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Sample records for parkinson neurospect del

  1. Right prefrontal rTMS treatment for refractory auditory command hallucinations - a neuroSPECT assisted case study.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Shaul; Dannon, Pinhas N; Goshen, Elinor; Amiaz, Revital; Zwas, Tzila S; Grunhaus, Leon

    2002-11-30

    Auditory command hallucinations probably arise from the patient's failure to monitor his/her own 'inner speech', which is connected to activation of speech perception areas of the left cerebral cortex and to various degrees of dysfunction of cortical circuits involved in schizophrenia as supported by functional brain imaging. We hypothesized that rapid transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), by increasing cortical activation of the right prefrontal brain region, would bring about a reduction of the hallucinations. We report our first schizophrenic patient affected with refractory command hallucinations treated with 10 Hz rTMS. Treatment was performed over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, with 1200 magnetic stimulations administered daily for 20 days at 90% motor threshold. Regional cerebral blood flow changes were monitored with neuroSPECT. Clinical evaluation and scores on the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale demonstrated a global improvement in the patient's condition, with no change in the intensity and frequency of the hallucinations. NeuroSPECT performed at intervals during and after treatment indicated a general improvement in cerebral perfusion. We conclude that right prefrontal rTMS may induce a general clinical improvement of schizophrenic brain function, without directly influencing the mechanism involved in auditory command hallucinations.

  2. Recent and future evolutions in NeuroSPECT with particular emphasis on the synergistic use and fusion of imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    d'Asseler, Y M; Koole, M; Lemahieu, I; Achten, E; Boon, P; De Deyn, P P; Dierckx, R A

    1997-09-01

    Recent and future evolutions in neuroSPECT apply to radiopharmaceuticals techniques and the synergistic use of different imaging modalities in the work-up of neurological disorders. The introduction of Technetium labelled perfusion tracers, which could pass the intact blood-brain barrier, together with the implementation of the tomographic principle, by making the conventional gamma camera rotating, enabled estimation of regional cerebral blood flow and indirectly of local brain metabolism. In addition at present Thallium-201 and Tc-99m sestaMIBI allow functional detection of viable tumor tissue, without interference from previous surgery or radiotherapy as seen using CT-scan or MRI. In neurology this has led to the recognition of SPECT by the American Academy of Neurology (Therapeutics and technology subcommittee) as an established or promising tool in major neurological disorders such as dementia, stroke and epilepsy, while other domains such as brain oncology are considered investigational. With regard to radiopharmaceuticals, recent evolutions mainly include the development of mostly Iodine-123 labelled receptor ligands, some of which are already commercially available. For instrumentation advances consist e.g. of multidetector systems equipped with fanbeam collimators, attenuation and scatter correction or coincidence detection. Given the present role for nuclear neurology it may be expected that these additional radiopharmaceutical and technical innovations will continue to stimulate the development of SPECT of the brain. The synergistic use of several imaging techniques such as CT, (functional) MRI, source imaging, SPECT and PET represents a multimodal holistic approach to probe cerebral functions for research and clinical purposes. Clinical indications, in which this synergistic use is illustrated include e.g. support of the clinical diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer type, presurgical ictal detection of seizure focus, detection of acute ischemia and

  3. Relative high frequency of the c.255delA parkin gene mutation in Spanish patients with autosomal recessive parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, E; Tolosa, E; Pastor, P; Marti, M; Valldeoriola, F; Campdelacreu, J; Oliva, R

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To search for the presence of parkin gene mutations in Spanish patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and characterise the phenotype associated with these mutations. Methods: Thirty seven PD patients with either early onset or autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance were selected for genetic study. Results: Mutations were identified in seven index patients (19%). Homozygous mutations were detected in six patients and a heterozygous mutation in one. The age at onset was lower in patients with mutations than in patients without mutations. Dystonia at onset was present in two patients with parkin gene mutations. The disease began in two patients with postural tremor in the upper limbs mimicking essential tremor. Four patients exhibited a long term response to dopamine agonists. The c.255delA mutation was identified in four unrelated families. This is a frameshift mutation leading to protein truncation. Conclusions: Parkin gene mutations are present in Spanish patients with early onset and/or an autosomal recessive parkinsonism. The c.255delA is the most frequent mutation found, suggesting a relative high prevalence in the Spanish population. PMID:12397156

  4. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Parkinson's Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Parkinson's Disease A A ... symptoms of something called Parkinson's disease. What Is Parkinson's Disease? You may have seen the actor Michael ...

  5. James Parkinson: Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2013-11-01

    Parkinson's disease is a condition that anyone with a modicum of medical knowledge can recognise in the street--as indeed how it was studied by James Parkinson himself. Its three characteristic features are: 1. Increase in the tone of the voluntary muscles (rigidity). 2. Slowness of movement (bradykinesis). 3. Tremor (the characteristic 'pill rolling' movements of the fingers).

  6. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may have seen the actor Michael J. Fox on TV talking about Parkinson's disease. He has ... and help find a cure. Mostly adults (like Fox and boxer Muhammad Ali) get Parkinson's disease. It's ...

  7. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Playfer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common disabling disease of old age. The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on clinical signs and has poor sensitivity, with about 25% of patients confidently diagnosed as having the disease actually having other conditions such as multi-system atrophy and other parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Benign essential tremor and arteriosclerotic pseudo-parkinsonism can easily be confused with Parkinson's disease. The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown. Speculative research highlights the role of oxidative stress and free radical mediated damage to dopaminergic cells. Parkinson's disease is the one neurodegenerative disorder in which drugs have been demonstrated to be of value. There is now a wide variety of drugs and formulations available, including anticholinergics, amantidine, L-dopa, dopamine agonists including apomorphine, selegiline and soon to be available catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors. Disabling side-effects of treatment, fluctuations, dyskinesias and psychiatric problems require strategic use of the drugs available. There is an increasing potential for neurosurgical intervention. PMID:9196696

  8. Secondary parkinsonism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Encephalitis Hemoglobin derivatives Meningitis Parkinson disease Stroke Toxins Review Date 8/13/2015 Updated by: Joseph V. ... Division of Neurology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Internal review and ...

  9. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors. A full understanding of Parkinson's risk requires integrated efforts to study both genetic and environmental factors. ... Parkinson’s disease (December 2014) Australian researcher outlines an integrated approach for studying Parkinson’s (December 2014) Research on ...

  11. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific part of your brain. The electrodes are connected to a generator implanted in your chest near ... with Parkinson's disease to improve their walking and speech. Participating in art therapy, such as painting or ...

  12. Parkinson disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to destroy brain tissue that causes Parkinson symptoms. Stem cell transplant and other procedures are being studied. LIFESTYLE ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  13. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, E C; Calne, D B

    1989-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease there is degeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra, with consequent depletion of the neurotransmitter dopamine. The triad of tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia is the clinical hallmark. Drugs currently used for palliative therapy fall into three categories: anticholinergic agents, dopamine precursors (levodopa combined with extracerebral decarboxylase inhibitors) and artificial dopamine agonists. It has been argued, on theoretical grounds, that some drugs slow the progress of Parkinson's disease, although no firm evidence has supported this. Treatment must be individualized, and more than one type of drug can be given concurrently after a careful build-up in dosage. We review the adverse effects of various drugs and consider new developments such as slow-release preparations, selective D-1 and D-2 agonists and transplants of dopaminergic cells into the brain. The treatment of Parkinson's disease can be demanding, rewarding and sometimes frustrating, but it remains a most challenging exercise in pharmacotherapy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2563667

  14. Hitler's parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Lillian B; Bonney, Phillip A; Smitherman, Adam D; Sughrue, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Of the multitude of medical and psychiatric conditions ascribed to Hitler both in his lifetime and since his suicide in April 1945, few are more substantiated than parkinsonism. While the timeline of the development of this condition, as well as its etiology, are debated, there is clear evidence for classic manifestations of the disease, most prominently a resting tremor but also stooped posture, bradykinesia, micrographia, and masked facial expressions, with progression steadily seen over his final years. Though ultimately speculation, some have suggested that Hitler suffered from progressive cognitive and mood disturbances, possibly due to parkinsonism, that affected the course of events in the war. Here, the authors discuss Hitler's parkinsonism in the context of the Third Reich and its eventual destruction, maintaining that ultimately his disease had little effect on the end result.

  15. Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Terzakis, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects one million people in the United States. This article reviews the etiology and pathophysiology of PD, risk factors, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of this common disease. Implications for home care clinicians are included.

  16. Viral Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Haeman; Boltz, David A.; Webster, Robert G.; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a debilitating neurological disorder characterized that affects 1-2% of the adult population over 55 years of age. For the vast majority of cases, the etiology of this disorder is unknown, although it is generally accepted that there is a genetic susceptibility to any number of environmental agents. One such agent may be viruses. It has been shown that numerous viruses can enter the nervous system, i.e. they are neurotropic, and induce a number of encephalopathies. One of the secondary consequences of these encephalopathies can be parkinsonism, that is both transient as well as permanent. One of the most highlighted and controversial cases of viral parkinsonism is that which followed the 1918 influenza outbreak and the subsequent induction of von Economo's encephalopathy. In this review, we discuss the neurological sequelae of infection by influenza virus as well as that of other viruses known to induce parkinsonism including Coxsackie, Japanese encephalitis B, St. Louis, West Nile and HIV viruses. PMID:18760350

  17. Parkinson's Disease: Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Research Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Parkinson's Patient Active as Research Advocate Joel Grace Photo courtesy of Parkinson's Disease ...

  18. Progression of Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seminars Parkinson's News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  19. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seminars Parkinson's News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Foundation Newsletter

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  1. Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Poewe, Werner; Seppi, Klaus; Tanner, Caroline M; Halliday, Glenda M; Brundin, Patrik; Volkmann, Jens; Schrag, Anette-Eleonore; Lang, Anthony E

    2017-03-23

    Parkinson disease is the second-most common neurodegenerative disorder that affects 2-3% of the population ≥65 years of age. Neuronal loss in the substantia nigra, which causes striatal dopamine deficiency, and intracellular inclusions containing aggregates of α-synuclein are the neuropathological hallmarks of Parkinson disease. Multiple other cell types throughout the central and peripheral autonomic nervous system are also involved, probably from early disease onwards. Although clinical diagnosis relies on the presence of bradykinesia and other cardinal motor features, Parkinson disease is associated with many non-motor symptoms that add to overall disability. The underlying molecular pathogenesis involves multiple pathways and mechanisms: α-synuclein proteostasis, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, calcium homeostasis, axonal transport and neuroinflammation. Recent research into diagnostic biomarkers has taken advantage of neuroimaging in which several modalities, including PET, single-photon emission CT (SPECT) and novel MRI techniques, have been shown to aid early and differential diagnosis. Treatment of Parkinson disease is anchored on pharmacological substitution of striatal dopamine, in addition to non-dopaminergic approaches to address both motor and non-motor symptoms and deep brain stimulation for those developing intractable L-DOPA-related motor complications. Experimental therapies have tried to restore striatal dopamine by gene-based and cell-based approaches, and most recently, aggregation and cellular transport of α-synuclein have become therapeutic targets. One of the greatest current challenges is to identify markers for prodromal disease stages, which would allow novel disease-modifying therapies to be started earlier.

  2. Young-Onset Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help make life better for people with Parkinson's General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day ® Team Hope ... can help make life better for people with Parkinson's General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day ® Team Hope ...

  3. Parkinson disease - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may ...

  4. Parkinson disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Parkinson disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Parkinson disease : The Michael J. Fox Foundation -- www.michaeljfox.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  5. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Team Finding Resources Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  6. Symptoms of Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  7. Managing Your Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Team Finding Resources Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  8. Parkinson's Disease Foundation News

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  9. Living with Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Team Finding Resources Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  10. Respiratory-chain enzyme activities in isolated mitochondria of lymphocytes from untreated Parkinson's disease patients. Grupo-Centro de Trastornos del Movimiento.

    PubMed

    Martín, M A; Molina, J A; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Benito-León, J; Ortí-Pareja, M; Campos, Y; Arenas, J

    1996-05-01

    We studied respiratory-chain enzyme activities in lymphocyte mitochondria from 36 untreated Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and in 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The respiratory-chain enzyme activities did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Moreover, no patient showed respiratory-chain enzyme levels below normal range. Values for activities of complexes in the PD group did not correlate with age at onset, duration, scores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating scales, or Hoehn and Yahr staging. These results suggest that the presence of defects of respiratory-chain complexes could depend on methodologic aspects, and that determinations of respiratory-chain enzymes in cell homogenates are not generally appropriate for evaluating abnormal mitochondrial dysfunction, especially when the amount of the specific enzyme is relatively low, as is the case of blood cells. In addition, the method of measuring complex I activity is critical for evaluating the results. In conclusion, our finding of normal mitochondrial function in lymphocyte mitochondria suggests that this tissue cannot be used to develop a diagnostic test for PD.

  11. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Benninger, David H

    2013-01-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses therapeutic challenges. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in noninvasive brain stimulation as an alternative therapeutic tool. The rationale for its use draws from the concept that reversing abnormalities in brain activity and physiology thought to cause the clinical deficits may restore normal functioning. Currently the best evidence in support of this concept comes from DBS, which improves motor deficits, and modulates brain activity and motor cortex physiology, although whether a causal interaction exists remains largely undetermined. Most trials of noninvasive brain stimulation in PD have applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), targeting the motor cortex. Current studies suggest a possible therapeutic potential for rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but clinical effects so far have been small and negligible with regard to functional independence and quality of life. Approaches to potentiate the efficacy of rTMS include increasing stimulation intensity and novel stimulation parameters that derive their rationale from studies on brain physiology. These novel parameters are intended to simulate normal firing patterns or to act on the hypothesized role of oscillatory activity in the motor cortex and basal ganglia with regard to motor control and its contribution to the pathogenesis of motor disorders. Noninvasive brain stimulation studies will enhance our understanding of PD pathophysiology and might provide further evidence for potential therapeutic applications.

  12. Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH

    MedlinePlus

    ... The NINDS also collaborates with the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) on BioFIND , a ... an Art / Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease / Michael J. Fox: Spurring Research on Parkinson's / Diagnosis and Treatment / Research ...

  13. Parkinson's disease and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Vaserman, Nathalie

    2005-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with an increased risk of falls. The risk is greatest in patients with advanced disease. Because Parkinson's disease usually occurs late in life, the risk factors related to the neurological impairments add to those associated with aging. The incidence of fractures is high in patients with Parkinson's disease, with femoral neck fractures in older women being particularly common. Risk factors for fractures include a low body mass index, limited exposure to sunlight, an inadequate vitamin D intake with low 25-OH vitamin D levels, and bone loss. Several studies found decreased bone mineral density values at the femoral neck and lumbar spine in patients with Parkinson's disease. Although this decrease is ascribable in part to factors unrelated with Parkinson's disease, such as older age and female gender, Parkinson's disease itself also plays a role, most notably in patients with severe neurological impairments (Hoehn and Yahr stages III and IV).

  14. Parkinson's disease with camptocormia

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, F; Houeto, J L; du Montcel, S Tezenas; Bonneville, F; Etchepare, F; Welter, M L; Rivaud‐Pechoux, S; Hahn‐Barma, V; Maisonobe, T; Behar, C; Lazennec, J Y; Kurys, E; Arnulf, I; Bonnet, A M; Agid, Y

    2006-01-01

    Background Camptocormia is defined as an abnormal flexion of the trunk that appears when standing or walking and disappears in the supine position. The origin of the disorder is unknown, but it is usually attributed either to a primary or a secondary paravertebral muscle myopathy or a motor neurone disorder. Camptocormia is also observed in a minority of patients with parkinsonism. Objective To characterise the clinical and electrophysiological features of camptocormia and parkinsonian symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease and camptocormia compared with patients with Parkinson's disease without camptocormia. Methods Patients with parkinsonism and camptocormia (excluding patients with multiple system atrophy) prospectively underwent a multidisciplinary clinical (neurological, neuropsychological, psychological, rheumatological) and neurophysiological (electromyogram, ocular movement recording) examination and were compared with age‐matched patients with Parkinson's disease without camptocormia. Results The camptocormia developed after 8.5 (SD 5.3) years of parkinsonism, responded poorly to levodopa treatment (20%) and displayed features consistent with axial dystonia. Patients with camptocormia were characterised by prominent levodopa‐unresponsive axial symptoms (ie, axial rigidity, gait disorder and postural instability), along with a tendency for greater error in the antisaccade paradigm. Conclusion We suggest that (1) the salient features of parkinsonism observed in patients with camptocormia are likely to represent a specific form of Parkinson's disease and camptocormia is an axial dystonia and (2) both camptocormia and parkinsonism in these patients might result from additional, non‐dopaminergic neuronal dysfunction in the basal ganglia. PMID:16754693

  15. Parkinson's disease. Team talk.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer

    2006-07-27

    Multidisciplinary working and co-ordination between different parts of the care pathway are key to improving services for Parkinson's disease patients. Benefits of this approach include care continuity and increased sharing of skills between professionals. Specialist Parkinson's nurses form a key part of the multidisciplinary workforce, and have formed peer networks to keep up to date on best practice.

  16. Hereditary Parkinson s Disease Natural History Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Parkinson Disease 6, Early-Onset; Parkinson Disease (Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset) 7, Human; Parkinson Disease Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset; Parkinson Disease, Autosomal Recessive Early-Onset, Digenic, Pink1/Dj1

  17. Ambulation and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Amano, Shinichi; Roemmich, Ryan T; Skinner, Jared W; Hass, Chris J

    2013-05-01

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a variety of motor and nonmotor features. This article reviews the problems of postural instability and gait disturbance in persons with Parkinson disease through the discussion of (1) the neuropathology of parkinsonian motor deficits, (2) behavioral manifestations of gait and postural abnormalities observed in persons with Parkinson disease, and (3) pharmacologic, surgical, and physical therapy-based interventions to combat postural instability and gait disturbance. This article advances the treatment of postural instability and gait disturbance by condensing up-to-date knowledge and making it available to clinicians and rehabilitation professionals.

  18. [Neurochemistry of Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism plus].

    PubMed

    Pascual, J; Misiego, M

    1997-08-01

    The neurochemistry of Parkinson's disease and other degenerative parkinsonisms is reviewed, emphasizing the changes described in the dopaminergic system. Presynaptic dopaminergic markers are reduced over the striatum in all these degenerative parkinsonisms, dopamine receptor changes being more heterogeneous. While in Parkinson's disease D1 and D2 receptors remain preserved as compared to controls, in progressive supranuclear palsy there is a loss of nigral D1 receptors and of striatal D2 receptors. This finding has also been described in striatonigral degeneration. There are no clear data about the status of D3, D4 and D5 dopamine receptors in these conditions. The alterations in other neurotransmission systems, cholinegic, adrenergic, serotoninergic and peptidergic are, in general, less dramatic, although they have not been studied in detail. To conclude, further studies are necessary in these field, in these moment, however, the preservation of striatal D2 dopamine receptors is the neurochemical finding with the best correlation with the response to levodopa or other dopaminergic agonists.

  19. Parkinson's Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women & PD Initiative Raise Awareness Fundraise as a PDF Champion Find Community Events Get Creative Display the ... Your Story Go Global: World Parkinson Congress Supporting PDF Make a Donation Make a Memorial or Honor ...

  20. Flies with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vanhauwaert, Roeland; Verstreken, Patrik

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is an incurable neurodegenerative disease. Most cases of the disease are of sporadic origin, but about 10% of the cases are familial. The genes thus far identified in Parkinson's disease are well conserved. Drosophila is ideally suited to study the molecular neuronal cell biology of these genes and the pathogenic mutations in Parkinson's disease. Flies reproduce quickly, and their elaborate genetic tools in combination with their small size allow researchers to analyze identified cells and neurons in large numbers of animals. Furthermore, fruit flies recapitulate many of the cellular and molecular defects also seen in patients, and these defects often result in clear locomotor and behavioral phenotypes, facilitating genetic modifier screens. Hence, Drosophila has played a prominent role in Parkinson's disease research and has provided invaluable insight into the molecular mechanisms of this disease.

  1. Parkinson's Disease Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... by which organisms grow and develop. Developmental biology studies in Parkinson's disease hold potential to identify therapeutic targets and new cell replacement strategies. Diagnosis Identification or naming of a disease by ...

  2. [The Parkinson puzzle].

    PubMed

    Guseo, András

    2012-12-30

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most frequent progressive degenerative disorders with unknown origin of the nervous system. The commutation of the disease on Guam led to the discovery of a neurotoxin which was also found in other continents. This neurotoxin was identified in the common cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). Early clinical observations suggested some loose correlations with gastric and duodenal ulcer and Parkinson's disease, while recent studies revealed a toxin, almost identical to that found in cyanobacteria in one strain of Helicobacter pylori, which proved to cause Parkinson like symptoms in animals. Therefore, it cannot be ruled out that there is a slowly progressive poisoning in Parkinson's disease. The disease specific alpha-sinuclein inclusions can be found in nerve cells of the intestinal mucosa far before the appearance of clinical symptoms indicating that the disease may start in the intestines. These results are strengthened by the results of Borody's fecal transplants, after which in Parkinson patients showed a symptomatic improvement. Based on these observations the Parkinson puzzle is getting complete. Although these observations are not evidence based, they may indicate a new way for basic clinical research, as well as a new way of thinking for clinicians. These new observations in psycho-neuro-immunology strengthen the fact that immunological factors may also play a critical factor facilitating local cell necrosis which may be influenced easily.

  3. How Is Parkinson's Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help make life better for people with Parkinson's General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day ® Team Hope ... can help make life better for people with Parkinson's General Gift Tribute Gift Moving Day ® Team Hope ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Parkinson disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... are some genetic conditions more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Most cases of Parkinson disease probably ... Parkinson's disease: variation by age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jun 1;157(11): ...

  5. The skin in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Flint, A

    1977-09-01

    The characteristic oily skin in individuals with parkinsonism has long been observed by clinicians. The oiliness seems to be associated with periods when the disease is most active. This seborrhea has been observed particularly in post-encephalitic parkinsonism, as well as in idiopathic paralysis agitans. It also occurs in phenothiazine-induced parkinsonism.

  6. Osteoporosis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Invernizzi, Marco; Carda, Stefano; Viscontini, Giovanni Sguazzini; Cisari, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    Patients affected by Parkinson's disease are at a high risk for fractures, mainly of the hip. These fractures are caused by falls due to postural imbalance, neurological impairment and reduced bone mass. The purpose of this study was (1) to investigate the correlations and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying bone loss in Parkinson's disease and appraise bone loss or fracture risk reduction interventions; (2) to develop a research agenda that informs the design and development of risk reduction strategies. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are very common findings in patients with Parkinson's disease, affecting up to 91% of women and 61% of men. Reduced bone mass in Parkinsonian patients seems to be caused mainly by reduced mobility through a mechanism similar to that observed in other neurological diseases. Endocrine (such as vitamin D deficiency), nutritional and iatrogenic factors also play an important role in bone mass depletion. Female gender, disease duration and severity (Hoehn and Yahr stages III and IV), old age and low body mass index are related to more severe osteoporosis. Vitamin D supplementation and bisphosphonates seem to be effective in reducing the risk of nonvertebral fractures in patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Prevention and evaluation of osteoporosis through bone mass density assessment should be considered in all patients with Parkinson's disease.

  7. [Parkinsonism during lithium use].

    PubMed

    Walrave, T R W M; Bulens, C

    2009-01-01

    Two patients with bipolar disorder had been treated for years with lithium without any complications but began to develop symptoms of rigidity and an altered gait, namely symptoms compatible with a diagnosis of Parkinsonism with an action tremor. In both patients lithium levels were within the therapeutic range. Medication-induced Parkinsonism occurs frequently in patients using antipsychotic medication, but is a rare complication in patients receiving long term treatment with lithium. The lithium dosage was reduced gradually and within a few months all neurological symptoms subsided completely.

  8. Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Kramberger, Milica G

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Parkinson's syndrome and Parkinson's disease in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2011-04-01

    In the majority of cases, mitochondrial disorders are multisystem conditions that most frequently affect the skeletal muscle, followed by the central nervous system. One of the clinical manifestations of central nervous system involvement is Parkinson's syndrome (PS). Evidence for an association of mitochondrial defects with PS comes from mitochondrial disorder patients who have developed Parkinson's syndrome and from Parkinson's syndrome patients who have developed a mitochondrial disorder. In addition, there are a number of patients with Parkinson's syndrome or Parkinson's disease (PD) who later develop subclinical immunohistological or biochemical indications of mitochondrial defects or accumulates mitochondrial DNA mutations within various cerebral regions. There are also Parkinson's syndrome patients who present with elevated cerebrospinal-fluid lactate by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Furthermore, it has been shown that mutations in genes causing PD, such as PINK1, parkin, DJ1, alpha-synuclein, and LRRK2, also cause mitochondrial dysfunction, which is one of the reasons why they are called mitochondrial nigropathies. Parkinson's syndrome in patients with a mitochondrial disorder may also result from oxidative stress or exogenous toxins. Treatment of mitochondrial Parkinson's syndrome is not at variance with the treatment of Parkinson's syndrome due to other causes, but because of the multisystem nature of mitochondrial disorders, mitochondrial Parkinson's syndrome requires additional therapeutic support.

  10. [Pramipexole in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Shindriaeva, N N; Gankina, O A; Levin, O S

    2015-01-01

    Pramipexole is non-ergoline dopamine receptor agonist. There is accumulating evidence for the efficacy of pramipexole in treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Authors have summarized the results concerning the optimal start treatment, the using of pramipexole in early and advanced PD stages, effects of pramipexole on tremor, cognitive impairment, affective functions and safety pramipexole.

  11. 2006 World Parkinson Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    15-4:15 PM [Community] When children grow up with a chronically parent David Morley (UK) Room 204A (5) 3:15-4:15 PM [Policy] Domestic & Int’l...Margaret Holloway (UK) "Pathways through care: a patient/ carer -led approach to the management of Parkinson’s disease in the community" 204B (130

  12. Parkinson disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Gazewood, John D; Richards, D Roxanne; Clebak, Karl

    2013-02-15

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurologic disorder afflicting approximately 1 percent of Americans older than 60 years. The cardinal features of Parkinson disease are bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and postural instability. There are a number of neurologic conditions that mimic the disease, making it difficult to diagnose in its early stages. Physicians who rarely diagnose Parkinson disease should refer patients suspected of having it to physicians with more experience in making the diagnosis, and should periodically reevaluate the accuracy of the diagnosis. Treatment is effective in reducing motor impairment and disability, and should be started when a patient begins to experience functional impairment. The combination of carbidopa and levodopa is the most effective treatment, but dopamine agonists and monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors are also effective, and are less likely to cause dyskinesias. For patients taking carbidopa/levodopa who have motor complications, adjunctive therapy with a dopamine agonist, a monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor, or a catechol O-methyltransferase inhibitor will improve motor symptoms and functional status, but with an increase in dyskinesias. Deep brain stimulation is effective in patients who have poorly controlled symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Occupational, physical, and speech therapy improve patient function. Fatigue, sleep disturbances, dementia, and depression are common in patients with Parkinson disease. Although these conditions are associated with significantly lower quality of life, they may improve with treatment.

  13. Insecticide Exposure in Parkinsonism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Behavioral, neurochemical, and immunocytochemical studies characterized the possible role of insecticide exposure in the etiology of Parkinson’s ... disease as it may relate to Gulf War Syndrome. Chlorpyrifos (CP) and permethrin (PM) were given 3 times over a two week period by injection (CP

  14. Charcot and vascular Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Germiniani, Francisco M B; Munhoz, Renato P

    2017-03-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893), recognized as the founder of Neurology and the first formal teacher of nervous system diseases, died on August 16, 1893, from acute pulmonary edema secondary to myocardial infarction. In his last years, there were several descriptions of his gait and posture disorders, suggesting the diagnosis of "lower-half parkinsonism" due to cerebrovascular disease.

  15. Caregiver distress in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Cifu, David X; Carne, William; Brown, Rashelle; Pegg, Phillip; Ong, Jason; Qutubuddin, Abu; Baron, Mark S

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the frequency and degree of caregiver burden in persons with parkinsonism, a group of disorders with four primary symptoms that include tremor, rigidity, postural instability, and bradykinesia. We assessed associations between perceived caregiver burden and physical, cognitive, and functional impairments using well-established tools for persons with parkinsonism. The 49 individuals with parkinsonism ranged in age from 61 to 87 (mean = 75), while their caregivers (N = 49) ranged in age from 48 to 83 (mean = 70). The caregivers were predominantly either wives (82%) or daughters (6%), with other family members, friends, and/or neighbors (12%) making up the rest. The caregivers reported a relatively high ability for coping (mean scores = 4.6/6). Caregiver burden was significantly negatively associated with activities of daily living and motoric difficulties as measured on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Likewise, caregiver burden was negatively associated with caregiver self-reported sleep and coping ability. Results did not demonstrate an association on the UPDRS among mentation, behavior, and mood. We found a significant negative correlation for mentation between the Folstein Mini-Mental Status Examination and caregiver burden measures; however, we did not find this association with the Dementia Rating Scale-2. Patient's self-reported pain and caregiver burden were not associated.

  16. Vascular parkinsonism: Deconstructing a syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarra, Joaquin A.; Lang, Anthony E.; Sethi, Kapil D; Espay, Alberto J.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive ambulatory impairment and abnormal white matter signal on neuroimaging come together under the diagnostic umbrella of vascular parkinsonism. A critical appraisal of the literature, however, suggests that (1) no abnormal structural imaging pattern is specific to vascular parkinsonism; (2) there is poor correlation between brain magnetic resonance imaging hyperintensities and microangiopathic brain disease and parkinsonism from available clinicopathologic data; (3) pure parkinsonism from vascular injury (“definite” vascular parkinsonism) consistently results from ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes involving the substantia nigra and/or nigrostriatal pathway but sparing the striatum itself, the cortex, and the intervening white matter; and (4) many cases reported as vascular parkinsonism may represent pseudovascular parkinsonism (e.g., Parkinson disease or another neurodegenerative parkinsonism such as progressive supranuclear palsy with non-specific neuroimaging signal abnormalities), vascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., akinetic mutism due to bilateral mesial frontal strokes or apathetic depression from bilateral striatal lacunar strokes), or pseudovascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., higher-level gait disorders, including normal pressure hydrocephalus with transependimal exudate). These syndromic designations are preferable over vascular parkinsonism until pathology or validated biomarkers confirm the underlying nature and relevance of the leukoaraiosis. PMID:25997420

  17. Can You Have Parkinsonism without Having PD?

    MedlinePlus

    ... HELPLINE 1-800-4PD-INFO DONATE Your gift can help make life better for people with Parkinson's ... Team Hope TM for Parkinson's DONATE Your gift can help make life better for people with Parkinson's ...

  18. RNA metabolism in the pathogenesis of Parkinson׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bingwei; Gehrke, Stephan; Wu, Zhihao

    2014-10-10

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson׳s disease are progressive disorders of the nervous system that affect the function and maintenance of specific neuronal populations. While most disease cases are sporadic with no known cause, a small percentage of disease cases are caused by inherited genetic mutations. The identification of genes associated with the familial forms of the diseases and subsequent studies of proteins encoded by the disease genes in cellular or animal models have offered much-needed insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis. Recent studies of the familial Parkinson׳s disease genes have emphasized the importance of RNA metabolism, particularly mRNA translation, in the disease process. It is anticipated that continued studies on the role of RNA metabolism in Parkinson׳s disease will offer unifying mechanisms for understanding the cause of neuronal dysfunction and degeneration and facilitate the development of novel and rational strategies for treating this debilitating disease.

  19. The neuromythology of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Calne, Donald B; Mizuno, Yoshikuni

    2004-07-01

    Over the last century three central points have become the orthodox dogma accepted and taught by those who study Parkinson's Disease. These are: Parkinson's Disease is one disease. Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra are an acceptable hallmark of Parkinson's Disease. Lewy bodies are responsible for the death of nigral neurons in Parkinson's Disease. Each of these tenets now present difficulties, and we are beginning to enter an era in which we must look critically at the current evidence to decide whether each dictum can be sustained.

  20. Parkinson's disease: emerging pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Strecker, Karl; Schwarz, Johannes

    2008-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. The prevalence is increasing with age and averages approximately 0.3% in the entire population. The clinical picture is dominated by the cardinal motor symptoms such as tremor at rest, bradykinesia, muscular rigidity, stooped posture and postural instability. Psychiatric comorbidity is common, comprising dementia, depression, anxiety and psychosis. Although many drugs have been developed and introduced into the market to provide symptomatic treatment, there is still no cure for PD and not even solid evidence for disease-modifying strategies. In addition, motor complications in advanced stages of the disease, side effects of the dopaminergic therapy, and non-motor symptoms remain huge challenges during long-term therapy. Thus, new therapeutic agents are desperately needed. Here, we describe current therapies and possible future developments that we hope will contribute to sustaining quality of life in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease for many years.

  1. Parkinson's disease: gene therapies.

    PubMed

    Coune, Philippe G; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    With the recent development of effective gene delivery systems, gene therapy for the central nervous system is finding novel applications. Here, we review existing viral vectors and discuss gene therapy strategies that have been proposed for Parkinson's disease. To date, most of the clinical trials were based on viral vectors to deliver therapeutic transgenes to neurons within the basal ganglia. Initial trials used genes to relieve the major motor symptoms caused by nigrostriatal degeneration. Although these new genetic approaches still need to prove more effective than existing symptomatic treatments, there is a need for disease-modifying strategies. The investigation of the genetic factors implicated in Parkinson's disease is providing precious insights in disease pathology that, combined with innovative gene delivery systems, will hopefully offer novel opportunities for gene therapy interventions to slow down, or even halt disease progression.

  2. Biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sherer, Todd B

    2011-04-20

    Biomarkers for detecting the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) could accelerate development of new treatments. Such biomarkers could be used to identify individuals at risk for developing PD, to improve early diagnosis, to track disease progression with precision, and to test the efficacy of new treatments. Although some progress has been made, there are many challenges associated with developing biomarkers for detecting PD in its earliest stages.

  3. Paraquat and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Berry, C; La Vecchia, C; Nicotera, P

    2010-07-01

    As evidence emerges that complex gene alterations are involved in the onset of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of environmental chemicals in the pathogenesis of this disease becomes intensely debated. Although it is undisputed that acute exposure to certain chemicals such as 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) is sufficient to cause human parkinsonism, the evidence that the risk for PD increases because of environmental exposure is generally weaker. Several studies have suggested that pesticide exposure and life in rural areas are significant risks factors for PD. Among other pesticides, paraquat (PQ) has been linked to PD by epidemiological studies and experimental work in rodents, in which it causes lesions in the substantia nigra, pars compacta. However, the evidence that human exposure to the chemical results in an increased risk for PD is rather limited and based on insufficient epidemiological data. This review critically analyses the evidence that implicates PQ in parkinsonism and discusses the limitations of chemical modelling of PD.

  4. Treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Aminoff, M J

    1994-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy with levodopa for Parkinson's disease provides symptomatic benefit, but fluctuations in (or loss of) response may eventually occur. Dopamine agonists are also helpful and, when taken with low doses of levodopa, often provide sustained benefit with fewer side effects; novel agonists and new methods for their administration are therefore under study. Other therapeutic strategies are being explored, including the use of type B monoamine oxidase inhibitors to reduce the metabolic breakdown of dopamine, catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors to retard the breakdown of levodopa, norepinephrine precursors to compensate for deficiency of this neurotransmitter, glutamate antagonists to counteract the effects of the subthalamic nucleus, and various neurotrophic factors to influence dopaminergic nigrostriatal cells. Surgical procedures involving pallidotomy are sometimes helpful. Those involving cerebral transplantation of adrenal medullary or fetal mesencephalic tissue have yielded mixed results; benefits may relate to the presence of growth factors in the transplanted tissue. The transplantation of genetically engineered cell lines will probably become the optimal transplantation procedure. The cause of Parkinson's disease may relate to oxidant stress and the generation of free radicals. It is not clear whether treatment with selegiline hydrochloride (a type B monoamine oxidase inhibitor) delays the progression of Parkinson's disease, because the drug also exerts a mild symptomatic effect. Daily treatment with vitamin E (a scavenger of free radicals) does not influence disease progression, perhaps because of limited penetration into the brain. Images PMID:7975571

  5. Methamphetamine and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Granado, Noelia; Ares-Santos, Sara; Moratalla, Rosario

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder predominantly affecting the elderly. The aetiology of the disease is not known, but age and environmental factors play an important role. Although more than a dozen gene mutations associated with familial forms of Parkinson's disease have been described, fewer than 10% of all cases can be explained by genetic abnormalities. The molecular basis of Parkinson's disease is the loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia (caudate/putamen) due to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which leads to the motor impairment characteristic of the disease. Methamphetamine is the second most widely used illicit drug in the world. In rodents, methamphetamine exposure damages dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, resulting in a significant loss of dopamine in the striatum. Biochemical and neuroimaging studies in human methamphetamine users have shown decreased levels of dopamine and dopamine transporter as well as prominent microglial activation in the striatum and other areas of the brain, changes similar to those observed in PD patients. Consistent with these similarities, recent epidemiological studies have shown that methamphetamine users are almost twice as likely as non-users to develop PD, despite the fact that methamphetamine abuse and PD have distinct symptomatic profiles. PMID:23476887

  6. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Investigator Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance...2. Developing an identification protocol. The primary source of parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called...of parkinsonism among Alaska Natives. Status: Complete 3. Developing a secure Alaska Native parkinsonism registry database. Status: The database

  7. Respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, D; Torsney, K M

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory dysfunction has been associated with Parkinson's disease since it was first described in 1817. The respiratory symptoms observed in Parkinson's disease patients vary greatly. Most patients remain asymptomatic, whereas others present with acute shortness of breath and even stridor. In August 2016, an electronic literature search was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. Results were screened and studies reporting on respiratory dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease were included. Respiratory dysfunction is due to a combination of factors including restrictive changes, upper airway obstruction, abnormal ventilatory drive and response to medications. Much debate surrounds the mechanism underlying respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, its prevalence and the effect of levodopa on respiration. It is clear from this review that larger studies, comparing patients of similar disease duration and severity using the same pulmonary function parameters, are required to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology underlying respiratory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

  8. Postural control in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Jackeline Yumi; Quitschal, Rafaela Maia; Doná, Flávia; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloísa Helena

    2014-01-01

    Postural instability is one of the most disabling features of Parkinson's disease. To evaluate postural balance in Parkinson's disease. Thirty patients with Parkinson's disease were compared with controls using Tetrax™ interactive balance system posturography. For different positions, patients with Parkinson's disease showed a significantly higher weight distribution index, fall index, Fourier transformation at low-medium frequencies (F2-F4), and significantly lower right/left and toe/heel synchronization versus controls. Postural imbalance in Parkinson's disease patients is characterized by the abnormalities of weight distribution index, synchronization index, Fourier transformation index, and fall index as measured by Tetrax™ posturography. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Seborrheic dermatitis in neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Binder, R L; Jonelis, F J

    1983-06-01

    An increased prevalence of seborrheic dermatitis has previously been noted in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and in postencephalitic parkinsonism. Our study of 42 hospitalized patients with drug-induced parkinsonism and 47 hospitalized psychiatric patients without that disorder showed a statistically significant higher prevalence of clinically diagnosed seborrheic dermatitis in the group with drug-induced parkinsonism (59.5% v 15%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of an increased prevalence of seborrheic dermatitis with drug-induced parkinsonism.

  10. Parkinson's disease and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ylikoski, Ari; Martikainen, Kirsti; Sieminski, Mariusz; Partinen, Markku

    2015-11-01

    There is a broad spectrum of sleep disturbances observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). The prevalence of symptoms of insomnia and chronic inability to sleep and their association with other sleep disorders were studied. Altogether 1447 randomly selected Parkinson patients, aged 43-89 years, participated in a questionnaire study. A structured questionnaire with 207 items was based on the Basic Nordic Sleep questionnaire. Questions on demographics, PD, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, and other issues were included. The response rate was 59 % (N = 854), and of these 81 % returned fully answered questionnaire (N = 689). Prevalence of chronic inability to sleep was 36.9 % (95 % CI 33.3-40.5). Difficulty of initiating sleep was 18.0 % (95 % CI 15.1-20.9), disrupted sleep 81.54 % (78.5-84.4), awakenings during night 31.3 % (27.8-34.8), early morning awakenings 40.4 % (36.8-44.1) and non-restorative sleep 38.5 % (34.8-42.1). In the logistic regression models, poor quality of life and restless legs syndrome correlated significantly with chronic insomnia disorder. Disrupted sleep and early morning awakenings were the most common insomnia symptoms. PD patients do not seem to have difficulties in sleep initiation. Insomnia symptoms including disruptive sleep and non-restorative sleep are common in patients with Parkinson's disease. Inability to sleep is more common as comorbidity than a single sleep problem.

  11. Epidemiology of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrea; Gilbert, Rebecca M

    2016-11-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a common progressive neurodegenerative condition, causing both motor and non motor symptoms. Motor symptoms include stiffness, slowness, rest tremor and poor postural reflexes, whereas nonmotor symptoms include abnormalities of mood, cognition, sleep and autonomic function. Affected patients show cell loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and accumulation of aggregated alpha-synuclein into intracellular structures called Lewy bodies, within specific brain regions. The main known non modifiable risk factor is age. The neuroepidemiology of PD is complex with susceptibility genes and a number of modifiable risk factors that can increase and others that can mitigate risk and outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Inflammation and Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Barcia González, C; Herrero Ezquerro, M T

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with aging characterized by a motor extrapiramidal alteration secondary to the progressive death of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. The cause of this neuronal loss remains unknown but post mortem studies on brains of parkinsonian patients showed high index of inflammatory mechanism markers. This point has gone to open new lines of research in order to ascertain what role have these inflammatory process in neuronal degeneration and has opened new therapeutic possibilities to stop or at least to brake the neurodegenerative process.

  13. Parkinson's Disease and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Tang, Bei-Sha; Guo, Ji-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by the hallmarks of motor symptoms, such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability. However, through clinical investigations in patients and experimental findings in animal models of Parkinson's disease for years, it is now well recognized that Parkinson's disease is more than just a motor-deficit disorder. The majority of Parkinson's disease patients suffer from nonmotor disabilities, for instance, cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, sensory dysfunction, and sleep disorder. So far, anti-PD prescriptions and surgical treatments have been mainly focusing on motor dysfunctions, leaving cognitive impairment a marginal clinical field. Within the nonmotor symptoms, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and significant aspects of Parkinson's disease, and cognitive deficits such as dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial disturbances could seriously affect the quality of life, reduce life expectancy, prolong the duration of hospitalization, and therefore increase burdens of caregiver and medical costs. In this review, we have done a retrospective study of the recent related researches on epidemiology, clinical manifestation and diagnosis, genetics, and potential treatment of cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease, aiming to provide a summary of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and make it easy for clinicians to tackle this challenging issue in their future practice.

  14. Parkinson's Disease and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bei-sha

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by the hallmarks of motor symptoms, such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability. However, through clinical investigations in patients and experimental findings in animal models of Parkinson's disease for years, it is now well recognized that Parkinson's disease is more than just a motor-deficit disorder. The majority of Parkinson's disease patients suffer from nonmotor disabilities, for instance, cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, sensory dysfunction, and sleep disorder. So far, anti-PD prescriptions and surgical treatments have been mainly focusing on motor dysfunctions, leaving cognitive impairment a marginal clinical field. Within the nonmotor symptoms, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and significant aspects of Parkinson's disease, and cognitive deficits such as dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial disturbances could seriously affect the quality of life, reduce life expectancy, prolong the duration of hospitalization, and therefore increase burdens of caregiver and medical costs. In this review, we have done a retrospective study of the recent related researches on epidemiology, clinical manifestation and diagnosis, genetics, and potential treatment of cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease, aiming to provide a summary of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and make it easy for clinicians to tackle this challenging issue in their future practice. PMID:28058128

  15. Presymptomatic detection of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jenner, P

    1993-01-01

    Presymptomatic detection of Parkinson's disease is necessary if neuroprotective therapies are to be utilized in its treatment. Various methods (PET, electrophysiology, enzyme assays, olfactory function) may be applicable but none has been rigorously evaluated. Other possible approaches are now considered. Plasma HVA levels (pHVA) in the presence of debrisoquine may reflect cerebral dopamine function. However, there are no detectable differences in pHVA between newly diagnosed and untreated parkinsonian patients and control subjects. Compensatory increases in dopamine turnover may mask a decrease in pHVA in the early stages of the disease. So, at present this technique could not be used as a diagnostic tool. Post-mortem studies of brain in Parkinson's disease may provide clues to biochemical markers indicative of nigral pathology. Mitochondrial complex I activity is reduced in substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease and it was reported also to be markedly reduced in blood platelets. However, subsequent studies suggest that the difference in platelet complex I activity is too small to be diagnostic of Parkinson's disease. There are also selective reductions in brain glutathione levels in Parkinson's disease restricted to substantia nigra, which do not occur in other neurodegenerative disorders and are not due to drug treatment. Importantly, in incidental Lewy body disease (preclinical Parkinson's disease) nigral glutathione levels are reduced to the same degree as in advanced Parkinson's disease. So, some peripheral index of altered glutathione function may be valuable in the early detection of the disease process.

  16. Cellular models for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Falkenburger, Björn H; Saridaki, Theodora; Dinter, Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    Developing new therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease requires cellular models. Current models reproduce the two most salient changes found in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease: The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the existence of protein aggregates consisting mainly of α-synuclein. Cultured cells offer many advantages over studying Parkinson's disease directly in patients or in animal models. At the same time, the choice of a specific cellular model entails the requirement to focus on one aspect of the disease while ignoring others. This article is intended for researchers planning to use cellular models for their studies. It describes for commonly used cell types the aspects of Parkinson's disease they model along with technical advantages and disadvantages. It might also be helpful for researchers from other fields consulting literature on cellular models of Parkinson's disease. Important models for the study of dopaminergic neuron degeneration include Lund human mesencephalic cells and primary neurons, and a case is made for the use of non-dopaminergic cells to model pathogenesis of non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. With regard to α-synuclein aggregates, this article describes strategies to induce and measure aggregates with a focus on fluorescent techniques. Cellular models reproduce the two most salient changes of Parkinson's disease, the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the existence of α-synuclein aggregates. This article is intended for researchers planning to use cellular models for their studies. It describes for commonly used cell types and treatments the aspects of Parkinson's disease they model along with technical advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this article describes strategies to induce and measure aggregates with a focus on fluorescent techniques. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease.

  17. Reaction time in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Evarts, E V; Teräväinen, H; Calne, D B

    1981-03-01

    Both reaction time and movement time tend to be prolonged in Parkinson's disease, but they are often impaired independently of each other. Prolongation of RT is relatively slight, while MT undergoes more substantial and consistent disturbance. Choice RT and kinaesthetic RT do not have any advantage over simple visual RT as measurements of neurological deficit in parkinsonism, since they are all impaired to the same extent. MT is more useful than RT as an objective indicator of therapeutic efficacy, but further studies of RT (with tests requiring programming of displacement, velocity, and accuracy) may provide insights into the nature of the central motor disorder in Parkinson's disease.

  18. Parkinson's disease tremor: pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Mark

    2012-01-01

    There are a number of tremors that may affect patients with Parkinson's disease, but the classic is tremor-at-rest. The tremor is also seen during postural action after a short pause, and is often called re-emergent tremor although it appears that the physiology is the same. As a manifestation of Parkinson's disease, it is separate from bradykinesia and rigidity as the magnitude of tremor is not related to dopamine deficiency nor does it respond readily to dopamine treatment. Cellular activity in the different basal ganglia nuclei can be coherent with tremor, but cellular activity in the VIM nucleus of the thalamus, a cerebellar relay nucleus, is more coherent than cellular activity in basal ganglia. It is also notable that different body parts may have similar tremor frequencies, but are generally not exactly the same and are not phase locked. This suggests that each body part has a separate tremor generator. The ability to stay separate may be due to the somatotopic segregation of basal ganglia loops. Analysis of cellular behavior in the thalamus shows that the thalamus is not the generator of tremor. New data suggest that the basal ganglia trigger a cerebellar circuit to produce the tremor.

  19. Budipine in Parkinson's tremor.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Heinz

    2006-10-25

    It is generally accepted that patients with a tremor-dominant type of idiopathic Parkinson's disease progress more slowly than the ones with the rigid-akinetic type. On the other hand successful treatment of Parkinsonian tremor is a challenge. German neurologists use anticholinergics, budipine, beta-blockers, clozapine, dopaminergic substances and for most severe cases deep brain stimulation. Budipine is an enigma because its main mode of action is still unknown, although it is mostly listed under glutamate antagonists. There is however no other anti-Parkinsonian drug available with such a broad spectrum of action as shown for budipine. Budipine has been studied in open and double-blind studies as monotherapy and adjunct therapy. In both instances the drug showed beneficial effects to the patients. It may well be that the non-dopaminergic mode of action of budipine is helpful even for patients who are on stable medication. When 3 years ago reports on budipine-induced prolongation of the QT interval in the ECG emerged larger trials were stopped and nowadays there are strict rules on how to use budipine. Nonetheless, budipine in our hands is a most useful and safe drug to treat tremor and other main symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

  20. Argentine tango in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    2016-10-28

    This article reports on a meta-analysis of 13 studies of the effects of Argentine tango (AT) as a music-based movement therapy for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Nine studies involved randomised controlled trials.

  1. [Neuropsychological characteristics of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Ostrosky-Solis, F

    Form part of the clinical symptoms of Parkinson's disease. These disorders may present in varying degrees: whilst in some patients a clinical picture of dementia is seen, in others there are only specific symptoms. In this article we consider three of the most controversial aspects currently dominating study of the neuropsychology of Parkinson's disease. The first relates to the pathophysiological basis and neurotransmitters involved. The second deals with the distinction between subcortical-type and Alzheimer-type dementia, and the third with the pathophysiological basis underlying the cognitive profile of the subgroups of patients with Parkinson's disease who do not present dementia. The relation between the factors causing the disease, neuropathology, individual variables and the presence of these subgroups requires precise systematic investigation of the neuropsychology shown by patients with Parkinson's disease.

  2. Postural tremor of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J M; Yiannikas, C; Morris, J G; Einstein, R; Jackson, D; Byth, K

    1994-06-01

    Previous studies have reported the resting tremor (RT) of Parkinson's disease to occur at frequencies between 3-7 Hz and to be characterised by an alternating pattern of electromyographic (EMG) bursting activity between opposing muscles. A postural tremor (PT), of higher frequency (> 6 Hz) and with a synchronous pattern of EMG activity, has also been previously described in Parkinson's disease. We investigated the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of both the RT and PT of 11 patients with Parkinson's disease and 10 patients with essential tremor in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of L-Dopa/benserazide and propranolol. Tremor amplitude and frequency were assessed via bidirectional accelerometry, and the pattern of activation of the antagonist muscles of the forearm was determined with use of surface EMG. In the Parkinson's disease group studied, the frequency, EMG pattern of bursts, and response to L-Dopa were similar for the two tremors (median improvement of RT by 70% and PT by 61%). Despite some overlap between the Parkinson's disease and essential tremor groups in the electrophysiology of the tremor, there was no such dramatic pharmacological response in the latter group. These results suggest that the RT and PT of Parkinson's disease share a common pathophysiology and are distinct from essential tremor.

  3. Axial rotation in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaugoyeau, M; Viallet, F; Aurenty, R; Assaiante, C; Mesure, S; Massion, J

    2006-01-01

    Aims To investigate the ability of patients with Parkinson's disease to perform a rotation around the longitudinal axis of the body. Three questions were raised. Is body rotation impaired in Parkinson's disease? Is there a level of the kinematic chain from the head to the foot at which the impairment is more severe? Is the deficit related to the general slowness of movement in Parkinson's disease? Methods Kinematic data were recorded. The temporal organisation of body rotation during gait initiation was analysed in 10 patients with Parkinson's disease, who were all at an advanced stage of the disease and had all experienced falls and freezing during their daily life, and in five controls. The latency of the onset of the rotation of each segment was measured by taking the onset of the postural phase of step initiation as reference value. Locomotor variables were also analysed. Results Body rotation was found to be impaired in patients with Parkinson's disease, as the delay in the onset of the rotation of each segment is greater than that in controls. Moreover, a specific uncoupling in the onset of shoulder and pelvis segment rotation was seen in patients. This impairment of rotation is not related only to the general slowness of movements. Conclusion Patients with Parkinson's disease were found to have an impairment of posturo‐kinetic coordination and impaired capacity to exert appropriate ground reaction forces to orient the pelvis in space. PMID:16574736

  4. [Pharmacoeconomic study of the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Vivancos-Matellano, F; Garcia-Ruiz, A J; Garcia-Agua Soler, N

    2016-12-16

    Introduccion. Cuando el tratamiento farmacologico oral o transdermico de la enfermedad de Parkinson pierde eficacia, se dispone de tres terapias mediante dispositivos asistidos que pueden reducir las complicaciones motoras y no motoras: la apomorfina en infusion subcutanea (ASBI), la bomba de infusion duodenal continua de levodopa/carbidopa (IDL) y la estimulacion cerebral profunda (ECP). Objetivo. Efectuar un analisis farmacoeconomico comparativo del uso de ASBI con IDL y ECP; como objetivo secundario, discutir el perfil del candidato ideal para cada una de las tecnicas. Pacientes y metodos. Se extrajo informacion sobre datos de años de vida ganados y años de vida ganados ajustados por calidad (AVAC) segun la escala de Hoehn y Yahr, e informacion sobre costes y consumo de recursos para cada alternativa. La perspectiva del analisis fue la del Sistema Nacional de Salud, y el horizonte temporal fue de cinco años para los costes y toda la vida del paciente para las utilidades. Las medidas de resultado utilizadas fueron los años de vida ganados y AVAC, y en su comparacion se uso la ratio coste-utilidad incremental. Resultados. El coste-utilidad obtenido para cada opcion fue: 31.956 euros/AVAC para la ECP, 38.249 euros/AVAC para la ASBI y 75.206 euros/AVAC para la IDL. Conclusiones. Los resultados permiten evaluar la efectividad y utilidad de los diferentes tratamientos para la enfermedad de Parkinson avanzada, pues se presentan en ganancias de años vividos en plena salud. Los datos obtenidos contribuyen a la toma de decisiones que determinen la planificacion y gestion de cada caso, sin olvidar las preferencias del paciente y del neurologo, asi como las limitaciones presupuestarias.

  5. [Neurorehabilitation in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Möller, Jens Carsten; Menig, Alexandra; Oechsner, Matthias

    2016-03-30

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease which is characterized by the cardinal symptoms akinesia, rigidity, rest tremor and postural instability. Besides PD features also a wide range of non-motor symptoms. Physical activity is recommended for all stages of PD and may hypothetically even have a positive influence on the course of the disease. Rehabilitative treatments become increasingly important in the advanced stage of the disease and include mainly physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy. Neurorehabilitation is arguably most important for the treatment of axial symptoms such as freezing, hypophonia, dysphagia, postural instability and postural disturbances that respond poorly to drug therapy. This article provides an overview of current developments in the field of neurorehabilitation in PD.

  6. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Morgan, John C; Mehta, Shyamal H; Sethi, Kapil D

    2010-11-01

    Biomarkers are objectively measured characteristics that are indicators of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or responses to therapeutic interventions. To date, clinical assessment remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and clinical rating scales are well established as the gold standard for tracking progression of PD. Researchers have identified numerous potential biomarkers that may aid in the differential diagnosis of PD and/or tracking disease progression. Clinical, genetic, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics), and neuroimaging biomarkers may provide useful tools in the diagnosis of PD and in measuring disease progression and response to therapies. Some potential biomarkers are inexpensive and do not require much technical expertise, whereas others are expensive or require specialized equipment and technical skills. Many potential biomarkers in PD show great promise; however, they need to be assessed for their sensitivity and specificity over time in large and varied samples of patients with and without PD.

  7. Symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    2011-10-26

    Most people with Parkinson's disease (PD) have some non-motor symptoms such as sleep disturbance. Some will have impulse control disorders manifested as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, binge eating or compulsive shopping. Others show lack of initiative, indifference and lack of emotional response. This apathy, which is distinct from depression, has been reported to be present in 70 per cent of people with PD. This study examined 99 non-demented people with PD and found that quality of life was reduced in those with either of these impulse control disorders. The behavioural changes put a strain on relationships, and apathy resulted in a withdrawal from relationships and hobbies. The authors emphasise the need to diagnose and manage complications in a timely manner.

  8. Misperceptions and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Joseph H

    2017-03-15

    Most of the neurobehavioral aspects of Parkinson's disease have been well established and studied, but many are not well known, and hardly studied. This article focuses on several behavioral abnormalities that are common, and frequently cause difficulty for the patient and family due to lack of recognition as part of the disease. While it is well known that L-Dopa dyskinesias are frequently not recognized or under appreciated by patients, a similar lack of recognition may affect the patient's own speech volume, where their center of gravity is located, whether they are tilted to one side, and their under-recognition of others' emotional displays. In addition, PD patients are often misperceived by others incorrect impression of their emotional and cognitive state based purely on facial expression. These changes and others are briefly reviewed.

