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Sample records for part ii reaction

  1. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Part II: Homogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests several mechanisms for catalysis by metal ion complexes. Discusses the principal factors of importance in these catalysis reactions and suggests reactions suitable for laboratory study. (MLH)

  2. Adverse mucocutaneous reactions related to chemotherapeutic agents: part II.

    PubMed

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Brandt, Hebert Roberto Clivati; Moure, Emanuella Rosyane Duarte; Pereira, Guilherme Luiz Stelko; Sanches Júnior, Jose Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Events and reactions involving chemotherapy are common in clinical oncology. Chemotherapeutic agents are widely used in therapy. Side effects range from the common to the rare and may be confused with other mucocutaneous manifestations resulting from the oncological treatment. The objective of this paper was to present data on skin reactions to chemotherapy, particularly those cases in which the dermatologist is requested to issue a report and asked to comment on the safety and viability of readministration of a specific drug. The authors describe aspects associated with these events, presenting a detailed analysis of each one of them.

  3. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the American…

  4. Asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids via homologation of Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff bases. Part 3: Michael addition reactions and miscellaneous transformations.

    PubMed

    Aceña, José Luis; Sorochinsky, Alexander E; Soloshonok, Vadim

    2014-09-01

    The major goal of this review is a critical discussion of the literature data on asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids via Michael addition reactions involving Ni(II)-complexes of amino acids. The material covered is divided into two conceptually different groups dealing with applications of: (a) Ni(II)-complexes of glycine as C-nucleophiles and (b) Ni(II)-complexes of dehydroalanine as Michael acceptors. The first group is significantly larger and consequently subdivided into four chapters based on the source of stereocontrolling element. Thus, a chiral auxiliary can be used as a part of nucleophilic glycine Ni(II) complex, Michael acceptor or both, leading to the conditions of matching vs. mismatching stereochemical preferences. The particular focus of the review is made on the practical aspects of the methodology under discussion and mechanistic considerations.

  5. Wear Mechanisms of Carbon-Based Refractory Materials in SiMn Tap-Holes—Part II: In Situ Observation of Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkamp, J. D.; Pistorius, P. Chris; Tangstad, M.

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the study presented here is to determine to what extent chemical reactions between carbon-based refractory and slag or metal in the tap-hole of a SiMn furnace can contribute to wear of tap-hole refractory. The results of the study are reported in two parts. In Part I, thermodynamic calculations suggested that reaction between silicomanganese slag and carbon-based tap-hole refractory is possible, and experiments with nominally pure materials support this. However, practical refractory materials are by no means pure materials and contain secondary phases and porosity which can be expected to affect reaction with slag. In Part II, such reactions are examined experimentally, in cup and wettability tests, using commercially available carbon block and cold-ramming paste refractory materials and mainly industrial SiMn slag. Clear evidence was found of chemical reaction at approximately 1870 K (approximately 1600 °C), forming SiC and, it appears, metal droplets. Both carbon block and ramming paste refractory reacted with slag, with preferential attack on and penetration into the binder phase rather than aggregate particles. The two types of carbon-based refractory materials showed similar extents of chemical reaction observed as wetting and penetration in the laboratory tests. The differences in refractory life observed practically in industrial furnaces should therefore be attributed to wear mechanisms other than pure chemical wear as studied in this work.

  6. Long-term trend in patch test reactions: a 32-year statistical overview (1970-2002), part II.

    PubMed

    Tudela, Emilie; MacPherson, Cora; Maibach, Howard I

    2008-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis remains an important problem worldwide. The objective of this study was to analyze patch test positivity trends of the North American Contact Dermatitis Group. Publications from 1970 to 2002 were reviewed and re-analyzed. Statistical significance was determined with a Cochran-Armitage trend test. We observed a significant increase in positive reactions with carbamates, balsam of Peru, thimerosal, formaldehyde, imidazolidinyl urea, and methyldibromoglutaronitrile. The rates of positive reactions to Dimethylol dimethyl (DMDM) hydantoin, diazolidinyl urea, and methylchloroisothiazolone/methylisothiazolone remained unchanged. We showed a significant decrease in positive reactions for all other allergens. These data provide challenges in public health--for industry, government, and medicine--to decrease the frequency of allergic contact dermatitis. However, the complexities of evaluating a 32-year analysis are numerous, so the data should be interpreted with caution and within the context of this work.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of a mathematical model of lithium-sulfur cells: Part II: Precipitation reaction kinetics and sulfur content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaznavi, Mahmoudreza; Chen, P.

