropion, trazodone, venlafaxine, mirtazapine and duloxetin. The dopaminergic agonist pramipexole is a treatment option.

  3. A novel treatment target for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wakade, Chandramohan; Chong, Raymond

    2014-12-15

    We hypothesize that GPR109A message and expression are up-regulated in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). GPR109A is a high-affinity niacin receptor. Niacin is a precursor for NAD-NADH which is needed for dopamine production. Thus, niacin supplementation may serve three purposes: reduce inflammation through GPR109A-related mechanisms, increase dopamine synthesis in the striatum through NADPH supply and increase NAD/NADH ratio to boost mitochondrial functions. GPR109A and its agonists are known to exert anti-inflammatory actions in the skin, gut and retina. However these roles are neither anticipated nor established in the CNS. For the first time here we propose the roles of GPR109A and its agonists including niacin in CNS pathology. Moreover we predict that the neuroprotective roles of either niacin or butyrates in CNS occur via GPR109A. PMID:25455298

  4. Parkinson's disease pharmacogenomics: new findings and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schumacher-Schuh, Artur F; Rieder, Carlos R M; Hutz, Mara H

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is unique among neurodegenerative disorders because a highly effective pharmacological symptomatic treatment is available. The marked variability in drug response and in adverse profiles associated with this treatment led to the search of genetic markers associated with these features. We present a review of the literature on PD pharmacogenetics to provide a critical discussion of the current findings, new approaches, limitations and recommendations for future research. Pharmacogenetics studies in this field have assessed several outcomes and genes, with special focus on dopaminergic genes, mainly DRD2, which is the most important receptor in nigrostriatal pathway. The heterogeneity in methodological strategies employed by different studies is impressive. The question of whether PD pharmacogenetics studies will improve clinical management by causing a shift from a trial-and-error approach to a pharmacological regimen that takes into account the individual variability remains an open question. Collaborative longitudinal studies with larger sample sizes, better outcome definitions and replication studies are required.

  5. Parkinson's Disease and Sleep/Wake Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Swick, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has traditionally been characterized by its cardinal motor symptoms of bradykinesia, rigidity, resting tremor, and postural instability. However, PD is increasingly being recognized as a multidimensional disease associated with myriad nonmotor symptoms including autonomic dysfunction, mood disorders, cognitive impairment, pain, gastrointestinal disturbance, impaired olfaction, psychosis, and sleep disorders. Sleep disturbances, which include sleep fragmentation, daytime somnolence, sleep-disordered breathing, restless legs syndrome (RLS), nightmares, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD), are estimated to occur in 60% to 98% of patients with PD. For years nonmotor symptoms received little attention from clinicians and researchers, but now these symptoms are known to be significant predictors of morbidity in determining quality of life, costs of disease, and rates of institutionalization. A discussion of the clinical aspects, pathophysiology, evaluation techniques, and treatment options for the sleep disorders that are encountered with PD is presented. PMID:23326757

  6. Parkinson's disease and issues related to driving.

    PubMed

    Uitti, Ryan J

    2009-12-01

    Driving a motor vehicle represents an important activity associated with personal independence and freedom. Being told that one can no longer drive is itself associated with loss of independence, depression, low self-esteem and reduced activities [1,2]. Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), therefore, understandably wish to continue to be able to maintain their ability to drive automobiles, motorcycles, airplanes, and boats, etc. The ability to determine if and when a PD patient is no longer fit to drive a motor vehicle is important for maintaining safety for the PD patient and the public. There are numerous requirements for being able to drive a motor vehicle safely. When any of these capacities deteriorate, the ability to drive safely may be lost. This review will concentrate upon common issues that would be peculiar to patients with PD. PMID:20082971

  7. Visual hallucinations in photographs in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaou, Okeanis; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Friedman, Joseph

    2013-05-22

    Visual hallucinations are reported in 16-37% of drug-treated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and are the most common hallucinations in PD. We report two patients with PD with symptoms that uniquely integrate visual hallucinations and delusions. We report two cases of patients with PD with visual hallucinations who saw the persistence of these hallucinations in photographs. These pictures were taken to prove the absence of these hallucinations. We believe this is the first description of this peculiar phenomenon, in which hallucinations or illusions could be replicated in photographs. Both patients had delusions associated with the images and we speculate that the images they saw in the photographs represent a further delusion, hence a 'delusional hallucination' or 'delusional illusion.' We believe that delusions fostering hallucinations are rare.

  8. Is PARKIN parkinsonism a cancer predisposition syndrome?

    PubMed

    Schüle, Birgitt; Byrne, Christie; Rees, Linda; Langston, J William

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the PARKIN gene (chromosome 6q25-27) were first described in 1998 in families with "juvenile" autosomal recessive parkinsonism. More than 180 causative variants in the PARKIN gene have been identified; point mutations and copy number variants (i.e., exon deletions or duplications) occur at nearly equal frequencies.(1) PARKIN is one of the largest genes in the human genome (1.3 Mb) and contains a chromosomal fragile site (CFS) FRA6E (6q26) between exons 2 and 8. This is of interest regarding the etiology of cancer because CFSs are prone to spontaneous breaks leading to chromosome alterations. Therefore, it is not surprising that PARKIN mutations have also been found in various cancer cell lines and primary tumors.(2,3) Mutations in PARKIN show decreased PARKIN E3 ligase function with resultant accumulation of cyclin E, creating the potential for mitotic instability in dividing cells.

  9. Treatment of Parkinson's disease using cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lindvall, Olle

    2015-01-01

    The clinical trials with intrastriatal transplantation of human fetal mesencephalic tissue, rich in dopaminergic neurons, in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients show that cell replacement can work and in some cases induce major, long-lasting improvement. However, owing to poor tissue availability, this approach can only be applied in very few patients, and standardization is difficult, leading to wide variation in functional outcome. Stem cells and reprogrammed cells could potentially be used to produce dopaminergic neurons for transplantation. Importantly, dopaminergic neurons of the correct substantia nigra phenotype can now be generated from human embryonic stem cells in large numbers and standardized preparations, and will soon be ready for application in patients. Also, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons are being considered for clinical translation. Available data justify moving forward in a responsible way with these dopaminergic neurons, which should be tested, using optimal patient selection, cell preparation and transplantation procedures, in controlled clinical studies. PMID:26416681

  10. Parkinson's disease and age: The obvious but largely unexplored link.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Rashed; Basak, Indranil; Patil, Ketan S; Alves, Guido; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2015-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive neurodegenerative disorder with increased prevalence in the aging population. It is estimated that approximately 1.5 million individuals in the US alone suffer from Parkinson's disease and with the extension of life expectancy this number is expected to rise dramatically within the next twenty-five years. The majority of Parkinson's disease cases are sporadic. But mutations in genes such as α-synuclein, Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and LRRK2, have been conclusively associated with both early- and late-onset of the disease. Although the genetics of Parkinson's disease is starting to become unraveled, the interplay between genetic and environmental factors is largely unknown as are the underlying mechanisms that trigger the disease as the brain ages. The risk of Parkinson's disease increases dramatically in individuals over the age of 60 and it is estimated that more than 1% of all seniors have some form of the condition. In this review, we will highlight some of the central proteins associated with Parkinson's disease and how they may be linked to processes and factors associated with age.

  11. Peripheral neuropathy and parkinsonism: a large clinical and pathogenic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sebastien; Vital, Claude

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) has been reported in idiopathic and hereditary forms of parkinsonism, but the pathogenic mechanisms are unclear and likely heterogeneous. Levodopa-induced vitamin B12 deficiency has been discussed as a causal factor of PN in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, but peripheral nervous system involvement might also be a consequence of the underlying neurodegenerative process. Occurrence of PN with parkinsonism has been associated with a panel of mitochondrial cytopathies, more frequently related to a nuclear gene defect and mainly polymerase gamma (POLG1) gene. Parkin (PARK2) gene mutations are responsible for juvenile parkinsonism, and possible peripheral nervous system involvement has been reported. Rarely, an association of parkinsonism with PN may be encountered in other neurodegenerative diseases such as fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome related to premutation CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene, Machado-Joseph disease related to an abnormal CAG repeat expansion in ataxin-3 (ATXN3) gene, Kufor-Rakeb syndrome caused by mutations in ATP13A2 gene, or in hereditary systemic disorders such as Gaucher disease due to mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene and Chediak-Higashi syndrome due to LYST gene mutations. This article reviews conditions in which PN may coexist with parkinsonism. PMID:25582874

  12. Morbidity in early Parkinson's disease and prior to diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Rune; Kjellberg, Jakob; Ibsen, Rikke; Jennum, Poul

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonmotor symptoms are probably present prior to, early on, and following, a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Nonmotor symptoms may hold important information about the progression of Parkinson's disease. Objective To evaluated the total early and prediagnostic morbidities in the 3 years before a hospital contact leading to a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Methods Retrospective morbidity data from Danish National Patient Registry records (1997–2007) of 10,490 adult patients with a secondary care diagnosis of Parkinson's disease were compared with 42,505 control cases. Results Parkinson's disease was associated with significantly higher morbidity rates associated with conditions in the following categories: mental and psychiatric, nervous system, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal system and connective tissue, genitourinary, abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, injury, poisoning and certain other external causes, and other factors influencing health status and contact with health services. It was negatively associated with neoplasm, cardiovascular, and respiratory diseases. Conclusions Patients with a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease present significant differences in morbidities early on, following, and prior to, their diagnosis, compared with healthy controls. PMID:24944873

  13. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27193487

  14. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Early Freezing of Gait: Atypical versus Typical Parkinson Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Abraham; Deep, Aman; Dhall, Rohit; Tran, An; Liu, Ming-Jai

    2015-01-01

    In 18 months, 850 patients were referred to Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center (MAPC). Among them, 810 patients had typical Parkinson disease (PD) and 212 had PD for ≤5 years. Among the 212 patients with early PD, 27 (12.7%) had freezing of gait (FOG). Forty of the 850 had atypical parkinsonism. Among these 40 patients, all of whom had symptoms for ≤5 years, 12 (30.0%) had FOG. FOG improved with levodopa in 21/27 patients with typical PD but did not improve in the 12 patients with atypical parkinsonism. FOG was associated with falls in both groups of patients. We believe that FOG unresponsive to levodopa in typical PD resembles FOG in atypical parkinsonism. We thus compared the 6 typical PD patients with FOG unresponsive to levodopa plus the 12 patients with atypical parkinsonism with the 21 patients with typical PD responsive to levodopa. We compared them by tests of locomotion and postural stability. Among the patients with FOG unresponsive to levodopa, postural stability was more impaired than locomotion. This finding leads us to believe that, in these patients, postural stability, not locomotion, is the principal problem underlying FOG.

  16. Endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity increases in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Charron, Giselle; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Laux, Alexis; Berthet, Amandine; Porras, Gregory; Canron, Marie-Hélène; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Li, Qin; Qin, Chuan; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika; Giros, Bruno; Delalande, François; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Vital, Anne; Goumon, Yannick; Bezard, Erwan

    2011-08-01

    Morphine is endogenously synthesized in the central nervous system and endogenous dopamine is thought to be necessary for endogenous morphine formation. As Parkinson's disease results from the loss of dopamine and is associated with central pain, we considered how endogenous morphine is regulated in the untreated and l-DOPA-treated parkinsonian brain. However, as the cellular origin and overall distribution of endogenous morphine remains obscure in the pathological adult brain, we first characterized the distribution of endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactive cells in the rat striatum. We then studied changes in the endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity of medium spiny neurons in normal, Parkinson's disease-like and l-DOPA-treated Parkinson's disease-like conditions in experimental (rat and monkey) and human Parkinson's disease. Our results reveal an unexpected dramatic upregulation of neuronal endogenous morphine-like compound immunoreactivity and levels in experimental and human Parkinson's disease, only partially normalized by l-DOPA treatment. Our data suggest that endogenous morphine formation is more complex than originally proposed and that the parkinsonian brain experiences a dramatic upregulation of endogenous morphine immunoreactivity. The functional consequences of such endogenous morphine upregulation are as yet unknown, but based upon the current knowledge of morphine signalling, we hypothesize that it is involved in fatigue, depression and pain symptoms experienced by patients with Parkinson's disease.

  17. Hallucinations and psychosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rabey, Josè Martin

    2009-12-01

    Although Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered mainly a movement disorder, robust information accumulated during the last 30 years has shown that about 30% of PD patients may also suffer from psychosis, which deeply affects their quality of life and eventually brings them to permanent hospitalization in nursing homes. PD psychosis (PDPsy) mainly occurs after 10 or more years of treatment. The main features of PDPsy include recurrent and continuous hallucinations and delusions for at least 1 month. In addition, a recent consensus of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and National Institute of Mental Health Working Group also included illusions and a false sense of presence as "minor symptoms" supporting the diagnosis. In addition, accumulated clinical data have shown that "minor symptoms" and benign hallucinations also imply a bad prognosis with time. In the diagnostic criteria for PDPsy, it is considered that patients suffer from PD for at least more than 1 year before psychosis develops. If this is not the case, there is an unsolved problem of an overlapping diagnosis with Dementia with Lewy Bodies. Most clinicians consider that the main cause of psychosis is chronic exposure to dopaminergic medication. However, from an operational point of view there remain difficulties in defining a specific time of exposure and dose of treatment and the occurrence of PDPsy. Specific rating scales have been developed for the evaluation of PDPsy, such as the Parkinson Psychosis Rating Scale. The Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms usually applied in schizophrenic patients has also proved useful for scoring psychotic symptomatology in PD. Clozapine in low doses has been proven to be the most effective antipsychotic medication for PDPsy. However, its use may cause neutropenia. Therefore, new atypical antipsychotic drugs with serotonin 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist properties have been developed. Recently, pimavanserin--a 5-HT2A inverse agonist

  18. Concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hiejima, K; Satake, S

    1978-03-01

    Sixty-nine patients, 23 of whom had documented attacks of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), were studied electrophysiologically and the following results were obtained: (1) Antegrade concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrom (AC WPW) was demonstrated in 7 out of 69 patients by atrial stimulation including extrastimulus. Six of these 7 patients presented an accessory pathway (AP) conduction of the Kent type, 5 of which showed Type A and another, Type B. The remaining one of these 7 patients showed an AP conduction of the Mahaim type. One of the 7 patients showed a combination with the James and Kent types AP conduction. (2) Retrograde concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (RC WPW) was demonstrated in 8 out of 49 patients in whom the presence of V-A conduction was revealed by ventricular stimulation, while PSVT was documented in 7 of these 8 patients. An AP of the Kent type was identified in the left side of the heart in 5 out of 7 patients with documented PSVT, the right side in one and in the septal region in one. (3) The presence of bilateral or two APs were demonstrated in 3 patients. In another one with documented PSVT, the presence of a branched AP from a left-sided Kent bundle was assumed. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that concealed APs may be more frequent than realized. For example, the frequency of RC WPW in patients with PSVT was 30.4% (7/23) in our series. Accordingly, it is postulated that RC WPW may also be indicated for surgical therapy and that detailed electrophysiologic examination by the physician should be carried out for the sake of determining the indication.

  19. Hallucinations and psychosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rabey, Josè Martin

    2009-12-01

    Although Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered mainly a movement disorder, robust information accumulated during the last 30 years has shown that about 30% of PD patients may also suffer from psychosis, which deeply affects their quality of life and eventually brings them to permanent hospitalization in nursing homes. PD psychosis (PDPsy) mainly occurs after 10 or more years of treatment. The main features of PDPsy include recurrent and continuous hallucinations and delusions for at least 1 month. In addition, a recent consensus of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and National Institute of Mental Health Working Group also included illusions and a false sense of presence as "minor symptoms" supporting the diagnosis. In addition, accumulated clinical data have shown that "minor symptoms" and benign hallucinations also imply a bad prognosis with time. In the diagnostic criteria for PDPsy, it is considered that patients suffer from PD for at least more than 1 year before psychosis develops. If this is not the case, there is an unsolved problem of an overlapping diagnosis with Dementia with Lewy Bodies. Most clinicians consider that the main cause of psychosis is chronic exposure to dopaminergic medication. However, from an operational point of view there remain difficulties in defining a specific time of exposure and dose of treatment and the occurrence of PDPsy. Specific rating scales have been developed for the evaluation of PDPsy, such as the Parkinson Psychosis Rating Scale. The Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms usually applied in schizophrenic patients has also proved useful for scoring psychotic symptomatology in PD. Clozapine in low doses has been proven to be the most effective antipsychotic medication for PDPsy. However, its use may cause neutropenia. Therefore, new atypical antipsychotic drugs with serotonin 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist properties have been developed. Recently, pimavanserin--a 5-HT2A inverse agonist

  20. VPS35 Mutations in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Wider, Christian; Ross, Owen A.; Dachsel, Justus C.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Lincoln, Sarah J.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Cobb, Stephanie A.; Wilhoite, Greggory J.; Bacon, Justin A.; Behrouz, Bahareh; Melrose, Heather L.; Hentati, Emna; Puschmann, Andreas; Evans, Daniel M.; Conibear, Elizabeth; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Aasly, Jan O.; Burkhard, Pierre R.; Djaldetti, Ruth; Ghika, Joseph; Hentati, Faycal; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Lynch, Tim; Melamed, Eldad; Rajput, Alex; Rajput, Ali H.; Solida, Alessandra; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Uitti, Ryan J.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Vingerhoets, François; Farrer, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of genetic causes for Mendelian disorders has been based on the collection of multi-incident families, linkage analysis, and sequencing of genes in candidate intervals. This study describes the application of next-generation sequencing technologies to a Swiss kindred presenting with autosomal-dominant, late-onset Parkinson disease (PD). The family has tremor-predominant dopa-responsive parkinsonism with a mean onset of 50.6 ± 7.3 years. Exome analysis suggests that an aspartic-acid-to-asparagine mutation within vacuolar protein sorting 35 (VPS35 c.1858G>A; p.Asp620Asn) is the genetic determinant of disease. VPS35 is a central component of the retromer cargo-recognition complex, is critical for endosome-trans-golgi trafficking and membrane-protein recycling, and is evolutionarily highly conserved. VPS35 c.1858G>A was found in all affected members of the Swiss kindred and in three more families and one patient with sporadic PD, but it was not observed in 3,309 controls. Further sequencing of familial affected probands revealed only one other missense variant, VPS35 c.946C>T; (p.Pro316Ser), in a pedigree with one unaffected and two affected carriers, and thus the pathogenicity of this mutation remains uncertain. Retromer-mediated sorting and transport is best characterized for acid hydrolase receptors. However, the complex has many types of cargo and is involved in a diverse array of biologic pathways from developmental Wnt signaling to lysosome biogenesis. Our study implicates disruption of VPS35 and retromer-mediated trans-membrane protein sorting, rescue, and recycling in the neurodegenerative process leading to PD. PMID:21763482

  1. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in advanced Parkinson's disease: five year follow-up at a Portuguese center.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana; Andrade, Carlos; Rosas, Maria J; Linhares, Paulo; Massano, João; Vaz, Rui; Garrett, Carolina

    2014-05-16

    Introduccion. La estimulacion cerebral profunda (ECP) del nucleo subtalamico (NST) en la enfermedad de Parkinson (EP) es segura y eficaz: en la mayoria de series se describen respuestas motoras duraderas y estables. Objetivo. Informar sobre el desenlace a largo plazo de la ECP del NST en pacientes con EP avanzada atendidos en un centro hospitalario portugues. Pacientes y metodos. El estado motor se valoro con la escala unificada de valoracion de la enfermedad de Parkinson, parte III, antes de la intervencion quirurgica –en dos situaciones: sin efecto de la medicacion (off) y bajo el mejor efecto (on)–, en el postoperatorio y al cabo de cinco años (medicacion y estimulacion en on). Se cuantificaron las puntuaciones de cada sintoma axial. La incapacidad se evaluo con la escala de Rankin modificada (mRS). La aparicion de demencia se valoro seis meses y cinco años despues de la ECP. Resultados. Setenta y uno de los 183 pacientes sometidos a la ECP del NST concluyeron los cinco años de seguimiento. Diez de ellos quedaron excluidos: dos por fallecimiento (cancer e infarto de miocardio), cinco por perdida de seguimiento y tres por la retirada del sistema de estimulacion. La funcion motora manifesto una mejora del 78% en el postoperatorio y del 66% a los cinco años. En el postoperatorio se aprecio mejoria de los sintomas axiales, pero al cabo de los cinco años habian empeorado de manera significativa (p < 0,001). Las puntuaciones de la mRS tambien mejoraron en el postoperatorio, pero a los cinco años tambien habian disminuido, pese a que la mayoria (88,5%) conservaba la capacidad ambulatoria (mRS < 4). Un paciente (1,6%) manifesto demencia a los seis meses, mientras que otros 19 (31,2%) la manifestaron al cabo de los cinco años. La edad de los pacientes dementes era notablemente mayor (56,5 ± 7,8 frente a 63,7 ± 5,9 años; p < 0,001). Conclusiones. En esta serie de casos, la ECP del NST demostro su eficacia en la mejora de los sintomas motores, aunque habian

  2. The History of Parkinson's Disease: Early Clinical Descriptions and Neurological Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    Although components of possible Parkinson's disease can be found in very early documents, the first clear medical description was written in 1817 by James Parkinson. In the mid-1800s, Jean-Martin Charcot was particularly influential in refining and expanding this early description and in disseminating information internationally about Parkinson's disease. He separated Parkinson's disease from multiple sclerosis and other disorders characterized by tremor, and he recognized cases that later would likely be classified among the Parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Early treatments of Parkinson's disease were based on empirical observation, and anticholinergic drugs were used as early as the nineteenth century. The discovery of dopaminergic deficits in Parkinson's disease and the synthetic pathway of dopamine led to the first human trials of levodopa. Further historically important anatomical, biochemical, and physiological studies identified additional pharmacological and neurosurgical targets for Parkinson's disease and allow modern clinicians to offer an array of therapies aimed at improving function in this still incurable disease. PMID:22229124

  3. People with Gaucher Disease at Seven to Nine Percent Risk of Developing Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... alike — in PDF's new scientific journal. Browse Now Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Science News People with Gaucher ... at Seven to Nine Percent Risk of Developing Parkinson's - May 16 2014 Researchers have shown that people ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease: New Research Offers Hope for Better Diagnosis and Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease New Research Offers Hope for Better Diagnosis and Treatments ... to rule out other diseases. Read More "Parkinson's Disease" Articles New Research Offers Hope for Better Diagnosis and Treatments / ...

  5. Is PIGD a legitimate motor subtype in Parkinson disease?

    PubMed

    Kotagal, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease is a chronic progressive syndrome with a broad array of clinical features. Different investigators have suggested the heterogeneous motor manifestations of early Parkinson disease can be conceptualized through a taxonomy of clinical subtypes including tremor-predominant and postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant subtypes. Although it is theoretically valuable to distinguish subtypes of Parkinson disease, the reality is that few patients fit these discrete categories well and many transition from exhibiting elements of one subtype to elements of another. In the time since the initial description of the postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant subtype, Parkinson disease clinical research has blossomed in many ways - including an increased emphasis on the role of medical comorbidities and extranigral pathologies in Parkinson disease as markers of prognostic significance. By conceptualizing the pathogenesis of an expansive disease process in the limited terms of categorical motor subtypes, we run the risk of overlooking or misclassifying clinically significant pathogenic risk factors that lead to the development of motor milestones such as falls and related axial motor disability. Given its critical influence on quality of life and overall prognosis, we are in need of a model of postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant features in Parkinson disease that emphasizes the overlooked pathological influence of aging and medical comorbidities on the development of axial motor burden and postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant features. This Point of View proposes thinking of postural instability and gait difficulties in Parkinson disease not as a discrete subtype, but rather as multidimensional continuum influenced by several overlapping age-related pathologies.

  6. Is PIGD a legitimate motor subtype in Parkinson disease?

    PubMed

    Kotagal, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease is a chronic progressive syndrome with a broad array of clinical features. Different investigators have suggested the heterogeneous motor manifestations of early Parkinson disease can be conceptualized through a taxonomy of clinical subtypes including tremor-predominant and postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant subtypes. Although it is theoretically valuable to distinguish subtypes of Parkinson disease, the reality is that few patients fit these discrete categories well and many transition from exhibiting elements of one subtype to elements of another. In the time since the initial description of the postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant subtype, Parkinson disease clinical research has blossomed in many ways - including an increased emphasis on the role of medical comorbidities and extranigral pathologies in Parkinson disease as markers of prognostic significance. By conceptualizing the pathogenesis of an expansive disease process in the limited terms of categorical motor subtypes, we run the risk of overlooking or misclassifying clinically significant pathogenic risk factors that lead to the development of motor milestones such as falls and related axial motor disability. Given its critical influence on quality of life and overall prognosis, we are in need of a model of postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant features in Parkinson disease that emphasizes the overlooked pathological influence of aging and medical comorbidities on the development of axial motor burden and postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant features. This Point of View proposes thinking of postural instability and gait difficulties in Parkinson disease not as a discrete subtype, but rather as multidimensional continuum influenced by several overlapping age-related pathologies. PMID:27547776

  7. The neurobiology of the spinal cord in experimental parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Michela; Biagioni, Francesca; Vivacqua, Giorgio; Busceti, Carla Letizia; Bartalucci, Alessia; Soldani, Paola; D'Este, Loredana; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Fornai, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    The neurobiology of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals a number of unexpected areas which once were not recognized a priori as part of the neuropathology underlying PD. These areas may belong either to central nervous system or periphery. Among central areas major efforts in the last decade led to recognize a number of brain nuclei as part of the disease spreading or disease onset in PD patients. Unexpectedly recent evidence deriving from pathological studies in PD patients and corroborated by experimental models of PD provided clear evidence that the spinal cord is often recruited in PD pathology. Such an involvement is intriguing since the major degenerative disease of the spinal cord (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) features the involvement of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta, while some environmental (parkinsonism, ALS, and dementia of Guam) and genetic (Kufor-Rakeb syndrome) diseases are known to be characterized by mixed degeneration of pyramidal and extrapyramidal regions. Thus, the clear-cut between degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the loss of pyramidal motor system appears now more as a continuum of   degeneration which converge in abnormal activity and cell pathology of motor neurons as a final common pathway. Among motor neurons, visceral efferent cells of the spinal cord are involved and provide a robust neurobiological findings which may justify a variety of non-motor autonomic symptoms which characterize PD. Neurodegeneration in the spinal cord extends to the dorsal horn of the grey matter posing an intriguing link between PD and sensory alterations. The present manuscript reviews the involvement of multiple regions of the spinal cord in PD and experimental parkinsonism in the attempt to provide both a neurobiological background to understand non motor symptoms and to provide the anatomical basis for disease spreading. PMID:24873929

  8. Dopamine correlates of neurological and psychological status in untreated Parkinsonism1

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, Margaret M.; Crowley, T. J.; Rutledge, C. O.

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-seven untreated Parkinsonism patients showed significant positive correlations among decreased excretion of free dopamine, MMPI scores indicative of schizophrenic-like looseness of thinking, and the severity of all Parkinsonism signs except tremor. The data could indicate that abnormalities of dopamine metabolism may underlie both the motor and mental abnormalities of Parkinsonism. PMID:1003240

  9. Glucocerebrosidase activity in Parkinson's disease with and without GBA mutations.

    PubMed

    Alcalay, Roy N; Levy, Oren A; Waters, Cheryl C; Fahn, Stanley; Ford, Blair; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Mazzoni, Pietro; Pauciulo, Michael W; Nichols, William C; Gan-Or, Ziv; Rouleau, Guy A; Chung, Wendy K; Wolf, Pavlina; Oliva, Petra; Keutzer, Joan; Marder, Karen; Zhang, Xiaokui

    2015-09-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations have been associated with Parkinson's disease in numerous studies. However, it is unknown whether the increased risk of Parkinson's disease in GBA carriers is due to a loss of glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity. We measured glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity in dried blood spots in patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 517) and controls (n = 252) with and without GBA mutations. Participants were recruited from Columbia University, New York, and fully sequenced for GBA mutations and genotyped for the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, the most common autosomal dominant mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity in dried blood spots was measured by a mass spectrometry-based assay and compared among participants categorized by GBA mutation status and Parkinson's disease diagnosis. Parkinson's disease patients were more likely than controls to carry the LRRK2 G2019S mutation (n = 39, 7.5% versus n = 2, 0.8%, P < 0.001) and GBA mutations or variants (seven homozygotes and compound heterozygotes and 81 heterozygotes, 17.0% versus 17 heterozygotes, 6.7%, P < 0.001). GBA homozygotes/compound heterozygotes had lower enzymatic activity than GBA heterozygotes (0.85 µmol/l/h versus 7.88 µmol/l/h, P < 0.001), and GBA heterozygotes had lower enzymatic activity than GBA and LRRK2 non-carriers (7.88 µmol/l/h versus 11.93 µmol/l/h, P < 0.001). Glucocerebrosidase activity was reduced in heterozygotes compared to non-carriers when each mutation was compared independently (N370S, P < 0.001; L444P, P < 0.001; 84GG, P = 0.003; R496H, P = 0.018) and also reduced in GBA variants associated with Parkinson's risk but not with Gaucher disease (E326K, P = 0.009; T369M, P < 0.001). When all patients with Parkinson's disease were considered, they had lower mean glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity than controls (11.14 µmol/l/h versus 11.85 µmol/l/h, P = 0.011). Difference compared to controls persisted in patients with

  10. 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Orimo, S; Ozawa, E; Nakade, S; Sugimoto, T; Mizusawa, H

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy is clinically used to estimate local myocardial sympathetic nerve damage in some forms of heart disease, autonomic nerve disturbance in diabetic neuropathy, and disturbance of the autonomic nervous system in neurodegenerative disease. In the present study, examinations were performed to clarify (1) the proportion of cardiac sympathetic nerve disturbance in Parkinson's disease, (2) the usefulness of 123I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy to detect sympathetic nerve disturbances compared with autonomic function tests, (3) cardiac function in patients who have a decreased MIBG uptake in 123I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy, (4) the usefulness of 123I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy to differentiate Parkinson's disease from the other neurological diseases mimicking it.
METHODS—123I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy was performed, together with autonomic function tests and cardiac examinations in 46 patients with Parkinson's disease and 25 patients with vascular parkinsonism, essential tremor, or multiple system atrophy.
RESULTS—In an anterior image study, the average count per pixel in heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio decreased in 80% of the patients with Parkinson's disease in the early phase and 84% in the late phase. The mean H/M ratio in Parkinson's disease was significantly lower than that in controls and the other diseases. The H/M ratio tended to decrease with the disease progression. In almost half of the patients in Hoehn and Yahr stage I, the H/M ratio was already decreased. The sympathetic skin response in upper and lower limbs, head up tilt test, and coefficient of variation of R-R interval were abnormal in 17%, 31%, 30%, and 17% of the patients, respectively. All the patients with abnormal autonomic functions were in Hoehn and Yahr stage III, IV, or V. Echocardiography showed normal left ventricular function. Twenty four hour Holter electrocardiography detected no serious arrhythmias except

  11. Anhedonia in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Assogna, Francesca; Cravello, Luca; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2011-08-15

    Anhedonia, defined as lowered ability to experience physical or social pleasure, is a key symptom of several psychiatric illnesses. In this systematic review, we aimed to evaluate the role of anhedonia in Parkinson's Disease and its relationships with other clinical characteristics, dopamine dysfunction, and antiparkinsonian therapy. The database was selected using PubMed Services. Relevant journals were hand-searched, and the bibliographies of all the important articles were scrutinized to find additional publications. Fifteen studies assessed the topic of anhedonia in Parkinson's disease from 1984 to 2009 and mainly described it as a core symptom of depression in patients with Parkinson's disease. Some studies investigated the relationship between anhedonia and neuropsychological symptoms and found correlations with frontal lobe functions. Reports on the relationship between anhedonia and illness severity or motor symptoms are rather inconclusive. No definitive conclusions can be drawn because few studies have been published on this topic. Nevertheless, some evidence suggests that in Parkinson's disease anhedonia is a secondary phenomenon linked to depression, apathy severity, and frontal lobe dysregulation and that it could respond to antiparkinsonian treatment. Future studies of larger samples of patients are strongly required to definitively clarify the relationship between anhedonia and other clinical features, such as depression, anxiety, apathy, cognition, and motor status. Furthermore, more reliable tools and validated diagnostic criteria are necessary to assess anhedonia in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  12. [Health-related quality of life in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Cano-de la Cuerda, Roberto; Vela-Desojo, Lydia; Miangolarra-Page, Juan C; Macías-Macías, Yolanda; Muñoz-Hellin, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a disabling and progressive neurological condition characterized by multiple motor and non motor symptoms that contribute to deterioration in quality of life. The diversity of symptoms associated with the disease and its management affect the patients on their physical, social and mental quality of life. The aim of this study was to identify key dimensions of health related quality of life (HRQOL) in a population affected with Parkinson's disease with a degree of mild-moderate impairment. Thirty six patients with Parkinson were recruited. The Hoehn and Yarh scale, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rate Scale, the scale of activities of daily life and Schwab & England Get Up & Go Test were applied. HRQOL was assessed with the EuroQol-5D and the specific questionnaire Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 items. The dimensions of the PDQ-39, except the PDQ-39 Pain domain and the EuroQol-5D correlated significantly with the severity of the disease. HRQOL was correlated with the functional status of patients. Only the PDQ-39 pain domain correlated with the risk of falls. Our results suggest that the HRQOL of patients with PD, in a state of mild-moderate impairment, is strongly influenced by disease severity and functional status. PMID:21163736

  13. Control effects of stimulus paradigms on characteristic firings of parkinsonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghui; Wang, Qingyun; Chen, Guanrong

    2014-09-01

    Experimental studies have shown that neuron population located in the basal ganglia of parkinsonian primates can exhibit characteristic firings with certain firing rates differing from normal brain activities. Motivated by recent experimental findings, we investigate the effects of various stimulation paradigms on the firing rates of parkinsonism based on the proposed dynamical models. Our results show that the closed-loop deep brain stimulation is superior in ameliorating the firing behaviors of the parkinsonism, and other control strategies have similar effects according to the observation of electrophysiological experiments. In addition, in conformity to physiological experiments, we found that there exists optimal delay of input in the closed-loop GPtrain|M1 paradigm, where more normal behaviors can be obtained. More interestingly, we observed that W-shaped curves of the firing rates always appear as stimulus delay varies. We furthermore verify the robustness of the obtained results by studying three pallidal discharge rates of the parkinsonism based on the conductance-based model, as well as the integrate-and-fire-or-burst model. Finally, we show that short-term plasticity can improve the firing rates and optimize the control effects on parkinsonism. Our conclusions may give more theoretical insight into Parkinson's disease studies.