  9. Parkinson Disease Psychosis: Update

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms are common in drug treated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Visual hallucinations occur in about 30% and delusions, typically paranoid in nature, occur in about 5%. These problems, particularly the delusions, cause great distress for patient and caregivers, and are among the most important precipitants for nursing home placement. Psychotic symptoms carry a poor prognosis. They often herald dementia, and are associated with increased mortality. These symptoms often abate with medication reductions, but this may not be tolerated due to worsened motor function. Only clozapine has level A evidence to support its use in PD patients with psychosis (PDP), whether demented or not. While quetiapine has been recommended by the American Academy of Neurology for “consideration,” double blind placebo controlled trials have demonstrated safety but not efficacy. Other antipsychotic drugs have been reported to worsen motor function and data on the effectiveness of cholinesterase inhibitors is limited. PDP remains a serious problem with limited treatment options. PMID:23242358

  10. Neurorehabilitation in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Archibald, Neil; Miller, Nick; Rochester, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second commonest neurodegenerative disorder in the UK with an increasing prevalence in our aging population. The clinical features of PD are varied with a variety of "motor" and "nonmotor" symptoms and the condition is best thought of as a multisystem neurodegenerative disorder rather than as a "pure" movement disorder. Although the mainstay of treatment is pharmacological, nonpharmacological interventions are vital as part of a multidisciplinary approach to the disorder. Neurorehabilitative interventions have been used for some time in the treatment of PD but, until recently, there has been little evidence to support the clinical impression that physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech and language therapy have a positive impact on both motor and nonmotor symptoms. This chapter will review the current evidence base for neurorehabilitation in PD and discuss the challenges of service provision within healthcare systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Noradrenaline and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Delaville, Claire; Deurwaerdère, Philippe De; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and motor symptoms including bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor at rest. These symptoms are exhibited when striatal dopamine concentration has decreased by around 70%. In addition to motor deficits, PD is also characterized by the non-motor symptoms. However, depletion of DA alone in animal models has failed to simultaneously elicit both the motor and non-motor deficits of PD, possibly because the disease is a multi-system disorder that features a profound loss in other neurotransmitter systems. There is growing evidence that additional loss of noradrenaline (NA) neurons of the locus coeruleus, the principal source of NA in the brain, could be involved in the clinical expression of motor as well as in non-motor deficits. In the present review, we analyze the latest evidence for the implication of NA in the pathophysiology of PD obtained from animal models of parkinsonism and from parkinsonian patients. Recent studies have shown that NA depletion alone, or combined with DA depletion, results in motor as well as in non-motor dysfunctions. In addition, by using selective agonists and antagonists of noradrenaline alpha receptors we, and others, have shown that α2 receptors are implicated in the control of motor activity and that α2 receptor antagonists can improve PD motor symptoms as well as l-Dopa-induced dyskinesia. In this review we argue that the loss of NA neurons in PD has an impact on all PD symptoms and that the addition of NAergic agents to dopaminergic medication could be beneficial in the treatment of the disease. PMID:21647359

  12. Homotaurine in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Lucia; De Nigris, Francesca; Specchia, Alessandro; Fasano, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Homotaurine is a natural compound of red algae, which has been demonstrated to have a neuroprotective effect and has been evaluated as a possible therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease. This was a single blind, randomized, controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of homotaurine in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and cognitive impairment. Patients were evaluated at baseline and 6 months later. Assessments included, the evaluation of: motor and non-motor conditions and complications (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, UPDRS); disability and quality of life; depression; excessive daytime sleepiness and fatigue. An extensive neuropsychological tests battery was administered evaluating specific cognitive domains: memory, phonemic verbal fluency, executive functions and selective visual attention. After baseline testing, patients were allocated to one of the two groups: (A) treatment group: patients treated with homotaurine 100 mg; (B) control group: patients not treated with homotaurine. Forty-seven patients were evaluated at baseline, 24 (51 %) completed the study (PD-homotaurine: n = 11; 44 % and PD-controls: n = 13; 59 %); discontinuation rate was similar across subjects (p = 1.0). Intention to treat analyses to evaluate homotaurine safety showed mild side effects (gastrointestinal upsetting) in 3 patients. Per protocol analyses of homotaurine efficacy showed no difference between groups. Within group analyses showed that PD-homotaurine patients had better score at UPDRS-I at the end of the study compared to baseline (p = 0.017) and at Epworth Sleepiness Scale (p = 0.01). No other differences were found. No significant difference arose for the PD-ctrl group. Homotaurine is a safe drug. Our data suggest a beneficial effect of homotaurine on excessive sleepiness. Future studies are encouraged to confirm this promising role of homotaurine in promoting the sleep/awake cycle in patients with PD.

  13. Michael J. Fox: Spurring Research on Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Michael J. Fox: Spurring Research on Parkinson's Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents Michael J. Fox and his wife, actress Tracy Pollan, founded ...

  14. Gambling, Sex, and…Parkinson's Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... spent, browse our financial information. Learn More Gambling, Sex, and…Parkinson's Disease? By Laura Marsh, M.D. ... and, in people with Parkinson's, most typically involve sex, gambling and abuse of anti-parkinsonian medications. Pathological ...

  15. Could Parkinson's Disease Raise Stroke Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163751.html Could Parkinson's Disease Raise Stroke Risk? Or is the link the other way ... link between Parkinson's disease and the risk for stroke. However, the study can't prove that one ...

  16. New Parkinson's Drug May Combat Movement Difficulties

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162855.html New Parkinson's Drug May Combat Movement Difficulties Opicapone, added to ... HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that people with Parkinson's disease may achieve better and more reliable motor ...

  17. Oxidative Damage in Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    of Parkinson’s Disease and the MPTP model of Parkinsonism. In the past year, we have developed a novel column switching assay for measurement of...oxidative damage to DNA in human body fluids. We have applied to this plasma samples of Parkinson’s Disease patients. We have also developed a novel...methodology. We have found a relatively high mutation rate and control samples and intend to apply this to Parkinson’s Disease . We have continued our

  18. International Conference on Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Partial Contents: Description of Parkinson’s Disease as a Clinical Syndrome. Physiology and Pathophysiology of Parkinson’s Disease . PET Studies on...the Function of Dopamine in Health and Parkinson’s Disease . Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons: Determination of Their Developmental Fate by Transcription...Developmental Programmed Cell Death in Dopamine Neurons The Cast of Molecular Characters Parkinson’s Disease : Felons,Conspirators, and Suspects. Oxidative

  19. [Quantitative gait analysis in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Villadoniga, M; San Millan, A; Cabanes-Martinez, L; Aviles-Olmos, I; Del Alamo-De Pedro, M; Regidor, I

    2016-08-01

    Objetivo. Describir las alteraciones de la marcha e inestabilidad postural en un grupo de pacientes con enfermedad de Parkinson (EP) avanzada. Pacientes y metodos. Se analizo la marcha de pacientes con EP en estadio avanzado on medicacion. Por medio de un sistema de analisis computarizado del movimiento, se estudiaron las variables cinematicas: cadencia, numero de ciclos con apoyo correcto (ciclos HFPS), numero de ciclos totales, duracion de las fases del ciclo, electromiografia, y goniometria de rodilla y tobillo. La valoracion clinica del equilibrio y la inestabilidad postural se completo con los tests Tinetti y Timed Up and Go. Resultados. El analisis mostro alteraciones en los parametros espaciotemporales con respecto a los rangos de normalidad: disminucion de los ciclos HFPS, aumento del numero total de ciclos y alteracion de la cadencia en muchos pacientes, y conservacion de la cadencia media dentro de los limites de la normalidad, aumento de la duracion de la fase de apoyo, disminucion del apoyo monopodal y alteracion del rango articular de la rodilla y el tobillo. Asimismo, se observo una alteracion en las puntuaciones obtenidas en las escalas clinicas, que mostraban un aumento del factor de riesgo de caidas y dependencia leve. Conclusion. La cuantificacion mediante analisis objetivo de las variables cineticas y cinematicas en los pacientes con EP puede emplearse como herramienta para establecer la influencia de las distintas alternativas terapeuticas en el trastorno de la marcha.

  20. Stimulus Timing by People with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearden, J. H.; Smith-Spark, J. H.; Cousins, Rosanna; Edelstyn, N. M. J.; Cody, F. W. J.; O'Boyle, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that Parkinson's disease is marked by deficits in timed behaviour. However, the majority of studies of central timing mechanisms in patients with Parkinson's disease have used timing tasks with a motor component. Since the motor abnormalities are a defining feature of the condition, the status of timing in Parkinson's…

  1. Neuregulins, Neuroprotection and Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    Although the basic underlying mechanisms of Parkinson’s disease remain unknown, considerable efforts have centered on developing effective strategies...dopamine in the nigrostriatal system have the potential for overcoming the lack of dopamine neuronal function in Parkinson’s disease patients. Results...application of neuregulins to the treatment of neurotoxin-induced neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease .

  2. Stimulus Timing by People with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearden, J. H.; Smith-Spark, J. H.; Cousins, Rosanna; Edelstyn, N. M. J.; Cody, F. W. J.; O'Boyle, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that Parkinson's disease is marked by deficits in timed behaviour. However, the majority of studies of central timing mechanisms in patients with Parkinson's disease have used timing tasks with a motor component. Since the motor abnormalities are a defining feature of the condition, the status of timing in Parkinson's…

  3. Olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, C H; Shephard, B C; Daniel, S E

    1997-05-01

    To evaluate olfactory function in Parkinson's disease. A standardised odour identification test was used, together with an evoked potential assessment with hydrogen sulphide. In addition, histological analysis was performed on the olfactory bulbs of cadavers who died from Parkinson's disease. Over 70% of patients studied (71 of 96) were outside the 95% limit of normal on the identification test in an age matched sample and there was an unusual pattern of selective loss to certain odours, not hitherto described. The evoked potentials were significantly delayed but of comparable amplitude to a control matched population. Of the 73 patients studied only 37 had a technically satisfactory record containing a clear response to both gases and of these, 12 were delayed. For H2S there was more delay on stimulating the right nostril than the left. Some patients with normal smell identification test scores had delayed evoked potentials. In the pathological examination of olfactory bulbs from eight brains, changes characteristic of Parkinson's disease (Lewy bodies) were seen in every olfactory bulb, particularly in the anterior olfactory nucleus, and were sufficiently distinct to allow a presumptive diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Olfactory damage in Parkinson's disease is consistent and severe and may provide an important clue to the aetiology of the disease.

  4. Olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, C H; Shephard, B C; Daniel, S E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate olfactory function in Parkinson's disease. METHODS: A standardised odour identification test was used, together with an evoked potential assessment with hydrogen sulphide. In addition, histological analysis was performed on the olfactory bulbs of cadavers who died from Parkinson's disease. RESULTS: Over 70% of patients studied (71 of 96) were outside the 95% limit of normal on the identification test in an age matched sample and there was an unusual pattern of selective loss to certain odours, not hitherto described. The evoked potentials were significantly delayed but of comparable amplitude to a control matched population. Of the 73 patients studied only 37 had a technically satisfactory record containing a clear response to both gases and of these, 12 were delayed. For H2S there was more delay on stimulating the right nostril than the left. Some patients with normal smell identification test scores had delayed evoked potentials. In the pathological examination of olfactory bulbs from eight brains, changes characteristic of Parkinson's disease (Lewy bodies) were seen in every olfactory bulb, particularly in the anterior olfactory nucleus, and were sufficiently distinct to allow a presumptive diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. CONCLUSIONS: Olfactory damage in Parkinson's disease is consistent and severe and may provide an important clue to the aetiology of the disease. Images PMID:9153598

  5. Mitochondrial pathology in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Anthony H V

    2011-01-01

    The last 25 years have witnessed remarkable advances in our understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The ability to undertake detailed biochemical analyses of the Parkinson's disease postmortem brain enabled the identification of defects of mitochondrial and free-radical metabolism. The discovery of the first gene mutation for Parkinson's disease, in alpha-synuclein, ushered in the genetic era for the disease and the subsequent finding of several gene mutations causing parkinsonism, 15 at the time of writing. Technological advances both in sequencing technology and software analysis have allowed association studies of sufficiently large size accurately to describe genes conferring an increased risk for Parkinson's disease. What has been so surprising is the convergence of these 2 separate disciplines (biochemistry and genetics) in terms of reinforcing the importance of the same pathways (ie, mitochondrial dysfunction and free-radical metabolism). Other pathways are also important in pathogenesis, including protein turnover, inflammation, and post-translational modification, particularly protein phosphorylation and ubiquitination. However, even these additional pathways overlap with each other and with those of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. This review explores these concepts with particular relevance to mitochondrial involvement. © 2011 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  6. Free-water imaging in Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Planetta, Peggy J; Ofori, Edward; Pasternak, Ofer; Burciu, Roxana G; Shukla, Priyank; DeSimone, Jesse C; Okun, Michael S; McFarland, Nikolaus R; Vaillancourt, David E

    2016-02-01

    Conventional single tensor diffusion analysis models have provided mixed findings in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease, but recent work using a bi-tensor analysis model has shown more promising results. Using a bi-tensor model, free-water values were found to be increased in the posterior substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease compared with controls at a single site and in a multi-site cohort. Further, free-water increased longitudinally over 1 year in the posterior substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease. Here, we test the hypothesis that other parkinsonian disorders such as multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy have elevated free-water in the substantia nigra. Equally important, however, is whether the bi-tensor diffusion model is able to detect alterations in other brain regions beyond the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy and to accurately distinguish between these diseases. Free-water and free-water-corrected fractional anisotropy maps were compared across 72 individuals in the basal ganglia, midbrain, thalamus, dentate nucleus, cerebellar peduncles, cerebellar vermis and lobules V and VI, and corpus callosum. Compared with controls, free-water was increased in the anterior and posterior substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy. Despite no other changes in Parkinson's disease, we observed elevated free-water in all regions except the dentate nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, and corpus callosum of multiple system atrophy, and in all regions examined for progressive supranuclear palsy. Compared with controls, free-water-corrected fractional anisotropy values were increased for multiple system atrophy in the putamen and caudate, and increased for progressive supranuclear palsy in the putamen, caudate, thalamus, and vermis, and decreased in the superior cerebellar peduncle and corpus callosum. For all disease

  7. Hallucinations in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; Fénelon, Gilles; Stebbins, Glenn; Goetz, Christopher G

    2009-06-01

    Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) can experience hallucinations (spontaneous aberrant perceptions) and illusions (misinterpretations of real perceptual stimuli). Of such phenomena, visual hallucinations (VHs) and illusions are the most frequently encountered, although auditory, olfactory and tactile hallucinations can also occur. In cross-sectional studies, VHs occur in approximately one-third of patients, but up to three-quarters of patients might develop VHs during a 20-year period. Hallucinations can have substantial psychosocial effects and, historically, were the main reason for placing patients in nursing homes. Concomitant or overlapping mechanisms are probably active during VHs, and these include the following: central dopaminergic overactivity and an imbalance with cholinergic neurotransmission; dysfunction of the visual pathways, including specific PD-associated retinopathy and functional alterations of the extrastriate visual pathways; alterations of brainstem sleep-wake and dream regulation; and impaired attentional focus. Possible treatments include patient-initiated coping strategies, a reduction of antiparkinson medications, atypical neuroleptics and, potentially, cholinesterase inhibitors. Evidence-based studies, however, only support the use of one atypical neuroleptic, clozapine, and only in patients without dementia. Better phenomenological discrimination, combined with neuroimaging tools, should refine therapeutic options and improve prognosis. The aim of this Review is to present epidemiological, phenomenological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of hallucinations in PD.

  8. Glutamate and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Blandini, F; Porter, R H; Greenamyre, J T

    1996-02-01

    Altered glutamatergic neurotransmission and neuronal metabolic dysfunction appear to be central to the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). The substantia nigra pars compacta--the area where the primary pathological lesion is located--is particularly exposed to oxidative stress and toxic and metabolic insults. A reduced capacity to cope with metabolic demands, possibly related to impaired mitochondrial function, may render nigral highly vulnerable to the effects of glutamate, which acts as a neurotoxin in the presence of impaired cellular energy metabolism. In this way, glutamate may participate in the pathogenesis of PD. Degeneration of dopamine nigral neurons is followed by striatal dopaminergic denervation, which causes a cascade of functional modifications in the activity of basal ganglia nuclei. As an excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate plays a pivotal role in normal basal ganglia circuitry. With nigrostriatal dopaminergic depletion, the glutamatergic projections from subthalamic nucleus to the basal ganglia output nuclei become overactive and there are regulatory changes in glutamate receptors in these regions. There is also evidence of increased glutamatergic activity in the striatum. In animal models, blockade of glutamate receptors ameliorates the motor manifestations of PD. Therefore, it appears that abnormal patterns of glutamatergic neurotransmission are important in the symptoms of PD. The involvement of the glutamatergic system in the pathogenesis and symptomatology of PD provides potential new targets for therapeutic intervention in this neurodegenerative disorder.

  9. Biotherapies for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Remy, P

    2014-12-01

    The clinical use of biotherapies in Parkinson disease already has 30 years' history. The transplantation of dopamine fetal cells in the striatum of advanced patients has proved to be relevant in some patients but randomized efficacy trials in the US have provided disappointing results. However, cell therapies might come back on stage with the use of stem cells in the future. Gene therapy is a more recent strategy relying on viral vectors able to transduce genes coding either for the enzymes that can increase neurotransmitters production or genes for trophic factors. Several approaches have been developed in PD and have been experimented in patients. Although, some of the studies have evidenced insufficient clinical benefit, other programs, such as those using dopamine replacement techniques are promising. We find fresh hope in this field that might be the future of PD treatment. It remains however that advanced PD might not be the ideal condition to properly benefit from biotherapies and there is a need of studies at earlier stages of the disease, a time where major change in the disease course might be expected.

  10. Parkinson disease and exercise.

    PubMed

    Earhart, Gammon M; Falvo, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative movement disorder. PD was originally attributed to neuronal loss within the substantia nigra pars compacta, and a concomitant loss of dopamine. PD is now thought to be a multisystem disorder that involves not only the dopaminergic system, but other neurotransmitter systems whose role may become more prominent as the disease progresses (189). PD is characterized by four cardinal symptoms, resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability, all of which are motor. However, PD also may include any combination of a myriad of nonmotor symptoms (195). Both motor and nonmotor symptoms may impact the ability of those with PD to participate in exercise and/or impact the effects of that exercise on those with PD. This article provides a comprehensive overview of PD, its symptoms and progression, and current treatments for PD. Among these treatments, exercise is currently at the forefront. People with PD retain the ability to participate in many forms of exercise and generally respond to exercise interventions similarly to age-matched subjects without PD. As such, exercise is currently an area receiving substantial research attention as investigators seek interventions that may modify the progression of the disease, perhaps through neuroprotective mechanisms.

  11. Inflammation and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wersinger, Christophe; Sidhu, Anita

    2002-09-01

    Numerous recent findings indicate the possible involvement of an immune mechanism in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. The immune reaction could either act as a primary event, generating changes leading to cell death, or could be a secondary response to neuronal injury. In various neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's or Pick's disease, Down's syndrome, multiple sclerosis and the AIDS-dementia complex, the inflammatory pathomechanism is strongly supported by experimental and clinical studies. Such inflammatory mechanisms have also been postulated in Parkinson's disease (PD). This review summarizes some generalities about inflammation and immune reactions in the context of the brain, and provides clinical, epidemiological and experimental data showing that inflammation and immunity, or even auto-immunity, could be implicated in PD, either in its initial step or in its progression. Different experimental models useful for studying the role(s) of inflammation and (auto)immunity in the neurodegenerative process of the dopaminergic neurons in PD are examined. The major similarities and differences between PD and other neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  12. Parkinsonism in poets and writers.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease is a severe degenerative disease, which is bewildering for its array of clinical features. Writers for the past five centuries have described the associated symptoms. Before the nineteenth century, Miguel de Cervantes wrote Don Quixote de la Mancha and William Shakespeare wrote several tragedies dealing with neurological manifestations that are characteristic of Parkinson disease. From the nineteenth century onward, writers including Charles Dickens, Samuel Beckett, Galway Kinnell, and Harold Pinter among others have showcased in their works classic manifestations of Parkinson disease. This literary attention has led to a greater awareness on the part of the general public regarding this disease and, in turn, has opened the doors to a better understanding of and a better respect for the patients affected by this disease. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  14. Vaccination strategies for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Ramos, Marina; von Euler Chelpin, Marianne; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the world, but there is currently no available cure for it. Current treatments only alleviate some of the symptoms for a few years, but they become ineffective in the long run and do not stop the disease. Therefore it is of outmost importance to develop therapeutic strategies that can prevent, stop, or cure Parkinson disease. A very promising target for these therapies is the peripheral immune system due to its probable involvement in the disease and its potential as a tool to modulate neuroinflammation. But for such strategies to be successful, we need to understand the particular state of the peripheral immune system during Parkinson disease in order to avoid its weaknesses. In this review we examine the available data regarding how dopamine regulates the peripheral immune system and how this regulation is affected in Parkinson disease; the specific cytokine profiles observed during disease progression and the alterations documented to date in patients’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also review the different strategies used in Parkinson disease animal models to modulate the adaptive immune response to salvage dopaminergic neurons from cell death. After analyzing the evidence, we hypothesize the need to prime the immune system to restore natural tolerance against α-synuclein in Parkinson disease, including at the same time B and T cells, so that T cells can reprogram microglia activation to a beneficial pattern and B cell/IgG can help neurons cope with the pathological forms of α-synuclein. PMID:24670306

  15. Development of Parkinson's disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Kumar M; Tan, Eng-King

    2010-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, affecting over 6 million people worldwide. It is anticipated that the number of affected individuals may increase significantly in the most populous nations by 2030. During the past 20 years, much progress has been made in identifying and assessing various potential clinical, biochemical, imaging and genetic biomarkers for PD. Despite the wealth of information, development of a validated biomarker for PD is still ongoing. It is hoped that reliable and well-validated biomarkers will provide critical clues to assist in the diagnosis and management of Parkinson's disease patients in the near future.

  16. Metabolic Imaging in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Meles, Sanne K; Teune, Laura K; de Jong, Bauke M; Dierckx, Rudi A; Leenders, Klaus L

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on recent human (18)F-FDG PET studies in Parkinson disease. First, an overview is given of the current analytic approaches to metabolic brain imaging data. Next, we discuss how (18)F-FDG PET studies have advanced understanding of the relation between distinct brain regions and associated symptoms in Parkinson disease, including cognitive decline. In addition, the value of (18)F-FDG PET studies in differential diagnosis, identifying prodromal patients, and the evaluation of treatment effects are reviewed. Finally, anticipated developments in the field are addressed. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  17. Glutathione metabolism and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Smeyne, Michelle; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2013-09-01

    It has been established that oxidative stress, defined as the condition in which the sum of free radicals in a cell exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell, contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Glutathione is a ubiquitous thiol tripeptide that acts alone or in concert with enzymes within cells to reduce superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals, and peroxynitrites. In this review, we examine the synthesis, metabolism, and functional interactions of glutathione and discuss how these relate to the protection of dopaminergic neurons from oxidative damage and its therapeutic potential in Parkinson disease.

  18. Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Suttrup, Inga; Warnecke, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    More than 80 % of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop dysphagia during the course of their disease. Swallowing impairment reduces quality of life, complicates medication intake and leads to malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. Although the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood, it has been shown that dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the development of dysphagia in PD. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in PD patients is challenging and often delivers unreliable results. A modified water test assessing maximum swallowing volume is recommended to uncover oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD. PD-specific questionnaires may also be useful to identify patients at risk for swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and videofluoroscopic swallowing study are both considered to be the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. In addition, high-resolution manometry may be a helpful tool. These instrumental methods allow a reliable detection of aspiration events. Furthermore, typical patterns of impairment during the oral, pharyngeal and/or esophageal swallowing phase of PD patients can be identified. Therapy of dysphagia in PD consists of pharmacological interventions and swallowing treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs). Fluctuating dysphagia with deterioration during the off-state should be treated by optimizing dopaminergic medication. The methods used during swallowing treatment by SLTs shall be selected according to the individual dysphagia pattern of each PD patient. A promising novel method is an intensive training of expiratory muscle strength. Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinical relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. The goal of this review is giving an overview on current stages of epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of PD-associated dysphagia, which might be helpful for neurologists

  19. Imaging prodromal Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Siderowf, Andrew; Stern, Matthew; Seibyl, John; Eberly, Shirley; Oakes, David; Marek, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relative risk of abnormal dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging for subjects with and without hyposmia and the feasibility of acquiring a large, community-based, 2-tiered biomarker assessment strategy to detect prodromal Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: In this observational study, individuals without a diagnosis of PD, recruited through 16 movement disorder clinics, underwent tier 1 assessments (olfactory testing, questionnaires). Tier 2 assessments (neurologic examination, DAT imaging, and other biomarker assessments) were completed by 303 subjects. The main outcome of the study is to compare age-expected [123I]β-CIT striatal binding ratio in hyposmic and normosmic subjects. Results: Tier 1 assessments were mailed to 9,398 eligible subjects and returned by 4,999; 669 were hyposmic. Three hundred three subjects (203 hyposmic, 100 normosmic) completed baseline evaluations. DAT deficit was present in 11% of hyposmic subjects compared with 1% of normosmic subjects. Multiple logistic regression demonstrates hyposmia (odds ratio [OR] 12.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6, 96.1), male sex (OR 5.5; 95% CI 1.7, 17.2), and constipation (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.6, 11.6) as factors predictive of DAT deficit. Combining multiple factors (hyposmia, male sex, and constipation) increased the percentage of subjects with a DAT deficit to >40%. Conclusion: Subjects with DAT deficit who do not meet criteria for a diagnosis of PD can be identified by olfactory testing. Sequential biomarker assessment may identify those at risk of PD. Selecting hyposmic individuals enriches the population for DAT deficit, and combining hyposmia with other potential risk factors (male sex, constipation) increases the percentage of subjects with a DAT deficit compatible with prodromal PD. PMID:25298306

  20. Camptocormia in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kazuo; Uchida, Yutaka; Notani, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Abnormalities of posture represent one of the main features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Among them, camptocormia has been considered as rare in PD. We investigated frequency and clinical features of camptocormia in PD patients. Methods. 153 PD patients (mean 68.5 ± 10.7 years old, duration 5.9 ± 2.4 years) outpatiently recruited. After neurologic examination, patients were rated on the Unified PD Rating Scale motor scale (UPDRS Part III), minimental state examination (MMSE). Also we evaluated patients with camptocormia by MRI. Of the 153 PD patients, 27 had camptocormia (mean age, 67.9 ± 7.9 years old; disease duration, 6.1 ± 3.9 years). For further evaluation, we recruited age- and sex-matched 27 PD patients without camptocormia (11 men and 16 women; mean age ±  SD, 69.2 ± 10.1 years, duration 6.0 ± 2.7 years) These selected 54 patients completed several self-assessments. Lumbar and thoracic paraspinal muscles were studied by EMG. Results. There were no significant differences in age, duration, severity, and drug dose between patients with and without camptocormia. Analysis of NMSS subitems indicated that PD patients tended to show lower scores for sleep/fatigue, attention/memory, and miscellaneous items. Conclusions. We found significant differences concerning nonmotor signs and symptoms evaluated by FAB, PDQ-8, FSQ, VAS-F, and NMSS between patients with and without camptocormia. Our findings indicate that camptocormia is a relatively common sign in PD and that patients with camptocormia scores on the PDQ-8 compared with PD patients without camptocormia. This suggests that improvements in camptocormia of PD patients may improve their QOL. PMID:20948888

  1. Reckless generosity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Sean S; Evans, Andrew H; Quinn, Niall P; Lawrence, Andrew D; Lees, Andrew J

    2010-01-30

    There is an increasing awareness of impulsive-compulsive phenomena in patients treated for Parkinson's disease (PD). We describe another, potentially related phenomenon putatively associated with the use of dopamine agonists in 3 patients with PD, characterized by excessive and inappropriate philanthropy. (c) 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

  2. Parkinson's disease and oral care.

    PubMed

    Fiske, J; Hyland, K

    2000-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is a relatively common, progressive, neurological disorder. Its key features of resting tremor, bradykinesia, akinesia, restricted mobility and postural instability militate against independence for daily living, mobility, good nutrition and oral health. The successful management of the disease requires a multi-disciplinary approach in which the dietician, speech therapist, nurse and dental staff are pivotal members of the care team.

  3. Oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nikam, Shashikant; Nikam, Padmaja; Ahaley, S K; Sontakke, Ajit V

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the cascade, leading to dopamine cell degeneration in Parkinson's disease. However, oxidative stress is intimately linked to other components of the degenerative process, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, nitric oxide toxicity and inflammation. It is therefore difficult to determine whether oxidative stress leads to or is a consequence of, these events. Oxidative stress was assessed by estimating lipid peroxidation product in the form of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, nitric oxide in the form of nitrite & nitrate. Enzymatic antioxidants in the form of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin and non enzymatic antioxidant vitamins e.g. vitamin E and C in either serum or plasma or erythrocyte in 40 patients of Parkinson's disease in the age group 40-80 years. Trace elements e.g. copper, zinc and selenium were also estimated. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide levels were Significantly high but superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin, vitamin-E, vitamin-C, copper, zinc and selenium levels were significantly low in Parkinson's disease when compared with control subjects. Present study showed that elevated oxidative stress may be playing a role in dopaminergic neuronal loss in substentia nigra pars compacta and involved in pathogenesis of the Parkinson's disease.

  4. Primitive reflexes in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vreeling, F W; Verhey, F R; Houx, P J; Jolles, J

    1993-01-01

    A standardised protocol for the examination of 15 primitive reflexes in which the amplitude and the persistence were scored separately, was applied to 25 patients with Parkinson's disease and an equal number of healthy matched control subjects. Most reflexes were found considerably more often in the patients than in the control subjects, especially the snout, the glabellar tap, and its variant, the nasopalpebral reflex. Only the mouth open finger spread reflex was present more often in the control subjects. For all reflexes except this last, the scores for amplitude and persistence of the reflexes for the control group never exceeded the scores for the patient group. Reflexes persisted more often in the patients than in the control subjects. Parkinsonism alone can explain a large number of primitive reflexes, irrespective of the severity or duration of the disease. In contrast, the number of reflexes was related more closely to cognitive scales. It is concluded that such reflexes may be helpful in diagnosing Parkinson's disease. In addition, a standardised protocol for eliciting and scoring is essential for the study of these reflexes in parkinsonism and other neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:8270937

  5. Visual dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weil, Rimona S; Schrag, Anette E; Warren, Jason D; Crutch, Sebastian J; Lees, Andrew J; Morris, Huw R

    2016-07-13

    Patients with Parkinson's disease have a number of specific visual disturbances. These include changes in colour vision and contrast sensitivity and difficulties with complex visual tasks such as mental rotation and emotion recognition. We review changes in visual function at each stage of visual processing from retinal deficits, including contrast sensitivity and colour vision deficits to higher cortical processing impairments such as object and motion processing and neglect. We consider changes in visual function in patients with common Parkinson's disease-associated genetic mutations including GBA and LRRK2 We discuss the association between visual deficits and clinical features of Parkinson's disease such as rapid eye movement sleep behavioural disorder and the postural instability and gait disorder phenotype. We review the link between abnormal visual function and visual hallucinations, considering current models for mechanisms of visual hallucinations. Finally, we discuss the role of visuo-perceptual testing as a biomarker of disease and predictor of dementia in Parkinson's disease. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  6. Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients and Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Page Parkinson's Disease: Hope Through Research NINDS Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Strategic Plans NINDS ... Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia ...

  7. Parkinson's disease: Autoimmunity and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    De Virgilio, Armando; Greco, Antonio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; Gallo, Andrea; Conte, Michela; Rosato, Chiara; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that causes the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The resulting dopamine deficiency in the basal ganglia leads to a movement disorder that is characterized by classical parkinsonian motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease is recognized as the most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. PD ethiopathogenesis remains to be elucidated and has been connected to genetic, environmental and immunologic conditions. The past decade has provided evidence for a significant role of the immune system in PD pathogenesis, either through inflammation or an autoimmune response. Several autoantibodies directed at antigens associated with PD pathogenesis have been identified in PD patients. This immune activation may be the cause of, rather than a response to, the observed neuronal loss. Parkinsonian motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscular rigidity and resting tremor. The non-motor features include olfactory dysfunction, cognitive impairment, psychiatric symptoms and autonomic dysfunction. Microscopically, the specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies, which are brain deposits containing a substantial amount of α-synuclein, have been recognized. The progression of Parkinson's disease is characterized by a worsening of motor features; however, as the disease progresses, there is an emergence of complications related to long-term symptomatic treatment. The available therapies for Parkinson's disease only treat the symptoms of the disease. A major goal of Parkinson's disease research is the development of disease-modifying drugs that slow or stop the neurodegenerative process. Drugs that enhance the intracerebral dopamine concentrations or stimulate dopamine receptors remain the mainstay treatment for motor symptoms. Immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies aiming to attenuate PD neurodegeneration have become an attractive option and

  8. [The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP)].

    PubMed

    Oertel, Wolfgang H; Deuschl, Guenther; Eggert, Karla

    2016-04-01

    The Competence Network Parkinson (CNP) is a research infrastructure for disease-oriented translational and clinical research in the field of Parkinson syndromes (PS). It was initiated in 1999 and funded until 2008 by the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF). The CNP created a highly frequented website with information on PS for the general public and for experts. The CNP designed and established one of the first electronic internet-based data entry systems (secuTrial®) - fulfilling the legal standards of data safety and security - a material bank for genetic research on Parkinson's disease (PD), implemented and investigated new methods for early diagnosis of PD and related atypical PS including in vivo dopamine transporter imaging (DAT SPECT), established the German Parkinson Study Group (GPS-Pharma) with 40 certified trial centres for pharmacotherapeutical trials and the German interdisciplinary Parkinson Study Group (neurology and neurosurgery) for deep brain stimulation (GPS-DBS), and carried out several pharmacoeconomic and health care studies on PD in Germany. Sustainability of the infrastructure CNP has in part been achieved in form of the GPS-Pharma and the GPS-DBS, as well as in the German Study Group on REM Sleep Behaviour Disorder (RBD), a prodromal phase of PD. Part of the CNP activities, such as genetic research and research on cohorts of PD patients, have been incorporated into the German Center for Neurodegenerative Disorders (DZNE). Furthermore, topics such as health care research are funded within projects of the EU research program. The article describes problems in setting up a competence network from scratch and contains recommendations how to avoid them in the future.

  9. Sleep disturbances in Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, J J M

    2003-02-01

    The present article is meant to suggest an approach to the guidelines for the therapy of sleep disturbances in Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients.The factors affecting the quality of life in PD patients are depression, sleep disturbances and dependence. A large review of the literature on sleep disturbances in PD patients, provided the basis for the following classification of the sleep-arousal disturbances in PD patients. We suggest a model based on 3 steps in the treatment of sleep disturbances in PD patients. This model allowing the patient, the spouse or the caregiver a quiet sleep at night, may postpone the retirement and the institutionalization of the PD patient. I. Correct diagnosis of sleep disorders based on detailed anamnesis of the patient and of the spouse or of the caregiver. One week recording on a symptom diary (log) by the patient or the caregiver. Correct diagnosis of sleep disorders co morbidities. Selection of the most appropriate sleep test among: polysomnography (PSG), multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), multiple wake latency test (MWLT), Epworth Sleepiness Scale, actigraphy or video-PSG. II. The nonspecific therapeutic approach consists in: a) Checking the sleep effect on motor performance, is it beneficial, worse or neutral. b) Psycho-physical assistance. c) Dopaminergic adjustment is necessary owing to the progression of the nigrostriatal degeneration and the increased sensitivity of the terminals, which alter the normal modulator mechanisms of the motor centers in PD patients. Among the many neurotransmitters of the nigro-striatal pathway one can distinguish two with a major influence on REM and NonREM sleep. REM sleep corresponds to an increased cholinergic receptor activity and a decreased dopaminergic activity. This is the reason why REM sleep deprivation by suppressing cholinergic receptor activity ameliorates PD motor symptoms. L-Dopa and its agonists by suppressing cholinergic receptors suppress REM sleep. The permanent adjustment

  10. Adolf Hitler had post-encephalitic Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, A

    1996-04-01

    Adolf Hitler had Parkinson symptoms in 1934, at age 45 years. He may have had transient symptoms in 1923, at age 34 years. Young-onset parkinsonism, during the 1920s, favored a diagnosis of post-encephalitic rather than idiopathic parkinsonism. Hitler had oculogyric crises, phenomena only associated with post-encephalitic parkinsonism. In addition, he had dystonic facial spasms, palilalia and a sleep disorder, phenomena more likely to be associated with post-encephalitic than idiopathic parkinsonism. In November 1918, at age 29 years, Hitler may have had von Economo's encephalitis, while he was a patient in a hospital, recovering from poison gas. This paper looks at the possible relationship of von Economo's encephalitis to Hitler's asocial behavior; his obsessions and compulsions, his cruelty and rages. The influence of Hitler's parkinsonism on his conduct during World War II is discussed.

  11. Parkinson disease in the elderly adult.

    PubMed

    Willis, Allison W

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease is the second most neurodegenerative disease, after Alzheimer disease, that affects up to two million Americans, the overwhelming majority of whom are aged 60 and older. The changing demographics of the country place more Americans at risk for Parkinson disease (PD) than ever before. Primary care physicians treat the majority of PD patients in the United States. Here I review diagnosis and treatment strategies for idiopathic Parkinson disease in the elderly adult.

  12. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Investigator 4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking...2011. The aims of this project are: Specific Aim 1: Identify cases of parkinsonism among Alaska Native people and populate a secure electronic...registry database. Specific Aim 2: Provide education on parkinsonism and its treatment to primary care physicians and other health care providers

  13. Impulse-control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Joseph M; Stacy, Mark

    2008-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by bradykinesia, rigidity, postural instability, and resting tremor. Increasingly, Parkinson's disease has been associated with a broad spectrum of non-motor symptoms, such as olfactory loss, sleep disorders, autonomic dysfunction, cognitive impairment, psychosis, depression, anxiety, and apathy. In addition, a minority of Parkinson's disease patients develop compulsive behaviors while receiving dopamine-replacement therapy, including medication hoarding, pathological gambling, binge eating, hyperlibidinous behavior, compulsive shopping, and punding. These behaviors may result in psychosocial impairment for patients and therapeutic challenges for clinicians. This article reviews the anatomic substrates, behavioral spectrum, associated factors, and potential treatments for dopamine-replacement therapy-related compulsions in Parkinson's disease.

  14. Occupational and environmental causes of parkinsonism

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, C.M. )

    1992-07-01

    Occupational causes of parkinsonism have usually been identified by direct temporal association of an exposure with disease symptoms, although recently a latent period between exposure and disease causation is being investigated. This review presents the definition of parkinsonism as contrasted with Parkinson's disease, notes the general concepts important to the consideration of toxic effects on the central nervous system, and addresses each group of agents known to cause parkinsonism, including common sources of exposure, clinical course, and proposed mechanisms of toxicity. Agents discussed include manganese, carbon disulfide, organic solvents, carbon monoxide, and MTPT and similar agents.58 references.

  15. Great shakes: famous people with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey M

    2004-12-01

    James Parkinson is credited with the first complete clinical description of the syndrome attributed to his name, Parkinson disease. It is recognized as the first syndrome defined after neurology became a specialty. Descriptions of Parkinson features are rare in antiquity, and famous people with this disorder have not been found before the 1800s. During the 20th century, more and more famous people appear to be afflicted with Parkinson, and this article reviews some of those who have withstood the "test of Time magazine," and examines some of the reasons why the syndrome is a relatively recent disorder.

  16. Addictive behaviors and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Witjas, T; Eusebio, A; Fluchère, F; Azulay, J-P

    2012-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, the degeneration of the dopaminergic system and the longstanding exposure to dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) may cause, in a group of vulnerable patients, dysregulation of the brain reward system. These patients develop DRT-related compulsions, which include addiction to levodopa or dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS), punding, and impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs or behavioral addiction reported in Parkinson's disease include pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive buying and binge eating. Although the underlying pathophysiology is still poorly understood, these behaviors are linked by their reward-based and repetitive nature. Such behaviors may result in devastating psychosocial impairment for the patients and are often hidden. The recognition of these behaviors is important and allows a better clinical management. Although the limited data do not permit particular therapeutic strategies, some approaches are worth considering: DRT reduction, trials of non-dopaminergic medications and subthalamic chronic stimulation. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Assessment of Parkinson Disease Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurologic condition that causes motor and non-motor manifestations. Treatment provides symptomatic benefit but no current treatment has been proven to slow disease progression. Research studies of PD require a means of rating the severity of disease by measurement of motor manifestations, assessment of ability to perform daily functional activities, and symptomatic response to medication. The most common rating scales are the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Hoehn and Yahr staging, and the Schwab and England rating of activities of daily living. Each of these rating scales are described, including detailed instructions on how to implement these ratings. Although these are the most widely applied rating scales of PD, there are still substantial limitations to these scales that must be considered when using them for research. Finally, some common applications of these scales are described. PMID:19802812

  18. Charcot Spine and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loriaut, Philippe; Rozenberg, Sylvie; Boyer, Patrick; Dallaudière, Benjamin; Khiami, Frederic; Sariali, Elhadi; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    Charcot spine is rare condition whose association with Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been reported yet. The authors reported the cases of two patients with PD who developed Charcot spine. Both patients presented with a history of back pain and bilateral radicular leg pain. They had complete clinical and radiological assessment. Lumbar spine was involved in both patients. Clinical features and response to treatment were described. In the first case, circumferential fusion and stabilization were performed on the dislocated vertebral levels. A solid and stable fusion of the spine was obtained with satisfactory clinical outcome. Surgical treatment has been recommended to the other patient. In both cases, no other neurological etiology was found to account for Charcot spine. In conclusion, Charcot spine is associated with several neurological affections but has not previously been reported in association with Parkinson's disease. PMID:25165591

  19. Electroconvulsive therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Fajardo, Humberto; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Llorens-Arenas, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Bermudez, Jesús; Ruiz-Chow, Ángel; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela

    2015-10-01

    Purpose To analyze the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy for the management of depression and/or psychosis refractory to drug therapy in patients with Parkinson disease.Methods A retrospective study was carried out including patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy during the period between 2002 and 2013. A review of the literature was performed.Results A total of 27 patients were included. In regards to the neuropsychiatric diagnosis, 14 patients had major depression, 12 patients had both psychosis and depression, and only one patient had isolated psychosis. The mean number of electroconvulsive therapy sessions was 12 ± 2.8. After electroconvulsive therapy, all patients showed a statistically significant improvement in the Brief Psychiatric Rating scale (reduction of 52% points) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (reduction of 50% points) independent of the presence of psychosis, depression or both.Conclusion Electroconvulsive therapy is effective for the treatment of refractory neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

  20. Adolf Hitler and His Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B

    2015-01-01

    Research works have suggested almost incontrovertibly, that Adolf Hitler suffered from Parkinsonism. However, the precise nature of his illness had always been controversial and post-encephalitic and idiopathic varieties were the ones which were most commonly thought as the possible etiology. He displayed features like oculogyric crisis, palilalia, and autonomic symptoms which strongly implicate post-encephalitic etiology in the genesis of his illness. Others on the contrary, observed premorbid personality traits like non-flinching mental rigidity, extreme inflexibility, and awesome pedantry; which are often observed in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Moreover, nonmotor symptoms like disturbed sleep, proneness to temper tantrums, phases of depression, suspiciousness, and lack of trust on colleagues have also been described by various authors. Additionally, he was prescribed methamphetamine by his personal doctor and that might have led to the development of some of the later traits in his personality.

  1. Adolf Hitler and His Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B.

    2015-01-01

    Research works have suggested almost incontrovertibly, that Adolf Hitler suffered from Parkinsonism. However, the precise nature of his illness had always been controversial and post-encephalitic and idiopathic varieties were the ones which were most commonly thought as the possible etiology. He displayed features like oculogyric crisis, palilalia, and autonomic symptoms which strongly implicate post-encephalitic etiology in the genesis of his illness. Others on the contrary, observed premorbid personality traits like non-flinching mental rigidity, extreme inflexibility, and awesome pedantry; which are often observed in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Moreover, nonmotor symptoms like disturbed sleep, proneness to temper tantrums, phases of depression, suspiciousness, and lack of trust on colleagues have also been described by various authors. Additionally, he was prescribed methamphetamine by his personal doctor and that might have led to the development of some of the later traits in his personality. PMID:26713007

  2. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49–85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association. PMID:27688919

  3. [Neuropsychologic evaluation in Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Allegri, R F; Ranalli, C G; de Daras, A; Fascetto, V; Gallegos, M; Scarlatti, A; Tamaroff, L

    1992-01-01

    For decades Parkinson's disease has been considered to be limited to disturbed motor functions and its association with a cognitive deterioration is very recent. The frequency of cognitive decline varies according to the authors between 3% and 93% depending on the different criteria of evaluation. Owing to the discrepancy among the previous studies our object has been to determine the existence of cognitive changes of statistical significance, since even nowadays the relation between neuropsychology and physiopathology has been misunderstood. A total of 50 patients between 52 and 85 years old with Parkinson's disease have been neurological and neuropsychologically evaluated and the results correlated with 50 healthy controls. Patients, who presented clinical signs of demence according to the criteria of DSM III or any other neurological or general disease were excluded because of possible side effects on the motor cognitive phase. For the neuropsychological study Signoret's Battery of Cognitive Efficiency test (BEC 96) was used, it evaluates: the attention, orientation, thinking, memory, recognition, serial learning, fluency, naming and constructional functions. It was observed that all the patients with Parkinson's disease performed these tests worse than the controls, except for attention. From the statistical point of view the differences are highly significant (p < 0.001) for serial learning and constructional tests and significant (p < 0.05) for orientation, thinking fluency and naming. In the area of mnesic functions the patients with Parkinson's disease show an alteration that predominates significantly on serial learning, however, it is less important for logical memory. All the alterations correspond to the long term memory.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. [Physical therapy for parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Hubert, M

    2011-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex neurologic and progressive incapacitating disease. Parkinson's disease severely threatens the quality of live and the number of patients worldwide is expected to rise considerably in the coming decade due to aging of the population. Even with optimal medical management using drugs or neurosurgery, patients are faced with progressively increasing impairments (e.g. in speech, mental and movement related functions), and restrictions in participation (e.g. domestic life and social activities). Physical therapy is often prescribed next to medical treatment but there is a lack of uniform treatment. A systematic literature search for guidelines, systematic reviews, trials, and expert opinions lead to a better understanding. The key question: Is physiotherapy able to optimally treat the Parkinson's disease symptoms? In which way, how and on which scientific bases can the physiotherapist participate to improve autonomy and to help them living independently and avoid, as long as possible, institutionalization? This article has integrated clinical research findings to provide clinicians with an overview to physical therapist management of disorders in people with Parkinson's disease. An Evidence-Based Physical Therapy Guideline providing practice recommendations was developed by the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF). Evidence from research was supplemented with clinical expertise and patients values. Randomized clinical trials reflect specific core areas of physical therapy, that is, transfer, posture, balance, reaching and grasping, gait and physical condition. Another aspect is that of educating patients (as well as their partners and family) about the disease process and the benefits of exercise therapy. Alternative therapies can be helpful like Tai Chi, virtual games, dancing, yoga, ball games for example.

  5. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Son, Andre Y; Biagioni, Milton C; Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49-85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association.

  6. Swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mamolar Andrés, Sandra; Santamarina Rabanal, María Liliana; Granda Membiela, Carla María; Fernández Gutiérrez, María José; Sirgo Rodríguez, Paloma; Álvarez Marcos, César

    Parkinson's disease is a type of chronic neurodegenerative pathology with a typical movement pattern, as well as different, less studied symptoms such as dysphagia. Disease-related disorders in efficacy or safety in the process of swallowing usually lead to malnutrition, dehydration or pneumonias. The aim of this study was identifying and analyzing swallowing disorders in Parkinson's disease. The initial sample consisted of 52 subjects with Parkinson's disease to whom the specific test for dysphagia SDQ was applied. Nineteen participants (36.5%) with some degree of dysphagia in the SDQ test were selected to be evaluated by volume-viscosity clinical exploration method and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Disorders in swallowing efficiency and safety were detected in 94.7% of the selected sample. With regards to efficiency, disorders were found in food transport (89.5%), insufficient labial closing (68.4%) and oral residues (47.4%), relating to duration of ingestion. Alterations in security were also observed: pharynx residues (52.7%), coughing (47.4%), penetration (31.64%), aspiration and decrease of SaO2 (5.3%), relating to the diagnosis of respiratory pathology in the previous year. The SDQ test detected swallowing disorders in 36.5% of the subjects with Parkinson's disease. Disorders in swallowing efficiency and safety were demonstrated in 94.7% of this subset. Disorders of efficiency were more frequent than those of safety, establishing a relationship with greater time in ingestion and the appearance of respiratory pathology and pneumonias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  7. Auditory hallucinations in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Inzelberg, R.; Kipervasser, S.; Korczyn, A.

    1998-01-01

    Whereas visual hallucinations are often found among patients with Parkinson's disease, the occurrence of auditory hallucinations has never been systematically documented. The occurrence, past and present, of auditory hallucinations has been studied in 121consecutive patients with Parkinson's disease attending a movement disorders clinic. The cognitive state was evaluated using the short mental test (SMT). Hallucinations were reported for 45patients (37%); 35 (29%) had only visual hallucinations and 10(8%) both visual and auditory hallucinations. No patient reported auditory hallucinations unaccompanied by visual hallucinations. The auditory hallucinations occurred repeatedly, consisting of human voices. They were non-imperative (n=9), non-paranoid (n=9), and often incomprehensible (n=5). They were not obviously influenced by the patients' age, duration of disease, or treatment with levodopa. Cognitive impairment was more common among hallucinating patients (64%, 50%, and 25% among patients with visual hallucinations, auditory hallucinations, and non-hallucinating parkinsonian patients respectively). Depression necessitating antidepressants was present in five of 10 and other psychotic features in six patients with auditory hallucinations. It is concluded that auditory hallucinations occur in Parkinson's disease, particularly in patients who also have visual hallucinations and are cognitively impaired.

 PMID:9576549

  8. Gender differences in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Lisa M

    2007-03-01

    Because estrogen has numerous effects on dopamine neurotransmission, many researchers are interested in its possible use to either slow the progression or reduce the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). The incidence of PD is greater in men than in women. Gender differences in neurotoxicity have been observed, and basic research in experimental animals indicates that estrogen protects neurons from various forms of injury. However, the results of retrospective surveys of the neuroprotective effects of estrogen replacement in PD have been mixed, with some showing no effect on risk and others showing a reduction in risk. A mildly significant gender difference in disability and quality-of-life reporting has been noted, with women citing greater disability and reduced quality of life. Gender differences have been shown in response to treatment of PD, for example, in how levodopa is metabolized--women have greater levodopa bioavailability. In the Parkinson's Disease on Estrogen Therapy Replacement in the Menopause Years (POETRY) study, participants were found to have improved scores on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale. Based on the POETRY results, it is hypothesized that estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) may lead to improvement in PD symptoms and provide an opportunity to reduce the dosage of antiparkinsonian medication in women.

  9. Tremor analysis separates Parkinson's disease and dopamine receptor blockers induced parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aasef G

    2017-05-01

    Parkinson's disease, the most common cause of parkinsonism is often difficult to distinguish from its second most common etiology due to exposure to dopamine receptor blocking agents such as antiemetics and neuroleptics. Dual axis accelerometry was used to quantify tremor in 158 patients with parkinsonism; 62 had Parkinson's disease and 96 were clinically diagnosed with dopamine receptor blocking agent-induced parkinsonism. Tremor was measured while subjects rested arms (resting tremor), outstretched arms in front (postural tremor), and reached a target (kinetic tremor). Cycle-by-cycle analysis was performed to measure cycle duration, oscillation amplitude, and inter-cycle variations in the frequency. Patients with dopamine receptor blocker induced parkinsonism had lower resting and postural tremor amplitude. There was a substantial increase of kinetic tremor amplitude in both disorders. Postural and resting tremor in subjects with dopamine receptor blocking agent-induced parkinsonism was prominent in the abduction-adduction plane. In contrast, the Parkinson's disease tremor had equal amplitude in all three planes of motion. Tremor frequency was comparable in both groups. Remarkable variability in the width of the oscillatory cycles suggested irregularity in the oscillatory waveforms in both subtypes of parkinsonism. Quantitative tremor analysis can distinguish Parkinson's disease from dopamine receptor blocking agent-induced parkinsonism.

  10. Cerebral small vessel disease and incident parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    van der Holst, Helena M.; van Uden, Inge W.M.; Tuladhar, Anil M.; de Laat, Karlijn F.; van Norden, Anouk G.W.; Norris, David G.; van Dijk, Ewoud J.; Esselink, Rianne A.J.; Platel, Bram

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relation between baseline cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) and the risk of incident parkinsonism using different MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures. Methods: In the Radboud University Nijmegen Diffusion Tensor and Magnetic Resonance Cohort (RUN DMC) study, a prospective cohort study, 503 elderly participants with SVD and without parkinsonism were included in 2006. During follow-up (2011–2012), parkinsonism was diagnosed according to UK Brain Bank criteria. Cox regression analysis was used to investigate the association between baseline imaging measures and incident all-cause parkinsonism and vascular parkinsonism (VP). Tract-based spatial statistics analysis was used to identify differences in baseline DTI measures of white matter (WM) tracts between participants with VP and without parkinsonism. Results: Follow-up was available from 501 participants (mean age 65.6 years; mean follow-up duration 5.2 years). Parkinsonism developed in 20 participants; 15 were diagnosed with VP. The 5-year risk of (any) parkinsonism was increased for those with a high white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume (hazard ratio [HR] 1.8 per SD increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–2.4) and a high number of lacunes (HR 1.4 per number increase, 95% CI 1.1–1.8) at baseline. For VP, this risk was also increased by the presence of microbleeds (HR 5.7, 95% CI 1.9–16.8) and a low gray matter volume (HR 0.4 per SD increase, 95% CI 0.2–0.8). Lower fractional anisotropy values in bifrontal WM tracts involved in movement control were observed in participants with VP compared to participants without parkinsonism. Conclusions: SVD at baseline, especially a high WMH volume and a high number of lacunes, is associated with incident parkinsonism. Our findings favor a role of SVD in the etiology of parkinsonism. PMID:26446068

  11. Association of Parkinsonism or Parkinson Disease with Polypharmacy in the Year Preceding Diagnosis: A Nested Case-Control Study in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Young; Park, Ji-Won; Sohn, Hyun Soon; Kwon, Jin-Won

    2017-06-20

    Published studies on the association between polypharmacy and parkinsonism or Parkinson disease are very limited. The objective of this study was to investigate whether polypharmacy is associated with parkinsonism or Parkinson disease in elderly patients. From a South Korean national health insurance sample cohort database for 2002-2013, we matched parkinsonism cases (defined by diagnosis codes for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease) and Parkinson disease cases (patients who had records for both Parkinson disease diagnosis and anti-Parkinson disease drug prescriptions) with controls. Logistic regression analysis evaluated the associations of parkinsonism/Parkinson disease with polypharmacy (i.e., five or more prescribed daily drugs) during the year preceding parkinsonism/Parkinson disease diagnosis, medications potentially associated with parkinsonism, and comorbidity status (using the Charlson Comorbidity Index score and hospitalization records). The study population included 6209 cases and 24,836 controls for parkinsonism and 1331 cases and 5324 controls for Parkinson disease. In univariate logistic regression, odds ratios for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease increased significantly with increased polypharmacy, medications potentially associated with parkinsonism, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, or prior hospitalizations. In multiple logistic regression, odds ratios for parkinsonism/Parkinson disease (adjusted for medications potentially associated with parkinsonism and comorbidities) also increased with increased polypharmacy. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for Parkinson disease were higher than those for parkinsonism with stronger statistical significance: 1.41 (1.28-1.55) and 2.17 (1.84-2.57) for parkinsonism and 2.87 (2.30-3.58) and 4.75 (3.39-6.66) for Parkinson disease for between five and ten prescribed daily drugs and ten or more drugs, respectively. Polypharmacy in the year preceding diagnosis may be associated with an increased risk for parkinsonism/Parkinson

  12. Neuroleptic‐induced Parkinsonism: Clinicopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Shuaib, Umar A.; Rajput, Ali H.; Robinson, Christopher A.; Rajput, Alex

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Drug‐induced parkinsonism is a well‐known complication of several different drugs—the most common being neuroleptic‐induced parkinsonism. However, very few autopsies have been reported in such cases. Methods Patients assessed at Movement Disorders Clinic Saskatchewan are offered brain autopsy. Detailed clinical records are kept. Results Brains were obtained from 7 drug‐induced parkinsonism patients with parkinsonian symptom onset coinciding with use of drugs known to produce parkinsonism. Six were on antipsychotics and 1 was on metoclopramide. Three cases were treated with levodopa for parkinsonism. In two cases, parkinsonian features reversed after stopping the offending agent. Both had autopsy evidence of preclinical PD. In 4 of the remaining 5, dopamine‐blocking drugs were continued until death. In 4 of those 5, brain histology revealed no cause for the parkinsonism, but 1 had mild SN neuronal loss without Lewy bodies. Conclusion This study shows that reversal of parkinsonism after discontinuing offending drugs does not indicate absence of underlying pathology. Neuroleptics can unmask preclinical PD in patients with insufficient SN damage for the disease to manifest clinically. Though the mechanism of sustained parkinsonian features after discontinuing neuroleptics remains to be established, it is unlikely that dopamine receptor block leads to retrograde SN neuronal degeneration. Furthermore, l‐dopa does not appear to be toxic to SN. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:26660063

  13. [Deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease. Preliminary outcomes].