    2014-07-01

    A sensitivity analysis of a mathematical model of a lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery was performed, focusing on the precipitation rate constants and sulfur content, by investigating the response of the model to the variation of these parameters over a wide mathematical range. The necessity of rapid dissolution of elemental sulfur and rapid precipitation of reduced sulfur is discussed in detail. The sensitivity analysis suggests modifying the reduction reaction steps of sulfur can improve the predictions of the model of Li-S battery. Furthermore, an upper limit on the sulfur content of the cathode exists to ensure optimal performance. Although the model provides valuable knowledge concerning Li-S batteries, a modification to the assumed five-step reduction of sulfur combined with the consideration of the insulating nature of the active material is required to improve the model.

  8. Rockets -- Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    If two rockets are identical except that one engine burns in one-tenth the time of the other (total impulse and initial fuel mass of the two engines being the same), which rocket will rise higher? Why? The answer to this question (part 1 response in v20 n6, p410, Sep 1982) is provided. (Author/JN)

  9. Understanding Math - Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyks, Hollis W.; Austin, Robert J.

    This is the second remedial workbook-text in a two-part series written for deaf students at the secondary level. It covers fractions, geometry formulas, decimals and percents, and time. For the first workbook, see SE 015 827, and for the teacher's guide, see SE 015 829. (DT)

  10. Plasma etching of Hf-based high-k thin films. Part II. Ion-enhanced surface reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Ryan M.; Blom, Hans-Olof; Chang, Jane P.

    2009-03-15

    The mechanism for ion-enhanced chemical etching of hafnium aluminate thin films in Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3} plasmas was investigated in this work, specifically how the film composition, ion energy, and plasma chemistry determine their etch rates. Several compositions of Hf{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}O{sub y} thin films ranging from pure HfO{sub 2} to pure Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were etched in BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2} plasmas and their etch rates were found to scale with {radical}(E{sub ion}) in both Cl{sub 2} and BCl{sub 3} plasmas. In Cl{sub 2} plasmas, a transition point was observed around 50 eV, where the etch rate was significantly enhanced while the linear dependence to {radical}(E{sub ion}) was maintained, corresponding to a change in the removal of fully chlorinated to less chlorinated reaction products. In BCl{sub 3} plasma, deposition dominates at ion energies below 50 eV, while etching occurs above that energy with an etch rate of three to seven times that in Cl{sub 2}. The faster etch rate in BCl{sub 3} was attributed to a change in the dominant ion from Cl{sub 2}{sup +} in Cl{sub 2} plasma to BCl{sub 2}{sup +} in BCl{sub 3}, which facilitated the formation of more volatile etch products and their removal. The surface chlorination (0-3 at. %) was enhanced with increasing ion energy while the amount of boron on the surface increases with decreasing ion energy, highlighting the effect of different plasma chemistries on the etch rates, etch product formation, and surface termination.

  11. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-15

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  12. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: Sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reaction, and volatility issues of a 3-cell stack with LSM-based cells. After 6000 h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO7 showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  13. Part I: RNA hydrolysis catalyzed by imidazole compounds. Part II. Hydrophobic acceleration of reactions and mimics of thiamin-dependent enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Kool, E.T.