  14. Gaucher disease and comorbidities: B-cell malignancy and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Cox, Timothy M; Rosenbloom, Barry E; Barker, Roger A

    2015-07-01

    Data emerging from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry together with other contemporary clinical surveys have revealed a close association between Gaucher disease and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma and myeloma and Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease. Several possible explanations for increased B-cell proliferation and neoplasia in Gaucher disease have been proposed, including the possible influence of sphingosine (derived from the extra lysosomal metabolism of glucosylceramide), gene modifiers, splenectomy and immune system deregulation induced by cytokines, chemokines, and hydrolases released from Gaucher cells. Parkinson's disease is frequently seen in the otherwise-healthy relatives of Gaucher disease patients leading to the finding that GBA mutations represent a genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of the association between GBA mutations and Parkinson's disease has yet to be elucidated but the pathogenesis appears distinct from that of Gaucher disease. Several pathogenic pathways have been proposed including lysosomal and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. The effect of Gaucher disease specific therapies on the incidence of cancer or Parkinson's disease are not clear and will likely be evaluated in future ICGG Gaucher Registry studies. PMID:26096744

  15. Depression in Parkinson's disease: a quantitative and qualitative analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Gotham, A M; Brown, R G; Marsden, C D

    1986-01-01

    Depression is a common feature of Parkinson's disease, a fact of both clinical and theoretical significance. Assessment of depression in Parkinson's disease is complicated by overlapping symptomatology in the two conditions, making global assessments based on observer or self-ratings of doubtful validity. The present study aimed to provide both a quantitative and qualitative description of the nature of the depressive changes found in Parkinson's disease as compared with normal elderly subjects and arthritis patients. As with previous studies, the patients with Parkinson's disease scored significantly higher than normal controls on various self-ratings of depression and anxiety but, in this study, did not differ from those with arthritis. Qualitatively, both the Parkinson's disease and the arthritis groups had depression characterised by pessimism and hopelessness, decreased motivation and drive, and increased concern with health. In contrast, the negative affective feelings of guilt, self-blame and worthlessness were absent in both patient groups. This pattern of depression was significantly associated with severity of illness and functional disability. However, these factors account for only a modest proportion of the variability in test scores. Probable unexplored factors are individual differences in coping style and availability of support. PMID:3701347

  16. Living with Parkinson's and the Emerging Role of Occupational Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jansa, Jelka; Aragon, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic and increasingly complex condition, demanding multidisciplinary management. Over the last twenty years or so, alongside the growth of specialist services and healthcare teams specifically developed for people with Parkinson's, occupational therapy has grown in recognition as a treatment option, especially since evidence of its efficacy is now slowly emerging. The purpose of this work is to outline the role of occupational therapy clinical practice in the management of people living with Parkinson's disease and its emergent evidence base, combined with details of current occupational therapy philosophy and process, as applicable to occupational therapy practice for people with Parkinson's. The Canadian Practice Process Framework is used to structure this overview and was selected because it is a well-recognized, evidence-based tool used by occupational therapists and encompasses the core concepts of human occupation and person-centred practice. The framework employed allows the flexibility to reflect the pragmatic occupational therapy intervention process and so enables the illustration of the individually tailored approach required to accommodate to the complex pathology and personal, domestic, and social impacts, affecting the functioning of Parkinson's disease patients on a daily basis. PMID:26495151

  17. Parkinson's disease hand tremor detection system for mobile application.

    PubMed

    Fraiwan, Luay; Khnouf, Ruba; Mashagbeh, Abdel Razaq

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease currently affects millions of people worldwide and is steadily increasing. Many symptoms are associated with this disease, including rest tremor, bradykinesia, stiffness or rigidity of the extremities and postural instability. No cure is currently available for Parkinson's disease patients; instead most medications are for treatment of symptoms. This treatment depends on the quantification of these symptoms such as hand tremor. This work proposes a new system for mobile phone applications. The system is based on measuring the acceleration from the Parkinson's disease patient's hand using a mobile cell phone accelerometer. Recordings from 21 Parkinson's disease patients and 21 healthy subjects were used. These recordings were analysed using a two level wavelet packet analysis and features were extracted forming a feature vector of 12 elements. The features extracted from the 42 subjects were classified using a neural networks classifier. The results obtained showed an accuracy of 95% and a Kappa coefficient of 90%. These results indicate that a cell phone accelerometer can accurately detect and record rest tremor in Parkinson's disease patients. PMID:26977823

  18. Fibroblasts from skin biopsies as a tool for biomarker discovery in Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Mastroberardino, Pier Giorgio; Ambrosi, Giulia; Blandini, Fabio; Milanese, Chiara; Sepe, Sara

    2014-10-01

    Parkinson׳s disease (PD) is a complex disease and the current interest and focus of scientific research is both investigating the variety of causes that underlie PD pathogenesis, and identifying reliable biomarkers to diagnose and monitor the progression of pathology. Investigation on pathogenic mechanisms in peripheral cells, such as fibroblasts derived from patients with sporadic PD and age/gender matched controls, might generate deeper understanding of the deficits affecting dopaminergic neurons and, possibly, new tools applicable to clinical practice. The chronic and slow progressing nature of PD may result from subtle yet persistent alterations in biological mechanisms, which might be undetectable in basal, unchallenged conditions. Unlike body fluids, dermal fibroblasts can be exposed to different challenges while in culture and can therefore generate information about the dynamic cellular responses to exogenous stressors. These studies may ultimately generate indicators highlighting the biological defects intrinsic to PD. In fact, fibroblasts from idiopathic PD patients' exhibit deficits typically sustaining the neurodegenerative process of PD, such as increased susceptibility to rotenone as well as deficits in protein homeostasis and mitochondrial bioenergetics Fibroblasts therefore represent a powerful and minimally invasive tool to investigate PD pathogenic mechanisms, which might translate into considerable advances in clinical management of the disease. PMID:26461279

  19. Low Cerebral Glucose Metabolism: A Potential Predictor for the Severity of Vascular Parkinsonism and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunqi; Wei, Xiaobo; Liu, Xu; Liao, Jinchi; Lin, Jiaping; Zhu, Cansheng; Meng, Xiaochun; Xie, Dongsi; Chao, Dongman; Fenoy, Albert J; Cheng, Muhua; Tang, Beisha; Zhang, Zhuohua; Xia, Ying; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    This study explored the association between cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRGlc) and the severity of Vascular Parkinsonism (VP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). A cross-sectional study was performed to compare CMRGlc in normal subjects vs. VP and PD patients. Twelve normal subjects, 22 VP, and 11 PD patients were evaluated with the H&Y and MMSE, and underwent 18F-FDG measurements. Pearson's correlations were used to identify potential associations between the severity of VP/PD and CMRGlc. A pronounced reduction of CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen was detected in patients with VP and PD when compared with normal subjects. The VP patients displayed a slight CMRGlc decrease in the caudate putamen and frontal lobe in comparison with PD patients. These decreases in CMRGlc in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen were significantly correlated with the VP patients' H&Y, UPDRS II, UPDRS III, MMSE, cardiovascular, and attention/memory scores. Similarly, significant correlations were observed in patients with PD. This is the first clinical study finding strong evidence for an association between low cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of VP and PD. Our findings suggest that these changes in glucose metabolism in the frontal lobe and caudate putamen may underlie the pathophysiological mechanisms of VP and PD. As the scramble to find imaging biomarkers or predictors of the disease intensifies, a better understanding of the roles of cerebral glucose metabolism may give us insight into the pathogenesis of VP and PD. PMID:26618044

  20. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of four Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.D.; Shoffner, J.M.; Wallace, D.C.

    1996-01-22

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence was determined on 3 patients with Alzheimer`s disease (AD) exhibiting AD plus Parkinson`s disease (PD) neuropathologic changes and one patient with PD. Patient mtDNA sequences were compared to the standard Cambridge sequence to identify base changes. In the first AD + PD patient, 2 of the 15 nucleotide substitutions may contribute to the neuropathology, a nucleotide pair (np) 4336 transition in the tRNA{sup Gln} gene found 7.4 times more frequently in patients than in controls, and a unique np 721 transition in the 12S rRNA gene which was not found in 70 other patients or 905 controls. In the second AD + PD patient, 27 nucleotide substitutions were detected, including an np 3397 transition in the ND1 gene which converts a conserved methionine to a valine. In the third AD + PD patient, 2 polymorphic base substitutions frequently found at increased frequency in Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy patients were observed, an np 4216 transition in ND1 and an np 13708 transition in the ND5 gene. For the PD patient, 2 novel variants were observed among 25 base substitutions, an np 1709 substitution in the 16S rRNA gene and an np 15851 missense mutation in the cytb gene. Further studies will be required to demonstrate a casual role for these base substitutions in neurodegenerative disease. 68 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. MR parkinsonism index predicts vertical supranuclear gaze palsy in patients with PSP–parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, Maurizio; Williams, David R.; Vescio, Basilio; Arabia, Gennarina; Nigro, Salvatore; Nicoletti, Giuseppe; Salsone, Maria; Novellino, Fabiana; Nisticò, Rita; Pucci, Franco; Chiriaco, Carmelina; Pugliese, Pierfrancesco; Bosco, Domenico; Caracciolo, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify a biomarker for predicting the appearance of vertical supranuclear gaze palsy (VSGP) in patients affected by progressive supranuclear palsy–parkinsonism (PSP-P). Methods: Twenty-four patients with PSP-P were enrolled in the current study. Patients were clinically followed up every 6 months until the appearance of VSGP or the end of the follow-up (4 years). Participants underwent MRI at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Magnetic resonance parkinsonism index (MRPI), an imaging measure useful for diagnosing PSP, was calculated. Results: Twenty-one patients with PSP-P completed follow-up, and 3 patients dropped out. Eleven of 21 patients with PSP-P developed VSGP after a mean follow-up period of 28.5 months (range 6–48 months), while the remaining 10 patients with PSP-P did not develop VSGP during the 4-year follow-up period. At baseline, patients with PSP-P who later developed VSGP had MRPI values significantly higher than those of patients not developing VSGP without overlapping values between the 2 groups. MRPI showed a higher accuracy (100%) in predicting VSGP than vertical ocular slowness (accuracy 33.3%) or postural instability with or without vertical ocular slowness (accuracy 71.4% and 42.9%, respectively). Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that MRPI accurately predicted, on an individual basis, the appearance of VSGP in patients with PSP-P, thus confirming clinical diagnosis in vivo. PMID:27558375

  2. Pisa syndrome in Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism: clinical features, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Barone, Paolo; Santangelo, Gabriella; Amboni, Marianna; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Vitale, Carmine

    2016-09-01

    Pisa syndrome is defined as a reversible lateral bending of the trunk with a tendency to lean to one side. It is a frequent and often disabling complication of Parkinson's disease, and has also been described in several atypical forms of parkinsonism and in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders after drug exposure and surgical procedures. Although no consistent diagnostic criteria for Pisa syndrome are available, most investigations have adopted an arbitrary cutoff of at least 10° of lateral flexion for the diagnosis of the syndrome. Pathophysiological mechanisms underlying Pisa syndrome have not been fully explained. One hypothesis emphasises central mechanisms, whereby Pisa syndrome is thought to be caused by alterations in sensory-motor integration pathways; by contrast, a peripheral hypothesis emphasises the role of anatomical changes in the musculoskeletal system. Furthermore, several drugs are reported to induce Pisa syndrome, including antiparkinsonian drugs. As Pisa syndrome might be reversible, clinicians need to be able to recognise this condition early to enable prompt management. Nevertheless, further research is needed to determine optimum treatment strategies. PMID:27571158

  3. Parkinson's disease and history of outdoor occupation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Elena; Gallagher, Lisa G.; Nielsen, Susan Searles; Franklin, Gary M.; Littell, Christopher T.; Longstreth, W.T.; Swanson, Phillip D.; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Background Human and animal studies, albeit not fully consistent, suggest that vitamin D may reduce risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). Ultraviolet radiation converts vitamin D precursor to the active form. This study examined the hypothesis that working outdoors is associated with a decreased risk of PD. Methods PD cases were enrolled from Group Health Cooperative, a health maintenance organization in the Puget Sound region in western Washington State, and the University of Washington Neurology Clinic in Seattle. Participants included 447 non-Hispanic Caucasian newly diagnosed PD cases diagnosed between 1992 and 2008 and 578 unrelated neurologically normal controls enrolled in Group Health Cooperative, frequency matched by race/ethnicity, age and gender. Subjects' amount of outdoor work was estimated from self-reported occupational histories. Jobs were categorized by degree of time spent working outdoors. A ten-year lag interval was included to account for disease latency. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by logistic regression, with adjustment for age, gender, and smoking. Results Outdoor work was inversely associated with risk of PD (outdoor only compared to indoor only): OR= 0.74, 95% CI 0.44-1.25. However, there was no trend in relation to portion of the workday spent laboring outdoors and PD risk. Conclusion Occupational sunlight exposure and other correlates of outdoor work is not likely to have a substantial role in the etiology of PD. PMID:24044947

  4. Multimodal Imaging Signatures of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, F. DuBois; Drake, Daniel F.; Huddleston, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that manifests through hallmark motor symptoms, often accompanied by a range of non-motor symptoms. There is a putative delay between the onset of the neurodegenerative process, marked by the death of dopamine-producing cells, and the onset of motor symptoms, creating an urgent need to develop biomarkers that may yield early PD detection. Neuroimaging offers a non-invasive approach to examining the potential utility of a vast number of functional and structural brain characteristics as biomarkers. We present a statistical framework for analyzing neuroimaging data from multiple modalities to determine features that reliably distinguish PD patients from healthy control (HC) subjects. Our approach builds on elastic net, performing regularization and variable selection, while introducing additional criteria centering on parsimony and reproducibility. We apply our method to data from 42 subjects (28 PD patients and 14 HC). Our approach demonstrates extremely high accuracy, assessed via cross-validation, and isolates brain regions that are implicated in the neurodegenerative PD process. PMID:27147942

  5. The Cholinergic System and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Albin, Roger L.

    2010-01-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is viewed traditionally as a motor syndrome secondary to nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, recent studies emphasize non-motor features. Non-motor comorbidities, such as cognitive impairment, are likely the result of an intricate interplay of multi-system degenerations and neurotransmitter deficiencies extending beyond the loss of dopaminergic nigral neurons. The pathological hallmark of parkinsonian dementia is the presence of extra-nigral Lewy bodies that can be accompanied by other pathologies, such as senile plaques. Lewy first identified the eponymous Lewy body in neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM), the source of cholinergic innervation of the cerebral cortex. Although cholinergic denervation is recognized as a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), in vivo neuroimaging studies reveal loss of cerebral cholinergic markers in parkinsonian dementia similar to or more severe than in prototypical AD. Imaging studies agree with post-mortem evidence suggesting that basal forebrain cholinergic system degeneration appears early in PD and worsens coincident with the appearance of dementia. Early cholinergic denervation in PD without dementia appears to be heterogeneous and may make specific contributions to the PD clinical phenotype. Apart from well-known cognitive and behavioral deficits, central, in particular limbic, cholinergic denervation may be associated with progressive deficits of odor identification in PD. Recent evidence indicates also that subcortical cholinergic denervation, probably due to degeneration of brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus neurons, may relate to the presence of dopamine non-responsive gait and balance impairments, including falls, in PD. PMID:20060022

  6. Epidemiology of psychosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fénelon, Gilles; Alves, Guido

    2010-02-15

    Psychotic symptoms are frequent and disabling in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methodological issues in the epidemiology of PD associated psychosis (PDP) include differences in the symptoms assessed, the methods of assessment, and the selection of patients. Most studies are prospective clinic-based cross-sectional studies providing point prevalence rates in samples on dopaminergic treatment. Visual hallucinations are present in about one quarter to one third of the patients, auditory in up to 20%. Tactile/somatic, and olfactory hallucinations are usually not systematically sought. Minor phenomena such as sense of presence and visual illusions affect 17 to 72% of the patients, and delusions about 5%. Lifetime prevalence of visual hallucinations reaches approximately 50%. Prospective longitudinal cohort studies suggest that hallucinations persist and worsen in individual patients, and that their prevalence increases with time. A facilitating role of treatment on PDP is demonstrated at least for dopaminergic agonists, but there is no simple dose-effect relationship between dopaminergic treatment and the presence or severity of hallucinations. The main endogenous non-modifiable risk factor is cognitive impairment. Other associated factors include older age/longer duration of PD, disease severity, altered dream phenomena, daytime somnolence, and possibly depression and dysautonomia. PDP reduces quality of life in patients and increases caregiver distress, and is an independent risk factor for nursing home placement and development of dementia. PMID:19740486

  7. Eryptosis as a marker of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Swanepoel, Albe C; Buys, Antoinette V; Vermeulen, Natasha; Duim, Wiebren; Kell, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    A major trend in recent Parkinson's disease (PD) research is the investigation of biological markers that could help in identifying at-risk individuals or to track disease progression and response to therapies. Central to this is the knowledge that inflammation is a known hallmark of PD and of many other degenerative diseases. In the current work, we focus on inflammatory signalling in PD, using a systems approach that allows us to look at the disease in a more holistic way. We discuss cyclooxygenases, prostaglandins, thromboxanes and also iron in PD. These particular signalling molecules are involved in PD pathophysiology, but are also very important in an aberrant coagulation/hematology system. We present and discuss a hypothesis regarding the possible interaction of these aberrant signalling molecules implicated in PD, and suggest that these molecules may affect the erythrocytes of PD patients. This would be observable as changes in the morphology of the RBCs and of PD patients relative to healthy controls. We then show that the RBCs of PD patients are indeed rather dramatically deranged in their morphology, exhibiting eryptosis (a kind of programmed cell death). This morphological indicator may have useful diagnostic and prognostic significance. PMID:25411230

  8. Online multimedia teaching tool for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Misiaszek, Greg; Riconscente, Michelle; Henke, Maria; Walsh, John P

    2008-01-01

    We developed an online multimedia tool designed to enhance the student-learning environment in neurosciences through multi-sensory engagement. The combined use of scrolling text, narrations, and visual imagery engages multiple sensory modalities for effective learning, and it assists students in visualizing complex processes in the nervous system. The initial rollout of the online tool is for instruction in Parkinson's disease (PD), but its structure is flexible and can be used for teaching a variety of subjects. The instructor can access the tool online during lecture, and students can access the same information via the internet outside of class. In addition, each chapter is stand-alone and thus can be accessed online by other faculty or students to supplement other courses. Within each chapter or module, information is presented in outline format with greater detail accessible via sequential drop-down menus. This layering of related topics creates a spatial and motor-accessed path for learning. These multiple forms of engagement offer rich information representations to improve students' knowledge encoding, storing, and retrieval via multiple pathways. For instance, the tool includes student-controlled 2-D and 3-D animations, and video clip demonstrations of both patient case studies and on-campus research projects directly related to the subject material. Supplemental readings consist of current research articles (in Adobe Acrobat PDF file format) accessed within each educational topic. The teaching tool for PD is online at http://geroauen.usc.edu/Gero414_Beta/.

  9. The pathology roadmap in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Surmeier, D. James; Sulzer, David

    2013-01-01

    An under-appreciated clue about pathogenesis in Parkinson disease (PD) is the distribution of pathology in the early and middle stages of the disease. This pathological ‘roadmap’ shows that in addition to dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), a significant number of other central and peripheral neuronal populations exhibit Lewy pathology, phenotypic dysregulation or frank degeneration in PD patients. This spatially distributed, at-risk population of neurons shares a number of features, including autonomously generated activity, broad action potentials, low intrinsic calcium buffering capacity and long, poorly myelinated, highly branched axons. Many, and perhaps all, of these traits add to the metabolic burden in these neurons, suggesting that mitochondrial deficits could drive pathogenesis in PD—in agreement with a large segment of the literature. What is less clear is how this neuronal phenotype might shape the susceptibility to proteostatic dysfunction or to the spread of α-synuclein fibrils deposited in the extracellular space. The review explores the literature on these issues and their translational implications. PMID:23324593

  10. Components of depression in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Zahodne, Laura B; Marsiske, Michael; Okun, Michael S; Bowers, Dawn

    2012-09-01

    Depression is a clinically heterogeneous disorder common in Parkinson disease (PD). The goal of this study was to characterize PD depression in terms of components, including negative affect, apathy, and anhedonia. Ninety-five, nondemented individuals with idiopathic PD underwent a diagnostic interview and psychological battery. Twenty-seven patients (28%) met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition [DSM-IV]) criteria for a current depressive episode. The best-fitting confirmatory factor analysis model had 3 factors (negative affect, apathy, and anhedonia). Apathy loaded most strongly onto a second-order factor representing global psychological disturbance. All factors are uniquely associated with depression status. Negative affect exhibited the strongest relationship. Psychological disturbance in PD is heterogeneous and can produce symptoms of apathy, anhedonia, and negative affect. Apathy appears to be the core neuropsychiatric feature of PD, whereas negative affect (eg, dysphoria) seems to be most pathognomonic of depression. Future studies should examine the specific neural correlates and treatment response patterns unique to these 3 components.

  11. Non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Poewe, W

    2008-04-01

    Although still considered a paradigmatic movement disorder, Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with a broad spectrum of non-motor symptoms. These include disorders of mood and affect with apathy, anhedonia and depression, cognitive dysfunction and hallucinosis, as well as complex behavioural disorders. Sensory dysfunction with hyposmia or pain is almost universal, as are disturbances of sleep-wake cycle regulation. Autonomic dysfunction including orthostatic hypotension, urogenital dysfunction and constipation is also present to some degree in a majority of patients. Whilst overall non-motor symptoms become increasingly prevalent with advancing disease, many of them can also antedate the first occurrence of motor signs - most notably depression, hyposmia or rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD). Although exact clinicopathological correlations for most of these non-motor features are still poorly understood, the occurrence of constipation, RBD or hyposmia prior to the onset of clinically overt motor dysfunction would appear consistent with the ascending hypothesis of PD pathology proposed by Braak and colleagues. Screening these early non-motor features might, therefore, be one approach towards early 'preclinical' diagnosis of PD. This review article provides an overview of the clinical spectrum of non-motor symptoms in PD together with a brief review of treatment options.

  12. Phenomenology of dreams in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Borek, Leora L; Kohn, Robert; Friedman, Joseph H

    2007-01-15

    Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) occurs in approximately one third of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and is associated with a loss of muscle atonia during REM sleep and aggressive dream content. We examined the dream characteristics of PD patients to determine whether dream content differed between patients with RBD and without RBD, men and women with RBD, and men and women with PD. One hundred-twenty patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic PD were consecutively recruited from a movement disorders clinic and were assessed for RBD using clinical diagnostic criteria of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders Revised (2001). Verbatim dream content was obtained from each patient and categorized into dream themes that were coded into nominal categories. Fisher's exact tests determined whether particular dreams were correlated with RBD versus non-RBD, men and women with RBD, and men and women with PD. RBD patients had a higher percentage of violent dreams compared to non-RBD patients. There were no significant sex differences in the dream content of RBD patients. Men with PD had more aggressive dreams compared to females with PD. Aggressive dream content was characteristic of RBD patients and sex differences exist in the dream content of the PD population.

  13. Oral Health in Elders with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Giselle Rodrigues; Campos, Camila Heitor; Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate objectively and subjectively the oral health of elders with Parkinson's disease (PD), using clinical oral assessments and the General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI). Subjects included 37 removable prosthesis wearers, 17 with PD (mean age 69.59±5.09 years) and 20 without PD (mean age 72.00±5.69 years). The objective assessment included an evaluation of oral characteristics, including the number of remaining teeth, decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT), visible plaque index (VPI), salivary flow rate and removable prosthesis conditions. The subjective assessment included self-perception of oral health collected using the GOHAI index. The number of remaining teeth, DMFT, VPI, salivary flow rate and GOHAI data were compared between the groups using t-tests. Removable prosthesis conditions were analyzed using χ2 tests (p<0.05). There were no group differences in the number of remaining teeth, DMFT, VPI or salivary flow rate (p>0.05). Greater maxillary prosthesis defects were observed in the control group (p=0.037). GOHAI scores were low for the PD group and moderate for controls, yielding a group difference (p=0.04). In conclusion, elders with PD have similar oral health to controls. Although all elders had few remaining teeth, high DMFT and high VPI, PD elders had more negative self-perceptions of their oral health than did the controls. PMID:27224571

  14. Opicapone: A Review in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2016-09-01

    Oral opicapone (Ongentys(®)), a potent, third-generation, long-acting, peripheral catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor, is approved as adjunctive treatment to levodopa (L-Dopa)/dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor (DDCI) therapy in adults with Parkinson's disease (PD) and end-of-dose motor fluctuations who cannot be stabilized on those combinations. In 14- to 15-week, double-blind, multinational trials and in 1-year, open-label extension studies in this patient population, opicapone was an effective and generally well tolerated adjunctive therapy to L-Dopa plus a DDCI and other PD therapy. During the double-blind phase, adjunctive opicapone 50 mg once daily provided significantly greater improvements in motor fluctuations than placebo, with these improvements noninferior to those with entacapone. These beneficial improvements in motor fluctuations with opicapone were maintained in patients who continued adjunctive opicapone during the extension studies, with patients who switched from placebo or entacapone to opicapone experiencing significant improvements in motor fluctuations during this year. No new unexpected safety concerns were identified after ≈1.4 years' treatment with opicapone, with no serious cases of hepatotoxicity reported in clinical trials. With its convenient once-daily regimen, oral opicapone is an emerging COMT inhibitor option for use as adjunctive therapy to L-Dopa/DDCI therapy in adults with PD and end-of dose motor fluctuations who cannot be stabilized on those combinations. PMID:27498199

  15. Synaptic protein alterations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Ilse S; Burn, David; Morris, Christopher; Dexter, David

    2012-02-01

    Alterations occur within distal neuronal compartments, including axons and synapses, during the course of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). These changes could hold important implications for the functioning of neural networks, especially since research studies have shown a loss of dendritic spines locating to medium spiny projection neurons and impaired axonal transport in PD-affected brains. However, despite ever-increasing awareness of the vulnerability of synapses and axons, inadequate understanding of the independent mechanisms regulating non-somatic neurodegeneration prevails. This has resulted in limited therapeutic strategies capable of targeting these distinct cellular compartments. Deregulated protein synthesis, folding and degrading proteins, and protein quality-control systems have repeatedly been linked with morphological and functional alterations of synapses in the PD-affected brains. Here, we review current understanding concerning the proteins involved in structural and functional changes that affect synaptic contact-points in PD. The collection of studies discussed emphasizes the need for developing therapeutics aimed at deregulated protein synthesis and degradation pathways operating at axonal and dendritic synapses for preserving "normal" circuitry and function, for as long as possible.

  16. How to treat Parkinson's disease in 2013.

    PubMed

    Worth, Paul F

    2013-02-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common, progressive, debilitating disease with substantial physical, psychological and social implications. Pharmacological management is complex and should be individualised according to the needs of the patient. In early disease, treatment is generally highly effective, but medication becomes increasingly inadequate in controlling motor fluctuations and dyskinesias as the disease progresses. Non-motor symptoms, especially depression and dementia, require a holistic, multidisciplinary approach to maximise quality of life for patients and their carers. For the future, the ideal solution remains neuroprotection and restoration. Progress has been hampered by the lack of animal models that reflect the widespread brain pathology presumed to cause both motor and non-motor symptoms of PD in humans. Currently, agents are undergoing clinical trials in early, mildly affected patients, such as the plant-derived substance PYM50028 (Cogane), which promotes expression of endogenous neural growth factors and has shown promise in vitro and in animal models. Gene-therapy trials in progress rely on the viral vectors used to deliver the enzymatic machinery required for dopamine synthesis to the striatum. As PD progresses, adequate control of motor symptoms depends increasingly on continuous drug delivery, and greater physiological stimulation of dopamine receptors may help to prevent the development of LIDs and motor fluctuations. Efforts thus are afoot to develop better delivery systems for levodopa, and a new sustained-release formulation is in development.

  17. Neurotransmission in Parkinson's disease: beyond dopamine.

    PubMed

    Barone, P

    2010-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is most frequently associated with characteristic motor symptoms that are known to arise with degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. However, patients with this disease also experience a multitude of non-motor symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, apathy, anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment, dementia, olfactory dysfunction, pain, sweating and constipation, some of which can be at least as debilitating as the movement disorders and have a major impact on patients' quality of life. Many of these non-motor symptoms may be evident prior to the onset of motor dysfunction. The neuropathology of PD has shown that complex, interconnected neuronal systems, regulated by a number of different neurotransmitters in addition to dopamine, are involved in the aetiology of motor and non-motor symptoms. This review focuses on the non-dopaminergic neurotransmission systems associated with PD with particular reference to the effect that their modulation and interaction with dopamine has on the non-motor symptoms of the disease. PD treatments that focus on the dopaminergic system alone are unable to alleviate both motor and non-motor symptoms, particularly those that develop at early stages of the disease. The development of agents that interact with several of the affected neurotransmission systems could prove invaluable for the treatment of this disease.