    PubMed

    Pérez-de la Torre, Ramiro Antonio; Calderón-Vallejo, Alejandra; Morales-Briceño, Hugo; Gallardo-Ceja, David; Carrera-Pineda, Raúl; Guinto-Balanzar, Gerardo; Magallón-Barajas, Eduardo; Corlay-Noriega, Irma; Cuevas-García, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la enfermedad de Parkinson puede justificar un procedimiento quirúrgico que consiste en la estimulación cerebral profunda. Se presentan resultados a mediano y largo plazo de una cohorte de 60 pacientes del Hospital de Especialidades del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI. Métodos: los pacientes fueron operados con una metodología estereotáctica convencional a través del protocolo FrameLink (Medtronics Inc.). La técnica consistió en la evaluación preoperatoria de los pacientes, la colocación de marco estereotáctico, la realización de estudios de imagen, la planeación preoperatoria, el microrregistro, la macroestimulación y la colocación de implantes, que estuvo conformada por electrodos y generador en dos fases. La escala unificada para la evaluación de la enfermedad de Parkinson (UPDRS) preoperatoria, a tres, 12, y 36 meses fue utilizada como medida estándar. Se analizaron los resultados y las complicaciones como variables de interés. Resultados: se operaron 60 pacientes (41 hombres y 19 mujeres), con edad promedio de 56.5 años (rango de 39-70). Se obtuvieron de buenos a excelentes resultados en la mayoría de los pacientes con UPDRS promedio en periodo preoperatorio, a 3, 12 y 36 meses de 79.57, 66.85, 65.29 y 58.75, respectivamente (p < 0.0001). Las complicaciones se presentaron en forma mínima (en nueve pacientes: 15 %) y fueron manejadas de forma conservadora. Conclusiones: hubo una mejoría progresiva en el UPDRS durante los 36 meses de seguimiento.

  14. Quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Opara, J A; Brola, W; Leonardi, M; Błaszczyk, B

    2012-12-15

    In this review report, current possibilities of evaluation of quality of life in Parkinson's disease have been critically presented. Health Related Quality of Life (-HRQoL) comprises a wide spectrum of consequences of the disease. Measurement of quality of life has become increasingly relevant as an outcome parameter, especially in long-term trials. Most of the available QoL instruments depend on patient self-reports. The data can be collected by written questionnaires. There are universal questionnaires of QoL--for many diseases and the specific ones--specially created for one disease. Among universal questionnaires, the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Short-Form Health Status Survey (SF-36) are the most popular in Parkinson's disease. As for specific questionnaires: the Parkinson`s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL) have been described.

  15. The Clinical Evaluation of Parkinson's Tremor.

    PubMed

    Zach, Heidemarie; Dirkx, Michiel; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Helmich, Rick C

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease harbours many different tremors that differ in distribution, frequency, and context in which they occur. A good clinical tremor assessment is important for weighing up possible differential diagnoses of Parkinson's disease, but also to measure the severity of the tremor as a basis for further tailored treatment. This can be challenging, because Parkinson's tremor amplitude is typically very variable and context-dependent. Here, we outline how we investigate Parkinson's tremor in the clinic. We describe a simple set of clinical tasks that can be used to constrain tremor variability (cognitive and motor co-activation, several specific limb postures). This may help to adequately characterize the tremor(s) occurring in a patient with Parkinson's disease.

  16. How does parkinsonism start? Prodromal parkinsonism motor changes in idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder.

    PubMed

    Postuma, R B; Lang, A E; Gagnon, J F; Pelletier, A; Montplaisir, J Y

    2012-06-01

    Parkinsonism, as a gradually progressive disorder, has a prodromal interval during which neurodegeneration has begun but cardinal manifestations have not fully developed. A systematic direct assessment of this interval has never been performed. Since patients with idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder are at very high risk of parkinsonism, they provide a unique opportunity to observe directly the development of parkinsonism. Patients with idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder in an ongoing cohort study were evaluated annually with several quantitative motor measures, including the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Purdue Pegboard, alternate-tap test and timed up-and-go. Patients who developed parkinsonism were identified from this cohort and matched according to age to normal controls. Their results on motor testing from the preceding years were plotted, and then assessed with regression analysis, to determine when markers first deviated from normal values. Sensitivity and specificity of quantitative motor markers for diagnosing prodromal parkinsonism were assessed. Of 78 patients, 20 developed parkinsonism. On regression analysis, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale first intersected normal values at an estimated 4.5 years before diagnosis. Voice and face akinesia intersected earliest (estimated prodromal interval = 9.8 years), followed by rigidity (4.4 years), gait abnormalities (4.4 years) and limb bradykinesia (4.2 years). Quantitative motor tests intersected normal values at longer prodromal intervals than subjective examination (Purdue Pegboard = 8.6 years, alternate-tap = 8.2, timed up-and-go = 6.3). Using Purdue Pegboard and the alternate-tap test, parkinsonism could be detected with 71-82% sensitivity and specificity 3 years before diagnosis, whereas a Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score >4 identified prodromal parkinsonism with 88% sensitivity and 94% specificity 2 years before diagnosis. Removal of action

  17. Asymmetrical Pedaling Patterns in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Penko, Amanda L.; Hirsch, Joshua R.; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Martin, Philip E.; Blackburn, Gordon; Alberts, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 million Americans are affected by Parkinson's disease [1] which includes the symptoms of postural instability and gait dysfunction. Currently, clinical evaluations of postural instability and gait dysfunction consist of a subjective rater assessment of gait patterns using items from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and assessments can be insensitive to the effectiveness of medical interventions. Current research suggests the importance of cycling for Parkinson's disease patients, and while Parkinson's gait has been evaluated in previous studies, little is known about lower extremity control during cycling. The purpose of this study is to examine the lower extremity coordination patterns of Parkinson's patients during cycling. Methods Twenty five participants, ages 44-72, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in an exercise test on a cycle ergometer that was equipped with pedal force measurements. Crank torque, crank angle and power produced by right and left leg were measured throughout the test to calculate Symmetry Index at three stages of exercise (20 Watt, 60 Watt, maximum performance). Findings Decreases in Symmetry Index were observed for average power output in Parkinson's patients as workload increased. Maximum power Symmetry Index showed a significant difference in symmetry between performance at both the 20 Watt and 60 Watt stage and the maximal resistance stage. Minimum power Symmetry Index did not show significant differences across the stages of the test. While lower extremity asymmetries were present in Parkinson's patients during pedaling, these asymmetries did not correlate to postural instability and gait dysfunction Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores. Interpretation This pedaling analysis allows for a more sensitive measure of lower extremity function than the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and may help to provide unique insight into current and

  18. Normal CAG and CCG repeats in the Huntington`s disease genes of Parkinson`s disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J.; Barton, D.E.

    1995-04-24

    The clinical features of Parkinson`s disease, particularly rigidity and bradykinesia and occasionally tremor, are seen in juvenile-onset Huntington`s disease. Therefore, the CAG and CCG repeats in the Huntington`s disease gene were investigated in 45 Parkinson`s disease patients and compared to 40 control individuals. All of the Parkinson`s disease chromosomes fell within the normal size ranges. In addition, the distributions of the two repeats in the Parkinson`s disease patients did not differ significantly from those of the control population. Therefore, abnormalities of these trinucleotide repeats in the Huntington`s disease gene are not likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson`s disease. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  19. No allelic association between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3, and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nanko, S.; Hattori, M.; Dai, X.Y.

    1994-12-15

    Parkinson`s disease is thought to be caused by a combination of unknown environmental, genetic, and degenerative factors. Evidence from necropsy brain samples and pharmacokinetics suggests involvement of dopamine receptors in the pathogenesis or pathophysiology of Parkinson`s disease. Genetic association studies between Parkinson`s disease and dopamine D2, D3 and D4 receptor gene polymorphisms were conducted. The polymorphism was examined in 71 patients with Parkinson`s disease and 90 controls. There were no significant differences between two groups in allele frequencies at the D2, D3, and D4 dopamine receptor loci. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that susceptibility to Parkinson`s disease is associated with the dopamine receptor polymorphisms examined. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. [Perioperative management of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Mariscal, A; Medrano, I Hernández; Cánovas, A Alonso; Lobo, E; Loinaz, C; Vela, L; Espiga, P García-Ruiz; Castrillo, J C Martínez

    2012-01-01

    One of the particular characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the wide clinical variation as regards the treatment that can be found in the same patient. This occurs with specific treatment for PD, as well as with other drug groups that can make motor function worse. For this reason, the perioperative management of PD requires experience and above all appropriate planning. In this article, the peculiarities of PD and its treatment are reviewed, and a strategy is set out for the perioperative management of these patients. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic basis of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Tsimourtou, Vaïa; Kountra, Persa Maria; Paterakis, Konstantinos N; Kapsalaki, Eftychia Z; Fountas, Kostas N; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years, considerable progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of Parkinson disease (PD). Mutations in certain genes are found to cause monogenic forms of the disorder, with autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive inheritance. These genes include alpha-synuclein, parkin, PINK1, DJ-1, LRRK2, and ATP13A2. The monogenic variants are important tools in identifying cellular pathways that shed light on the pathogenesis of this disease. Certain common genetic variants are also likely to modulate the risk of PD. International collaborative studies and meta-analyses have identified common variants as genetic susceptibility risk/protective factors for sporadic PD.

  2. [Stereotactic surgery in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Linazasoro, G; Guridi, J; Vela, L; Gorospe, A; Rodríguez, M C; Aguilar, M; Ramos, E; Tolosa, E; Obeso, J A

    1997-10-01

    Stereotactic surgery for Parkinson's disease (PD) has regained interest due to the recently described hyperactivity of the subthalamic-pallidal pathway. Many patients suffering from complications associated with the chronic use of levodopa may benefit from surgical treatments. There are different surgical targets and techniques (ablative and deep brain stimulation). The choice of one particular target and technique relies on the clinical symptoms of the patient. The risk/benefit ratio of surgery is related to the careful selection of patients and the technical accuracy. Intraoperative microrecording is considered the best method to avoid side effects and partial results. A series of patient's selection and follow-up assessment criteria are proposed.

  3. Perioperative management of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Katus, Linn; Shtilbans, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide, leading to a wide range of disability and medical complications. Managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting can be particularly challenging. Suboptimal management can lead to medical complications, prolonged hospital stays, and delayed recovery. This review aims to address the most important issues related to caring for patients with Parkinson's disease perioperatively who are undergoing emergent or planned general surgery. It also intends to help hospitalists, internists, and other health care providers mitigate potential in-hospital morbidity and prevent prolonged recovery. Challenges in managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting include disruption of medication schedules, "nothing by mouth" status, reduced mobility, and medication interactions and their side effects. Patients with Parkinson's disease are more prone to immobility and developing dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, urinary retention, and psychiatric symptoms. These issues lead to higher rates of pneumonia, urinary tract infections, deconditioning, and falls compared with patients without Parkinson's disease, as well as prolonged hospital stays and a greater need for post-hospitalization rehabilitation. Steps can be taken to decrease these complications, including minimizing nothing by mouth status duration, using alternative routes of drugs administration when unable to give medications orally, avoiding drug interactions and medications that can worsen parkinsonism, assessing swallowing ability frequently, encouraging incentive spirometry, performing bladder scans, avoiding Foley catheters, and providing aggressive physical therapy. Knowing and anticipating these potential complications allow hospital physicians to mitigate nosocomial morbidity and shorten recovery times and hospital stays.

  4. Plasma urate and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weisskopf, M G; O'Reilly, E; Chen, H; Schwarzschild, M A; Ascherio, A

    2007-09-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to dopaminergic neuron degeneration in Parkinson's disease. Urate, a potent antioxidant, could be neuroprotective. To determine whether higher plasma concentrations of urate predict a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease, the authors conducted a nested case-control study among participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a cohort comprising over 18,000 men who provided blood samples in 1993-1995. Eighty-four incident cases of Parkinson's disease were diagnosed through 2000, and each was randomly matched to two controls by year of birth, race, and time of blood collection. Rate ratios of Parkinson's disease according to quartile of uricemia were estimated by use of conditional logistic regression. The mean urate concentration was 5.7 mg/dl among cases and 6.1 mg/dl among controls (p = 0.01). After adjustment for age, smoking, and caffeine, the rate ratio of Parkinson's disease for the highest quartile of uricemia compared with the lowest was 0.43 (95% confidence interval: 0.18, 1.02; p(trend) = 0.017). This association was stronger in analyses excluding cases diagnosed within 4 years (median) from blood collection (rate ratio = 0.17, 95% confidence interval: 0.04, 0.69; p(trend) = 0.010). These results suggest that high plasma urate concentrations may decrease the risk of Parkinson's disease, and they raise the possibility that interventions to increase plasma urate may reduce the risk and delay the progression of Parkinson's disease.

  5. Thiazolidinediones and Parkinson Disease: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Connolly, John G; Bykov, Katsiaryna; Gagne, Joshua J

    2015-12-01

    Thiazolidinediones, a class of medications indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, reduce inflammation and have been shown to provide a therapeutic benefit in animal models of Parkinson disease. We examined the association between treatment with thiazolidinediones and the onset of Parkinson disease in older individuals. We performed a cohort study of 29,397 Medicare patients enrolled in state pharmaceutical benefits programs who initiated treatment with thiazolidinediones or sulfonylureas during the years 1997 through 2005 and had no prior diagnosis of Parkinson disease. New users of thiazolidinediones were propensity score matched to new users of sulfonylureas and followed to determine whether they were diagnosed with Parkinson disease. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compare time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease in the propensity score-matched populations. To assess the association with duration of use, we performed several analyses that required longer continuous use of medications. In the primary analysis, thiazolidinedione users had a hazard ratio for a diagnosis of Parkinson disease of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 0.71, 1.66) when compared with sulfonylurea users. Increasing the duration-of-use requirements to 10 months did not substantially change the association; the hazard ratios ranged from 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.49, 2.05) to 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 0.60, 2.25). Thiazolidinedione use was not associated with a longer time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease than was sulfonylurea use, regardless of duration of exposure.

  6. [Problem solving care models for Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Csóka, Mária; Molnár, Sándorné; Kellős, Éva; Domján, Gyula

    2016-05-29

    Parkinson's disease affects more than 6,3 million people worldwide. Most patients and relatives are left alone to struggle with the symptoms associated with fluctuations in drug levels and the psychotic side effects of the anti-Parkinson's medications. Moreover, quite often even health providers may find difficult to interpret and manage the problems that have been encountered. The aims of the authors were to analyze systematically the biopsychosocial needs of Parkinson's patients, and to develop a complex, evidence-based Parkinson's-nursing-care model. Patients' needs were assessed based on an observational study involving an old patient with Parkinson's disease for more than 28 years. The model has been specified as a multidisciplinary care framework adapted to the special characteristics of Parkinson's disease which transcends the limitations of different standard nursing models. The elaborated model contains a detailed description of cooperative problem solving, which is organized around individual patients along with recommendations for addressing various potential problems that might be encountered. Implementation of the presented model can improve the life quality of Parkinson's patients and can facilitate the life of affected families provided that these families are well aware about the potential benefits of the novel care delivery system.

  7. Control of simultaneous movements distinguishes depressive motor retardation from Parkinson's disease and neuroleptic parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, S

    1992-10-01

    Patients with depressive motor retardation, neuroleptic induced parkinsonism or Parkinson's disease were tested on movement tasks requiring control of simultaneous movements. This was in order to determine whether these three groups of patients, who all show slowing of movements, also share the distinctive impairment of simultaneous movement control that is observed in Parkinson's disease. Though all three patient groups showed equivalent slowing on the motor tasks that were studied, the patterns of impairment were different. Only the patients with parkinsonism, either neuroleptic induced or from Parkinson's disease, showed additional slowing of a rapid ballistic elbow flexion movement when it was performed simultaneously with a rapid squeeze of the ipsilateral hand. Only patients with parkinsonism showed a significant increase in dual task interference on a bimanual bead and tapper task, compared with controls. The bead and tapper interference in patients with depressive motor retardation was between that of controls and parkinsonism. Having a bimanual skill had a large effect on the subjects' dual task interference on this task. The measures of dual task interference for the two tasks did not correlate with one another; difficulty running simultaneous motor programs does therefore not explain the interference that is observed when tapping is performed while the other hand simultaneously performs a dextrous motor task. Only patients with parkinsonism showed increased fatigue on the tapping task. The patients with depressive motor retardation did have elevated scores on a clinical rating of parkinsonism. Nevertheless there are clearly defined differences between the movement disorder observed in patients with depression, and that observed in in parkinsonism. The patterns of impairments in patients with neuroleptic parkinsonism were very similar to those of Parkinson's disease.

  8. Corneal nerve microstructure in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Misra, Stuti L; Kersten, Hannah M; Roxburgh, Richard H; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; McGhee, Charles N J

    2017-03-03

    Ocular surface changes and blink abnormalities are well-established in Parkinson's disease. Blink rate may be influenced by corneal sub-basal nerve density, however, this relationship has not yet been investigated in Parkinson's disease. This case-control study examined the ocular surface in patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease, including confocal microscopy of the cornea. Fifteen patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease (modified Hoehn and Yahr grade 3 or 4) and fifteen control participants were recruited. Ophthalmic assessment included slit-lamp examination, blink rate assessment, central corneal aesthesiometry and in vivo corneal confocal microscopy. The effect of disease laterality was also investigated. Of the 15 patients with Parkinson's disease, ten were male and the mean age was 65.5±8.6years. The corneal sub-basal nerve plexus density was markedly reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease (7.56±2.4mm/mm(2)) compared with controls (15.91±2.6mm/mm(2)) (p<0.0001). Corneal sensitivity did not differ significantly between the patients with Parkinson's disease (0.79±1.2mBAR) and the control group (0.26±0.35mBAR), p=0.12. Sub-basal nerve density was not significantly different between the eye ipsilateral to the side of the body with most-severe motor symptoms, and the contralateral eye. There was a significant positive correlation between ACE-R scores and sub-basal corneal nerve density (R(2)=0.66, p=0.02). This is the first study to report a significant reduction in corneal sub-basal nerve density in Parkinson's disease and demonstrate an association with cognitive dysfunction. These results provide further evidence to support the involvement of the peripheral nervous system in Parkinson's disease, previously thought to be a central nervous system disorder.

  9. Electroconvulsive Therapy Intervention for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Narang, Puneet; Glowacki, Anna; Lippmann, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is an established means to improve function in a variety of psychiatric and neurologic conditions, particularly for patients who remain treatment-refractory. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that sometimes does not respond well to conventional pharmacotherapies. Reports have indicated that electroconvulsive therapy may be an effective and safe treatment for those patients with Parkinson's disease who are not optimally responding to first-line treatments. Despite these reports, however, electroconvulsive therapy is not often used by clinicians in patients with treatment-resistant Parkinson's disease, perhaps due to stigma, lack of knowledge regarding its safety and efficacy, and/or inability to predict the duration of therapeutic benefit. Our objective was to determine if the available literature on ECT supports it as a safe and effective treatment option in patients with treatment-refractory Parkinson's disease. Motoric improvement induced by electroconvulsive therapy has been documented for decades in persons with Parkinson's disease. Efficacy and safety are reported following electroconvulsive therapy in people with Parkinson's disease who have sub-optimal response to medicines or experience the "on/off" phenomenon to L-dopa. Electroconvulsive therapy is an effective option for acute and maintenance treatment of Parkinson's disease in select patients. Inability to predict how long the beneficial effects of ECT therapy will last in patients with Parkinson's disease may be a reason why this treatment is underutilized by clinicians. More research is warranted to clarify parameters for application and duration of therapeutic benefit in individuals with difficult-to-treat Parkinson's disease.

  10. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease: a funder's perspective.

    PubMed

    Frasier, Mark; Chowdhury, Sohini; Eberling, Jamie; Sherer, Todd

    2010-10-01

    Therapeutic development in Parkinson's disease is hampered by the paucity of well-validated biomarkers that can assist with diagnosis and/or tracking the progression of the disease. Since its inception, the Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research has invested heavily in biomarker research and continues to prioritize discovery and development efforts. This article summarizes the history and evolution of the Michael J Fox Foundation's role in supporting biomarker research and lays out the current challenges in successfully developing markers that can be used to test therapies, while also providing a vision of future funding efforts in Parkinson's disease biomarkers.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA analysis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schapira, A H; Holt, I J; Sweeney, M; Harding, A E; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1990-01-01

    The reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme Q reductase (complex I) activity has recently been shown to be deficient in the substantia nigra of patients dying with Parkinson's disease. This biochemical defect is identical to that produced by the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which also produces parkinsonism in humans. Complex I comprises 25 polypeptides, seven of which are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. Restriction fragment analysis of substantia nigra DNA from six patients with Parkinson's disease did not show any major deletion. In two cases, there were different novel polymorphisms that were not observed in control brain (n = 6) or blood (n = 34) samples.

  12. [Enteric nervous system and Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Paillusson, S; Lebouvier, T; Pouclet, H; Coron, E; Bruley des Varannes, S; Damier, P; Neunlist, M; Derkinderen, P

    2012-06-01

    It has become increasingly evident over the last years that Parkinson's disease is a multicentric neurodegenerative disease that affects several neuronal structures outside the substantia nigra, among which is the enteric nervous system. The aims of the present article are to discuss the role of the enteric nervous system lesions in pathology spreading (Braak's hypothesis) and in the gastrointestinal dysfunction encountered in Parkinson's disease. Owing to its accessibility to biopsies, we further discuss the use of the enteric nervous system as an original source of biomarker in Parkinson's disease.

  13. Association between Parkinson's Disease and Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Oğuz, Sıdıka

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) is a common infection of the gastrointestinal system that is usually related to peptic ulcers. However, recent studies have revealed relationships between HP and many other diseases. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, HP can prevent the absorption of certain drugs. A high prevalence of HP has been found in patients with Parkinson's disease, and this bacterium causes motor fluctuations by affecting the absorption of levodopa, which is the main drug used to treat Parkinson's disease. Eradicating HP from patients with Parkinson's disease by applying antibiotic treatment will increase the absorption of levodopa and decrease their motor fluctuations. PMID:26932258

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging of Parkinson's disease, atypical parkinsonism, and essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Prodoehl, Janey; Li, Hong; Planetta, Peggy J; Goetz, Christopher G; Shannon, Kathleen M; Tangonan, Ruth; Comella, Cynthia L; Simuni, Tanya; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Leurgans, Sue; Corcos, Daniel M; Vaillancourt, David E

    2013-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging could be useful in characterizing movement disorders because it noninvasively examines multiple brain regions simultaneously. We report a multitarget imaging approach focused on the basal ganglia and cerebellum in Parkinson's disease, parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and essential tremor and in healthy controls. Seventy-two subjects were studied with a diffusion tensor imaging protocol at 3 Tesla. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to directly compare groups. Sensitivity and specificity values were quantified for control versus movement disorder (92% sensitivity, 88% specificity), control versus parkinsonism (93% sensitivity, 91% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus atypical parkinsonism (90% sensitivity, 100% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus multiple system atrophy (94% sensitivity, 100% specificity), Parkinson's disease versus progressive supranuclear palsy (87% sensitivity, 100% specificity), multiple system atrophy versus progressive supranuclear palsy (90% sensitivity, 100% specificity), and Parkinson's disease versus essential tremor (92% sensitivity, 87% specificity). The brain targets varied for each comparison, but the substantia nigra, putamen, caudate, and middle cerebellar peduncle were the most frequently selected brain regions across classifications. These results indicate that using diffusion tensor imaging of the basal ganglia and cerebellum accurately classifies subjects diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, atypical parkinsonism, and essential tremor and clearly distinguishes them from control subjects.

  15. Bromocriptine treatment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, J D; Marsden, C D; Donaldson, I; Galea-Debono, A; Walters, J; Kennedy, G; Asselman, P

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-one patients with Parkinson's disease were treated with the ergot alkaloid bromocriptine, a drug which stimulates dopamine receptors. Bromocriptine had a slight therapeutic effect in patients on no other treatment and an additional effect in patients on levodopa. The mean optimum dosage of bromocriptine, established over a 12 week period, was 26 mg daily. In 20 patients bromocriptine was compared with placebo in a double-blind controlled trial. Active treatment caused a significant (P less than 0.02) reduction in total disability and akinesia scores. The least disabled patients showed the greatest response. Side-effects of bromocriptine--nausea, vomiting, hallucinations, and abnormal involuntary movements--were similar to nature to those of levodopa. In most normal subjects, bromocriptine causes an increase in plasma growth hormone concentration. This was determined in 20 patients with Parkinson's disease after 1-15 mg bromocriptine. Only a single patient showed an obvious increase up to 120 minutes after dosage. Bromocriptine was not effective treatment in two patients who had not previously responded to levodopa and replacement of this drug by bromocriptine in patients with end-of-dose akinesia after chronic levodopa treatment did not totally abolish response swings. PMID:772175

  16. Iron in Parkinson's Disease Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galazka-Friedman, J.; Bauminger, E. R.; Friedman, A.

    2002-06-01

    Mössbauer studies of fresh frozen samples taken at autopsy from different parts of the human brain (globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra (NS), and hippocamp (Hip)) showed a relatively high concentration of iron in these structures. Mössbauer data, biochemical results and transmission electron micrographs lead to the conclusion that in all above-mentioned structures iron is located mainly within ferritin. However, the Mössbauer doublets obtained from most brain samples at 90 K are slightly asymmetric. This asymmetry could be caused by the presence of a small amount of non-ferritin-like iron. Measurements at 4.1 K showed besides the six-line spectra characteristic for ferritin-like iron, an additional doublet with Mössbauer parameters different from ferritin. We found a slightly higher asymmetry and intensity of the 4.1 K doublet in Mössbauer spectra of Parkinsonian SN than in control SN. As Parkinson's disease is a progressive degeneration of nervous cells in SN and iron may be involved in this degeneration process, this may suggest that the factors evoking these phenomena are related to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

  17. [Cognitive deterioration in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Perea-Bartolomé, M V

    Whether there are mental changes in Parkinson s disease (EP) or not, has been a confused and contradictory subject since the earliest studies and semiological definition of the disorder. James Parkinson himself, in his study An essay on the shaking palsy (1817), stated that in the condition he described, the sense and intellect were not damaged. Thanks to the development of cognitive neuropsychology, at the present time there are rather more precise concepts regarding this fascinating area of neurology. We give a summary, as schematic as possible, of theory relating to the known data. 1. The presence or absence of cognitive deterioration in EP 2. The neuropsychological characteristics of cognitive involvement in EP, cognitive defects in incipient EP and in established EP. 3. The risk factor involved in the occurrence of cognitive deterioration. This knowledge should be used for better understanding of the patient s mental state at every stage of the disease, during follow up studies and for the neuro conductual therapeutic and socio familial approach in each case.

  18. [Cell therapy for Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Shin-ichi

    2009-11-01

    Advances in the field of stem cell research have raised hopes of creating novel cell replacement therapies for Parkinson disease (PD), although double-blinded clinical trials have met with controversial success in patients implanted with fetal midbrain tissue and autopsy results have shown that some of the grafted fetal neurons displayed pathological changes typical of PD. Dopaminergic neurons have been efficiently derived from stem cells using various methods, and beneficial effects after transplantation have been demonstrated in animal models of PD. Some obstacles remain to be overcome before stem cell therapy can be routinely and safely used to treat PD in humans. A widely used prodrug/suicide gene therapy would be applied to stem cells to reduce risk of tumor formation. Since grafts were transplanted ectopically into the striatum instead of the substantia nigra in most current protocols, surviving dopaminergic neurons would not have to be the same subtype as the nigral cells. If the main mechanism underlying any functional recovery achieved by cell therapies is restoration of dopaminergic neurotransmission, then viral vector-mediated gene delivery of dopamine-synthesizing enzymes represents a more straightforward approach. Future targets for cell therapy should include some types of Parkinsonism with degeneration of striatal neurons.

  19. [Cognitive deterioration in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Vilert Barnet, J; Jarne Esparcia, A; Aguilar Barbera, M

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to contrast a sampling of 20 patients diagnosed as suffering from "Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease" (mean age, 54; schooling, 8.5 years; length of disease, 6.07 years) with a healthy control group, in order to detect possible correlation between intellectual impairment and depression in the individuals affected by Parkinsonism. An integrated battery of neuropsychological testing (PIEN-Test Barcelona. Peña, 1990) was used, in conjunction with "Beck's Depression Inventory". The results show significant differences in the following areas: expressive language, complex language comprehension, motor coordination, complex visuospatial factors, verbal memory and WAIS-type intelligence factors. Discriminant analysis was performed to select the most discriminating variables. The results were as follows, beginning with the most discriminating factor: motor coordination, complex comprehension, complex visuospatial factors, math skills and an overall slowing down. The patients with the highest depression levels were found to have the greatest impairment in mental control/attention and complex comprehension.

  20. [Proteomic biomarkers in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Bandrés, Sara; Durán, Raquel; Barrero, Francisco; Ramírez, Manuel; Vives, Francisco

    2014-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement and is caused by the death of the dopaminergic neurons in the compact part of the substantia nigra. Its diagnosis is essentially clinical, but although the signs and symptoms of PD are well known, the rate of diagnostic error is relatively high. It is estimated that 10-30% of patients initially diagnosed with PD are later reclassified. This disease has a high prevalence beyond the age of 60, and one of its biggest problems is that it is diagnosed when the degenerative process is already at a very advanced stage. Therefore, it is necessary to look for other biomarkers that make it possible to carry out an early diagnosis of PD, follow up its development, distinguish it from other related pathologies (parkinsonisms) and help monitor the effect of novel therapies. The fact that there are mutations that lead to PD, as well as polygenetic combinations that can act as risk factors, suggests the possibility of measuring the proteins resulting from the expression of these genes in peripheral tissues. And once their sensitivity and specificity have been proved they could be used as biomarkers for PD, even in the early phases of the disease. The aim of this work is to focus on a detailed review of the main candidate proteomic biomarkers researched to date by discussing the most recent literature.

  1. Community walking in people with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Robyn M; Morris, Meg E; Woollacott, Marjorie H; Brauer, Sandra G

    2012-01-01

    People with Parkinson's disease often have walking difficulty, and this is likely to be exacerbated while walking in places in the community, where people are likely to face greater and more varied challenges. This study aims to understand the facilitators and the barriers to walking in the community perceived by people with Parkinson's disease. This qualitative study involved 5 focus groups (n = 34) of people with Parkinson's disease and their partners residing in metropolitan and rural regions in Queensland, Australia. Results found that people with PD reported to use internal personal strategies as facilitators to community walking, but identified primarily external factors, particularly the environmental factors as barriers. The adoption of strategies or the use of facilitators allows people with Parkinson's disease to cope so that participants often did not report disability.

  2. Electrophysiologic analysis of early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Watts, R L; Mandir, A S; Ahn, K J; Juncos, J L; Zakers, G O; Freeman, A

    1991-08-01

    We have been interested in the application of quantitative measures of motor performance as a possible means of early detection of Parkinson's disease. To assess motor function, we have measured movement time (the physiologic correlate of bradykinesia) and reaction time (simple and directional choice) with an upper limb motor task, and tremor with accelerometry and electromyographic recordings. In this report we describe preliminary data from a Parkinson's disease patient group with symptoms of fewer than 2 years' average duration (compared with an age- and gender-matched normal control group) which indicate that precise, quantitative tests of motor function can detect the slight deviations from normal that are present in early Parkinson's disease. It appears that tests of bradykinesia are most sensitive, and detection of rest tremor is most specific. These tests may be applicable in screening individuals who are suspected of having or are "at risk for" Parkinson's disease and other related disorders.

  3. Electrophysiologic analysis of early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Watts, R L; Mandir, A S; Ahn, K J; Juncos, J L; Zakers, G O; Freeman, A

    1991-05-01

    We have been interested in the application of quantitative measures of motor performance as a possible means of early detection of Parkinson's disease. To assess motor function, we have measured movement time (the physiologic correlate of bradykinesia) and reaction time (simple and directional choice) with an upper limb motor task, and tremor with accelerometry and electromyographic recordings. In this report we describe preliminary data from a Parkinson's disease patient group with symptoms of fewer than 2 years' average duration (compared with an age- and gender-matched normal control group) which indicate that precise, quantitative tests of motor function can detect the slight deviations from normal that are present in early Parkinson's disease. It appears that tests of bradykinesia are most sensitive, and detection of rest tremor is most specific. These tests may be applicable in screening individuals who are suspected of having or are "at risk for" Parkinson's disease and other related disorders.

  4. UK Parkinson's Excellence Network: empowering service improvement across the UK.

    PubMed

    Burn, David

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's UK, together with leading Parkinson's professionals, has set up the UK Parkinson's Excellence Network to bring together the passion and expertise of leading clinicians with the strategic leadership and resources of Parkinson's UK underpinned by the voice of people affected by Parkinson's. Launched in London in February 2015, the Excellence Network aims to drive sustainable improvements in health and social care services. It will provide a more strategic approach to clinical development so that Parkinson's services across health and social care can be transformed to provide the best quality care across the UK.

  5. [Subtypes of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and factors predicting its becoming dementia].

    PubMed

    Toribio-Diaz, M Elena; Carod-Artal, Francisco J

    2015-07-01

    Introduccion. El deterioro cognitivo puede aparecer en las etapas mas iniciales de la enfermedad de Parkinson (EP). Determinar la prevalencia del deterioro cognitivo leve (DCL) como etapa de transicion o sus diferentes perfiles resulta complicado por la ausencia de criterios diagnosticos consensuados. Objetivo. Revisar el concepto de DCL en la EP, sus criterios diagnosticos y los factores predictores de conversion a demencia. Pacientes y metodos. Revision sistematica de los articulos publicados en Medline (PubMed) utilizando la combinacion de las palabras clave 'deterioro cognitivo leve' y 'enfermedad de Parkinson'. Resultados. Los criterios diagnosticos del DCL en la EP publicados por la Sociedad de Trastornos del Movimiento, a pesar de no estar validados, constituyen una importante herramienta para el diagnostico de estos pacientes. Su aplicacion se ve influida por las siguientes limitaciones: la heterogeneidad de los deficits cognitivos descritos en la EP, su evolucion variable, que dificulta el hallazgo de factores predictores de conversion a demencia, la seleccion de las pruebas neuropsicologicas mas apropiadas y la determinacion de los puntos de corte mas idoneos, y las caracteristicas del paciente, etapa de la enfermedad y tipo de tratamiento antiparkinsoniano. Conclusiones. Marcadores neuropsicologicos, de neuroimagen, biomarcadores o la limitacion en algunas actividades instrumentales son muy prometedores para la deteccion de pacientes con DCL en la EP y riesgo elevado de conversion a demencia.

  6. Precision grip and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fellows, S J; Noth, J; Schwarz, M

    1998-09-01

    In order to investigate sensorimotor processing and force development in Parkinson's disease, 16 patients, four patients with hemiparkinsonism and 12 age-matched normal subjects were assessed during lifting and holding of an object in a precision grip between thumb and forefinger, or holding the object in this grip at a fixed height above a table. In the former case, object loading could be changed between lifts without warning. In the latter case, unexpected step load changes to the object were applied to the object with a torque motor. All procedures could be applied with or without visual control of the hand and the object. Normal subjects lifted an unpredictable load employing the grip force parameters used in the preceding lift. If a load change was encountered, the parameters became adapted to the new conditions during the lift, modulating grip forces to match the loading. Parkinsonian patients retained this strategy and the ability to regulate grip forces according to load. Under all conditions, however, parkinsonian subjects developed abnormally high grip forces in both the lift and the hold phase, although the ratio of these forces remained normal. Lifting height was normal in parkinsonian subjects, but the duration of the lifting task was significantly prolonged, due to a marked slowing in the rate of grip force development in the lead-up to object lift-off and to prolongation of the movement phase. Forewarning of object loading, with or without visual control, did not reduce timing deficits or improve the rate of grip force development. However, it did allow parkinsonian subjects to reduce the safety margin significantly. Responses to step load changes imposed during holding without visual control showed minor abnormalities in the parkinsonian patients: onset latencies and EMG activity in the first dorsal interosseus and thenar muscles were normal up to 140 ms after displacement. Subsequent EMG activity in the first dorsal interosseus remained largely

  7. Recent developments in biomarkers in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer disease, and current demographic trends indicate a life-time risk approaching 4% and predict a doubling of prevalence by 2030. Strategies are being developed to apply recent advances in our understanding of the cause of Parkinson disease to the development of biomarkers that will enable the identification of at-risk individuals, enable early diagnosis and reflect the progression of disease. The latter will be particularly important for the testing of disease-modifying therapies. This review summarizes recent advances in Parkinson disease biomarker development. Recent findings Recent reports continue to reflect the application of a variety of clinical, imaging or biochemical measurements, alone or in combination, to general Parkinson disease populations. Probably the most promising is the assay of alpha-synuclein in the diagnosis and evolution of Parkinson disease. At present, detection techniques are still being refined, but once accurate and reproducible assays are available, it will be important to define the relationship of these to early diagnosis and progression. Alpha-synuclein concentrations may also be modulated by certain disease-modifying agents in development and so may represent a measure of their efficacy. It has to be accepted that no single measure currently fulfils all the necessary criteria for a biomarker in Parkinson disease, but combinations of measures are more likely to deliver benefit. Summary The Parkinson disease biomarker field is approaching a stage when certain combinations of clinical, imaging and biochemical measures may identify a proportion of individuals at risk for developing the disease. However, their general applicability may be limited. Attention is now turning to stratification of Parkinson disease into certain at-risk groups defined by genotype. The application of multimodal screening to these populations may be more

  8. Michael J. Fox and his Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kempster, Peter A

    2004-01-01

    Michael J. Fox was a popular and successful film and television comic actor who developed Parkinson's disease at the age of 29 years. His recently published book, Lucky Man, structured around the story of his Parkinson's disease, is an amusing, briskly paced yet introspective memoir that covers the first 40 years of his life. Although quite anecdotal, it contains interesting observations on the preclinical phase of the disorder, evolution of motor fluctuations, and tactics for pharmacological treatment.

  9. Ironing out Tau's Role in Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Stankowski, Jeannette N.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease affects more than five million people worldwide, yet no therapeutic has been identified that can slow or halt the progression of this debilitating disease. A new study in tau knockout mice suggests that tau deficiency causes impaired ferroportin-coupled iron export, by retention of the amyloid precursor protein, a neuronal ferroxidase partner, in the endoplasmic reticulum. This leads to parkinsonism through intracellular iron accumulation and degeneration of dopamine neurons (pages X-Y). PMID:22310680

  10. Oxidative Damage in Parkinson’s Disease.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Supranuclear Palsy . These studies showed that there is significant increase in lipid peroxidation in the subthalamic nucleus. We developed a novel column...of Parkinson’s Disease and the MPTP model of Parkinsonism. We carried out initial studies in the Parkinsonian Syndrome known as Progressive ...neuroprotective against MPTP neurotoxicity. The studies to date, have made significant progress on the original aims of the proposal.

  11. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    1-0001 Brian A Trimble, MD Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry Principal Investigator A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome...characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance. Parkinson’s disease is the most common form of PS... parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called the Resource and Patient Management System (RPMS), but the protocol will

  12. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    W81XWH-07-1-0001 Brian A Trimble, MD Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry Principal Investigator A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a...syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance. Parkinson’s disease is the most common form...protocol. The primary source of parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called the Resource and Patient Management

  13. Erectile function and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Chen, Honglei; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Glasser, Dale B; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Rimm, Eric B; Ascherio, Alberto

    2007-12-15

    Erectile dysfunction is common among individuals with Parkinson's disease, but it is unknown whether it precedes the onset of the classic features of Parkinson's disease. To address this question, the authors examined whether erectile dysfunction was associated with Parkinson's disease risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Analyses included 32,616 men free of Parkinson's disease at baseline in 1986 who in 2000 completed a retrospective questionnaire with questions on erectile dysfunction in different time periods. Relative risks were computed using Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for age, smoking, caffeine intake, history of diabetes, and other covariates. Among men who reported their erectile function before 1986, 200 were diagnosed with Parkinson's disease during 1986-2002. Men with erectile dysfunction before 1986 were 3.8 times more likely to develop Parkinson's disease during the follow-up than were those with very good erectile function (relative risk = 3.8, 95% confidence interval: 2.4, 6.0; p < 0.0001). Multivariate-adjusted relative risks of Parkinson's disease were 2.7, 3.7, and 4.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.4, 11.1; p = 0.008) for participants with first onset of erectile dysfunction (before 1986) at 60 or more, 50-59, and less than 50 years of age, respectively, relative to those without erectile dysfunction. In conclusion, in this retrospective analysis in a large cohort of men, the authors observed that erectile dysfunction was associated with a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease.

  14. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Questionable 0 DK f. seborrheic dermatitis 0 Yes 0 No 0 Questionable 0 DK Exclusion criteria O Prominent postural instability in the first 3...4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor, rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance...the Alaska Native Medical Center. B. Body The intent of this proposal is to establish a registry of parkinsonism cases among Alaska native

  15. Motivational modes and learning in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Foerde, Karin; Braun, Erin Kendall; Higgins, E Tory; Shohamy, Daphna

    2015-08-01

    Learning and motivation are intrinsically related, and both have been linked to dopamine. Parkinson's disease results from a progressive loss of dopaminergic inputs to the striatum and leads to impairments in motivation and learning from feedback. However, the link between motivation and learning in Parkinson's disease is not well understood. To address this gap, we leverage a well-established psychological theory of motivation, regulatory mode theory, which distinguishes between two functionally independent motivational concerns in regulating behavior: a concern with having an effect by initiating and maintaining movement (Locomotion) and a concern with establishing what is correct by critically evaluating goal pursuit means and outcomes (Assessment). We examined Locomotion and Assessment in patients with Parkinson's disease and age-matched controls. Parkinson's disease patients demonstrated a selective decrease in Assessment motivation but no change in Locomotion motivation, suggesting that Parkinson's disease leads to a reduced tendency to evaluate and monitor outcomes. Moreover, weaker Assessment motivation was correlated with poorer performance on a feedback-based learning task previously shown to depend on the striatum. Together, these findings link a questionnaire-based personality inventory with performance on a well-characterized experimental task, advancing our understanding of how Parkinson's disease affects motivation with implications for well-being and treatment outcomes. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Parkinson's disease between internal medicine and neurology.

    PubMed

    Csoti, Ilona; Jost, Wolfgang H; Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    General medical problems and complications have a major impact on the quality of life in all stages of Parkinson's disease. To introduce an effective treatment, a comprehensive analysis of the various clinical symptoms must be undertaken. One must distinguish between (1) diseases which arise independently of Parkinson's disease, and (2) diseases which are a direct or indirect consequence of Parkinson's disease. Medical comorbidity may induce additional limitations to physical strength and coping strategies, and may thus restrict the efficacy of the physical therapy which is essential for treating hypokinetic-rigid symptoms. In selecting the appropriate medication for the treatment of any additional medical symptoms, which may arise, its limitations, contraindications and interactions with dopaminergic substances have to be taken into consideration. General medical symptoms and organ manifestations may also arise as a direct consequence of the autonomic dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease. As the disease progresses, additional non-parkinsonian symptoms can be of concern. Furthermore, the side effects of Parkinson medications may necessitate the involvement of other medical specialists. In this review, we will discuss the various general medical aspects of Parkinson's disease.

  17. The adrenal medulla and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, S L

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature describing the condition of the adrenal medulla in Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized primarily by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Clinical observations have revealed that Parkinson's disease is also frequently accompanied by a variety of autonomic symptoms. The adrenal medulla is a major component of the autonomic nervous system. However, until recently this organ has not been of particular interest in Parkinson's disease. Early studies found histologic abnormalities in adrenal medullary cells, and several groups measured urinary and plasma catecholamines to determine general autonomic status. In the late 1980s adrenal medullary tissue was first transplanted to the caudate nucleus in an attempt to augment the decreased levels of dopamine, and thus treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. At this time the status of the adrenal medulla in this disease became clinically important. We measured the total catecholamine content of the parkinsonian adrenal medulla in tissue collected both at autopsy and in conjunction with adrenal-caudate transplants. Adrenal medullary catecholamines and several neuropeptides were severely depressed in parkinsonian glands. Thus, the adrenal medulla appears to be a target of the peripheral manifestations of Parkinson's disease.

  18. Moving Parkinson care to the home.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, E Ray; Vlaanderen, Floris P; Engelen, Lucien Jlpg; Kieburtz, Karl; Zhu, William; Biglan, Kevin M; Faber, Marjan J; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-09-01

    In many ways, the care of individuals with Parkinson disease does not meet their needs. Despite the documented benefits of receiving care from clinicians with Parkinson disease expertise, many patients (if not most) do not. Moreover, current care models frequently require older individuals with impaired mobility, cognition, and driving ability to be driven by overburdened caregivers to large, complex urban medical centers. Moving care to the patient's home would make Parkinson disease care more patient-centered. Demographic factors, including aging populations, and social factors, such as the splintering of the extended family, will increase the need for home-based care. Technological advances, especially the ability to assess and deliver care remotely, will enable the transition of care back to the home. However, despite its promise, this next generation of home-based care will have to overcome barriers, including outdated insurance models and a technological divide. Once these barriers are addressed, home-based care will increase access to high quality care for the growing number of individuals with Parkinson disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Genetics of Parkinson disease and essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Wider, Christian; Ross, Owen A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Elucidating the genetic background of Parkinson disease and essential tremor is crucial to understand the pathogenesis and improve diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Recent findings A number of approaches have been applied including familial and association studies, and studies of gene expression profiles to identify genes involved in susceptibility to Parkinson disease. These studies have nominated a number of candidate Parkinson disease genes and novel loci including Omi/HtrA2, GIGYF2, FGF20, PDXK, EIF4G1 and PARK16. A recent notable finding has been the confirmation for the role of heterozygous mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA) as risk factors for Parkinson disease. Finally, association studies have nominated genetic variation in the leucine-rich repeat and Ig containing 1 gene (LINGO1) as a risk for both Parkinson disease and essential tremor, providing the first genetic evidence of a link between the two conditions. Summary Although undoubtedly genes remain to be identified, considerable progress has been achieved in the understanding of the genetic basis of Parkinson disease. This same effort is now required for essential tremor. The use of next-generation high-throughput sequencing and genotyping technologies will help pave the way for future insight leading to advances in diagnosis, prevention and cure. PMID:20489616

  20. [Diet therapy in Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Vilming, S T

    1995-04-20

    The significance of restrictions on protein for patients with Parkinson's disease is reviewed. Large neutral amino acids and levodopa share the same saturated carrier system through the blood-brain-barrier. Fluctuating patients are sensitive to a decreased supply of levodopa from the blood, and clinical studies show that an increased concentration of large neutral amino acids in the blood decreases mobility and reduces "on-time". A reduction of protein intake to 0.75-0.8 g/kg body weight/day has been recommended. A protein redistribution diet implying that less than 10% of the daily protein is taken in daytime and the rest in the evening, gives best results. However, in the elderly, protein restrictions may lead to a lasting negative nitrogen balance, and even in younger patients the supply of certain minerals and vitamins may become too low or marginally adequate. The diet must therefore be used with caution.

  1. Nuclear microscopy in Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Lee, T.; Thong, P. S. P.; Tang, S. M.

    1995-09-01

    Rats have been subjected to unilateral lesioning with the selective neurotoxin 6-OHDA in order to induce Parkinsonism. Analysis using the NUS Nuclear Microscope facility have shown that iron levels are raised by an average of 26% in the lesioned subtantia nigra region of the brain compared with the non-lesioned side. In addition the background tissue level of iron is also elevated by 31% in the lesioned side, indicating that there is a general increase in iron levels as a result of the lesioning. This result is consistent with the other observations that other diseases of the brain are frequently associated with altered iron levels (eg. progressive nuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis).

  2. Neuroprotective therapy in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Le, Weidong

    2006-01-01

    During the past decade, there has been a remarkable progress in our understanding of the biology of Parkinson disease (PD), which has been translated into searching for novel therapy for PD. Much focus is shifted from the development of drugs that only relieve PD symptoms to new generation of remedies that can potentially protect dopaminergic neurons and modify the disease course. Several novel therapeutic approaches have been tested in preclinical experiments and in clinical trials, including molecules targeting on genes involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, neurotrophic factors critical for dopaminergic neuron survival and function, new generation of dopamine receptor agonists that may possess neuroprotective effects, and agents of antioxidation, antiinflammation, and antiapoptosis. The results of these studies will shed new light to our hope that PD can be cured in the future.

  3. Sleep Disorders in Atypical Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Sabra M.; Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorders are commonly seen in atypical parkinsonism, with particular disorders occurring more frequently in specific parkinsonian disorders. Multiple systems atrophy (MSA) is a synucleinopathy often associated with nocturnal stridor which is a serious, but treatable condition highly specific to MSA. In addition, this disorder is strongly associated with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD), which is also seen in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). RBD is far less prevalent in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), which is a tauopathy. Insomnia and impaired sleep architecture are the most common sleep abnormalities seen in PSP. Corticobasilar degeneration (CBD) is also a tauopathy, but has far fewer sleep complaints associated with it than PSP. In this manuscript we review the spectrum of sleep dysfunction across the atypical parkinsonian disorders, emphasize the importance of evaluating for sleep disorders in patients with parkinsonian symptoms, and point to sleep characteristics that can provide diagnostic clues to the underlying parkinsonian disorder. PMID:24955381

  4. Parkinson's disease and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Carina C; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-02-22

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the "primed" microglia into an "active" state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease.

  5. Parkinson's Disease and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the “primed” microglia into an “active” state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease. PMID:21403862

  6. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hisahara, Shin; Shimohama, Shun

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic) neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa) significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first choice to delay the starting of L-dopa therapy. In advanced stage of PD, they are also used as adjunct therapy together with L-dopa. DA receptor agonists act by stimulation of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors. Despite the usefulness, they could be causative drugs for valvulopathy and nonmotor complication such as DA dysregulation syndrome (DDS). In this paper, physiological characteristics of DA receptor familyare discussed. We also discuss the validity, benefits, and specific adverse effects of pharmaceutical DA receptor agonist. PMID:25954517

  7. Stapedial reflex in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Murofushi, T; Yamane, M; Osanai, R

    1992-01-01

    In 27 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), stapedial reflexes were measured using impedance audiometry and compared with those of 11 age-matched control subjects. The reflex threshold of PD patients was lower than that of control subjects. A prolongation of contraction time (C50) and relaxation time (D50) was revealed. Between patients with and without L-dopa, there was no significant difference for any reflex parameter. But, the D50 of patients without anticholinergic drugs was longer than that of patients with anticholinergic drugs. The authors could not find any relationship between the severity of PD and the reflex parameters. The authors assume that the prolongation of reflex parameters might be attributed to the hyperactivity of the indirect pathways of the stapedial reflex.

  8. Premotor Diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Heinz

    2017-08-03

    Typical Parkinsonian symptoms consist of bradykinesia plus rigidity and/or resting tremor. Some time later postural instability occurs. Pre-motor symptoms such as hyposmia, constipation, REM sleep behavior disorder and depression may antecede these motor symptoms for years. It would be ideal, if we had a biomarker which would allow to predict who with one or two of these pre-motor symptoms will develop the movement disorder Parkinson's disease (PD). Thus, it is interesting to learn that biopsies of the submandibular gland or colon biopsies may be a means to predict PD, if there is a high amout of abnormally folded alpha-synuclein and phosphorylated alpha-synuclein. This would be of relevance if we would have available means to stop the propagation of abnormal alpha-synuclein which is otherwise one of the reasons of this spreading disease PD.

  9. Initiation of Parkinson's disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Heinz

    2008-09-01

    Parkinson therapy should be commenced as soon as patients feel impaired by motor or other symptoms. Recently it has been stated, however, to start treatment immediately after the diagnosis of PD has been made, in order to offer some neuroprotection to active dopaminergic neurons and to prevent deleterious compensatory mechanisms in dopaminergic cells. The selection of the medication depends on the state of the disease, the clinical symptoms, concomitant diseases and age. In de novo patients, most guidelines, including those of the German Neurological Society, advocate to start with a dopamine agonist. In my opinion, initial treatment with a MAO-B-inhibitor and subsequent combination with a long-acting dopamine agonist may be even more promising with regard to neuroprotection, modification of the disease, avoidance of dyskinesia and good motor improvement.

  10. Therapeutic directions for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The focus on disease-modifying treatments and cures for Parkinson's disease (PD) has raised expectations for quantum leaps and overshadowed incremental gains that have been slowly achieved. Large multi-center clinical trials such as DATATOP and PRECEPT keep on generating new knowledge that is relevant to clinical care as well as experimental therapeutics. The largely unforeseen relationship between circulating uric acid and the occurrence and progression of PD was developed and confirmed in these clinical trials. Systematic follow-up of clinical trial cohorts after conclusion of the interventional phase provides added value that continues to inform about natural history, state and trait biomarkers, and genotype-phenotype relationships. These efforts are enhanced by data mining, public reporting, and timely sharing of data and biological samples.

  11. Finger tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lakie, M; Mutch, W J

    1989-03-01

    Finger tremor was investigated in 20 patients (age range 54-88 yr) diagnosed as suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease and six controls of a similar age and no known neurological abnormality. In nine of the patients tremor was not clinically obvious. When the tremor of these patients was recorded immediately after voluntary movement and subjected to instrumental analysis there were consistently observable differences from the controls. Such analysis may have diagnostic potential when there is clinical uncertainty. Surface EMG recordings were obtained from four patients. One patient had a large resting tremor with obvious reciprocating activity in flexors and extensors; in the others who had no symptomatic tremor there was reciprocating activity only after movement, and this died away in a few seconds as the induced tremor disappeared.

  12. Medio-lateral balance impairment differentiates between Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Nonnekes, Jorik; Aerts, Marjolein B; Abdo, W F; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2014-01-01

    In early disease stages, it can be difficult to differentiate clinically between Parkinson's disease and the various forms of atypical parkinsonism, like multiple system atrophy or progressive supranuclear palsy. Balance impairment in the medio-lateral plane (i.e. sideways) is often seen in patients with a form of atypical parkinsonism, but not in patients with Parkinson's disease. This is reflected by the distance between the feet during gait, which is typically normal (or even narrow) in Parkinson's disease, but widened in atypical parkinsonism. Estimating this stance width depends on subjective judgement, and is difficult to quantify in clinical practice. Here, we emphasize that this medio-lateral balance impairment can also be revealed using two simple tests: (1) inability to perform tandem gait (taking one or more side steps being abnormal); and (2) self-report by patients who have lost the ability to ride a bicycle. Both tests have a good diagnostic yield in differentiating between Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism, even early in the course of the disease.

  13. Reliability and Validity of 39-Item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire and Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Jesus-Ribeiro, Joana; Vieira, Elsa; Ferreira, Pedro; Januário, Cristina; Freire, António

    2017-05-31

    Parkinson's disease has a significant impact in quality of life, which can be assessed with 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire and Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire. This study aimed to evaluate the reliability and validity of these scales in Portuguese patients. Reliability was assessed through internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) and reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient). Regarding construct validity, we performed one-way analysis of variance across different groups according to modified Hoehn and Yahr scale. For criterion validity, we compared both scales with each other and with the Short Form 36-item Health Survey. In a total of 100 patients with Parkinson's disease, Cronbach's alpha ranged for 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire between 0.66 - 0.98, and for Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, between 0.78 - 0.98. Intraclass correlation coefficient for 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire ranged between 0.49 - 0.96, and for Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, ranged between 0.65 - 0.96. Both scales showed, in general, capacity to discriminate differences among patients in the different stages of disease. The scales presented moderate to strong magnitude correlations with some Short Form 36-item Health Survey domains. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for most domains were satisfactory. Overall, it has been demonstrated good reproducibility, as well as construct and criterion validity. The Portuguese versions of both scales showed to be valid and reliable.