    1988-01-01

    Catalysts modeled after the active site groups of the enzyme Ribonuclease A were synthesized and tested for catalysis of the hydrolysis of poly(rU), using a quantitative assay. The most effective of all the catalysts is N,N{prime}-bis-imidazolylmethane, which gave a four-fold rate enhancement as compared to N-methyl-imidazole. The structure/activity relationships are discussed in light of the ribonuclease mechanism. Also examined were reactions catalyzed by the coenzyme thiamine. In an investigation of the effects of restricting conformational freedom, a thiazolium salt was attached in two positions to {beta}-cyclodextrin. Since the catalyst gave about the same rate for tritium exchange from benzaldehyde as singly-attached catalysts, we surmise that any rate enhancement due to the restriction of bond rotations has been lost by forcing the structure into less productive conformations. The benzoin condensation catalyzed by cyanide was also investigated. The reaction was shown to be faster in water than in most organic solvents. Kinetic salt effects and the effects of added {beta}- and {gamma}-cyclodextrin were measured in water; salting-out ions and {gamma}-cyclodextrin increase the rate, while salting-in ions and {beta}-cyclodextrin decrease it. Negative salt effects were observed in formamide, ethylene glycol, and DMSO. All these media effects are discussed in relation to the compact, hydrophobic transition state for the reaction.

  14. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  15. Dynamic in-plane potential gradients for actively controlling electrochemical reactions: Part I. Characterization of 1- and 2-component alkanethiol monolayer gradients on thin gold films. Part II. Applications of in-plane potential gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balss, Karin Maria

    The research contained in this thesis is focused on the formation and characterization of surface composition gradients on thin gold films that are formed by applications of in-plane potential gradients. Injecting milliamp currents into thin Au films yields significant in-plane voltage drops so that, rather than assuming a single value of potential, an in-plane potential gradient is imposed on the film which depends on the resistivity of the film, the cross sectional area and the magnitude of the potential drop. Furthermore, the in-plane electric potential gradient means that, relative to a solution reference couple, electrochemical reactions occurs at defined spatial positions corresponding to the local potential, V(x) ˜ E0. The spatial gradient in electrochemical potential can then produce spatially dependent electrochemistry. Surface-chemical potential gradients can be prepared by arranging the spread of potentials to span an electrochemical wave mediating redox-associated adsorption or desorption. Examples of reactions that can be spatially patterned include the electrosorption of alkanethiols and over-potential metal deposition. The unique advantage of this method for patterning spatial compositions is the control of surface coverage in both space and time. The thesis is organized into two parts. In Part I, formation and characterization of 1- and 2-component alkanethiol monolayer gradients is investigated. Numerous surface science tools are employed to examine the distribution in coverage obtained by application of in-plane potential gradients. Macroscopic characterization was obtained by sessile water drop contact angle measurements and surface plasmon resonance imaging. Gradients were also imaged on micron length scales with pulsed-force mode atomic force microscopy. Direct chemical evidence of surface compositions in aromatic thiol surface coverage was obtained by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. In Part II, the applications of in-plane potential

  16. Regulation of the mammalian carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II by effectors and phosphorylation. Altered affinity for ATP and magnesium ions measured using the ammonia-dependent part reaction.

    PubMed

    Shaw, S M; Carrey, E A

    1992-08-01

    We have measured the 'core' mammalian carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) activity, using NH4Cl as the nitrogen-donating substrate and trapping carbamoyl phosphate as urea through its reaction with ammonium ions. When ATP and magnesium ion concentrations are close to those found in the cell, the substrate saturation curves for ammonia and bicarbonate are hyperbolic, giving Km (NH3) values of 166 microM at high ATP concentrations and 26 microM at low ATP concentrations, while the Km (bicarbonate) is 1.4 mM at both ATP concentrations used. These values for the Km (NH3) are lower than previously reported for CPS II, and closer to the values for the mitochondrial counterpart. The Km for ammonia and bicarbonate are not altered by phosphorylation of the multienzyme polypeptide CAD, which contains the first three enzyme activities of pyrimidine biosynthesis. The CPS II activity is lower with an excess of either ATP or magnesium ions, causing the apparently sigmoid dependence of activity upon ATP concentration to be enhanced at low concentrations of free magnesium ions. The feedback inhibitor, UTP, acts by stabilising a state with a low affinity for magnesium ions and for ATP. In the presence of the activator, 5-phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRibPP), the enzyme has a higher affinity for magnesium ions and thus the ATP dependence of the activity is hyperbolic. Phosphorylation of CAD similarly activates the CPS II enzyme by increasing the affinity for magnesium ions and by pushing the equilibrium away from the low-affinity UTP-stabilised state. Using our improved assay procedure, we observe a very large activation by PRibPP of carbamoylphosphate synthesis at low concentrations of magnesium ions, and we find that unlike UTP, the activator PRibPP is able to act on the phosphorylated enzyme. PMID:1499569