  18. Neurofeedback and physical balance in Parkinson's patients.

    PubMed

    Azarpaikan, Atefeh; Torbati, Hamidreza Taherii; Sohrabi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of the present research is to study the effect of a neurofeedback training (NFT) period on balance problems associated with Parkinson's disease. Sixteen patients were selected through purposive sampling and were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. The research procedure included eight sessions. Prior to and after training, pre-tests and post-tests of static and dynamic balance were administered using "limit of stability" for the Biodex as well as the Berg scale. The results revealed that, after neurofeedback training, a statistically significant improvement in both static and dynamic balance in the experimental group was achieved. The means of the Biodex and Berg scores in the experimental group increased from 18.87 to 42.87 and 17.62 to 46.37, respectively. The means of the Biodex and Berg scores in the control group in the pretest were 18.25 and 17.75 and increased to 20.00 and 20.50, respectively. The results suggest that NFT can improve static and dynamic balance in PD patients.

  19. Traversing a wormhole to combat Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Guy A; Caldwell, Kim A

    2008-01-01

    Human movement disorders represent a significant and unresolved societal burden. Among these, the most prevalent is Parkinson's disease (PD), a disorder afflicting millions worldwide. Despite major advances, stemming primarily from human genetics, there remains a significant gap in our understanding of what factors underlie disease susceptibility, onset, and progression. Innovative strategies to discern specific intracellular targets for subsequent drug development are needed to more rapidly translate basic findings to the clinic. Here we briefly review the recent contributions of research using the nematode roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system for identifying and characterizing gene products associated with PD. As a microscopic but multicellular and genetically tractable animal with a well-defined nervous system and an experimentally tenable lifespan, C. elegans affords significant advantages to researchers attempting to determine causative and therapeutic factors that influence neuronal dysfunction and age-associated neurodegeneration. The rapidity with which traditional genetic, large-scale genomic, and pharmacological screening can be applied to C. elegans epitomizes the utility of this animal for disease research. Moreover, with mature bioinformatic and functional genomic data readily available, the nematode is well positioned to play an increasingly important role in PD-associated discoveries.

  20. Drooling in Parkinson's Disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Pandey, Sanjay; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease causing both motor and non-motor symptoms. Drooling, an excessive pooling and spillover of saliva out of the oral cavity, is one of the non-motor symptoms in PD patients that produces various negative physical and psychosocial consequences for patients and their caregivers. At present, the pathophysiology of drooling in PD is not completely certain; however, impaired intra-oral salivary clearance is likely the major contributor. There are neither standard diagnostic criteria nor standard severity assessment tools for evaluating drooling in PD. In accordance with the possible pathophysiology, dopaminergic agents have been used to improve salivary clearance; however, these agents are not completely effective in controlling drooling. Various pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment options have been studied. Local injection with botulinum toxin serotypes A and B into major salivary glands is most effective to reduce drooling. Future research to explore the exact pathophysiology and develop standard diagnostic criteria and standard severity assessment tools are needed to formulate specific treatment options and improve patient care. PMID:25200111

  1. Altered pharyngeal muscles in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; Su, Hungxi; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H; Shill, Holly A; Caviness, John N; Samanta, Johan E; Beach, Thomas G

    2012-06-01

    Dysphagia (impaired swallowing) is common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and is related to aspiration pneumonia, the primary cause of death in PD. Therapies that ameliorate the limb motor symptoms of PD are ineffective for dysphagia. This suggests that the pathophysiology of PD dysphagia may differ from that affecting limb muscles, but little is known about potential neuromuscular abnormalities in the swallowing muscles in PD. This study examined the fiber histochemistry of pharyngeal constrictor and cricopharyngeal sphincter muscles in postmortem specimens from 8 subjects with PD and 4 age-matched control subjects. Pharyngeal muscles in subjects with PD exhibited many atrophic fibers, fiber type grouping, and fast-to-slow myosin heavy chain transformation. These alterations indicate that the pharyngeal muscles experienced neural degeneration and regeneration over the course of PD. Notably, subjects with PD with dysphagia had a higher percentage of atrophic myofibers versus with those without dysphagia and controls. The fast-to-slow fiber-type transition is consistent with abnormalities in swallowing, slow movement of food, and increased tone in the cricopharyngeal sphincter in subjects with PD. The alterations in the pharyngeal muscles may play a pathogenic role in the development of dysphagia in subjects with PD.

  2. Cutaneous autonomic denervation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Otano, Judith; Casanova-Mollà, Jordi; Morales, Merche; Valls-Solé, Josep; Tolosa, Eduard

    2015-08-01

    Numerous studies have detailed involvement of the peripheral autonomic nervous system (PANS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). We assessed autonomic innervation of dermal annexes through quantitative fluorescence measurement from skin obtained via punch biopsies at distal leg region in PD and control subjects. We defined a ratio between the area corresponding to protein gen product (PGP) immunoreactivity and the area corresponding to blood vessel or sweat gland as a quantitative measure of autonomic innervation. Presence of alpha-synuclein (AS) deposits in dermis and hypodermis was also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Skin biopsies form six PD patients and six healthy controls were studied. Autonomic innervation scores were lower in PD than in controls in both blood vessels and sweat glands. No AS or phosphorylated AS (pAS) immunoreactivity was detected in dermis or hypodermis in any of the studied subjects. The results of this investigation suggest that autonomic innervation of dermal annexes in living patients with PD is reduced compared to controls. AS or pAS deposits were not found in dermis or hypodermis suggesting that distal leg skin study is not useful for in vivo detection of AS in PD.

  3. Blood biomarker for Parkinson disease: peptoids

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Umar; Zaman, Sayed; Hynan, Linda S; Brown, L Steven; Dewey, Richard B; Karp, David; German, Dwight C

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. Because dopaminergic neuronal loss begins years before motor symptoms appear, a biomarker for the early identification of the disease is critical for the study of putative neuroprotective therapies. Brain imaging of the nigrostriatal dopamine system has been used as a biomarker for early disease along with cerebrospinal fluid analysis of α-synuclein, but a less costly and relatively non-invasive biomarker would be optimal. We sought to identify an antibody biomarker in the blood of PD patients using a combinatorial peptoid library approach. We examined serum samples from 75 PD patients, 25 de novo PD patients, and 104 normal control subjects in the NINDS Parkinson’s Disease Biomarker Program. We identified a peptoid, PD2, which binds significantly higher levels of IgG3 antibody in PD versus control subjects (P<0.0001) and is 68% accurate in identifying PD. The PD2 peptoid is 84% accurate in identifying de novo PD. Also, IgG3 levels are significantly higher in PD versus control serum (P<0.001). Finally, PD2 levels are positively correlated with the United Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale score (r = 0.457, P<0001), a marker of disease severity. The PD2 peptoid may be useful for the early-stage identification of PD, and serve as an indicator of disease severity. Additional studies are needed to validate this PD biomarker. PMID:27812535

  4. Dopaminergic Dysregulation, Artistic Expressiveness, and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    López-Pousa, S.; Lombardía-Fernández, C.; Olmo, J. Garre; Monserrat-Vila, S.; Vilalta-Franch, J.; Calvó-Perxas, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The most frequent behavioral manifestations in Parkinson's disease (PD) are attributed to the dopaminergic dysregulation syndrome (DDS), which is considered to be secondary to the iatrogenic effects of the drugs that replace dopamine. Over the past few years some cases of patients improving their creative abilities after starting treatment with dopaminergic pharmaceuticals have been reported. These effects have not been clearly associated to DDS, but a relationship has been pointed out. Methods Case study of a patient with PD. The evolution of her paintings along medication changes and disease advance has been analyzed. Results The patient showed a compulsive increase of pictorial production after the diagnosis of PD was made. She made her best paintings when treated with cabergolide, and while painting, she reported a feeling of well-being, with loss of awareness of the disease and reduction of physical limitations. Conclusions Dopaminergic antagonists (DA) trigger a dopaminergic dysfunction that alters artistic creativity in patients having a predisposition for it. The development of these skills might be due to the dopaminergic overstimulation due to the therapy with DA, which causes a neurophysiological alteration that globally determines DDS. PMID:23185168

  5. Cutaneous autonomic denervation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Otano, Judith; Casanova-Mollà, Jordi; Morales, Merche; Valls-Solé, Josep; Tolosa, Eduard

    2015-08-01

    Numerous studies have detailed involvement of the peripheral autonomic nervous system (PANS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). We assessed autonomic innervation of dermal annexes through quantitative fluorescence measurement from skin obtained via punch biopsies at distal leg region in PD and control subjects. We defined a ratio between the area corresponding to protein gen product (PGP) immunoreactivity and the area corresponding to blood vessel or sweat gland as a quantitative measure of autonomic innervation. Presence of alpha-synuclein (AS) deposits in dermis and hypodermis was also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Skin biopsies form six PD patients and six healthy controls were studied. Autonomic innervation scores were lower in PD than in controls in both blood vessels and sweat glands. No AS or phosphorylated AS (pAS) immunoreactivity was detected in dermis or hypodermis in any of the studied subjects. The results of this investigation suggest that autonomic innervation of dermal annexes in living patients with PD is reduced compared to controls. AS or pAS deposits were not found in dermis or hypodermis suggesting that distal leg skin study is not useful for in vivo detection of AS in PD. PMID:25536890

  6. Epidemiology of psychosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fénelon, Gilles; Alves, Guido

    2010-02-15

    Psychotic symptoms are frequent and disabling in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methodological issues in the epidemiology of PD associated psychosis (PDP) include differences in the symptoms assessed, the methods of assessment, and the selection of patients. Most studies are prospective clinic-based cross-sectional studies providing point prevalence rates in samples on dopaminergic treatment. Visual hallucinations are present in about one quarter to one third of the patients, auditory in up to 20%. Tactile/somatic, and olfactory hallucinations are usually not systematically sought. Minor phenomena such as sense of presence and visual illusions affect 17 to 72% of the patients, and delusions about 5%. Lifetime prevalence of visual hallucinations reaches approximately 50%. Prospective longitudinal cohort studies suggest that hallucinations persist and worsen in individual patients, and that their prevalence increases with time. A facilitating role of treatment on PDP is demonstrated at least for dopaminergic agonists, but there is no simple dose-effect relationship between dopaminergic treatment and the presence or severity of hallucinations. The main endogenous non-modifiable risk factor is cognitive impairment. Other associated factors include older age/longer duration of PD, disease severity, altered dream phenomena, daytime somnolence, and possibly depression and dysautonomia. PDP reduces quality of life in patients and increases caregiver distress, and is an independent risk factor for nursing home placement and development of dementia.

  7. The neurobiology of dysautonomia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Natale, Gianfranco; Biagioni, Francesca; Vivacqua, Giorgio; D'Este, Loredana; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Fornai, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) include a large variety of disorders that affects specific areas of the centralnervous system, leading to psychiatric and movement pathologies. A common feature that characterizes thesedisorders is the neuronal formation and accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates that lead to cell death. Inparticular, different proteinaceous aggregates accumulate to trigger a variety of clinical manifestations: prionprotein (PrPSc) in prion diseases, β-amyloid (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease(PD), huntingtin in Huntington's disease (HD), superoxide dismutase and TDP-43 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS), tau in tauopathies. Non-motor alterations also occur in several viscera, in particular the gastrointestinaltract. These often precede the onset of motor symptoms by several years. For this reason, dysautonomic changescan be predictive of NDs and their correct recognition is being assuming a remarkable importance. This peculiarfeature led more and more to the concept that neurodegeneration may initiate in the periphery and propagate retrogradelytowards the central nervous system in a prion-like manner. In recent years, a particular attention wasdedicated to the clinical assessment of autonomic disorders in patients affected by NDs. In this respect, experimentalanimal models have been developed to understand the neurobiology underlying these effects as well as toinvestigate autonomic changes in peripheral organs. This review summarizes experimental studies that have beencarried out to understand autonomic symptoms in NDs, with the purpose to provide appropriate tools for comprehensiveand integrated studies. PMID:24873928

  8. Action verbal fluency in Parkinson's patients.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Inês Tello; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Coelho, Miguel; Rosa, Mario M; Castro-Caldas, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    We compared the performance of 31 non-demented Parkinson's disease (PD) patients to 61 healthy controls in an action verbal fluency task. Semantic and phonemic fluencies, cognitive impairment and behavioural dysfunction were also assessed. The mean disease duration of PD was 9.8 years (standard deviation (SD) = 6.13). There were no age (U = 899.5, p = 0.616), gender(chi-square = 0.00, p = 1.00) or literacy (U = 956, p = 0.96) differences between the two groups. A significant difference was observed between the two groups in the action verbal fluency task (U = 406.5, p < 0.01) that was not found in the other fluency tasks. The education level was the only biographical variable that influenced the action (verb) fluency outcomes, irrespective of disease duration. Our findings suggest a correlation between the disease mechanisms in PD and a specific verb deficit, support the validity of the action (verb) fluency as an executive function measure and suggest that this task provides unique information not captured with traditional executive function tasks. PMID:26083889

  9. Ambiguous idiom processing in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Papagno, Costanza; Mattavelli, Giulia; Cattaneo, Zaira; Romito, Luigi; Albanese, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Patients affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) can provide crucial information about the involvement of the motor system and prefrontal cortex in processing idioms including action verbs, since dopamine modulates the activity of these structures, and, consequently, different levels of this neurotransmitter can induce different cognitive impairments. In order to investigate the ability to process ambiguous idioms containing an action verb in patients, we asked 15 PD patients, in both OFF- and ON-phases, and 15 healthy matched participants to judge the plausibility of literal and idiomatic sentences, each presented at a self-paced rate. Patients in OFF-phase were faster in reading idiomatic than literal sentences, supporting the view that the motor system is not involved in online idiom processing. However, patients during OFF-phase were impaired in judging the plausibility of idiomatic ambiguous sentences, possibly due to the reduction of dopamine in prefrontal regions. The involvement of the motor system was evident in the ON-phase for literal sentences, suggesting that motor activation is strictly dependent on the context. PMID:24479736

  10. Therapy-resistant symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vorovenci, Ruxandra Julia; Biundo, Roberta; Antonini, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the management of Parkinson's disease (PD) has come a long way, leading to an increase in therapeutic options that now include oral and transdermal drug delivery, infusion as well as surgical treatments. Nonetheless, in the evolution of this complex neurodegenerative disorder, several symptoms remain refractory to dopaminergic therapy. It is our aim to review the literature to date and to bring them into focus, as well as emphasizing on pathophysiological mechanisms, profile of risk factors in their development, and therapeutic options. We will focus on freezing of gait, camptocormia, dysphagia and dysphonia, as well as cognitive impairment and dementia because they represent the far end of therapy-resistant symptoms, encompassing poor health-related quality of life and often a more reserved prognosis with either a rapid evolution of the disease, and/or merely a more severe clinical picture. Pathophysiological mechanisms and brain neurotransmitter abnormalities behind these symptoms seem to overlap to some extent, and a better understanding of these correlations is desirable. We believe that further research is paramount to expand our knowledge of the dopamine-resistant symptoms and, consequently, to develop specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:26410626

  11. Pharmacogenetics of drug response in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Džoljić, Eleonora; Novaković, Ivana; Krajinovic, Maja; Grbatinić, Ivan; Kostić, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating, demoralizing and financially devastating condition affecting 1% of population at the age of 60 years. Thus, very important issue to address is individual therapy optimization. Recent results have shown evidence that variable efficacy of treatment and risk of motor and mental complications could have genetic origin. Significant roles in that process play (pharmaco)genomic/genetic studies of PD. Variability in genes coding for drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug receptors and proteins involved in drug pathway signaling is an important factor determining inter-individual variability in drug responses. Interpersonal differences in drug responses are clearly documented although individualized treatment of PD is not widely known. Treatment with antiparkinsonian drugs is associated with the development of complications, such as L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), hallucinations and excessive daytime sleepiness. Carriers of specific genetic polymorphisms are particularly susceptible to development of some of these drug adverse effects. Pharmacogenomics aims to understand the relationship between genetic factors and inter-individual variations in drug responses, and to translate this information in therapy tailored to individual patient genetics. Relatively few efforts have been made to investigate the role of pharmacogenetics in the individual response to anti-PD drugs. Thus, many genetic variations and polymorphisms in myriad of different proteins can influence individual response to anti-PD drugs.

  12. Parkinson's disease showing progressive conduction aphasia.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Ono, Kenjiro; Harada, Hiromi; Shima, Keisuke; Notoya, Masako; Yamada, Masahito

    2012-04-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may develop progressive dementia late in their clinical course. Dementia in PD is mostly related to neuropathological findings of extensive Lewy bodies (LBs), with or without the coexistence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Aphasia has been reported in patients with LB diseases with AD pathology; however, there have been no reports of typical PD patients developing progressive aphasia during their clinical course. We describe a female PD patient who later developed progressive conduction aphasia characterized by phonemic paraphasia and disturbance in repetition of short sentences without disturbance in writing or auditory comprehension. No episodes of fluctuations of attention, memory complaints, or planning errors were observed. She experienced episodes of visual hallucination. Her low scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination suggested impairment of orientation and attention, and her scores on Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices test indicated impaired visuospatial functions. However, her cognitive deficits were not sufficiently severe to impair her daily life. Brain magnetic resonance images revealed atrophy of the left superior temporal gyrus and widening of the left sylvian fissure. [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed glucose hypometabolism in the left cerebral hemisphere. These findings may be related to conduction aphasia. During the progression of PD lesions, the brainstem LB is assumed to take an upward course, extend to the limbic system, and then extend to the neocortex. Conduction aphasia observed in our patient may be associated with an unusual progression of the LB pathology from the brainstem to the left temporoparietal lobe. PMID:21879327

  13. Mitochondria: A Therapeutic Target for Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Hoffer, Alan; Hoffer, Barry; Qi, Xin

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. The exact causes of neuronal damage are unknown, but mounting evidence indicates that mitochondrial-mediated pathways contribute to the underlying mechanisms of dopaminergic neuronal cell death both in PD patients and in PD animal models. Mitochondria are organized in a highly dynamic tubular network that is continuously reshaped by opposing processes of fusion and fission. Defects in either fusion or fission, leading to mitochondrial fragmentation, limit mitochondrial motility, decrease energy production and increase oxidative stress, thereby promoting cell dysfunction and death. Thus, the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics processes, such as fusion, fission and mitophagy, represents important mechanisms controlling neuronal cell fate. In this review, we summarize some of the recent evidence supporting that impairment of mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy and mitochondrial import occurs in cellular and animal PD models and disruption of these processes is a contributing mechanism to cell death in dopaminergic neurons. We also summarize mitochondria-targeting therapeutics in models of PD, proposing that modulation of mitochondrial impairment might be beneficial for drug development toward treatment of PD.

  14. Disease-modifying strategies for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Lorraine V; Kalia, Suneil K; Lang, Anthony E

    2015-09-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an increasingly prevalent and progressively disabling neurodegenerative disease. The impact of PD on patients and their families as well as its burden on health care systems could be substantially reduced by disease-modifying therapies that slow the rate of neurodegeneration or stop the disease process. Multiple agents have been studied in clinical trials designed to assess disease modification in PD, but all have failed. Over the last 3 years, clinical trials investigating the potential of adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV)-neuturin, coenzyme Q10, creatine, pramipexole, and pioglitazone reported negative findings or futility. Despite these disappointments, progress has been made by expanding our understanding of molecular pathways involved in PD to reveal new targets, and by developing novel animal models of PD for preclinical studies. Currently, at least eight ongoing clinical trials are testing the promise of isradipine, caffeine, nicotine, glutathione, AAV2-glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), as well as active and passive immunization against α-synuclein (α-Syn). In this review, we summarize the clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies for PD that were published since 2013 as well as clinical trials currently in progress. We also discuss promising approaches and ongoing challenges in this area of PD research.

  15. The prediagnostic phase of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Noyce, Alastair John; Lees, Andrew John; Schrag, Anette-Eleonore

    2016-01-01

    The field of prediagnostic Parkinson's disease (PD) is fast moving with an expanding range of clinical and laboratory biomarkers, and multiple strategies seeking to discover those in the earliest stages or those ‘at risk’. It is widely believed that the highest likelihood of securing neuroprotective benefit from drugs will be in these subjects, preceding current point of diagnosis of PD. In this review, we outline current knowledge of the prediagnostic phase of PD, including an up-to-date review of risk factors (genetic and environmental), their relative influence, and clinical features that occur prior to diagnosis. We discuss imaging markers across a range of modalities, and the emerging literature on fluid and peripheral tissue biomarkers. We then explore current initiatives to identify individuals at risk or in the earliest stages that might be candidates for future clinical trials, what we are learning from these initiatives, and how these studies will bring the field closer to realistically commencing primary or secondary preventive trials for PD. Further progress in this field hinges on greater clinical and biological description, and understanding of the prediagnostic, peridiagnostic and immediate postdiagnostic stages of PD. Identifying subjects 3–5 years before they are currently diagnosed may be an ideal group for neuroprotective trials. At the very least, these initiatives will help clarify the stage before and around diagnosis, enabling the field to push into unchartered territory at the earliest stages of disease. PMID:26848171

  16. Covert orienting attention in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Izyuuinn, M; Schulzer, M; Hirayama, K

    1990-07-01

    We examined covert orienting attention in twenty patients with Parkinson's disease using Posner's reaction time (RT) method. Patients were divided according to the grade of severity (Hoehn and Yahr), the P1 group was grade I-II and P2 group grade II-IV. Each group of patients was compared with an equal number of age-matched controls. In controls, and in the less disabled younger P1 group, a significant RT difference was shown between "valid" and "crossed" conditions, that is, when the cue and target appeared in the same square or in equivalent squares in opposite visual fields. In the P2 group, however, there was no advantage of the "valid" over "crossed" conditions. Furthermore, the RT difference seen in controls between "valid" and "towards the fovea" or "away from the fovea" (conditions where cue and target were in adjacent squares) disappeared in the Parkinsonian groups. These results suggest that the covert shift of attention from initial focus to the cue is very weak, or does not occur in more disabled Parkinsonian patients, resulting in only a shift of attention to the target. In considering the elementary mental operations involved in covert orienting attention, this deficit may be attributable to a disturbance of moving attention.

  17. Cognitive predictors of balance in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ângela; Mendes, Andreia; Rocha, Nuno; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-06-01

    Postural instability is one of the most incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and appears to be related to cognitive deficits. This study aims to determine the cognitive factors that can predict deficits in static and dynamic balance in individuals with PD. A sociodemographic questionnaire characterized 52 individuals with PD for this work. The Trail Making Test, Rule Shift Cards Test, and Digit Span Test assessed the executive functions. The static balance was assessed using a plantar pressure platform, and dynamic balance was based on the Timed Up and Go Test. The results were statistically analysed using SPSS Statistics software through linear regression analysis. The results show that a statistically significant model based on cognitive outcomes was able to explain the variance of motor variables. Also, the explanatory value of the model tended to increase with the addition of individual and clinical variables, although the resulting model was not statistically significant The model explained 25-29% of the variability of the Timed Up and Go Test, while for the anteroposterior displacement it was 23-34%, and for the mediolateral displacement it was 24-39%. From the findings, we conclude that the cognitive performance, especially the executive functions, is a predictor of balance deficit in individuals with PD. PMID:27147421

  18. Sleep disturbances in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Sarah M; Mattson, Mark P

    2012-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the two most common neurodegenerative disorders and exact a burden on our society greater than cardiovascular disease and cancer combined. While cognitive and motor symptoms are used to define AD and PD, respectively, patients with both disorders exhibit sleep disturbances including insomnia, hypersomnia and excessive daytime napping. The molecular basis of perturbed sleep in AD and PD may involve damage to hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei that control sleep-wake cycles. Perturbations in neurotransmitter and hormone signaling (e.g., serotonin, norepinephrine and melatonin) and the neurotrophic factor BDNF likely contribute to the disease process. Abnormal accumulations of neurotoxic forms of amyloid β-peptide, tau and α-synuclein occur in brain regions involved in the regulation of sleep in AD and PD patients, and are sufficient to cause sleep disturbances in animal models of these neurodegenerative disorders. Disturbed regulation of sleep often occurs early in the course of AD and PD, and may contribute to the cognitive and motor symptoms. Treatments that target signaling pathways that control sleep have been shown to retard the disease process in animal models of AD and PD, suggesting a potential for such interventions in humans at risk for or in the early stages of these disorders. PMID:22552887

  19. Current Understanding of Psychosis in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Oluwadamilola O; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2016-10-01

    Psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the greatest determinants of nursing home placement and caregiver stress. Traditionally associated with medications with dopaminergic effect, it has now been linked to other medications and other stressors e.g. systemic illnesses. The development of hallucinations in a PD patient can herald the onset of dementia and usually predicts increased mortality risk. Medication reduction in PD psychosis usually reduces the symptoms; however, this comes at the cost of worsening motor function. If gradually decreasing the patient's medications does not resolve the psychosis, the treatment of choice is an atypical antipychotic. Though only clozapine has level A recommendation for this indication, other atypicals like quetiapine continue to get used for this purpose on account of the logistics involved with clozapine use. Cholinesterase inhibitors are also increasingly being used for PD psychosis on account of the association with dementia. The treatment of PD psychosis is an unmet need in PD management and search for suitable agents constitutes an active area of research in PD. PMID:27629356

  20. From micrographia to Parkinson's disease dysgraphia.

    PubMed

    Letanneux, Alban; Danna, Jeremy; Velay, Jean-Luc; Viallet, François; Pinto, Serge

    2014-10-01

    Micrographia, an abnormal reduction in writing size, is a specific behavioral deficit associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). In recent years, the availability of graphic tablets has made it possible to study micrographia in unprecedented detail. Consequently, a growing number of studies show that PD patients also exhibit impaired handwriting kinematics. Is micrographia still the most characteristic feature of PD-related handwriting deficits? To answer this question, we identified studies that investigated handwriting in PD, either with conventional pencil-and-paper measures or with graphic tablets, and we reported their findings on key spatiotemporal and kinematic variables. We found that kinematic variables (velocity, fluency) differentiate better between control participants and PD patients, and between off- and on-treatment PD patients, than the traditional measure of static writing size. Although reduced writing size is an important feature of PD handwriting, the deficit is not restricted to micrographia stricto sensu. Therefore, we propose the term PD dysgraphia, which encompasses all deficits characteristic of Parkinsonian handwriting. We conclude that the computerized analysis of handwriting movements is a simple and useful tool that can contribute to both diagnosis and follow-up of PD. PMID:25156696

  1. Behavioral persistence deficit in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J S

    2007-03-01

    The present study was performed to examine the degree to which decreased task persistence may contribute to deficits in the ability of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients to perform a problem solving task. Patients with mild/moderate PD performed a computerized Tower of Hanoi task in which they planned and verbalized moves to solve the puzzle but did not need to produce a limb motor response. All patients were tested at least 14 h off medication. As expected from previous studies of planning abilities in PD, patients had significant problems performing this task and accuracy decreased specifically when patients were presented with the most difficult puzzles in the sequence. PD patients solved fewer of the most difficult puzzles than did control subjects, but also made significantly fewer attempts to solve those puzzles than controls. These results suggest that PD patients not only have planning and problem solving deficits as have been documented previously, but that at least part of this and perhaps other cognitive performance problems may result from difficulty in maintaining adequate mental effort to successfully complete difficult tasks. PMID:17355551

  2. Parkinson's disease as a disconnection syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2010-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a major neurodegenerative disorder that is usually considered in terms of midbrain and basal ganglia dysfunction. Regarding PD instead as a disconnection syndrome may prove beneficial to understanding aspects of cognition, perception, and other neuropsychological domains in the disease. PD is usually of unilateral onset, providing evidence of intrahemispheric dissociations and an imbalance in the usual relative strengths of the right and left hemispheres. Hence, in order to appreciate the neuropsychology of PD, it is important to apply to this disease our understanding of hemispheric lateralization effects and within-hemisphere circuitry from brainstem to higher-order association cortex. The focus of this review is on the relevance of PD-related disconnections among subcortical and cortical structures to cognition, perception, emotion, and associated brainstem-based domains such as sleep and mood disturbance. Besides providing information on disease characteristics, regarding PD as a disconnection syndrome allows us to more completely understand normal brain-behavior relations in general.

  3. From micrographia to Parkinson's disease dysgraphia.

    PubMed

    Letanneux, Alban; Danna, Jeremy; Velay, Jean-Luc; Viallet, François; Pinto, Serge

    2014-10-01

    Micrographia, an abnormal reduction in writing size, is a specific behavioral deficit associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). In recent years, the availability of graphic tablets has made it possible to study micrographia in unprecedented detail. Consequently, a growing number of studies show that PD patients also exhibit impaired handwriting kinematics. Is micrographia still the most characteristic feature of PD-related handwriting deficits? To answer this question, we identified studies that investigated handwriting in PD, either with conventional pencil-and-paper measures or with graphic tablets, and we reported their findings on key spatiotemporal and kinematic variables. We found that kinematic variables (velocity, fluency) differentiate better between control participants and PD patients, and between off- and on-treatment PD patients, than the traditional measure of static writing size. Although reduced writing size is an important feature of PD handwriting, the deficit is not restricted to micrographia stricto sensu. Therefore, we propose the term PD dysgraphia, which encompasses all deficits characteristic of Parkinsonian handwriting. We conclude that the computerized analysis of handwriting movements is a simple and useful tool that can contribute to both diagnosis and follow-up of PD.

  4. Delayed gastric emptying in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marrinan, Sarah; Emmanuel, Anton V; Burn, David J

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are evident in all stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). Most of the gastrointestinal abnormalities associated with PD are attributable to impaired motility. At the level of the stomach, this results in delayed gastric emptying. The etiology of delayed gastric emptying in PD is probably multifactorial but is at least partly related to Lewy pathology in the enteric nervous system and discrete brainstem nuclei. Delayed gastric emptying occurs in both early and advanced PD but is underdetected in routine clinical practice. Recognition of delayed gastric emptying is important because it can cause an array of upper gastrointestinal symptoms, but additionally it has important implications for the absorption and action of levodopa. Delayed gastric emptying contributes significantly to response fluctuations seen in people on long-term l-dopa therapy. Neurohormonal aspects of the brain-gut axis are pertinent to discussions regarding the pathophysiology of delayed gastric emptying in PD and are also hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD itself. Ghrelin is a gastric-derived hormone with potential as a therapeutic agent for delayed gastric emptying and also as a novel neuroprotective agent in PD. Recent findings relating to ghrelin in the context of PD and gastric emptying are considered. This article highlights the pathological abnormalities that may account for delayed gastric emptying in PD. It also considers the wider relevance of abnormal gastric pathology to our current understanding of the etiology of PD. PMID:24151126

  5. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  6. Associations between B Vitamins and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang

    2015-08-27

    B vitamins may correlate with Parkinson's disease (PD) through regulating homocysteine level. However, there is no comprehensive assessment on the associations between PD and B vitamins. The present study was designed to perform a meta-analytic assessment of the associations between folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 and PD, including the status of B vitamins in PD patients compared with controls, and associations of dietary intakes of B vitamins and risk of PD. A literature search using Medline database obtained 10 eligible studies included in the meta-analyses. Stata 12.0 statistical software was used to perform the meta-analysis. Pooled data revealed that there was no obvious difference in folate level between PD patients and healthy controls, and PD patients had lower level of vitamin B12 than controls. Available data suggested that higher dietary intake of vitamin B6 was associated with a decreased risk of PD (odds ratio (OR) = 0.65, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = (0.30, 1.01)), while no significant association was observed for dietary intake of folate and vitamin B12 and risk of PD. PD patients had lower level of vitamin B12 and similar level of folate compared with controls. Dietary intake of vitamin B6 exhibited preventive effect of developing PD based on the available data. As the number of included studies is limited, more studies are needed to confirm the findings and elucidate the underpinning underlying these associations.