  14. Dopaminergic agonists in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso Cánovas, A; Luquin Piudo, R; García Ruiz-Espiga, P; Burguera, J A; Campos Arillo, V; Castro, A; Linazasoro, G; López Del Val, J; Vela, L; Martínez Castrillo, J C

    2014-05-01

    Non-ergoline dopamine agonists (DA) are effective treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD). This review presents the pharmacology, evidence of efficacy and safety profile of pramipexole, ropinirole, and rotigotine, and practical recommendations are given regarding their use in clinical practice. Extended-release formulations of pramipexole and ropinirole and transdermal continuous delivery rotigotine patches are currently available; these may contribute to stabilising of plasma levels. In early PD, the three drugs significantly improve disability scales, delay time to dyskinesia and allow a later introduction of levodopa. In late PD they reduced total 'off'-time, improved Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in both 'on' and 'off' state and allowed a reduction in total levodopa dosage. A significant improvement in quality of life scales has also been demonstrated. Extended-release formulations have proved to be non-inferior to the immediate release formulations and are better tolerated (ropinirole). Despite a generally good safety profile, serious adverse events, such as impulse control disorder and sleep attacks, need to be routinely monitored. Although combination therapy has not been addressed in scientific literature, certain combinations, such as apomorphine and another DA, may be helpful. Switching from one DA to another is feasible and safe, although in the first days an overlap of dopaminergic side effects may occur. When treatment with DA is stopped abruptly, dopamine withdrawal syndrome may present. Suspending any DA, especially pramipexole, has been linked to onset of apathy, which may be severe. New non-ergotine DAs are a valuable option for the treatment of both early and late PD. Despite their good safety profile, serious adverse effects may appear; these effects may have a pathoplastic effect on the course of PD and need to be monitored. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bose, Anindita; Beal, M Flint

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. About 2% of the population above the age of 60 is affected by the disease. The pathological hallmarks of the disease include the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies that are made of α-synuclein. Several theories have been suggested for the pathogenesis of PD, of which mitochondrial dysfunction plays a pivotal role in both sporadic and familial forms of the disease. Dysfunction of the mitochondria that is caused by bioenergetic defects, mutations in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA gene mutations linked to mitochondria, and changes in dynamics of the mitochondria such fusion or fission, changes in size and morphology, alterations in trafficking or transport, altered movement of mitochondria, impairment of transcription, and the presence of mutated proteins associated with mitochondria are implicated in PD. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the mechanisms that can cause mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. We bring to the forefront, new signaling pathways such as the retromer-trafficking pathway and its implication in the disease and also provide a brief overview of therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial defects in PD. Bioenergetic defects, mutations in mitochondrial DNA, nuclear DNA gene mutations, alterations in mitochondrial dynamics, alterations in trafficking/transport and mitochondrial movement, abnormal size and morphology, impairment of transcription and the presence of mutated proteins associated with mitochondria are implicated in PD. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction in PD and bring to the forefront new signaling pathways that may be involved in PD. We also provide an overview of therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial defects in PD. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Vowel articulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Skodda, Sabine; Visser, Wenke; Schlegel, Uwe

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze vowel articulation in Parkinson's disease (PD) speakers suffering from mild hypokinetic dysarthria as compared with healthy controls in correlation to net speech rate (NSR) and intonation variability (F(0)SD). Furthermore, we intended to reveal possible correlations among vowel articulation, global motor performance, and stage of disease. We examined 68 PD patients (34 male) with mild dysarthria (1 point according to the "speech" item 18 of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale/UPDRS-III) and 32 age-matched control persons (16 male) using a reading task with subsequent acoustical analysis. F1 and F2 frequency values of the vowels /a/, /i/, and /u/ were extracted from defined words within the text. Description of vowel articulation was based on measures of triangular vowel space area (tVSA) and Vowel Articulation Index (VAI). PD patients were scored according to UPDRS-III and Hoehn and Yahr stages. VAI values were significantly reduced in male and female PD patients as compared with the accordant control group, whereas tVSA was only reduced in the male PD speakers. NSR was negatively correlated to tVSA and VAI only in female PD speakers. No correlations were seen between vowel articulation and UPDRS-III and stage of disease. VAI seem to be superior to tVSA in the description of impaired vowel articulation in PD. Reduced VAI could be detected in male and female parkinsonian speakers suffering only from mild dysarthria with preserved speech intelligibility and therefore might be applicable to identify subclinical changes of vowel articulation. Moreover, some aspects of altered speech performance in PD seem to feature some gender-specific patterns, which justify further investigation. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Trajectories of prediagnostic functioning in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Darweesh, Sirwan K L; Verlinden, Vincentius J A; Stricker, Bruno H; Hofman, Albert; Koudstaal, Peter J; Ikram, M Arfan

    2017-02-01

    SEE BREEN AND LANG DOI101093/AWW321 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: At the time of clinical diagnosis, patients with Parkinson's disease already have a wide range of motor and non-motor features that affect their daily functioning. However, the temporal sequence of occurrence of these features remains largely unknown. We studied trajectories of daily functioning and motor and non-motor features in the 23 years preceding Parkinson's disease diagnosis by performing a nested case-control study within the prospective Rotterdam study. Between 1990 and 2013, we repeatedly performed standardized assessments of daily functioning (Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire, Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale), potential prediagnostic motor (hypo- and bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity, postural imbalance, postural abnormalities) and non-motor features of Parkinson's disease, including cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination, Stroop Test, Letter-Digit-Substitution Test, Word Fluency Test), mood (Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Scale), and autonomic function (blood pressure, laxative use). In addition, the cohort was followed-up for the onset of clinical Parkinson's disease using several overlapping modalities, including repeated in-person examinations, as well as complete access to medical records and specialist letters of study participants. During follow-up, 109 individuals were diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, and each case was matched to 10 controls based on age and sex (total n = 1199). Subsequently, we compared prediagnostic trajectories of daily functioning and other features between Parkinson's disease cases and controls. From 7 years before diagnosis onwards, prediagnostic Parkinson's disease cases more commonly had problems in instrumental activities of daily functioning, and more frequently showed signs of movement poverty and slowness, tremor and subtle cognitive deficits. In the

  18. Extending palliative care to patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sarah K

    2010-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease have an illness which shortens their life and involves a heavy symptom burden for patient and carer. This article discusses some common palliative care issues pertinent to patients with Parkinson's disease.

  19. Does a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Does a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk? Study showed 3 or more servings daily ... a slight rise in the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Experts who reviewed the study stressed that ...

  20. Study Looks At Parkinson's Effect on Life Span

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_165589.html Study Looks at Parkinson's Effect on Life Span 2-year difference seen ... HealthDay News) -- People with brain diseases such as Parkinson's and dementia with Lewy bodies die about two ...

  1. Orthostatic Hypotension (Low Blood Pressure) and Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Team Finding Resources Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  2. Is It Parkinson's or Something Else? Blood Test Might Tell

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163484.html Is It Parkinson's or Something Else? Blood Test Might Tell ... for prime time," Parkinson's disease experts said. But, it marks progress in the quest for an objective ...

  3. Hepatitis Infection May Raise Risk for Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164379.html Hepatitis Infection May Raise Risk for Parkinson's Disease New ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with the liver infection hepatitis may be at heightened risk of developing Parkinson's ...

  4. Parkinson Disease: Treating Symptoms Unrelated to Muscle Movement

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAMILIES PARKINSON DISEASE: TREATING SYMPTOMS UNRELATED TO MUSCLE MOVEMENT This fact sheet may help you understand which ... help Parkinson disease (PD) symptoms unrelated to muscle movement. Neurologists from the American Academy of Neurology are ...

  5. Exercise May Be Real Medicine for Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Human Services. More Health News on: Exercise and Physical Fitness Parkinson's Disease Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Exercise and Physical Fitness Parkinson's Disease About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer ...

  6. [Genetics and present therapy options in Parkinson's disease: a review].

    PubMed

    Bereznai, Benjamin; Molnar, Mária Judit

    2009-05-30

    In the past years, six monogenic forms of Parkinson disease have clearly been associated with this movement disorder. The most frequent forms are LRRK2- and Parkin-associated Parkinson disease. Currently, a genetic diagnosis does not change the therapy, the genes involved in genetic Parkinson disease help to understand the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of Parkinson disease. Beside the overview of the molecular-genetic basis, we give a review about genetic testing, pharmacological and other multidisciplinary treatment options.

  7. Dopamine Transporter Imaging Assessment of Parkinson’s Disease Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    terminal integrity, will provide a quantitative biomarker of Parkinson’s disease progression in subjects with early Parkinson’s disease during a rime...dopa on the rate of progression of Parkinson’s disease . All subjects have been and will be recruited and clinically evaluated through their participation...in early Parkinson’s disease , whether the rate of neuronal degeneration is affected by L-dopa, a potential neurotoxin, and whether the changes in

  8. Placebo influences on dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Christopher G; Laska, Eugene; Hicking, Christine; Damier, Philippe; Müller, Thomas; Nutt, John; Warren Olanow, C; Rascol, Olivier; Russ, Hermann

    2008-04-15

    Clinical features that are prognostic indicators of placebo response among dyskinetic Parkinson's disease patients were determined. Placebo-associated improvements occur in Parkinsonism, but responses in dyskinesia have not been studied. Placebo data from two multicenter studies with identical design comparing sarizotan to placebo for treating dyskinesia were accessed. Sarizotan (2 mg/day) failed to improve dyskinesia compared with placebo, but both treatments improved dyskinesia compared with baseline. Stepwise regression identified baseline characteristics that influenced dyskinesia response to placebo, and these factors were entered into a logistic regression model to quantify their influence on placebo-related dyskinesia improvements and worsening. Because placebo-associated improvements in Parkinsonism have been attributed to heightened dopaminergic activity, we also examined the association between changes in Parkinsonism and dyskinesia. Four hundred eighty-four subjects received placebo treatment; 178 met criteria for placebo-associated dyskinesia improvement and 37 for dyskinesia worsening. Older age, lower baseline Parkinsonism score, and lower total daily levodopa doses were associated with placebo-associated improvement, whereas lower baseline dyskinesia score was associated with placebo-associated worsening. Placebo-associated dyskinesia changes were not correlated with Parkinsonism changes, and all effects in the sarizotan group were statistically explained by the placebo-effect regression model. Dyskinesias are affected by placebo treatment. The absence of correlation between placebo-induced changes in dyskinesia and Parkinsonism argues against a dopaminergic activation mechanism to explain placebo-associated improvements in dyskinesia. The magnitude and variance of placebo-related changes and the factors that influence them can be helpful in the design of future clinical trials of antidyskinetic agents.

  9. Combined Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Apparent Transverse Relaxation Rate Differentiate Parkinson Disease and Atypical Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Du, G; Lewis, M M; Kanekar, S; Sterling, N W; He, L; Kong, L; Li, R; Huang, X

    2017-05-01

    Both diffusion tensor imaging and the apparent transverse relaxation rate have shown promise in differentiating Parkinson disease from atypical parkinsonism (particularly multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy). The objective of the study was to assess the ability of DTI, the apparent transverse relaxation rate, and their combination for differentiating Parkinson disease, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and controls. A total of 106 subjects (36 controls, 35 patients with Parkinson disease, 16 with multiple system atrophy, and 19 with progressive supranuclear palsy) were included. DTI and the apparent transverse relaxation rate measures from the striatal, midbrain, limbic, and cerebellar regions were obtained and compared among groups. The discrimination performance of DTI and the apparent transverse relaxation rate among groups was assessed by using Elastic-Net machine learning and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Compared with controls, patients with Parkinson disease showed significant apparent transverse relaxation rate differences in the red nucleus. Compared to those with Parkinson disease, patients with both multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy showed more widespread changes, extending from the midbrain to striatal and cerebellar structures. The pattern of changes, however, was different between the 2 groups. For instance, patients with multiple system atrophy showed decreased fractional anisotropy and an increased apparent transverse relaxation rate in the subthalamic nucleus, whereas patients with progressive supranuclear palsy showed an increased mean diffusivity in the hippocampus. Combined, DTI and the apparent transverse relaxation rate were significantly better than DTI or the apparent transverse relaxation rate alone in separating controls from those with Parkinson disease/multiple system atrophy/progressive supranuclear palsy; controls from those with Parkinson

  10. Database for Parkinson Disease Mutations and Rare Variants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    for Parkinson Disease Mutations and Rare Variants 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jeffery M...Vance, J.M.: “Parkinson Disease Variant Database”. MDS 19th International Congress of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders, San Diego, CA, June 14

  11. Myopathic camptocormia in a patient with levodopa unresponsive parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Linazasoro, G; Suárez, J A

    2002-03-01

    Camptocormia may be seen in Parkinson's disease. As no changes in paraspinal musculature are found, it is attributed to dystonia or extreme rigidity. However, several cases of parkinsonism and dropped head due to neck extensor myopathy have been reported. We report the first patient with levodopa unresponsive parkinsonism and camptocormia of muscular origin.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gautier, C A; Corti, O; Brice, A

    2014-05-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (ND) include a wide spectrum of diseases characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunctions or degeneration. With an estimated cost of 135 billion € in 2010 in the European Union (Olesen et al., 2012), they put an enormous economic as well as social burden on modern societies. Hence, they have been the subject of a huge amount of research for the last fifty years. For many of these diseases, our understanding of their profound causes is incomplete and this hinders the discovery of efficient therapies. ND form a highly heterogeneous group of diseases affecting various neuronal subpopulations reflecting different origins and different pathological mechanisms. However, some common themes in the physiopathology of these disorders are emerging. There is growing evidence that mitochondrial dysfunctions play a pivotal role at some point in the course of neurodegeneration. In some cases (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), impairment of mitochondrial functions probably occurs late in the course of the disease. In a subset of ND, current evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunctions play a more seminal role in neuronal demise. Parkinson's disease (PD) presents one of the strongest cases based in part on post-mortem studies that have shown mitochondrial impairment (e.g. reduced complex I activity) and oxidative damage in idiopathic PD brains. The occurrence of PD is largely sporadic, but clinical syndromes resembling sporadic PD have been linked to specific environmental insults or to mutations in at least 5 distinct genes (α-synuclein, parkin, DJ-1, PINK1 and LRRK2). It is postulated that the elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the selective dopaminergic degeneration in familial and environmental Parkinsonism should provide important clues to the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for idiopathic PD. Hence, numerous cellular and animal models of the disease have been generated that mimic these

  13. [Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Van den Heuvel, O A; Van der Werf, Y D; Groenewegen, H J; Foncke, E M J; Berendse, H W

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterised not only by the classic triad of bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor, but also by the frequent occurrence of various non-motor symptoms such as the impulse control disorders (pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive buying, binge eating, punding and dopamine dependency). To increase insight into the clinical presentation, risk factors, treatment and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease. Relevant literature was reviewed. Impulse control disorders belong to an important group of neuropsychiatric disorders that occur at some point in 5-10% of patients with Parkinson's disease. They generally occur in conjunction with dopaminergic medication and can have a marked social, relational and/ or financial impact. Early recognition of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease is important and a close collaboration between the neurologist and the psychiatrist is essential in order to ensure correct diagnosis and the best possible treatment. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease show considerable phenomenological overlap with other repetitive behaviours within the impulsive-compulsive spectrum of disorders to which the obsessive-compulsive disorders and addiction disorders belong. The overlap can possibly be explained by a shared pathophysiological mechanism involving an imbalance between the direct and indirect pathways of the dorsal and ventral frontal-striatal circuits.

  14. [Cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Abe, Nobuhito; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-04-01

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting in motor symptoms and cognitive deficits. Neuropsychological studies have suggested that patients with Parkinson disease exhibit a broad range of cognitive deficits even in the early stages of the disease. In this review, we discuss the neuropsychological evidence for cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson disease, outlining the different domains of cognitive disturbance. First, we review previous findings on executive dysfunction, which is associated with a disruption in frontostriatal circuitry mainly driven by dopaminergic dysmodulation. Executive dysfunction is the core symptom in the cognitive deficits in Parkinson disease. Second, we focus on impairment in different domains of memory function, such as short-term and long-term memory. Third, we discuss the pattern of cognitive deficits in visuospatial ability, ranging from basic perceptual processes to rather complex motor skills. Next, we summarize the profile of cognitive deficits in language, although previous findings are mixed and hence this topic is relatively controversial. Finally, we introduce several recent findings on social cognitive deficits, which is a new area of research that has emerged in the past decade. We also discuss the possible neural mechanisms underlying each domain of cognitive deficits in patients with Parkinson disease.

  15. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology. PMID:24672633

  16. Mortalin inhibition in experimental Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chiasserini, Davide; Tozzi, Alessandro; de Iure, Antonio; Tantucci, Michela; Susta, Federica; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Koya, Keizo; Binaglia, Luciano; Calabresi, Paolo

    2011-08-01

    Among heat shock proteins, mortalin has been linked to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In the present work a rat model of Parkinson's disease was used to analyze the expression of striatal proteins and, more specifically, mortalin expression. The possible involvement of mortalin in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis was further investigated by utilizing an electrophysiological approach and pharmacological inhibition of mortalin in both the physiological and the parkinsonian states. Proteomic analysis was used to investigate changes in striatal protein expression in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease. The electrophysiological effects of MKT-077, a rhodamine-123 analogue acting as an inhibitor of mortalin, were measured by field potential recordings from corticostriatal brain slices obtained from control, sham-operated, and 6-hydroxydopamine-denervated animals. Slices in the presence of rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, were also analyzed. Proteomic analysis revealed downregulation of mortalin in the striata of 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats in comparison with sham-operated animals. MKT-077 reduced corticostriatal field potential amplitude in physiological conditions, inducing membrane depolarization and inward current in striatal medium spiny neurons. In addition, we observed that concentrations of MKT-077 not inducing any electrophysiological effect in physiological conditions caused significant changes in striatal slices from parkinsonian animals as well as in slices treated with a submaximal concentration of rotenone. These findings suggest a critical link between mortalin function and mitochondrial activity in both physiological and pathological conditions mimicking Parkinson's disease.

  17. Copper and copper proteins in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Montes, Sergio; Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  18. Vocal tract characteristics in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gillivan-Murphy, Patricia; Carding, Paul; Miller, Nick

    2016-06-01

    Voice tremor is strongly linked to the Parkinson's disease speech-voice symptom complex. Little is known about the underlying anatomic source(s) of voice tremor when it occurs. We review recent literature addressing this issue. Additionally we report findings from a study we conducted employing rating of vocal tract structures viewed using nasolaryngoscopy during vocal and nonspeech tasks. In Parkinson's disease, using laryngeal electromyography, tremor has not been identified in muscles in the vocal folds even when perceived auditorily. Preliminary findings using nasolaryngoscopy suggest that Parkinson's disease voice tremor is not associated with the vocal folds and may involve the palate, the global larynx, and the arytenoids. Tremor in the vertical larynx on /a/, and tremor in the arytenoid cartilages on /s/ differentiated patients with Parkinson's disease from neurologically healthy controls. Visual reliable detection of tremor when it is absent or borderline present, is challenging. Parkinson's disease voice tremor is likely to be related to oscillatory movement in structures across the vocal tract rather than just the vocal folds. To progress clinical practice, more refined tools for the visual rating of tremor would be beneficial. How far voice tremor represents a functionally significant factor for speakers would also add to the literature.

  19. The relationship of negative schizophrenia to parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Kay, S R

    1990-11-01

    The positive-negative distinction of schizophrenia has emerged as a valid means of clarifying its heterogeneity. Despite evidence that the two symptom classes may reflect different dimensions of the disease, there is presently no integrated model for understanding of the pathophysiology of these symptoms and their co-occurrence in schizophrenia. We propose that negative phenomena of schizophrenia may be a variant of Parkinsonism. This view is supported by the overlap with Parkinsonism in terms of clinical features, neurochemistry, pharmacology, as well as neuroradiological and neuropathological aspects. As such, negative symptoms may be a manifestation of disease of the basal ganglia and constitute the core pathology in schizophrenia. Positive symptoms, conversely, may reflect an "accessory" process related to a compensatory increase in striatal and limbic dopamine activity following an injury to the dopaminergic system. In the present communication we present a series of studies that support the association of negative schizophrenia and Parkinsonism. Based on this evidence, we suggest that schizophrenic patients with prominent negative symptoms might be managed like patients with Parkinson's disease, namely, with dopaminergic drugs and MAO-B inhibitors. Finally, the association of negative schizophrenia with Parkinsonism raises the possibility that adrenal medullary tissue transplantation, which may benefit a selected group of Parkinsonian patients, may be a future promising therapy for refractory negative schizophrenia.

  20. Dysregulation of the causative genes for hereditary parkinsonism in the midbrain in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Joong; Jeon, Junbeom; Shin, Jaemoon; Kim, Nan Young; Hong, Jeong Hoon; Oh, Jae-Min; Hong, SangKyoon; Kim, Yeo Jin; Kim, Young-Eun; Kang, Suk Yun; Ma, Hyeo-Il; Lee, Unjoo; Yoon, Jeehee

    2017-08-01

    Many hereditary movement disorders with complex phenotypes without a locus symbol prefix for familial PD present as parkinsonism; however, the dysregulation of genes associated with these phenotypes in the SNpc of PD patients has not been systematically studied. Gene set enrichment analyses were performed using 10 previously published genome-wide expression datasets obtained by laser-captured microdissection of pigmented neurons in the SNpc. A custom-curated gene set for hereditary parkinsonism consisting of causative genes (n = 78) related to disorders with a parkinsonism phenotype, but not necessarily idiopathic or monogenic PD, was constructed from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database. In 9 of the 10 gene expression data sets, gene set enrichment analysis showed that the disease-causing genes for hereditary parkinsonism were downregulated in the SNpc in PD patients compared to controls (nominal P values <0.05 in five studies). Among the 63 leading edge subset genes representing downregulated genes in PD, 79.4% were genes without a locus symbol prefix for familial PD. A meta-gene set enrichment analysis performed with a random-effect model showed an association between the gene set for hereditary parkinsonism and PD with a negative normalized enrichment score value (-1.40; 95% CI: -1.52∼-1.28; P < 6.2E-05). Disease-causing genes with a parkinsonism phenotype are downregulated in the SNpc in PD. Our study highlights the importance of genes associated with hereditary movement disorders with parkinsonism in understanding the pathogenesis of PD. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  1. PDON: Parkinson's disease ontology for representation and modeling of the Parkinson's disease knowledge domain.

    PubMed

    Younesi, Erfan; Malhotra, Ashutosh; Gündel, Michaela; Scordis, Phil; Kodamullil, Alpha Tom; Page, Matt; Müller, Bernd; Springstubbe, Stephan; Wüllner, Ullrich; Scheller, Dieter; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2015-09-22

    Despite the unprecedented and increasing amount of data, relatively little progress has been made in molecular characterization of mechanisms underlying Parkinson's disease. In the area of Parkinson's research, there is a pressing need to integrate various pieces of information into a meaningful context of presumed disease mechanism(s). Disease ontologies provide a novel means for organizing, integrating, and standardizing the knowledge domains specific to disease in a compact, formalized and computer-readable form and serve as a reference for knowledge exchange or systems modeling of disease mechanism. The Parkinson's disease ontology was built according to the life cycle of ontology building. Structural, functional, and expert evaluation of the ontology was performed to ensure the quality and usability of the ontology. A novelty metric has been introduced to measure the gain of new knowledge using the ontology. Finally, a cause-and-effect model was built around PINK1 and two gene expression studies from the Gene Expression Omnibus database were re-annotated to demonstrate the usability of the ontology. The Parkinson's disease ontology with a subclass-based taxonomic hierarchy covers the broad spectrum of major biomedical concepts from molecular to clinical features of the disease, and also reflects different views on disease features held by molecular biologists, clinicians and drug developers. The current version of the ontology contains 632 concepts, which are organized under nine views. The structural evaluation showed the balanced dispersion of concept classes throughout the ontology. The functional evaluation demonstrated that the ontology-driven literature search could gain novel knowledge not present in the reference Parkinson's knowledge map. The ontology was able to answer specific questions related to Parkinson's when evaluated by experts. Finally, the added value of the Parkinson's disease ontology is demonstrated by ontology-driven modeling of PINK1

  2. Identifying Pilots with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Clem, Peter A; Navathe, Pooshan D; Drane, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    In 2012 the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare produced a report titled 'Dementia in Australia.'(2) The report noted that the number of people with dementia in Australia would reach almost 400,000 by 2020. Australia is a jurisdiction which does not impose a mandatory retirement age for pilots. With an aging population it was hypothesized that conditions such as Parkinson's disease (PD) were likely to be seen more commonly by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA). It was decided that this was an appropriate time to retrospectively study the data held by CASA. An interrogation of CASA databases was undertaken. Data was produced comparing percentage of Class 1 certificate holders over 60 yr of age against time. A cohort of pilots and controllers with PD was identified. The history of the cases was reviewed. The study confirms that the pilot population is aging in line with population trends. Over a period from 1992 to 2012, 22 cases of pilots and controllers with PD were identified. The study confirmed that PD will be of increased relevance over the next decade. Gaps between policy and practice managing past cases were identified. Updated guidelines have been published aiming to address the deficiencies identified in the study. Historically pilots and controllers have been able to maintain certification for an average of 3.75 yr. This information should be of benefit to clinicians, pilots, and controllers when considering occupation and treatment options.

  3. [Psychotic symptoms in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Fénelon, Gilles

    2006-12-01

    About one third of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience hallucinations, mostly of a complex visual type, less often auditory or tactile. Minor hallucinatory phenomena, including sense of presence, passage hallucinations and visual illusions are frequent. Hallucinations primarily occur in a context of clear sensorium in patients with longstanding PD. They are more frequent in the evening or during the night. Insight in the hallucinatory nature of the phenomenon may be retained, partial, fluctuating, or abolished. An altered insight is common when cognitive impairment is present, and may be associated with delusions and (or) delusional misidentifications. Pharmacological factors such as dopaminergic treatment clearly trigger or increase the occurence of hallucinations in PD. However, in the recent years, emphasis has been made on disease-related factors including cognitive impairment, diurnal somnolence, visual disorders (either contrast and color discrimination impairment due to PD, or coincident ocular disorders), long duration of PD, late onset, severe axial impairment and autonomic dysfunction. The pathophysiology of hallucinations of PD is poorly understood but is likely to be multifactorial. The first steps of the treatment consist in giving information and reassurance to the patient and his/her caregiver, re-evaluating the antiparkinsonian treatment and associated medications, and evaluating the patient for mood disorder, visual impairment, and cognitive impairment. Cholinesterase inhibitors, when prescribed for associated cognitive impairment, may be beneficial on hallucinations. In the more severe forms, clozapine has been proved to be safe and effective.

  4. Reading comprehension in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Murray, Laura L; Rutledge, Stefanie

    2014-05-01

    Although individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) self-report reading problems and experience difficulties in cognitive-linguistic functions that support discourse-level reading, prior research has primarily focused on sentence-level processing and auditory comprehension. Accordingly, the authors investigated the presence and nature of reading comprehension in PD, hypothesizing that (a) individuals with PD would display impaired accuracy and/or speed on reading comprehension tests and (b) reading performances would be correlated with cognitive test results. Eleven adults with PD and 9 age- and education-matched control participants completed tests that evaluated reading comprehension; general language and cognitive abilities; and aspects of attention, memory, and executive functioning. The PD group obtained significantly lower scores on several, but not all, reading comprehension, language, and cognitive measures. Memory, language, and disease severity were significantly correlated with reading comprehension for the PD group. Individuals in the early stages of PD without dementia or broad cognitive deficits can display reading comprehension difficulties, particularly for high- versus basic-level reading tasks. These reading difficulties are most closely related to memory, high-level language, and PD symptom severity status. The findings warrant additional research to delineate further the types and nature of reading comprehension impairments experienced by individuals with PD.

  5. Imaging biomarkers in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David J; Pavese, Nicola

    2011-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons associated with intracellular Lewy inclusion bodies. The result is poverty of movement, increased muscle rigidity, and tremor at rest and on posture. Midbrain/nigral structural abnormalities can be demonstrated in vivo with both transcranial sonography (TCS) and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) while positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) ligands exist to demonstrate dopamine terminal dysfunction. These radiotracers are markers of dopamine storage capacity, vesicular monoamine and dopamine transporter availability. While loss of putamen dopaminergic function leads to motor disability, Lewy bodies not only target dopamine neurons but have also been observed in serotoninergic, noradrenergic, and cholinergic neurons. As a consequence, non-dopaminergic neurotransmission is also impaired resulting in non-motor symptoms including sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, dementia, and autonomic dysfunction. PET and SPECT ligands exist to interrogate the function of monoaminergic and cholinergic neurons. Cortical and limbic Lewy body disease is seen in more advanced PD and this can be detected with FDG PET as abnormal covariance between levels of resting brain metabolism in these regions. Additionally, widespread microglial activation can be detected in PD with PET. This review discusses the role of structural and functional imaging for understanding parkinsonian syndromes and aiding in their diagnosis and management.

  6. Pulmonary function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hovestadt, A; Bogaard, J M; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-01-01

    Pulmonary function was investigated in 31 consecutive patients with relatively severe Parkinson's disease. Clinical disability was assessed by Hoehn and Yahr scale, Northwestern University Disability Scale and Websterscore. All patients were on levodopa substitution therapy and used anticholinergics. Pulmonary function was investigated by spirography, determination of a maximal inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume curve and, when possible, maximal static mouth pressures were determined. Peak inspiratory and expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and maximal static mouth pressures were significantly below normal values. Vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and vital capacity were relatively normal. Nine patients had upper airway obstruction (UAO) as judged by abnormal values for peak inspiratory flow, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow and the ratio of maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow at 50%. Flow-volume curves were normal in eight patients; four patients demonstrated flow decelerations and accelerations (type A) and 16 had a rounded off flow-volume curve (type B). Type A can be explained by UAO and type B by a combination of decreased effective muscle strength and possible UAO. Overall results of pulmonary function tests in patients without any clinical signs or symptoms of pulmonary disease point to subclinical upper airway obstruction and decreased effective muscle strength in a significant proportion of patients. PMID:2926415

  7. Pulmonary function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hovestadt, A; Bogaard, J M; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-03-01

    Pulmonary function was investigated in 31 consecutive patients with relatively severe Parkinson's disease. Clinical disability was assessed by Hoehn and Yahr scale, Northwestern University Disability Scale and Websterscore. All patients were on levodopa substitution therapy and used anticholinergics. Pulmonary function was investigated by spirography, determination of a maximal inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume curve and, when possible, maximal static mouth pressures were determined. Peak inspiratory and expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and maximal static mouth pressures were significantly below normal values. Vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and vital capacity were relatively normal. Nine patients had upper airway obstruction (UAO) as judged by abnormal values for peak inspiratory flow, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow and the ratio of maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow at 50%. Flow-volume curves were normal in eight patients; four patients demonstrated flow decelerations and accelerations (type A) and 16 had a rounded off flow-volume curve (type B). Type A can be explained by UAO and type B by a combination of decreased effective muscle strength and possible UAO. Overall results of pulmonary function tests in patients without any clinical signs or symptoms of pulmonary disease point to subclinical upper airway obstruction and decreased effective muscle strength in a significant proportion of patients.

  8. Parkinson's disease protects against smoking?

    PubMed

    Allam, Mohamed Farouk; Campbell, Michael J; Del Castillo, Amparo Serrano; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to estimate the pooled risk of current and former smoking for Parkinson's disease (PD). We have reviewed all observational studies that evaluated the association between PD risk and smoking habit. Twenty six studies were identified: 21 case-control, 4 cohort and 1 cross-sectional. The cross-sectional study did not compare former with never smokers. These studies were carried out between 1968 and 2000. There was an obvious protective effect of current smoking in the pooled estimate [risk estimate 0.37 (95% confidence interval 0.33 to 0.41)]. Former versus never smokers had pooled risk estimate of 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.76 to 0.92). Current and former smoking do not, therefore, exert the same protective effect against PD so that it is unnecessary to postulate a biological mechanism through which smoking protects against PD. The results show that the reverse direction of causation is a more probable explanation, i.e. movement disorders of PD protect against smoking. Another explanation is that failure to develop strong smoking habits in early adult life might be a prodromal symptom of the disease and could perhaps be its first clinical manifestation.

  9. Genetic comorbidities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Saad, Mohamad; Noyce, Alastair J; Keller, Margaux F; Schrag, Anette; Bestwick, Jonathan P; Traynor, Bryan J; Gibbs, J Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G; Cookson, Mark R; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B

    2014-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a number of known genetic risk factors. Clinical and epidemiological studies have suggested the existence of intermediate factors that may be associated with additional risk of PD. We construct genetic risk profiles for additional epidemiological and clinical factors using known genome-wide association studies (GWAS) loci related to these specific phenotypes to estimate genetic comorbidity in a systematic review. We identify genetic risk profiles based on GWAS variants associated with schizophrenia and Crohn's disease as significantly associated with risk of PD. Conditional analyses adjusting for SNPs near loci associated with PD and schizophrenia or PD and Crohn's disease suggest that spatially overlapping loci associated with schizophrenia and PD account for most of the shared comorbidity, while variation outside of known proximal loci shared by PD and Crohn's disease accounts for their shared genetic comorbidity. We examine brain methylation and expression signatures proximal to schizophrenia and Crohn's disease loci to infer functional changes in the brain associated with the variants contributing to genetic comorbidity. We compare our results with a systematic review of epidemiological literature, while the findings are dissimilar to a degree; marginal genetic associations corroborate the directionality of associations across genetic and epidemiological data. We show a strong genetically defined level of comorbidity between PD and Crohn's disease as well as between PD and schizophrenia, with likely functional consequences of associated variants occurring in brain.

  10. Cognitive decline in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Aarsland, Dag; Creese, Byron; Politis, Marios; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Ffytche, Dominic H; Weintraub, Daniel; Ballard, Clive

    2017-04-01

    Dementia is a frequent problem encountered in advanced stages of Parkinson disease (PD). In recent years, research has focused on the pre-dementia stages of cognitive impairment in PD, including mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Several longitudinal studies have shown that MCI is a harbinger of dementia in PD, although the course is variable, and stabilization of cognition - or even reversal to normal cognition - is not uncommon. In addition to limbic and cortical spread of Lewy pathology, several other mechanisms are likely to contribute to cognitive decline in PD, and a variety of biomarker studies, some using novel structural and functional imaging techniques, have documented in vivo brain changes associated with cognitive impairment. The evidence consistently suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid-β42, a marker of comorbid Alzheimer disease (AD), predict future cognitive decline and dementia in PD. Emerging genetic evidence indicates that in addition to the APOE*ε4 allele (an established risk factor for AD), GBA mutations and SCNA mutations and triplications are associated with cognitive decline in PD, whereas the findings are mixed for MAPT polymorphisms. Cognitive enhancing medications have some effect in PD dementia, but no convincing evidence that progression from MCI to dementia can be delayed or prevented is available, although cognitive training has shown promising results.

  11. Cognitive Training in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Walton, Courtney C; Naismith, Sharon L; Lampit, Amit; Mowszowski, Loren; Lewis, Simon J G

    2017-03-01

    Cognitive impairment is now widely accepted as a fundamental aspect of Parkinson's disease (PD). Given the prevalence of cognitive impairment and the associated impact on well-being, evidence-based interventions are needed. However, while research is continually accumulating in order to better understand the pathology and trajectory of cognitive changes, treatment options lag behind. Nonpharmacological approaches are of particular interest in this group, given the typical polypharmacy already present in PD patients. In this regard, cognitive training (CT) is a relatively new and prominent therapeutic option with accumulating scientific support and increasing public awareness. Research has now established benefits across many different populations, and trials investigating the use of CT specifically in PD are becoming more common. We offer a brief summary of CT and its efficacy in PD samples to date, as well as discuss areas requiring further exploration in this group. Crucially, we suggest that CT should be supported as a research priority in PD, given both proven and potential benefits as a noninvasive and well-tolerated behavioral intervention for cognitive impairment.

  12. Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schrempf, Wiebke; Brandt, Moritz D; Storch, Alexander; Reichmann, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are very common and have an immense negative impact on their quality of life. Insomnia, daytime sleepiness with sleep attacks, restless-legs syndrome (RLS) and REM-sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) are the most frequent sleep disorders in PD. Neurodegenerative processes within sleep regulatory brain circuitries, antiparkinsonian (e.g., levodopa and dopamine agonists) and concomitant medication (e.g., antidepressants) as well as comorbidities or other non-motor symptoms (such as depression) are discussed as causative factors. For the diagnosis of sleep disturbances we recommend regular screening using validated questionnaires such as the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) or the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS), for evaluating daytime sleepiness we would suggest to use the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the inappropriate sleep composite score (ISCS) or the Stanford sleepiness scale (SSS). All of these questionnaires should be used in combination with a detailed medical history focusing on common sleep disorders and medication. If necessary, patients should be referred to sleep specialists or sleep laboratories for further investigations. Management of sleep disorders in PD patients usually starts with optimization of (dopaminergic) antiparkinsonian therapy followed by specific treatment of the sleep disturbances. Aside from these clinical issues of sleep disorders in PD, the concept of REM-sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) as an early sign for emerging neurodegenerative diseases is of pivotal interest for future research on biomarkers and neuroprotective treatment strategies of neurodegenerative diseases, and particularly PD.

  13. Genetic comorbidities in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Mike A.; Saad, Mohamad; Noyce, Alastair J.; Keller, Margaux F.; Schrag, Anette; Bestwick, Jonathan P.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G.; Cookson, Mark R.; Morris, Huw R.; Williams, Nigel; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nick; Hardy, John; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has a number of known genetic risk factors. Clinical and epidemiological studies have suggested the existence of intermediate factors that may be associated with additional risk of PD. We construct genetic risk profiles for additional epidemiological and clinical factors using known genome-wide association studies (GWAS) loci related to these specific phenotypes to estimate genetic comorbidity in a systematic review. We identify genetic risk profiles based on GWAS variants associated with schizophrenia and Crohn's disease as significantly associated with risk of PD. Conditional analyses adjusting for SNPs near loci associated with PD and schizophrenia or PD and Crohn's disease suggest that spatially overlapping loci associated with schizophrenia and PD account for most of the shared comorbidity, while variation outside of known proximal loci shared by PD and Crohn's disease accounts for their shared genetic comorbidity. We examine brain methylation and expression signatures proximal to schizophrenia and Crohn's disease loci to infer functional changes in the brain associated with the variants contributing to genetic comorbidity. We compare our results with a systematic review of epidemiological literature, while the findings are dissimilar to a degree; marginal genetic associations corroborate the directionality of associations across genetic and epidemiological data. We show a strong genetically defined level of comorbidity between PD and Crohn's disease as well as between PD and schizophrenia, with likely functional consequences of associated variants occurring in brain. PMID:24057672

  14. Interlimb coordination in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, A; Stelmach, G E

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which Parkinson's disease (PD) patients could "spatially link" the upper limbs to facilitate the performance of bimanual simultaneous movements. Six right-handed PD patients, and seven normal age- and sex-matched controls performed three different tasks: (a) an isotonic elbow flexion as rapidly as possible through an angle of 30 degrees; (b) an isometric contraction of the flexor muscles at the elbow joint to 40% and 60% of maximal volitional force (MVF) for a period of 5 s; (c) an isometric contraction for 2.5 s with one limb, then simultaneously performing an isotonic flexion with the contralateral limb while maintaining the isometric contraction for 2.5 s more. As expected, PD patients were significantly slower in performing the isotonic movement and produced lower peak velocities than the controls. More importantly, the two groups were differentially affected during the bimanual condition. In normals, movement time decreased and peak velocity increased in the bimanual condition. In contrast, PD patients showed increased movement times and sometimes decreased peak velocities in the bimanual condition. The results suggest that normal subjects utilize bilateral outflow to symmetrical muscle groups to synchronize the two limbs in the bimanual task, whereas PD patients dissociate the two limbs.

  15. Visual Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common disorder of middle-aged and elderly people in which degeneration of the extrapyramidal motor system causes significant movement problems. In some patients, however, there are additional disturbances in sensory systems including loss of the sense of smell and auditory and/or visual problems. This paper is a general overview of the visual problems likely to be encountered in PD. Changes in vision in PD may result from alterations in visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, colour discrimination, pupil reactivity, eye movements, motion perception, visual field sensitivity, and visual processing speeds. Slower visual processing speeds can also lead to a decline in visual perception especially for rapidly changing visual stimuli. In addition, there may be disturbances of visuospatial orientation, facial recognition problems, and chronic visual hallucinations. Some of the treatments used in PD may also have adverse ocular reactions. The pattern electroretinogram (PERG) is useful in evaluating retinal dopamine mechanisms and in monitoring dopamine therapies in PD. If visual problems are present, they can have an important effect on the quality of life of the patient, which can be improved by accurate diagnosis and where possible, correction of such defects. PMID:21687773

  16. Oral Hygiene in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Batista, Leonardo M; Portela de Oliveira, Millena Teles; Magalhaes, Wilrama B; Bastos, Poliana Lima

    2015-11-02

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a multifactorial etiology. The symptoms are characterized by motor disorders - tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural instability, which hinder oral hygiene. Oral and dental health in Parkinson's disease has been under-documented and findings are conflicting. Moreover, a number of dentists have limited experience regarding the management of these patients. This article reviews literature published within the last fifteen years, to better understand the impact of this disease in oral health. A literature search (MEDLINE and PUBMED), using keywords Parkinson Disease and Oral Hygiene, yielded 27 articles, from which 20 were selected. All of the articles were published in English in the last 15 years.

  17. Drugs of abuse and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mursaleen, Leah R; Stamford, Jonathan A

    2016-01-04

    The term "drug of abuse" is highly contextual. What constitutes a drug of abuse for one population of patients does not for another. It is therefore important to examine the needs of the patient population to properly assess the status of drugs of abuse. The focus of this article is on the bidirectional relationship between patients and drug abuse. In this paper we will introduce the dopaminergic systems of the brain in Parkinson's and the influence of antiparkinsonian drugs upon them before discussing this synergy of condition and medication as fertile ground for drug abuse. We will then examine the relationship between drugs of abuse and Parkinson's, both beneficial and deleterious. In summary we will draw the different strands together and speculate on the future merit of current drugs of abuse as treatments for Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Parkinson's disease: Exit toxins, enter genetics.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, Marie; Hoffer, Barry; Olson, Lars

    2010-02-09

    Parkinson's disease was long considered a non-hereditary disorder. Despite extensive research trying to find environmental risk factors for the disease, genetic variants now stand out as the major causative factor. Since a number of genes have been implicated in the pathogenesis it seems likely that several molecular pathways and downstream effectors can affect the trophic support and/or the survival of dopamine neurons, subsequently leading to Parkinson's disease. The present review describes how toxin-based animal models have been valuable tools in trying to find the underlying mechanisms of disease, and how identification of disease-linked genes in humans has led to the development of new transgenic rodent models. The review also describes the current status of the most common genetic susceptibility factors for Parkinson's disease identified up to today. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Diagnosis and therapy of idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Heinz

    2006-05-15

    The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on a thorough clinical examination with demonstration of the presence of bradykinesia, as well as tremor, rigidity, postural instability and hyposmia. Symptomatic forms and atypical Parkinson syndrome should be ruled out. Nuclear medical analyses of the dopamine metabolism and the dopamine receptors are used only in exceptions to clarify difficult cases of differential diagnoses. For young patients, dopamine-agonists and, indeed, once again increasingly MAO-B inhibitors, such as rasagiline, are mainly used for therapy. Older patients und patients in advanced stages receive levodopa and a COMT inhibitor. As supplemental therapy, amantadine is given for dyskinesia and apathy and budipine is given for tremor-dominant type of Parkinson's disease. In advanced stages with motor fluctuations, apomorphine or Duodopa pumps or deep brain stimulation are employed.

  20. [Cabergoline in the treatment of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Pastor, P; Tolosa, E

    2003-05-01

    Cabergoline (1-[(6-allelylergolin-8 beta-yl)carbonyl]-1-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-3-ethyl-urea) is a new agonist of the D2 dopaminergic receptors used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Cabergoline is characterized by unique pharmacologic properties, such as its long plasma half-life (about 68 hours), which allows for once a day administration. Cabergoline is well tolerated, as has been shown in several clinical trials. Based on the information available, we suggest that cabergoline produces an improvement in the symptoms of Parkinson's disease similar to those produced by other dopaminergic agonists. Cabergoline monotherapy, when used in previously untreated patients, is an appropriate option for the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. Cabergoline improves motor symptoms, delays the presentation of levodopa-induced motor complications, and diminishes the amount of levodopa required for the control of the symptoms. We suggest that cabergoline is an adequate adjuvant treatment for Parkinson' disease. There is improvement in motor symptoms (without substantially increased dyskinesias), reduced severity and duration of the wearing-off period, and diminished need for levodopa. Cabergoline can also be useful in the treatment of sleep disturbances associated with advanced Parkinson's disease such as nocturnal akinesia and dystonia. However, additional studies on cabergoline's effects in nocturnal disturbances associated with Parkinson's disease are still required. Cabergoline is a well tolerated drug. Its side effects are seen mainly in the digestive and nervous system (central and peripheral). The efficacy of cabergoline in comparison to other dopaminergic agonists should be tested in future clinical studies.

  1. Obesity, diabetes, and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Natalia; Gao, Xiang; McCullough, Marjorie L; Jacobs, Eric J; Patel, Alpa V; Mayo, Tinisha; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Ascherio, Alberto

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether obesity and diabetes are related to risk of Parkinson's disease. We prospectively followed 147,096 participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort from 1992 to 2005. Participants provided information on anthropometric variables and medical history at baseline and on waist circumference in 1997. Incident cases of Parkinson's disease (n = 656) were confirmed by treating neurologists and medical record review. Relative risks were estimated using proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, gender, smoking, and other risk factors. Neither body mass index nor waist circumference significantly predicted Parkinson's disease risk. Relative risk comparing individuals with a baseline body mass index of ≥ 30 to those with a body mass index <23 was 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.75, 1.34; P trend: 0.79), and that comparing individuals with a waist circumference in the top category (≥ 40.3 inches in men and ≥ 35 inches in women) to those in the bottom category (<34.5 inches in men and <28 inches in women) was 1.35 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.93; P trend: 0.08). History of diabetes was not significantly associated with Parkinson's disease risk (combined relative risks = 0.88; 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 1.25; P heterogeneity = 0.96). In addition, neither body mass index at age 18 nor changes in weight between age 18 and baseline were significantly associated with Parkinson's disease risk. The results did not differ significantly by gender. Our results do not provide evidence for a relationship between body mass index, weight change, waist circumference, or baseline diabetes and risk of Parkinson's disease.

  2. Imaging prodromal Parkinson disease: the Parkinson Associated Risk Syndrome Study.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Danna; Siderowf, Andrew; Stern, Matthew; Seibyl, John; Eberly, Shirley; Oakes, David; Marek, Kenneth

    2014-11-04

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relative risk of abnormal dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging for subjects with and without hyposmia and the feasibility of acquiring a large, community-based, 2-tiered biomarker assessment strategy to detect prodromal Parkinson disease (PD). In this observational study, individuals without a diagnosis of PD, recruited through 16 movement disorder clinics, underwent tier 1 assessments (olfactory testing, questionnaires). Tier 2 assessments (neurologic examination, DAT imaging, and other biomarker assessments) were completed by 303 subjects. The main outcome of the study is to compare age-expected [(123)I]β-CIT striatal binding ratio in hyposmic and normosmic subjects. Tier 1 assessments were mailed to 9,398 eligible subjects and returned by 4,999; 669 were hyposmic. Three hundred three subjects (203 hyposmic, 100 normosmic) completed baseline evaluations. DAT deficit was present in 11% of hyposmic subjects compared with 1% of normosmic subjects. Multiple logistic regression demonstrates hyposmia (odds ratio [OR] 12.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6, 96.1), male sex (OR 5.5; 95% CI 1.7, 17.2), and constipation (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.6, 11.6) as factors predictive of DAT deficit. Combining multiple factors (hyposmia, male sex, and constipation) increased the percentage of subjects with a DAT deficit to >40%. Subjects with DAT deficit who do not meet criteria for a diagnosis of PD can be identified by olfactory testing. Sequential biomarker assessment may identify those at risk of PD. Selecting hyposmic individuals enriches the population for DAT deficit, and combining hyposmia with other potential risk factors (male sex, constipation) increases the percentage of subjects with a DAT deficit compatible with prodromal PD. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. [Sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease: characteristics, evaluation and therapeutic approaches].

    PubMed

    Faludi, Béla; Janszky, József; Komoly, Sámuel; Kovács, Norbert

    2015-07-05

    Parkinson's disease is a well known representent of the movement disorder group of neurological disorders. The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is based on specific symptoms and signs of movement abnormalities. In addition to classic motor symptoms, Parkinson's disease has characteristic non-motor features, and some of these emerges the classic signs. The authors discuss characteristics and therapeutic interventions in Parkinson's disease related sleep disturbances. The authors reviewed and summarised literature data on sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease published in the PubMed database up to January 2015. Sleep problems are important non-motor complains (insomnia, hypersomnia, REM behaviour disorder, sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome). The neurodegenerative process of the brain-stem, the effect of symptoms of Parkinson's disease on sleep and concomitant sleep disorders constitute the background of the patient's complains. Appropriate diagnosis and therapy of the consequential or concomitant sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease will help to improve the patient's quality of life.

  4. Oxidative Stress in Genetic Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Varçin, Mustafa; Bentea, Eduard; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence in Parkinson's disease of a link between oxidative stress and some of the monogenically inherited Parkinson's disease-associated genes. This paper focuses on the importance of this link and potential impact on neuronal function. Basic mechanisms of oxidative stress, the cellular antioxidant machinery, and the main sources of cellular oxidative stress are reviewed. Moreover, attention is given to the complex interaction between oxidative stress and other prominent pathogenic pathways in Parkinson's disease, such as mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, an overview of the existing genetic mouse models of Parkinson's disease is given and the evidence of oxidative stress in these models highlighted. Taken into consideration the importance of ageing and environmental factors as a risk for developing Parkinson's disease, gene-environment interactions in genetically engineered mouse models of Parkinson's disease are also discussed, highlighting the role of oxidative damage in the interplay between genetic makeup, environmental stress, and ageing in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22829959

  5. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: epidemiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shlomo, Y; Sieradzan, K

    1995-01-01

    Since the introduction of levodopa therapy for idiopathic Parkinson's disease over 20 years ago, there has been an awakening of research interest in this chronic neuro-degenerative disorder. This paper describes current understanding of the role of genetic and environmental factors in the aetiology of idiopathic Parkinson's disease and problems associated with both diagnosis and management. It briefly outlines both pharmacological and non-pharmacological options for treatment. Despite an increasing armoury of available treatments, the optimum management for this condition remains controversial. PMID:7619574

  6. [Management of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Crespo-Burillo, José A; Alarcia-Alejos, Raquel

    2015-04-16

    Autonomic dysfunction is a common manifestation in patients with in Parkinson's disease, which can sometimes precede motor impairment. It can be expressed as orthostatic and postprandial hypotension, supine hypertension, hypersalivation, constipation, delayed gastric emptying, dyshidrosis, bladder and sexual dysfunction. It impairs the quality of life of patients and complicates the management of motor symptoms. Evidence available to treat complications is low. Our aim is to review the pathophysiology and clinical features of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and provide a practical approach to handling the available evidence.

  7. Parkinson's disease: initial treatment of motor disorders.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterised by three main symptoms: slowness and paucity of movements, rigidity, and resting tremor. Rapid improvement in these symptoms after levodopa administration supports the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. It is important to inform the patient tactfully, allowing him or her to control the pace at which information on the diagnosis, symptoms and prognosis is conveyed. Patients with minimal discomfort or mild disability derive little benefit from drug therapy. Physiotherapy and physical exercises are sometimes useful. Previously untreated patients with marked functional impairment should receive medication. The choice is essentially between levodopa and ropinirole, and mainly depends on the patient's age.

  8. A Case of SSRI Induced Irreversible Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahbaj A; Azad, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are widely used antidepressants for variety of clinical conditions and have found popularity. They are sometimes associated with extrapyramidal side effects including Parkinsonism. We report a case of generalized anxiety disorder on treatment with SSRI (fluoxetine / sertraline) who developed irreversible Parkinsonism. SSRI are known to cause reversible or irreversible motor disturbances through pathophysiological changes in basal ganglion motor system by altering the dopamine receptors postsynaptically. Clinician should keep risk benefit ratio in mind and change of antidepressant of different class may be considered. Case is reported to alert physicians to possibility of motor system damage while treating with SSRI. PMID:25859504

  9. [Nature of speech disorders in Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Pawlukowska, W; Honczarenko, K; Gołąb-Janowska, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to discuss physiology and pathology of speech and review of the literature on speech disorders in Parkinson disease. Additionally, the most effective methods to diagnose the speech disorders in Parkinson disease were also stressed. Afterward, articulatory, respiratory, acoustic and pragmatic factors contributing to the exacerbation of the speech disorders were discussed. Furthermore, the study dealt with the most important types of speech treatment techniques available (pharmacological and behavioral) and a significance of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment was highlighted.

  10. [Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Joutsa, Juho; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2013-01-01

    Of the patients having Parkinson's disease, up to third encounters some degree of impulse control problems and one out of seven suffers from true impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping and binge eating. Dopaminergic drugs used in anti-Parkinson therapy, especially dopamine agonists, increase the risk of these disorders. Impulse control disorders are associated with a relatively more active dopamine-mediated neurotransmission of the mesolimbic and mesocortical system. Discontinuation of dopamine agonist medication can thus be considered as the first line treatment of these disorders.

  11. Living with Parkinson's Disease: Staying Determined.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2017-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common chronically disabling disorders of the nervous system. The disorder affects predominately older adults; only 4% of individuals are diagnosed before age 50. Receiving a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease can be overwhelming for someone who is active and feels healthy, but new research shows that patients who take charge of their illness by adopting healthful habits of mind and body can slow the development of the disease and have a better quality of life. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(4), 15-18.].

  12. The role of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging in Parkinson's disease and in the differential diagnosis with atypical parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Romulo Varella; Pereira, João Santos

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. Clinically, it is characterized by motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease should be differentiated from atypical parkinsonism conditions. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging is the primary imaging method employed in order to facilitate the differential diagnosis, and its role has grown after the development of advanced techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging. The purpose of this article was to review the role of magnetic resonance imaging in Parkinson's disease and in the differential diagnosis with atypical parkinsonism, emphasizing the diffusion technique. PMID:28894333

  13. The contribution of Niemann-Pick SMPD1 mutations to Parkinson disease in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Dagan, E; Schlesinger, I; Ayoub, M; Mory, A; Nassar, M; Kurolap, A; Peretz-Aharon, J; Gershoni-Baruch, R

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson disease is noted for its association with mutations in GBA and the p.G2019S mutation in LRRK2. This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of Ashkenazi founder mutations in sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) in Ashkenazi patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD); and their impact on PD phenotypic expression. SMPD1 underlies the lysosomal storage disease - Niemann-Pick. A case (n = 287) control (n = 400) study was undertaken. All patients underwent a physical, neurobehavioral and neurologic examination that incorporated the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Three founder SMPD1 Ashkenazi mutations (c.996delC (fsP330), p.L302P and p.R496L) were investigated in patients and controls, previously evaluated for carriage of founder mutations in GBA and the p.G2019S mutation in LRRK2. Nine (3.1%) PD patients compared to two (0.5%) individuals from the control group were found to carry one of the three Ashkenazi SMPD1 founder mutations (p = 0.007). The overall clinical characteristics of PD patients carrying SMPD1 mutations were similar to those of PD patients with no mutations in SMPD1, GBA and LRRK2 (n = 189). We maintain that disruptive mutations in SMPD1 constitute a risk factor for PD. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Molecular imaging to track Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonisms: New imaging frontiers.