  17. Stars and Nuclei. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Oakes

    1972-01-01

    A brief review of the evidence that nuclear reactions are the main source of stellar energy, how nuclear reactions synthesize the elements, and how nuclear reactions determine the course of stellar evolution. (Author/CP)

  18. Standards in neurosonology. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). PMID:27104002

  19. Standards in neurosonology. Part II.

    PubMed

    Wojczal, Joanna; Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity).

  20. Culturally and linguistically responsive teaching: part II.

    PubMed

    Billings, Diane M

    2015-03-01

    This part II of a two-part article about culturally and linguistically responsive teaching provides suggestions for evaluating learners who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) and are often under-represented in nursing education settings.

  1. Exploring Water Pollution. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1975-01-01

    This is part two of a three part article related to the science activity of exploring environmental problems. Part one dealt with background information for the classroom teacher. Presented here is a suggested lesson plan on water pollution. Objectives, important concepts and instructional procedures are suggested. (EB)

  2. Continuum Thermodynamics - Part II: Applications and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Bettina; Wilmanski, Krzysztof

    The intention by writing Part II of the book on continuum thermodynamics was the deepening of some issues covered in Part I as well as a development of certain skills in dealing with practical problems of oscopic processes. However, the main motivation for this part is the presentation of main facets of thermodynamics which appear when interdisciplinary problems are considered. There are many monographs on the subjects of solid mechanics and thermomechanics, on fluid mechanics and on coupled fields but most of them cover only special problems in great details which are characteristic for the chosen field. It is rather seldom that relations between these fields are discussed. This concerns, for instance, large deformations of the skeleton of porous materials with diffusion (e.g. lungs), couplings of deformable particles with the fluid motion in suspensions, couplings of adsorption processes and chemical reactions in immiscible mixtures with diffusion, various multi-component aspects of the motion, e.g. of avalanches, such as segregation processes, etc...

  3. X-pinch. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S. A. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    Results of experimental studies of the X-pinch since its invention and implementation in 1982 at the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. The review consists of two parts. The first part briefly outlines the history of creation and studies of X-pinches, describes the diagnostic techniques and devices developed during these studies, and presents the main results obtained in studying the physical processes occurring in the X-pinch. The second part is devoted to the results of detailed studies of the spatial, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the X-pinch hot spot—the region where the highest plasma parameters are achieved and which is a source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. Some results of X-pinch simulations are also presented.

  4. Playing It Safe: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penman, Kenneth A.; Niccolai, Frances R.

    1985-01-01

    Explains how to prevent outdoor sports injuries; discusses related litigation and specific cases involving playing field turf, tennis, skiing, and pools; and sets out facility design and maintenance considerations and recommendations. A sidebar provides information about injury insurance available to NCAA schools. Part I of this article appeared…

  5. Local Area Networks: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessy, Raymond E., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses five approaches used by industry/colleges to provide local area network (LAN) capabilities in the analytical laboratory: (1) mixed baseband bus network coupled to a star net; (2) broadband bus network; (3) ring network; (4) star network coupled to broadband net; and (5) simple multiprocessor center. Part I (September issue) focused on…

  6. Occlusal disease revisited: Part II.

    PubMed

    Lytle, J D

    2001-06-01

    In part I of this article, the evolution of bruxism from childhood was discussed. Further, the different types of anterior tooth wear were reviewed. Specifically, the type of wear noted in bruxed-braced or cross-over position was pointed out. Examples were illustrated to allow the practitioner to recognize the type of parafunction in advance of treatment. This article will continue the discussion of cross over with moderate to extreme examples. Suggestions for treatment are discussed depending on the severity of the problem. Restorative failure and the implications for implant dentistry are noted. PMID:11490404