  7. The relationship between electrovestibulography and Parkinson's disease severity.

    PubMed

    Shoushtarian, Mehrnaz; Lithgow, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second largest neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. This disease results from the loss of dopamine producing neurons in parts of the basal ganglia of the brain. Previous studies have shown the involvement of the dopamine system in the basal ganglia in balance control. Sensations of balance in the body are detected by the vestibular apparatus. In this project, electrovestibulography (EVestG) has been used to measure neuronal activity of the vestibular apparatus and nuclei from Parkinson's patients. A wavelet based signal processing technique, a Neural Event Extraction Routine, has been used to extract biomarkers from these EVestG recordings. These measurements appear to be correlated with scores from mobility tests which indicate disease progression and mobility impairment in Parkinson's patients. PMID:18002471

  8. Impaired step up/over in persons with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Joe R; Horvat, Michael; Ray, Christopher T

    2010-04-01

    This study explored the functional movement task of stepping up and over an obstacle in individuals with Parkinson's disease to their aged-matched controls. Ten participants with Parkinson's disease and 10 aged matched participants were assessed on the Step Up/Over task completed on a NeuroCom EquiTest long forceplate and analyzed using Group MANOVAs. The results indicate that individuals with Parkinson's disease produce less lifting force and exhibited an increased time to complete the task of stepping up and over an object when compared with their aged matched peers. Considering the substantial risk of falls demonstrated in this population these preliminary finding demonstrate the need for interventions aimed at improving this component of function. PMID:20440021

  9. Serotonergic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and its relevance to disability.

    PubMed

    Politis, Marios; Loane, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that Parkinson's disease is not solely affecting the dopaminergic system. Results from biochemical, animal, postmortem, and functional imaging studies have revealed that other neurotransmitter systems are affected as well, including the serotonergic system. With the use of in vivo positron emission tomography functional imaging, it has been shown that serotonergic terminals are affected at a varying, nonlinear degree starting early in the clinical course of Parkinson's disease. Tremor and the majority of nonmotor symptoms do not seem to respond adequately to dopaminergic medication. Recent studies suggest that serotonergic dysfunction has a direct relevance to Parkinson's disease symptoms, the so-called nonmotor symptoms, including depression, fatigue, weight changes, and visual hallucinations. These in vivo findings indicate that agents acting on the serotonergic system could help towards alleviating these symptoms. This paper aims to review the current literature and to highlight the need for further in vivo investigations.

  10. Stepping analysis in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, O; Taguchi, K; Kikukawa, M; Ogiba, T

    1993-07-01

    POLGON (Polarized light goniometer) was used to evaluate ataxia during stepping movements in patients with spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and Parkinson's disease. The measurements included mean angular change of shoulders (M.A.C.S.) and its coefficient of variation (C.V.). In patients with SCD, the values of M.A.C.S. were significantly larger at 1.0 step/s than those at other stepping rhythms. This results suggests that the stepping rhythm of 1.0 step/s is useful for the detection of cerebellar ataxia. The values of C.V. correlated with the degree of advancement of SCD. In patients with Parkinson's disease, the values of M.A.C.S. tended to decrease because of the restricted elevation of the knee, while those of C.V. were increased. The results showed that the stepping test using the POLGON was useful for estimation of the characteristic disequilibrium of SCD and Parkinson's disease.

  11. Genetics Underlying Atypical Parkinsonism and Related Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Sonja W.; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonism syndromes, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, are neurodegenerative diseases with complex clinical and pathological features. Heterogeneity in clinical presentations, possible secondary determinants as well as mimic syndromes pose a major challenge to accurately diagnose patients suffering from these devastating conditions. Over the last two decades, significant advancements in genomic technologies have provided us with increasing insights into the molecular pathogenesis of atypical parkinsonism and their intriguing relationships to related neurodegenerative diseases, fueling new hopes to incorporate molecular knowledge into our diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches towards managing these conditions. In this review article, we summarize the current understanding of genetic mechanisms implicated in atypical parkinsonism syndromes. We further highlight mimic syndromes relevant to differential considerations and possible future directions. PMID:26501269

  12. [Parkinson's disease due to laboral exposition to paraquat].

    PubMed

    León-Verastegui, Angel Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is considered a neurodegenerative disorder, which involves environmental factors in the etiology of the disease. Such as chemical agents with neuromolecular effect among which is the MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6 tetra-hydropyridine), MPP (1-methyl-4-phenyl hypyridinium), paraquat, the latter used as a herbicide in the agricultural fields of our country. It has been documented in epidemiological and experimental studies the association of occupational exposure to paraquat and Parkinson's disease. The aim of this paper is to describe a clinical case of occupational medicine in Parkinson's disease in occupationally exposed workers to paraquat, elevating the importance of medical history work, which was the key to the clinical case study. PMID:23331754

  13. The promise of stem cells in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Langston, J William

    2005-01-01

    Neurotransplantation as a treatment for Parkinson disease reached the stage of human trials over 15 years ago, but the field, which is still in its infancy, has encountered a number of roadblocks since then, both political and scientific. With hope that stem cells may be used as a new source of dopaminergic neurons to replace the degenerating nerve cells in Parkinson disease looming, it is critical that we learn from the past as we work toward achieving new milestones aimed at making this new therapeutic strategy a reality. One of those milestones, which is an important translational step in the development of stem cell technology and the subject of a report in this issue of the JCI, involves transplanting new dopaminergic cell lines to a primate model of Parkinson disease.

  14. Patterns of cortical thinning in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Carme; Segura, Barbara; Baggio, Hugo Cesar; Abos, Alexandra; Marti, Maria Jose; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Compta, Yaroslau; Bargallo, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Clinical variability in the Parkinson's disease phenotype suggests the existence of disease subtypes. We investigated whether distinct anatomical patterns of atrophy can be identified in Parkinson's disease using a hypothesis‐free, data‐driven approach based on cortical thickness data. Methods T1‐weighted 3‐tesla MRI and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment were performed in a sample of 88 nondemented Parkinson's disease patients and 31 healthy controls. We performed a hierarchical cluster analysis of imaging data using Ward's linkage method. A general linear model with cortical thickness data was used to compare clustering groups. Results We observed 3 patterns of cortical thinning in patients when compared with healthy controls. Pattern 1 (n = 30, 34.09%) consisted of cortical atrophy in bilateral precentral gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules, cuneus, posterior cingulate, and parahippocampal gyrus. These patients showed worse cognitive performance when compared with controls and the other 2 patterns. Pattern 2 (n = 29, 32.95%) consisted of cortical atrophy involving occipital and frontal as well as superior parietal areas and included patients with younger age at onset. Finally, in pattern 3 (n = 29, 32.95%), there was no detectable cortical thinning. Patients in the 3 patterns did not differ in disease duration, motor severity, dopaminergic medication doses, or presence of mild cognitive impairment. Conclusions Three cortical atrophy subtypes were identified in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients: (1) parieto‐temporal pattern of atrophy with worse cognitive performance, (2) occipital and frontal cortical atrophy and younger disease onset, and (3) patients without detectable cortical atrophy. These findings may help identify prognosis markers in Parkinson's disease. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement

  15. Changes in multifinger interaction and coordination in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaebum; Wu, Yen-Hsun; Lewis, Mechelle M.; Huang, Xuemei

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we tested several hypotheses related to changes in finger interaction and multifinger synergies during multifinger force production tasks in Parkinson's disease. Ten patients with Parkinson's disease, mostly early stage, and 11 healthy control subjects participated in the study. Synergies were defined as covaried adjustment of commands to fingers that stabilized the total force produced by the hand. Both Parkinson's disease patients and control subjects performed accurate isometric force production tasks with the fingers of both the dominant and nondominant hands. The Parkinson's disease patients showed significantly lower maximal finger forces and higher unintended force production (enslaving). These observations suggest that changes in supraspinal control have a major effect on finger individuation. The synergy indexes in the patients were weaker in both steady-state and cyclic force production tasks compared with the controls. These indexes also were stronger in the left (nondominant) hand in support of the dynamic-dominance hypothesis. Half of the patients could not perform the cyclic task at the highest frequency (2 Hz). Anticipatory adjustments of synergies prior to a quick force pulse production were delayed and reduced in the patients compared with the controls. Similar differences were observed between the asymptomatic hands of the patients with symptoms limited to one side of the body and matched hands of control subjects. Our study demonstrates that the elusive changes in motor coordination in Parkinson's disease can be quantified objectively, even in patients at a relatively early stage of the disease. The results suggest an important role of the basal ganglia in synergy formation and demonstrate a previously unknown component of impaired feedforward control in Parkinson's disease reflected in the reduced and delayed anticipatory synergy adjustments. PMID:22552184

  16. Changes in multifinger interaction and coordination in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaebum; Wu, Yen-Hsun; Lewis, Mechelle M; Huang, Xuemei; Latash, Mark L

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we tested several hypotheses related to changes in finger interaction and multifinger synergies during multifinger force production tasks in Parkinson's disease. Ten patients with Parkinson's disease, mostly early stage, and 11 healthy control subjects participated in the study. Synergies were defined as covaried adjustment of commands to fingers that stabilized the total force produced by the hand. Both Parkinson's disease patients and control subjects performed accurate isometric force production tasks with the fingers of both the dominant and nondominant hands. The Parkinson's disease patients showed significantly lower maximal finger forces and higher unintended force production (enslaving). These observations suggest that changes in supraspinal control have a major effect on finger individuation. The synergy indexes in the patients were weaker in both steady-state and cyclic force production tasks compared with the controls. These indexes also were stronger in the left (nondominant) hand in support of the dynamic-dominance hypothesis. Half of the patients could not perform the cyclic task at the highest frequency (2 Hz). Anticipatory adjustments of synergies prior to a quick force pulse production were delayed and reduced in the patients compared with the controls. Similar differences were observed between the asymptomatic hands of the patients with symptoms limited to one side of the body and matched hands of control subjects. Our study demonstrates that the elusive changes in motor coordination in Parkinson's disease can be quantified objectively, even in patients at a relatively early stage of the disease. The results suggest an important role of the basal ganglia in synergy formation and demonstrate a previously unknown component of impaired feedforward control in Parkinson's disease reflected in the reduced and delayed anticipatory synergy adjustments. PMID:22552184

  17. Aripiprazole Can Improve Apraxia of Eyelid Opening in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tokisato, Kaori; Fukunaga, Kimiko; Tokunaga, Makoto; Watanabe, Susumu; Nakanishi, Ryoji; Yamanaga, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We herein report three cases of Parkinson's disease associated with difficulty in eyelid opening, referred to as apraxia of eyelid opening (AEO), which improved after aripiprazole treatment. In case 1, aripiprazole was administered as a psychiatric treatment. It proved to be effective in AEO with blepharospasm. In case 2 and case 3, the patients experienced AEO without blepharospasm, and a significant improvement was observed after aripiprazole treatment. In this study, the aripiprazole dosage ranged between 3 and 9 mg/day. This is the first report of aripiprazole as a potentially effective treatment for AEO in Parkinson's disease.

  18. Recent progress of imaging agents for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoai; Cai, Huawei; Ge, Ran; Li, Lin; Jia, Zhiyun

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common progressive, neurodegenerative brain disease that is promoted by mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, protein aggregation and proteasome dysfunction in the brain. Compared with computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), non-invasive nuclear radiopharmaceuticals have great significance for the early diagnosis of PD due to their high sensitivity and specificity in atypical and preclinical cases. Based on the development of coordination chemistry and chelator design, radionuclides may be delivered to lesions by attaching to PD-related transporters and receptors, such as dopamine, serotonin, and others. In this review, we comprehensively detailed the current achievements in radionuclide imaging in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25977680

  19. Iatrogenic parkinsonism: the role of flunarizine and cinnarizine.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Rita; Correia, Ana Sofia Aleixo; Bugalho, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    We performed a clinical report based, descriptive and retrospective study, aimed at comparing Flunarizine/Cinnarizine-induced parkinsonism (FCIP) patients and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. The FCIP group (n = 30) presented a lower frequency of rigidity and unilateral tremor than the PD group (n = 70). All FCIP patients improved, 13 after dopaminergic treatment. FCIP patients who improved spontaneously presented lower frequency of rigidity, compared with the other FCIP subgroup and PD group. FCIP patients who did not improve spontaneously showed a clinical pattern similar to PD patients. PMID:25125483

  20. A characterization of the prosodic loss in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Darkins, A W; Fromkin, V A; Benson, D F

    1988-07-01

    Prosodic contours in the verbal output of 30 patients with Idiopathic Parkinson's disease were contrasted to those of fifteen age-, sex-, and educationally matched normal subjects. All subjects were tested for language disorder, dementia, depression, and the comprehension of linguistic prosody. The striking disorder of prosody in Parkinson's disease relates to motor control, not to a loss of the linguistic knowledge required to make prosodic distinctions. It appears that prosody, language and the motor planning of speech are integrated at a basal ganglia level.

  1. The interpretation of dysprosody in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Caekebeke, J F; Jennekens-Schinkel, A; van der Linden, M E; Buruma, O J; Roos, R A

    1991-01-01

    Prosodic features in the speech production of 21 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease were tested. The appreciation of vocal and facial expression was also examined in the same patients. Significant intergroup differences were found in the prosody production tasks but, in contrast to previous results, not in the receptive tasks on the recognition and appreciation of prosody and of facial expression. The discrepancy between the production and recognition of prosodic features does not support the suggestion that dysprosody in Parkinson's disease is necessarily a disorder of processing emotional information that could be misinterpreted as a dysarthria. PMID:2019840

  2. Neurosyphilis with psychotic symptoms and Parkinsonism in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Zou, Shoukang; Huang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl with neurosyphilis was misdiagnosed as having viral encephalitis with psychotic symptoms and Parkinsonism. We found that she was experiencing visual hallucinations, persecutory delusions, flattening of affect, poorness of thought, tremors, four-limb rigidity, and restlessness, and she was unable to communicate with others. The Venereal Disease Research Laboratory serum test and further lumbar puncture enabled us to diagnose her with neurosyphilis. After antibiotic treatment, her psychotic symptoms and Parkinsonism were relieved. From this case, we believe that it is important to keep organic psychosis in mind during the diagnostic workup, and we argue that routine syphilis screening is necessary in psychiatry clinical practice.

  3. [A case of esophageal achalasia followed by Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Mitani, Maki; Kawamoto, Kunihiko; Funakawa, Itaru; Jinnai, Kenji

    2005-08-01

    In 1992, a 63 year-old woman complained of dysphagia and chest pain, and was diagnosed with esophageal achalasia. Three years later, she developed resting tremor, cog-wheel rigidity, and retro-pulsion, and was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and given appropriate medication. Several years later, intractable vomitting and aspiration pneumonia developed, and the lower esophageal sphincter was dilated using a pneumatic balloon dilator under gastroscopic guidance in 2004. That procedure improved her symptoms and the esophageal dilation was visualized on chest CT images. Herein, we report this rare case of esophageal achalasia followed by Parkinson's disease and discuss the relationship between the two diseases.

  4. Arachnophobia alleviated by subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Allert, Niels; Gippert, Sabrina M; Sajonz, Bastian E A; Nelles, Christoph; Bewernick, Bettina; Schlaepfer, Thomas E; Coenen, Volker A

    2016-06-01

    We report on a Parkinson patient with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias in whom deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) not only improved motor symptoms but also pre-existing arachnophobia. Arachnophobia had been unchanged by the course of Parkinson's disease but rapidly improved with STN-DBS. Both, motor effects and the improvement of arachnophobia were stable during 2 years follow-up. To our knowledge this is the first report on STN stimulation effects on a specific phobia. PMID:27198699

  5. Meanings of feeling well among women with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Malin; Nilsson, Carina

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a qualitative inquiry to describe the meanings of feeling well as experienced by women with Parkinson's disease. Nine women were interviewed and we analysed the interviews using a reflective lifeworld approach based on phenomenological epistemology. We present the analysis as five constituents: the body as unnoticed; being able to move on; feeling joy by being connected; finding peace and harmony; and being the director of one's own life. Our findings can be used to understand and promote well-being among women with Parkinson's disease. In care meetings, knowledge about the lived and experienced health processes supports the women's striving to not let illness dominate their experience of daily life.

  6. Oral rehabilitation of a Parkinson's patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yashpal; Saini, Monika; Garg, Neha

    2013-04-16

    Parkinson's disease is an idiopathic disorder of the central nervous system, characterized by resting tremors, muscular rigidity, slow and decreased movements. Oral rehabilitation of these patients requires special care, especially in those cases where the patient's socioeconomic status is not good and patient cannot come several times for fabrication of a complete denture. This clinical report presents a case of a Parkinson's patient who was completely rehabilitated in 3 appointments using special techniques. Border molding, final impression and jaw relation procedures were done in one appointment by using a custom tray with detachable handles and occlusal rims. PMID:24303468

  7. Aripiprazole Can Improve Apraxia of Eyelid Opening in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tokisato, Kaori; Fukunaga, Kimiko; Tokunaga, Makoto; Watanabe, Susumu; Nakanishi, Ryoji; Yamanaga, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We herein report three cases of Parkinson's disease associated with difficulty in eyelid opening, referred to as apraxia of eyelid opening (AEO), which improved after aripiprazole treatment. In case 1, aripiprazole was administered as a psychiatric treatment. It proved to be effective in AEO with blepharospasm. In case 2 and case 3, the patients experienced AEO without blepharospasm, and a significant improvement was observed after aripiprazole treatment. In this study, the aripiprazole dosage ranged between 3 and 9 mg/day. This is the first report of aripiprazole as a potentially effective treatment for AEO in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26631893

  8. Levodopa response in Parkinsonism with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Robert A; Churchyard, Andrew; Dahl, Henrik H; Hutchison, Wendy M; Kirby, Denise M; Thyagarajan, Dominic

    2007-05-15

    We report a patient with an autosomal dominant chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia phenotype associated with multiple mtDNA deletions in muscle from a family in which linkage analysis excluded mutations in DNA polymerase gamma (POLG), adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT-1) or C10orf2 (Twinkle). She presented with prominent Parkinsonism characterized by prolonged benefit from levodopa (L-dopa) and the later development of L-dopa induced dyskinesias and motor fluctuations. Thus L-dopa responsiveness, L-dopa induced dyskinesias and motor fluctuations may also occur in atypical Parkinsonism of mitochondrial disease, just as they may in multiple system atrophy. PMID:17357142

  9. Nocturnal manifestations of atypical and vascular parkinsonism: how do they differ from Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Jitkritsadakul, Onanong; Petchrutchatachart, Sitthi; Kaewwilai, Lalita; Panyakaew, Pattamon; Boonrod, Nonglak; Colosimo, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    While nocturnal disturbances of Parkinson's disease (PD) are increasingly recognized as being part of a continuum that includes daytime manifestations, there is still little analysis in the medical literature that assesses these complex phenomena in patients with atypical (AP) and vascular parkinsonisms (VP). The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of these disturbances in patients with AP and VP and to determine the range of nighttime symptoms that occur compared with those in patients with PD. This comparison was done using a semi-structured interview and self-rated questionnaires in 63 AP and VP patients (PSP 24, MSA 24, CBD 5, and VP 10), and 208 PD patients. 61 AP and VP patients (96.8%) and 201 PD patients (96.6%) reported at least one nocturnal symptom with a score of less than 6 on the Modified Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (MPDSS). Nocturnal akinesia, as measured on the Nocturnal Akinesia, Dystonia, and Cramp Score, was found to be significantly greater in patients with PSP (p = 0.006), MSA (p = 0.002), and CBD (p = 0.012) than PD patients, but not VP patients (p = 0.428). Like those with PD, patients with AP and VP identified the problem of getting up at night to urinate (MPDSS item 8) as being the most frequent and troublesome nocturnal symptom. MSA and PSP patients reported more frequent (p = 0.001) and troublesome (p < 0.001) urinary incontinence (MPDSS item 9) than PD patients and MSA patients had more severe problems with unexpectedly falling asleep during the day (MPDSS item 15) than PD patients (p = 0.003). In summary, our study determined that nocturnal manifestations are commonly experienced by patients with AP and VP and highlighted specific nocturnal symptoms, which are more prevalent and troublesome in certain AP syndromes. The concept of 24-h control of symptoms should not be limited to only PD and we recommend that all who are involved in the care of AP and VP patients should realize that many nocturnal symptoms are

  10. Olfaction in Parkinson's disease and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is an early ‘pre-clinical’ sign of Parkinson's disease (PD). The present review is a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of such dysfunction in PD and related disorders. The olfactory bulb is implicated in the dysfunction, since only those syndromes with olfactory bulb pathology exhibit significant smell loss. The role of dopamine in the production of olfactory system pathology is enigmatic, as overexpression of dopaminergic cells within the bulb's glomerular layer is a common feature of PD and most animal models of PD. Damage to cholinergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic systems is likely involved, since such damage is most marked in those diseases with the most smell loss. When compromised, these systems, which regulate microglial activity, can influence the induction of localized brain inflammation, oxidative damage, and cytosolic disruption of cellular processes. In monogenetic forms of PD, olfactory dysfunction is rarely observed in asymptomatic gene carriers, but is present in many of those that exhibit the motor phenotype. This suggests that such gene-related influences on olfaction, when present, take time to develop and depend upon additional factors, such as those from aging, other genes, formation of α-synuclein- and tau-related pathology,or lowered thresholds to oxidative stress from toxic insults. The limited data available suggest that the physiological determinants of the early changes in PD-related olfactory function are likely multifactorial and may include the same determinants as those responsible for a number of other non-motor symptoms of PD, such as dysautonomia and sleep disturbances. PMID:22192366

  11. Assessing comorbidity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Visser, Martine; Marinus, Johan; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Schipper, Ruth G B; Stiggelbout, Anne M

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of an interview-based assessment of comorbidity, in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The Cumulative Illness Rating Scale-Geriatric (CIRS-G) was completed (1) in an interview with 31 PD patients and their caregivers, and (2) by reviewing the patient's medical charts from their general practitioners. Based on the interview, all patients had some comorbidity, 84% had one or more moderate comorbid diseases. The most frequently affected organ systems were "lower gastrointestinal" and "genitourinary". The mean +/- SD total score of the interview-based (chart-based) CIRS-G was 6.9 +/- 3.8 (7.6 +/- 3.5) with a mean of 4.3 +/- 1.9 (5.0 +/- 1.9) affected organ systems and a mean of 2.1 +/- 1.7 (2.3 +/- 1.6) organ systems with at least moderate comorbidity per patient. The agreement (intraclass correlation coefficients) between the interview-based and chart-based assessments for the six summary scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.81. The agreement for the 14 organ systems ranged from 0.13 to 1.00 (weighted kappa); 12 had a K(w) above 0.40 (moderate agreement). The comorbidity summary scores had a moderate correlation with age and disability. The interview-based assessment of the CIRS-G is easy to apply and is an accurate method to assess comorbidity in patients with PD.

  12. Motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Chen, Robert

    2013-09-04

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there are alterations of the basal ganglia (BG) thalamocortical networks, primarily due to degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. These changes in subcortical networks lead to plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1), which mediates cortical motor output and is a potential target for treatment of PD. Studies investigating the motor cortical plasticity using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have found altered plasticity in PD, but there are inconsistencies among these studies. This is likely because plasticity depends on many factors such as the extent of dopaminergic loss and disease severity, response to dopaminergic replacement therapies, development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID), the plasticity protocol used, medication, and stimulation status in patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). The influences of LID and DBS on BG and M1 plasticity have been explored in animal models and in PD patients. In addition, many other factors such age, genetic factors (e.g., brain derived neurotropic factor and other neurotransmitters or receptors polymorphism), emotional state, time of the day, physical fitness have been documented to play role in the extent of plasticity induced by TMS in human studies. In this review, we summarize the studies that investigated M1 plasticity in PD and demonstrate how these afore-mentioned factors affect motor cortical plasticity in PD. We conclude that it is important to consider the clinical, demographic, and technical factors that influence various plasticity protocols while developing these protocols as diagnostic or prognostic tools in PD. We also discuss how the modulation of cortical excitability and the plasticity with these non-invasive brain stimulation techniques facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD and help design potential therapeutic possibilities in this disorder.

  13. [A 73-year-old woman with familial Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Takanashi, M; Urabe, T; Ohta, S; Hamano, Y; Mori, H; Shirai, T; Kondo, T; Mizuno, Y

    1999-12-01

    We report a 73-year-old Japanese woman with familial Parkinson's disease. The patient was well until her 67 years of the age, when she noted rest tremor in her right hand. Soon after her gait became short stepped. She visited our clinic on October 6, 1992 when she was 68 years old. She was alert and well oriented without dementia. She showed masked face, small voice, small stepped gait, retropulsion, resting tremor in her right hand, rigidity in the neck, and bradykinesia. She was treated with 400 mg/day of levodopa-carbidopa, which improved her symptoms, however, she developed wearing off phenomenon 3 years after the initiation of levodopa treatment. On August 26, 1998, she developed abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting. She was admitted to another hospital, where abdominal plain x-ray revealed an evidence of intestinal obstruction (ileus). She was treated with nasogastric suction and intravenous fluid. Her condition did not improve and she was transferred to our hospital on August 29, 1998. Her family history revealed no consanguineous marriage. She had two elder brothers and three elder sisters. One of her brothers had been diagnosed as Parkinson's disease. Her husband also suffered from Parkinson's disease, however, her parents apparently did not have Parkinson's disease. On admission, she appeared to be drowsy. Her blood pressure was 102/70 mmHg, body temperature 36.2 degrees C. The lungs were clear and no cardiac murmur was present. Abdomen was flat and bowel sound was audible. No abnormal mass was palpable. Neurologic examination revealed mild consciousness disturbance, masked face, and small voice. No motor paralysis was noted. Muscle tone was hypotonic. No abnormal involuntary movement was noted. Abnormal laboratory findings on admission were as follows; WBC 11,300/microliter, amylase 1,373 IU/l, CK 446 IU/l, BUN 50 mg/dl, creatinine 1.17 mg/dl, CRP 22.7 mg/ dl, Na 134 mEq/l, K 3.1 mEq/l, and Cl 81 mEq/l. A chest x-ray film revealed pneumonic shadows in

  14. Use of complementary therapies and non-prescribed medication in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, P; Johnson, M; Wallis, P

    2002-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease resort to complementary therapy and non-prescribed medication in the hope of improving their quality of life. In the US 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease reported the use of at least one form of complementary therapy for Parkinson's disease. Data for the UK are limited. A structured questionnaire was administered to consecutive patients attending a Parkinson's disease clinic. Patients were excluded if they were cognitively impaired, if they were living in an institution, or if they declined to take part. The participants were asked about current and previous use of complementary therapy in general and Parkinson's disease in particular and were presented with an extensive list of complementary therapies and non-prescribed medications. The response rate was 90% and 80 patients met the inclusion criteria. Fifty four per cent (n=44) reported the use of at least one form of complementary therapy or non-prescribed medication either for Parkinson's disease or for some other indication, of whom 31 (38.7% of the total sample) used it solely for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The most commonly used complementary therapies for Parkinson's disease were massage (n=9) and aromatherapy (n=8). Non-prescribed medication was mainly used for indications other than Parkinson's disease and the commonest drugs used were simple analgesics (n=7), cod liver oil (n=5), and multivitamins (n=4). The use of complementary therapy for Parkinson's disease correlated significantly (Pearson's r=0.44, p=0.01) with a younger age at diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Comorbidity correlated significantly with complementary therapy use for indications other than Parkinson's disease (Pearson's r=0.29, p= 0.01). The use of complementary therapy for Parkinson's disease in this UK based clinic closely mimics that in the US. Non-pharmacological complementary therapy is mainly used for Parkinson's disease, while non-prescribed medication is more commonly used for

  15. Baseline and longitudinal grey matter changes in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: ICICLE-PD study.

    PubMed

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; Firbank, Michael J; Lawson, Rachael A; Yarnall, Alison J; Duncan, Gordon W; Owen, Adrian M; Khoo, Tien K; Brooks, David J; Rowe, James B; Barker, Roger A; Burn, David J; O'Brien, John T

    2015-10-01

    Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease is associated with progression to dementia (Parkinson's disease dementia) in a majority of patients. Determining structural imaging biomarkers associated with prodromal Parkinson's disease dementia may allow for the earlier identification of those at risk, and allow for targeted disease modifying therapies. One hundred and five non-demented subjects with newly diagnosed idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 37 healthy matched controls had serial 3 T structural magnetic resonance imaging scans with clinical and neuropsychological assessments at baseline, which were repeated after 18 months. The Movement Disorder Society Task Force criteria were used to classify the Parkinson's disease subjects into Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment (n = 39) and Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment (n = 66). Freesurfer image processing software was used to measure cortical thickness and subcortical volumes at baseline and follow-up. We compared regional percentage change of cortical thinning and subcortical atrophy over 18 months. At baseline, cases with Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment demonstrated widespread cortical thinning relative to controls and atrophy of the nucleus accumbens compared to both controls and subjects with Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment. Regional cortical thickness at baseline was correlated with global cognition in the combined Parkinson's disease cohort. Over 18 months, patients with Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment demonstrated more severe cortical thinning in frontal and temporo-parietal cortices, including hippocampal atrophy, relative to those with Parkinson's disease and no cognitive impairment and healthy controls, whereas subjects with Parkinson's disease and no cognitive impairment showed more severe frontal cortical thinning compared to healthy controls. At baseline, Parkinson's disease with no cognitive impairment

  16. Many Faces of Parkinson's Disease: Non-Motor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Mi; Koh, Seong-Beom

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multi-systemic disorder that is characterized by a combination of motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS). The dopaminergic neurodegeneration of PD is involved in the genesis of NMS, but other conditions and side effects of levodopa are also associated with NMS. NMS can develop at all stage of PD and rapid eyeball movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD), constipation, depression, and olfactory dysfunction are considered prodromal signs of PD. Many NMS related with motor deficits and cognitive dysfunction. Some NMS including olfactory dysfunction, RBD and abnormal stereopsis are associated with presence of other NMS of PD. In addition, several NMS can be helpful to differentiate between idiopathic PD and other parkinsonian disorders. Early recognition and management of NMS in PD patients is important for preserving quality of life.