    PubMed

    Strafella, Antonio P; Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Perlmutter, Joel S; Eidelberg, David; Pavese, Nicola; Van Eimeren, Thilo; Piccini, Paola; Politis, Marios; Thobois, Stephane; Ceravolo, Roberto; Higuchi, Makoto; Kaasinen, Valtteri; Masellis, Mario; Peralta, M Cecilia; Obeso, Ignacio; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Ángel; Cilia, Roberto; Ballanger, Benedicte; Niethammer, Martin; Stoessl, Jon A

    2017-02-01

    Molecular imaging has proven to be a powerful tool for investigation of parkinsonian disorders. One current challenge is to identify biomarkers of early changes that may predict the clinical trajectory of parkinsonian disorders. Exciting new tracer developments hold the potential for in vivo markers of underlying pathology. Herein, we provide an overview of molecular imaging advances and how these approaches help us to understand PD and atypical parkinsonisms. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. [Placebo effect in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hideto

    2007-02-01

    "Placebo" is Latin for "I shall please". The placebo effect has been widely documented by randomized placebo-controlled drug studies. One of the best examples of placebo effectiveness is that have been shown in clinical trials of anti-parkinsonian drugs. The placebo effect is observable not only in drug trials but also with deep brain stimulation. Recent advances in research on the placebo effect in Parkinson's disease (PD) have suggested that motor symptoms of PD can be essentially improved by placebo. A recent study using positron emission tomography (PET) with raclopride demonstrated that release of endogeneous dopamine in the dorsal striatum occurs in placebo-responsive patients with PD. This suggests that placebo-induced expectation of clinical improvement may activate endogenous dopamine in the striatum, and that placebo effectiveness is thus achieved by endogenous dopamine supplementation. Indeed, decreased neuronal activities in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), that were recorded during surgery to implant deep brain stimulation electrodes, correlated well with placebo-induced clinical improvement in patients with PD. Although the detailed pathophysiological mechanism underlying the placebo effects remains uncertain, theoretically, the placebo effect has generally been explained by two different mechanisms: one is conditioning theory (pavlovian conditioning), and the other is cognitive theory (expectation of clinical improvement). Although both mechanisms may contribute to placebo effects, the placebo effect in PD may be attributed more to cognitive mechanisms such as expectation of improvement, because the placebo effect can be obtained in de novo PD patients. There have been accumulating findings that suggest a functional relationship between dopamine and the expectation of clinical improvement (reward). Further basic studies are required to clarify the complex link between dopamine and the reward system, but such findings will contribute to a better

  16. Mucuna pruriens in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Laguna, Janeth; Cassani, Erica; Cereda, Emanuele; Pozzi, Nicolò G.; Isaias, Ioannis U.; Contin, Manuela; Barichella, Michela; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether Mucuna pruriens (MP), a levodopa-containing leguminous plant growing in all tropical areas worldwide, may be used as alternative source of levodopa for indigent individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) who cannot afford long-term therapy with marketed levodopa preparations. Methods: We investigated efficacy and safety of single-dose intake of MP powder from roasted seeds obtained without any pharmacologic processing. Eighteen patients with advanced PD received the following treatments, whose sequence was randomized: (1) dispersible levodopa at 3.5 mg/kg combined with the dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor benserazide (LD+DDCI; the reference treatment); (2) high-dose MP (MP-Hd; 17.5 mg/kg); (3) low-dose MP (MP-Ld; 12.5 mg/kg); (4) pharmaceutical preparation of LD without DDCI (LD−DDCI; 17.5 mg/kg); (5) MP plus benserazide (MP+DDCI; 3.5 mg/kg); (6) placebo. Efficacy outcomes were the change in motor response at 90 and 180 minutes and the duration of on state. Safety measures included any adverse event (AE), changes in blood pressure and heart rate, and the severity of dyskinesias. Results: When compared to LD+DDCI, MP-Ld showed similar motor response with fewer dyskinesias and AEs, while MP-Hd induced greater motor improvement at 90 and 180 minutes, longer ON duration, and fewer dyskinesias. MP-Hd induced less AEs than LD+DDCI and LD−DDCI. No differences in cardiovascular response were recorded. Conclusion: Single-dose MP intake met all noninferiority efficacy and safety outcome measures in comparison to dispersible levodopa/benserazide. Clinical effects of high-dose MP were similar to levodopa alone at the same dose, with a more favorable tolerability profile. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02680977. PMID:28679598

  17. Modeling anxiety in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Broen, Martijn P G; Köhler, Sebastian; Moonen, Anja J H; Kuijf, Mark L; Dujardin, Kathy; Marsh, Laura; Richard, Irene H; Starkstein, Sergio E; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Leentjens, Albert F G

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to construct a model for anxiety in PD and compare the relative contributions of PD-specific and -nonspecific general population risk factors for anxiety in this model. Structural equation modeling of associations of risk factors with the anxiety outcome using a cross-sectional data set of 342 patients with PD were used. A model with acceptable to good fit was generated that explained 65% of the variance in anxiety scores. A previous history of depression and the severity of the depressive symptoms scored on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale were the only nonspecific variables with a direct effect on anxiety. The presence of motor fluctuations and disease-related decline in activities of daily living were PD-specific markers of anxiety. Nonspecific risk factors had a greater influence in the model than PD-specific risk factors. Standardized regression coefficients suggested that the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score was the most important contributor to the variation in anxiety. A post-hoc analysis showed that the effects of the following variables on anxiety levels were fully mediated by depression: sex; family history of depression; previous history of anxiety; cognitive status; difficulties in non-disease-specific activities of daily living; and severity of motor signs. In this cross-sectional study, we showed that nonspecific general population risk factors are more important markers for anxiety than PD-specific risk factors. Depression was the most prominent marker. PD-specific markers for anxiety appear to be more situational and related to off periods and disease-specific disturbances of activities of daily living. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Nutritional therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Evatt, Marian L

    2007-05-01

    Advise patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to consume a balanced diet, with special attention to adequate intake of dietary fiber, fluids, and macro- and micronutrients. Regularly reassess patients' nutritional history and anthropomorphic measures (height and weight), particularly in patients with advanced disease. PD-related psychosocial as well as physical and cognitive limitations increase susceptibility to subacute and chronic malnutrition. Nutritional requirements may change with PD progression or after surgical therapy for PD. Patients and caregivers may benefit from counseling by a dietician who is knowledgeable about the nutritional risks and needs of PD. Regularly inquire about dysphagia symptoms, and consider speech therapy consultation for clinical and modified barium-swallowing evaluations and management recommendations. Although non-oral delivery options of dopaminergic therapy are increasing, severe dysphagia may warrant percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement for nutritional support and more reliable PD medication dosing. Analyze vitamin B(12) and D concentrations at regular intervals. Both vitamins are frequently deficient in elderly persons but may not be routinely checked by primary care physicians. Record over-the-counter and nutritional supplement medications at each visit, and assist patients in periodically re-evaluating their potential benefits, side effects, drug interactions, and costs. To date, clinical trials of antioxidant vitamins and nutritional supplements have provided insufficient evidence to support routine use for PD in the clinic. Data from several clinical trials of antioxidant vitamins/nutritional supplements are expected in the near future. Consider altering medication dosing in relation to meals to help with mild to moderate motor fluctuations. Patients with severe motor fluctuations may benefit from adapting the 5:1 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio in their daily meals and snacks. Following a "protein

  19. Parkinson's disease and driving ability

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajiv; Pentland, Brian; Hunter, John; Provan, Frances

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To explore the driving problems associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to ascertain whether any clinical features or tests predict driver safety. Methods The driving ability of 154 individuals with PD referred to a driving assessment centre was determined by a combination of clinical tests, reaction times on a test rig and an in‐car driving test. Results The majority of cases (104, 66%) were able to continue driving although 46 individuals required an automatic transmission and 10 others needed car modifications. Ability to drive was predicted by the severity of physical disease, age, presence of other associated medical conditions, particularly dementia, duration of disease, brake reaction, time on a test rig and score on a driving test (all p<0.001). The level of drug treatment and the length of driving history were not correlated. Discriminant analysis revealed that the most important features in distinguishing safety to drive were severe physical disease (Hoehn and Yahr stage 3), reaction time, moderate disease associated with another medical condition and high score on car testing. Conclusions Most individuals with PD are safe to drive, although many benefit from car modifications or from using an automatic transmission. A combination of clinical tests and in‐car driving assessment will establish safety to drive, and a number of clinical correlates can be shown to predict the likely outcome and may assist in the decision process. This is the largest series of consecutive patients seen at a driving assessment centre reported to date, and the first to devise a scoring system for on‐road driving assessment. PMID:17178820

  20. Neurologist care in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Schootman, M.; Evanoff, B.A.; Perlmutter, J.S.; Racette, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the utilization of neurologist providers in the treatment of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) in the United States and determine whether neurologist treatment is associated with improved clinical outcomes. Methods: This was a retrospective observational cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries with PD in the year 2002. Multilevel logistic regression was used to determine which patient characteristics predicted neurologist care between 2002 and 2005 and compare the age, race, sex, and comorbidity-adjusted annual risk of skilled nursing facility placement and hip fracture between neurologist- and primary care physician–treated patients with PD. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the adjusted 6-year risk of death using incident PD cases, stratified by physician specialty. Results: More than 138,000 incident PD cases were identified. Only 58% of patients with PD received neurologist care between 2002 and 2005. Race and sex were significant demographic predictors of neurologist treatment: women (odds ratio [OR] 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76–0.80) and nonwhites (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.79–0.87) were less likely to be treated by a neurologist. Neurologist-treated patients were less likely to be placed in a skilled nursing facility (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.77–0.82) and had a lower risk of hip fracture (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.80–0.92) in logistic regression models that included demographic, clinical, and socioeconomic covariates. Neurologist-treated patients also had a lower adjusted likelihood of death (hazard ratio 0.78, 95% CI 0.77–0.79). Conclusions: Women and minorities with PD obtain specialist care less often than white men. Neurologist care of patients with PD may be associated with improved selected clinical outcomes and greater survival. PMID:21832214

  1. Workforce unavailability in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Timpka, J; Svensson, J; Nilsson, M H; Pålhagen, S; Hagell, P; Odin, P

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) become unavailable in the workforce earlier than comparable members of the general population. This may result in significant social insurance expenses, but as workforce participation can be a source for social interaction and a vital part of the personal identity, there are likely to be personal implications extending far beyond the economic aspects. This study aimed to identify aspects that may contribute to workforce unavailability in people with PD. This was a cross-sectional registry study using data from the Swedish national quality registry for PD and included persons with PD in Skåne County, Sweden who were younger than 65 years. Variables were selected from the registry based on earlier studies and clinical experience and were tested for association with unavailability in the workforce: first in a series of simple regression analyses and then in a multiple logistic regression analysis. A total of 99 persons with PD-of whom 59 were available and 40 were unavailable in the workforce-were included in the study. Age (OR per year: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.18-1.85; P < 0.01) and anxiety (OR: 6.81, 95% CI: 1.20-38.67; P = 0.03) were significant contributing factors for unavailability in the workforce. Based on the findings in this exploratory study, anxiety-a potentially modifiable factor-and age may be contributing factors for workforce unavailability in PD. However, prospective studies are warranted to confirm the findings and the causation of the association between anxiety and workforce unavailability needs to be clarified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Somaiya, Mansi; Kumar, Santhosh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is essentially characterized by the motor symptoms in the form of resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, over the years it has been recognized that motor symptoms are just the “tip of the iceberg” of clinical manifestations of PD. Besides motor symptoms, PD characterized by many non-motor symptoms, which include cognitive decline, psychiatric disturbances (depression, psychosis and impulse control), sleep difficulties, autonomic failures (gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, urinary, thermoregulation) and pain syndrome. This review evaluates the various aspects of psychiatric disorders including cognitive decline and sleep disturbances in patients with PD. The prevalence rate of various psychiatric disorders is high in patients with PD. In terms of risk factors, various demographic, clinical and treatment-related variables have been shown to be associated with higher risk of development of psychiatric morbidity. Evidence also suggests that the presence of psychiatric morbidity is associated with poorer outcome. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD are meager. Available evidence suggests that tricyclic antidepressants like desipramine and nortriptyline are efficacious for management of depression. Among the antipsychotics, clozapine is considered to be the best choice for management of psychosis in patients with PD. Among the various cognitive enhancers, evidence suggest efficacy of rivastigmine in management of dementia in patients with PD. To conclude, this review suggests that psychiatric morbidity is highly prevalent in patients with PD. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach must be followed to improve the overall outcome of PD. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of various other measures for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD. PMID:25552854

  3. James Parkinson's Chimera: syndrome or disease?

    PubMed

    Kempster, P A; Hurwitz, B; Lees, A J

    2017-06-01

    It is 200 years since James Parkinson published An Essay on the Shaking Palsy. While his monograph continues to be acclaimed for its precedence and clarity of description, what is often overlooked is the originality of Parkinson's ideas. Here we show that he appreciated the weakness of the systematic 18th century nosologies, which presupposed that medical species, the building blocks of these Linnaean taxonomic schemes, were as distinct as plant and animal species; and that Parkinson made a conceptual leap about combinations of clinical phenomena in recurring patterns, now recognised to be one of the germs of neurological thinking about syndromes. The Essay's written style underpins another aspect of significance to contemporary neurological practice - an inherent intellectual humility. In this commemorative year we locate the continuing importance of the related notions of syndrome and disease in successive frameworks of knowledge about the shaking palsy. Syndrome and disease are interpreted as dual character concepts, one clinically-based and the other restricted to pathophysiological causation. They both remain fundamental to understanding Parkinson's syndrome-disease today.

  4. [A core deficit in Parkinson disease?].

    PubMed

    Benítez-Burraco, A; Herrera, E; Cuetos, F

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson disease is a neurodegenerative condition involving motor, cognitive, and linguistic deficits. It is important to know why all these different deficits co-occur in the affected people. This paper aims to clarify whether these comorbid deficits result from the selective impairment of a computational primitive, namely, a context-sensitive computational ability according to Chomsky's Hierarchy (a well-established research tool in comparative neuroscience). A total of 15 medicated subjects with Parkinson disease and 15 controls were selected. They were matched in age and education. A battery of tasks was designed to test 3 different domains (motor capacities, cognition, and language) and 2 different computational abilities (context-free and context-sensitive operations). Significant differences between groups were observed only regarding the linguistic task involving context-sensitive computations (correferences). The observed deficits in our patients with Parkinson disease cannot be explained in terms of the selective impairment of one only unspecific, low-level computational process. At the same time, differences between patients and controls are expected to be greater if the former are not medicated. Moreover, we should pursue in the search of (this kind of) computational primitives than can be selectively impaired in people with Parkinson disease, because they may help to achieve an earlier diagnosis of this condition. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Midlife migraine and late-life parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Ross, G. Webster; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Garcia, Melissa; Gudmundsson, Larus S.; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Sigurlaug; Wagner, Amy K.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that having migraine in middle age is related to late-life parkinsonism and a related disorder, restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease (WED). Methods: The AGES-Reykjavik cohort (born 1907–1935) has been followed since 1967. Headaches were classified based on symptoms assessed in middle age. From 2002 to 2006, 5,764 participants were reexamined to assess symptoms of parkinsonism, diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD), family history of PD, and RLS/WED. Results: Subjects with midlife migraine, particularly migraine with aura (MA), were in later life more likely than others to report parkinsonian symptoms (odds ratio [OR]MA = 3.6 [95% CI 2.7–4.8]) and diagnosed PD (ORMA = 2.5 [95% CI 1.2–5.2]). Women with MA were more likely than others to have a parent (ORMA = 2.26 [95% CI 1.3–4.0]) or sibling (ORMA = 1.78 [95% CI 1.1–2.9]) with PD. Late-life RLS/WED was increased for headache generally. Associations were independent of cardiovascular disease and MRI-evident presumed ischemic lesions. Conclusions: These findings suggest there may be a common vulnerability to, or consequences of, migraine and multiple indicators of parkinsonism. Additional genetic and longitudinal observational studies are needed to identify candidate pathways that may account for the comorbid constellation of symptoms. PMID:25230997

  6. Voice Onset Time in Parkinson Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Emily; Goberman, Alexander M.

    2010-01-01

    Research has found that speaking rate has an effect on voice onset time (VOT). Given that Parkinson disease (PD) affects speaking rate, the purpose of this study was to examine VOT with the effect of rate removed (VOT ratio), along with the traditional VOT measure, in individuals with PD. VOT and VOT ratio were examined in 9 individuals with PD…

  7. Parkinson's disease: A risk factor for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Malochet-Guinamand, Sandrine; Durif, Franck; Thomas, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease. On the long term, it may be complicated by various musculoskeletal problems, such as osteoporotic fractures, that have significant socioeconomic consequences. Indeed, patients suffering from Parkinson's disease have a higher fracture risk, particularly hip fracture risk, than other subjects of the same age because of both a higher risk of falls and lower bone mineral density. Bone loss in Parkinson's disease may be associated with the severity and duration of the disease. We review here the different suspected mechanisms of accelerated bone loss in Parkinson's disease, amongst which weight loss and reduced mobility appear to play key roles. Antiparkinsonian drugs, particularly levodopa, may also be associated with decreased bone mineral density as a result of hyperhomocysteinaemia. We discuss the role of other nutritional deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, folate or vitamin K. In conclusion, it seems necessary to screen for and treat osteoporosis in this at-risk population, while actions to prevent falls are still disappointing. A better understanding of the factors explaining bone loss in this population would help implementing preventive actions.

  8. Altered sensorimotor integration in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gwyn N; Byblow, Winston D

    2002-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to investigate sensorimotor integration in the upper limb of 10 patients with Parkinson's disease and 10 age-matched controls. Non-conditioned and subthreshold conditioned (2 ms interstimulus interval) responses were recorded in the flexor and extensor carpi radialis muscles (FCR and ECR) of the more impaired (non-dominant) limb. Stimuli were delivered while the wrist joint was positioned statically at various joint angles as well as during different phases of passive movement of the wrist joint (90 degrees amplitude, 0.2 Hz). The FCR and ECR muscles remained relaxed during all stimulation. In both groups, responses in the static condition were larger when the target muscle was in a shortened position. Responses were also facilitated in the muscle shortening phases of passive movement. In both static and dynamic conditions, the extent of modulations in response amplitude was significantly reduced in the patient group. The level of intracortical inhibition (ICI) was also significantly less in the Parkinson's disease patients in static conditions. During passive movement, control subjects demonstrated a clear reduction in ICI compared with the static trials; however, the level of ICI was unchanged in the Parkinson's disease group in the dynamic condition. The results suggest an abnormal influence of afference on corticomotor excitability in Parkinson's disease. This may be related to abnormal sensory input, a defective integrative unit or an inappropriate motor response.

  9. Early Parkinson's May Prompt Vision Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... vision may be an early sign of Parkinson's disease, researchers report. The neurodegenerative condition is caused by the loss of neurons in several brain structures, resulting in tremors, rigidity or stiffness, along with ... disease is primarily considered a motor disorder, several studies ...

  10. Accuracy Improvement for Predicting Parkinson's Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Nilashi, Mehrbakhsh; Ibrahim, Othman; Ahani, Ali

    2016-09-30

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a member of a larger group of neuromotor diseases marked by the progressive death of dopamineproducing cells in the brain. Providing computational tools for Parkinson disease using a set of data that contains medical information is very desirable for alleviating the symptoms that can help the amount of people who want to discover the risk of disease at an early stage. This paper proposes a new hybrid intelligent system for the prediction of PD progression using noise removal, clustering and prediction methods. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Expectation Maximization (EM) are respectively employed to address the multi-collinearity problems in the experimental datasets and clustering the data. We then apply Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Support Vector Regression (SVR) for prediction of PD progression. Experimental results on public Parkinson's datasets show that the proposed method remarkably improves the accuracy of prediction of PD progression. The hybrid intelligent system can assist medical practitioners in the healthcare practice for early detection of Parkinson disease.

  11. Voice Onset Time in Parkinson Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Emily; Goberman, Alexander M.

    2010-01-01

    Research has found that speaking rate has an effect on voice onset time (VOT). Given that Parkinson disease (PD) affects speaking rate, the purpose of this study was to examine VOT with the effect of rate removed (VOT ratio), along with the traditional VOT measure, in individuals with PD. VOT and VOT ratio were examined in 9 individuals with PD…

  12. Emotion and Object Processing in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Henri; Gagne, Marie-Helene; Hess, Ursula; Pourcher, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    The neuropsychological literature on the processing of emotions in Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals conflicting evidence about the role of the basal ganglia in the recognition of facial emotions. Hence, the present study had two objectives. One was to determine the extent to which the visual processing of emotions and objects differs in PD. The…

  13. Parkinson's disease motor subtypes and mood.

    PubMed

    Burn, David J; Landau, Sabine; Hindle, John V; Samuel, Michael; Wilson, Kenneth C; Hurt, Catherine S; Brown, Richard G

    2012-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is heterogeneous, both in terms of motor symptoms and mood. Identifying associations between phenotypic variants of motor and mood subtypes may provide clues to understand mechanisms underlying mood disorder and symptoms in Parkinson's disease. A total of 513 patients were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and separately classified into anxious, depressed, and anxious-depressed mood classes based on latent class analysis of a semistructured interview. Motor subtypes assessed related to age-of-onset, rate of progression, presence of motor fluctuations, lateralization of motor symptoms, tremor dominance, and the presence of postural instability and gait symptoms and falls. The directions of observed associations tended to support previous findings with the exception of lateralization of symptoms, for which there were no consistent or significant results. Regression models examining a range of motor subtypes together indicated increased risk of anxiety in patients with younger age-of-onset and motor fluctuations. In contrast, depression was most strongly related to axial motor symptoms. Different risk factors were observed for depressed patients with and without anxiety, suggesting heterogeneity within Parkinson's disease depression. Such association data may suggest possible underlying common risk factors for motor subtype and mood. Combined with convergent evidence from other sources, possible mechanisms may include cholinergic system damage and white matter changes contributing to non-anxious depression in Parkinson's disease, while situational factors related to threat and unpredictability may contribute to the exacerbation and maintenance of anxiety in susceptible individuals. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  14. [Parkinson's disease in literature, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, Roberto; Carrillo, Jesús M

    2014-02-01

    INTRODUCTION. Since James Parkinson published what can be considered the first treaty on the disease that bears his name in 1817, the scientific literature on this pathology has not ceased to grow. But the illness has also been represented in literature, the cinema and on television, where the symptoms, treatment and socio-familial context of the disease have often been examined very closely. AIM. To address the cases in which Parkinson's disease appears in literature, cinema and television, as well as to reflect on the image of the condition presented in those contexts. DEVELOPMENT. We reviewed some of the most important works in the literature dealing with Parkinson's disease from any period of history and many of them were found to offer very faithful portrayals of the disease. Likewise, we also reviewed major films and TV series that sometimes offer the general public a close look at the vision and the impact of the disease on patients or their relatives. CONCLUSIONS. Literature, cinema and television have helped provide a realistic view of both Parkinson's disease and the related healthcare professionals, and there are many examples that portray the actual experiences of the patients themselves, while also highlighting the importance of healthcare and socio-familial care.

  15. Emotion and Object Processing in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Henri; Gagne, Marie-Helene; Hess, Ursula; Pourcher, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    The neuropsychological literature on the processing of emotions in Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals conflicting evidence about the role of the basal ganglia in the recognition of facial emotions. Hence, the present study had two objectives. One was to determine the extent to which the visual processing of emotions and objects differs in PD. The…

  16. Levodopa and the progression of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Marek, Kenneth

    2004-12-09

    Despite the known benefit of levodopa in reducing the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, concern has been expressed that its use might hasten neurodegeneration. This study assessed the effect of levodopa on the rate of progression of Parkinson's disease. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we evaluated 361 patients with early Parkinson's disease who were assigned to receive carbidopa-levodopa at a daily dose of 37.5 and 150 mg, 75 and 300 mg, or 150 and 600 mg, respectively, or a matching placebo for a period of 40 weeks, and then to undergo withdrawal of treatment for 2 weeks. The primary outcome was a change in scores on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) between baseline and 42 weeks. Neuroimaging studies of 142 subjects were performed at baseline and at week 40 to assess striatal dopamine-transporter density with the use of iodine-123-labeled 2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ([123I]beta-CIT) uptake. The severity of parkinsonism increased more in the placebo group than in all the groups receiving levodopa: the mean difference between the total score on the UPDRS at baseline and at 42 weeks was 7.8 units in the placebo group, 1.9 units in the group receiving levodopa at a dose of 150 mg daily, 1.9 in those receiving 300 mg daily, and -1.4 in those receiving 600 mg daily (P<0.001). In contrast, in a substudy of 116 patients the mean percent decline in the [123I]beta-CIT uptake was significantly greater with levodopa than placebo (-6 percent among those receiving levodopa at 150 mg daily, -4 percent in those receiving it at 300 mg daily, and -7.2 percent among those receiving it at 600 mg daily, as compared with -1.4 percent among those receiving placebo; 19 patients with no dopaminergic deficits on the baseline scans were excluded from the analysis) (P=0.036). The subjects receiving the highest dose of levodopa had significantly more dyskinesia, hypertonia, infection, headache, and nausea than those

  17. MDS clinical diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Postuma, Ronald B; Berg, Daniela; Stern, Matthew; Poewe, Werner; Olanow, C Warren; Oertel, Wolfgang; Obeso, José; Marek, Kenneth; Litvan, Irene; Lang, Anthony E; Halliday, Glenda; Goetz, Christopher G; Gasser, Thomas; Dubois, Bruno; Chan, Piu; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Adler, Charles H; Deuschl, Günther

    2015-10-01

    This document presents the Movement Disorder Society Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Parkinson's disease (PD). The Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria are intended for use in clinical research but also may be used to guide clinical diagnosis. The benchmark for these criteria is expert clinical diagnosis; the criteria aim to systematize the diagnostic process, to make it reproducible across centers and applicable by clinicians with less expertise in PD diagnosis. Although motor abnormalities remain central, increasing recognition has been given to nonmotor manifestations; these are incorporated into both the current criteria and particularly into separate criteria for prodromal PD. Similar to previous criteria, the Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria retain motor parkinsonism as the core feature of the disease, defined as bradykinesia plus rest tremor or rigidity. Explicit instructions for defining these cardinal features are included. After documentation of parkinsonism, determination of PD as the cause of parkinsonism relies on three categories of diagnostic features: absolute exclusion criteria (which rule out PD), red flags (which must be counterbalanced by additional supportive criteria to allow diagnosis of PD), and supportive criteria (positive features that increase confidence of the PD diagnosis). Two levels of certainty are delineated: clinically established PD (maximizing specificity at the expense of reduced sensitivity) and probable PD (which balances sensitivity and specificity). The Movement Disorder Society criteria retain elements proven valuable in previous criteria and omit aspects that are no longer justified, thereby encapsulating diagnosis according to current knowledge. As understanding of PD expands, the Movement Disorder Society criteria will need continuous revision to accommodate these advances. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. [James Parkinson (1755-1824) revisited].

    PubMed

    Poirier, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    The name of Parkinson is universally famous because of the eponymous disease. But as a man, James Parkinson (1755-1824), is poorly known. He was born, married and passed away in his St-Leonard parish in Shoreditch (London). After having studied Latin, Greek, natural philosophy, and stenography (shorthand), which he considered as the basic tools of any doctor, he studied for six months at the London Hospital Medical College, and served his apprenticeship as an apothecary-surgeon with his father for six years. Then he was qualified as a surgeon in 1784 at the age of 29 years. His activity has been deployed in three areas: 1) medicine, 2) political activism and social reformism, 3) paleontology and oryctology. As a physician, Parkinson has published several books, the most important concerned paralysis agitans (future Parkinson's disease), gout, complications of lightning (future Lichtenberg figures and keraunoparalysis), acute appendicitis (with his son John Parkinson) and hernias (diagnosis, development, dangers of hernia ruptures, and design of a simple truss). Its ideological and political commitment was manifested by joining two secret societies and publishing numerous pamphlets, many of which are signed by the pseudonym Old Hubert; he campaigned for a better representation of the people in Parliament, for greater social justice, for the defense and recognition of the rights of the poor, the insane, the children, and against children abuse. He published a small compendium of chemistry, he was one of the thirteen members who create the British Geological Society and is recognized as one of the founders of paleontology; as was Georges Cuvier (1769-1832), he remained a strong supporter of creationism and catastrophism. Distinguished oryctologist, he gave his name to several fossils, mainly molluscs.

  19. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, E; Paparrigopoulos, Th

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease affecting 1-2% of the population over 60. Although diagnosed by its characteristic motor manifestations, PD may be preceded, and is frequently accompanied, by a wide range of psychiatric and cognitive symptoms. These symptoms are often more debilitating than its motor complications and it is nowadays appreciated that they can be an important cause of excess disability in PD, frequently necessitating hospitalization and institutionalization. Despite their frequent occurrence, most PD-related neuropsychiatric symptoms remain under-recognized and undertreated in clinical practice and their diagnosis is challenging because of the overlap of the somatic features of the psychiatric disorders and the motor symptoms of PD. Even when identified, there is a common perception that many of these symptoms are untreatable. Their recognition is essential not only for ascertaining the functional status of patients but also for better appreciating the nature of the neurodegenerative process in PD. These symptoms may precede the onset of motor symptoms and can be used as screening tools allowing for very early disease identification and for trials of possible diseasemodifying interventions. The pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD involves complex and multifactorial mechanisms, including disease-related and psychological factors. Alterations in neurotransmitters like dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, involving subcortical projections and synaptic and neuronal changes involving limbic and cortical structures combine to result in these nonmotor symptoms. Potentially earlier evaluation and treatment of comorbid psychiatric and cognitive disorders in PD could improve quality of life and patient productivity, reduce morbidity and caregiver burden, and minimize healthcare costs. Management strategies include adjustment of dopaminergic medication, use of psychotropic

  20. The Parkinson's disease sleep scale: a new instrument for assessing sleep and nocturnal disability in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, K; Pal, S; DiMarco, A; Whately-Smith, C; Bridgman, K; Mathew, R; Pezzela, F; Forbes, A; Hogl, B; Trenkwalder, C

    2002-01-01

    Background: No formal instruments are available for quantifying sleep problems in Parkinson's disease. Objective: To develop a new sleep scale to quantify the various aspects of nocturnal sleep problems in Parkinson's disease, which may occur in up to 96% of affected individuals. Methods: Employing a multidisciplinary team approach, a visual analogue scale was devised addressing 15 commonly reported symptoms associated with sleep disturbance in Parkinson's disease—the Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS). In all, 143 patients with Parkinson's disease completed the PDSS, covering the entire spectrum of disease from newly diagnosed to advanced stage. As controls, 137 age healthy matched subjects also completed the scale. Test–retest reliability was assessed in a subgroup of subjects. The Epworth sleepiness scale was also satisfactorily completed by 103 of the patients with Parkinson's disease. Results: PDSS scores in the Parkinson group were significantly different from the healthy controls. Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease had impaired scores compared with early/moderate disease. Individual items of the scale showed good discriminatory power between Parkinson's disease and healthy controls. Relevant items of the PDSS correlated with excessive daytime sleepiness. The scale showed robust test–retest reliability. Conclusions: This appears to be the first description of a simple bedside screening instrument for evaluation of sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease. A combination of subitems may help identify specific aspects of sleep disturbance, which in turn may help target treatment. PMID:12438461

  1. Virtual house calls for Parkinson disease (Connect.Parkinson): study protocol for a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Achey, Meredith A; Beck, Christopher A; Beran, Denise B; Boyd, Cynthia M; Schmidt, Peter N; Willis, Allison W; Riggare, Sara S; Simone, Richard B; Biglan, Kevin M; Dorsey, E Ray

    2014-11-27

    Interest in improving care for the growing number of individuals with chronic conditions is rising. However, access to care is limited by distance, disability, and distribution of doctors. Small-scale studies in Parkinson disease, a prototypical chronic condition, have suggested that delivering care using video house calls is feasible, offers similar clinical outcomes to in-person care, and reduces travel burden. We are conducting a randomized comparative effectiveness study (Connect.Parkinson) comparing usual care in the community to usual care augmented by virtual house calls with a Parkinson disease specialist. Recruitment is completed centrally using online advertisements and emails and by contacting physicians, support groups, and allied health professionals. Efforts target areas with a high proportion of individuals not receiving care from neurologists. Approximately 200 individuals with Parkinson disease and their care partners will be enrolled at 20 centers throughout the United States and followed for one year. Participants receive educational materials, then are randomized in a 1:1 ratio to continue their usual care (control arm) or usual care and specialty care delivered virtually (intervention arm). Care partners are surveyed about their time and travel burden and their perceived caregiver burden. Participants are evaluated via electronic survey forms and videoconferencing with a blinded independent rater at baseline and at 12 months. All study activities are completed remotely.The primary outcomes are: (1) feasibility, as measured by the proportion of visits completed, and (2) quality of life, as measured by the 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include measures of clinical benefit, quality of care, time and travel burden, and caregiver burden. Connect.Parkinson will evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of using technology to deliver care into the homes of individuals with Parkinson disease. The trial may serve as a

  2. Naturally- and experimentally-designed restorations of the Parkin gene deficit in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, Hirohide; Hirano, Makito; Kiriyama, Takao; Ikeda, Masanori; Ueno, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Intranuclear events due to mutations in the Parkin gene remain elusive in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP). We identified a mutant PARKIN protein in fibroblast cultures from a pair of siblings with ARJP who were homozygous for the exon 4-deleted Parkin gene. Disease was mild in one patient and debilitating in the other. The detected mutant, encoded by a transcript lacking exon 3 as well as exon 4, is an in-frame deletion that removes 121 aa, resulting in a 344-aa protein (PaDel3,4). Cell culture and transfection studies revealed negative correlations between expression levels of PaDel3,4 and those of cell cycle proteins, including cyclin E, CDK2, ppRb, and E2F-1, and demonstrated that GFP-PaDel3,4 entered nucleus and ubiquitinated cyclin E as a part of SCF{sup hSel-10} ligase complex in the patient cells. In addition, nuclear localization signal-tagged PaDel3,4 expressed in the transfected patient cells most effectively ubiquitinated cyclin E and reduced DNA damage, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Antisense-oligonucleotide treatment promoted skipping of exon 3 and thus generated PaDel3,4, increasing cell survival. Collectively, we propose that naturally- and experimentally-induced exon skipping at least partly restores the mutant Parkin gene deficit, providing a molecular basis for the development of therapeutic exon skipping.

  3. Naturally- and experimentally-designed restorations of the Parkin gene deficit in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Asai, Hirohide; Hirano, Makito; Kiriyama, Takao; Ikeda, Masanori; Ueno, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Intranuclear events due to mutations in the Parkin gene remain elusive in autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP). We identified a mutant PARKIN protein in fibroblast cultures from a pair of siblings with ARJP who were homozygous for the exon 4-deleted Parkin gene. Disease was mild in one patient and debilitating in the other. The detected mutant, encoded by a transcript lacking exon 3 as well as exon 4, is an in-frame deletion that removes 121 aa, resulting in a 344-aa protein (PaDel3,4). Cell culture and transfection studies revealed negative correlations between expression levels of PaDel3,4 and those of cell cycle proteins, including cyclin E, CDK2, ppRb, and E2F-1, and demonstrated that GFP-PaDel3,4 entered nucleus and ubiquitinated cyclin E as a part of SCF(hSel-10) ligase complex in the patient cells. In addition, nuclear localization signal-tagged PaDel3,4 expressed in the transfected patient cells most effectively ubiquitinated cyclin E and reduced DNA damage, protecting cells from oxidative stress. Antisense-oligonucleotide treatment promoted skipping of exon 3 and thus generated PaDel3,4, increasing cell survival. Collectively, we propose that naturally- and experimentally-induced exon skipping at least partly restores the mutant Parkin gene deficit, providing a molecular basis for the development of therapeutic exon skipping.

  4. Safety and Efficacy Study of VY-AADC01 for Advanced Parkinson's Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease; Parkinson's Disease; Basal Ganglia Disease; Brain Diseases; Central Nervous System Diseases; Movement Disorders; Nervous System Diseases; Neurodegenerative Diseases; Parkinsonian Disorders

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Heim, Beatrice; Krismer, Florian; De Marzi, Roberto; Seppi, Klaus

    2017-04-04

    The differential diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes is considered one of the most challenging in neurology and error rates in the clinical diagnosis can be high even at specialized centres. Despite several limitations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has undoubtedly enhanced the diagnostic accuracy in the differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative parkinsonism over the last three decades. This review aims to summarize research findings regarding the value of the different MRI techniques, including advanced sequences at high- and ultra-high-field MRI and modern image analysis algorithms, in the diagnostic work-up of Parkinson's disease. This includes not only the exclusion of alternative diagnoses for Parkinson's disease such as symptomatic parkinsonism and atypical parkinsonism, but also the diagnosis of early, new onset, and even prodromal Parkinson's disease.

  6. A report on the WHO working group on Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Janca, A

    1999-01-01

    In order to raise awareness of the public health importance of Parkinson's disease, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has recently established a Working Group on Parkinson's Disease and included it in the framework of the WHO Global Initiative on Neurology and Public Health. The first meeting of this international expert group produced a set of recommendations covering the following aspects of Parkinson's disease: epidemiology; organisation of services and treatment; education, training and information, and direct and indirect costs of care. An independent international research project entitled Global Parkinson's Disease Survey has recently been launched in response to the recommendations of the WHO Working Group on Parkinson's Disease. This paper summarises the recommendations of this WHO Working Group and outlines objectives, methods and preliminary pilot results of the Global Parkinson's Disease Survey.

  7. Disrupted social connectedness in people with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Mohammad Ali; Negarandeh, Reza; Bastani, Farideh; Greysen, Ryan

    2014-03-01

    A study was conducted to explore the effects of Parkinson's disease on people's social interactions. An exploratory qualitative design was used. Participants were a purposive sample of 10 people with Parkinson's disease who were attending a hospital outpatients' neurology clinic. Data were collected by semi-structured in-depth interviews. All interviews were transcribed and analysed by using conventional content analysis to explore the participants' experiences and perceptions on social interactions, using the central question 'what effect does Parkinson's disease have on people's social interactions?' Analysis revealed that Parkinson's disease affected social interactions by disrupting social connectedness. Social connectedness was disrupted by a number of factors, including 'progressive physical disability, mood disturbances, shrinking of social activities and secluding oneself. Older adults with Parkinson's disease therefore face a number of challenges to remaining socially connected. It appears that disrupted social connectedness is one of the negative consequences of living with Parkinson's.

  8. Four Cases of Parkinson Disease Diagnosed During the Postpartum Period.

    PubMed

    Maltête, David; Grangeon, Lou; Le Goff, Floriane; Ozel, Gulden; Fetter, Damien; Ahtoy, Patrick; Temgoua, Olivier; Rouillé, Audrey; Lefaucheur, Romain

    2017-07-01

    There is little experience with the effect of pregnancy on Parkinson disease because the number of women with Parkinson disease who are of childbearing age is small. We report four cases beginning during the postpartum period and discuss the potential contribution of different factors that may influence the occurrence of Parkinson disease in this time period. Four women aged 29-35 years developed arm tremor, shoulder pain, dizziness, or decreased dexterity of the hand in the first few days or months after childbirth. They were initially diagnosed with postpartum depression or psychogenic parkinsonism. Finally, dopamine transporter imaging confirmed the diagnosis of young-onset Parkinson disease. Early-onset Parkinson disease may present in postpartum women. In women with atypical motor symptoms in addition to depression, this diagnosis should be considered.

  9. Physical therapy and occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Radder, Danique L M; Sturkenboom, Ingrid H; van Nimwegen, Marlies; Keus, Samyra H; Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M

    2017-01-04

    Current medical management is only partially effective in controlling the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. As part of comprehensive multidisciplinary care, physical therapy and occupational therapy aim to support people with Parkinson's disease in dealing with the consequences of their disease in daily activities. In this narrative review, we address the limitations that people with Parkinson's disease may encounter despite optimal medical management, and we clarify both the unique and shared approaches that physical therapists and occupational therapists can apply in treating these limitations.

  10. Dopamine Transporter Imaging Assessment of Parkinson’s Disease Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    terminal integrity, will provide a quantitative biomarker of Parkinson’s disease progression in subjects with early Parkison’s disease during a nine month...the r te of progression of Parkinson’s disease . All subjects have been and will be recruited and clinically evaluated through their participation in...will directly evaluate in vivo the rate of ongoing dopaminergic ne ronal degeneration in early Parkinson’s disease , whether the rate of ongoing

  11. A mixed-methods study into ballet for people living with Parkinson's1

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Sara; McGill, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Background: Parkinson's is a neurological disease that is physically debilitating and can be socially isolating. Dance is growing in popularity for people with Parkinson's and claims have been made for its benefits. The paper details a mixed-methods study that examined a 12-week dance project for people with Parkinson's, led by English National Ballet. Methods: The effects on balance, stability and posture were measured through the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale and a plumb-line analysis. The value of participation and movement quality were interpreted through ethnographic methods, grounded theory and Effort analysis. Results: Triangulation of results indicates that people were highly motivated, with 100% adherence, and valued the classes as an important part of their lives. Additionally, results indicated an improvement in balance and stability, although not in posture. Conclusions: Dancing may offer benefit to people with Parkinson's through its intellectual, artistic, social and physical aspects. The paper suggests that a range of research methods is fundamental to capture the importance of multifaceted activity, such as dance, to those with Parkinson's. PMID:23805165

  12. Can loss of the swallow tail sign help distinguish between Parkinson Disease and the Parkinson-Plus syndromes?

    PubMed

    Oustwani, Christopher Sami; Korutz, Alexander William; Lester, Malisa Siri; Kianirad, Yasaman; Simuni, Tanya; Hijaz, Tarek Aref

    To determine if loss of the swallow tail sign (STS) can distinguish Parkinson Disease (PD) from the Parkinson-Plus syndromes. Twenty-five patients with PD, 21 with Parkinson-Plus syndromes, and 14 control patients were included. Presence of the STS was assessed. The STS was present in 79% of controls, statistically greater than the PD/Parkinson-Plus patients. There was no difference in the presence of the STS between the PD/Parkinson-Plus subgroups or when scanning at 1.5 T or 3 T. Loss of the STS could not distinguish between PD and Parkinson-Plus patients. The STS can be identified at both 1.5 T and 3 T. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dental management of Parkinson's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Katyayan, Preeti Agarwal; Katyayan, Manish Khan; Nugala, Babitha

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is an idiopathic, slowly progressive disorder of the central nervous system characterized by resting tremor, muscular rigidity, slow and decreased movement (bradykinesia), and postural instability. Oral healthcare providers can expect to be called upon to care for patients with this progressively debilitating disease. To provide competent care to patients with Parkinson's disease, clinicians must understand the disease, its treatment and its impact on the patient's ability to undergo and respond to dental care. The successful prosthodontic management of a 74-year-old completely edentulous Parkinson's disease patient is presented, with the conclusion that a prosthodontic intervention may contribute to improvement in the quality of life of a Parkinson's disease patient.

  14. Non-motor symptoms may herald Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Tien K; Burn, David J

    2009-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, after Alzheimer's disease. It predominantly affects the elderly. Age is the most clearly established risk factor and there is a male:female ratio of 1.5:1. Current incidence in the general population is 8.4-19 per 100,000 population per year with an approximate prevalence of 120 per 100,000 population. NICE recommends that patients with suspected Parkinson's disease should be referred untreated to a specialist with expertise in parkinsonian disorders. The diagnosis is primarily clinical. Parkinson's disease should be suspected in all patients presenting with bradykinesia (which is essential for the diagnosis of any form of parkinsonism, including Parkinson's disease), muscular rigidity, resting tremor (4-6 Hz) and postural instability not caused by a primary visual, vestibular, cerebellar, or proprioceptive dysfunction. At present, there are no specific biochemical, imaging or genetic tests to assist in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Structural brain imaging (MRI or CT) has no role in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease but may be useful to exclude cerebrovascular disease, hydrocephalus and Wilson's disease in selected cases. Parkinson's disease is a condition that results in both motor and non-motor symptoms. Morbidity associated with non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease is becoming increasingly recognised and some non-motor symptoms such as hyposmia, apathy, depression and REM sleep behaviour disorder may precede the onset of motor symptoms.

  15. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake in Parkinson's disease also decreases at thyroid.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hideaki; Udaka, Fukashi; Oda, Masaya; Tamura, Akiko; Kubori, Tamotsu; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Kameyama, Masakuni

    2005-05-01

    Decreased cardiac metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake was reported in Parkinson's disease and this contributes to the differential diagnosis between Parkinson's disease and other forms of parkinsonism such as multiple system atrophy. However, decreased MIBG uptake of the thyroid has not been demonstrated. To compare MIBG uptake of the thyroid among Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and controls. Twenty-six patients with Parkinson's disease, 11 patients with multiple system atrophy and 14 controls were examined in this study. Planar images were taken 15 minutes (early images) and 3 hours (late images) after intravenous injection of 111 MBq 123I-MIBG. MIBG uptake of the thyroid on early images decreased significantly in Parkinson's disease compared to controls (p < 0.0001) and multiple system atrophy (p = 0.018). MIBG uptake of the thyroid on early images decreased significantly also in multiple system atrophy compared to controls (p = 0.027). On late images, thyroid uptake differed significantly only between Parkinson's disease and controls (p = 0.010). Our study is the first to demonstrate decreased MIBG uptake of the thyroid in Parkinson's disease. Sympathetic nervous denervation of Parkinson's disease occurred not only in the heart but also in the thyroid.

  16. Neuromuscular rate of force development deficit in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Kelley G; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; LeDoux, Mark S; Schilling, Brian K

    2017-06-01

    Bradykinesia and reduced neuromuscular force exist in Parkinson disease. The interpolated twitch technique has been used to evaluate central versus peripheral manifestations of neuromuscular strength in healthy, aging, and athletic populations, as well as moderate to advanced Parkinson disease, but this method has not been used in mild Parkinson disease. This study aimed to evaluate quadriceps femoris rate of force development and quantify potential central and peripheral activation deficits in individuals with Parkinson disease. Nine persons with mild Parkinson Disease (Hoehn & Yahr≤2, Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale total score=mean 19.1 (SD 5.0)) and eight age-matched controls were recruited in a cross-sectional investigation. Quadriceps femoris voluntary and stimulated maximal force and rate of force development were evaluated using the interpolated twitch technique. Thirteen participants satisfactorily completed the protocol. Individuals with early Parkinson disease (n=7) had significantly slower voluntary rate of force development (p=0.008; d=1.97) and rate of force development ratio (p=0.004; d=2.18) than controls (n=6). No significant differences were found between groups for all other variables. Persons with mild-to-moderate Parkinson disease display disparities in rate of force development, even without deficits in maximal force. The inability to produce force at a rate comparable to controls is likely a downstream effect of central dysfunction of the motor pathway in Parkinson disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Increased risk of parkinsonism associated with welding exposure

    PubMed Central

    Racette, Brad A.; Criswell, Susan R.; Lundin, Jessica I.; Hobson, Angela; Seixas, Noah; Kotzbauer, Paul T.; Evanoff, Bradley A.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Zhang, Jing; Sheppard, Lianne; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Objective Manganese (Mn), an established neurotoxicant, is a common component of welding fume. The neurological phenotype associated with welding exposures has not been well described. Prior epidemiologic evidence linking occupational welding to parkinsonism is mixed, and remains controversial. Methods This was a cross-sectional and nested case–control study to investigate the prevalence and phenotype of parkinsonism among 811 shipyard and fabrication welders recruited from trade unions. Two reference groups included 59 non-welder trade workers and 118 newly diagnosed, untreated idiopathic PD patients. Study subjects were examined by a movement disorders specialist using the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor subsection 3 (UPDRS3). Parkinsonism cases were defined as welders with UPDRS3 score ≥15. Normal was defined as UPDRS3 < 6. Exposure was classified as intensity adjusted, cumulative years of welding. Adjusted prevalence ratios for parkinsonism were calculated in relation to quartiles of welding years. Results The overall prevalence estimate of parkinsonism was 15.6% in welding exposed workers compared to 0% in the reference group. Among welders, we observed a U-shaped dose–response relation between weighted welding exposure-years and parkinsonism. UPDRS3 scores for most domains were similar between welders and newly diagnosed idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) patients, except for greater frequency of rest tremor and asymmetry in PD patients. Conclusion This work-site based study among welders demonstrates a high prevalence of parkinsonism compared to nonwelding-exposed workers and a clinical phenotype that overlaps substantially with PD. PMID:22975422

  18. Disease modification in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Henchcliffe, Claire; Severt, W Lawrence

    2011-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related, progressive, multisystem neurodegenerative disorder resulting in significant morbidity and mortality, as well as a growing social and financial burden in an aging population. The hallmark of PD is loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta, leading to bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor. Current pharmacological treatment is therefore centred upon dopamine replacement to alleviate symptoms. However, two major problems complicate this approach: (i) motor symptoms continue to progress, requiring increasing doses of medication, which result in both short-term adverse effects and intermediate- to long-term motor complications; (ii) dopamine replacement does little to treat non-dopaminergic motor and non-motor symptoms, which are an important source of morbidity, including dementia, sleep disturbances, depression, orthostatic hypotension, and postural instability leading to falls. It is critical, therefore, to develop a broader and more fundamental therapeutic approach to PD, and major research efforts have focused upon developing neuroprotective interventions. Despite many encouraging preclinical data suggesting the possibility of addressing the underlying pathophysiology by slowing cell loss, efforts to translate this into the clinical realm have largely proved disappointing in the past. Barriers to finding neuroprotective or disease-modifying drugs in PD include a lack of validated biomarkers of progression, which hampers clinical trial design and interpretation; difficulties separating symptomatic and neuroprotective effects of candidate neuroprotective therapies; and possibly fundamental flaws in some of the basic preclinical models and testing. However, three recent clinical trials have used a novel delayed-start design in an attempt to overcome some of these roadblocks. While not examining markers of cell loss and function, which would determine neuroprotective effects, this trial design

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction in idiopathic Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Parker, W D; Swerdlow, R H

    1998-04-01

    Disordered mitochondrial metabolism may play an important role in a number of idiopathic neurodegenerative disorders. The question of mitochondrial dysfunction is particularly attractive in the case of idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD), since Vyas et al. recognized in the 1980s that the parkinsonism-inducing compound N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine is a mitochondrial toxin. The unique genetic properties of mitochondria also make them worthy of consideration for a pathogenic role in PD, as well as in other late-onset, sporadic neurodegenerative disorders. Although affected persons occasionally do provide family histories that suggest Mendelian inheritance, the vast majority of the time these diseases appear sporadically. Because of unique features such as heteroplasmy, replicative segregation, and threshold effects, mitochondrial inheritance can allow for the apparent sporadic nature of these diseases.

  20. Diagnosing Parkinson's Diseases Using Fuzzy Neural System

    PubMed Central

    Abiyev, Rahib H.; Abizade, Sanan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the design of the recognition system that will discriminate between healthy people and people with Parkinson's disease. A diagnosing of Parkinson's diseases is performed using fusion of the fuzzy system and neural networks. The structure and learning algorithms of the proposed fuzzy neural system (FNS) are presented. The approach described in this paper allows enhancing the capability of the designed system and efficiently distinguishing healthy individuals. It was proved through simulation of the system that has been performed using data obtained from UCI machine learning repository. A comparative study was carried out and the simulation results demonstrated that the proposed fuzzy neural system improves the recognition rate of the designed system. PMID:26881009

  1. Stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun

    2007-06-01

    The aim of stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease is to reconstruct nigro-striatal neuronal pathways using endogenous neural stem/precursor cells or grafted dopaminergic neurons. As an alternative, transplantation of stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons into the striatum has been attempted, with the aim of stimulating local synapse formation and/or release of dopamine and cytokines from grafted cells. Candidate stem cells include neural stem/precursor cells, embryonic stem cells and other stem/precursor cells. Among these, embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells that proliferate extensively, making them a good potential donor source for transplantation. However, tumor formation and ethical issues present major problems for embryonic stem cell therapy. This review describes the current status of stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease, as well as future research approaches from a clinical perspective.

  2. Advances in the genetics of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Joanne; Farrer, Matt

    2013-08-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease that was long considered the result of environmental factors. In the past 15 years, however, a genetic aetiology for PD has begun to emerge. Here, we review results from linkage and next-generation sequencing studies of familial parkinsonism, as well as candidate gene and genome-wide association findings in sporadic PD. In these studies, many of the genetic findings overlap, despite different designs and study populations, highlighting novel therapeutic targets. The molecular results delineate a sequence of pathological events whereby deficits in synaptic exocytosis and endocytosis, endosomal trafficking, lysosome-mediated autophagy and mitochondrial maintenance increase susceptibility to PD. These discoveries provide the rationale, molecular insight and research tools to develop neuroprotective and disease-modifying therapies.

  3. [Indirect costs in idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Barth, F; Baum, B; Bremen, D; Meuser, T; Jost, W H

    2005-04-01

    The economic impact of parkinsonism has been getting more significant due to the increasing prevalence of Parkinson's disease and the modern therapies available nowadays. The present study is supposed to update the existing databases and to provide a sound foundation for rational decision-making in the health care sector. It does not only focus on the direct costs of this disease incurred by 75 patients over a longer period, but also and for the first time, takes a look on the indirect cost as well. The study shows that the expenses for PD-related house rebuilding and early retirement make up for a substantial share among the indirect costs. In the overall analysis, the ratio between both, direct and indirect costs appear to be relatively balanced with slight domination of the direct costs.

  4. Protective Mechanisms of Flavonoids in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magalingam, Kasthuri Bai; Radhakrishnan, Ammu Kutty; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic, debilitating neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta region in human midbrain. To date, oxidative stress is the well accepted concept in the etiology and progression of Parkinson's disease. Hence, the therapeutic agent is targeted against suppressing and alleviating the oxidative stress-induced cellular damage. Within the past decades, an explosion of research discoveries has reported on the protective mechanisms of flavonoids, which are plant-based polyphenols, in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease using both in vitro and in vivo models. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature on the neuroprotective mechanisms of flavonoids in protecting the dopaminergic neurons hence reducing the symptoms of this movement disorder. The mechanism reviewed includes effect of flavonoids in activation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, suppressing the lipid peroxidation, inhibition of inflammatory mediators, flavonoids as a mitochondrial target therapy, and modulation of gene expression in neuronal cells. PMID:26576219

  5. Muscle silent period in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Higgins, D C; Haidri, N H; Wilbourn, A J

    1971-10-01

    The muscle silent period was measured in 11 patients with moderate to severe rigidity associated with Parkinson's disease. The determinations were made under conditions of maximum disability for each patient, since all medications had been withdrawn before testing. The duration of the EMG silence, produced by small and large electrical twitch contractions of the adductor pollicis muscle, fell within a range of values previously determined for normal individuals. Major alleviation of the rigidity and bradykinesia with chronic oral l-dopa therapy was not accompanied by any change in the silent period. It was concluded that in untreated Parkinsonism, and also after its treatment with l-dopa, the functioning of the muscle spindles and local inhibitory reflexes remains normal.

  6. [Psychological and behavioural disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Fénelon, Gilles; Césaro, Pierre

    2010-10-01

    Psychological and behavioral disorders associated with Parkinson's disease can have a major impact on patients' and caregivers' quality of life. Depression, anxiety, psychotic symptoms (e.g hallucinations), apathy and impulse-control disorders raise questions as to the respective roles of premorbid vulnerability, disease-related factors, and drug adverse effects. These disorders are often difficult to manage, and there is an unmet need for controlled trials in this field.

  7. Unravelling mitochondrial pathways to Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Celardo, I; Martins, L M; Gandhi, S

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for cellular function due to their role in ATP production, calcium homeostasis and apoptotic signalling. Neurons are heavily reliant on mitochondrial integrity for their complex signalling, plasticity and excitability properties, and to ensure cell survival over decades. The maintenance of a pool of healthy mitochondria that can meet the bioenergetic demands of a neuron, is therefore of critical importance; this is achieved by maintaining a careful balance between mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial trafficking, mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy. The molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes are gradually being elucidated. It is widely recognized that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the form of reduced bioenergetic capacity, increased oxidative stress and reduced resistance to stress, is observed in several Parkinson's disease models. However, identification of the recessive genes implicated in Parkinson's disease has revealed a common pathway involving mitochondrial dynamics, transport, turnover and mitophagy. This body of work has led to the hypothesis that the homeostatic mechanisms that ensure a healthy mitochondrial pool are key to neuronal function and integrity. In this paradigm, impaired mitochondrial dynamics and clearance result in the accumulation of damaged and dysfunctional mitochondria, which may directly induce neuronal dysfunction and death. In this review, we consider the mechanisms by which mitochondrial dysfunction may lead to neurodegeneration. In particular, we focus on the mechanisms that underlie mitochondrial homeostasis, and discuss their importance in neuronal integrity and neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph

  8. Dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christina A; Nirenberg, Melissa J

    2010-01-01

    To report and characterize a dopamine agonist (DA) withdrawal syndrome (DAWS) in Parkinson disease. Retrospective cohort study. Outpatient tertiary movement disorders clinic. Patients A cohort of 93 nondemented patients with Parkinson disease enrolled in a prospective study of nonmotor and motor disease manifestations. Main Outcome Measure The presence of DAWS, defined as a severe, stereotyped cluster of physical and psychological symptoms that correlate with DA withdrawal in a dose-dependent manner, cause clinically significant distress or social/occupational dysfunction, are refractory to levodopa and other Parkinson disease medications, and cannot be accounted for by other clinical factors. Of 40 subjects treated with a DA, 26 underwent subsequent DA taper. Of these 26 subjects, 5 (19%) developed DAWS and 21 (81%) did not. All subjects with DAWS had baseline DA-related impulse control disorders. Symptoms of DAWS resembled those of other drug withdrawal syndromes and included anxiety, panic attacks, agoraphobia, depression, dysphoria, diaphoresis, fatigue, pain, orthostatic hypotension, and drug cravings. Subjects with DAWS as compared with those without DAWS had higher baseline DA use (mean [SD], 420 [170] vs 230 [180] DA levodopa equivalent daily doses [DA-LEDD], respectively; P = .04) and higher cumulative DA exposure (mean [SD], 1800 [1200] vs 700 [900] DA-LEDD-years, respectively; P = .03). Subjects with DAWS also had considerably lower Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores than those without DAWS (mean [SD], 21 [5] vs 31 [10], respectively; P = .007), despite comparable disease duration (mean [SD], 7.3 [7] vs 6.3 [4] years, respectively; P = .77) and similar total dopaminergic medication use (mean [SD], 830 [450] vs 640 [610] total LEDD, respectively; P = .52) in the 2 groups. Dopamine agonists have a stereotyped withdrawal syndrome that can lead to profound disability in a subset of patients. Physicians should monitor patients closely when

  9. Small intestine dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Justyna; Szlufik, Stanisław; Nieciecki, Michał; Charzyńska, Ingeborga; Królicki, Leszek; Smektała, Piotr; Friedman, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the small bowel transit time in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten patients with PD with no gastrointestinal complaints and ten healthy control subjects were investigated using single photon emission computed tomography fused with computed tomography after swallowing of a specially prepared capsule containing technetium 99m, which allowed visualization of the passage in the intestines. Preliminary results show that the small intestine passage in PD patients was prolonged compared to controls.