  7. Understanding Radiation Thermometry. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    This document is a two-part course on the theory and practice of radiation thermometry. Radiation thermometry is the technique for determining the temperature of a surface or a volume by measuring the electromagnetic radiation it emits. This course covers the theory and practice of radiative thermometry and emphasizes the modern application of the field using commercially available electronic detectors and optical components. The course covers the historical development of the field, the fundamental physics of radiative surfaces, along with modern measurement methods and equipment.

  8. Laser induced fluorescence studies of iodine oxide chemistry. Part II. The reactions of IO with CH3O2, CF3O2 and O3.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Terry J; Tucceri, María E; Crowley, John N

    2006-11-28

    The technique of pulsed laser photolysis was coupled to laser induced fluorescence detection of iodine oxide (IO) to measure rate coefficients, k for the reactions IO + CH(3)O(2)--> products (R1, 30-318 Torr N(2)), IO + CF(3)O(2)--> products (R2, 70-80 Torr N(2)), and IO + O(3)--> OIO + O(2) (R3a). Values of k(1) = (2 +/- 1) x 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), k(2) = (3.6 +/- 0.8) x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and k(3a) <5 x 10(-16) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) were obtained at T = 298 K. In the course of this work, the product yield of IO from the reaction of CH(3)O(2) with I was determined to be close to zero, whereas CH(3)OOI was formed efficiently at 70 Torr N(2). Similarly, no evidence was found for IO formation in the CF(3)O(2) + I reaction. An estimate of the rate coefficients k(CH(3)O(2) + I) = 2 x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and k(CH(3)OOI + I) = 1.5 x 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was also obtained. The results on k(1)-k(3) are compared to the limited number of previous investigations and the implications for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer are briefly discussed.

  9. Revenue cycle management, Part II.

    PubMed

    Crew, Matt

    2007-01-01

    The proper management of your revenue cycle requires the application of "best practices" and the continual monitoring and measuring of the entire cycle. The correct technology will enable you to gain the insight and efficiencies needed in the ever-changing healthcare economy. The revenue cycle is a process that begins when you negotiate payor contracts, set fees, and schedule appointments and continues until claims are paid in full. Every single step in the cycle carries equal importance. Monitoring all phases and a commitment to continually communicating the results will allow you to achieve unparalleled success. In part I of this article, we explored the importance of contracting, scheduling, and case management as well as coding and clinical documentation. We will now take a closer look at the benefits charge capture, claim submission, payment posting, accounts receivable follow-up, and reporting can mean to your practice.

  10. Sports Concussion Management: part II.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Thomas R; Cox, Conrad B; Bielak, Ken; Casmus, Robert; Laskowitz, Daniel; Nichols, Gregory

    2014-02-01

    Millions of concussions occur every year in the United States. The public interest in concussion has increased after a number of high-profile deaths in high school athletes from sports-related head trauma and in some professional athletes from chronic traumatic encephalopathy. One of the most active areas of research in sports medicine during the last decade has been the evaluation and management of concussion. In this second article of a two-part series, we provide an overview of the latest scientific advances in concussion research. This overview includes an update on the pathobiological changes that occur during concussion and the results of biomechanical studies. In addition, to aid the practicing clinician, we review the literature on proven and currently studied concussion risk factors, including a history of concussion, fatigue, and age. Genetic polymorphisms and biomarkers may provide risk-prediction capability, but at present the research remains inconclusive. Diffusion tensor imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging are promising technologies that reveal more sophisticated data about the impact of concussion on the brain. We review the existing literature on the application of these neuroimaging modalities to sports concussion. An update from the Fourth International Conference on Concussion in Sport, with highlights of new recommendations, and the presentation of the third edition of the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool to evaluate acute concussion, concludes our review.