  17. The medical treatment of Parkinson disease from James Parkinson to George Cotzias.

    PubMed

    Fahn, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    It took exactly 150 years since James Parkinson's description in 1817 of the illness bearing his name until the development of effective therapy for this disorder, namely, the introduction of high-dosage levodopa by George Cotzias in 1967. During the first 50 years, no effective therapy was available, but neurologists reported using different agents, including metals. Then, around 1867, Charcot found solanaceous alkaloids to be somewhat helpful, and these became the accepted and popular therapy for the next 75 years. When basic scientists discovered that these alkaloids had central antimuscarinic activity, pharmaceutical chemists developed synthetic chemical agents that were equally effective, with possibly less adverse effects, and around 1950 these synthetic drugs became the standard medical therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). The link between dopamine and PD did not take place until 1957, 140 years after Parkinson's Essay. The clue came from research on reserpine, a drug derived from the Rauwolfia plant that caused a sedative effect, now recognized as a drug-induced parkinsonian state. Initial investigations revealed that reserpine caused the release and depletion of serotonin stores in the brain. With that knowledge, Arvid Carlsson, a young pharmacologist in Sweden, decided to explore the possibility that reserpine might also affect brain catecholamines. In his now famous, elegant, and simple experiment, he showed that injecting l-dopa, the precursor of catecholamines, alleviated the reserpine-induced parkinsonian state in animals, whereas the precursor of serotonin failed to do so. Carlsson then developed a highly sensitive assay to measure dopamine, and his lab found that dopamine is selectively present in high concentrations in the striatum and that administered l-dopa could restore the dopamine depleted by reserpine. Carlsson postulated that all these findings implicate dopamine in motor disorders. Oleh Hornykiewicz, a young pharmacologist in Vienna, on

  18. Finger tapping analysis in patients with Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Djurić-Jovičić, Milica; Petrović, Igor; Ječmenica-Lukić, Milica; Radovanović, Saša; Dragašević-Mišković, Nataša; Belić, Minja; Miler-Jerković, Vera; Popović, Mirjana B; Kostić, Vladimir S

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate repetitive finger tapping patterns in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy-Richardson syndrome (PSP-R), or multiple system atrophy of parkinsonian type (MSA-P). The finger tapping performance was objectively assessed in PD (n=13), PSP-R (n=15), and MSA-P (n=14) patients and matched healthy controls (HC; n=14), using miniature inertial sensors positioned on the thumb and index finger, providing spatio-temporal kinematic parameters. The main finding was the lack or only minimal progressive reduction in amplitude during the finger tapping in PSP-R patients, similar to HC, but significantly different from the sequence effect (progressive decrement) in both PD and MSA-P patients. The mean negative amplitude slope of -0.12°/cycle revealed less progression of amplitude decrement even in comparison to HC (-0.21°/cycle, p=0.032), and particularly from PD (-0.56°/cycle, p=0.001), and MSA-P patients (-1.48°/cycle, p=0.003). No significant differences were found in the average finger separation amplitudes between PD, PSP-R and MSA-P patients (pmsa-pd=0.726, pmsa-psp=0.363, ppsp-pd=0.726). The lack of clinically significant sequence effect during finger tapping differentiated PSP-R from both PD and MSA-P patients, and might be specific for PSP-R. The finger tapping kinematic parameter of amplitude slope may be a neurophysiological marker able to differentiate particular forms of parkinsonism. PMID:27343040

  19. α-Synuclein inclusions in the skin of Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leyva, Ildefonso; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana Laura; Jiménez-Capdeville, María E; Rentería-Palomo, Ana Arely; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Héctor Gerardo; Valdés-Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Fuentes-Ahumada, Cornelia; Torres-Álvarez, Bertha; Sepúlveda-Saavedra, Julio; Soto-Domínguez, Adolfo; Santoyo, Martha E; Rodriguez-Moreno, José Ildefonso; Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The presence in the brain of α-synuclein containing Lewy neurites, or bodies, is the histological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The discovery of α-synuclein aggregates in nerve endings of the heart, digestive tract, and skin has lent support to the concept of PD as a systemic disease. Our goals were, first, to demonstrate the presence of α-synuclein inclusions in the skin and, second, to detect quantitative differences between patients with PD and atypical parkinsonism (AP). Methods Skin biopsies were taken from 67 patients and 20 controls. The biopsies underwent immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) testing for α-synuclein, whereupon its presence was quantified as the percentage of positive cells. Patients were divided into those with PD and those with AP. AP patients included AP with neurodegenerative disease (proteinopathies) and secondary AP. Results Sixty-seven patients (34 with PD) and 20 controls were recruited. In the PD group, α-synuclein was detected in 58% of the cells in the spinous cell layer (SCL), 62% in the pilosebaceous unit (PSU), and 58% in the eccrine glands (EG). The AP-proteinopathies group showed 7%, 7%, and 0% expression of α-synuclein, respectively. No expression was found in the skin of the control group. Conclusions The expression of α-synuclein in the skin was relatively high in the PD group, scarce in AP, and null for the individuals in the control group. While these findings require further confirmation, this minimally invasive technique may aid in the improvement of the accuracy of PD diagnoses. PMID:25356418

  20. When Are High-Tech Communicators Effective in Parkinson's Disease?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferriero, Giorgio; Caligari, Marco; Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Franchignoni, Franco

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a 63-year-old woman with Parkinson's disease showing loss of intelligibility of speech and severely impaired handwriting, despite undergoing physical and speech therapies. As the patient had sufficient residual motor abilities and adequate cognitive function and motivation, a computer-based communication aid with a software…

  1. Linguistic Correlates of Asymmetric Motor Symptom Severity in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtgraves, Thomas; McNamara, Patrick; Cappaert, Kevin; Durso, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Asymmetric motor severity is common in Parkinson's Disease (PD) and provides a method for examining the neurobiologic mechanisms underlying cognitive and linguistic deficits associated with the disorder. In the present research, PD participants (N = 31) were assessed in terms of the asymmetry of their motor symptoms. Interviews with the…

  2. Swallowing Disorders in Parkinson's Disease: Impact of Lingual Pumping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argolo, Natalie; Sampaio, Marília; Pinho, Patrícia; Melo, Ailton; Nóbrega, Ana Caline

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lingual pumping (LP) is a repetitive, involuntary, anteroposterior movement of the tongue on the soft palate that is executed prior to transferring the food bolus to the pharynx, but we also observed LP when multiple swallows were taken. LP may be associated with rigidity and bradykinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This…

  3. Caring for the Student with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prenni, Patricia G.

    2009-01-01

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a cardiac condition in which an extra electrical pathway within the heart causes an abnormal increase in heart rate. It affects one to three people of every 1,000 people worldwide, occurring more often in males. Diagnosis usually occurs during young adulthood, so it is important for school nurses to be familiar…

  4. Horizontal and Vertical Attentional Orienting in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nys, Gudrun M. S.; Santens, Patrick; Vingerhoets, Guy

    2010-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) typically suffer from an asymmetric degeneration of dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra, resulting in right-sided (RPD) or left-sided (LPD) predominance of motor symptomatology. As the dopaminergic system is also involved in attention, we examined horizontal and vertical orienting of attention in LPD…

  5. ORNL research could lead to new treatment for Parkinson's

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd Evans

    2009-08-12

    Parkinson's disease can be debilitating, and right now, there is no cure. But soon, there could be one more way doctors can help fight off the symptoms of that disease, along with stroke and brain tumors. It's all because of research conducted over the past five years at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  6. Impaired Awareness of Movement Disorders in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amanzio, Martina; Monteverdi, Silvia; Giordano, Alessandra; Soliveri, Paola; Filippi, Paola; Geminiani, Giuliano

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study analyzed the presence of awareness of movement disorders (dyskinesias and hypokinesias) in 25 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and motor fluctuations (dyskinesias, wearing off, on-off fluctuations). Of the few studies that have dealt with this topic, none have analyzed the differences in the awareness of motor deficits…

  7. Feasibility of Group Voice Therapy for Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searl, Jeff; Wilson, Kristel; Haring, Karen; Dietsch, Angela; Lyons, Kelly; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose was to demonstrate the feasibility of executing treatment tasks focused on increasing loudness in a group format for individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). A second purpose was to report preliminary pre-to-post treatment outcomes for individuals with PD immediately after they complete the group program. Methods:…

  8. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  9. Impaired Emotion Recognition in Music in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Tricht, Mirjam J.; Smeding, Harriet M. M.; Speelman, Johannes D.; Schmand, Ben A.

    2010-01-01

    Music has the potential to evoke strong emotions and plays a significant role in the lives of many people. Music might therefore be an ideal medium to assess emotion recognition. We investigated emotion recognition in music in 20 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 20 matched healthy volunteers. The role of cognitive dysfunction…

  10. ORNL research could lead to new treatment for Parkinson's

    ScienceCinema

    Boyd Evans

    2016-07-12

    Parkinson's disease can be debilitating, and right now, there is no cure. But soon, there could be one more way doctors can help fight off the symptoms of that disease, along with stroke and brain tumors. It's all because of research conducted over the past five years at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  11. Medication Impairs Probabilistic Classification Learning in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahanshahi, Marjan; Wilkinson, Leonora; Gahir, Harpreet; Dharminda, Angeline; Lagnado, David A.

    2010-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), it is possible that tonic increase of dopamine associated with levodopa medication overshadows phasic release of dopamine, which is essential for learning. Thus while the motor symptoms of PD are improved with levodopa medication, learning would be disrupted. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of…

  12. Neural Substrates of Cognitive Skill Learning in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauchamp, M. H.; Dagher, A.; Panisset, M.; Doyon, J.

    2008-01-01

    While cognitive skill learning is normally acquired implicitly through frontostrial circuitry in healthy individuals, neuroimaging studies suggest that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) do so by activating alternate, intact brain areas associated with explicit memory processing. To further test this hypothesis, 10 patients with PD and 12…

  13. Parkinson's disease and forced exercise: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Qutubuddin, Abu; Reis, Timothy; Alramadhani, Raed; Cifu, David X; Towne, Alan; Carne, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The concept of forced exercise has drawn attention for the treatment of Parkinson's disease symptoms with anecdotal reports of success. This study sought to ascertain any significant effect of forced exercise using a motorized stationary bicycle when compared to controls on Parkinson's disease symptoms in a blinded, randomized, and controlled setting. Setting. Parkinson's disease outpatient clinic, Veterans Administration Medical Center. Method. We assessed 23 patients (13 experimental and 10 controls) on a number of standard Parkinson's measures at baseline, after participation in eight weeks of twice weekly forced exercise or eight weeks of conventional clinic care, and then after a three-month period had elapsed. Dependent measures were UPDRS-III, Berg Balance Scale, finger taping test, and the PDQ-39. Results. Results did not demonstrate any main effect differences between the exercise and control groups on any measure at any point in time. A within subjects effect was demonstrated for the forced exercise group on overall UPDRS-III scores at the three-month end point. No other within group effects were noted. Results suggest that early enthusiasm for forced exercise may need tempering. Limitations of the study are discussed as well as numerous logistical challenges to this type of study.

  14. [Possibilities of non-drug treatment for Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Pokhabov, D V; Abramov, V G; Pokhabov, D D

    2016-01-01

    In this article, non-drug methods of treatment of Parkinson's disease are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the motor symptoms of disease, specifically to gait disorders. Information about objective methods of gait impairment is presented. Own results that confirm the effect of a method of tempo-rhythmical correction of walk in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and vascular parkinsonism as well as a device for assessment of gait parameters developed by the authors are analyzed. The efficacy of other methods of gait correction using external cues, study design and level of evidence are analyzed as well. Information about possibilities of physical therapy and ergotherapy for correction of different symptoms of Parkinson's disease is presented. Positive and negative results of transcranial magnetic stimulation, light therapy and transcranial micropolarization in PD are analyzed. Basis non-drug methods of PD treatment, which currently have insufficient level of evidence (methods of mental relaxation and auditory training, methods of whole body vibration (vibromassage), laser therapy (photoacoustic therapy), acupuncture), are described in brief. Perspectives of the method of gait recovery in PD using tempo-rhythmic correction are emphasized.

  15. Analysis of Mitochondrial haemoglobin in Parkinson's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Freya; Greville-Heygate, Oliver; Liddell, Susan; Emes, Richard; Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is an early feature of neurodegeneration. We have shown there are mitochondrial haemoglobin changes with age and neurodegeneration. We hypothesised that altered physiological processes are associated with recruitment and localisation of haemoglobin to these organelles. To confirm a dynamic localisation of haemoglobin we exposed Drosophila melanogaster to cyclical hypoxia with recovery. With a single cycle of hypoxia and recovery we found a relative accumulation of haemoglobin in the mitochondria compared with the cytosol. An additional cycle of hypoxia and recovery led to a significant increase of mitochondrial haemoglobin (p<0.05). We quantified ratios of human mitochondrial haemoglobin in 30 Parkinson's and matched control human post-mortem brains. Relative mitochondrial/cytosolic quantities of haemoglobin were obtained for the cortical region, substantia nigra and cerebellum. In age matched post-mortem brain mitochondrial haemoglobin ratios change, decreasing with disease duration in female cerebellum samples (n=7). The change is less discernible in male cerebellum (n=18). In cerebellar mitochondria, haemoglobin localisation in males with long disease duration shifts from the intermembrane space to the outer membrane of the organelle. These new data illustrate dynamic localisation of mitochondrial haemoglobin within the cell. Mitochondrial haemoglobin should be considered in the context of gender differences characterised in Parkinson's disease. It has been postulated that cerebellar circuitry may be activated to play a protective role in individuals with Parkinson's. The changing localisation of intracellular haemoglobin in response to hypoxia presents a novel pathway to delineate the role of the cerebellum in Parkinson's disease. PMID:27181046

  16. Does idiopathic parkinsonism in Aberdeen follow intrauterine influenza?

    PubMed Central

    Ebmeier, K P; Mutch, W J; Calder, S A; Crawford, J R; Stewart, L; Besson, J O

    1989-01-01

    A study is presented which fails to replicate a recent report that peak years of birth of patients later developing Parkinson's disease are related to the influenza pandemics of the period 1890-1930. The years of birth of a whole population cohort of 243 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease examined in Aberdeen in 1983 and reexamined in 1986/7 were compared with deaths due to influenza in the City of Aberdeen in the years 1900-1930. Although a significant peak of Parkinson births (compared with the age profile of the Aberdeen population in 1983) occurred in 1902, there appeared to be no systematic relationship between Parkinson births and influenza deaths. In addition, no season of birth effect could be detected in a comparison with 232 matched controls. The presence of peaks of birth years, for whatever aetiological reason, is of significance to epidemiological studies in that prevalence estimates may be influenced by the year of study relative to these mini-cohorts. PMID:2769287

  17. [Possibilities of non-drug treatment for Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Pokhabov, D V; Abramov, V G; Pokhabov, D D

    2016-01-01

    In this article, non-drug methods of treatment of Parkinson's disease are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the motor symptoms of disease, specifically to gait disorders. Information about objective methods of gait impairment is presented. Own results that confirm the effect of a method of tempo-rhythmical correction of walk in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and vascular parkinsonism as well as a device for assessment of gait parameters developed by the authors are analyzed. The efficacy of other methods of gait correction using external cues, study design and level of evidence are analyzed as well. Information about possibilities of physical therapy and ergotherapy for correction of different symptoms of Parkinson's disease is presented. Positive and negative results of transcranial magnetic stimulation, light therapy and transcranial micropolarization in PD are analyzed. Basis non-drug methods of PD treatment, which currently have insufficient level of evidence (methods of mental relaxation and auditory training, methods of whole body vibration (vibromassage), laser therapy (photoacoustic therapy), acupuncture), are described in brief. Perspectives of the method of gait recovery in PD using tempo-rhythmic correction are emphasized. PMID:27635607

  18. Parkinson's Law quantified: three investigations on bureaucratic inefficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimek, Peter; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    We formulate three famous, descriptive essays of Parkinson on bureaucratic inefficiency in a quantifiable and dynamical socio-physical framework. In the first model we show how the use of recent opinion formation models for small groups can be used to understand Parkinson's observation that decision-making bodies such as cabinets or boards become highly inefficient once their size exceeds a critical 'Coefficient of Inefficiency', typically around 20. A second observation of Parkinson—which is sometimes referred to as Parkinson's Law—is that the growth of bureaucratic or administrative bodies usually goes hand in hand with a drastic decrease of its overall efficiency. In our second model we view a bureaucratic body as a system of a flow of workers, who enter, become promoted to various internal levels within the system over time, and leave the system after having served for a certain time. Promotion usually is associated with an increase of subordinates. Within the proposed model it becomes possible to work out the phase diagram under which conditions of bureaucratic growth can be confined. In our last model we assign individual efficiency curves to workers throughout their life in administration, and compute the optimum time to give them the old age pension, in order to ensure a maximum of efficiency within the body—in Parkinson's words we compute the 'Pension Point'.

  19. Dynamic Structure of Emotions Among Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Nesselroade, John R.; Shifren, Kim; McArdle, John J.

    2004-01-01

    With few exceptions, the dynamics underlying the mood structures of individuals with Parkinson's Disease have consistently been overlooked. Based on 12 participants' daily self-reports over 72 days, we identified 10 participants whose covariance matrices for positive and negative affect were similar enough to warrant pooling. Dynamic factor models…

  20. Assessing the Executive Function Deficits of Patients with Parkinsons Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, William; Moberg, Paul; Duda, John; Stern, Matthew; Weintraub, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of the Tower of London-Drexel (TOL DX ) in assessing the executive deficits associated with Parkinsons disease (PD). We sought to determine whether the TOL DX would differentiate between (a) patients with PD and healthy control participants (HCP), (b) demented and nondemented patients, and (c)…

  1. Evaluation of Nonmotor Symptoms in Diagnosis of Parkinsonism and Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Chiun-Hian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nonmotor symptoms particularly olfactory dysfunction, RBD, depression, hallucinations, and constipation are currently not included in the typical clinical criteria for diagnosing Lewy body Parkinsonian disorders (LBPD). The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic value of nonmotor symptoms in patients presenting with Parkinsonism and tremor. Methods. All new patients seen between January 2007 and May 2013 in the Movement Disorders Specialist Clinics of the Royal Melbourne Hospital (RMH), who were referred with a possible neurodegenerative syndrome or concerns of Parkinsonism and/or tremor, were included. Patients underwent routine evaluation with the four-minute “Sniffin Sticks” test, RBD, depression, and constipation. Results. 291 patients were included in the analysis. Conclusion. We found that lower olfaction scores based on “Sniffin Sticks” testing combined with reports of depression and constipation are independent predictors for the diagnosis of the spectrum of Lewy body Parkinsonian disorders (LBPD). Parkinson's disease (PD) cannot be reliably clinically differentiated from other causes of Parkinsonism that share symptomatology and structural abnormalities. PMID:27403372

  2. Glucocerebrosidase mutations in clinical and pathologically proven Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Juliane; Bras, Jose; Deas, Emma; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Parkkinen, Laura; Lachmann, Robin H.; Li, Abi; Holton, Janice; Guerreiro, Rita; Paudel, Reema; Segarane, Badmavady; Singleton, Andrew; Lees, Andrew; Hardy, John; Houlden, Henry; Revesz, Tamas; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) are associated with Gaucher's disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder. Parkinsonism is an established feature of Gaucher's disease and an increased frequency of mutations in GBA has been reported in several different ethnic series with sporadic Parkinson's disease. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of GBA mutations in British patients affected by Parkinson's disease. We utilized the DNA of 790 patients and 257 controls, matched for age and ethnicity, to screen for mutations within the GBA gene. Clinical data on all identified GBA mutation carriers was reviewed and analysed. Additionally, in all cases where brain material was available, a neuropathological evaluation was performed and compared to sporadic Parkinson's disease without GBA mutations. The frequency of GBA mutations among the British patients (33/790 = 4.18%) was significantly higher (P = 0.01; odds ratio = 3.7; 95% confidence interval = 1.12–12.14) when compared to the control group (3/257 = 1.17%). Fourteen different GBA mutations were identified, including three previously undescribed mutations, K7E, D443N and G193E. Pathological examination revealed widespread and abundant α-synuclein pathology in all 17 GBA mutation carriers, which were graded as Braak stage of 5–6, and had McKeith's limbic or diffuse neocortical Lewy body-type pathology. Diffuse neocortical Lewy body-type pathology tended to occur more frequently in the group with GBA mutations compared to matched Parkinson's disease controls. Clinical features comprised an early onset of the disease, the presence of hallucinations in 45% (14/31) and symptoms of cognitive decline or dementia in 48% (15/31) of patients. This study demonstrates that GBA mutations are found in British subjects at a higher frequency than any other known Parkinson's disease gene. This is the largest study to date on a non-Jewish patient sample with a detailed genotype/phenotype/pathological analyses

  3. Protein intake, nitrogen balance and nutritional status in patients with Parkinson's disease; time for a change?

    PubMed

    Zilli Canedo Silva, Maryanne; Carol Fritzen, Natali; de Oliveira, Marlon; Paes da Silva, Michel; Rasmussen Petterle, Ricardo; Teive, Hélio Afonso; de Mesquita Barros Almeida Leite, Christiane; Rabito, Estela Iraci; Madalozzo Schieferdecker, Maria Eliana; Carvalho, Mauricio

    2015-06-01

    Objetivo: evaluar ingestión proteica, balance nitrogenado y estado nutricional de pacientes con enfermedad de Parkinson (EP) clínicamente estables. Métodos: estudio transversal de pacientes con EP en los niveles 1-3 según la escala de Hoehn-Yahr e individuos sin enfermedad neurológica (controles), pareados por edad y género. Todos los participantes fueron sometidos a una entrevista de la historia nutricional, antropometría, impedancia eléctrica y registro alimentario de 3 días consecutivos, incluyendo un fin de semana. Fueron colectados sangre venosa en ayuno y orina de 24 horas para evaluación de la depuración de la creatinina, índice creatinina-altura y balance nitrogenado. Resultados: el promedio de edad en pacientes con EP fue 58,9 ± 12,8 años en comparación con 54,7 ± 12,6 años de los controles, p = 0,345. Un tercio del grupo EP tuvo síntomas de disfagia, con menor ingestión de agua y fibras, comparados a los controles. La circunferencia de la pantorrilla fue menor en grupo EP (35,5 ± 2,8 vs. 38,4 ± 3,5 cm, p = 0,012). La ingestión de nitrógeno fue significativamente menor y el balance de nitrógeno fue negativo en grupo EP (-1,8 ± 3,9 vs. 1,1 ± 4,2 controles, p = 0,064). Los antioxidantes folato y vitamina E fueron consumidos en pequeñas cantidades en ambos grupos, aunque significativamente menor en los pacientes con EP (p = 0,042 y 0,031, respectivamente). Discusión: la ingestión proteica diaria de aproximadamente 1,1 g/kg en pacientes clínicamente estables con EP puede no ser suficiente para garantizar un balance neutro de calorías-nitrógeno, así como para mantener la masa muscular. Serán necesarios mayores estudios que produzcan una imagen más completa del estado metabólico de los pacientes con Parkinson.

  4. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease (recent update).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil; Moon, Carolyn Seungyoun; Khogali, Azza; Haidous, Ali; Chabenne, Anthony; Ojo, Comfort; Jelebinkov, Miriana; Kurdi, Yousef; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder mostly affecting the aging population over sixty. Cardinal symptoms including, tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooling, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are already destroyed. Hence we need early, sensitive, specific, and economical peripheral and/or central biomarker(s) for the differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PD. These can be classified as clinical, biochemical, genetic, proteomic, and neuroimaging biomarkers. Novel discoveries of genetic as well as nongenetic biomarkers may be utilized for the personalized treatment of PD during preclinical (premotor) and clinical (motor) stages. Premotor biomarkers including hyper-echogenicity of substantia nigra, olfactory and autonomic dysfunction, depression, hyposmia, deafness, REM sleep disorder, and impulsive behavior may be noticed during preclinical stage. Neuroimaging biomarkers (PET, SPECT, MRI), and neuropsychological deficits can facilitate differential diagnosis. Single-cell profiling of dopaminergic neurons has identified pyridoxal kinase and lysosomal ATPase as biomarker genes for PD prognosis. Promising biomarkers include: fluid biomarkers, neuromelanin antibodies, pathological forms of α-Syn, DJ-1, amyloid β and tau in the CSF, patterns of gene expression, metabolomics, urate, as well as protein profiling in the blood and CSF samples. Reduced brain regional N-acetyl-aspartate is a biomarker for the in vivo assessment of neuronal loss using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and T2 relaxation time with MRI. To confirm PD diagnosis, the PET biomarkers include [(18)F]-DOPA for estimating dopaminergic neurotransmission, [(18)F]dG for mitochondrial bioenergetics, [(18)F]BMS for mitochondrial complex-1, [(11)C](R)-PK11195 for microglial activation, SPECT imaging with (123)Iflupane and βCIT for dopamine transporter, and urinary

  5. Association Between Tuberculosis and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Hao; Chou, Chung-Hsing; Liu, Feng-Cheng; Lin, Te-Yu; Huang, Wen-Yen; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have investigated the association between tuberculosis (TB) and Parkinson disease (PD). This nationwide, population-based, retrospective cohort study investigated the risk of PD in patients with TB. We selected patients newly diagnosed with TB (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification: 011) from 2000 to 2009 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database as the TB cohort. The comparison cohort (the non-TB cohort) was frequency matched to the TB cohort at a ratio of 4:1 by sex, age, and the index date. We analyzed the risks of PD by using Cox proportional hazard regression models. A total of 121,951 patients with TB and 487,800 non-TB controls were enrolled in this study. The TB cohort had a 1.38-fold risk of PD compared with the non-TB cohort after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidities (aHR, 95% CI: 1.30–1.46). The adjusted risk of PD in the TB and non-TB cohorts increased in subgroups regardless of age, sex, and comorbidities. Combined effect of TB and comorbidities on the risk of PD were significant in patients with TB who had diabetes (aHR: 2.26, 95% CI: 2.02–2.52), hypertension (aHR: 2.23, 95% CI: 2.04–2.44), head injury (aHR: 2.32, 95% CI: 1.95–2.77), chronic kidney disease (aHR: 2.02, 95% CI: 1.49–2.72), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (aHR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.66–2.05), depression (aHR: 4.66, 95% CI: 3.59–6.05), dementia (aHR: 3.70, 95% CI: 2.99–4.59), and stroke (aHR: 2.56, 95% CI: 2.28–2.87). The risk of PD was higher in a follow-up within 1 year (aHR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.58–2.00) and decreased with the follow-up period in the TB cohort. Patients with TB have an independently 1.38-fold risk of PD. The risk of PD decreased with the follow-up period in the TB cohort. Physicians should be aware of the risk of PD in patients with TB when treating such patients. PMID:26937925

  6. Ventricular dilatation and brain atrophy in patients with Parkinson's disease with incipient dementia.

    PubMed

    Camicioli, Richard; Sabino, Jennifer; Gee, Myrlene; Bouchard, Thomas; Fisher, Nancy; Hanstock, Chris; Emery, Derek; Martin, W R Wayne

    2011-07-01

    Age-related ventricular enlargement is accelerated in Alzheimer's disease, but its relationship to cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease is less clear, even though dementia is common in Parkinson's disease. Our goals were to determine if greater enlargement of the ventricles and gray or white matter atrophy occurred in Parkinson's disease patients developing cognitive decline. Older nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease (33) and age- and sex-matched controls (39) were recruited and prospectively assessed for the development of significant cognitive decline over 36 months. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained every 18 months, and ventricular volume and total brain gray and white matter volumes were measured using reliable segmentation of T1-weighted volumetric scans. Subjects with incidental intracranial abnormalities, an atypical course, and stroke as well as dropouts were excluded from a cohort of 52 patients and 50 controls. Among 33 patients and 39 controls, 10 patients and 3 controls developed significant cognitive impairment or dementia. Ventricular change and Parkinson's disease status were significantly associated with dementia. Ventricular change was significantly correlated with change in Mini-Mental Status Examination in the Parkinson's disease with dementia group (r = 0.87, P = .001). Gray matter atrophy was greater in Parkinson's disease with dementia, with similar change over time in both Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's disease with dementia. White matter volumes were not significantly different between Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's disease with dementia; however, the decrease over time might be greater in Parkinson's disease with dementia. Ventricular dilatation occurs early in the course of significant cognitive decline in patients with Parkinson's disease, possibly reflecting both cortical gray and white matter loss. PMID:21442661

  7. Treatment of Parkinson disease: a 64-year-old man with motor complications of advanced Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Tarsy, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    In early stages, Parkinson disease typically begins with asymmetric or unilateral motor symptoms due to combinations of mild bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor. In most cases, with progression, signs of more generalized bradykinesia appear, which include facial masking, reduced voice volume, and slowing of activities of daily living. In more advanced Parkinson disease, other disabling manifestations may follow, such as impaired balance, gait freezing, falls, speech disturbance, and cognitive impairment. Levodopa is the most effective medical treatment for Parkinson disease. However, motor complications uniquely related to levodopa treatment may emerge that may be difficult to manage. These include fluctuating levodopa responses and involuntary movements and postures known as dyskinesia and dystonia. Medication adjustments are usually effective, but in some cases surgical intervention with deep brain stimulation becomes necessary to alleviate motor complications. The case of Mr L, a man with an 11-year history of Parkinson disease, illustrates these emerging motor complications and the manner in which they may be managed both medically and surgically.

  8. The safety, tolerability and efficacy of pimavanserin tartrate in the treatment of psychosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hermanowicz, Stefan; Hermanowicz, Neal

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease psychosis (PDP) is a common and often very disturbing component of Parkinson's disease (PD). PDP consists of hallucinations that are mainly visual and delusions that are often of a paranoid nature. These symptoms can be the most troubling and disruptive of all the manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Current treatment methods include the reduction of anti-Parkinson's medications, a strategy that may worsen the motor problems the medications are prescribed to alleviate, and the introduction of selected antipsychotic medications that carry with them the potential for troubling side effects and serious consequences. Pimavanserin has been developed and studied in clinical trials to specifically address Parkinson's disease psychosis and has been submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its approval for this purpose. If this is granted, we believe the evidence of Pimavanserin efficacy, safety and tolerability will position this medication as the first choice for treatment of Parkinson's disease psychosis.