  10. Hereditary chin tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Erer, Sevda; Jankovic, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    Hereditary chin tremor (HCT) is characterized by rhythmical, involuntary movements of the chin muscles usually inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. We describe a 74-year old man with familial, childhood-onset chin tremor, and a 3-year history of progressive hand tremor, gait difficulty, and other parkinsonian features. Since chin tremor often occurs in Parkinson's disease (PD), a coexistent HCT may not be recognized unless past and family history of tremor is carefully explored.

  11. The nature of excessive sleepiness and sudden sleep onset in Parkinson׳s disease

    PubMed Central

    Távora, Daniel Gurgel Fernandes; de Bruin, Veralice Meireles Sales; Lopes Gama, Romulo; Lopes, Emily Mourão Soares; Jorge, Iago Farias; de Bruin, Pedro Felipe Carvalhedo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and sudden sleep onset (SOS) episodes are frequent in Parkinson׳s disease (PD). The objectives are to identify clinical characteristics and factors associated with EDS and SOS episodes. Methods Clinical demographic data were recorded (N=100, mean age=65.0±10.4). EDS was identified by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS>10) and SOS episodes were registered. Disease severity was evaluated by the Unified Parkinson׳s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS, I, II, and III), sleep disturbances by the Parkinson׳s Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS<100), depressive symptoms by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI>10) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) by the REM sleep behavior scale. Levodopa equivalent dose was measured. Results: PD patients with EDS (67%) were predominately male (73.1%) and had worse disease severity (UPDRS II and III p= 0.005); SOS episodes (39%) were associated with disease duration, diabetes, sleep disturbances (PDSS Scale), disease severity (UPDRS I, II, III) and RBD symptoms (p<0.05). Stepwise regression analysis showed that EDS was independently associated with motor-symptoms severity (UPDRS III scale, p=0.003). SOS episodes were independently associated with disease duration (p=0.006) and sleep disturbances (PDSS scale, p=0.03): patients had more uncomfortable immobility at night, tremor on waking and snoring or difficult breathing. Discussion EDS and or SOS episodes are frequent and manifest a differential pattern in PD. SOS episodes are associated with longer disease duration, diabetes, sleep disturbances and RBD symptoms indicating that these “sleep attacks” are of multifactorial origin and probably influenced by brain structural abnormalities. PMID:26483896

  12. [The Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: A metabolic disease?].

    PubMed

    Rieu, I; Boirie, Y; Morio, B; Derost, P; Ulla, M; Marques, A; Debilly, B; Bannier, S; Durif, F

    2010-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by motor impairments (tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability) associated or not with non-motor complications (cognitive disorders, dysautonomia). Most of patients loose weight during evolution of their disease. Dysregulations of hypothalamus, which is considered as the regulatory center of satiety and energy metabolism, could play a major role in this phenomenon. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (NST) is an effective method to treat patients with advanced Parkinson's disease providing marked improvement of motor impairments. This chirurgical procedure also induces a rapid and strong body weight gain and sometimes obesity. This post-operative weight gain, which exceeds largely weight lost recorded in non-operated patient, could be responsible of metabolic disorders (such as diabetes) and cardiovascular diseases. This review describes body weight variations generated by Parkinson' disease and deep brain stimulation of the NST, and focuses on metabolic disorders capable to explain them. Finally, this review emphasizes on the importance of an adequate nutritional follow up care for parkinsonian patient.

  13. Visuospatial working memory in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, V A; Welch, J L; Dick, D J

    1989-01-01

    Visuospatial impairment is frequently reported in Parkinson's disease but the psychological mechanisms which subserve the impaired abilities and the way in which breakdown of the mechanisms leads to performance deficits have not been precisely delineated. This paper reports experimental investigations designed to test the hypothesis that the locus of the impairment is the visuospatial subsystem of working memory. Subjects were a group of sixteen patients with Parkinson's disease of mild to moderate severity and a matched control group. They performed complex visuospatial and verbal memory tasks. The Parkinsonian group were significantly slower than the control group when performing the visuospatial task. They were not significantly slower and made no more errors than the control group on the verbal task. The findings are compatible with the hypothesis that the visuospatial subsystem of working memory is impaired in Parkinson's disease. It is demonstrated that the impairment is not the result of a reduction in the capacity of this subsystem but is due to difficulty in utilising information stored in the subsystem to perform complex visuospatial tasks. PMID:2592967

  14. Motor Cortex Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    De Rose, Marisa; Guzzi, Giusy; Bosco, Domenico; Romano, Mary; Lavano, Serena Marianna; Plastino, Massimiliano; Volpentesta, Giorgio; Marotta, Rosa; Lavano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27–31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39), and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27–31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred. PMID:23213520

  15. Overview of mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bobela, Wojciech; Zheng, Lu; Schneider, Bernard L

    2014-09-03

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of neurons in specific regions of the nervous system, notably in the substantia nigra pars compacta and, in most cases, by the deposition of intraneuronal inclusions named Lewy bodies. These pathological alterations have profound effects on the brain function, leading to the progressive development of various symptoms, the most prominent being the impaired initiation of voluntary movements caused by the loss of dopamine signaling in the basal ganglia. Here, we provide an overview of the mouse models of Parkinson's disease, with the goal of guiding selection of the most appropriate model for studying the question at hand. Pharmacological approaches targeting dopamine signaling and toxins leading to selective degeneration of nigral neurons are used to validate symptomatic treatments that aim at restoring effective dopaminergic function for motor control. Alternative mouse models are based on genetic modifications that are meant to reproduce the inherited alterations associated with familial forms of Parkinson's disease. Although genetic models have most often failed to induce overt degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons, they provide essential tools to explore the multifactorial etiology of this complex neurodegenerative disorder. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Motor cortex stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Rose, Marisa; Guzzi, Giusy; Bosco, Domenico; Romano, Mary; Lavano, Serena Marianna; Plastino, Massimiliano; Volpentesta, Giorgio; Marotta, Rosa; Lavano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27-31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39), and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27-31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred.

  17. PET and SPECT studies in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brooks, D J

    1997-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) provide sensitive means for quantifying the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic fibres in Parkinson's disease and for detecting the presence of dopaminergic dysfunction in asymptomatic at-risk relatives and patients with isolated tremor. Functional imaging can also be used to follow the rate of disease progression objectively, determine the efficacy of putative neuroprotective agents, and monitor the viability of transplants of fetal tissue. Additionally, in vivo pharmacological changes associated with development of treatment complications (fluctuations, dyskinesias) can be studied. Loss of dopaminergic projections produces profound changes in resting and activated brain metabolism. PET and SPECT activation studies have suggested that the akinesia of Parkinson's disease is associated with failure to activate the supplementary motor and dorsal pre-frontal areas. Activation of these cortical areas is restored towards normal by the use of dopaminergic medication, striatal transplantation with fetal mesencephalic tissue, and pallidotomy. The aim of this chapter is to review the insight which functional imaging has given us into the pathophysiology of parkinsonism.

  18. Increased visual dependence in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Azulay, Jean Philippe; Mesure, Serge; Amblard, Bernard; Pouget, Jean

    2002-12-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that there is increased visual dependence perceptually in patients with Parkinson's disease. We also evaluated whether the visual control of posture and locomotion was related to perceptual visual field dependence. 21 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 22 age-matched normal subjects were compared on judgment of the visual vertical using the Rod-and-Frame test with visual perturbations in the frontal plane with a tilted frame. Patients had significantly larger errors than controls in the estimation of the subjective vertical. In the same experiment, we performed a posture and a gait analysis in both groups. Posturographic evaluation did not indicate significant differences in unsteadiness between patients and controls. Gait analysis indicated a typical pattern of reduced velocity, shortened stride length, and normal step width. A significant correlation of .89 was found only in the Parkinsonian group between their errors in estimating subjective visual vertical and the Romberg quotient evaluating visual contribution to postural control. No specific locomotor pattern was correlated with visual dependence. Considering our results and previous reports on the visual control of posture, we conclude that patients with Parkinson's disease showed a significantly increased dependence upon visual information both perceptually and motorically, with an increased perceptual visual dependence in the patients being predictive of an equivalent visual dependence or visual control of posture and equilibrium.

  19. Psychosis in parkinsonism: an unorthodox approach

    PubMed Central

    Onofrj, Marco; Carrozzino, Danilo; D’Amico, Aurelio; Di Giacomo, Roberta; Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Thomas, Astrid; Onofrj, Valeria; Taylor, John-Paul; Bonanni, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Psychosis in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently considered as the occurrence of hallucinations and delusions. The historical meaning of the term psychosis was, however, broader, encompassing a disorganization of both consciousness and personality, including behavior abnormalities, such as impulsive overactivity and catatonia, in complete definitions by the International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). Our review is aimed at reminding that complex psychotic symptoms, including impulsive overactivity and somatoform disorders (the last being a recent controversial entity in PD), were carefully described in postencephalitic parkinsonism (PEP), many decades before dopaminergic treatment era, and are now described in other parkinsonisms than PD. Eminent neuropsychiatrists of the past century speculated that studying psychosis in PEP might highlight its mechanisms in other conditions. Yet, functional assessments were unavailable at the time. Therefore, the second part of our article reviews the studies of neural correlates of psychosis in parkinsonisms, by taking into account both theories on the narrative functions of the default mode network (DMN) and hypotheses on DMN modulation. PMID:28553118

  20. Clinical characteristics of parkinsonism in frontotemporal dementia according to subtypes.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Kyung; Park, Kee Hyung; Yoon, Bora; Lee, Jae-Hong; Choi, Seong Hye; Joung, Jee H; Yoon, Soo Jin; Kim, Byeong C; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Joo; Na, Duk L; Park, Kyung Won

    2017-01-15

    We investigated the prevalence of parkinsonism in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) subtypes and the cognitive and behavioral differences between FTD with and without parkinsonism in a well-structured, prospective cohort. One hundred and ninety-one FTD patients were enrolled and all patients underwent comprehensive neurological evaluations, neuropsychological tests, and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. The prevalence of parkinsonism was 38.7% (74 patients), and included 33 (46.5%) behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD), 16 (24.2%) semantic dementia (SD), 19 (45.2%) progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), and 6 (50%) FTD associated with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND). SD patients with parkinsonism had higher CDR sum of boxes scores (9.7±4.5 vs 6.2±4.5, p=0.024), frontal behavioral inventory total score (33.7±20.5 vs 24.3±14.5, p=0.045), and executive function score of frontal executive dysfunction, disinhibition, and apathy (28.9±13.7 vs 19.2±12.9, p=0.021) than those without parkinsonism. Seoul Instrumental Activities of Daily Living score (bvFTD: 23.5±11.7 vs 17.3±11.3, p=0.031, SD: 23.1±11.1 vs 11.3±9.3, p=0.005) was higher for bvFTD and SD with parkinsonism than for those without parkinsonism. Parkinsonism is found to be more common in patients with bvFTD, PNFA, and FTD-MND patients than those with SD. Behavioral disturbances were more prominent in SD with parkinsonism than without. Additional studies are needed to determine the pathomechanism and optimal treatment of parkinsonism in different FTD subtypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcranial sonography and functional imaging in glucocerebrosidase mutation Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, MJ; Hagenah, J; Dhawan, V; Peng, S; Stanley, K; Raymond, D; Deik, A; Gross, SJ; Schreiber-Agus, N; Mirelman, A; Marder, K; Ozelius, LJ; Eidelberg, D; Bressman, SB; Saunders-Pullman, R

    2012-01-01

    Background Heterozygous glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations are the leading genetic risk factor for Parkinson disease, yet imaging correlates, particularly transcranial sonography, have not been extensively described. Methods To determine whether GBA mutation heterozygotes with Parkinson disease demonstrate hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra, transcranial sonography was performed in Ashkenazi Jewish Parkinson disease subjects, tested for the eight most common Gaucher disease mutations and the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, and in controls. [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose or [18F]-fluorodopa positron emission tomography is also reported from a subset of Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations. Results Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations (n=23) had a greater median maximal area of substantia nigral echogenicity compared to controls (n=34, aSNmax=0.30 vs. 0.18, p=0.007). There was no difference in median maximal area of nigral echogenicity between Parkinson disease groups defined by GBA and LRRK2 genotype: GBA heterozygotes; GBA homozygotes/compound heterozygotes (n=4, aSNmax=0.27); subjects without LRRK2 or GBA mutations (n=32, aSNmax=0.27); LRRK2 heterozygotes/homozyogotes without GBA mutations (n=27, aSNmax=0.28); and GBA heterozygotes/LRRK2 heterozygotes (n=4, aSNmax=0.32, overall p=0.63). In secondary analyses among Parkinson disease subjects with GBA mutations, maximal area of nigral echogenicity did not differ based on GBA mutation severity or mutation number. [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (n=3) and [18F]-fluorodopa (n=2) positron emission tomography in Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations was consistent with findings in idiopathic Parkinson disease. Conclusions Both transcranial sonography and positron emission tomography are abnormal in GBA mutation associated Parkinson disease, similar to other Parkinson disease subjects. PMID:23062841

  2. Non-motor Parkinson's: integral to motor Parkinson's, yet often neglected

    PubMed Central

    Todorova, Antoniya; Jenner, Peter; Ray Chaudhuri, K

    2014-01-01

    Non-motor symptoms are a key component of Parkinson's disease, possibly representing a clinical biomarker of its premotor phase. The burden of non-motor symptoms can define a patient's health-related quality of life. Non-motor symptoms substantially increase the cost of care—requiring increased hospitalisation and treatment—and pose a major challenge to healthcare professionals. However, clinicians often regard non-motor symptoms and their management as peripheral to that of the motor symptoms. Here, we address the clinical issues and unmet needs of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. PMID:24699931

  3. Pharmacological treatment of Parkinson disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Barbara S; Lang, Anthony E

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide. Although no available therapies alter the underlying neurodegenerative process, symptomatic therapies can improve patient quality of life. To provide an evidence-based review of the initial pharmacological management of the classic motor symptoms of Parkinson disease; describe management of medication-related motor complications (such as motor fluctuations and dyskinesia), and other medication adverse effects (nausea, psychosis, and impulse control disorders and related behaviors); and discuss the management of selected nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease, including rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, cognitive impairment, depression, orthostatic hypotension, and sialorrhea. References were identified using searches of PubMed between January 1985 and February 2014 for English-language human studies and the full database of the Cochrane Library. The classification of studies by quality (classes I-IV) was assessed using the levels of evidence guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology and the highest-quality data for each topic. Although levodopa is the most effective medication available for treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson disease, in certain instances (eg, mild symptoms, tremor as the only or most prominent symptom, aged <60 years) other medications (eg, monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors [MAOBIs], amantadine, anticholinergics, β-blockers, or dopamine agonists) may be initiated first to avoid levodopa-related motor complications. Motor fluctuations may be managed by modifying the levodopa dosing regimen or by adding several other medications, such as MAOBIs, catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors, or dopamine agonists. Impulse control disorders are typically managed by reducing or withdrawing dopaminergic medication, particularly dopamine agonists. Evidence-based management of some nonmotor symptoms is limited by a paucity of high-quality positive studies

  4. Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2011-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

  5. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure was the…

  6. Exercise Training and Parkinson's Disease: Placebo or Essential Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Iris; Engelhardt, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Exercise training is often recommended for people with Parkinson's disease, though there is debate about the pathophysiologic cause of impaired movement in Parkinsonism which makes it difficult to develop a specific exercise treatment for symptoms that include hypokinesia, tremor, and muscular rigidity. Most published studies show a benefit of…

  7. Dopaminergic modulation of memory and affective processing in Parkinson depression.

    PubMed

    Blonder, Lee X; Slevin, John T; Kryscio, Richard J; Martin, Catherine A; Andersen, Anders H; Smith, Charles D; Schmitt, Frederick A

    2013-11-30

    Depression is common in Parkinson's disease and is associated with cognitive impairment. Dopaminergic medications are effective in treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease; however, little is known regarding the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on cognitive function in depressed Parkinson patients. This study examines the neuropsychological effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy in Parkinsonian depression. We compared cognitive function in depressed and non-depressed Parkinson patients at two time-points: following overnight withdrawal and after the usual morning regimen of dopaminergic medications. A total of 28 non-demented, right-handed patients with mild to moderate idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated. Ten of these patients were depressed according to DSM IV criteria. Results revealed a statistically significant interaction between depression and medication status on three measures of verbal memory and a facial affect naming task. In all cases, depressed Parkinson's patients performed significantly more poorly while on dopaminergic medication than while off. The opposite pattern emerged for the non-depressed Parkinson's group. The administration of dopaminergic medication to depressed Parkinson patients may carry unintended risks.

  8. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure was the…

  9. Clear Speech Variants: An Acoustic Study in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated how different variants of clear speech affect segmental and suprasegmental acoustic measures of speech in speakers with Parkinson's disease and a healthy control group. Method: A total of 14 participants with Parkinson's disease and 14 control participants served as speakers. Each speaker produced 18 different…

  10. Clear Speech Variants: An Acoustic Study in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated how different variants of clear speech affect segmental and suprasegmental acoustic measures of speech in speakers with Parkinson's disease and a healthy control group. Method: A total of 14 participants with Parkinson's disease and 14 control participants served as speakers. Each speaker produced 18 different…

  11. Exercise Training and Parkinson's Disease: Placebo or Essential Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Iris; Engelhardt, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Exercise training is often recommended for people with Parkinson's disease, though there is debate about the pathophysiologic cause of impaired movement in Parkinsonism which makes it difficult to develop a specific exercise treatment for symptoms that include hypokinesia, tremor, and muscular rigidity. Most published studies show a benefit of…

  12. Appetitive motivational deficits in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shore, Danielle M; Rafal, Robert; Parkinson, John A

    2011-08-15

    Parkinson's disease is known for its effects on sensorimotor coordination caused by degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway. Dopamine-innervated areas of the ventral striatum also become compromised in Parkinson's disease, and little is known about the potential impact of this pathology on motivational processes mediated by the mesolimbic dopamine system. The current study tested the hypothesis that patients with Parkinson's disease would show a deficit in appetitive motivational arousal. Patients with Parkinson's disease and age-matched healthy controls completed a visual discrimination task in which control and appetitive food images (incidental to the task) were presented in the background. Response rate changes indicated appetitive motivational arousal. The healthy controls showed an increase in response rate on the task when appetitive food cues were present compared with control stimuli. In contrast, the Parkinson's disease group showed an inverse pattern to the healthy controls. The reduction in appetitive motivation correlated with an individual's Parkinsonian symptomology. Patients with Parkinson's disease demonstrated an impairment in appetitive motivational arousal consistent with the progression of dopaminergic degeneration across the course of the disease. Dysfunction of this system affects quality of life in Parkinson's disease, and a blunting of the anticipatory motivation may contribute to the high prevalence of depression in Parkinson's disease.

  13. "PINK1"-Linked Parkinsonism Is Associated with Lewy Body Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samaranch, Lluis; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Arbelo, Jose M.; Ferrer, Isidre; Lorenzo, Elena; Irigoyen, Jaione; Pastor, Maria A.; Marrero, Carmen; Isla, Concepcion; Herrera-Henriquez, Joanna; Pastor, Pau

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 gene mutations have been associated with autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease. To date, no neuropathological reports have been published from patients with Parkinson's disease with both phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 gene copies mutated. We analysed…

  14. The Effects of Levodopa on Word Intelligibility in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Letter, Miet; Santens, Patrick; Van Borsel, John

    2005-01-01

    Dysarthria is a common manifestation in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. This study investigated the effects of levodopa on intelligibility in patients with Parkinson's disease. Ten participants were tested during on- and off-states using the Yorkston and Beukelman intelligibility test (1980). Intelligibility as scored by a panel of…

  15. Neural Control of Walking in People with Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Horak, F. B.

    2016-01-01

    People with Parkinson's disease exhibit debilitating gait impairments, including gait slowness, increased step variability, and poor postural control. A widespread supraspinal locomotor network including the cortex, cerebellum, basal ganglia, and brain stem contributes to the control of human locomotion, and altered activity of these structures underlies gait dysfunction due to Parkinson's disease. PMID:26889015

  16. Visual dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease and essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Štenc Bradvica, Ivanka; Bradvica, Mario; Matić, Suzana; Reisz-Majić, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the specificity and sensitivity of the Pelli-Robson and Ishihara diagnostic methods in differing Parkinson's disease from essential tremor compared to DaTSCAN (dopamine transporter scan) findings. The intention was to investigate whether visual dysfunction appears in the early state of Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we included patients with the symptomatology of parkinsonism lasting between 6 and 12 months. The study included 164 patients of which 59 (36.0%) suffered from Parkinson's disease, 51 (31.1%) from essential tremor, and 54 (32.9%) healthy patients which presented the control group. The specificity of Pelli-Robson test in confirming Parkinson's disease was 53% and the sensitivity 81.4%. The specificity of Ishihara test in confirming Parkinson's disease was 88.2%, and sensitivity 55.9%. We found that the colour and contrast dysfunction are present as the earliest symptoms of Parkinson's disease. In this study the Pelli-Robson test is highly sensitive and the Ishihara tables are highly specific in the differential diagnosis between Parkinson's disease and essential tremor, but neither of these methods fulfils the criteria for the validity of a test. We suggest performing both of these methods to evaluate which patients are indicated for DaTSCAN.

  17. Cognitive Changes in Presymptomatic Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    Patients do not typically develop Parkinson’s Disease (PD) until they lose approximately 70% of their dopaminergic neurons. This neural degeneration... Parkinson’s Disease it is important to understand the effect of the dopaminergic system on the cortex. One possible action of dopamine on the cerebral cortex

  18. Cognitive Changes in Presymptomatic Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    Patients do not typically develop Parkinson’s Disease (PD) until they lose approximately 7O% of their dopaminergic neurons. This neural degeneration...with Parkinson’s Disease it is important to understand the effect of the dopaminergic system on the cortex. One possible action of dopamine on the

  19. "PINK1"-Linked Parkinsonism Is Associated with Lewy Body Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samaranch, Lluis; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Arbelo, Jose M.; Ferrer, Isidre; Lorenzo, Elena; Irigoyen, Jaione; Pastor, Maria A.; Marrero, Carmen; Isla, Concepcion; Herrera-Henriquez, Joanna; Pastor, Pau

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 gene mutations have been associated with autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease. To date, no neuropathological reports have been published from patients with Parkinson's disease with both phosphatase and tensin homolog-induced putative kinase 1 gene copies mutated. We analysed…

  20. Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2011-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

  1. The Effects of Levodopa on Word Intelligibility in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Letter, Miet; Santens, Patrick; Van Borsel, John

    2005-01-01

    Dysarthria is a common manifestation in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. This study investigated the effects of levodopa on intelligibility in patients with Parkinson's disease. Ten participants were tested during on- and off-states using the Yorkston and Beukelman intelligibility test (1980). Intelligibility as scored by a panel of…

  2. Study of magnetic field of the brain in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Makhortykh, S A; Semechkin, R A

    2009-03-01

    The magnetic field of the brain in parkinsonism was studied. Magnetic encephalography data were analyzed by a comprehensive spectral method. Sources of magnetic activity of the brain were simulated by punctate current dipoles. Based on the results of classification, we detected the pattern of high magnetic activity; this opens new vistas for the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  3. Factors contributing to malnutrition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung R; Chung, Sun J; Yoo, Sung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and to identify clinical, psychosocial, and nutritional factors contributing to malnutrition in Korean patients with Parkinson's disease. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design. Of 102 enrolled patients, 26 (25.5%) were malnourished and 27 (26.5%) were at risk of malnutrition based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores. Malnutrition was related to activity of daily living score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, duration of levodopa therapy, Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory scores, body weight, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and body mass index. On multiple logistic regression analysis, anxiety score, duration of levodopa therapy, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and loss of body weight were significant factors predicting malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, nutritional assessment, including psychological evaluation, is required for Parkinson's disease patients to facilitate interdisciplinary nutritional intervention for malnourished patients.

  4. Using 'omics' to define pathogenesis and biomarkers of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Caudle, W Michael; Bammler, Theo K; Lin, Yvonne; Pan, Sheng; Zhang, Jing

    2010-06-01

    Although great effort has been put forth to uncover the complex molecular mechanisms exploited in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, a satisfactory explanation remains to be discovered. The emergence of several -omics techniques, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have been integral in confirming previously identified pathways that are associated with dopaminergic neurodegeneration and subsequently Parkinson's disease, including mitochondrial and proteasomal function and synaptic neurotransmission. Additionally, these unbiased techniques, particularly in the brain regions uniquely associated with the disease, have greatly enhanced our ability to identify novel pathways, such as axon-guidance, that are potentially involved in Parkinson's pathogenesis. A comprehensive appraisal of the results obtained by different -omics has also reconfirmed the increase in oxidative stress as a common pathway likely to be critical in Parkinson's development/progression. It is hoped that further integration of these techniques will yield a more comprehensive understanding of Parkinson's disease etiology and the biological pathways that mediate neurodegeneration.

  5. Anxiety, depression, and quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Quelhas, Rosa; Costa, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson's disease has a major impact on quality of life. This cross-sectional study assessed 43 idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients in order to evaluate the impact of Parkinson's disease severity (Hoehn and Yahr scale), anxiety, and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) on quality of life (Short Form-36 Health Survey questionnaire). Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Short Form-36 Health Survey scores were significantly correlated in Hoehn and Yahr stage 2 Parkinson's disease (n=33), and anxiety had a strong correlation with physical score. Multivariate analysis (n=43) revealed that anxiety was the strongest predictor of quality of life. Anxious and depressive symptoms have a different meaning in Parkinson's disease, and both must be routinely assessed in order to optimize quality of life.

  6. Could seborrhoeic dermatitis be implicated in the pathogenesis of parkinsonism?

    PubMed

    O'Neill, C J; Richardson, M D; Charlett, A; McHugh, L; Bowes, S G; Purkiss, A G; Weller, C; Dobbs, S M; Dobbs, R J

    1994-04-01

    The spouses of a group of aged sufferers have been demonstrated to have multifarious differences relevant to parkinsonism from matched controls, which were difficult to explain by selective mating, learned or reactive behaviour. Could parkinsonism be transmissible? The frequency of inflammation and scaling on head or neck was greater (P = 0.05) in these spouses (19 available) than in controls (36), the best discriminating site of inflammation being scalp (P = 0.02). Both seborrhoeic dermatitis and overt, or pre-clinical, parkinsonism occurred in sufferers and spouses: to presume they are not causally related is to accept multiple entities. In favour of seborrhoeic dermatitis being causal for parkinsonism, rather than vice versa, is the involvement of a known organism, Pityrosporum ovale, in the dermatitis, and that the evidence of parkinsonism in the spouses indicated that they were only part way down the path towards the clinical condition.

  7. Comparative study of Parkinson's disease and leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 p.G2019S parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Joanne; Amouri, Rim; Duda, John E; Morley, James F; Read, Matthew; Donald, Alan; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Thompson, Christina; Szu Tu, Chelsea; Gustavsson, Emil K; Ben Sassi, Samia; Hentati, Emna; Zouari, Mourad; Farhat, Emna; Nabli, Fatma; Hentati, Faycel; Farrer, Matthew J

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease for which leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 carriers) p.G2019S confers substantial genotypic and population attributable risk. With informed consent, we have recruited clinical data from 778 patients from Tunisia (of which 266 have LRRK2 parkinsonism) and 580 unaffected subjects. Motor, autonomic, and cognitive assessments in idiopathic Parkinson disease and LRRK2 patients were compared with regression models. The age-associated cumulative incidence of LRRK2 parkinsonism was also estimated using case-control and family-based designs. LRRK2 parkinsonism patients had slightly less gastrointestinal dysfunction and rapid eye movement sleep disorder. Overall, disease penetrance in LRRK2 carriers was 80% by 70 years but women become affected a median 5 years younger than men. Idiopathic Parkinson disease patients with younger age at diagnosis have slower disease progression. However, age at diagnoses does not predict progression in LRRK2 parkinsonism. LRRK2 p.G2019S mutation is a useful aid to diagnosis and modifiers of disease in LRRK2 parkinsonism may aid in developing therapeutic targets.

  8. Is the Parkinson Anxiety Scale comparable across raters?

    PubMed

    Forjaz, Maria João; Ayala, Alba; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Dujardin, Kathy; Pontone, Gregory M; Starkstein, Sergio E; Weintraub, Daniel; Leentjens, Albert F G

    2015-04-01

    The Parkinson Anxiety Scale is a new scale developed to measure anxiety severity in Parkinson's disease specifically. It consists of three dimensions: persistent anxiety, episodic anxiety, and avoidance behavior. This study aimed to assess the measurement properties of the scale while controlling for the rater (self- vs. clinician-rated) effect. The Parkinson Anxiety Scale was administered to a cross-sectional multicenter international sample of 362 Parkinson's disease patients. Both patients and clinicians rated the patient's anxiety independently. A many-facet Rasch model design was applied to estimate and remove the rater effect. The following measurement properties were assessed: fit to the Rasch model, unidimensionality, reliability, differential item functioning, item local independency, interrater reliability (self or clinician), and scale targeting. In addition, test-retest stability, construct validity, precision, and diagnostic properties of the Parkinson Anxiety Scale were also analyzed. A good fit to the Rasch model was obtained for Parkinson Anxiety Scale dimensions A and B, after the removal of one item and rescoring of the response scale for certain items, whereas dimension C showed marginal fit. Self versus clinician rating differences were of small magnitude, with patients reporting higher anxiety levels than clinicians. The linear measure for Parkinson Anxiety Scale dimensions A and B showed good convergent construct with other anxiety measures and good diagnostic properties. Parkinson Anxiety Scale modified dimensions A and B provide valid and reliable measures of anxiety in Parkinson's disease that are comparable across raters. Further studies are needed with dimension C. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Family Functioning and Communication in Spouses of Patients with Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seo Young; Yang, Myung Hwa; Lee, Jung Ah; Jang, Wooyoung; Lee, Chong Sik

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with parkinsonism exhibit motor symptoms, cognitive impairment, and neuropsychiatric changes, and these symptoms increase caregiver burden. Family dynamics can be influenced by the presence of comorbidities, which is especially important in diseases causing caregiver burden. We investigated the effects of spousal parkinsonism on family functioning and communication. Methods Couples without parkinsonism, who visited hospital-based family practices, were recruited by 28 family physicians from 22 hospitals between April 2009 and June 2011; patients with parkinsonism and their spouses were recruited from a single institution. The participants completed questionnaires on demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, family functioning (the Korean version of the Family Adaptation and Cohesion Evaluation Scale [FACES] III), and family communication (the Family Communication Scale of the FACES-IV). We compared family functioning and communication between spouses of the patients with and without parkinsonism. Results The mean family adaptability and cohesion scores of the spouses of the patients with parkinsonism were 23.09±6.48 and 32.40±8.43, respectively, whereas those of the control group were 23.84±5.88 and 34.89±7.59, respectively. Family functioning and family communication were significantly different between the spouses of individuals with and without parkinsonism. After adjusting for age, sex, income, and cardiovascular disease in the logistic regression analysis, family functioning was found to significantly deteriorate in the spouses of patients with parkinsonism but not the control group. Family communication decreased significantly in spouses of patients with parkinsonism. Conclusion Family functioning and family communication significantly deteriorated in spouses of patients with parkinsonism. PMID:28197328

  10. Longitudinal Study of Gray Matter Changes in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Jia, X; Liang, P; Li, Y; Shi, L; Wang, D; Li, K

    2015-12-01

    The pathology of Parkinson disease leads to morphological brain volume changes. So far, the progressive gray matter volume change across time specific to patients with Parkinson disease compared controls remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate the pattern of gray matter changes in patients with Parkinson disease and to explore the progressive gray matter volume change specific to patients with Parkinson disease with disease progression by using voxel-based morphometry analysis. Longitudinal cognitive assessment and structural MR imaging of 89 patients with Parkinson disease (62 men) and 55 healthy controls (33 men) were from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative data base, including the initial baseline and 12-month follow-up data. Two-way analysis of covariance was performed with covariates of age, sex, years of education, imaging data from multiple centers, and total intracranial volume by using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra tool from SPM8 software. Gray matter volume changes for patients with Parkinson disease were detected with decreased gray matter volume in the frontotemporoparietal areas and the bilateral caudate, with increased gray matter volume in the bilateral limbic/paralimbic areas, medial globus pallidus/putamen, and the right occipital cortex compared with healthy controls. Progressive gray matter volume decrease in the bilateral caudate was found for both patients with Parkinson disease and healthy controls, and this caudate volume was positively associated with cognitive ability for both groups. The progressive gray matter volume increase specific to the patients with Parkinson disease was identified close to the left ventral lateral nucleus of thalamus, and a positive relationship was found between the thalamic volume and the tremor scores in a subgroup with tremor-dominant patients with Parkinson disease. The observed progressive changes in gray matter volume in Parkinson disease may provide

  11. Technology in Parkinson's disease: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; Bonato, Paolo; Nahab, Fatta B; Maetzler, Walter; Dean, John M; Klucken, Jochen; Eskofier, Bjoern M; Merola, Aristide; Horak, Fay; Lang, Anthony E; Reilmann, Ralf; Giuffrida, Joe; Nieuwboer, Alice; Horne, Malcolm; Little, Max A; Litvan, Irene; Simuni, Tanya; Dorsey, E Ray; Burack, Michelle A; Kubota, Ken; Kamondi, Anita; Godinho, Catarina; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Mitsi, Georgia; Krinke, Lothar; Hausdorff, Jeffery M; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Papapetropoulos, Spyros

    2016-09-01

    The miniaturization, sophistication, proliferation, and accessibility of technologies are enabling the capture of more and previously inaccessible phenomena in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, more information has not translated into a greater understanding of disease complexity to satisfy diagnostic and therapeutic needs. Challenges include noncompatible technology platforms, the need for wide-scale and long-term deployment of sensor technology (among vulnerable elderly patients in particular), and the gap between the "big data" acquired with sensitive measurement technologies and their limited clinical application. Major opportunities could be realized if new technologies are developed as part of open-source and/or open-hardware platforms that enable multichannel data capture sensitive to the broad range of motor and nonmotor problems that characterize PD and are adaptable into self-adjusting, individualized treatment delivery systems. The International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society Task Force on Technology is entrusted to convene engineers, clinicians, researchers, and patients to promote the development of integrated measurement and closed-loop therapeutic systems with high patient adherence that also serve to (1) encourage the adoption of clinico-pathophysiologic phenotyping and early detection of critical disease milestones, (2) enhance the tailoring of symptomatic therapy, (3) improve subgroup targeting of patients for future testing of disease-modifying treatments, and (4) identify objective biomarkers to improve the longitudinal tracking of impairments in clinical care and research. This article summarizes the work carried out by the task force toward identifying challenges and opportunities in the development of technologies with potential for improving the clinical management and the quality of life of individuals with PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Predictors of dementia in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Anang, Julius B.M.; Bertrand, Josie-Anne; Romenets, Silvia Rios; Latreille, Veronique; Panisset, Michel; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated an array of possible markers of early dementia in Parkinson disease. Methods: We performed a comprehensive assessment of autonomic, sleep, psychiatric, visual, olfactory, and motor manifestations in 80 patients with Parkinson disease who were dementia-free at baseline. After 4.4 years’ follow-up, patients were evaluated for dementia. Predictive variables were assessed using logistic regression adjusting for disease duration, follow-up duration, age, and sex. Results: Of 80 patients, 27 (34%) developed dementia. Patients destined to develop dementia were older and more often male (odds ratio [OR] = 3.64, p = 0.023). Those with baseline mild cognitive impairment had increased dementia risk (OR = 22.5, p < 0.001). REM sleep behavior disorder at baseline dramatically increased dementia risk (OR = 49.7, p = 0.001); however, neither daytime sleepiness nor insomnia predicted dementia. Higher baseline blood pressure increased dementia risk (OR = 1.37 per 10 mm Hg, p = 0.032). Orthostatic blood pressure drop was strongly associated with dementia risk (OR = 1.84 per 10 mm Hg, p < 0.001); having a systolic drop of >10 mm Hg increased dementia odds 7-fold (OR = 7.3, p = 0.002). Abnormal color vision increased dementia risk (OR = 3.3, p = 0.014), but olfactory dysfunction did not. Among baseline motor variables, proportion of gait involvement (OR = 1.12, p = 0.023), falls (OR = 3.02, p = 0.042), and freezing (OR = 2.63, p = 0.013), as well as the Purdue Pegboard Test (OR = 0.67, p = 0.049) and alternate tap test (OR = 0.97, p = 0.033) predicted dementia. Conclusion: Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, REM sleep behavior disorder, color discrimination ability, and gait dysfunction strongly predict development of dementia in Parkinson disease. PMID:25171928

  13. DNAJC13 mutations in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Rajput, Alex; Milnerwood, Austen J; Shah, Brinda; Szu-Tu, Chelsea; Trinh, Joanne; Yu, Irene; Encarnacion, Mary; Munsie, Lise N; Tapia, Lucia; Gustavsson, Emil K; Chou, Patrick; Tatarnikov, Igor; Evans, Daniel M; Pishotta, Frederick T; Volta, Mattia; Beccano-Kelly, Dayne; Thompson, Christina; Lin, Michelle K; Sherman, Holly E; Han, Heather J; Guenther, Bruce L; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Bernard, Virginie; Ross, Colin J; Appel-Cresswell, Silke; Stoessl, A Jon; Robinson, Christopher A; Dickson, Dennis W; Ross, Owen A; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Aasly, Jan O; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Hentati, Faycal; Gibson, Rachel A; McPherson, Peter S; Girard, Martine; Rajput, Michele; Rajput, Ali H; Farrer, Matthew J

    2014-04-01

    A Saskatchewan multi-incident family was clinically characterized with Parkinson disease (PD) and Lewy body pathology. PD segregates as an autosomal-dominant trait, which could not be ascribed to any known mutation. DNA from three affected members was subjected to exome sequencing. Genome alignment, variant annotation and comparative analyses were used to identify shared coding mutations. Sanger sequencing was performed within the extended family and ethnically matched controls. Subsequent genotyping was performed in a multi-ethnic case-control series consisting of 2928 patients and 2676 control subjects from Canada, Norway, Taiwan, Tunisia, and the USA. A novel mutation in receptor-mediated endocytosis 8/RME-8 (DNAJC13 p.Asn855Ser) was found to segregate with disease. Screening of cases and controls identified four additional patients with the mutation, of which two had familial parkinsonism. All carriers shared an ancestral DNAJC13 p.Asn855Ser haplotype and claimed Dutch-German-Russian Mennonite heritage. DNAJC13 regulates the dynamics of clathrin coats on early endosomes. Cellular analysis shows that the mutation confers a toxic gain-of-function and impairs endosomal transport. DNAJC13 immunoreactivity was also noted within Lewy body inclusions. In late-onset disease which is most reminiscent of idiopathic PD subtle deficits in endosomal receptor-sorting/recycling are highlighted by the discovery of pathogenic mutations VPS35, LRRK2 and now DNAJC13. With this latest discovery, and from a neuronal perspective, a temporal and functional ecology is emerging that connects synaptic exo- and endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, endosomal recycling and the endo-lysosomal degradative pathway. Molecular deficits in these processes are genetically linked to the phenotypic spectrum of parkinsonism associated with Lewy body pathology.

  14. The most cited works in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Francisco A; Lozano, Andres M

    2011-02-15

    The number of citations a work has received is a measure of its impact. We identified the top cited works in Parkinson's disease. A Web of Science search was performed for articles including the keyword "Parkinson*" in the title (the asterisk was included in the search string as a wild card character). Articles with more than 400 citations, the threshold to be considered a "citation classic," were identified and analyzed. The 107 articles identified appeared in 33 different journals, with clinical articles primarily appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine and Lancet, and scientific articles primarily in Nature, Science, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. There were 52 laboratory studies, 38 clinical studies, 12 review articles, and 5 classifications of disease. The clinical studies included evaluation of medical and surgical therapies, and the laboratory studies included gene discovery, molecular biology, and cellular biology, as well as animal models and neuropathological studies. High impact topics included deep brain stimulation, levodopa therapy and related adverse effects, MPTP-based animal studies, discovery and evaluation of genetic mutations, and pathogenesis related to oxidative degeneration. More than half of the articles identified in this study have been published in the past 20 years. Prior to 1990, highly cited articles in Parkinson's disease tended to be those that evaluated medical therapies and defined the clinical and neuropathological characteristics of the disease. Since 1990, a high proportion of the citation classics address the genetic characterization of and surgical treatments for the disease suggesting that these are the most significant recent developments and main drivers of impact in this field.

  15. Parkinson's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Cacabelos, Ramón

    2017-03-04

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most important age-related neurodegenerative disorder in developed societies, after Alzheimer's disease, with a prevalence ranging from 41 per 100,000 in the fourth decade of life to over 1900 per 100,000 in people over 80 years of age. As a movement disorder, the PD phenotype is characterized by rigidity, resting tremor, and bradykinesia. Parkinson's disease -related neurodegeneration is likely to occur several decades before the onset of the motor symptoms. Potential risk factors include environmental toxins, drugs, pesticides, brain microtrauma, focal cerebrovascular damage, and genomic defects. Parkinson's disease neuropathology is characterized by a selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, with widespread involvement of other central nervous system (CNS) structures and peripheral tissues. Pathogenic mechanisms associated with genomic, epigenetic and environmental factors lead to conformational changes and deposits of key proteins due to abnormalities in the ubiquitin-proteasome system together with dysregulation of mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. Conventional pharmacological treatments for PD are dopamine precursors (levodopa, l-DOPA, l-3,4 dihidroxifenilalanina), and other symptomatic treatments including dopamine agonists (amantadine, apomorphine, bromocriptine, cabergoline, lisuride, pergolide, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine), monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors (selegiline, rasagiline), and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors (entacapone, tolcapone). The chronic administration of antiparkinsonian drugs currently induces the "wearing-off phenomenon", with additional psychomotor and autonomic complications. In order to minimize these clinical complications, novel compounds have been developed. Novel drugs and bioproducts for the treatment of PD should address dopaminergic neuroprotection to reduce premature neurodegeneration in addition to enhancing

  16. Cognition, coping, and outcome in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Catherine S; Landau, Sabine; Burn, David J; Hindle, John V; Samuel, Mike; Wilson, Ken; Brown, Richard G

    2012-10-01

    Cognitive impairment and depression are common and disabling non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have shown associations between them but the nature of the relationship remains unclear. In chronic illness, problem- or task-oriented coping strategies are associated with better outcome but often require higher level cognitive functioning. The present study investigated, in a sample of patients with PD, the relationships between cognitive function, choice of coping strategies, and a broad index of outcome including depression, anxiety, and health-related quality of life (QoL). It was hypothesized that the coping strategy used could mediate the association between cognition and outcome. 347 participants completed the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-8, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised. Structural Equation Modeling was used to test the hypothesized model of cognition, coping, and outcome based on a direct association between cognition and outcome and an indirect association mediated by coping. Overall, poorer cognition predicted less use of task-oriented coping, which predicted worse outcome (a latent variable comprised of higher depression and anxiety and lower QoL). The analyses suggested a small indirect effect of cognition on outcome mediated by coping. The findings suggest that patients who fail to employ task-oriented coping strategies may be at greater risk of depression, anxiety, and poor health-related QoL. Even mild to moderate cognitive impairment may contribute to reduced use of task-oriented coping. Suitably adapted cognitive-behavioral approaches may be useful to enable the use of adaptive coping strategies in such patients.

  17. [Epidemiology and causes of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Lill, C M; Klein, C

    2017-03-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and has a growing socioeconomic impact due to demographic changes in the industrial nations. There are several forms of PD, a fraction of which (<5%) are monogenic, i. e. caused by mutations in single genes. At present, six genes have been established for the clinically classical form of parkinsonism including three autosomal dominantly (SNCA, LRRK2, VPS35) and three autosomal recessively inherited ones (Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1). In addition, there are a plethora of genes causing atypical forms of parkinsonism. In contrast, idiopathic PD is of a multifactorial nature. Genome-wide association studies have established a total of 26 genetic loci for this form of the disease; however, for most of these loci the underlying functional genetic variants have not yet been identified and the respective disease mechanisms remain unresolved. Furthermore, there are a number of environmental and life style factors that are associated with idiopathic PD. Exposure to pesticides and possibly a history of head trauma represent genuine risk factors. Other PD-associated factors, such as smoking and intake of coffee and alcohol may not represent risk factors per se and the cause-effect relationship has not yet been elucidated for most of these factors. A patient with a positive family history and/or an early age of disease onset should undergo counseling with respect to a possible monogenic form of the disease. Disease prediction based on genetic, environmental and life style factors is not yet possible for idiopathic PD and potential gene-specific therapies are currently in the development or early testing phase.

  18. Managing Parkinson's disease with continuous dopaminergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Erik; Lees, Andrew J; Volkmann, Jens; van Laar, Teus; Hovestadt, Ad

    2008-04-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease is marked by the loss of dopaminergic neurons, which leads to striatal dopaminergic deficiency. This causes resting tremor, hypokinesia, rigidity, bradykinesia, and loss of postural reflexes. Most current treatments for Parkinson's disease aim to restore striatal dopamine signaling by increasing the supply of dopamine with oral levodopa (L-dopa), stimulating dopamine receptors directly using dopamine agonists, or inhibiting the reuptake of endogenous dopamine. L-dopa is standard therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease. However, with continued treatment and disease progression, the response to oral dopaminergic drugs becomes unstable and motor fluctuations emerge, including off periods and dyskinesia. Direct duodenal-administered infusible L-dopa/carbidopa is effective for the management of refractory motor fluctuations in some patient populations. However, enteral infusions cannot mimic the function of the normal dopaminergic brain, and around-the-clock constant-rate administration carries the risk of causing refractory off periods associated with severe immobility and hyperpyrexia. Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is also a promising treatment. DBS passes a high-frequency electrical current into the target area, mimicking the effect of lesioning the stimulated area. However, this treatment requires invasive surgery and is appropriate for a limited segment of the patient population. This supplement provides a rationale for the use of continuous dopaminergic receptor stimulation and offers guidelines on the individualization of treatment decisions, with special focus on continuous L-dopa infusion and STN DBS. Erik Wolters, MD, PhD, offers an introduction to the impact of continuous L-dopa infusion. Andrew J. Lees, MD, FRCP, provides an overview of the physiologic response to L-dopa and reviews clinical pharmacologic studies of intravenous and intraduodenal L-dopa. Jens Volkmann, MD, discusses

  19. Evaluation of Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jagmag, Shail A.; Tripathi, Naveen; Shukla, Sunil D.; Maiti, Sankar; Khurana, Sukant

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. Animal models have contributed a large part to our understanding and therapeutics developed for treatment of PD. There are several more exhaustive reviews of literature that provide the initiated insights into the specific models; however a novel synthesis of the basic advantages and disadvantages of different models is much needed. Here we compare both neurotoxin based and genetic models while suggesting some novel avenues in PD modeling. We also highlight the problems faced and promises of all the mammalian models with the hope of providing a framework for comparison of various systems. PMID:26834536

  20. Rasagiline induced hypersexuality in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Dennys; Kurako, Kateryna; Galvez-Jimenez, Nestor

    2014-03-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICD) are increasingly recognized in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly when treated with commonly used dopamine agonists such as pramipexole and ropinirole. Less evident is the possible association between monoamine oxidase inhibitors type B (MAO-B) and the development of ICD. Rasagiline is a second generation MAO-B I inducing moderate symptomatic and possibly disease modifying benefits with apparently good tolerability and safety profile in PD patients. Rasagiline is effective and well tolerated in PD as a monotherapy or in combination with levodopa. Here, we report a patient with PD who developed ICD when treated de novo with MAO-B inhibitors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Cognitive impairments in progression of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Stepkina, D A; Zakharov, V V; Yakhno, N N

    2010-01-01

    A total of 88 patients with progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) were studied. Cognitive impairments (CI) in PD were in most cases progressive in nature, predominantly because of increases in the severity of dysregulatory and neurodynamic disorders, impairments to visuospatial functions, and, in some cases, deficits in nominative speech function. A high frequency of transformation of moderate cognitive impairments to dementia was demonstrated over periods of 2-5 years. Predictors of the progression of CI in PD were identified: elderly age, later onset of disease, and the severity of PD. The greatest rate of progression of CI was seen in patients with initially more severe impairments of regulatory and visuospatial functions.

  2. Modeling the Parkinson's tremor and its treatments.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Mohammad; Sarbaz, Yashar; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar

    2005-10-07

    In this paper, we discuss modeling issues of the Parkinson's tremor. Through the work we have employed physiological structure as well as functioning of the parts in brain that are involved in the disease. To obtain more practical similarity, random behaviors of the connection paths are also considered. Medication or treatment of the disease both by drug prescription and electrical signal stimulation are modeled based on the same model introduced for the disease itself. Two new medication strategies are proposed based on the model to reduce the side effects caused by the present drug prescription.

  3. Parkinson's Disease: Is It a Toxic Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Gad ELhak, Seham A.; Ghanem, Abdel Aziz A.; AbdelGhaffar, Hassan; El Dakroury, Sahar; Salama, Mohamed M.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the neurodegenerative diseases which we can by certainty identify its pathology, however, this confidence disappeares when talking about the cause. A long history of trials, suggestions, and theories tried linking PD to a specific causation. In this paper, a new suggestion is trying to find its way, could it be toxicology? Can we—in the future—look to PD as an occupational disease, in fact, many clues point to the possible toxic responsibility—either total or partial—in causing this disease. Searching for possible toxic causes for PD would help in designing perfect toxic models in animals. PMID:21152209

  4. [Where are the grafts in Parkinson's disease?].

    PubMed

    Goetz, C G

    1989-03-09

    Although laboratory studies started about twenty years ago, the international interest in transplants for Parkinson's disease was not aroused until the 1980's. Since the spectacular report by Madrazo et al. (1987), several groups of research-workers in various parts of the world are trying to reproduce or surpass these results. The latest studies indicate that while patients draw some benefits from adrenal medullary transplant to caudate nucleus, the operation involves inordinary risks. Moreover, the efficacy of this method is clearly less impressive now than was originally reported.

  5. Singing, music and dance in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    2016-10-28

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a long-term neurological condition that can affect profoundly physical, psychological and social function. It becomes more prevalent with age, affecting 1.6% of the population over the age of 65. Motor symptoms can include slowness, tremor, stiffness and impaired balance; non-motor symptoms can include changed mood and cognition, as well as a wide range of physical, emotional and social functions. There is emerging research into the value of non-pharmacological approaches, such as music, singing and dance. Three reviews of the evidence are summarised.

  6. Approach to the patient with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin E

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with motor, nonmotor, and behavioral findings. Imaging technology advances have allowed the characterization of the underlying pathologic changes to the brain and identification of specific lesions in dopaminergic neurons. Although certain imaging techniques allow for detection up to 20 years before the onset of motor symptoms, these advances have yet to produce meaningful treatments to halt the disease or reverse its course. Current treatments are directed at optimizing symptomatic management. Referral to a movement disorder specialist familiar with PD should be considered for providers with limited familiarity in diagnosis or treatment.

  7. Traditional and complementary therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Manyam, B V; Sánchez-Ramos, J R

    1999-01-01

    Parkinson's disease has existed in different parts of the world since ancient times. The first clear description is found in the ancient Indian medical system of Ayurveda under the name Kampavata. Traditional therapies in the form of herbal preparations containing anticholinergics, levodopa, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors were used in the treatment of PD in India, China, and the Amazon basin. Scientific reevaluation of these therapies may be valuable, as shown in the case of Mucuna pruriens and Banisteria caapi. Complementary therapies such as massage therapy, biofeedback, and acupuncture may have beneficial effects for patients and deserve further study.

  8. Present and future selves in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Alexandra; Allen, Joanne; Dubourg, Lydia; Souchay, Céline

    2017-08-13

    The study of the self in neuropsychological patients raises not only theoretical questions on the relationships between the self, autobiographical memory (AM), and episodic future thinking but also clinical issues for patients' daily life and care. We addressed this issue in Parkinson's disease patients for whom AM and future thinking impairments have been documented. All patients and controls generated and dated up past and future self-images and provided associated past and future events. Our findings suggest a subtle pattern of preservation/impairment of different dimensions (quantitative and qualitative) of self-images, which rely partially on the episodic quality of past and future events.

  9. Personality, addiction, dopamine: insights from Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dagher, Alain; Robbins, Trevor W

    2009-02-26

    In rare instances, patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may become addicted to their own medication or develop behavioral addictions such as pathological gambling. This is surprising because PD patients typically have a very low incidence of drug abuse and display a personality type that is the polar opposite of the addictive personality. These rare addictive syndromes, which appear to result from excessive dopaminergic medication use, illustrate the link between dopamine, personality, and addiction. We describe the clinical phenomena and attempt to relate them to current models of learning and addiction. We conclude that persistently elevated dopaminergic stimulation promotes the development and maintenance of addictive behaviors.

  10. Positron emission tomography studies in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Eidelberg, D

    1992-05-01

    PET imaging is a rapidly expanding technique with growing clinical utility. In this review, we have discussed the contribution of functional neuroimaging with PET in elucidating the pathophysiology of parkinsonism. In addition, we emphasize the growing role of this technique in the clinical setting. FDG/PET has become increasingly available at major medical centers and is especially suitable as an aid in the clinical assessment of patients with akinetic-rigid or other movement disorders. Although this technique is essentially quantitative and ideally suited for broad population studies, qualitative and semiquantitative approaches may suffice in the evaluation of individual patients. To the extent that several of the functional imaging models are linear with raw count rates, blood sampling may not be needed in each instance. Moreover recent advances in SPECT perfusion imaging may permit the extension of PET diagnostic criteria to other imaging modalities that are less costly and more accessible in the community setting. New statistical methods for the detection of regional metabolic covariation patterns hold special promise for the development of disease-specific imaging markers, which may permit rapid differential diagnosis, improved drug trials, and possible preclinical detection. F-dopa/PET has provided many important in vivo insights into the nigrostriatal dopamine system and its role in the development of parkinsonism. In contrast to FDG/PET, this technique demands specialized radiochemistry, plasma analysis, and modeling approaches that currently restrict its applicability to a few research PET centers. Several promising developments in radiochemical synthesis, data acquisition, and kinetic modeling may simplify the technique sufficiently to be used in the clinical domain. F-dopa/PET holds particular promise in preclinical screening of individuals at risk for Parkinson's disease on genetic or environmental grounds. This has great significance in view of the

  11. [Impulse control disorders and Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Burkhard, P R; Catalano-Chiuvé, S; Gronchi-Perrin, A; Berney, A; Vingerhoets, F J G; Lüscher, C

    2008-05-07

    A variety of behavioral disorders occurring abruptly in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) has been recently published and attracted considerable attention in the press. Taking the form of pathological gambling, compulsive shopping, addiction to Internet and to other recreational activities, hypersexuality or bulimia, impulse control disorders (ICD) related to PD are probably more frequent than previously appreciated and may have consequences as spectacular as disastrous for the involved patients. ICD are currently viewed as particular adverse reactions to antiparkinsonian medications, notably to dopamine agonists, and, accordingly, tend to improve or disappear when PD therapy is appropriately adjusted.

  12. Parkinsonism as a Complication of Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kamel, Walaa A.; Hashel, Jasem Y. Al; Kilany, Ayman; Altailji, Samira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between Parkinsonism and BS has already been reported in only three patients worldwide. CASE SUMMARY: We report a 39-years old Kuwaiti female who presented with parkinsonian features and mononeuropathy (carpal tunnel syndrome) 3 years after a vertical sleeve gastrectomy operation. CONCLUSION: We conclude that with the increasing popularity of bariatric surgery, clinicians will need to recognize and manage neurologic complications that may appear soon after or years to decades later. Thorough evaluation is essential for any patient who has undergone bariatric surgery and develops neurologic symptoms. PMID:27275313

  13. Genomic aspects of sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Riederer, P; Youdim, M B H; Mandel, S; Gerlach, M; Grünblatt, E

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is thought to be associated with oxidative stress mechanisms, as well as with glutamate receptor abnormalities, ubiquitin-proteasome dysfunction, inflammatory and cytokine activation, dysfunction in neurotrophic factors, damage to mitochondria, cytoskeletal abnormalities, synaptic dysfunction and activation of apoptotic pathways. To investigate these hypotheses, many researchers have applied molecular biology techniques to the study of neuronal cell death in these conditions. In this article, we discuss recent findings of gene expression in PD that may elucidate the usage of specific new biomarkers for sporadic PD and point to novel drug developments.

  14. Integrating Patient Concerns into Parkinson's Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shen-Yang; Tan, Ai Huey; Fox, Susan H; Evans, Andrew H; Low, Soon Chai

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex motor and non-motor disorder and management is often challenging. In this review, we explore emerging approaches to improve the care of patients, drawing from the literature regarding patient-centred care, patient and caregiver perspectives and priorities, gaps in knowledge among patients and caregivers and the need for accurate information, individual variability in disease manifestations, prognostication of disease course, new developments in health technologies and personalized medicine, specialty care, pharmacological and non-pharmacological management, financial burden, lifestyle and work-related issues, support groups and palliative care.

  15. Baseline genetic associations in the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI).

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Keller, Margaux F; Hernandez, Dena G; Chen, Lan; Stone, David J; Singleton, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    The Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative is an international multicenter study whose main goal is investigating markers for Parkinson's disease (PD) progression as part of a path to a treatment for the disease. This manuscript describes the baseline genetic architecture of this study, providing not only a catalog of disease-linked variants and mutations, but also quantitative measures with which to adjust for population structure. Three hundred eighty-three newly diagnosed typical PD cases, 65 atypical PD and 178 healthy controls, from the Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative study have been genotyped on the NeuroX or Immunochip arrays. These data are freely available to all researchers interested in pursuing PD research within the Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative. The Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative represents a study population with low genetic heterogeneity. We recapitulate known PD associations from large-scale genome-wide association studies and refine genetic risk score models for PD predictability (area under the curve, ∼0.74). We show the presence of six LRRK2 p.G2019S and nine GBA p.N370S mutation carriers. The Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative study and its genetic data are useful in studies of PD biomarkers. The genetic architecture described here will be useful in the analysis of myriad biological and clinical traits within this study. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Small saccades restrict visual scanning area in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Terao, Yasuo; Furubayashi, Toshiaki; Yugeta, Akihiro; Fukuda, Hideki; Emoto, Masaki; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate abnormalities in visual scanning when Parkinson's disease patients view images of varying complexity. Eighteen nondemented Parkinson's disease patients and 18 normal subjects participated in the study. The ocular fixation position during viewing visual images was recorded using an eye-tracking device. The number of saccades, duration of fixation, amplitude of saccades, and scanned area in Parkinson's disease patients were compared with those in normal subjects. We also investigated whether the number of saccades, duration of fixation, or amplitude of saccades influenced the scanned area. While scanning images of varying complexity, Parkinson's disease patients made fewer saccades with smaller amplitude and longer fixation compared with normal subjects. As image complexity increased, the number of saccades and duration of fixation gradually approached those of normal subjects. Nevertheless, the scanned area in Parkinson's disease patients was consistently smaller than that in normal subjects. The scanned area significantly correlated with saccade amplitude in most images. Importantly, although Parkinson's disease patients cannot make frequent saccades when viewing simple figures, they can increase the saccade number and reduce their fixation duration when viewing more complex figures, making use of the abundant visual cues in such figures, suggesting the existence of ocular kinesie paradoxale. Nevertheless, both the saccade amplitude and the scanned area were consistently smaller than those of normal subjects for all levels of visual complexity. This indicates that small saccade amplitude is the main cause of impaired visual scanning in Parkinson's disease patients. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  17. Study of familial Parkinson's disease in Russia, Uzbekistan, and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Atadzhanov, M; Zumla, A; Mwaba, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were (A) to determine inheritance patterns of familial Parkinson's disease in three different geographical areas (Russia, Uzbekistan, and Zambia); (B) compare clinical characteristics of familial with sporadic Parkinson's disease; and (C) assess whether there were ethnic differences in clinical manifestations of the disease. Methods: Fifty two index cases of familial Parkinson's disease in Moscow, 55 in Tashkent, and 27 in Lusaka were selected on the basis of the typical clinical features of Parkinson's disease with a familial history. The sex ratio, transmission patterns, and segregation ratio were determined by pedigree analysis. Results: Familial Parkinson's disease was found in all three countries (30 families in Russia, 12 in Uzbekistan, and seven in Zambia), and appeared more common in Russia. Both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive patterns of inheritance were seen, but autosomal dominance was more common in all countries. Conclusions: In all three countries men have a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease than women and there are ethnic differences in clinical manifestations of the disease. The onset of both familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease in Zambian patients occurs at a younger age and is associated with slow progression and a benign course, and generally responds well to levodopa treatment. PMID:15701745

  18. [Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    da Costa, Andreia Gomes; Gago, Miguel Fernandes; Garrett, Carolina

    2011-12-01

    In current medical practice, the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease remains essentially clinical. This practice determines that the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is done in an already advanced neuropathological stage of the disease. The aim of this study is to review the validity of cerebrospinal fluid protein biological markers in the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. The a-synuclein and DJ-1 proteins, due to their role in the hereditary Parkinson's disease, have been the most widely studied cerebrospinal biomarkers. Nevertheless, they have had divergent results mostly owing to different processing, identification and control of laboratory techniques. The new proteomic techniques, directed to the detection of multiple undifferentiated proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (eg. ceruloplasmin, chromogranin B, apoH), are promising. The early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is imperious as it is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes extensive morbidity. Most of current scientific research in Parkinson's disease is focused on the discovery of neuroprotective drugs. Thus, the definition of biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is highly relevant.

  19. Fatigue in Parkinson's disease: The contribution of cerebral metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang Soo; Aminian, Kelly; Li, Crystal; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Strafella, Antonio P

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue is a common and disabling non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease associated with a feeling of overwhelming lack of energy. The aim of this study was to identify the neural substrates that may contribute to the development of fatigue in Parkinson's disease. Twenty-three Parkinson's disease patients meeting UK Brain Bank criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease were recruited and completed the 2-[(18) F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET scan. The metabolic activities of Parkinson's disease patients with fatigue were compared to those without fatigue using statistical parametric mapping analysis. The Parkinson's disease group exhibiting higher level of fatigue showed anti-correlated metabolic changes in cortical regions associated with the salience (i.e., right insular region) and default (i.e., bilateral posterior cingulate cortex) networks. The metabolic abnormalities detected in these brain regions displayed a significant correlation with level of fatigue and were associated with a disruption of the functional correlations with different cortical areas. These observations suggest that fatigue in Parkinson's disease may be the expression of metabolic abnormalities and impaired functional interactions between brain regions linked to the salience network and other neural networks. Hum Brain Mapp 38:283-292, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Burden among caregivers of patients with Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Benavides, Olga; Alburquerque, Daniela; Chaná-Cuevas, Pedro

    2013-03-01

    Parkinson disease (EPI) patients often require being assisted by others. These caregivers are exposed to a decrease in their quality of Ufe. To explore Parkinson disease patient features associated with a greater burden among their caregivers. Fifty one patients with Parkinson disease (aged 67 ± 12 years, 29 men, with 8 ± 5 years of disease) and their caregivers, were studied. Patients were assessed with the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III, the Hoehn & Yahr stage standardization, Parkinson s minimental test, the neuropsychiatric inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory (IDB). The Zarit Burden Interview (ESZ) was applied to caregivers. According to IDB, 45% of patients whose caregivers presented little or no burden had a depression, compared to 78% of those whose caregivers had modérate or intense burden. (p < 0.01). The ESZ score of caregivers correlated significantly with Parkinson patients' age, IDB and axial involvement in the UPDRS-III (correlation coefficients ofOAp < 0.01, 0.6p < 0.01 and 0.46 p < 0.01, respectively). Motor alterations, cognitive impairment and most importantly depression of patients with Parkinson disease are deteminants of burden for their caregivers.

  1. Transient and reversible parkinsonism after acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Arima, Hajime; Sobue, Kazuya; So, MinHye; Morishima, Tetsuro; Ando, Hirkoshi; Katsuya, Hirotada

    2003-01-01

    Parkinsonism is a rare complication in patients with organophosphate poisoning. To date there have been two cases of transient parkinsonism after acute and severe cholinergic crisis, both of which were successfully treated using amantadine, an anti-parkinsonism drug. We report on an 81-year-old woman who was admitted for the treatment of acute severe organophosphate poisoning. Although acute cholinergic crisis was treated successfully with large doses of atropine and 2-pyridine aldoxime methiodide (PAM), extrapyramidal manifestations were noticed on hospital day 6. The neurological symptoms worsened, and the diagnosis of parkinsonism was made by a neurologist on hospital day 9. Immediately, biperiden (5mg), an anti-parkinsonism drug, was administered intravenously, and her symptoms markedly improved. From the following day, biperiden (5 mg/day) was given intramuscularly for eight days. Subsequently, neurological symptoms did not relapse, and no drugs were required. Our patient is the third case of parkinsonism developing after an acute severe cholinergic crisis and the first case successfully treated with biperiden. Patients should be carefully observed for the presence of neurological signs in this kind of poisoning. If present, an anti-parkinsonism drug should be considered.

  2. Parkinson's disease impairs the ability to change set quickly.

    PubMed

    Chong, R K; Horak, F B; Woollacott, M H

    2000-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that basal ganglia dysfunction in Parkinson's disease impairs the ability to quickly change set. The ability to change set was inferred by measuring the change in the amplitude of automatic gastrocnemius or tibialis anterior muscle responses in standing subjects: (1) when the direction of a surface perturbation changed from a backward translation to a toes up rotation; and (2) when subjects were instructed to 'give' or 'resist' while responding to the translations and rotations. In experiment 1, a change in sensorimotor set was assessed by the suppression of gastrocnemius responses to toes up rotations following a series of backward translations. Unlike healthy young and older subjects, Parkinson subjects did not change sensorimotor set immediately to the first rotation, but needed several rotations to change their responses. When required to alternate their responses between backward translations and toes up rotations, Parkinson subjects showed a smaller amplitude change in gastrocnemius responses. In experiment 2, Parkinson subjects had more difficulty in using cognitive set to modify their responses, especially when instructed to 'resist' the perturbations. A small number of healthy older subjects also had difficulties changing set quickly, but to a lesser extent than the Parkinson subjects. Levodopa medication did not improve the Parkinson subjects' ability to change set quickly. These results suggest that the basal ganglia, which are affected in Parkinson's disease, are critical neural substrates in the ability to change set quickly.

  3. Three Cases of Levodopa-Resistant Parkinsonism After Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehanna, Raja; Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Itin, Ilia

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patients: Male, 77 • Female, 44 • Male, 9 Final Diagnosis: Radiation induced parkinsonism Symptoms: Slowness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Unequivocal brain radiation-induced parkinsonism has so far been reported in only in two pediatric patients. However, with the rising incidence rates for brain tumors in industrialized countries and the consequential increased exposure to cranial radiotherapy, clinicians might become more exposed to this entity. Case Report: Three patients were treated for intraparenchymal brain tumor with resection, chemotherapy, and whole brain radiation. One patient developed leukoencephalopathy and parkinsonism within one year of treatment, one developed it seven years after treatment completion, and one developed dementia, parkinsonism and cerebral infracts 40 years after whole brain radiation. Brain MRIs and a DaTscan were obtained. All patients failed a trial of carbidopa/levodopa. We suggest that the brain radiation exposure was responsible for levodopa resistant parkinsonism, cognitive decline, and diffuse leukoencephalopathy. Conclusions: Although rare, radiation therapy-induced parkinsonism might be responsible for levodopa-resistant parkinsonism. PMID:27909286

  4. Prevalence of Parkinson's disease and other types of parkinsonism: a door-to-door survey in three Sicilian municipalities. The Sicilian Neuro-Epidemiologic Study (SNES) Group.

    PubMed

    Morgante, L; Rocca, W A; Di Rosa, A E; De Domenico, P; Grigoletto, F; Meneghini, F; Reggio, A; Savettieri, G; Castiglione, M G; Patti, F

    1992-10-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Parkinson's disease and other types of parkinsonism in a Sicilian population using a door-to-door two-phase approach. This design called for the administration of a brief screening instrument to all subjects who, on November 1, 1987, were residents of Terrasini (Palermo Province), Santa Teresa di Riva (Messina Province), and Riposto (Catania Province), Sicily (N = 24,496). Study neurologists using specified diagnostic criteria extensively investigated those subjects who screened positive. We found 63 subjects affected by Parkinson's disease, 21 with secondary parkinsonism, and seven with unspecified parkinsonism. The crude prevalence per 100,000 population was 371.5 for all types of parkinsonism and 257.2 for Parkinson's disease; for both entities, prevalence increased steeply with age and showed an inconsistent sex pattern. Our prevalence figures for Parkinson's disease are higher than those previously reported in Italy or elsewhere, which may be due, in part, to more complete case-ascertainment.

  5. How do people live life successfully with Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Kang, Mi-Young; Ellis-Hill, Caroline

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore how people live life successfully with Parkinson's disease and what contributed to the level of success. To examine the level of success as defined by people with Parkinson's disease. To find what contributed to the level of success. Self-care support has gained importance for supporting people with their chronic diseases including Parkinson's disease. Although self-care and life adjustments can improve patients' general well-being, it is unclear which approaches best facilitate positive adjustments to illness. Semi-structured interviews with participants with Parkinson's disease. Eight participants living with Parkinson's disease for 2-16 years were recruited from a Parkinson's disease voluntary group in the UK. Interviews covered their perceived level of success and the factors which they perceived led to that success. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Participants rated a high level of success in living with Parkinson's disease with an average personal rating 75/100 despite facing difficulties. Successful living was perceived to have taken place when people were either (1) able to return to their usual state of health or (2) considered themselves to be stable within a new/readjusted state of health. Aspects which were perceived to support positive psychosocial adjustment included a positive mindset, determination, acceptance of new challenges and family support. Maintaining usual life and physical ability is the major concern among the people with Parkinson's disease. It would be helpful for health care professionals to identify what constitutes a 'usual' life for that person and to support them to develop a positive mindset and acceptance of new challenges, drawing on the determination of the person as well as any available family support. In supporting self-care, it is helpful to gain information about the subjective experience of living with Parkinson's disease including their perceived level of success at

  6. Moist smokeless tobacco (Snus) use and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ye, Weimin; Liu, Zhiwei; Norberg, Margareta; Forsgren, Lars; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva; Bellocco, Rino; Alfredsson, Lars; Knutsson, Anders; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Wennberg, Patrik; Galanti, Maria Rosaria; Lager, Anton C J; Araghi, Marzieh; Lundberg, Michael; Magnusson, Cecilia; Wirdefeldt, Karin

    2016-12-10

    Cigarette smoking is associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease. It is unclear what constituent of tobacco smoke may lower the risk. Use of Swedish moist smokeless tobacco (snus) can serve as a model to disentangle what constituent of tobacco smoke may lower the risk. The aim of this study was to determine whether snus use was associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease. Individual participant data were collected from seven prospective cohort studies, including 348 601 men. We used survival analysis with multivariable Cox regression to estimate study-specific relative risk of Parkinson's disease due to snus use, and random-effects models to pool estimates in a meta-analysis. The primary analyses were restricted to never-smokers to eliminate the potential confounding effect of tobacco smoking. During a mean follow-up time of 16.1 years, 1199 incident Parkinson's disease cases were identified. Among men who never smoked, ever-snus users had about 60% lower Parkinson's disease risk compared with never-snus users [pooled hazard ratio (HR) 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28-0.61]. The inverse association between snus use and Parkinson's disease risk was more pronounced in current (pooled HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.23-0.63), moderate-heavy amount (pooled HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19-0.90) and long-term snus users (pooled HR 0.44, 95% CI 0.24-0.83). Non-smoking men who used snus had a substantially lower risk of Parkinson's disease. Results also indicated an inverse dose-response relationship between snus use and Parkinson's disease risk. Our findings suggest that nicotine or other components of tobacco leaves may influence the development of Parkinson's disease. © The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  7. Increased risk of parkinsonism associated with welding exposure.

    PubMed

    Racette, Brad A; Criswell, Susan R; Lundin, Jessica I; Hobson, Angela; Seixas, Noah; Kotzbauer, Paul T; Evanoff, Bradley A; Perlmutter, Joel S; Zhang, Jing; Sheppard, Lianne; Checkoway, Harvey

    2012-10-01

    Manganese (Mn), an established neurotoxicant, is a common component of welding fume. The neurological phenotype associated with welding exposures has not been well described. Prior epidemiologic evidence linking occupational welding to parkinsonism is mixed, and remains controversial. This was a cross-sectional and nested case-control study to investigate the prevalence and phenotype of parkinsonism among 811 shipyard and fabrication welders recruited from trade unions. Two reference groups included 59 non-welder trade workers and 118 newly diagnosed, untreated idiopathic PD patients. Study subjects were examined by a movement disorders specialist using the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor subsection 3 (UPDRS3). Parkinsonism cases were defined as welders with UPDRS3 score ≥15. Normal was defined as UPDRS3<6. Exposure was classified as intensity adjusted, cumulative years of welding. Adjusted prevalence ratios for parkinsonism were calculated in relation to quartiles of welding years. The overall prevalence estimate of parkinsonism was 15.6% in welding exposed workers compared to 0% in the reference group. Among welders, we observed a U-shaped dose-response relation between weighted welding exposure-years and parkinsonism. UPDRS3 scores for most domains were similar between welders and newly diagnosed idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) patients, except for greater frequency of rest tremor and asymmetry in PD patients. This work-site based study among welders demonstrates a high prevalence of parkinsonism compared to nonwelding-exposed workers and a clinical phenotype that overlaps substantially with PD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reproductive factors and Parkinson's disease risk in Danish women.

    PubMed

    Greene, N; Lassen, C F; Rugbjerg, K; Ritz, B

    2014-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is more common in men than women by a ratio of about 1.5:1 and yet there is no consensus to date as to whether female reproductive factors including hormone use affect Parkinson's disease risk. Our objective was to examine the relationship between Parkinson's disease and female reproductive factors in the largest population-based Parkinson's disease case-control study to date. Seven hundred and forty-three female Parkinson's disease cases diagnosed between 1996 and 2009 were selected from the Danish National Hospital Register, diagnoses confirmed by medical record review, and the cases were matched by birth year to 765 female controls randomly selected from the Danish Civil Registration System. Covariate information was collected in computer-assisted telephone interviews covering an extensive array of topics including reproductive and lifestyle factors. After adjusting for smoking, caffeine and alcohol use, education, age, and family Parkinson's disease history, inverse associations between Parkinson's disease and early menarche (first period at ≤11 years), oral contraceptives, high parity (≥4 children) and bilateral oophorectomy were found; adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence limits were respectively 0.68 (0.45-1.03) for early menarche, 0.87 (0.69-1.10) for oral contraceptives, 0.79 (0.59-1.06) for high parity and 0.65 (0.45-0.94) for bilateral oophorectomy. Little support for associations between Parkinson's disease and fertile life length, age at menopause or post-menopausal hormone treatment was found. Reproductive factors related to women's early- to mid-reproductive lives appear to be predictive of subsequent Parkinson's disease risk whereas factors occurring later in life seem less important. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  9. LRRK2 Expression Is Deregulated in Fibroblasts and Neurons from Parkinson Patients with Mutations in PINK1.

    PubMed

    Azkona, Garikoitz; López de Maturana, Rakel; Del Rio, Patricia; Sousa, Amaya; Vazquez, Nerea; Zubiarrain, Amaia; Jimenez-Blasco, Daniel; Bolaños, Juan P; Morales, Blas; Auburger, Georg; Arbelo, José Matias; Sánchez-Pernaute, Rosario

    2016-12-14

    Mutations in PINK1 (PARK6), a serine/threonine kinase involved in mitochondrial homeostasis, are associated with early onset Parkinson's disease. Fibroblasts from Parkinson's disease patients with compound heterozygous mutations in exon 7 (c.1488 + 1G > A; c.1252_1488del) showed no apparent signs of mitochondrial impairment. To elucidate changes primarily caused by lack of functional PINK1, we over-expressed wild-type PINK1, which induced a significant downregulation of LRRK2 (PARK8). Indeed, we found that LRRK2 protein basal levels were significantly higher in the mutant PINK1 fibroblasts. To examine the interaction between the two PARK genes in a disease-relevant cell context, we generated induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from mutant, carrier and control fibroblasts by lentiviral-mediated re-programming. Efficiency of neural induction and dopamine differentiation using a floor-plate induction protocol was similar in all genotypes. As observed in fibroblasts, PINK1 mutant neurons showed increased LRRK2 expression both at the RNA and protein level and transient over-expression of wild-type PINK1 efficiently downregulated LRRK2 levels. Additionally, we confirmed a dysregulation of LRRK2 expression in fibroblasts from patients with a different homozygous mutation in PINK1 exon 4, c.926G > A (G309D). Thus, our results identify a novel role of PINK1 modulating the levels of LRRK2 in Parkinson's disease fibroblasts and neurons, suggest a convergent pathway for these PARK genes, and broaden the role of LRRK2 in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

  10. Updates in the medical management of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Hubert H

    2012-01-01

    Most, if not all, currently available drugs for Parkinson disease address dopaminergic loss and relieve symptoms. However, their adverse effects can be limiting and they do not address disease progression. Moreover, nonmotor features of Parkinson disease such as depression, dementia, and psychosis are now recognized as important and disabling. A cure remains elusive. However, promising interventions and agents are emerging. As an example, people who exercise regularly are less likely to develop Parkinson disease, and if they develop it, they tend to have slower progression.

  11. Parkinson's disease--the continuing search for biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Breen, David P; Michell, Andrew W; Barker, Roger A

    2011-03-01

    There is currently no well-established biomarker for Parkinson's disease. The need to better diagnose the condition, define the subtypes of disease, and follow its course independent of any symptomatic drug effects is well-established. In this review, we will begin by reviewing the evidence for biological fluid biomarkers in Parkinson's disease. We will then touch upon the role of brain imaging in diagnosis and defining prognosis, as well as the value of studying motor phenotype and its potential applications for characterising Parkinson's disease subtypes with differing natural histories.

  12. Problems associated with fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nyhlén, Jakob; Constantinescu, Radu; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2010-10-01

    This article focuses on biochemical markers that may be used in the diagnostics of Parkinson's disease and associated disorders, and to identify early cases and stratify patients into subgroups. We present an updated account of some currently available candidate fluid biomarkers, and discuss their diagnostic performance and limitations. We also discuss some of the general problems with Parkinson's disease biomarkers and possible ways of moving forward. It may be concluded that a diagnostically useful fluid biomarker for Parkinson's disease is yet to be identified. However, some interesting candidates exist and may prove useful in the future, alone or when analyzed together in patterns.

  13. Visual contrast sensitivity in drug-induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Wildt, G J; Keemink, C J

    1989-03-01

    The influence of stimulus orientation on contrast sensitivity function was studied in 10 patients with drug-induced Parkinsonism. Nine of the 10 patients had at least one eye with contrast sensitivity deficit for vertical and/or horizontal stimuli. Only generalised contrast sensitivity loss, observed in two eyes, was stimulus orientation independent. All spatial frequency-selective contrast deficits in 15 eyes were orientation dependent. The striking similarity between the pattern of contrast sensitivity loss in drug-induced Parkinsonism and that in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, suggests that generalised dopaminergic deficiency, from whatever cause, affects visual function in an analogous way.

  14. Visual contrast sensitivity in drug-induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed Central

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Wildt, G J; Keemink, C J

    1989-01-01

    The influence of stimulus orientation on contrast sensitivity function was studied in 10 patients with drug-induced Parkinsonism. Nine of the 10 patients had at least one eye with contrast sensitivity deficit for vertical and/or horizontal stimuli. Only generalised contrast sensitivity loss, observed in two eyes, was stimulus orientation independent. All spatial frequency-selective contrast deficits in 15 eyes were orientation dependent. The striking similarity between the pattern of contrast sensitivity loss in drug-induced Parkinsonism and that in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, suggests that generalised dopaminergic deficiency, from whatever cause, affects visual function in an analogous way. PMID:2926418

  15. Anchanling reduces pathology in a lactacystin- induced Parkinson's disease model☆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinghong; Wu, Zhengzhi; Gao, Xiaowei; Zhu, Qingwei; Jin, Yu; Wu, Anmin; Huang, Andrew C. J.

    2012-01-01

    A rat model of Parkinson's disease was induced by injecting lactacystin stereotaxically into the left mesencephalic ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. After rats were intragastrically perfused with Anchanling, a Chinese medicine, mainly composed of magnolol, for 5 weeks, when compared with Parkinson's disease model rats, tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased, α-synuclein and ubiquitin expression was decreased, substantia nigra cell apoptosis was reduced, and apomorphine-induced rotational behavior was improved. Results suggested that Anchanling can ameliorate Parkinson's disease pathology possibly by enhancing degradation activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:25767493

  16. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of parkinsonism related to boxing.

    PubMed

    Davie, C A; Pirtosek, Z; Barker, G J; Kingsley, D P; Miller, P H; Lees, A J

    1995-06-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, localised to the lentiform nucleus, was carried out in three ex-professional boxers who developed a parkinsonian syndrome, six patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, and six age matched controls. The three ex-boxers all showed a pronounced reduction in the absolute concentration of N-acetylaspartate compared with the patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and the control group. This reduction is likely to reflect neuronal loss occurring in the putamen and globus pallidus and supports the hypothesis that the extrapyramidal syndrome that may occur in ex-boxers is a distinct entity from idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

  17. Somatization in Parkinson's Disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Carrozzino, Danilo; Bech, Per; Patierno, Chiara; Onofrj, Marco; Morberg, Bo Mohr; Thomas, Astrid; Bonanni, Laura; Fulcheri, Mario

    2017-08-01

    The current systematic review study is aimed at critically analyzing from a clinimetric viewpoint the clinical consequence of somatization in Parkinson's Disease (PD). By focusing on the International Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a comprehensive electronic literature research strategy on ISI Web-of-Science, PsychINFO, PubMed, EBSCO, ScienceDirect, MEDLINE, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. Out of 2.926 initial records, only a total of 9 studies were identified as clearly relevant and analyzed in this systematic review. The prevalence of somatization in PD has been found to range between 7.0% and 66.7%, with somatoform disorders acting as clinical factor significantly contributing to predict a progressive cognitive impairment. We highlighted that somatization is a highly prevalent comorbidity affecting PD. However, the clinical consequence of such psychiatric symptom should be further evaluated by replacing the clinically inadequate diagnostic label of psychogenic parkinsonism with the psychosomatic concept of persistent somatization as conceived by the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Parkinson's disease: diagnostic utility of volumetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Lin; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Hsu, Ai-Ling; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Lin, Ching-Po; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2017-04-01

    This paper aims to examine the effectiveness of structural imaging as an aid in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). High-resolution T 1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 72 patients with idiopathic PD (mean age, 61.08 years) and 73 healthy subjects (mean age, 58.96 years). The whole brain was parcellated into 95 regions of interest using composite anatomical atlases, and region volumes were calculated. Three diagnostic classifiers were constructed using binary multiple logistic regression modeling: the (i) basal ganglion prior classifier, (ii) data-driven classifier, and (iii) basal ganglion prior/data-driven hybrid classifier. Leave-one-out cross validation was used to unbiasedly evaluate the predictive accuracy of imaging features. Pearson's correlation analysis was further performed to correlate outcome measurement using the best PD classifier with disease severity. Smaller volume in susceptible regions is diagnostic for Parkinson's disease. Compared with the other two classifiers, the basal ganglion prior/data-driven hybrid classifier had the highest diagnostic reliability with a sensitivity of 74%, specificity of 75%, and accuracy of 74%. Furthermore, outcome measurement using this classifier was associated with disease severity. Brain structural volumetric analysis with multiple logistic regression modeling can be a complementary tool for diagnosing PD.

  19. MDS research criteria for prodromal Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Berg, Daniela; Postuma, Ronald B; Adler, Charles H; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Chan, Piu; Dubois, Bruno; Gasser, Thomas; Goetz, Christopher G; Halliday, Glenda; Joseph, Lawrence; Lang, Anthony E; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Litvan, Irene; Marek, Kenneth; Obeso, José; Oertel, Wolfgang; Olanow, C Warren; Poewe, Werner; Stern, Matthew; Deuschl, Günther

    2015-10-01

    This article describes research criteria and probability methodology for the diagnosis of prodromal PD. Prodromal disease refers to the stage wherein early symptoms or signs of PD neurodegeneration are present, but classic clinical diagnosis based on fully evolved motor parkinsonism is not yet possible. Given the lack of clear neuroprotective/disease-modifying therapy for prodromal PD, these criteria were developed for research purposes only. The criteria are based upon the likelihood of prodromal disease being present with probable prodromal PD defined as ≥80% certainty. Certainty estimates rely upon calculation of an individual's risk of having prodromal PD, using a Bayesian naïve classifier. In this methodology, a previous probability of prodromal disease is delineated based upon age. Then, the probability of prodromal PD is calculated by adding diagnostic information, expressed as likelihood ratios. This diagnostic information combines estimates of background risk (from environmental risk factors and genetic findings) and results of diagnostic marker testing. In order to be included, diagnostic markers had to have prospective evidence documenting ability to predict clinical PD. They include motor and nonmotor clinical symptoms, clinical signs, and ancillary diagnostic tests. These criteria represent a first step in the formal delineation of early stages of PD and will require constant updating as more information becomes available. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Neurophysiology of Drosophila Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    West, Ryan J. H.; Furmston, Rebecca; Williams, Charles A. C.; Elliott, Christopher J. H.

    2015-01-01

    We provide an insight into the role Drosophila has played in elucidating neurophysiological perturbations associated with Parkinson's disease- (PD-) related genes. Synaptic signalling deficits are observed in motor, central, and sensory systems. Given the neurological impact of disease causing mutations within these same genes in humans the phenotypes observed in fly are of significant interest. As such we observe four unique opportunities provided by fly nervous system models of Parkinson's disease. Firstly, Drosophila models are instrumental in exploring the mechanisms of neurodegeneration, with several PD-related mutations eliciting related phenotypes including sensitivity to energy supply and vesicular deformities. These are leading to the identification of plausible cellular mechanisms, which may be specific to (dopaminergic) neurons and synapses rather than general cellular phenotypes. Secondly, models show noncell autonomous signalling within the nervous system, offering the opportunity to develop our understanding of the way pathogenic signalling propagates, resembling Braak's scheme of spreading pathology in PD. Thirdly, the models link physiological deficits to changes in synaptic structure. While the structure-function relationship is complex, the genetic tractability of Drosophila offers the chance to separate fundamental changes from downstream consequences. Finally, the strong neuronal phenotypes permit relevant first in vivo drug testing. PMID:25960916

  1. Appendectomy may delay Parkinson's disease Onset.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Alexandre; Gonçalves, Alexandra; Vila-Chã, Nuno; Moreira, Inês; Fernandes, Joana; Damásio, Joana; Teixeira-Pinto, Armando; Taipa, Ricardo; Lima, António Bastos; Cavaco, Sara

    2015-09-01

    Alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) is particularly abundant in the vermiform appendix, which makes this structure an anatomical candidate for the initiation of Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology. We hypothesized that history of appendectomy might affect PD clinical onset. A total of 295 PD patients enrolled in a comprehensive observational study were asked about past history of appendectomy. Cox's regression, with a time-dependent covariate, explored the effects of appendectomy on age at PD onset. Thirty-four patients (11.5%) had appendectomy before PD onset. There was no significant effect of appendectomy on age at PD onset for the entire cohort (P = 0.153). However, among patients with late onset (≥55 years), we found evidence that those with past appendectomy had more years of life without PD symptoms than patients without appendectomy (P = 0.040). No association was found for the young-onset group (P = 0.663). An apparent relationship was observed between appendectomy and PD onset in the late PD cohort. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  2. Oxidative polymorphism of debrisoquine in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, J; Ladero, J M; Jimenez-Jimenez, F J; Martinez, C; Puerto, A M; Valdivielso, M J; Llerena, A; Cobaleda, J; Muñoz, J J

    1990-01-01

    Oxidative phenotype and metabolic ratio (MR) of debrisoquine (DBQ) have been determined in 87 patients with Parkinson's disease and in 556 healthy control subjects. Three patients (3.45%) and 34 control subjects (6.12%), having an MR greater than 12.6, were classified as poor metabolisers (PM) of DBQ (ns). The distribution of MR values in the 84 Parkinsonian patients classified as extensive metabolisers (EM) showed a less efficient oxidative rate when compared with controls of the same phenotype (p less than 0.001). This difference may be due to enzymatic inhibition caused by drug treatment in 40 of these patients. As in patients not taking any drug known to inhibit the oxidation of DBQ, distribution of MR values was not different from that in controls. A negative correlation (r = -0.36, p less than 0.02) was found between MR of DBQ and age at onset of disease in patients free of drugs known to interact with DBQ metabolism. A higher rate of DBQ oxidation could be a genetic factor that delays the clinical onset of Parkinson's disease in predisposed people. PMID:2341841

  3. [Nonpharmacological treatment procedures for Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Witt, K; Kalbe, E; Erasmi, R; Ebersbach, G

    2017-03-01

    Nonpharmacological treatment strategies in Parkinson' disease include heterogeneous treatment modalities, such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, cognitive training and deep brain stimulation as well as noninvasive brain stimulation strategies. Even in the early stages of Parkinson's disease nonpharmacological interventions, such as active exercise therapy and speech therapy can be indicated taking the individual symptoms of a patient into account. Mild cognitive deficits are frequently detected in the course of the disease and progression of these disorders to dementia in the advanced stages of the disease is not uncommon. The starting point for a cognitive training, training strategy and training frequency is unknown and currently under investigation. Deep brain stimulation is an established treatment modality, which should be considered when motor fluctuations cannot be adequately controlled by pharmacological treatment. This therapeutic option depends on patient-specific needs and has to be managed by a multiprofessional team. Non-invasive neurostimulation techniques, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation are experimental tools and cannot currently be recommended for general use.

  4. Parkinson's disease biomarkers program brain imaging repository.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Edward; Du, Guangwei; Babcock, Debra; Huang, Xuemei; Vaillancourt, David E

    2016-01-01

    The Parkinson's Disease Biomarkers Program (PDBP) is a multi-site study designed to identify Parkinson's disease (PD) biomarkers that can be used to improve the understanding of PD pathophysiology and to develop tools that provide novel measures to evaluate PD clinical trials. The PDBP consortium comprises numerous individual projects of which two are specifically geared to the development of brain imaging markers for diagnosis, progression, and prognosis of PD or related disorders. All study data from PD patients, atypical Parkinsonian patients, patients with essential tremor, and healthy controls collected from the sites are integrated in the PDBP database and will be publically available. All subjects are asked to submit blood samples, and undergo a battery of clinical evaluations that cover motor, cognitive, and other background information. In addition, a subset of subjects contributed cerebrospinal fluid samples. A restricted access, web-based Data Management Resource facilitates rapid sharing of data and biosamples across the entire PD research community. The PDBP consortium is a useful resource for research and collaboration aimed at the discovery of biomarkers and their use in understanding the pathophysiology of PD.

  5. Plasma urate and Parkinson's disease in women.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Eilis J; Gao, Xiang; Weisskopf, Marc G; Chen, Honglei; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Spiegelman, Donna; Ascherio, Alberto

    2010-09-15

    Plasma urate has been consistently associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease in men, but it is less clear if this relation exists in women. Between 1990 and 2004, the authors conducted a nested case-control study among participants of the female-only Nurses' Health Study. In controls (n = 504), plasma urate was positively associated with age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, hypertension, and use of diuretics and was inversely associated with physical activity and postmenopausal hormone use, as expected. Mean urate levels were 5.04 mg/dL for cases (n = 101) and 4.86 mg/dL for controls (P = 0.17). The age-, smoking-, and caffeine-adjusted rate ratio comparing women in the highest (≥5.8 mg/dL) with those in the lowest (<4.0 mg/dL) quartile was 1.33 (95% confidence interval: 0.69, 2.57; P(trend) = 0.4). Further adjustment for body mass index, physical activity, history of hypertension, and postmenopausal hormone use did not change the results. Unlike in men, these findings do not support the hypothesis that urate is strongly associated with lower rates of Parkinson's disease among women.

  6. Clinical pharmacokinetics of levodopa in parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bianchine, J R; Shaw, G M

    1976-01-01

    Although levodopa has provided a major advance in the treatment of parkinsonism, its maximum benefits have not yet been realised, in part because of its complicated pharmacokinetics. This review summarises that available pharmacokinetic data involving levodopa, especially as it relates to therapeutic response of parkinsonian patients. A large number of factors, including protein intake, gastric emptying time, pyridoxine ingestion, and dopa decarboxylase activity, affect plasma levels of levodopa attained following oral administration of this drug. Other variables influence the rate of brain uptake of levodopa from the blood. Even so, plasma levodopa concentration correlates significantly with dosage size in a large parkinsonian population and also coincides with therapeutic response in many, but not all, patients. Therefore, in certain instances, valuable information may be derived by correlating clinical response with plasma levodopa concentration. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of homovanillic acid, a major metabolite of dopamine, may have some value in predicting clinical response to levodopa. This relationship, however, has not been firmly established. Concentration of homovanillic acid or levodopa in body fluids may also be closely related to certain adverse side-effects, including abnormal involuntary movements, gastric discomfort and psychiatric disturbances. Evidence indicates that a clearer understanding of levodopa pharmacokinetics may improve the clinical management of parkinsonism.

  7. Optimizing diagnosis in Parkinson's disease: Radionuclide imaging.

    PubMed

    Arena, Julieta E; Stoessl, A Jon

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and other disorders characterized by basal ganglia dysfunction are often associated with limited structural imaging changes that might assist in the clinical or research setting. Radionuclide imaging has been used to assess characteristic functional changes. Presynaptic dopaminergic dysfunction in PD can be revealed through the imaging of different steps in the process of dopamine synthesis and storage: L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity, Vesicular Monoamine Transporter type 2 (VMAT2) binding or its reuptake via the dopamine transporter (DAT). Postsynaptic dopamine dysfunction can also be studied with a variety of different tracers that primarily assess D2-like dopamine receptor availability. The function of other neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine, serotonin and acetylcholine can be imaged as well, giving important information about the underlying pathophysiologic process of PD and its complications. The imaging of metabolic activity and pathologic changes has also provided great advances in the field. Together, these techniques have allowed for a better understanding of PD, may be of aid for differentiating PD from other forms of parkinsonism and will undoubtedly be useful for the establishment of new therapeutic targets.

  8. Unmasking levodopa resistance in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nonnekes, Jorik; Timmer, Monique H M; de Vries, Nienke M; Rascol, Olivier; Helmich, Rick C; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-11-01

    Some motor and nonmotor features associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) do not seem to respond well to levodopa (or other forms of dopaminergic medication) or appear to become resistant to levodopa treatment with disease progression and longer disease duration. In this narrative review, we elaborate on this issue of levodopa resistance in PD. First, we discuss the possibility of pseudoresistance, which refers to dopamine-sensitive symptoms or signs that falsely appear to be (or have become) resistant to levodopa, when in fact other mechanisms are at play, resulting in suboptimal dopaminergic efficacy. Examples include interindividual differences in pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics and underdosing because of dose-limiting side effects or because of levodopa phobia. Moreover, pseudoresistance can emerge as not all features of PD respond adequately to the same dosage of levodopa. Second, we address that for several motor features (eg, freezing of gait or tremor) and several nonmotor features (eg, specific cognitive functions), the response to levodopa is fairly complex, with a combination of levodopa-responsive, levodopa-resistant, and even levodopa-induced characteristics. A possible explanation relates to the mixed presence of underlying dopaminergic and nondopaminergic brain lesions. We suggest that clinicians take these possibilities into account before concluding that symptoms or signs of PD are totally levodopa resistant. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. [Update on the pathophysiology of Parkinson' disease].

    PubMed

    Duyckaerts, Charles; Sazdovitch, Véronique; Seilhean, Danielle

    2010-10-01

    Changes in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease were suspected by Brissaud in the late 19th century. They were subsequently confirmed by Tretiakoff but neglected by Lewy, who described the inclusion bodies that bear his name. The experimental Parkinsonian syndrome caused by reserpine led Carlsson to discover the neuromediatory role of dopamine, a finding at the origin of L-DOPA therapy. Identification of a mutation of the alpha-synuclein gene in cases of familial Parkinson's disease with autosomal dominant transmission was followed by the detection of the protein product in Lewy bodies and neurites. Alpha-synuclein is now recognized as being the main constituent of Lewy bodies. Alpha-synuclein immunohistochemistry has revealed that lesions can extend from the autonomous nervous system to the cortex (in Lewy body dementia). The Lewy body itself does not appear to be the direct cause of symptoms, which correlate better with neuronal death. Neuronal death could be due to metabolic disturbances related to alpha-synuclein accumulation, ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction, or oxidative stress. Non-autonomous cell death, caused by neuro-inflammation or gliosis, has also been incriminated.

  10. Parkinson's Disease: The Mitochondria-Iron Link

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Carlos M.; Núñez, Marco T.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage are conditions often found in damaged brain areas of Parkinson's disease. We propose that a causal link exists between these three events. Mitochondrial dysfunction results not only in increased reactive oxygen species production but also in decreased iron-sulfur cluster synthesis and unorthodox activation of Iron Regulatory Protein 1 (IRP1), a key regulator of cell iron homeostasis. In turn, IRP1 activation results in iron accumulation and hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. These three occurrences—mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage—generate a positive feedback loop of increased iron accumulation and oxidative stress. Here, we review the evidence that points to a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation as early events in the development of sporadic and genetic cases of Parkinson's disease. Finally, an attempt is done to contextualize the possible relationship between mitochondria dysfunction and iron dyshomeostasis. Based on published evidence, we propose that iron chelation—by decreasing iron-associated oxidative damage and by inducing cell survival and cell-rescue pathways—is a viable therapy for retarding this cycle. PMID:27293957

  11. Parkinson's Disease: The Mitochondria-Iron Link.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Yorka; Carrasco, Carlos M; Campos, Joaquín D; Aguirre, Pabla; Núñez, Marco T

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage are conditions often found in damaged brain areas of Parkinson's disease. We propose that a causal link exists between these three events. Mitochondrial dysfunction results not only in increased reactive oxygen species production but also in decreased iron-sulfur cluster synthesis and unorthodox activation of Iron Regulatory Protein 1 (IRP1), a key regulator of cell iron homeostasis. In turn, IRP1 activation results in iron accumulation and hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. These three occurrences-mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage-generate a positive feedback loop of increased iron accumulation and oxidative stress. Here, we review the evidence that points to a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation as early events in the development of sporadic and genetic cases of Parkinson's disease. Finally, an attempt is done to contextualize the possible relationship between mitochondria dysfunction and iron dyshomeostasis. Based on published evidence, we propose that iron chelation-by decreasing iron-associated oxidative damage and by inducing cell survival and cell-rescue pathways-is a viable therapy for retarding this cycle.

  12. Cardiovascular effects of levodopa in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Noack, Cornelia; Schroeder, Christoph; Heusser, Karsten; Lipp, Axel

    2014-08-01

    Levodopa is one of the most effective symptomatic treatment options for Parkinsonism with a favorable safety and tolerability profile. In some patients, particularly those suffering from orthostatic intolerance, the hypotensive effect of levodopa limits its therapeutic use. We used continuous noninvasive cardiovascular and ventilatory monitoring in 17 patients suffering from moderate Parkinson's disease to quantify the hypotensive effect of levodopa and to determine whether this effect is rather vasodepressor or cardioinhibitory. Oral administration of 200 mg levodopa/50 mg benserazide induced a significant decrease in mean arterial pressure (-15%, p < 0.001), cardiac stroke volume (-13%, p < 0.01) and measures of cardiac contractility (dP/dt: -18%, p < 0.001). Systemic vascular resistance, heart rate and ventilatory parameters remained preserved. Our data indicate that the hypotensive blood pressure response to levodopa is caused primarily by a negative inotropic mechanism rather than peripheral vasodilation. Whether this effect is triggered peripherally at the level of the heart or is mediated via central sympathoinhibition remains unsolved.

  13. Parkinsonism due to manganism in a welder.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Ahmed H; Rauch, Ronald; Schulz, Paul E

    2003-01-01

    A 33-year-old right-handed male presented complaining of a 2-year history of progressive cognitive slowing, rigidity, tremors, slowing of movements, and gait instability leading to falls. On examination, he had a Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) score of 29, slowed saccadic eye pursuit, hypomimia, cogwheel rigidity, a 3- to 4-Hz tremor, and a "cock-walk" gait. His symptoms and signs were similar to idiopathic Parkinson's disease; however, he was young, inattention and forgetfulness occurred early in the course of the disorder, levodopa was unhelpful, and his gait was atypical. His work up for secondary causes of parkinsonism was negative, except for increased signal intensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) in the bilateral basal ganglia. Typical etiologies for that finding were ruled-out, which led to further inquiries into the patient's lifestyle. He was a welder, and discussion with his employer revealed that he used a steel-manganese alloy, he often worked in a confined ship's hold, and he did not use a respiratory mask. Because manganese toxicity can produce increased T1-weighted signal intensities in the basal ganglia, the authors tested his serum and urine manganese, and both were elevated. This patient emphasizes the importance of a careful occupational history in persons presenting with atypical manifestations of a neurodegenerative disorder. It also lends support to the hypothesis that welding can produce enough exposure to manganese to produce neurologic impairment.

  14. Active music therapy and Parkinson's disease: methods.

    PubMed

    Pacchetti, C; Aglieri, R; Mancini, F; Martignoni, E; Nappi, G

    1998-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is an unconventional, multisensorial therapy poorly assessed in medical care but widely used to different ends in a variety of settings. MT has two branches: active and passive. In active MT the utilisation of instruments is structured to correspond to all sensory organs so as to obtain suitable motor and emotional responses. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the effects of MT in the neurorehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), a common degenerative disorder involving movement and emotional impairment. Sixteen PD patients took part in 13 weekly sessions of MT each lasting 2 hours. At the beginning and at the end of the session, every 2 weeks, the patients were evaluated by a neurologist, who assessed PD severity with UPDRS, emotional functions with Happiness Measures (HM) and quality of life using the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL). After every session a significant improvement in motor function, particularly in relation to hypokinesia, was observed both in the overall and in the pre-post session evaluations. HM, UPDRS-ADL and PDQL changes confirmed an improving effect of MT on emotional functions, activities of daily living and quality of life. In conclusion, active MT, operating at a multisensorial level, stimulates motor, affective and behavioural functions. Finally, we propose active MT as new method to include in PD rehabilitation programmes. This article describes the methods adopted during MT sessions with PD patients.

  15. Speech disorders of Parkinsonism: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Critchley, E M

    1981-01-01

    Study of the speech disorders of Parkinsonism provides a paradigm of the integration of phonation, articulation and language in the production of speech. The initial defect in the untreated patient is a failure to control respiration for the purpose of speech and there follows a forward progression of articulatory symptoms involving larynx, pharynx, tongue and finally lips. There is evidence that the integration of speech production is organised asymmetrically at thalamic level. Experimental or therapeutic lesions in the region of the inferior medial portion of ventro-lateral thalamus may influence the initiation, respiratory control, rate and prosody of speech. Higher language functions may also be involved in thalamic integration: different forms of anomia are reported with pulvinar and ventrolateral thalamic lesions and transient aphasia may follow stereotaxis. The results of treatment with levodopa indicates that neurotransmitter substances enhance the clarity, volume and persistence of phonation and the latency and smoothness of articulation. The improvement of speech performance is not necessarily in phase with locomotor changes. The dose-related dyskinetic effects of levodopa, which appear to have a physiological basis in observations previously made in post-encephalitic Parkinsonism, not only influence the prosody of speech with near-mutism, hesitancy and dysfluency but may affect work-finding ability and in instances of excitement (erethism) even involve the association of long-term memory with speech. In future, neurologists will need to examine more closely the role of neurotransmitters in speech production and formulation. PMID:7031185

  16. Pragmatic Comprehension Deficit in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holtgraves, Thomas; McNamara, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing the specific speech act (Searle, 1969) that a speaker performs with an utterance is a fundamental feature of pragmatic competence. However, little is known about neurocognitive mediation of speech act comprehension. The present research examined the extent to which people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) comprehend specific speech acts. In the first experiment, participants read conversational utterances and then performed a lexical decision task (decide whether a target string of letters is a word). Consistent with past research, non-impaired participants performed this task more quickly when the target string was the speech act associated with the preceding utterance. In contrast, people with Parkinson's disease did not demonstrate this effect, suggesting that speech act activation is slowed or is not an automatic component of comprehension for people with PD. In a second study, participants were given unlimited time to indicate their recognition of the speech act performed with an utterance. PD participants were significantly poorer at this task than were control participants. We conclude that a previously undocumented language disorder exists in PD and that this disorder involves a selective deficit in speech act comprehension. Frontostriatal systems (the systems impaired in PD) likely contribute to normal speech act comprehension. PMID:19763993

  17. Apathy and depression in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Oguru, Miyako; Tachibana, Hisao; Toda, Kazuo; Okuda, Bungo; Oka, Nobuyuki

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical correlates of apathy and depression in Parkinson disease (PD), and to clarify whether apathy can be dissociated from depression. One hundred fifty patients with PD completed the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II), Starkstein's Apathy Scale (AS), and a quality of life (QOL) battery. Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were performed on the same day. Apathy (AS score > or = 16) was diagnosed in 60% of patients and depression (BDI-II score > or = 14) in 56%. Apathy coexisted with depression in 43% of patients, compared with depression without apathy in 13% and apathy without depression in 17%. Apathy scale score was significantly correlated with UPDRS scores, HY stage, and age, whereas BDI-II score was correlated only with UPDRS scores. Both AS and BDI-II scores were negatively correlated with QOL. However, multiple regression analysis revealed that depression was strongly and negatively associated with emotional well-being and communication, whereas apathy was mainly associated with cognition and stigma. These findings suggest that apathy and depression may be separable in PD, although both are common in patients with PD and are associated with QOL.

  18. [Frontal dysfunction in idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Vera-Cuesta, H; Vera-Acosta, H; Alvarez-González, L; Fernández-Maderos, I; Casabona-Fernández, E

    In his description of the disease in his original work, James Parkinson claimed that the 'senses remained intact', but later reports began to identify cognitive impairment that ranged from dementia to barely identifiable subclinical deteriorations. Research carried out in recent decades has revealed that cognitive disorders form part of the clinical symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and point to the frontal lobes as being the most affected areas; a great deal of controversy, however, still surrounds their definition, epidemiology and pathology. To determine and classify the frontal deficits associated to this disease and to relate this cognitive performance with certain characteristics of the disease. The sample utilised in the study was made up of 222 subjects divided into two groups according to their diagnosis: 111 subjects with idiopathic PD and 111 control subjects. The neuropsychological examination was performed using the Frontal Assessment Battery, the copy of the Rey-Osterrieth complex figure and the digit test for determining frontal functioning. We prove the existence of a frontal dysfunction that is characterised by impaired working memory, with visuospatial and executive dysfunction, which suggests greater involvement of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and cingulate. According to our findings, because working memory and visuospatial functioning are correlated to the motor status and the time elapsed since the onset of the disease, they could share the same underlying neuroanatomical foundations--the nigrostriatal denervation. This is not the case of executive function, which was not found to be related to the characteristics of the disease under study.

  19. Neuroprotection trials in Parkinson's disease: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hart, Robert G; Pearce, Lesly A; Ravina, Bernard M; Yaltho, Toby C; Marler, John R

    2009-04-15

    Treatments to slow the progression are a major unmet need in Parkinson's disease. Detailed assessment of randomized trials testing putative neuroprotective drugs was undertaken to inform the design, reporting, and interpretation of future studies. This study is a systematic review of trials testing neuroprotective drugs. Data were extracted independently by two coauthors. Fifteen completed, published trials involving 4,087 participants tested 13 different drugs in 18 double-blind comparisons with placebo. Seven comparisons involving 2,000 subjects assessed MAO-B inhibitors. The primary outcome was change in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score in eight trials and time to need for dopaminergic therapy in seven. Mean participant age was 62 years, 35% were women, the interval from diagnosis to entry averaged 11 months, and the number of participants averaged 272 (largest = 806). Follow-up averaged <16 months in all but two trials. Detailed randomization methods and success of double-blinding were reported in 20% and 13%, respectively. Based on the investigators' conclusions, six trials were interpreted as consistent with a neuroprotective effect, three as negative, and five as either confounded or not meeting criteria for futility. Neuroprotection trials have involved relatively uniform groups of participants early in the clinical disease course, with outcomes weighted heavily toward motor deterioration. Future trials should include participants with wider ranges of disease stages and assess broader neurological outcomes.

  20. Emerging preclinical pharmacological targets for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological condition caused by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia. It is the most prevalent form of Parkinsonism, categorized by cardinal features such as bradykinesia, rigidity, tremors, and postural instability. Due to the multicentric pathology of PD involving inflammation, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis, and protein aggregation, it has become difficult to pin-point a single therapeutic target and evaluate its potential application. Currently available drugs for treating PD provide only symptomatic relief and do not decrease or avert disease progression resulting in poor patient satisfaction and compliance. Significant amount of understanding concerning the pathophysiology of PD has offered a range of potential targets for PD. Several emerging targets including AAV-hAADC gene therapy, phosphodiesterase-4, potassium channels, myeloperoxidase, acetylcholinesterase, MAO-B, dopamine, A2A, mGlu5, and 5-HT-1A/1B receptors are in different stages of clinical development. Additionally, alternative interventions such as deep brain stimulation, thalamotomy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and gamma knife surgery, are also being developed for patients with advanced PD. As much as these therapeutic targets hold potential to delay the onset and reverse the disease, more targets and alternative interventions need to be examined in different stages of PD. In this review, we discuss various emerging preclinical pharmacological targets that may serve as a new promising neuroprotective strategy that could actually help alleviate PD and its symptoms. PMID:26988916

  1. Detection of preclinical Parkinson's disease with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Putamen 18F-dopa uptake of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is reduced by at least 35% at onset of symptoms; therefore, positron-emission tomography (PET) can be used to detect preclinical disease in clinically unaffected twins and relatives of patients with PD. Three out of 6 monozygotic and 2 out of 3 dizygotic unaffected PD co-twins have shown reduced putamen 18F-dopa uptake to date. In addition, an intact sibling and a daughter of 1 of 4 siblings with PD both had low putamen 18F-dopa uptake. These preliminary findings suggest there may be a familial component to the etiology of PD. PET can also be used to detect underlying nigral pathology in patients with isolated tremor and patients who become rigid taking dopamine-receptor blocking agents (DRBAs). Patients with familial essential tremor have normal, and those with isolated rest tremor have consistently low, putamen 18F-dopa uptake. Drug-induced parkinsonism is infrequently associated with underlying nigral pathology.

  2. Detection of preclinical Parkinson's disease with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, D.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Putamen 18F-dopa uptake of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is reduced by at least 35% at onset of symptoms; therefore, positron-emission tomography (PET) can be used to detect preclinical disease in clinically unaffected twins and relatives of patients with PD. Three out of 6 monozygotic and 2 out of 3 dizygotic unaffected PD co-twins have shown reduced putamen 18F-dopa uptake to date. In addition, an intact sibling and a daughter of 1 of 4 siblings with PD both had low putamen 18F-dopa uptake. These preliminary findings suggest there may be a familial component to the etiology of PD. PET can also be used to detect underlying nigral pathology in patients with isolated tremor and patients who become rigid taking dopamine-receptor blocking agents (DRBAs). Patients with familial essential tremor have normal, and those with isolated rest tremor have consistently low, putamen 18F-dopa uptake. Drug-induced parkinsonism is infrequently associated with underlying nigral pathology.