  9. Risk of Falls in Parkinson's Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study of 160 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Ana; Grandas, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Falls are a major source of disability in Parkinson's disease. Risk factors for falling in Parkinson's disease remain unclear. To determine the relevant risk factors for falling in Parkinson's disease, we screened 160 consecutive patients with Parkinson's disease for falls and assessed 40 variables. A comparison between fallers and nonfallers was performed using statistical univariate analyses, followed by bivariate and multivariate logistic regression, receiver-operating characteristics analysis, and Kaplan-Meier curves. 38.8% of patients experienced falls since the onset of Parkinson's disease (recurrent in 67%). Tinetti Balance score and Hoehn and Yahr staging were the best independent variables associated with falls. The Tinetti Balance test predicted falls with 71% sensitivity and 79% specificity and Hoehn and Yahr staging with 77% sensitivity and 71% specificity. The risk of falls increased exponentially with age, especially from 70 years onward. Patients aged >70 years at the onset of Parkinson's disease experienced falls significantly earlier than younger patients. PMID:22292126

  10. Parkinsonism and Neurological Manifestations of Influenza Throughout the 20th and 21st Centuries

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Julie; Smeyne, Richard J.; Jang, Haeman; Miller, Bayard; Okun, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Given the recent paper by Jang et al. on “A Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Influenza Virus” which reported a novel animal model of parkinsonism, we aimed to perform a complete historical review of the 20th and 21st century literature on parkinsonism and neurological manifestations of influenza. Scope There were at least twelve major flu pandemics reported in the literature in the 20th and 21st century. Neurological manifestations most prevalent during the pandemics included delirium, encephalitis, ocular abnormalities, amyotrophy, myelopathy, radiculopathy, ataxia and seizures. Very little parkinsonism was reported with the exception of the 1917 cases originally described by von Economo. Conclusions To date there have been surprisingly few cases of neurological issues inclusive of parkinsonism associated with influenza pandemics. Given the recent animal model of H5N1 influenza associated parkinsonism, the medical establishment should be prepared to evaluate for the re-emergence of parkinsonism during future outbreaks. PMID:20650672

  11. Trib3 Is Elevated in Parkinson's Disease and Mediates Death in Parkinson's Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaotian; Zareen, Neela; Rao, Apeksha; Berman, Zachary; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura; Bernd, Paulette; Crary, John F.; Levy, Oren A.; Greene, Lloyd A.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive loss of select neuronal populations, but the prodeath genes mediating the neurodegenerative processes remain to be fully elucidated. Trib3 (tribbles pseudokinase 3) is a stress-induced gene with proapoptotic activity that was previously described as highly activated at the transcriptional level in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) cellular model of PD. Here, we report that Trib3 immunostaining is elevated in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) of human PD patients. Trib3 protein is also upregulated in cellular models of PD, including neuronal PC12 cells and rat dopaminergic ventral midbrain neurons treated with 6-OHDA, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), or α-synuclein fibrils (αSYN). In the toxin models, Trib3 induction is substantially mediated by the transcription factors CHOP and ATF4. Trib3 overexpression is sufficient to promote neuronal death; conversely, Trib3 knockdown protects neuronal PC12 cells as well as ventral midbrain dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA, MPP+, or αSYN. Mechanism studies revealed that Trib3 physically interacts with Parkin, a prosurvival protein whose loss of function is associated with PD. Elevated Trib3 reduces Parkin expression in cultured cells; and in the SNpc of PD patients, Parkin levels are reduced in a subset of dopaminergic neurons expressing high levels of Trib3. Loss of Parkin at least partially mediates the prodeath actions of Trib3 in that Parkin knockdown in cellular PD models abolishes the protective effect of Trib3 downregulation. Together, these findings identify Trib3 and its regulatory pathways as potential targets to suppress the progression of neuron death and degeneration in PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Current treatments ameliorate symptoms, but not the underlying neuronal death. Understanding the core neurodegenerative processes in PD is a

  12. Atomoxetine restores the response inhibition network in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rae, Charlotte L; Nombela, Cristina; Rodríguez, Patricia Vázquez; Ye, Zheng; Hughes, Laura E; Jones, P Simon; Ham, Timothy; Rittman, Timothy; Coyle-Gilchrist, Ian; Regenthal, Ralf; Sahakian, Barbara J; Barker, Roger A; Robbins, Trevor W; Rowe, James B

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease impairs the inhibition of responses, and whilst impulsivity is mild for some patients, severe impulse control disorders affect ∼10% of cases. Based on preclinical models we proposed that noradrenergic denervation contributes to the impairment of response inhibition, via changes in the prefrontal cortex and its subcortical connections. Previous work in Parkinson's disease found that the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine could improve response inhibition, gambling decisions and reflection impulsivity. Here we tested the hypotheses that atomoxetine can restore functional brain networks for response inhibition in Parkinson's disease, and that both structural and functional connectivity determine the behavioural effect. In a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study, 19 patients with mild-to-moderate idiopathic Parkinson's disease underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a stop-signal task, while on their usual dopaminergic therapy. Patients received 40 mg atomoxetine or placebo, orally. This regimen anticipates that noradrenergic therapies for behavioural symptoms would be adjunctive to, not a replacement for, dopaminergic therapy. Twenty matched control participants provided normative data. Arterial spin labelling identified no significant changes in regional perfusion. We assessed functional interactions between key frontal and subcortical brain areas for response inhibition, by comparing 20 dynamic causal models of the response inhibition network, inverted to the functional magnetic resonance imaging data and compared using random effects model selection. We found that the normal interaction between pre-supplementary motor cortex and the inferior frontal gyrus was absent in Parkinson's disease patients on placebo (despite dopaminergic therapy), but this connection was restored by atomoxetine. The behavioural change in response inhibition (improvement indicated by reduced stop-signal reaction

  13. Atomoxetine restores the response inhibition network in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rae, Charlotte L; Nombela, Cristina; Rodríguez, Patricia Vázquez; Ye, Zheng; Hughes, Laura E; Jones, P Simon; Ham, Timothy; Rittman, Timothy; Coyle-Gilchrist, Ian; Regenthal, Ralf; Sahakian, Barbara J; Barker, Roger A; Robbins, Trevor W; Rowe, James B

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease impairs the inhibition of responses, and whilst impulsivity is mild for some patients, severe impulse control disorders affect ∼10% of cases. Based on preclinical models we proposed that noradrenergic denervation contributes to the impairment of response inhibition, via changes in the prefrontal cortex and its subcortical connections. Previous work in Parkinson's disease found that the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine could improve response inhibition, gambling decisions and reflection impulsivity. Here we tested the hypotheses that atomoxetine can restore functional brain networks for response inhibition in Parkinson's disease, and that both structural and functional connectivity determine the behavioural effect. In a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study, 19 patients with mild-to-moderate idiopathic Parkinson's disease underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a stop-signal task, while on their usual dopaminergic therapy. Patients received 40 mg atomoxetine or placebo, orally. This regimen anticipates that noradrenergic therapies for behavioural symptoms would be adjunctive to, not a replacement for, dopaminergic therapy. Twenty matched control participants provided normative data. Arterial spin labelling identified no significant changes in regional perfusion. We assessed functional interactions between key frontal and subcortical brain areas for response inhibition, by comparing 20 dynamic causal models of the response inhibition network, inverted to the functional magnetic resonance imaging data and compared using random effects model selection. We found that the normal interaction between pre-supplementary motor cortex and the inferior frontal gyrus was absent in Parkinson's disease patients on placebo (despite dopaminergic therapy), but this connection was restored by atomoxetine. The behavioural change in response inhibition (improvement indicated by reduced stop-signal reaction

  14. Metatarsal fracture as a consequence of foot dystonia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    McDade, Eric; Weiner, William J; Shulman, Lisa M

    2008-01-01

    We report a 45-year-old man with a 4-year history of Parkinson's disease complicated by the development of left-foot dystonia resulting in a fracture of the fifth metatarsal. Orthopedic injuries are common in Parkinson's disease, but they are usually secondary to falls. Although drug-induced dystonia is a common side effect of pharmacological treatment of Parkinson's disease, this is the first report of a fracture related to these abnormal movements.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA in CSF distinguishes LRRK2 from idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Podlesniy, Petar; Vilas, Dolores; Taylor, Peggy; Shaw, Leslie M; Tolosa, Eduard; Trullas, Ramon

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA regulates mitochondrial function which is altered in both idiopathic and familial forms of Parkinson's disease. To investigate whether these two disease forms exhibit an altered regulation of mitochondrial DNA we measured cell free mitochondrial DNA content in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from idiopathic and LRRK2-related Parkinson's disease patients. The concentration of mitochondrial DNA was measured using a digital droplet polymerase chain reaction technique in a total of 98 CSF samples from a cohort of subjects including: 20 LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers with Parkinson's disease, 26 asymptomatic LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers, 31 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 21 first-degree relatives of LRRK2 Parkinson's disease patients without the mutation. Here we report that LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers with Parkinson's disease exhibit a high concentration of mitochondrial DNA in CSF compared with asymptomatic LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers and with idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients. In addition, idiopathic, but not LRRK2 Parkinson's disease is associated with low CSF concentration of α-synuclein. These results show that high mitochondrial DNA content in CSF distinguishes idiopathic from LRRK2-related Parkinson's disease suggesting that different biochemical pathways underlie neurodegeneration in these two disorders.

  16. The association between mutations in the lysosomal protein glucocerebrosidase and parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    DePaolo, J.; Goker-Alpan, O.; Samaddar, T.; Lopez, G.; Sidransky, E.

    2009-01-01

    A body of work has emerged over the past decade demonstrating a relationship between mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA), the gene implicated in Gaucher disease, and the development of parkinsonism. Several different lines of research support this relationship. First, patients with Gaucher disease who are homozygous for mutations in GBA have a higher than expected propensity to develop Parkinson disease (PD). Furthermore, carriers of GBA mutations, particularly family members of patients with Gaucher disease have displayed an increased rate of parkinsonism. Subsequently, investigators from centers around the world screened cohorts of patients with parkinsonism for GBA mutations and found that overall, subjects with Parkinson disease as well as other Lewy body disorders have at least a five–fold increase in the number of carriers of GBA mutations as compared to age matched controls. In addition, neuropathologic studies of subjects with parkinsonism carrying GBA mutations demonstrate Lewy bodies, depletion of neurons of the substantia nigra and involvement of hippocampal layers CA2−4. While the basis for this association has yet to be elucidated, evidence continues to support the role of GBA as a Parkinson risk factor across different centers, synucleinopathies and ethnicities. Further studies of the association between Gaucher disease and parkinsonism will stimulate new insights into the pathophysisology of the two disorders, and will prove crucial for both genetic counseling of patients and family members and the design of relevant therapeutic strategies for specific patients with parkinsonism. PMID:19425057

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Kii Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yui; Morimoto, Satoru; Yoneda, Misao; Kuzuhara, Shigeki; Kokubo, Yasumasa

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex is classified as one of the tauopathies. Methods. The total tau, phosphorylated tau, and amyloid β42 levels were assayed in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex (n = 12), Alzheimer's disease (n = 9), Parkinson's disease (n = 9), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 11), and controls (n = 5) using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Results. Total tau and phosphorylated tau did not increase and amyloid β42 was relatively reduced in Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex. Relatively reduced amyloid β42 might discriminate Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease, and the ratios of phosphorylated-tau to amyloid β42 could discriminate Kii amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex from Alzheimer's disease. Conclusions. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis may be useful to differentiate amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex from Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease.

  18. [Neuropsychological study in patients with Parkinson's disease: the effects of deep brain stimulation].

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Cristina; Fernández-Medina, Juliana M; Parra-Bolaños, Nicolás; Martínez-Restrepo, Óscar A

    2016-02-16

    Introduccion. La enfermedad de Parkinson (EP) es un trastorno cuyas manifestaciones clinicas se observan en el ambito motor y neuropsicologico e influyen en la calidad de vida del paciente. Diversos estudios cientificos muestran la eficacia de la estimulacion cerebral profunda como tratamiento sobre los sintomas motores, pero faltan estudios sobre los sintomas neuropsicologicos. Objetivo. Analizar la existencia de diferencias significativas en procesos neuropsicologicos, como la atencion, la memoria, el lenguaje, la visuopercepcion y la funcion ejecutiva en los pacientes con EP antes y despues de la estimulacion cerebral profunda. Pacientes y metodos. La muestra estuvo formada por 20 pacientes parkinsonianos de 50-70 años de ambos sexos, pertenecientes a entidades prestadoras de servicios de salud de Medellin, a los que se les administraron el Continuous Performance Test y el Trail Making Test para valorar la atencion, la figura compleja de Rey y la prueba de memoria de Ardila para evaluar la memoria, el test de Boston y fluidez verbal para valorar el lenguaje, la figura compleja de Rey copia para la visuopercepcion, y el test de clasificacion de cartas de Wisconsin para valorar la funcion ejecutiva. Resultados. Existen diferencias significativas entre las puntuaciones antes y despues de la estimulacion cerebral profunda en los pacientes con EP en la atencion y la memoria. Conclusiones. El conocimiento de estos hallazgos es relevante para la terapia neuropsicologica de los pacientes con EP.

  19. Psychosocial Challenges Experienced by Partners of People With Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, Summer Carnett

    2015-08-01

    Although researchers have examined issues related to partners providing care for a person with Parkinson disease (PWP), few have explored partners' broader psychosocial experiences. To investigate this underexplored area, individual, in-depth interviews with 23 partners of PWPs were conducted. Participants reported significant psychosocial challenges, including having the PWP withdraw from communication, being unable to "rescue" the PWP, being the recipient of the PWP's frustration, expressing impatience with the PWP, shouldering increased responsibility, being confronted with possibly losing the PWP, losing valued activities, feeling housebound, being unable to predict the PWP's daily well-being, and experiencing uncertainty about future caregiving and disease progression. These results indicate that being the partner of a PWP involves serious, complex psychosocial challenges related to both caregiving and noncaregiving issues. This research highlights the need for a family-centered approach to Parkinson care and provides valuable insight that can inform interventions and nursing practice for this population.

  20. A walking support/evaluation machine for patients with parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Kai, Yoshihiro; Tanioka, Tetsuya; Inoue, Yoshio; Matsuda, Takuya; Sugawara, Kenichi; Takasaka, Youichiro; Nagamine, Isao

    2004-02-01

    Various walk supporting systems have been devised and developed. However, they have not been designed for supporting or evaluating the gait of parkinsonian patients, and not much consideration has been given to gait disturbances of parkinsonian patients. In this study: (a) We prepared a tentative model of walk supporting and monitoring system in consideration of typical symptoms of parkinsonism. (b) We conducted gait rehabilitation in a parkinsonian patient using the walk supporting and monitoring system and confirmed (i) the occurrence of frozen gait during walking, (ii) brachybasia, (iii) the absence of anterior tilting of the posture, pulsion symptom, and festination, and (iv) occurrence of hesitation to start walking. Therefore, typical symptoms of parkinsonism can be detected by the use of this system. (c) The medical staff can evaluate the state of recovery of patients on the basis of the data obtained from this system and use them for purposes such as guidance of rehabilitation.

  1. Effect of stimulus orientation on contrast sensitivity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; Van der Wildt, G J

    1988-01-01

    We studied the effect of stimulus orientation on contrast sensitivity function in 21 patients with Parkinson's disease and in 10 normal subjects. This was done by measuring contrast sensitivity over a range of spatial frequencies for vertical and horizontal sine wave grating stimuli. There was a great test-retest consistency in normal subjects and patients. Fifteen of the 21 patients showed contrast sensitivity deficit in at least one eye. Orientation-specific loss was demonstrated in 17 of the 25 "affected" eyes. The most frequent type of orientation-specific loss was a notch defect, which preferentially affected the middle spatial frequencies. We attribute orientation-specific and spatial frequency-selective loss in Parkinson's disease to a functional disruption of neurons on the visual cortex.

  2. Parkinson's disease and primate research: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, E A C; Aziz, T Z

    2006-01-01

    Scientific research involving non‐human primates has contributed towards many advances in medicine and surgery. This review discusses its role in the progress made towards our understanding of Parkinson's disease and its treatment. Established medical treatments like dopamine agonists continue to need primate models to assess their efficacy, safety, and mechanism of action. The recently developed treatment of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus required validation in primates before entering the clinic. Controversies surrounding future treatments such as gene therapy show the need for properly evaluated preclinical research using appropriate animal models before progression to clinical trials. Research on primates has played—and continues to play—a crucial part in deepening our understanding of Parkinson's disease, improving current therapies, and developing new treatments that are both safe and effective. In animal research, the “three Rs” of humane technique—reduction, refinement, and replacement—should be adhered to. PMID:16679465

  3. Meanings of feeling well among women with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Malin; Nilsson, Carina

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a qualitative inquiry to describe the meanings of feeling well as experienced by women with Parkinson's disease. Nine women were interviewed and we analysed the interviews using a reflective lifeworld approach based on phenomenological epistemology. We present the analysis as five constituents: the body as unnoticed; being able to move on; feeling joy by being connected; finding peace and harmony; and being the director of one's own life. Our findings can be used to understand and promote well-being among women with Parkinson's disease. In care meetings, knowledge about the lived and experienced health processes supports the women's striving to not let illness dominate their experience of daily life. PMID:26489404

  4. Adrenal Pheochromocytoma Incidentally Discovered in a Patient With Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Petramala, Luigi; Concistrè, Antonio; Marinelli, Cristiano; Zinnamosca, Laura; Iannucci, Gino; Lucia, Piernatale; De Vincentis, Giuseppe; Letizia, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the diagnostic route of pheochromocytoma (PHEO) in a patient under dopaminergic treatment. A 70-year-old man with Parkinsonism and under treatment with levodopa and carbidopa came to our observation for evaluation of arterial hypertension and right adrenal mass discovered incidentally. To evaluate adrenal hormone levels we performed a dexamethasone suppression test, plasma aldosterone levels and 24-hr urinary metanephrine, which revealed elevated levels of catecholamines metabolities. 123-I-metaiodobenzylguanidine SPECT scintiscan revealed raised activity within the right adrenal gland concordant with the mass. The diagnosis of PHEO was posed and an elective laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed; histopathological examination confirmed the PHEO diagnosis. Recently the coexistence of PHEO and Parkinsonism is a very rare association of diseases, with only 3 cases reported in literature. In this article, another case is reported and diagnostic procedures are discussed. PMID:26496334

  5. Mitochondria-Targeted Protective Compounds in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moriano, Carlos; González-Burgos, Elena; Gómez-Serranillos, M. Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are cytoplasmic organelles that regulate both metabolic and apoptotic signaling pathways; their most highlighted functions include cellular energy generation in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), regulation of cellular calcium homeostasis, balance between ROS production and detoxification, mediation of apoptosis cell death, and synthesis and metabolism of various key molecules. Consistent evidence suggests that mitochondrial failure is associated with early events in the pathogenesis of ageing-related neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Mitochondria-targeted protective compounds that prevent or minimize mitochondrial dysfunction constitute potential therapeutic strategies in the prevention and treatment of these central nervous system diseases. This paper provides an overview of the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, with particular attention to in vitro and in vivo studies on promising endogenous and exogenous mitochondria-targeted protective compounds. PMID:26064418

  6. The emergence of Parkinson disease among patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Elstein, Deborah; Alcalay, Roy; Zimran, Ari

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, several lines of evidence have been presented that document the clinical manifestations, genetic associations, and sub-cellular mechanisms of the inter-relatedness of β-glucocerebrosidase mutations and the emergence of Parkinson disease among carriers and patients with Gaucher disease. This review is an attempt to apprise the reader of the recent literature with the caveat that this is an area of intensive exploration that is constantly being updated because of the immediate clinical ramifications but also because of the impact on our understanding of Parkinson disease, and finally because of the unexpected inter-reactions between these entities on the molecular level. It has been an unexpected happenstance that it has been discovered that a rare monogenetic disease has an interface at many points with a neurological disorder of the elderly that has both familial and sporadic forms: to date there is no cure for either of these disorders.

  7. Bumetanide to Treat Parkinson Disease: A Report of 4 Cases.

    PubMed

    Damier, Philippe; Hammond, Constance; Ben-Ari, Yeheskel

    2016-01-01

    Relying on recent experimental data in 2 animal models of Parkinson disease (PD), we have tested the effects of the loop diuretic bumetanide as an add-on treatment to dopaminergic drugs in 4 volunteered patients with PD using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Bumetanide is a specific antagonist of the chloride importer NKCC1 (sodium/potassium/chloride cotransporter isoform 1) that ameliorates neuronal inhibition by reducing intracellular chloride levels in a variety of pathological conditions. Bumetanide is however not labeled for use in PD. We report an improvement of PD motor symptoms in the 4 patients treated with bumetanide (5 mg/d for 2 months). Bumetanide also improved gait and freezing in 2 of these patients. Our results suggest that bumetanide is well tolerated and call for double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trials to confirm the therapeutic efficacy of bumetanide.

  8. Neuroimaging biomarkers for Parkinson disease: facts and fantasy.

    PubMed

    Perlmutter, Joel S; Norris, Scott A

    2014-12-01

    In this grand rounds, we focus on development, validation, and application of neuroimaging biomarkers for Parkinson disease (PD). We cover whether such biomarkers can be used to identify presymptomatic individuals (probably yes), provide a measure of PD severity (in a limited fashion, but frequently done poorly), investigate pathophysiology of parkinsonian disorders (yes, if done carefully), play a role in differential diagnosis of parkinsonism (not well), and investigate pathology underlying cognitive impairment (yes, in conjunction with postmortem data). Along the way, we clarify several issues about definitions of biomarkers and surrogate endpoints. The goal of this lecture is to provide a basis for interpreting current literature and newly proposed clinical tools in PD. In the end, one should be able to critically distinguish fact from fantasy. PMID:25363872

  9. Iron in Parkinson disease, blood diseases, malaria and ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauminger, E. R.; Nowik, I.

    1998-12-01

    The concentration of iron in Substantia nigra, the part of the brain which is involved in Parkinson disease, has been found by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) to be ~ 160 μg/g wet tissue and ~ 670 μg/g dry weight, both in control and Parkinson samples. All the iron observed by MS in these samples is ferritin-like iron. In several blood diseases, large amounts of ferritin-like iron have been observed in red blood cells. Desferral removed iron from serum, but not from red blood cells. The iron compound in the malarial pigment of human blood infected by P. falciparum was found to be hemin-like, whereas the pigment iron in rats infected by P. berghei was different from any known iron porphyrin.

  10. Parkinson's syndrome after closed head injury: a single case report

    PubMed Central

    Doder, M; Jahanshahi, M; Turjanski, N; Moseley, I; Lees, A

    1999-01-01

    A 36 year old man, who sustained a skull fracture in 1984, was unconscious for 24 hours, and developed signs of Parkinson's syndrome 6 weeks after the injury. When assessed in 1995, neuroimaging disclosed a cerebral infarction due to trauma involving the left caudate and lenticular nucleus. Parkinson's syndrome was predominantly right sided, slowly progressive, and unresponsive to levodopa therapy. Reaction time tests showed slowness of movement initiation and execution with both hands, particularly the right. Recording of movement related cortical potentials suggested bilateral deficits in movement preparation. Neuropsychological assessment disclosed no evidence of major deficits on tests assessing executive function or working memory, with the exception of selective impairments on the Stroop and on a test of self ordered random number sequences. There was evidence of abulia. The results are discussed in relation to previous literature on basal ganglia lesions and the effects of damage to different points of the frontostriatal circuits.

 PMID:10084539

  11. Park sleep: a non-motor dominant Parkinson's disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Canepa, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man was evaluated in our neurology department, for a presumed diagnosis of 'night-time seizures'; however, this diagnosis was quickly dismissed after the patient (and his wife) described how he 'acted out' and talked throughout his dreams, without any seizure-like activity. This problem had been present for ∼10 years. An EEG ruled out epilepsy. The patient also described a 10-year history of constipation, loss of smell and 'frequent collapses'. These symptoms fit in with the recently published criteria of 'prodromal Parkinson's Disease' and prompted a formal assessment for Parkinson's disease (PD). He had no tremor. A subtle festinating gait pattern and a 2-finger tremor in the right hand were noted. The diagnosis of PD was confirmed by a dopamine transporter scan. Clinically, this is one-Park sleep: rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder subtype-of 7 different non-motor dominant PD phenotypes recently described. PMID:27284098

  12. [Gastroparesis and other gastrointestinal symptoms in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Santos-Garcia, D; de Deus, T; Tejera-Perez, C; Exposito-Ruiz, I; Suarez-Castro, E; Carpintero, P; Macias-Arribi, M

    2015-09-16

    Different gastrointestinal symptoms, such as excessive salivation, deterioration and other disorders affecting the teeth, dysphagia, gastroparesis, gastroesophageal reflux, constipation, difficult defecation or loss of weight are frequent events in all the stages of the development of Parkinson's disease and affect at least a third of the patients. These symptoms reflect the dysfunction of the enteric nervous system, and the stomach is one of the organs where alpha-synuclein is first deposited. Other factors, such as the dysfunction of structures in the central nervous system like the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagal nerve, hormonal factors or secondary effects deriving from the consumption of antiparkinsonian drugs, are involved in its origin. The present article offers a detailed review of the epidemiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic management aspects of the different gastrointestinal symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

  13. Amphetamine discrimination as a test for anti-parkinsonism drugs.

    PubMed

    Schechter, M D

    1977-07-01

    Rats were trained and tested on a two-lever discrimination task based upon the presence or absence of 0.8 mg/kg d-amphetamine. After 80% criterion performance was attained, dopaminergic drugs reported to be effective in the treatment of Parkinson's disease were tested to investigate their ability to produce d-amphetamine-like responding. Amantidine (50 mg/kg), apomorphine (2.5 mg/kg), n-propylnoraporphine (0.1, 0.2 and 1.0 mg/kg), and piribedil (25 mg/kg) were all observed to produce d-amphetamine-appropriate responding. These results indicate that discriminative behavior controlled by d-amphetamine is mediated by central dopaminergic systems and the use of this technique in the evaluation of potential anti-Parkinsonism drugs is discussed. PMID:885158

  14. Fatigue in Parkinson's disease: report from a mutidisciplinary symposium

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joseph H; Beck, James C; Chou, Kelvin L; Clark, Gracia; Fagundes, Christopher P; Goetz, Christopher G; Herlofson, Karen; Kluger, Benzi; Krupp, Lauren B; Lang, Anthony E; Lou, Jao-Shin; Marsh, Laura; Newbould, Anne; Weintraub, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is a severe problem for many people living with Parkinson's disease (PD). Best estimates suggest that more than 50% of patients experience this debilitating symptom. Little is known about its etiology or treatment, making the understanding of fatigue a true unmet need. As part of the Parkinson's Disease Foundation Community Choice Research Program, patients, caregivers, and scientists attended a symposium on fatigue on 16 and 17 October 2014. We present a summary of that meeting, reviewing what is known about the diagnosis and treatment of fatigue, its physiology, and what we might learn from multiple sclerosis (MS), depression, and cancer—disorders in which fatigue figures prominently too. We conclude with focused recommendations to enhance our understanding and treatment of this prominent problem in PD. PMID:27239558

  15. Meanings of feeling well among women with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Malin; Nilsson, Carina

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a qualitative inquiry to describe the meanings of feeling well as experienced by women with Parkinson's disease. Nine women were interviewed and we analysed the interviews using a reflective lifeworld approach based on phenomenological epistemology. We present the analysis as five constituents: the body as unnoticed; being able to move on; feeling joy by being connected; finding peace and harmony; and being the director of one's own life. Our findings can be used to understand and promote well-being among women with Parkinson's disease. In care meetings, knowledge about the lived and experienced health processes supports the women's striving to not let illness dominate their experience of daily life. PMID:26489404

  16. [Gastroparesis and other gastrointestinal symptoms in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Santos-Garcia, D; de Deus, T; Tejera-Perez, C; Exposito-Ruiz, I; Suarez-Castro, E; Carpintero, P; Macias-Arribi, M

    2015-09-16

    Different gastrointestinal symptoms, such as excessive salivation, deterioration and other disorders affecting the teeth, dysphagia, gastroparesis, gastroesophageal reflux, constipation, difficult defecation or loss of weight are frequent events in all the stages of the development of Parkinson's disease and affect at least a third of the patients. These symptoms reflect the dysfunction of the enteric nervous system, and the stomach is one of the organs where alpha-synuclein is first deposited. Other factors, such as the dysfunction of structures in the central nervous system like the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagal nerve, hormonal factors or secondary effects deriving from the consumption of antiparkinsonian drugs, are involved in its origin. The present article offers a detailed review of the epidemiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic management aspects of the different gastrointestinal symptoms in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26350777

  17. Mirtazapine improves visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tagai, Kenji; Nagata, Tomoyuki; Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Tsuno, Norifumi; Ozone, Motohiro; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Psychotic symptoms often occur as a complication in Parkinson's disease patients, and a set of criteria for Parkinson's disease with psychosis (PDPsy) has been established. Among these criteria, hallucinations are one of the specific symptoms, with visual hallucinations being the most common. While atypical antipsychotic agents are often used for the treatment of PDPsy, adverse effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms, often hinder its continuation or tolerance. There have been some reports and reviews indicating that antidepressants may be effective for PDPsy and other forms of dementia with psychosis. In this report, we present a patient with PDPsy who was treated with one of the new-generation antidepressants, mirtazapine. Mirtazapine improved the patient's refractory psychotic symptoms, especially her visual hallucinations, without worsening her motor symptoms.

  18. Glucocerebrosidase Involvement in Parkinson Disease and Other Synucleinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Maria do Rosário

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in both copies (homozygous or compound heterozygous) of the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, which cleaves the glycolipid glucocerebroside into glucose and ceramide cause Gaucher disease. However, multiple independent studies have also reported an association between GBA mutations and Parkinsonism with an increased frequency of heterozygous GBA mutations in various cohorts of patients with parkinsonism and other Lewy body disorders. Furthermore, GBA mutation carriers exhibit diverse parkinsonian phenotypes and present a diffuse pattern of Lewy body distribution in the cerebral cortex. This review provides an overview of the genetic basis for this association in various diseases with dysfunction of the central nervous system in which affected individuals developed Parkinsonian symptoms. The emerging clinical, pathological, and genetic studies in neuronal synucleinopathies suggest a common underlying mechanism in the etiology of these neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22557990

  19. Exploring the link between glucocerebrosidase mutations and parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Westbroek, Wendy; Gustafson, Ann Marie; Sidransky, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Clinical, genetic and pathological studies all demonstrate that mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA), which encodes the lysosomal enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease (GD), are an important and common risk factor for Parkinson disease (PD) and related disorders. Some patients with GD and Gaucher carriers develop parkinsonism. Furthermore, subjects with PD have a greatly increased frequency of GBA mutations. GBA mutation carriers exhibit diverse parkinsonian phenotypes, and have glucocerebrosidase-positive Lewy bodies. Although the mechanism for this association is unknown, we present several theories, including enhanced protein aggregation, prion transmission, lipid accumulation, and impaired autophagy, mitophagy or trafficking. Each has inherent limitations, and an unknown “second hit” might be essential. Elucidating the basis for this link will have important consequences and should provide new insights into lysosomal pathways and potential treatment strategies. PMID:21723784

  20. Momentum-based morphometric analysis with application to Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyun; Khan, Ali R.; McKeown, Martin J.; Beg, Mirza F.

    2011-03-01

    We apply the initial momentum shape representation of diffeomorphic metric mapping from a template region of interest (ROI) to a given ROI as a morphometic marker in Parkinson's disease. We used a three-step segmentation-registrationmomentum process to derive feature vectors from ROIs in a group of 42 subjects consisting of 19 Parkinson's Disease (PD) subjects and 23 normal control (NC) subjects. Significant group differences between PD and NC subjects were detected in four basal ganglia structures including the caudate, putamen, thalamus and globus pallidus. The magnitude of regionally significant between-group differences detected ranged between 34-75%. Visualization of the different structural deformation pattern between-groups revealed that some parts of basal ganglia structure actually hypertrophy, presumably as a compensatory response to more widespread atrophy. Our results of both hypertrophy and atrophy in the same structures further demonstrate the importance of morphological measures as opposed to overall volume in the assessment of neurodegenerative disease.

  1. Spatial disorientation as an early symptom of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hovestadt, A; de Jong, G J; Meerwaldt, J D

    1987-03-01

    In 44 consecutive outpatients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) without levodopa substitution therapy, we tested spatial orientation. Spatial orientation was impaired on the rod orientation test in 43 patients, on the line orientation test in 7 patients, and on the facial recognition test in 17 patients. There was no correlation between severity of spatial disorientation and age, length of illness, verbal WAIS score, or severity of PD. Impairment of spatial orientation is part of PD even in mild cases.

  2. Transdermal rotigotine for the perioperative management of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wüllner, Ullrich; Kassubek, Jan; Odin, Per; Schwarz, Michael; Naumann, Markus; Häck, Hermann-Josef; Boroojerdi, Babak; Reichmann, Heinz

    2010-07-01

    Continuous delivery of antiparkinsonian medication during a perioperative period is desirable to avoid 'off'-symptom complications in surgical patients with concomitant Parkinson's disease (PD). Fourteen PD patients undergoing surgery under general anesthesia were switched from oral dopaminergic medication to transdermally delivered 24-h rotigotine (median dose 12 mg/24 h) for the perioperative period. Rotigotine treatment was considered feasible by patients, their anesthesiologists and neurologists with good control of PD symptoms and easy switching and re-switching of PD medication.

  3. Motor Skill Learning, Retention, and Control Deficits in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pendt, Lisa Katharina; Reuter, Iris; Müller, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease, which affects the basal ganglia, is known to lead to various impairments of motor control. Since the basal ganglia have also been shown to be involved in learning processes, motor learning has frequently been investigated in this group of patients. However, results are still inconsistent, mainly due to skill levels and time scales of testing. To bridge across the time scale problem, the present study examined de novo skill learning over a long series of practice sessions that comprised early and late learning stages as well as retention. 19 non-demented, medicated, mild to moderate patients with Parkinson's disease and 19 healthy age and gender matched participants practiced a novel throwing task over five days in a virtual environment where timing of release was a critical element. Six patients and seven control participants came to an additional long-term retention testing after seven to nine months. Changes in task performance were analyzed by a method that differentiates between three components of motor learning prominent in different stages of learning: Tolerance, Noise and Covariation. In addition, kinematic analysis related the influence of skill levels as affected by the specific motor control deficits in Parkinson patients to the process of learning. As a result, patients showed similar learning in early and late stages compared to the control subjects. Differences occurred in short-term retention tests; patients' performance constantly decreased after breaks arising from poorer release timing. However, patients were able to overcome the initial timing problems within the course of each practice session and could further improve their throwing performance. Thus, results demonstrate the intact ability to learn a novel motor skill in non-demented, medicated patients with Parkinson's disease and indicate confounding effects of motor control deficits on retention performance. PMID:21760898

  4. Intermanual transfer in an artist with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kho, Kuan H; Janssen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    A professional right-handed painter with Parkinson's disease (PD) broke his right arm and continued to paint with his left hand, showing an intact intermanual transfer of skills. This neurocognitive process is related to the supplementary motor area, a brain region that has also been shown to be involved in PD. This observation raises questions about the exact neural underpinnings of intermanual transfer and the possible impact of neurodegenerative disease and medication.