  3. Autophonic loudness perception in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Brajot, François-Xavier; Shiller, Douglas M.; Gracco, Vincent L.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the intensity and loudness of self-generated (autophonic) speech remains invariant despite changes in auditory feedback, indicating that non-auditory processes contribute to this form of perception. The aim of the current study was to determine if the speech perception deficit associated with Parkinson's disease may be linked to deficits in such processes. Loudness magnitude estimates were obtained from parkinsonian and non-parkinsonian subjects across four separate conditions: self-produced speech under normal, perturbed, and masked auditory feedback, as well as auditory presentation of pre-recorded speech (passive listening). Slopes and intercepts of loudness curves were compared across groups and conditions. A significant difference in slope was found between autophonic and passive-listening conditions for both groups. Unlike control subjects, parkinsonian subjects' magnitude estimates under auditory masking increased in variability and did not show as strong a shift in intercept values. These results suggest that individuals with Parkinson's disease rely on auditory feedback to compensate for underlying deficits in sensorimotor integration important in establishing and regulating autophonic loudness. PMID:27036273

  4. Magnetic resonance parkinsonism index in progressive supranuclear palsy and vascular parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Mostile, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Alessandra; Cicero, Calogero Edoardo; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Bruno, Elisa; Dibilio, Valeria; Luca, Antonina; Sciacca, Giorgia; Raciti, Loredana; Contrafatto, Donatella; Chiaramonte, Ignazio; Zappia, Mario

    2016-04-01

    To investigate accuracy of the magnetic resonance parkinsonism index (MRPI) in differentiating progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) from vascular parkinsonism (VP). We retrospectively analyzed radiological data of 12 PSP patients and 17 VP patients group-matched by age and sex who performed a standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Analysis of selected structures morphometry was performed to all study subjects and the MRPI was calculated for each selected patient. MRI midbrain area as well as superior cerebellar peduncle width were significantly lower in PSP patients compared to VP subjects. MRPI was significantly larger in PSP patients compared to VP subjects. MRPI value ≥13 distinguished the two groups with a sensitivity of 100 % (95 % CI 69.9-100) and a specificity of 100 % (95 % CI 77.1-100). MRPI may represent an accurate tool in differentiating PSP from VP.

  5. MRI measurements of brainstem structures in patients with vascular parkinsonism, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong C; Choi, Seong-Min; Choi, Kang-Ho; Nam, Tai-Seung; Kim, Joon-Tae; Lee, Seung-Han; Park, Man-Seok; Yoon, Woong

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) measurements of brainstem structures have been reported to be useful in differentiating patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) from those with Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to determine whether quantitative measurements of brainstem structures on MR images can help differentiate vascular parkinsonism (VaP) from degenerative parkinsonism (PD and PSP). Areas of the midbrain and pons, and widths of the superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP) and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) were measured in 62 patients with PD, 25 patients with PSP (11 probable and 14 possible), and 24 patients with VaP on T 1-weighted MR images. The midbrain-to-pons area ratio (M/P ratio), MCP-to-SCP width ratio (MCP/SCP ratio), and MR parkinsonism index (MRPI; P/M × MCP/SCP) were calculated. The midbrain area and M/P ratio of patients with VaP (104 and 0.22 mm(2), respectively) were smaller than those in patients with PD (121 and 0.24 mm(2), respectively) and larger than those in patients with PSP (90 and 0.19 mm(2), respectively). The MRPI was significantly larger in patients with PSP (13.6) in comparison with those with PD (10.1) and VaP (10.7). However, the MRPI of patients with VaP was not significantly different from patients with PD. Our study showed that MRPI was useful in differentiating PSP from VaP or PD. Thus, MR imaging measurements of brainstem structures may help differentiate patients with VaP from those with PD and PSP.

  6. Parkinson's Disease Subtypes in the Oxford Parkinson Disease Centre (OPDC) Discovery Cohort.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Michael; Baig, Fahd; Rolinski, Michal; Ruffman, Claudio; Nithi, Kannan; May, Margaret T; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Hu, Michele T M

    2015-01-01

    Within Parkinson's there is a spectrum of clinical features at presentation which may represent sub-types of the disease. However there is no widely accepted consensus of how best to group patients. Use a data-driven approach to unravel any heterogeneity in the Parkinson's phenotype in a well-characterised, population-based incidence cohort. 769 consecutive patients, with mean disease duration of 1.3 years, were assessed using a broad range of motor, cognitive and non-motor metrics. Multiple imputation was carried out using the chained equations approach to deal with missing data. We used an exploratory and then a confirmatory factor analysis to determine suitable domains to include within our cluster analysis. K-means cluster analysis of the factor scores and all the variables not loading into a factor was used to determine phenotypic subgroups. Our factor analysis found three important factors that were characterised by: psychological well-being features; non-tremor motor features, such as posture and rigidity; and cognitive features. Our subsequent five cluster model identified groups characterised by (1) mild motor and non-motor disease (25.4%), (2) poor posture and cognition (23.3%), (3) severe tremor (20.8%), (4) poor psychological well-being, RBD and sleep (18.9%), and (5) severe motor and non-motor disease with poor psychological well-being (11.7%). Our approach identified several Parkinson's phenotypic sub-groups driven by largely dopaminergic-resistant features (RBD, impaired cognition and posture, poor psychological well-being) that, in addition to dopaminergic-responsive motor features may be important for studying the aetiology, progression, and medication response of early Parkinson's.

  7. Apolipoprotein E alleles in Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s patients

    SciTech Connect

    Poduslo, S.E.; Schwankhaus, J.D.

    1994-09-01

    A number of investigators have found an association between the apolipoprotein E4 allele and Alzheimer`s disease. The E4 allele appears at a higher frequency in late onset familial Alzheimer`s patients. In our studies we obtained blood samples from early and late onset familial and sporadic Alzheimer`s patients and spouses, as well as from Parkinson`s patients. The patients were diagnosed as probable Alzheimer`s patients after a neurological examination, extensive blood work, and a CAT scan. The diagnosis was made according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. The apolipoprotein E4 polymorphism was detected after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, restriction enzyme digestion with Hhal, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Ethidium bromide-stained bands at 91 bp were designated as allele 3, at 83 bp as allele 2, and at 72 bp as allele 4. Of the 84 probable Alzheimer`s patients (all of whom were Caucasian), 47 were heterozygous and 13 were homozygous for the E4 allele. There were 26 early onset patients; 13 were heterozygous and 7 homozygous for the E4 allele. The frequencies for the E4 allele for late onset familial patients was 0.45 and for sporadic patients was 0.37. We analyzed 77 spouses with an average age of 71.9 {plus_minus} 7.4 years as controls, and 15 were heterozygous for the E4 allele for an E4 frequency of 0.097. Of the 53 Parkinson`s patients, 11 had the E4 allele for a frequency of 0.113. Thus our findings support the association of the ApoE4 allele with Alzheimer`s disease.

  8. Urinary Incontinence, Incident Parkinsonism, and Parkinson's Disease Pathology in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Buchman, Noa M; Leurgans, Sue E; Shah, Raj J; VanderHorst, Veronique; Wilson, Robert S; Bachner, Yaacov G; Tanne, David; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; Buchman, Aron S

    2017-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that urinary incontinence (UI) is associated with incident parkinsonism in older adults. We used data from 2,617 older persons without dementia. Assessment included baseline self-report UI and annual structured exam which assessed parkinsonian signs, motor performances, cognitive function, and self-report disabilities. We used a series of Cox proportional hazards models to examine the association of UI with parkinsonism and adverse health outcomes and a mixed-effect model to examine the association of UI with the annual rate of cognitive decline. In decedents, regression models were used to examine if UI proximate to death was related to postmortem indices of neuropathologies. At baseline, more than 45% of participants reported some degree of UI. Over an average of nearly 8 years of follow-up, UI was associated with incident parkinsonism (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.02, 1.12), death (HR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.11), incident ADL disability (HR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.07, 1.16), and incident mobility disability (HR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.02, 1.13). UI was not related to incident MCI (HR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.97, 1.07), incident AD dementia (HR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.95, 1.05) or to the rate of cognitive decline (Estimate = -.002, standard error = .002, p = .167). In 1,024 decedents with brain autopsy, UI proximate to death was related to PD pathology (Lewy body pathology and nigral neuronal loss), but not Alzheimer's disease pathology or other age-related neuropathologies. UI in older adults is associated with incident parkinsonism and may identify older adults at risk for accumulating PD brain pathology.

  9. Does restraining nitric oxide biosynthesis rescue from toxins-induced parkinsonism and sporadic Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Satya Prakash; Yadav, Sharawan; Singhal, Naveen Kumar; Tiwari, Manindra Nath; Mishra, Sarad Kumar; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2014-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important inorganic molecule of the biological system owing to diverse physiological implications. NO is synthesised from a semi-essential amino acid L-arginine. NO biosynthesis is catalysed by a family of enzymes referred to as nitric oxide synthases (NOSs). NO is accused in many acute and chronic illnesses, which include central nervous system disorders, inflammatory diseases, reproductive impairments, cancer and cardiovascular anomalies. Owing to very unstable nature, NO gets converted into nitrite, peroxynitrite and other reactive nitrogen species that could lead to nitrosative stress in the nigrostriatal system. Nitrosative stress is widely implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD), and its beneficial and harmful effects are demonstrated in in vitro, rodent and primate models of toxins-induced parkinsonism and in the blood, cerebrospinal fluid and nigrostriatal tissues of sporadic PD patients. The current article updates the roles of NO and NOSs in sporadic PD and toxins-induced parkinsonism in rodents along with the scrutiny of how inhibitors of NOSs could open a new line of approach to moderately rescue from PD pathogenesis based on the existing literature. The article also provides a perspective concerning the lack of ample admiration to such an approach and how to minimise the underlying lacunae.

  10. Postural & striatal deformities in Parkinson`s disease: Are these rare?

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjay; Garg, Hitesh

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson`s disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and is characterized by tremor, rigidity and akinesia. Diagnosis is clinical in the majority of the patients. Patients with PD may have stooped posture but some of them develop different types of postural and striatal deformities. Usually these deformities are more common in atypical parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy and multisystem atrophy. But in many studies it has been highlighted that these may also be present in approximately one third of PD patients leading to severe disability. These include antecollis or dropped head, camptocormia, p0 isa syndrome, scoliosis, striatal hands and striatal toes. The pathogenesis of these deformities is a complex combination of central and peripheral influences such as rigidity, dystonia and degenerative skeletal changes. Duration of parkinsonism symptoms is an important risk factor and in majority of the patients these deformities are seen in advanced statge of the disease. The patients with such symptoms may initially respond to dopaminergic medications but if not intervened they may become fixed and difficult to treat. Pain and restriction of movement are most common clinical manifestations and these may mimick symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders like rheumatoid arthritis. Early diagnosis is important as the patients may respond to adjustment in dopaminergic medications. Recent advances such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) and ultrasound guided botulinum toxin injection are helpful in management of these deformities in patients with PD.

  11. Recognition and management of neuropsychiatric complications in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, Florian; Agbokou, Catherine; Gauthier, Serge

    2006-12-05

    Parkinson's disease is primarily considered a motor disease characterized by rest tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural disturbances. However, neuropsychiatric complications, including mood and anxiety disorders, fatigue, apathy, psychosis, cognitive impairment, dementia, sleep disorders and addictions, frequently complicate the course of the illness. The pathophysiologic features of these complications are multifaceted and include neuropathophysiologic changes of a degenerative disease, exposure to antiparkinsonian treatments and emotional reactions to having a disabling chronic illness. Changes in mental status have profound implications for the well-being of patients with Parkinson's disease and of their caregivers. Treatment is often efficacious but becomes a challenge in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. In this article, we review the key clinical features of neuropsychiatric complications in Parkinson's disease as well as what is known about their epidemiologic characteristics, risk factors, pathophysiologic features and management.

  12. Recognition and management of neuropsychiatric complications in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferreri, Florian; Agbokou, Catherine; Gauthier, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is primarily considered a motor disease characterized by rest tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural disturbances. However, neuropsychiatric complications, including mood and anxiety disorders, fatigue, apathy, psychosis, cognitive impairment, dementia, sleep disorders and addictions, frequently complicate the course of the illness. The pathophysiologic features of these complications are multifaceted and include neuropathophysiologic changes of a degenerative disease, exposure to antiparkinsonian treatments and emotional reactions to having a disabling chronic illness. Changes in mental status have profound implications for the well-being of patients with Parkinson's disease and of their caregivers. Treatment is often efficacious but becomes a challenge in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. In this article, we review the key clinical features of neuropsychiatric complications in Parkinson's disease as well as what is known about their epidemiologic characteristics, risk factors, pathophysiologic features and management. PMID:17146092

  13. Fractal dynamics of body motion in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Masaki; Akay, Metin; Tamura, Toshiyo; Higashi, Yuji; Fujimoto, Toshiro

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we assess the complexity (fractal measure) of body motion during walking in patients with Parkinson's disease. The body motion of 11 patients with Parkinson's disease and 10 healthy elderly subjects was recorded using a triaxial accelerometry technique. A triaxial accelerometer was attached to the lumbar region. An assessment of the complexity of body motion was made using a maximum-likelihood-estimator-based fractal analysis method. Our data suggest that the fractal measures of the body motion of patients with Parkinson's disease are higher than those of healthy elderly subjects. These results were statistically different in the X (anteroposterior), Y (lateral) and Z (vertical) directions of body motion between patients with Parkinson's disease and the healthy elderly subjects (p < 0.01 in X and Z directions and p < 0.05 in Y direction). The complexity (fractal measure) of body motion can be useful to assess and monitor the output from the motor system during walking in clinical practice.

  14. Understanding Parkinson Disease: A Complex and Multifaceted Illness.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishna, Apoorva; Alexander, Sheila A

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson disease is an incredibly complex and multifaceted illness affecting millions of people in the United States. Parkinson disease is characterized by progressive dopaminergic neuronal dysfunction and loss, leading to debilitating motor, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms. Parkinson disease is an enigmatic illness that is still extensively researched today to search for a better understanding of the disease, develop therapeutic interventions to halt or slow progression of the disease, and optimize patient outcomes. This article aims to examine in detail the normal function of the basal ganglia and dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system, the etiology and pathophysiology of Parkinson disease, related signs and symptoms, current treatment, and finally, the profound impact of understanding the disease on nursing care.

  15. Ipsilateral coordination features for automatic classification of Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, Fernanda; Atehortúa, Angélica; Martínez, Fabio; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    A reliable diagnosis of the Parkinson Disease lies on the objective evaluation of different motor sub-systems. Discovering specific motor patterns associated to the disease is fundamental for the development of unbiased assessments that facilitate the disease characterization, independently of the particular examiner. This paper proposes a new objective screening of patients with Parkinson, an approach that optimally combines ipsilateral global descriptors. These ipsilateral gait features are simple upper-lower limb relationships in frequency and relative phase spaces. These low level characteristics feed a simple SVM classifier with a polynomial kernel function. The strategy was assessed in a binary classification task, normal against Parkinson, under a leave-one-out scheme in a population of 16 Parkinson patients and 7 healthy control subjects. Results showed an accuracy of 94;6% using relative phase spaces and 82;1% with simple frequency relations.

  16. [Effects of bushenhuoxue granules on sleep quality in Parkinson's patients].

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Yang, Ming-Hui; Li, Shao-Dan; Liu, Yi

    2011-09-01

    To study the effects of Bushenhuoxue Granules on Parkinson's disease sleep scale (PDSS) score in Parkinson's patients. 120 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups randomly,the control group were treated with placebo and treatment group with Bushenhuoxue Granules, both group based on Madopar treatment. Double-blinded clinical trial was adopted in treatment period. Follow-up period for 6 months, PDSS was adopted to measure sleep condition of PD patients at baseline time, after 3 months and after 9 months. Bushenhuoxue Granules treatment group showed a higher efficacy than the placebo group in relieving the sleep disorders of Parkinson disease patients,both in treatment and follow-up period (P < 0.01). No adverse effects were found in this trial. Bushenhuoxue Granules can markedly improve sleep disorders in Parkinson's patients. The effects are stable and obvious along with the process of treatment.

  17. Parkinson's Disease and Melanoma May Occur Together, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_167078.html Parkinson's Disease and Melanoma May Occur Together, Study Finds Doctors should counsel ... are about four times more likely to develop melanoma skin cancer, and conversely, people with melanoma have ...

  18. The beneficial role of intensive exercise on Parkinson disease progression.

    PubMed

    Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Balbi, Pietro; Maestri, Roberto; Bertotti, Gabriella; Boveri, Natalia; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, a considerable number of articles has shown that exercise is effective in improving motor performance in Parkinson disease. In particular, recent studies have focused on the efficacy of intensive exercise in achieving optimal results in the rehabilitation of patients with Parkinson disease. The effects of intensive exercise in promoting cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in animal models are reported in a large cohort of studies, and these neuroplastic effects are probably related to increased expression of a variety of neurotrophic factors. The authors outline the relation between intensive exercises and neuroplastic activity on animal models of Parkinson disease and discuss the clinical results of different intensive strategies on motor performance and disease progression in patients with Parkinson disease.

  19. CareMAP: Caring for Someone with Advanced Parkinson Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Parkinson's disease and caregiving. EMAIL SUBMIT Featured Videos Changes Around the House Plans and Scheduling Movement ... Home Travel and Transportation Rest and Sleep More Videos Changes Around the House Plans and Scheduling Movement ...

  20. EMG signal morphology in essential tremor and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ruonala, V; Meigal, A; Rissanen, S M; Airaksinen, O; Kankaanpaa, M; Karjalainen, P A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to differentiate patients with essential tremor from patients with Parkinson's disease. The electromyographic signal from the biceps brachii muscle was measured during isometric tension from 17 patients with essential tremor, 35 patients with Parkinson's disease, and 40 healthy controls. The EMG signals were high pass filtered and divided to smaller segments from which histograms were calculated using 200 histogram bins. EMG signal histogram shape was analysed with a feature dimension reduction method, the principal component analysis, and the shape parameters were used to differentiate between different patient groups. The height of the histogram and the side difference between left and right hand were the best discriminators between essential tremor and Parkinson's disease groups. With this method, it was possible to discriminate 13/17 patients with essential tremor from 26/35 patients with Parkinson's disease and 14/17 patients with essential tremor from 29/40 healthy controls.

  1. Premovement facilitation of corticospinal excitability in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Koichi; Notani, Masaru; Iwata, Akira; Minamida, Fumiko; Abe, Kazuo

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the abnormality of premovement facilitation in patients with Parkinson's disease. Seven patients with Parkinson's disease and seven healthy subjects participated in this study. The subjects attempted abduction of the index finger in response to a visual start cue, and motor-evoked potentials were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle before movement onset. The rate of premovement facilitation in patients with Parkinson's disease was slower than that in healthy subjects. Additionally, the rate of premovement facilitation as a function of delay from the start cue was positively correlated with the reaction time. These findings indicate that premovement facilitation is abnormal in patients with Parkinson's disease. This abnormality may be partially related to akinesia.

  2. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in advanced Parkinson's disease: five year follow-up at a Portuguese center.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana; Andrade, Carlos; Rosas, Maria J; Linhares, Paulo; Massano, João; Vaz, Rui; Garrett, Carolina

    2014-05-16

    Introduccion. La estimulacion cerebral profunda (ECP) del nucleo subtalamico (NST) en la enfermedad de Parkinson (EP) es segura y eficaz: en la mayoria de series se describen respuestas motoras duraderas y estables. Objetivo. Informar sobre el desenlace a largo plazo de la ECP del NST en pacientes con EP avanzada atendidos en un centro hospitalario portugues. Pacientes y metodos. El estado motor se valoro con la escala unificada de valoracion de la enfermedad de Parkinson, parte III, antes de la intervencion quirurgica –en dos situaciones: sin efecto de la medicacion (off) y bajo el mejor efecto (on)–, en el postoperatorio y al cabo de cinco años (medicacion y estimulacion en on). Se cuantificaron las puntuaciones de cada sintoma axial. La incapacidad se evaluo con la escala de Rankin modificada (mRS). La aparicion de demencia se valoro seis meses y cinco años despues de la ECP. Resultados. Setenta y uno de los 183 pacientes sometidos a la ECP del NST concluyeron los cinco años de seguimiento. Diez de ellos quedaron excluidos: dos por fallecimiento (cancer e infarto de miocardio), cinco por perdida de seguimiento y tres por la retirada del sistema de estimulacion. La funcion motora manifesto una mejora del 78% en el postoperatorio y del 66% a los cinco años. En el postoperatorio se aprecio mejoria de los sintomas axiales, pero al cabo de los cinco años habian empeorado de manera significativa (p < 0,001). Las puntuaciones de la mRS tambien mejoraron en el postoperatorio, pero a los cinco años tambien habian disminuido, pese a que la mayoria (88,5%) conservaba la capacidad ambulatoria (mRS < 4). Un paciente (1,6%) manifesto demencia a los seis meses, mientras que otros 19 (31,2%) la manifestaron al cabo de los cinco años. La edad de los pacientes dementes era notablemente mayor (56,5 ± 7,8 frente a 63,7 ± 5,9 años; p < 0,001). Conclusiones. En esta serie de casos, la ECP del NST demostro su eficacia en la mejora de los sintomas motores, aunque habian

  3. Targeting impulsivity in Parkinson's disease using atomoxetine.

    PubMed

    Kehagia, Angie A; Housden, Charlotte R; Regenthal, Ralf; Barker, Roger A; Müller, Ulrich; Rowe, James; Sahakian, Barbara J; Robbins, Trevor W

    2014-07-01

    Noradrenergic dysfunction may play a significant role in cognition in Parkinson's disease due to the early degeneration of the locus coeruleus. Converging evidence from patient and animal studies points to the role of noradrenaline in dopaminergically insensitive aspects of the parkinsonian dysexecutive syndrome, yet the direct effects of noradrenergic enhancement have not to date been addressed. Our aim was to directly investigate these, focusing on impulsivity during response inhibition and decision making. To this end, we administered 40 mg atomoxetine, a selective noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor to 25 patients with Parkinson's disease (12 female /13 male; 64.4 ± 6.9 years old) in a double blind, randomized, placebo controlled design. Patients completed an extensive battery of neuropsychological tests addressing response inhibition, decision-making, attention, planning and verbal short term memory. Atomoxetine improved stopping accuracy on the Stop Signal Task [F(1,19) = 4.51, P = 0.047] and reduced reflection impulsivity [F(1,9) = 7.86, P = 0.02] and risk taking [F(1,9) = 9.2, P = 0.01] in the context of gambling. The drug also conferred effects on performance as a function of its measured blood plasma concentration: it reduced reflection impulsivity during information sampling [adjusted R(2) = 0.23, F(1,16) = 5.83, P = 0.03] and improved problem solving on the One Touch Stockings of Cambridge [adjusted R(2) = 0.29, F(1,17) = 8.34, P = 0.01]. It also enhanced target sensitivity during sustained attention [F(1,9) = 5.33, P = 0.046]. The results of this exploratory study represent the basis of specific predictions in future investigations on the effects of atomoxetine in Parkinson's disease and support the hypothesis that targeting noradrenergic dysfunction may represent a new parallel avenue of therapy in some of the cognitive and behavioural deficits seen in the disorder. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors

  4. Parkinson Disease Detection from Speech Articulation Neuromechanics

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Vilda, Pedro; Mekyska, Jiri; Ferrández, José M.; Palacios-Alonso, Daniel; Gómez-Rodellar, Andrés; Rodellar-Biarge, Victoria; Galaz, Zoltan; Smekal, Zdenek; Eliasova, Ilona; Kostalova, Milena; Rektorova, Irena

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The research described is intended to give a description of articulation dynamics as a correlate of the kinematic behavior of the jaw-tongue biomechanical system, encoded as a probability distribution of an absolute joint velocity. This distribution may be used in detecting and grading speech from patients affected by neurodegenerative illnesses, as Parkinson Disease. Hypothesis: The work hypothesis is that the probability density function of the absolute joint velocity includes information on the stability of phonation when applied to sustained vowels, as well as on fluency if applied to connected speech. Methods: A dataset of sustained vowels recorded from Parkinson Disease patients is contrasted with similar recordings from normative subjects. The probability distribution of the absolute kinematic velocity of the jaw-tongue system is extracted from each utterance. A Random Least Squares Feed-Forward Network (RLSFN) has been used as a binary classifier working on the pathological and normative datasets in a leave-one-out strategy. Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted to estimate the influence of the stochastic nature of the classifier. Two datasets for each gender were tested (males and females) including 26 normative and 53 pathological subjects in the male set, and 25 normative and 38 pathological in the female set. Results: Male and female data subsets were tested in single runs, yielding equal error rates under 0.6% (Accuracy over 99.4%). Due to the stochastic nature of each experiment, Monte Carlo runs were conducted to test the reliability of the methodology. The average detection results after 200 Montecarlo runs of a 200 hyperplane hidden layer RLSFN are given in terms of Sensitivity (males: 0.9946, females: 0.9942), Specificity (males: 0.9944, females: 0.9941) and Accuracy (males: 0.9945, females: 0.9942). The area under the ROC curve is 0.9947 (males) and 0.9945 (females). The equal error rate is 0.0054 (males) and 0.0057 (females

  5. Personality traits and brain dopaminergic function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kaasinen, V; Nurmi, E; Bergman, J; Eskola, O; Solin, O; Sonninen, P; Rinne, J O

    2001-11-06

    A distinctive personality type, characterized by introversion, inflexibility, and low novelty seeking, has been suggested to be associated with Parkinson's disease. To test the hypothesis that Parkinson's disease is associated with a specific dopamine-related personality type, the personality structures of 61 unmedicated Parkinson's disease patients and 45 healthy controls were examined. Additionally, in 47 Parkinson's disease patients, the dopaminergic function in the brain was directly measured with 6-[(18)F]fluoro-l-dopa ((18)F-dopa) positron emission tomography (PET) with MRI coregistration. The novelty-seeking personality score, supposedly associated with the parkinsonian personality, was slightly lower in the Parkinson's disease group compared with controls, but it did not have a significant relationship with (18)F-dopa uptake in any of the brain regions studied (r = -0.12 to 0.11, P > 0.15). The harm-avoidance personality score, associated with anxiety and depression, was clearly increased in patients with Parkinson's disease and it had a paradoxical, highly significant positive correlation with the (18)F-dopa uptake in the right caudate nucleus (r = 0.53, P = 0.04, Bonferroni corrected for 220 comparisons). Although the results of this study are not in disagreement with the concept of low-novelty-seeking personality type in Parkinson's disease, the personality type does not seem to be dopamine dependent. The correlation between the personality trait of harm avoidance and (18)F-dopa may reflect a specific feedback circuitry of neurotransmitters that is associated with negative emotionality in Parkinson's disease.

  6. Excessive daytime sleepiness in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Knie, Bettina; Mitra, M Tanya; Logishetty, Kartik; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2011-03-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is described as inappropriate and undesirable sleepiness during waking hours and is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease, affecting up to 50% of patients. EDS has a large impact on the quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients as well as of their caregivers, in some cases even more than the motor symptoms of the disease. Drug-induced EDS is a particular problem as many dopamine agonists used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease have EDS as an adverse effect. Dopaminergic treatment may also render a subset of Parkinson's disease patients at risk for sudden-onset sleep attacks that occur without warning and can be particularly hazardous if the patient is driving. This demonstrates the need for early recognition and management not only to increase health-related quality of life but also to ensure patient safety. There are many assessment tools for EDS, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), although only the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS) and the SCales for Outcomes in PArkinson's Disease-Sleep (SCOPA-S) are specifically validated for Parkinson's disease. Polysomnography can be used when necessary. Management comprises non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches. Non-pharmacological approaches can be the mainstay of treatment for mild to moderate EDS. Advice on good sleep hygiene is instrumental, as pharmacological approaches have yet to provide consistent and reliable results without significant adverse effects. The efficacy of pharmacological treatment of EDS in Parkinson's disease using wakefulness-promoting drugs such as modafinil remains controversial. Further areas of research are now also focusing on adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists, sodium oxybate and caffeine to promote wakefulness. A definitive treatment for the highly prevalent drug-induced EDS has not yet been found.

  7. Imaging of genetic and degenerative disorders primarily causing Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David J

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter the structural and functional imaging changes associated with both genetic causes of Parkinson's disease and the sporadic condition are reviewed. The role of imaging for supporting diagnosis and detecting subclinical disease is discussed and the potential use and drawbacks of using imaging biomarkers for monitoring disease progression are debated. Additionally, the use of imaging for differentiating atypical parkinsonian syndromes from Parkinson's disease is presented.

  8. Elective Thoracolumbar Spine Fusion Surgery in Patients with Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Puvanesarajah, Varun; Jain, Amit; Qureshi, Rabia; Carstensen, S Evan; Tyger, Rosemarie; Hassanzadeh, Hamid

    2016-12-01

    Few data are available concerning clinical outcomes in patients with Parkinson disease who undergo elective thoracolumbar spine fusion surgery. The goal of this study is to elucidate complication and revision rates after posterior thoracolumbar fusion surgery in patients with Parkinson disease, with a focus on how Parkinson disease modifies these rates. The PearlDiver database (2005-2012) was queried for patients who underwent posterior approach thoracolumbar fusion from 2006 to 2011. Cohorts of patients with a previous diagnosis of Parkinson disease (n = 4816) and without (n = 280,702) were compared. Multivariate analysis that included various comorbidities and demographics was used to calculate effects of Parkinson disease on development of postoperative infection and major medical complications within 90 days and revision surgery within 1 year. For analyses, significance was set at P < 0.001. Major medical complications were observed in 545 patients (11.3%) for 90 days after the index procedure. Postoperative infection was noted in 91 patients (1.9%) within 90 days, and revision surgeries were performed in 250 patients (5.2%) within 1 year. Multivariate analysis showed that Parkinson disease was significantly associated with an increased risk for medical complications (adjusted odds ratio, 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.34; P < 0.001) and revision surgery (adjusted odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-1.93; P < 0.001), but not postoperative infection (P = 0.02). Patients with Parkinson disease are more likely to require revision surgery and have higher rates of adverse medical events postoperatively. Patients with Parkinson disease should be appropriately selected to ensure favorable clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Sleepiness in Idiopathic REM Sleep Behavior Disorder and Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnulf, Isabelle; Neutel, Dulce; Herlin, Bastien; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Cochen de Cock, Valérie; Vidailhet, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether patients with idiopathic and symptomatic RBD were sleepier than controls, and if sleepiness in idiopathic RBD predicted earlier conversion to Parkinson disease. Methods: The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and its determinants were compared at the time of a video-polysomnography for an RBD diagnosis in patients with idiopathic RBD, in patients with Parkinson disease, and in controls. Whether sleepiness at time of RBD diagnosis predicted an earlier conversion to neurodegenerative diseases was retrospectively analyzed in the followed-up patients. Results: The 75 patients with idiopathic RBD were sleepier (ESS: 7.8 ± 4.6) at the time of RBD diagnosis than 74 age- and sex-matched controls (ESS: 5.0 ± 3.6, P < 0.0001). They reached the levels of 114 patients with Parkinson disease (ESS: 8.7 ± 4.8), whether they had (n = 78) or did not have (n = 36) concomitant RBD. The severity of sleepiness in idiopathic RBD correlated with younger age, but not with sleep measures. Among the 69 patients with idiopathic RBD who were followed up for a median 3 years (1–15 years), 16 (23.2%) developed parkinsonism (n = 6), dementia (n = 6), dementia plus parkinsonism (n = 2), and multiple system atrophy (n = 2). An ESS greater than 8 at time of RBD diagnosis predicted a shorter time to phenoconversion to parkinsonism and dementia, from RBD onset, and from RBD diagnosis (when adjusted for age and time between RBD onset and diagnosis). Conclusions: Sleepiness is associated with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder and predicts more rapid conversion to parkinsonism and dementia, suggesting it is an early marker of neuronal loss in brainstem arousal systems. Citation: Arnulf I, Neutel D, Herlin B, Golmard JL, Leu-Semenescu S, Cochen de Cock V, Vidailhet M. Sleepiness in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder and Parkinson disease. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1529–1535. PMID:26085299

  10. Parieto-motor functional connectivity is impaired in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Palomar, Francisco J; Conde, Virginia; Carrillo, Fátima; Fernández-del-Olmo, Miguel; Koch, Giacomo; Mir, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    Bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease is associated with a difficulty in selecting and executing motor actions, likely due to alterations in the functional connectivity of cortico-cortical circuits. Our aims were to analyse the functional interplay between the posterior parietal cortex and the ipsilateral primary motor area in Parkinson's disease using bifocal transcranial magnetic stimulation, to evaluate its modulation by dopaminergic treatment and its relationship to a simple choice reaction task. We studied 12 Parkinson's disease patients with and without dopaminergic treatment and 12 healthy controls. A paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol was applied over the right posterior parietal cortex and the right primary motor area using different conditioning stimulus intensities and interstimulus intervals. Reaction and movement times were studied by a simple choice reaction task. In controls, we observed a significant facilitation of motor evoked potential amplitudes at 4 ms interstimulus interval when conditioning stimulus intensity was set to 90% of resting motor threshold. This functional interaction was not observed in Parkinson's disease patients without dopaminergic treatment and was not restored with treatment. Moreover, correlation analyses revealed that Parkinson's disease patients with less impaired parieto-motor interaction were faster in executing reaching movements in a choice reaction time task, suggesting that the functional parieto-motor impairment described here could be related to bradykinesia observed in Parkinson's disease patients. Parieto-motor functional connectivity is impaired in Parkinson's disease. The reduced efficacy of this connection could be related to presence of bradykinesia previously observed in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Charity seeks consistent level of care for people with Parkinson's.

    PubMed

    Sprinks, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    IN ITS 2015-19 strategy, Parkinson's UK has set out a vision that high-quality services will be available to meet the needs of people with Parkinson's disease (PD) at every point of their journey. The charity envisages greater consistency in standards across the UK, so that wherever PD patients are treated in the country, they will receive the same level of care.

  12. Parkin gene causing benign autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Nisipeanu, P; Inzelberg, R; Abo Mouch, S; Carasso, R L; Blumen, S C; Zhang, J; Matsumine, H; Hattori, N; Mizuno, Y

    2001-06-12

    Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP) is an early-onset parkinsonism caused by exonic deletions or point mutations in the parkingene. The relationship between the type of the genetic defect and the clinical presentation, the response to therapy, and the evolution have not been yet determined. The authors describe a single-basepair deletion at nucleotide 202 in exon 2 of the parkin gene in a kindred with a benign clinical course.

  13. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Sleep and circadian rhythm regulation in early Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Breen, David P; Vuono, Romina; Nawarathna, Upekshani; Fisher, Kate; Shneerson, John M; Reddy, Akhilesh B; Barker, Roger A

    2014-05-01

    Sleep disturbances are recognized as a common nonmotor complaint in Parkinson disease but their etiology is poorly understood. To define the sleep and circadian phenotype of patients with early-stage Parkinson disease. Initial assessment of sleep characteristics in a large population-representative incident Parkinson disease cohort (N=239) at the University of Cambridge, England, followed by further comprehensive case-control sleep assessments in a subgroup of these patients (n=30) and matched controls (n=15). Sleep diagnoses and sleep architecture based on polysomnography studies, actigraphy assessment, and 24-hour analyses of serum cortisol, melatonin, and peripheral clock gene expression (Bmal1, Per2, and Rev-Erbα). Subjective sleep complaints were present in almost half of newly diagnosed patients and correlated significantly with poorer quality of life. Patients with Parkinson disease exhibited increased sleep latency (P = .04), reduced sleep efficiency (P = .008), and reduced rapid eye movement sleep (P = .02). In addition, there was a sustained elevation of serum cortisol levels, reduced circulating melatonin levels, and altered Bmal1 expression in patients with Parkinson disease compared with controls. Sleep dysfunction seen in early Parkinson disease may reflect a more fundamental pathology in the molecular clock underlying circadian rhythms.

  15. The frequency of buccopalpebral reflex in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Eser, Hülya; Ünal, Yasemin; Kutlu, Gülnihal; Öcal, Ruhsen; İnan, Levent Ertuğrul

    2016-11-17

    This study aimed to define the frequency of a primitive reflex, the buccopalpebral reflex (BPR), and its association with the clinical situation in patients with Parkinson disease. Between May 2010 and May 2011, 222 patients, 115 with Parkinson disease and 107 patients without any sign of neurodegenerative disease, were included in the study. All included patients were examined for BPR and snout reflex and were also evaluated with the Mini Mental State Examination. All patients with Parkinson disease were classified with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Hoehn and Yahr Score to determine their clinical severity. Sixteen patients with Parkinson disease (13.9%) had a BPR (+) and 4 patients in the control group (3.7%) (P < 0.001). The UPDRS score, UPDRS daily life activities score, and UPDRS motor system score were all higher in the group with BPR (+). All patients with a BPR also had a positive snout reflex. BPR is more frequent in patients with Parkinson disease than in patients without a neurodegenerative disease.

  16. [Mechanism of anti-aging therapy on Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yu; He, Shuai-Bing; Wang, Hui-Hui; Fu, Xu-Yan; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Rao; Wang, Yun

    2016-07-01

    Many studies have shown that anti-aging treatment has value to prevention and treatment of some diseases. For the treatment of Parkinson' s disease, clinical and experimental researches have proved the potential value of anti-aging treatment, yet the mechanism remains unclear. For this reason, this work used the anti-aging prescriptions of Buyang Huanwu decoction in traditional Chinese medicines example to discover the anti-aging treatment mechanism on Parkinson's disease. The results showed that the mechanism of mitochondrial damage, apoptosis, free radicals and oxidative stress could contribute to the treatment of Parkinson' s disease. Buyang Huanwu decoction is more than as the carrier in this article, the discovered anti-aging treatment mechanism Parkinson's disease is not confined to Buyang Huanwu decoction, could also be used to understand the anti-aging treatment mechanism using other prescription. The main contribution of this paper is to clarify the mechanism of anti-aging treatment of Parkinson's disease, and provide a new strategy for the treatment and prevention of Parkinson's disease. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  17. Frontal deficits differentiate progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Eun C; Williams, David R; Anderson, Jacqueline F I

    2016-03-01

    The clinical differentiation of progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease can be challenging, due to overlapping clinical features and a lack of diagnostic markers. Abnormalities in cognitive function form part of the clinical spectrums of these diseases and distinctive cognitive profiles may be helpful in differentiating these diseases in the diagnostic period. A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery was administered to 12 patients with clinically diagnosed progressive supranuclear palsy and 12 patients with Parkinson's disease matched for age and disease duration. Effect size (Cohen's d) was calculated for cognitive tests that were significantly different between groups. Patients with progressive supranuclear palsy performed significantly worse than those with Parkinson's disease on measures of processing speed, verbal fluency, planning, verbal abstract reasoning, verbal memory, and made more perseverative responses on a set shifting task. Measures of executive function, manual dexterity and processing speed were most diagnostically useful (Cohen's d > 2.0) in differentiating between progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson's disease. These findings suggest that more severe and prominent 'frontal' cognitive deficits in patients with progressive parkinsonism would be helpful in predicting progressive supranuclear palsy rather than Parkinson's disease and these findings may contribute to the development of diagnostic criteria.

  18. Network Analysis Identifies Disease-Specific Pathways for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Monti, Chiara; Colugnat, Ilaria; Lopiano, Leonardo; Chiò, Adriano; Alberio, Tiziana

    2016-12-21

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the progressive loss of specific neurons in selected regions of the central nervous system. The main clinical manifestation (movement disorders, cognitive impairment, and/or psychiatric disturbances) depends on the neuron population being primarily affected. Parkinson's disease is a common movement disorder, whose etiology remains mostly unknown. Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra causes an impairment of the motor control. Some of the pathogenetic mechanisms causing the progressive deterioration of these neurons are not specific for Parkinson's disease but are shared by other neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature of all the quantitative proteomic investigations of neuronal alterations in different models of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to distinguish between general and Parkinson's disease-specific pattern of neurodegeneration. Then, we merged proteomics data with genetics information from the DisGeNET database. The comparison of gene and protein information allowed us to identify 25 proteins involved uniquely in Parkinson's disease and we verified the alteration of one of them, i.e., transaldolase 1 (TALDO1), in the substantia nigra of 5 patients. By using open-source bioinformatics tools, we identified the biological processes specifically affected in Parkinson's disease, i.e., proteolysis, mitochondrion organization, and mitophagy. Eventually, we highlighted four cellular component complexes mostly involved in the pathogenesis: the proteasome complex, the protein phosphatase 2A, the chaperonins CCT complex, and the complex III of the respiratory chain.

  19. Peripheral neuropathy and parkinsonism: a large clinical and pathogenic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sebastien; Vital, Claude

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy (PN) has been reported in idiopathic and hereditary forms of parkinsonism, but the pathogenic mechanisms are unclear and likely heterogeneous. Levodopa-induced vitamin B12 deficiency has been discussed as a causal factor of PN in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, but peripheral nervous system involvement might also be a consequence of the underlying neurodegenerative process. Occurrence of PN with parkinsonism has been associated with a panel of mitochondrial cytopathies, more frequently related to a nuclear gene defect and mainly polymerase gamma (POLG1) gene. Parkin (PARK2) gene mutations are responsible for juvenile parkinsonism, and possible peripheral nervous system involvement has been reported. Rarely, an association of parkinsonism with PN may be encountered in other neurodegenerative diseases such as fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome related to premutation CGG repeat expansion in the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene, Machado-Joseph disease related to an abnormal CAG repeat expansion in ataxin-3 (ATXN3) gene, Kufor-Rakeb syndrome caused by mutations in ATP13A2 gene, or in hereditary systemic disorders such as Gaucher disease due to mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene and Chediak-Higashi syndrome due to LYST gene mutations. This article reviews conditions in which PN may coexist with parkinsonism.

  20. Current development of acupuncture research in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bai-Yun; Salvage, Sarah; Jenner, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is an age-related progressive neurodegenerative disease. The etiology and pathogenetic mechanisms that cause PD are still not fully understood. The available treatments to PD are only symptomatic relief. Acupuncture is used to treat many medical conditions for 1000 years in China and has gained wider and increasing acceptance within both public and medical profession because it has been a very safe and well-tolerated treatment. In this chapter, we reviewed relevant laboratory findings regarding acupuncture mechanism on Parkinson's. We showed that acupuncture stimulation in Parkinson's models had generated valuable mechanistic insight of Parkinson's and showed that acupuncture treatment is in fact a neuroprotective therapy that increase the release of various neuroprotective agents such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and cyclophilin A. In addition, acupuncture therapy slows cell death process and attenuates oxidative stress to dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Further, acupuncture therapy modulates neuronal activity of the basal ganglia output structures. These results suggest that early application of acupuncture therapy to Parkinson's patients may be helpful for the best efficacy of acupuncture treatment. It is hopeful that translation of achievement in acupuncture research in Parkinson's models will maximize the potentials of acupuncture treatment.

  1. Morbidity in early Parkinson's disease and prior to diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Rune; Kjellberg, Jakob; Ibsen, Rikke; Jennum, Poul

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonmotor symptoms are probably present prior to, early on, and following, a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Nonmotor symptoms may hold important information about the progression of Parkinson's disease. Objective To evaluated the total early and prediagnostic morbidities in the 3 years before a hospital contact leading to a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Methods Retrospective morbidity data from Danish National Patient Registry records (1997–2007) of 10,490 adult patients with a secondary care diagnosis of Parkinson's disease were compared with 42,505 control cases. Results Parkinson's disease was associated with significantly higher morbidity rates associated with conditions in the following categories: mental and psychiatric, nervous system, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal system and connective tissue, genitourinary, abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, injury, poisoning and certain other external causes, and other factors influencing health status and contact with health services. It was negatively associated with neoplasm, cardiovascular, and respiratory diseases. Conclusions Patients with a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease present significant differences in morbidities early on, following, and prior to, their diagnosis, compared with healthy controls. PMID:24944873

  2. Neuroprotection in Parkinson's disease: love story or mission impossible?

    PubMed

    Linazasoro, Gurutz J

    2002-05-01

    Parkinson's disease was the first neurodegenerative disease in which a deficient neurotransmitter (dopamine) was successfully replaced by a systemically administered drug (levodopa). However, chronic levodopa therapy is associated with the development of motor and psychiatric complications. Furthermore, the progressive course of the disease is not halted and levodopa-resistant symptoms, such as dementia or postural instability, eventually appear. Most of these problems are related to the progressive nature of Parkinson's disease. Therefore, stopping or slowing the progression of Parkinson's disease is one of the main therapeutic objectives. Since the discovery of1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced parkinsonism in the early 1980s, the possibility of protecting dopaminergic nigral neurons against the action of toxic insults has attracted the attention of the neurological community. Could Parkinson's disease also be the first neurodegenerative condition with a potential neuroprotective treatment? The promise of rational neuroprotective therapy is generating much excitement and some frustration among researchers. In this article, the state of the art of neuroprotection in Parkinson's disease is reviewed.

  3. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Since the original descriptions of hedonistic homeostatic dysregulation syndrome and pathological gambling in Parkinson's disease, impulse control disorders, such as compulsive spending, punding, or binge eating, are increasingly recognized. Although the term hedonistic homeostatic dysregulation syndrome has been supplanted by the concept of the dopamine dysregulation syndrome, the features of severe dyskinesias, cyclical mood disorder with hypomania or manic psychosis, and impairment of social and occupational functioning in the setting of increased intake of antiparkinson therapy remain. At this time, impulse control disorder is defined as maladaptive behaviors that emerge with disease progression and increasing antiparkinson medications. These behaviors may be disruptive, such as punding, or destructive, such as compulsive spending, gambling, binge eating, or hypersexuality. PMID:20948752

  4. Parkinson's Disease and Sleep/Wake Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Swick, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has traditionally been characterized by its cardinal motor symptoms of bradykinesia, rigidity, resting tremor, and postural instability. However, PD is increasingly being recognized as a multidimensional disease associated with myriad nonmotor symptoms including autonomic dysfunction, mood disorders, cognitive impairment, pain, gastrointestinal disturbance, impaired olfaction, psychosis, and sleep disorders. Sleep disturbances, which include sleep fragmentation, daytime somnolence, sleep-disordered breathing, restless legs syndrome (RLS), nightmares, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD), are estimated to occur in 60% to 98% of patients with PD. For years nonmotor symptoms received little attention from clinicians and researchers, but now these symptoms are known to be significant predictors of morbidity in determining quality of life, costs of disease, and rates of institutionalization. A discussion of the clinical aspects, pathophysiology, evaluation techniques, and treatment options for the sleep disorders that are encountered with PD is presented. PMID:23326757

  5. Brain Iron Metabolism Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Wang, Jun; Rogers, Jack; Xie, Junxia

    2017-05-01

    Dysfunction of iron metabolism, which includes its uptake, storage, and release, plays a key role in neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. Understanding how iron accumulates in the substantia nigra (SN) and why it specifically targets dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons is particularly warranted for PD, as this knowledge may provide new therapeutic avenues for a more targeted neurotherapeutic strategy for this disease. In this review, we begin with a brief introduction describing brain iron metabolism and its regulation. We then provide a detailed description of how iron accumulates specifically in the SN and why DAergic neurons are especially vulnerable to iron in PD. Furthermore, we focus on the possible mechanisms involved in iron-induced cell death of DAergic neurons in the SN. Finally, we present evidence in support that iron chelation represents a plausable therapeutic strategy for PD.

  6. Pesticides, microglial NOX2, and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Taetzsch, Thomas; Block, Michelle L

    2013-02-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that pesticide exposure is associated with an increased risk for developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Several pesticides known to damage dopaminergic (DA) neurons, such as paraquat, rotenone, lindane, and dieldrin also demonstrate the ability to activate microglia, the resident innate immune cell in the brain. While each of these environmental toxicants may impact microglia through unique mechanisms, they all appear to converge on a common final pathway of microglial activation: NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) activation. This review will detail the role of microglia in selective DA neurotoxicity, highlight what is currently known about the mechanism of microglial NOX2 activation in these key pesticides, and describe the importance for DA neuron survival and PD etiology.

  7. Pathophysiology of bladder dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Tateno, Fuyuki; Kishi, Masahiko; Tsuyuzaki, Yohei; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency) is a common non-motor disorder in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, bladder dysfunction is sometimes non-responsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine basal ganglia-frontal circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. The pathophysiology of the bladder dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life.

  8. Management of pain in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sophie, Munazza; Ford, Blair

    2012-11-01

    Pain is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD) and accounts for substantial morbidity in up to 80 % of patients. Despite contributing to disease-related discomfort and disability, pain in PD frequently goes underacknowledged and undertreated in clinical practice. Although the exact underlying neurophysiology is unclear, there is increasing understanding of the role of the basal ganglia in somatosensory processing, as well as involvement of additional brainstem structures and non-dopaminergic pathways; appreciation of these mechanisms has implications for treatment strategies. Categorizing painful symptoms based on their clinical description into musculoskeletal, dystonic, radicular-peripheral neuropathic and central pain categories provides a useful framework for management. Importantly, these symptoms should be evaluated in relation to motor symptoms and dopaminergic therapy. A multi-disciplinary approach is recommended as follows: physical therapy, liaison with pain management and consultations to rheumatological, orthopaedic and neurosurgical services should be considered.

  9. Impaired intracellular trafficking defines early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hunn, Benjamin H M; Cragg, Stephanie J; Bolam, J Paul; Spillantini, Maria-Grazia; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an insidious and incurable neurodegenerative disease, and represents a significant cost to individuals, carers, and ageing societies. It is defined at post-mortem by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra together with the presence of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. We examine here the role of α-synuclein and other cellular transport proteins implicated in PD and how their aberrant activity may be compounded by the unique anatomy of the dopaminergic neuron. This review uses multiple lines of evidence from genetic studies, human tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells, and refined animal models to argue that prodromal PD can be defined as a disease of impaired intracellular trafficking. Dysfunction of the dopaminergic synapse heralds trafficking impairment.

  10. Nonpharmacological treatments for patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M; Ebersbach, Georg

    2015-09-15

    Since 2013, a number of studies have enhanced the literature and have guided clinicians on viable treatment interventions outside of pharmacotherapy and surgery. Thirty-three randomized controlled trials and one large observational study on exercise and physiotherapy were published in this period. Four randomized controlled trials focused on dance interventions, eight on treatment of cognition and behavior, two on occupational therapy, and two on speech and language therapy (the latter two specifically addressed dysphagia). Three randomized controlled trials focused on multidisciplinary care models, one study on telemedicine, and four studies on alternative interventions, including music therapy and mindfulness. These studies attest to the marked interest in these therapeutic approaches and the increasing evidence base that places nonpharmacological treatments firmly within the integrated repertoire of treatment options in Parkinson's disease.

  11. Pesticides, Microglial NOX2, and Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Taetzsch, Thomas; Block, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that pesticide exposure is associated with an increased risk for developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Several pesticides known to damage dopaminergic (DA) neurons, such as paraquat, rotenone, lindane, and dieldrin also demonstrate the ability to activate microglia, the resident innate immune cell in the brain. While each of these environmental toxicants may impact microglia through unique mechanisms, they all appear to converge on a common final pathway of microglial activation: NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) activation. This review will detail the role of microglia in selective DA neurotoxicity, highlight what is currently known about the mechanism of microglial NOX2 activation in these key pesticides, and describe the importance for DA neuron survival and PD etiology. PMID:23349115

  12. Visual hallucinations in photographs in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaou, Okeanis; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Friedman, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Visual hallucinations are reported in 16–37% of drug-treated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and are the most common hallucinations in PD. We report two patients with PD with symptoms that uniquely integrate visual hallucinations and delusions. We report two cases of patients with PD with visual hallucinations who saw the persistence of these hallucinations in photographs. These pictures were taken to prove the absence of these hallucinations. We believe this is the first description of this peculiar phenomenon, in which hallucinations or illusions could be replicated in photographs. Both patients had delusions associated with the images and we speculate that the images they saw in the photographs represent a further delusion, hence a ‘delusional hallucination’ or ‘delusional illusion.’ We believe that delusions fostering hallucinations are rare. PMID:23704424

  13. Visual hallucinations in photographs in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vaou, Okeanis; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Friedman, Joseph

    2013-05-22

    Visual hallucinations are reported in 16-37% of drug-treated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and are the most common hallucinations in PD. We report two patients with PD with symptoms that uniquely integrate visual hallucinations and delusions. We report two cases of patients with PD with visual hallucinations who saw the persistence of these hallucinations in photographs. These pictures were taken to prove the absence of these hallucinations. We believe this is the first description of this peculiar phenomenon, in which hallucinations or illusions could be replicated in photographs. Both patients had delusions associated with the images and we speculate that the images they saw in the photographs represent a further delusion, hence a 'delusional hallucination' or 'delusional illusion.' We believe that delusions fostering hallucinations are rare.

  14. FAST TRACK: daytime sleepiness in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rye, D B; Bliwise, D L; Dihenia, B; Gurecki, P

    2000-03-01

    We describe multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) results in 27 adult patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Pathological sleepiness (i.e. mean sleep latency

  15. Biomarkers of cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Hsien; Wu, Ruey-Meei

    2015-05-01

    Cognitive impairment is a frequent and devastating non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Impaired cognition has a major impact on either quality of life or mortality in patients with PD. Notably, the rate of cognitive decline and pattern of early cognitive deficits in PD are highly variable between individuals. Given that the underlying mechanisms of cognitive decline or dementia associated with PD remain unclear, there is currently no mechanism-based treatment available. Identification of biological markers, including neuroimaging, biofluids and common genetic variants, that account for the heterogeneity of PD related cognitive decline could provide important insights into the pathological processes that underlie cognitive impairment in PD. These combined biomarker approaches will enable early diagnosis and provide indicators of cognitive progression in PD patients. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of biomarkers for cognitive impairments in PD.

  16. Advances in Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shyamal H; Adler, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and the numbers are projected to double in the next two decades with the increase in the aging population. An important focus of current research is to develop interventions to slow the progression of the disease. However, prerequisites to it include the development of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis which would identify at-risk groups and disease progression. In this review, we present updated evidence of already known clinical biomarkers (such as hyposmia and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD)) and neuroimaging biomarkers, as well as newer possible markers in the blood, CSF, and other tissues. While several promising candidates and methods to assess these biomarkers are on the horizon, it is becoming increasingly clear that no one candidate will clearly fulfill all the roles as a single biomarker. A multimodal and combinatorial approach to develop a battery of biomarkers will likely be necessary in the future.

  17. Blood-based biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Lama M; Stern, Matthew B; Chen-Plotkin, Alice

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for biomarkers to diagnose Parkinson's disease (PD), assess disease severity, and prognosticate course. Various types of biologic specimens are potential candidates for identifying biomarkers--defined here as surrogate indicators of physiological or pathophysiological states--but blood has the advantage of being minimally invasive to obtain. There are, however, several challenges to identifying biomarkers in blood. Several candidate biomarkers identified in other diseases or in other types of biological fluids are being pursued as blood-based biomarkers in PD. In addition, unbiased discovery is underway using techniques including metabolomics, proteomics, and gene expression profiling. In this review, we summarize these techniques and discuss the challenges and successes of blood-based biomarker discovery in PD. Blood-based biomarkers that are discussed include α-synuclein, DJ-1, uric acid, epidermal growth factor, apolipoprotein-A1, and peripheral inflammatory markers.

  18. Etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Anthony H V

    2009-08-01

    The etiology of Parkinson disease (PD) is multifactorial and is likely to involve different causes in different patients. Several different genes have been identified as causes of familial PD, including alpha-synuclein gene mutations and multiplications, and mutations of parkin, PINK1, DJ1, and LRRK2. The biochemical consequences of these mutations have served to reinforce the relevance of the pathways to pathogenesis previously characterized, for example, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and protein misfolding and aggregation. The recognition that glucocerebrosidase mutations represent a significant risk factor for PD has focused attention on lysosomal function and autophagy as relevant to PD. Several environmental factors have also been shown to influence the risk for PD, although odds ratios remain relatively modest. Specific toxins can cause dopaminergic cell death in man and animals, but they probably have limited relevance to the etiology of PD.

  19. Non-motor features of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Anthony H V; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Jenner, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Many of the motor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD) can be preceded, sometimes for several years, by non-motor symptoms that include hyposmia, sleep disorders, depression and constipation. These non-motor features appear across the spectrum of patients with PD, including individuals with genetic causes of PD. The neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological bases of non-motor abnormalities in PD remain largely undefined. Here, we discuss recent advances that have helped to establish the presence, severity and effect on the quality of life of non-motor symptoms in PD, and the neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological mechanisms involved. We also discuss the potential for the non-motor features to define a prodrome that may enable the early diagnosis of PD.

  20. Olfactory pathogenesis of idiopathic Parkinson disease revisited.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Alicja; Bagic, Anto

    2008-06-15

    Idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) is traditionally considered a movement disorder with hallmark lesions located in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). However, recent histopathological studies of some PD cases suggest the possibility of a multisystem disorder which progresses in a predictable sequence as described in Braak's staging criteria. The disease process starts in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (dmX) and anterior olfactory nucleus and bulb, and from there, spreads through the brainstem nuclei to ultimately reach the SNpc, which then presents as symptomatic PD. In this article, we would like to revisit the olfactory pathogenesis of PD based on Braak's staging system and review anatomical pathways supporting such a possibility. We also suggest some biomarkers for early stages of PD. Additionally, we present and discuss the possibility that a prion-like process underlies the neurodegenerative changes in PD.