  5. Hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: prevalence, phenomenology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Fénelon, G; Mahieux, F; Huon, R; Ziégler, M

    2000-04-01

    Hallucinations, mainly of a visual nature, are considered to affect about one-quarter of patients with Parkinson's disease. They are commonly viewed as a side-effect of antiparkinsonian treatment, but other factors may be involved. The aim of this study was to determine the phenomenology, prevalence and risk factors of hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. Two-hundred and sixteen consecutive patients fulfilling clinical criteria for Parkinson's disease were studied. Demographic and clinical variables were recorded, including motor and cognitive status, depressive symptoms and sleep-wake disturbances. Patients with and without hallucinations were compared using non-parametric tests, and logistic regression was applied to significant data. Hallucinations had been present during the previous 3 months in 39.8% of the patients, and fell into three categories: minor forms, consisting of a sensation of a presence (person), a sideways passage (commonly of an animal) or illusions were present in 25.5% of the patients (an isolated occurrence in 14.3%), formed visual hallucinations were present in 22.2% (isolated in 9.3%) and auditory hallucinations were present in 9.7% (isolated in 2.3%). Patients with minor hallucinations had a higher depression score than non-hallucinators but did not differ in other respects. Logistic regression analysis identified three factors independently predictive of formed visual hallucinations: severe cognitive disorders, daytime somnolence and a long duration of Parkinson's disease. These findings indicate that, when minor hallucinations are included, the total prevalence is much higher than previously reported. A simple side-effect of dopaminergic treatment is not sufficient to explain the occurrence of all visual hallucinations. The main risk factor in treated patients is cognitive impairment, although sleep-wake cycle disturbances, and possibly other factors related to the duration of the disease, act as cofactors.

  6. Co-occurrence of multiple sclerosis and Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaygannejad, Vahid; Shirmardi, Maryam; Dehghani, Leila; Maghzi, Helia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with the highest prevalence in adults over 60 years of age On the other hand multiple sclerosis (MS), which mostly affects individuals between 20 and 40 years of age, is another neurodegenerative and autoimmune disease of the CNS, however, less common than PD. Here we aim to report the case of a 39-year-old woman, who developed PD 18 years after diagnosis of MS. PMID:27195248

  7. Co-occurrence of multiple sclerosis and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Shaygannejad, Vahid; Shirmardi, Maryam; Dehghani, Leila; Maghzi, Helia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with the highest prevalence in adults over 60 years of age On the other hand multiple sclerosis (MS), which mostly affects individuals between 20 and 40 years of age, is another neurodegenerative and autoimmune disease of the CNS, however, less common than PD. Here we aim to report the case of a 39-year-old woman, who developed PD 18 years after diagnosis of MS. PMID:27195248

  8. Environmental neurotoxin-induced progressive model of parkinsonism in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei-Bin; McDowell, Kimberly A.; Siebert, Aubrey A.; Clark, Sarah M.; Dugger, Natalie V.; Valentino, Kimberly M.; Jinnah, H. A.; Sztalryd, Carole; Fishman, Paul S.; Shaw, Christopher A.; Jafri, M. Samir; Yarowsky, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Exposure to a number of drugs, chemicals or environmental factors can cause parkinsonism. Epidemiologic evidence supports a causal link between the consumption of flour made from the washed seeds of the plant, Cycas micronesica, by the Chamorro population of Guam and the development of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC). Methods We now report that consumption of washed cycad flour pellets by Sprague-Dawley male rats induces progressive parkinsonism. Results Cycad-fed rats displayed motor abnormalities after two to three months of feeding such as spontaneous unilateral rotation, shuffling gait and stereotypy. Histological and biochemical examination of brains from cycad-fed rats revealed an initial decrease in the levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum (STR), followed by neurodegeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) cell bodies in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). α-synuclein (α-syn; proteinase K-resistant) and ubiquitin aggregates were found in the DAergic neurons of the SNc and neurites in the STR. In addition, we identified α-syn aggregates in neurons of the locus coeruleus and cingulate cortex. No loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord was found after chronic consumption of cycad flour. In an organotypic slice culture of the rat substantia nigra and the striatum, an organic extract of cycad causes a selective loss of DA neurons and α-synuclein aggregates in the substantia nigra. Interpretation Cycad-fed rats exhibit progressive behavioral, biochemical, and histological hallmarks of parkinsonism, coupled with a lack of fatality. PMID:20582986

  9. Multi-center analysis of glucocerebrosidase mutations in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Sidransky, Ellen; Nalls, Michael A.; Aasly, Jan O.; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Annesi, Grazia; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Bar-Shira, Anat; Berg, Daniela; Bras, Jose; Brice, Alexis; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Clark, Lorraine N.; Condroyer, Christel; De Marco, Elvira Valeria; Dürr, Alexandra; Eblan, Michael J.; Fahn, Stanley; Farrer, Matthew; Fung, Hon-Chung; Gan-Or, Ziv; Gasser, Thomas; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Giladi, Nir; Griffith, Alida; Gurevich, Tanya; Januario, Cristina; Kropp, Peter; Lang, Anthony E.; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Lesage, Suzanne; Marder, Karen; Mata, Ignacio F.; Mirelman, Anat; Mitsui, Jun; Mizuta, Ikuko; Nicoletti, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Catarina; Ottman, Ruth; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Pereira, Lygia V.; Quattrone, Aldo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Rolfs, Arndt; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Rozenberg, Roberto; Samii, Ali; Samaddar, Ted; Schulte, Claudia; Sharma, Manu; Singleton, Andrew; Spitz, Mariana; Tan, Eng-King; Tayebi, Nahid; Toda, Tatsushi; Troiano, André; Tsuji, Shoji; Wittstock, Matthias; Wolfsberg, Tyra G.; Wu, Yih-Ru; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Zhao, Yi; Ziegler, Shira G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicate an increased frequency of mutations in the gene for Gaucher disease, glucocerebrosidase (GBA), among patients with Parkinson disease. An international collaborative study was conducted to ascertain the frequency of GBA mutations in ethnically diverse patients with Parkinson disease. Methods Sixteen centers participated, including five from the Americas, six from Europe, two from Israel and three from Asia. Each received a standard DNA panel to compare genotyping results. Genotypes and phenotypic data from patients and controls were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models and the Mantel Haenszel procedure to estimate odds ratios (ORs) across studies. The sample included 5691 patients (780 Ashkenazi Jews) and 4898 controls (387 Ashkenazi Jews). Results All 16 centers could detect GBA mutations, L444P and N370S, and the two were found in 15.3% of Ashkenazi patients with Parkinson disease (ORs = 4.95 for L444P and 5.62 for N370S), and in 3.2% of non-Ashkenazi patients (ORs = 9.68 for L444P and 3.30 for N370S). GBA was sequenced in 1642 non-Ashkenazi subjects, yielding a frequency of 6.9% for all mutations, demonstrate that limited mutation screens miss half the mutant alleles. The presence of any GBA mutation was associated with an OR of 5.43 across studies. Clinically, although phenotypes varied, subjects with a GBA mutation presented earlier, and were more likely to have affected relatives and atypical manifestations. Conclusion Data collected from sixteen centers demonstrate that there is a strong association between GBA mutations and Parkinson disease. PMID:19846850

  10. Deep-brain stimulator and control of Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Harbaugh, Robert; Abraham, Jose K.

    2004-07-01

    The design of a novel feedback sensor system with wireless implantable polymer MEMS sensors for detecting and wirelessly transmitting physiological data that can be used for the diagnosis and treatment of various neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, head injury, stroke, hydrocephalus, changes in pressure, patient movements, and tremors is presented in this paper. The sensor system includes MEMS gyroscopes, accelerometers, and pressure sensors. This feedback sensor system focuses on the development and integration of implantable systems with various wireless sensors for medical applications, particularly for the Parkinson's disease. It is easy to integrate and modify the sensor network feed back system for other neurological disorders mentioned above. The monitoring and control of tremor in Parkinson's disease can be simulated on a skeleton via wireless telemetry system communicating with electroactive polymer actuator, and microsensors attached to the skeleton hand and legs. Upon sensing any abnormal motor activity which represent the characteristic rhythmic motion of a typical Parkinson's (PD) patient, these sensors will generate necessary control pulses which will be transmitted to a hat sensor system on the skeleton head. Tiny inductively coupled antennas attached to the hat sensor system can receive these control pulses, demodulate and deliver it to actuate the parts of the skeleton to control the abnormal motor activity. This feedback sensor system can further monitor and control depending on the amplitude of the abnormal motor activity. This microsystem offers cost effective means of monitoring and controlling of neurological disorders in real PD patients. Also, this network system offers a remote monitoring of the patients conditions without visiting doctors office or hospitals. The data can be monitored using PDA and can be accessed using internet (or cell phone). Cellular phone technology will allow a health care worker to be

  11. Rumination and behavioural factors in Parkinson's disease depression

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Camille L.; Rimes, Katharine A.; Brown, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Parkinson's disease is associated with high rates of depression. There is growing interest in non-pharmacological management including psychological approaches such as Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. To date, little research has investigated whether processes that underpin cognitive models of depression, on which such treatment is based, apply in patients with Parkinson's disease. The study aimed to investigate the contribution of core psychological factors to the presence and degree of depressive symptoms. Methods 104 participants completed questionnaires measuring mood, motor disability and core psychological variables, including maladaptive assumptions, rumination, cognitive-behavioural avoidance, illness representations and cognitive-behavioural responses to symptoms. Results Regression analyses revealed that a small number of psychological factors accounted for the majority of depression variance, over and above that explained by overall disability. Participants reporting high levels of rumination, avoidance and symptom focusing experienced more severe depressive symptoms. In contrast, pervasive negative dysfunctional beliefs did not independently contribute to depression variance. Conclusion Specific cognitive (rumination and symptom focusing) and behavioural (avoidance) processes may be key psychological markers of depression in Parkinson's disease and therefore offer important targets for tailored psychological interventions. PMID:26944399

  12. Characteristics of diadochokinesis in Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjaden, Kris; Watling, Elizabeth

    2002-05-01

    The current study applies a quantitative, acoustic analysis procedure for the study of rapid syllable productions outlined by Kent and colleagues [R. D. Kent et al., J. Med. Sp. Lang. Path. 7, 83-90 (1999)] to syllables produced by speakers with Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis. Neurologically healthy talkers will be studied for comparison purposes. Acoustic measures will be reported for syllable repetitions of /p schwa/, /t schwa/, and /k schwa/. Temporal measures will include syllable duration, syllable rate, and stop gap duration. The energy envelope of syllable repetitions will be quantified using measures of rms amplitude minima and maxima. Acoustic measures will be contrasted to determine the extent to which acoustic profiles of diadochokinesis distinguish hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's Disease, ataxic dysarthria secondary to Multiple Sclerosis, and spastic dysarthria secondary to Multiple Sclerosis. It also is of interest to determine whether speakers with Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis judged to be nondysarthric via perceptual analyses also demonstrate objective, acoustic profiles of diadochokinesis that are within normal limits. [Work supported by NIH.

  13. Neurorehabilitation for Parkinson's disease: Future perspectives for behavioural adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ekker, Merel S; Janssen, Sabine; Nonnekes, Jorik; Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder, resulting in both motor and non-motor symptoms that significantly reduce quality of life. Treatment consists of both pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical treatment approaches. Neurorehabilitation is an important non-pharmaceutical treatment approach, and a prime component of this is formed by the training of behavioural adaptations that can assist patients to cope better with their motor and non-motor symptoms. Optimal delivery of neurorehabilitation requires a tailor-made, personalized approach. In this review we discuss the great potential for growth in the field of neurorehabilitation. Specifically, we will focus on four relatively new developments: visual rehabilitation (because Parkinson patients are very dependent on optimal vision); cueing delivered by wearable devices (allowing for objective, continuous, and quantitative detection of mobility problems, such that cueing can be delivered effectively in an on-demand manner - i.e., with external cues being delivered only at a time when they are needed most); exergaming (to promote compliance with exercise programs); and telemedicine (allowing for delivery of expert rehabilitation advice to the patient's own home). Evidence in these new fields is growing, based on good clinical trials, fuelling hope that state-of-the-art neurorehabilitation can make a real impact on improving the quality of life of patients affected by Parkinson's disease.

  14. Unraveling a new circuitry for sleep regulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Targa, Adriano D S; Rodrigues, Lais S; Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Aurich, Mariana F; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; da Cunha, Cláudio; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2016-09-01

    Sleep disturbances are among the most disabling non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and basal ganglia are likely involved in these dysfunctions, as they are affected by neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease and have a role in sleep regulation. To investigate this, we promoted a lesion in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus or substantia nigra pars compacta of male rats, followed by 24 h of REM sleep deprivation. Then, we administrated a dopaminergic D2 receptor agonist, antagonist or vehicle directly in the striatum. After a period of 24 h of sleep-wake recording, we observed that the ibotenic acid infusion in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus blocked the so-called sleep rebound effect mediated by REM sleep deprivation, which was reversed by striatal D2 receptors activation. Rotenone infusion in the substantia nigra pars compacta also blocked the sleep rebound, however, striatal D2 receptors activation did not reverse it. In addition, rotenone administration decreased the time spent in NREM sleep, which was corroborated by positive correlations between dopamine levels in both substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum and the time spent in NREM sleep. These findings suggest a new circuitry for sleep regulation in Parkinson's disease, involving the triad composed by pedunculopontine nucleus, substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum, evidencing a potential therapeutic target for the sleep disturbances associated to this pathology. PMID:27091486

  15. A controlled, longitudinal study of dementia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Biggins, C A; Boyd, J L; Harrop, F M; Madeley, P; Mindham, R H; Randall, J I; Spokes, E G

    1992-01-01

    Serial assessments of cognition, mood, and disability were carried out at nine month intervals over a 54 month period on a cohort of 87 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and a matched cohort of 50 control subjects. Dementia was diagnosed from data by rigorously applying DSM-III-R criteria. Initially, 6% (5/87) PD patients were demented, compared with none of the 50 control subjects. A further 10 PD patients met the dementia criteria during the follow up period; this was equivalent, with survival analysis, to a cumulative incidence of 19%. With the number of person years of observation as the denominator, the incidence was 47.6/1000 person years of observation. None of the control subjects fulfilled dementia criteria during the follow up period. The patients with PD who became demented during follow up were older at onset of Parkinson's disease than patients who did not become demented, had a longer duration of Parkinson's disease, and were older at inclusion to the study. PMID:1640232

  16. Subcortical evoked activity and motor enhancement in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Anzak, Anam; Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Khan, Sadaquate; Javed, Shazia; Gill, Steven S; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Akram, Harith; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Brown, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Enhancements in motor performance have been demonstrated in response to intense stimuli both in healthy subjects and in the form of 'paradoxical kinesis' in patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we identify a mid-latency evoked potential in local field potential recordings from the region of the subthalamic nucleus, which scales in amplitude with both the intensity of the stimulus delivered and corresponding enhancements in biomechanical measures of maximal handgrips, independent of the dopaminergic state of our subjects with Parkinson's disease. Recordings of a similar evoked potential in the related pedunculopontine nucleus - a key component of the reticular activating system - provide support for this neural signature in the subthalmic nucleus being a novel correlate of ascending arousal, propagated from the reticular activating system to exert an 'energizing' influence on motor circuitry. Future manipulation of this system linking arousal and motor performance may provide a novel approach for the non-dopaminergic enhancement of motor performance in patients with hypokinetic disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

  17. Missense dopamine transporter mutations associate with adult parkinsonism and ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Freja H.; Skjørringe, Tina; Yasmeen, Saiqa; Arends, Natascha V.; Sahai, Michelle A.; Erreger, Kevin; Andreassen, Thorvald F.; Holy, Marion; Hamilton, Peter J.; Neergheen, Viruna; Karlsborg, Merete; Newman, Amy H.; Pope, Simon; Heales, Simon J.R.; Friberg, Lars; Law, Ian; Pinborg, Lars H.; Sitte, Harald H.; Loland, Claus; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel; Galli, Aurelio; Hjermind, Lena E.; Møller, Lisbeth B.; Gether, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are widespread brain disorders that involve disturbances of dopaminergic signaling. The sodium-coupled dopamine transporter (DAT) controls dopamine homeostasis, but its contribution to disease remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed a cohort of patients with atypical movement disorder and identified 2 DAT coding variants, DAT-Ile312Phe and a presumed de novo mutant DAT-Asp421Asn, in an adult male with early-onset parkinsonism and ADHD. According to DAT single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) scans and a fluoro-deoxy-glucose-PET/MRI (FDG-PET/MRI) scan, the patient suffered from progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration. In heterologous cells, both DAT variants exhibited markedly reduced dopamine uptake capacity but preserved membrane targeting, consistent with impaired catalytic activity. Computational simulations and uptake experiments suggested that the disrupted function of the DAT-Asp421Asn mutant is the result of compromised sodium binding, in agreement with Asp421 coordinating sodium at the second sodium site. For DAT-Asp421Asn, substrate efflux experiments revealed a constitutive, anomalous efflux of dopamine, and electrophysiological analyses identified a large cation leak that might further perturb dopaminergic neurotransmission. Our results link specific DAT missense mutations to neurodegenerative early-onset parkinsonism. Moreover, the neuropsychiatric comorbidity provides additional support for the idea that DAT missense mutations are an ADHD risk factor and suggests that complex DAT genotype and phenotype correlations contribute to different dopaminergic pathologies. PMID:24911152

  18. Great expectations: the placebo effect in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lidstone, Sarah Christine

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the placebo effect has increased exponentially in parallel with the advances in brain imaging. This is of particular importance in the field of Parkinson's disease, where clinicians have described placebo effects in their patients for decades. Significant placebo effects have been observed in clinical trials for medications as well as more invasive surgical trials including deep-brain stimulation and stem-cell implantation. In addition to placebo effects occurring as a byproduct of randomized controlled trials, investigation of the placebo effect itself in the laboratory setting has further shown the capacity for strong placebo effects within this patient population. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that placebos stimulate the release of dopamine in the striatum of patients with Parkinson's disease and can alter the activity of dopamine neurons using single-cell recording. When taken together with the findings from other medical conditions discussed elsewhere in this publication, a unified mechanism for the placebo effect in Parkinson's disease is emerging that blends expectation-induced neurochemical changes and disease-specific nigrostriatal dopamine release. PMID:25304530

  19. Ipratropium bromide spray as treatment for sialorrhea in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Teri R; Galpern, Wendy R; Asante, Abena; Arenovich, Tamara; Fox, Susan H

    2007-11-15

    Sialorrhea is a significant problem in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Current treatment options include systemic anticholinergics which frequently cause side effects. We hypothesized that sublingual application of ipratropium bromide spray, an anticholinergic agent that does not cross the blood brain barrier, may reduce drooling without systemic side effects. We performed a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study in 17 subjects with PD and bothersome drooling. Patients were randomized to receive ipratropium bromide or placebo (one to two sprays, maximum of four times per day) for 2 weeks followed by a 1 week washout and crossover for further 2 weeks of treatment. The primary outcome was an objective measure of weight of saliva production. Secondary outcomes were subjective rating of severity and frequency of sialorrhoea using home diaries, United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part II salivation subscore, parkinsonian disability using UPDRS, and adverse events. Ipratropium bromide spray had no significant effect on weight of saliva produced. There was a mild effect of treatment on subjective measures of sialorrhea. There were no significant adverse events. Ipratropium bromide spray was well tolerated in subjects with PD. Although it did not affect objective measures of saliva production, further studies in parkinsonism may be warranted.

  20. Adult-onset phenylketonuria with rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Tufekcioglu, Zeynep; Cakar, Arman; Bilgic, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Gurvit, Hakan; Emre, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene, which converts phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although it is principally a childhood disorder, in rare cases, the first signs of PKU may develop in late adulthood resembling common neurological diseases. Here we report a 59-year-old, previously normal functioning man who was admitted with blurred vision, cognitive problems, and gait difficulty that began 8 months before. He had brisk reflexes and left side dominant parkinsonism. His Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was 25/30, and neuropsychological evaluation revealed a dysexecutive syndrome with simultanagnosia and constructional apraxia. His Clinical Dementia Rating score (CDR) was 1. Cranial MRI revealed bilateral diffuse hyperintense lesions in parietal and occipital white matter in T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, and diffusion weighted images. Diagnostic workup for rapidly progressive dementias was all normal except PHE level which was found to be highly elevated (1075 μmol/L, normal 39-240 μmol/L) with normal tyrosine level (61.20 μmol/L, normal 35-100 μmol/L). Three months after PHE-restricted diet, his cognitive impairment and signs of parkinsonism significantly improved, with MRI scan unchanged. This case demonstrates that late-onset PKU is a rare, treatable cause of rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism with certain constellations such as consanguinity and white matter abnormalities (WMAs) in imaging. PMID:26962957

  1. Great expectations: the placebo effect in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lidstone, Sarah Christine

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the placebo effect has increased exponentially in parallel with the advances in brain imaging. This is of particular importance in the field of Parkinson's disease, where clinicians have described placebo effects in their patients for decades. Significant placebo effects have been observed in clinical trials for medications as well as more invasive surgical trials including deep-brain stimulation and stem-cell implantation. In addition to placebo effects occurring as a byproduct of randomized controlled trials, investigation of the placebo effect itself in the laboratory setting has further shown the capacity for strong placebo effects within this patient population. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that placebos stimulate the release of dopamine in the striatum of patients with Parkinson's disease and can alter the activity of dopamine neurons using single-cell recording. When taken together with the findings from other medical conditions discussed elsewhere in this publication, a unified mechanism for the placebo effect in Parkinson's disease is emerging that blends expectation-induced neurochemical changes and disease-specific nigrostriatal dopamine release.

  2. Unraveling a new circuitry for sleep regulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Targa, Adriano D S; Rodrigues, Lais S; Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Aurich, Mariana F; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; da Cunha, Cláudio; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2016-09-01

    Sleep disturbances are among the most disabling non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and basal ganglia are likely involved in these dysfunctions, as they are affected by neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease and have a role in sleep regulation. To investigate this, we promoted a lesion in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus or substantia nigra pars compacta of male rats, followed by 24 h of REM sleep deprivation. Then, we administrated a dopaminergic D2 receptor agonist, antagonist or vehicle directly in the striatum. After a period of 24 h of sleep-wake recording, we observed that the ibotenic acid infusion in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus blocked the so-called sleep rebound effect mediated by REM sleep deprivation, which was reversed by striatal D2 receptors activation. Rotenone infusion in the substantia nigra pars compacta also blocked the sleep rebound, however, striatal D2 receptors activation did not reverse it. In addition, rotenone administration decreased the time spent in NREM sleep, which was corroborated by positive correlations between dopamine levels in both substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum and the time spent in NREM sleep. These findings suggest a new circuitry for sleep regulation in Parkinson's disease, involving the triad composed by pedunculopontine nucleus, substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum, evidencing a potential therapeutic target for the sleep disturbances associated to this pathology.

  3. Subcortical evoked activity and motor enhancement in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Anzak, Anam; Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Khan, Sadaquate; Javed, Shazia; Gill, Steven S.; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Akram, Harith; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander L.; Aziz, Tipu; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Enhancements in motor performance have been demonstrated in response to intense stimuli both in healthy subjects and in the form of ‘paradoxical kinesis’ in patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we identify a mid-latency evoked potential in local field potential recordings from the region of the subthalamic nucleus, which scales in amplitude with both the intensity of the stimulus delivered and corresponding enhancements in biomechanical measures of maximal handgrips, independent of the dopaminergic state of our subjects with Parkinson's disease. Recordings of a similar evoked potential in the related pedunculopontine nucleus – a key component of the reticular activating system – provide support for this neural signature in the subthalmic nucleus being a novel correlate of ascending arousal, propagated from the reticular activating system to exert an ‘energizing’ influence on motor circuitry. Future manipulation of this system linking arousal and motor performance may provide a novel approach for the non-dopaminergic enhancement of motor performance in patients with hypokinetic disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:26687971

  4. Dopaminergic Modulation of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in Parkinson Depression

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Anders H.; Smith, Charles D.; Slevin, John T.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Martin, Catherine A.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Blonder, Lee X.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with emotional abnormalities. Dopaminergic medications ameliorate Parkinsonian motor symptoms, but less is known regarding the impact of dopaminergic agents on affective processing, particularly in depressed PD (dPD) patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on brain activation to emotional stimuli in depressed versus nondepressed Parkinson disease (ndPD) patients. Participants included 18 ndPD patients (11 men, 7 women) and 10 dPD patients (7 men, 3 women). Patients viewed photographs of emotional faces during functional MRI. Scans were performed while the patient was taking anti-Parkinson medication and the day after medication had been temporarily discontinued. Results indicate that dopaminergic medications have opposite effects in the prefrontal cortex depending upon depression status. DPD patients show greater deactivation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) on dopaminergic medications than off, while ndPD patients show greater deactivation in this region off drugs. The VMPFC is in the default-mode network (DMN). DMN activity is negatively correlated with activity in brain systems used for external visual attention. Thus dopaminergic medications may promote increased attention to external visual stimuli among dPD patients but impede normal suppression of DMN activity during external stimulation among ndPD patients. PMID:26793404

  5. Neurorehabilitation for Parkinson's disease: Future perspectives for behavioural adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ekker, Merel S; Janssen, Sabine; Nonnekes, Jorik; Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder, resulting in both motor and non-motor symptoms that significantly reduce quality of life. Treatment consists of both pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical treatment approaches. Neurorehabilitation is an important non-pharmaceutical treatment approach, and a prime component of this is formed by the training of behavioural adaptations that can assist patients to cope better with their motor and non-motor symptoms. Optimal delivery of neurorehabilitation requires a tailor-made, personalized approach. In this review we discuss the great potential for growth in the field of neurorehabilitation. Specifically, we will focus on four relatively new developments: visual rehabilitation (because Parkinson patients are very dependent on optimal vision); cueing delivered by wearable devices (allowing for objective, continuous, and quantitative detection of mobility problems, such that cueing can be delivered effectively in an on-demand manner - i.e., with external cues being delivered only at a time when they are needed most); exergaming (to promote compliance with exercise programs); and telemedicine (allowing for delivery of expert rehabilitation advice to the patient's own home). Evidence in these new fields is growing, based on good clinical trials, fuelling hope that state-of-the-art neurorehabilitation can make a real impact on improving the quality of life of patients affected by Parkinson's disease. PMID:26362955

  6. The association between ß-glucocerebrosidase mutations and parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Matthew; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the ß-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA), which encodes the lysosomal enzyme ß-glucocerebrosidase, have traditionally been implicated in Gaucher disease, an autosomal-recessive lyososomal storage disorder. Yet the past two decades have yielded an explosion of epidemiological and basic-science evidence linking mutations in GBA with the development of Parkinson disease as well. Although the specific contribution of mutant GBA to the pathogenesis of parkinsonism remains unknown, evidence suggests both loss of function and toxic gain-of-function by abnormal ß-glucocerebrosidase may be important, and a close relationship between ß-glucocerebrosidase and α-synuclein. Furthermore, multiple lines of evidence suggest that while GBA-associated PD closely mimics idiopathic PD (IPD), it may present at a younger age, and is more frequently complicated by cognitive dysfunction. Understanding the clinical association between GBA and PD, and the relationship between ß-glucocerebrosidase and α-synuclein, may enhance understanding of the pathogenesis of IPD, improve prognostication and treatment of GBA carriers with parkinsonism, and may furthermore inform therapies for IPD not due to GBA mutations. PMID:23812893

  7. Challenges of modifying disease progression in prediagnostic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Salat, David; Noyce, Alastair J; Schrag, Anette; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease starts years before a clinical diagnosis can be reliably made. The prediagnostic phase of the disease offers a window of opportunity in which disease-modifying therapies-ie, those aimed at delaying or preventing the progression to overt disease and its many complications-could be most beneficial, but no such therapies are available at present. The unravelling of the mechanisms of neurodegeneration from the earliest stages, however, could lead to the development of new interventions whose therapeutic potential will need to be assessed in adequately designed clinical trials. Advances in the understanding of this prediagnostic phase of Parkinson's disease (for which the clinical diagnostic and prognostic markers used in more advanced disease stages are not applicable) will lead to the identification of biomarkers of neurodegeneration and its progression. These biomarkers will, in turn, help to identify the optimum population to be included and the most appropriate outcomes to be assessed in trials of disease-modifying drugs. Potential risks to minimally symptomatic participants, some of whom might not progress to manifest Parkinson's disease, and individuals who do not wish to know their mutation carrier status, could pose specific ethical dilemmas in the design of these trials. PMID:26993435

  8. Association analysis of a polymorphism of the monoamine oxidase B gene with Parkinson`s disease in a Japanese population

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, Yuji; Murayama, Nobuhiro; Kuwano, Akira; Kondo, Ikuko

    1995-12-18

    The polymorphic allele of the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) gene detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) was associated with Parkinson`s disease (PD) in Caucasians. We characterized this polymorphic allele, allele 1, of the MAO-B gene using direct sequencing of PCR products. A single DNA substitution (G-A), resulting gain of Mae III restriction site was detected in intron 13 of the MAO-B gene. The allele associated with PD in Caucasians was twice as frequent as in healthy Japanese, but the association of the allele of the MAO-B gene was not observed in Japanese patients with PD. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Levels of HVA, 5-HIAA, and MHPG in the CSF of vascular parkinsonism compared to Parkinson's disease and controls.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Megan K; Kuiperij, H Bea; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2013-12-01

    The neurochemical abnormalities underlying vascular parkinsonism (VP) have not been well characterised. A better understanding may help to optimize pharmacological interventions. Since VP patients generally have a poorer response to l-Dopa than Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, we investigated whether levels of relevant CSF neurotransmitter metabolites may be differentially altered in VP and PD and assessed the potential of neurotransmitter metabolites as biomarkers. We compared CSF levels of homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol, in 16 VP patients, 57 PD patients and 60 non-neurological controls. We found that levels of HVA were reduced in PD compared with both VP and controls but did not differ significantly between VP and controls indicating that dopamine deficiency was less pronounced in VP. PMID:24122060

  10. Advances in GBA-associated Parkinson's disease--Pathology, presentation and therapies.

    PubMed

    Barkhuizen, Melinda; Anderson, David G; Grobler, Anne F

    2016-02-01

    GBA mutations are to date the most common genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The GBA gene encodes the lysomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase. Whilst bi-allelic GBA mutations cause Gaucher disease, both mono- and bi-allelic mutations confer risk for Parkinson's disease. Clinically, Parkinson's disease patients with GBA mutations resemble idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients. However, these patients have a modest reduction in age-of-onset of disease and a greater incidence of cognitive decline. In some cases, GBA mutations are also responsible for familial Parkinson's disease. The accumulation of α-synuclein into Lewy bodies is the central neuropathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease. Pathologic GBA mutations reduce enzymatic function. A reduction in glucocerebrosidase function increases α-synuclein levels and propagation, which in turn inhibits glucocerebrosidase in a feed-forward cascade. This cascade is central to the neuropathology of GBA-associated Parkinson's disease. The lysosomal integral membrane protein type-2 is necessary for normal glucocerebrosidase function. Glucocerebrosidase dysfunction also increases in the accumulation of β-amyloid and amyloid-precursor protein, oxidative stress, neuronal susceptibility to metal ions, microglial and immune activation. These factors contribute to neuronal death. The Mendelian Parkinson's disease genes, Parkin and ATP13A2, intersect with glucocerebrosidase. These factors sketch a complex circuit of GBA-associated neuropathology. To clinically interfere with this circuit, central glucocerebrosidase function must be improved. Strategies based on reducing breakdown of mutant glucocerebrosidase and increasing the fraction that reaches the lysosome has shown promise. Breakdown can be reduced by interfering with the ability of heat-shock proteins to recognize mutant glucocerebrosidase. This underlies the therapeutic efficacy of certain pharmacological chaperones and histone deacetylase inhibitors. These

  11. Age-specific Parkinson disease risk in GBA mutation carriers: information for genetic counseling

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Huma Q.; Balwani, Manisha; Bier, Louise; Alcalay, Roy N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We sought to estimate age-specific risk of Parkinson disease in relatives of patients with Gaucher disease, who are obligate carriers of GBA mutations and who were not ascertained by family history of Parkinson disease. Methods A validated family history of Parkinson disease questionnaire was administered to 119 patients with Gaucher disease who were evaluated at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine from 2009 to 2012; the ages of their parents, siblings, and children, history of Parkinson disease, age at onset of Parkinson disease, and ethnic background were obtained. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were used to estimate age-specific Parkinson disease penetrance among parents of patients with Gaucher disease, who are obligatory GBA mutation carriers. Results Two participants with Gaucher disease were affected by Parkinson disease (5.4% of those who were 60 years or older). Of the 224 informative parents of patients with Gaucher disease, 11 had Parkinson disease (4.9%). Among the parents (obligatory carriers), cumulative risk of Parkinson disease by ages 65 and 85 was estimated to be 2.2% ±2.1% and 10.9% ±7.2%, respectively. Conclusion We provide useful age-specific estimates of Parkinson disease penetrance in patients with Gaucher disease and GBA heterozygous carriers for genetic counseling. Although GBA mutations may increase the risk for PD, the vast majority of patients with Gaucher disease and heterozygotes may not develop the disease. Further studies are needed to identify what modifies the risk of Parkinson disease in GBA mutation carriers. PMID:22935721

  12. Kinematics of the Reach-to-Grasp Movement in Vascular Parkinsonism: A Comparison with Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Parma, Valentina; Zanatto, Debora; Straulino, Elisa; Scaravilli, Tomaso; Castiello, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    The performance of patients with vascular parkinsonism (VPD) on a reach-to-grasp task was compared with that of patients affected by idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and age-matched control subjects. The aim of the study was to determine how patients with VPD and IPD compare at the level of the kinematic organization of prehensile actions. We examined how subjects concurrently executed the transport and grasp components of reach-to-grasp movements when grasping differently sized objects. When comparing both VPD and IPD groups to control subjects, all patients showed longer movement duration and smaller hand opening, reflecting bradykinesia and hypometria, respectively. Furthermore, for all patients, the onset of the manipulation component was delayed with respect to the onset of the transport component. However, for patients with VPD this delay was significantly smaller than that found for the IPD group. It is proposed that this reflects a deficit - which is moderate for VPD as compared to IPD patients - in the simultaneous (or sequential) implementation of different segments of a complex movement. Altogether these findings suggest that kinematic analysis of reach-to-grasp movement has the ability to provide potential instruments to characterize different forms of parkinsonism. PMID:24904519

  13. Effect of Intensive Voice Treatment on Tone-Language Speakers with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehill, Tara L.; Wong, Lina L. -N.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intensive voice therapy on Cantonese speakers with Parkinson's disease. The effect of the treatment on lexical tone was of particular interest. Four Cantonese speakers with idiopathic Parkinson's disease received treatment based on the principles of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT).…

  14. Everyday Cognitive Failures and Memory Problems in Parkinson's Patients without Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliakoff, Ellen; Smith-Spark, James H.

    2008-01-01

    There is growing evidence that Parkinson's disease patients without dementia exhibit cognitive deficits in some executive, memory and selective attention tasks. However, the impact of these deficits on their everyday cognitive functioning remains largely unknown. This issue was explored using self-report questionnaires. Twenty-four Parkinson's…

  15. Variability in Fundamental Frequency during Speech in Prodromal and Incipient Parkinson's Disease: A Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harel, Brian; Cannizzaro, Michael; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Nearly two centuries ago, Parkinson (1817) first observed that a particular pattern of speech changes occur in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Numerous studies have documented these changes using a wide variety of acoustic measures, and yet few studies have attempted to quantify any such changes longitudinally, through the early…

  16. Effects of Clay Manipulation on Somatic Dysfunction and Emotional Distress in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkis-Abuhoff, Deborah L.; Goldblatt, Robert B.; Gaydos, Morgan; Corrato, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this outcome study was on art therapy as a support for medical treatment and palliative care. A total of 41 patients were placed in 2 matched groups: 22 patients with Parkinson's disease and 19 patients without Parkinson's disease. Each participant completed the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) (Derogatis, 1993) pre- and post-session,…

  17. Inverse Association of Parkinson Disease With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Nationwide Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Te-Yu; Shen, Chih-Hao; Chou, Yu-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Kuen-Tze; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-01

    The effects of the inflammatory mediators involved in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) on subsequent Parkinson disease have been reported, but no relevant studies have focused on the association between the 2 diseases. This nationwide population-based study evaluated the risk of Parkinson disease in patients with SLE.We identified 12,817 patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance database diagnosed with SLE between 2000 and 2010 and compared the incidence rate of Parkinson disease among these patients with that among 51,268 randomly selected age and sex-matched non-SLE patients. A Cox multivariable proportional-hazards model was used to evaluate the risk factors of Parkinson disease in the SLE cohort.We observed an inverse association between a diagnosis of SLE and the risk of subsequent Parkinson disease, with the crude hazard ratio (HR) being 0.60 (95% confidence interval 0.45-0.79) and adjusted HR being 0.68 (95% confidence interval 0.51-0.90). The cumulative incidence of Parkinson disease was 0.83% lower in the SLE cohort than in the non-SLE cohort. The adjusted HR of Parkinson disease decreased as the follow-up duration increased and was decreased among older lupus patients with comorbidity.We determined that patients with SLE had a decreased risk of subsequent Parkinson disease. Further research is required to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  18. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure…

  19. Semantic Trouble Sources and Their Repair in Conversations Affected by Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saldert, Charlotta; Ferm, Ulrika; Bloch, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that dysarthria arising from Parkinson's disease may affect intelligibility in conversational interaction. Research has also shown that Parkinson's disease may affect cognition and cause word-retrieval difficulties and pragmatic problems in the use of language. However, it is not known whether or how these…

  20. Does Implicit Learning in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease depend on the Level of Cognitive Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenbossche, Jochen; Deroost, Natacha; Soetens, Eric; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the level of cognitive functioning on sequence-specific learning in Parkinson's disease (PD). This was done by examining the relationship between the scales for outcomes in Parkinson's disease-cognition [SCOPA-COG, Marinus, J., Visser, M., Verwey, N. A., Verhey, F. R. J., Middelkoop, H. A. M.,Stiggelbout, A., et…

  1. Levodopa delivery systems for the treatment of Parkinson's disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Goole, J; Amighi, K

    2009-10-01

    This review describes the different drug delivery systems containing levodopa that are used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Their composition, process of preparation, advantages, disadvantages and limitations are discussed as well as the major objective in the management of Parkinson's disease according to the pathology of the disease. PMID:19651197

  2. Are Dental Implants the Answer to Tooth Loss in Patients with Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Packer, Mark E

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease present a challenge to dental clinicians as this degenerative disease leads to problems accessing care and maintaining an adequate level of oral health. This article provides an overview of the implications of Parkinson's disease on oral health and explores the role of dental implants in the management of such patients.

  3. Visual short-term memory deficits in REM sleep behaviour disorder mirror those in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rolinski, Michal; Zokaei, Nahid; Baig, Fahd; Giehl, Kathrin; Quinnell, Timothy; Zaiwalla, Zenobia; Mackay, Clare E; Husain, Masud; Hu, Michele T M

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with REM sleep behaviour disorder are at significantly higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Here we examined visual short-term memory deficits--long associated with Parkinson's disease--in patients with REM sleep behaviour disorder without Parkinson's disease using a novel task that measures recall precision. Visual short-term memory for sequentially presented coloured bars of different orientation was assessed in 21 patients with polysomnography-proven idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder, 26 cases with early Parkinson's disease and 26 healthy controls. Three tasks using the same stimuli controlled for attentional filtering ability, sensorimotor and temporal decay factors. Both patients with REM sleep behaviour disorder and Parkinson's disease demonstrated a deficit in visual short-term memory, with recall precision significantly worse than in healthy controls with no deficit observed in any of the control tasks. Importantly, the pattern of memory deficit in both patient groups was specifically explained by an increase in random responses. These results demonstrate that it is possible to detect the signature of memory impairment associated with Parkinson's disease in individuals with REM sleep behaviour disorder, a condition associated with a high risk of developing Parkinson's disease. The pattern of visual short-term memory deficit potentially provides a cognitive marker of 'prodromal' Parkinson's disease that might be useful in tracking disease progression and for disease-modifying intervention trials.

  4. Differential role of dopamine in emotional attention and memory: evidence from Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hälbig, Thomas D; Assuras, Stephanie; Creighton, Judy; Borod, Joan C; Tse, Winona; Frisina, Pasquale G; Voustianiouk, Andrei; Gracies, Jean-Michel; Olanow, C Warren

    2011-08-01

    Consistent with the hypothesis that dopamine is implicated in the processing of salient stimuli relevant to the modification of various behavioral responses, Parkinson's disease is associated with emotional blunting. To address the hypothesis that emotional attention and memory are modulated by dopaminergic neurotransmission in Parkinson's disease, we assessed 15 nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease while on and off dopaminergic medication and 15 age-matched healthy controls. Visual stimuli were presented, and recognition was used to assess emotional memory. Response latency was used as a measure of emotional attention modulation. Stimuli were varied based on valence (pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant) and arousal (high and low) dimensions. Controls had significantly better memory for positive than negative stimuli, whereas patients with Parkinson's disease tested off medication had significantly better memory for negative than positive items. This negativity bias was lost when they were tested while on dopaminergic medication. Reaction times in patients with Parkinson's disease off medication were longer than in healthy controls and, paradoxically, were even longer when on medication. Further, although both healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease in the "off" state had arousal-induced prolongation of reaction time, this effect was not seen in patients with Parkinson's disease on medication. These data indicate that dopaminergic neurotransmission is implicated in emotional memory and attention and suggest that dopamine mediates emotional memory via the valence dimension and emotional attention via arousal. Furthermore, our findings suggest that emotional changes in Parkinson's disease result from the effects of both the disease process and dopaminergic treatment.

  5. Anhedonia, depression, and motor functioning in Parkinson's disease during treatment with pramipexole.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Matthias R; Brecht, H Michael; Koester, Juergen; Kraus, Peter H; Reichmann, Heinz

    2005-01-01

    Anhedonia, a core symptom of depression, correlates with motor alterations in major depressive disorder and has been assumed to be frequent in depressed patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present study, the authors assessed for the first time frequency of anhedonia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (N = 657) and the relationship of anhedonia and parkinsonian motor deficits during treatment with pramipexole. Mild depression was present in 47% of the patients and moderate to severe depression in 22%. Anhedonic individuals included 45.7% of all patients and 79.7% of depressed Parkinson's disease patients. Anhedonic Parkinson's disease patients had greater motor deficits, restrictions in activities of daily living, and depression compared to nonanhedonic patients. Frequency of anhedonia and depression was significantly reduced during treatment with pramipexole. Future studies should further investigate antianhedonic efficacy of dopamine agonists including pramipexole in depressed patients with Parkinson's disease.

  6. Alpha-Synuclein in Parkinson's Disease: From Pathogenetic Dysfunction to Potential Clinical Application.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingjia; Pu, Jiali

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease/synucleinopathy that develops slowly; however, there is no efficient method of early diagnosis, nor is there a cure. Progressive dopaminergic neuronal cell loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta and widespread aggregation of the α-synuclein protein (encoded by the SNCA gene) in the form of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites are the neuropathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The SNCA gene has undergone gene duplications, triplications, and point mutations. However, the specific mechanism of α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease remains obscure. Recent research showed that various α-synuclein oligomers, pathological aggregation, and propagation appear to be harmful in certain areas in Parkinson's disease patients. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the pathogenetic dysfunction of α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease and highlights current approaches that seek to develop this protein as a possible diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target.

  7. Alpha-Synuclein in Parkinson's Disease: From Pathogenetic Dysfunction to Potential Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease/synucleinopathy that develops slowly; however, there is no efficient method of early diagnosis, nor is there a cure. Progressive dopaminergic neuronal cell loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta and widespread aggregation of the α-synuclein protein (encoded by the SNCA gene) in the form of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites are the neuropathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The SNCA gene has undergone gene duplications, triplications, and point mutations. However, the specific mechanism of α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease remains obscure. Recent research showed that various α-synuclein oligomers, pathological aggregation, and propagation appear to be harmful in certain areas in Parkinson's disease patients. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the pathogenetic dysfunction of α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease and highlights current approaches that seek to develop this protein as a possible diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27610264

  8. Stochastic anomaly detection in eye-tracking data for quantification of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Daniel; Medvedev, Alexander; Axelson, Hans; Nyholm, Dag

    2013-10-01

    Two methods for distinguishing between healthy controls and patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease by means of recorded smooth pursuit eye movements are presented and evaluated. Both methods are based on the principles of stochastic anomaly detection and make use of orthogonal series approximation for probability distribution estimation. The first method relies on the identification of a Wiener-type model of the smooth pursuit system and attempts to find statistically significant differences between the estimated parameters in healthy controls and patientts with Parkinson's disease. The second method applies the same statistical method to distinguish between the gaze trajectories of healthy and Parkinson subjects attempting to track visual stimuli. Both methods show promising results, where healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease are effectively separated in terms of the considered metric. The results are preliminary because of the small number of participating test subjects, but they are indicative of the potential of the presented methods as diagnosing or staging tools for Parkinson's disease.

  9. Sporadic Parkinson disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis complex (Brait-Fahn-Schwartz disease).

    PubMed

    Manno, Concetta; Lipari, Alessio; Bono, Valeria; Taiello, Alfonsa Claudia; La Bella, Vincenzo

    2013-03-15

    Clinical evidence for parkinsonism may accompany Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with a frequency ranging from 5% to 17%. The concurrence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Parkinson's disease, outside the known Guam and Kii Peninsula foci, is instead rare, but this raises the possibility of a common pathogenesis. Clinically this complex presents with a levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and has been termed Brait-Fahn-Schwartz disease. Here we describe two patients with this uncommon neurodegenerative complex. Both presented with Parkinson disease and progressed to a full blown Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. We further suggest that the association of Parkinson disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis represents a distinct nosological entity, which should be kept separated from extrapyramidal signs and symptoms that may occur in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

  10. Alpha-Synuclein in Parkinson's Disease: From Pathogenetic Dysfunction to Potential Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease/synucleinopathy that develops slowly; however, there is no efficient method of early diagnosis, nor is there a cure. Progressive dopaminergic neuronal cell loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta and widespread aggregation of the α-synuclein protein (encoded by the SNCA gene) in the form of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites are the neuropathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The SNCA gene has undergone gene duplications, triplications, and point mutations. However, the specific mechanism of α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease remains obscure. Recent research showed that various α-synuclein oligomers, pathological aggregation, and propagation appear to be harmful in certain areas in Parkinson's disease patients. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the pathogenetic dysfunction of α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease and highlights current approaches that seek to develop this protein as a possible diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target.

  11. Autonomic nervous system testing may not distinguish multiple system atrophy from Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Riley, D; Chelimsky, T

    2003-01-01

    Background: Formal laboratory testing of autonomic function is reported to distinguish between patients with Parkinson's disease and those with multiple system atrophy (MSA), but such studies segregate patients according to clinical criteria that select those with autonomic dysfunction for the MSA category. Objective: To characterise the profiles of autonomic disturbances in patients in whom the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease or MSA used criteria other than autonomic dysfunction. Methods: 47 patients with parkinsonism and autonomic symptoms who had undergone autonomic laboratory testing were identified and their case records reviewed for non-autonomic features. They were classified clinically into three diagnostic groups: Parkinson's disease (19), MSA (14), and uncertain (14). The performance of the patients with Parkinson's disease was compared with that of the MSA patients on five autonomic tests: RR variation on deep breathing, heart rate changes with the Valsalva manoeuvre, tilt table testing, the sudomotor axon reflex test, and thermoregulatory sweat testing. Results: None of the tests distinguished one group from the other with any statistical significance, alone or in combination. Parkinson's disease and MSA patients showed similar patterns of autonomic dysfunction on formal testing of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic, vasomotor, and central and peripheral sudomotor functions. Conclusions: This study supports the clinical observation that Parkinson's disease is often indistinguishable from MSA when it involves the autonomic nervous system. The clinical combination of parkinsonism and dysautonomia is as likely to be caused by Parkinson's disease as by MSA. Current clinical criteria for Parkinson's disease and MSA that direct patients with dysautonomia into the MSA group may be inappropriate. PMID:12486267

  12. Parkinson disease, 10 years after its genetic revolution: multiple clues to a complex disorder.

    PubMed

    Klein, Christine; Schlossmacher, Michael G

    2007-11-27

    Over the last 10 years, an unprecedented number of scientific reports have been published that relate to the pathogenesis of parkinsonism. Since the discovery in 1997 of the first heritable form of parkinsonism that could be linked to a mutation in a single gene, SNCA, many more genetic leads have followed (Parkin, DJ-1, PINK1, LRRK2, to name a few); these have provided us with many molecular clues to better explore the etiology of parkinsonism and have led to the dismantling of many previously held dogmas about Parkinson disease (PD). Epidemiologic studies have delineated an array of environmental modulators of susceptibility to parkinsonism, which can now be examined in the context of gene expression. Furthermore, in vivo imaging data and postmortem results have generated concepts that greatly expanded our appreciation for the phenotypic spectrum of parkinsonism from its presymptomatic to advanced stages. With this plethora of new information emerged the picture of a complex syndrome that raises many questions: How many forms of classic parkinsonism/Parkinson disease(s) are there? Where does the disease begin? What causes late-onset, "idiopathic" PD? What are the caveats related to genetic testing? What is the role of Lewy bodies? What will be the best disease model to accommodate the now known genetic and environmental contributors to parkinsonism? What will be the ideal markers and targets for earlier diagnosis and cause-directed therapy? In the following article we highlight some of the burning issues surrounding the understanding of classic parkinsonism, a complex puzzle of genes, environment, and an aging host.

  13. The coeruleus/subcoeruleus complex in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Longo-Dos Santos, Clarisse; Ewenczyk, Claire; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Gallea, Cecile; Quattrocchi, Graziella; Pita Lobo, Patricia; Poupon, Cyril; Benali, Habib; Arnulf, Isabelle; Vidailhet, Marie; Lehericy, Stéphane

    2013-07-01

    In Parkinson's disease, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is an early non-dopaminergic syndrome with nocturnal violence and increased muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep that can precede Parkinsonism by several years. The neuronal origin of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in Parkinson's disease is not precisely known; however, the locus subcoeruleus in the brainstem has been implicated as this structure blocks muscle tone during normal rapid eye movement sleep in animal models and can be damaged in Parkinson's disease. Here, we studied the integrity of the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus complex in patients with Parkinson's disease using combined neuromelanin-sensitive, structural and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging approaches. We compared 24 patients with Parkinson's disease and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, 12 patients without rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent clinical examination and characterization of rapid eye movement sleep using video-polysomnography and multimodal imaging at 3 T. Using neuromelanin-sensitive imaging, reduced signal intensity was evident in the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus area in patients with Parkinson's disease that was more marked in patients with than those without rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. Reduced signal intensity correlated with the percentage of abnormally increased muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep. The results confirmed that this complex is affected in Parkinson's disease and showed a gradual relationship between damage to this structure, presumably the locus subcoeruleus, and abnormal muscle tone during rapid eye movement sleep, which is the cardinal marker of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. In longitudinal studies, the technique may also provide early markers of non-dopaminergic Parkinson's disease pathology to predict the occurrence of Parkinson's disease

  14. Standardized Handwriting to Assess Bradykinesia, Micrographia and Tremor in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Esther J.; Tolonen, Antti J.; Cluitmans, Luc; van Gils, Mark; Conway, Bernard A.; Zietsma, Rutger C.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess whether standardized handwriting can provide quantitative measures to distinguish patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease from age- and gender-matched healthy control participants. Design Exploratory study. Pen tip trajectories were recorded during circle, spiral and line drawing and repeated character ‘elelelel’ and sentence writing, performed by Parkinson patients and healthy control participants. Parkinson patients were tested after overnight withdrawal of anti-Parkinsonian medication. Setting University Medical Center Groningen, tertiary care, the Netherlands. Participants Patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 10; mean age 69.0 years; 6 male) and healthy controls (n = 10; mean age 68.1 years; 6 male). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Movement time and velocity to detect bradykinesia and the size of writing to detect micrographia. A rest recording to investigate the presence of a rest-tremor, by frequency analysis. Results Mean disease duration in the Parkinson group was 4.4 years and the patients were in modified Hoehn-Yahr stages 1–2.5. In general, Parkinson patients were slower than healthy control participants. Median time per repetition, median velocity and median acceleration of the sentence task and median velocity of the elel task differed significantly between Parkinson patients and healthy control participants (all p<0.0014). Parkinson patients also wrote smaller than healthy control participants and the width of the ‘e’ in the elel task was significantly smaller in Parkinson patients compared to healthy control participants (p<0.0014). A rest-tremor was detected in the three patients who were clinically assessed as having rest-tremor. Conclusions This study shows that standardized handwriting can provide objective measures for bradykinesia, tremor and micrographia to distinguish Parkinson patients from healthy control participants. PMID:24854199

  15. [Pramipexole in Parkinson disease. Results of a treatment observation].

    PubMed

    Reichmann, H; Brecht, H M; Kraus, P H; Lemke, M R

    2002-08-01

    Pramipexole is a novel, internationally available selective nonergot D2 dopamine agonist. The effectiveness, tolerability, and safety of pramipexole have been extensively proven in controlled trials in patients in the early and advanced stage of Parkinson's disease as monotherapy and in combination with L dopa. These trials indicated specific activity against tremor, anhedonia, and depression. Therefore, the present prospective, multicenter postmarketing surveillance study evaluated for the first time to what extent the results from the controlled pramipexole trials could be replicated under routine conditions in neurological practice and clinics. Modern scales were applied for the assessment of tremor and mood, i.e., the Short Parkinson's Evaluation Scale (SPES), the Tremor Impact Scale (TIS), and the German version of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS-D). In 298 German Centers, 657 Parkinson's patients (365 men, 292 women) in advanced disease stages were treated with pramipexole in combination with levodopa. The average ages (+/- SD) were 67 (+/- 8.9) years for men and 69 (+/- 9.4) years for females. Motor functioning, especially tremor, motor complications, depression, and activities of daily living improved highly significantly (P < 0.0005), including self-rating by the patients. The dosage of levodopa could be reduced on average by 8% (P < 0.0001). This might contribute to a slowing of the disease progression in the long run. Dropouts due to side effects were observed only in 3.5% of the patients. Using new assessment scales suitable for routine application allowed confirmation of the results from controlled clinical trials with regard to tremor, anhedonia, and depression. The average daily dosage of pramipexole prescribed was 1.05 mg and thus was definitely lower than the average daily dosages of 2.35-2.66 mg used in controlled trials. This signifies that the option to adjust dosage according to effectiveness and tolerability under routine conditions

  16. Depression in patients with Parkinson's disease and the associated features.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Sun, Shenggang; Qiao, Xian; Liu, Yudong

    2009-12-01

    The study was aimed to examine the prevalence of depression in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and identify its features. A total of 131 out-patients, diagnosed as having idiopathic PD in accordance with the United Kingdom Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank criteria, were interviewed with questionnaire and evaluated by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Hohen &Yahr staging (H&Y staging) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). Patients were divided into three groups in terms of HRSD score: depression group, sub-threshold depression group and non-depression group. The clinical variables and symptom profiles were obtained and compared among the three groups. The results showed that 27 patients (20.6%) fell into the depression group, 71 (54.2%) into the sub-threshold depression group, and 33 (25.2%) into the non-depression group. There were no differences in age, gender or tremor score among the groups (P>0.05). Significant differences were found in duration of PD, UPDRS score, rigidity score and H&Y stage between the sub-threshold depression group (or the depression group) and the non-depression group (P<0.05). Moreover, the clinical variables in the subthreshold depression group had the trend of increasing with the severity of PD and their values were similar to those in the depression group. Anhedonia, feeling of incapability, sleep disturbance, gastrointestinal symptoms and depressive moods were most common in the depression group. And these symptoms also were more common in the other two groups. It is concluded that depression and sub-threshold depression are common in PD and share similar clinical features. Furthermore, subthreshold depression might be the prodrome of depression and may develop into depression as the condition progresses.

  17. Placebo effect of medication cost in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Matthew M.; Eliassen, James C.; Dwivedi, Alok; Smith, Matthew S.; Banks, Christi; Allendorfer, Jane B.; Lang, Anthony E.; Fleck, David E.; Linke, Michael J.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of cost, a traditionally “inactive” trait of intervention, as contributor to the response to therapeutic interventions. Methods: We conducted a prospective double-blind study in 12 patients with moderate to severe Parkinson disease and motor fluctuations (mean age 62.4 ± 7.9 years; mean disease duration 11 ± 6 years) who were randomized to a “cheap” or “expensive” subcutaneous “novel injectable dopamine agonist” placebo (normal saline). Patients were crossed over to the alternate arm approximately 4 hours later. Blinded motor assessments in the “practically defined off” state, before and after each intervention, included the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor subscale, the Purdue Pegboard Test, and a tapping task. Measurements of brain activity were performed using a feedback-based visual-motor associative learning functional MRI task. Order effect was examined using stratified analysis. Results: Although both placebos improved motor function, benefit was greater when patients were randomized first to expensive placebo, with a magnitude halfway between that of cheap placebo and levodopa. Brain activation was greater upon first-given cheap but not upon first-given expensive placebo or by levodopa. Regardless of order of administration, only cheap placebo increased activation in the left lateral sensorimotor cortex and other regions. Conclusion: Expensive placebo significantly improved motor function and decreased brain activation in a direction and magnitude comparable to, albeit less than, levodopa. Perceptions of cost are capable of altering the placebo response in clinical studies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that perception of cost is capable of influencing motor function and brain activation in Parkinson disease. PMID:25632091

  18. Non-motor symptoms in Chinese Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jing; Zhou, Mingzhu; Chen, Wei; Liu, Zhenguo

    2014-05-01

    This study was designed to survey the prevalence and distribution of non-motor symptoms (NMS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients in Shanghai, China, and to investigate the association between NMS and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). One hundred fifty-five PD patients were evaluated using the NMS Questionnaire 30 (NMSQuest), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39). These data were compared with an international cross-sectional study, and the associations of motor and non-motor measures with HRQoL were estimated. Predictors of HRQoL were sought through multiple linear regression analyses. Each PD patient had eight different individual NMS on average. The problems of memory (65.82%), constipation (64.56%) and nocturia (61.39%) were the most frequent complaints. NMS prevalence in PD patients in Shanghai was consistent with that in the international study, although the composition proportions were different. There was a significant association of PDQ-39 score with NMSQuest score (rs=0.433, p=0.000), UPDRS III score (rs=0.473, p=0.000), Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) stage (rs=0.567, p=0.000), disease duration (rs=0.220, p=0.005), and levodopa equivalent dosage (rs=0.263, p=0.001). H-Y stage (disease severity) and NMS score were the strongest predictors for PDQ-39 score. This study confirmed that NMS are common in PD, occurring across all disease stages and have a great impact on quality of life. NMS progression contributes significantly to HRQoL decline, and should be well recognized and treated.

  19. [Medial posteroventral pallidotomy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Krauss, J K; Grossman, R G; Lai, E C; Schwartz, K; Jankovic, J

    1997-01-01

    Stereotactic medial posteroventral pallidotomy for treatment of Parkinson's disease attracts increasing attention. We report on the preliminary results of 12 patients at 1 year after microelectrode-guided unilateral pallidotomy. The primary indications were severe bradykinesia and levodopa-induced dyskinesias. After radiofrequency lesioning all patients had immediate improvement of contralateral parkinsonian signs. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the localization of the lesions. At the 1-year follow-up, all patients had sustained benefit. The global improvement was rated as moderate in six cases, and as marked in six other cases. The mean values of various subscores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) showed highly significant changes in the "off" state (pre/postoperatively): UPDRS Motor score (60.3/31). UPDRS Activities of Daily Living (ADL) score (33.2/18.3), gait/postural stability score (13.8/7.0), and subscores for contralateral rigidity (4.9/2.1), tremor (7.1/1.4) and bradykinesia (11.6/5.3). There was also significant improvement of ipsilateral bradykinesia and rigidity. Furthermore, we found significant changes of the mean values of the UPDRS ADL and motor "on" scores, an increase of the percentage of "on" time with reduced on-off fluctuations, and a decrease of the percentage of levodopa-induced dyskinesias, with marked improvement or complete abolition of contralateral dyskinesias in particular. The preoperative levodopa regimen was maintained, in general, or only slightly modified, if necessary. Two patients had transient complications: one patient suffered postoperative pneumonia and altered mental status; another patient displayed mild Broca's aphasia secondary to a small stroke involving the dorsal thalamus and the adjacent white matter. There were no persistent side effects at the 1-year follow-up. Contemporary unilateral pallidotomy is an effective and promising therapeutical option for surgical treatment of

  20. [Clinical and medicine characteristics of patients with Parkinson's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yi, Dan-Hui; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2014-09-01

    This study analyze the characteristics and clinical medicine in 17 hospitals all over China, based on hospital information system diagnostic information database, including 4 497 cases of hospitalized patients with Parkinson's syndrome. Results indicate, the most common comorbidities are infarction, hypertension, coronary heart disease, diabetes and lung infections, including cerebral infarction, the combined incidence of hypertension in men reached 33.46% and 30.05%, respectively, it is slightly lower in the females. Men with coronary heart disease are more than women, women with diabetes and bone disease are more than men. Combined incidence of the disease increases with age, vascular factors occupy an important position. The most common combined diseases in patients with 90 years of age or older are coronary heart disease, lung infection, and often accompanied by metabolic disorders and nutritional emergency, critical care. Constipation, depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, cognitive impairment are common non-motor symptoms. The drug categories associated with Parkinson's core symptoms treatment are about 20% to 30% of clinical medicine, the others are associated with the treatment of combined disease, clinical medicine and disease spectrum consistent. Blood circulation topped Chinese agents applied frequency, reaching 44.52%; laxative drugs accounted for 11.66%; detoxification agent representing 9.46%. The first twenty Chinese medicine of the applying frequency reached 56.07% of the total utilization, including 12 kinds of traditional Chinese medicine injections, accounting for 60%. Therefore, in the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinsons syndrome, the treatment of comorbidities is very important, more attentions should be paid to vascular factors of the disease, Chinese medicine should be more concerned to improve the non-motor symptoms, give full play to the pharmaceutical multi-target, the overall regulation of advantages, integrative medicine, and improve