  11. High efficiency chemical energy conversion system based on a methane catalytic decomposition reaction and two fuel cells. Part II. Exergy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinghua; Tian, Ye; Li, Hongjiao; Jia, Lijun; Xia, Chun; Thompson, Levi T.; Li, Yongdan

    A methane catalytic decomposition reactor-direct carbon fuel cell-internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (MCDR-DCFC-IRSOFC) energy system is highly efficient for converting the chemical energy of methane into electrical energy. A gas turbine cycle is also used to output more power from the thermal energy generated in the IRSOFC. In part I of this work, models of the fuel cells and the system are proposed and validated. In this part, exergy conservation analysis is carried out based on the developed electrochemical and thermodynamic models. The ratio of the exergy destruction of each unit is examined. The results show that the electrical exergy efficiency of 68.24% is achieved with the system. The possibility of further recovery of the waste heat is discussed and the combined power-heat exergy efficiency is over 80%.

  12. Possibilities for recycling cellulases after use in cotton processing: part II: Separation of cellulases from reaction products and released dyestuffs by ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Helena; Bishop, David; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2002-04-01

    The adsorption and activity of a total cellulase (Trichoderma reesei) was measured and compared on undyed and dyed cotton fabrics. Recovery of enzymes from the reaction mixture and by desorption from the cotton substrate was evaluated. About 80% of the initial protein could be recovered. The removal of released products (soluble reducing sugars and dyes) from the treatment liquor and subsequent concentration of cellulase proteins was performed using an ultrafiltration membrane. Strong protein-dye interactions made it impossible to separate efficiently the dyes from the enzyme-containing treatment liquors. The use of surfactants did not enhance cellulase desorption from cotton fabric. Although anionic surfactants have a deactivating effect on cellulases, this effect seems to be reversible, since after ultrafiltration the cellulase activity was similar to that of enzymes desorbed with buffer only. Humicola insolens cellulases were shown to be much more sensitive to anionic surfactant than T. reesei cellulases. The use of cellulases that bind reversibly to cellulose is suggested for achieving more efficient cellulase recycling and for reducing backstaining by dye-cellulase complexes.

  13. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Andrade, Carolina H.; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R2=0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q2ext = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. PMID:25560673

  14. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-04-15

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R{sup 2} = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q{sup 2}{sub ext} = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin

  15. [Personal contextual factors (short version), part II].

    PubMed

    Viol, M; Grotkamp, S; Seger, W

    2007-01-01

    In this journal a group of medical experts recently compiled a proposal for a systemic classification of personal contextual factors into domains, categories and items with respect to the ethical guidelines of the ICF (part I). In a second step the main issues have been transferred into the preliminary draft for a short version which is presented in this paper to give support for practical daily use in health insurance matters (part II). PMID:17347930

  16. Asymmetric synthesis of α-amino acids via homologation of Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff bases. Part 2: aldol, Mannich addition reactions, deracemization and (S) to (R) interconversion of α-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Sorochinsky, Alexander E; Aceña, José Luis; Moriwaki, Hiroki; Sato, Tatsunori; Soloshonok, Vadim

    2013-11-01

    This review provides a comprehensive treatment of literature data dealing with asymmetric synthesis of α-amino-β-hydroxy and α,β-diamino acids via homologation of chiral Ni(II) complexes of glycine Schiff bases using aldol and Mannich-type reactions. These reactions proceed with synthetically useful chemical yields and thermodynamically controlled stereoselectivity and allow direct introduction of two stereogenic centers in a single operation with predictable stereochemical outcome. Furthermore, new application of Ni(II) complexes of α-amino acids Schiff bases for deracemization of racemic α-amino acids and (S) to (R) interconversion providing additional synthetic opportunities for preparation of enantiomerically pure α-amino acids, is also reviewed. Origin of observed diastereo-/enantioselectivity in the aldol, Mannich-type and deracemization reactions, generality and limitations of these methodologies are critically discussed.

  17. Globalization in the pharmaceutical industry, Part II.

    PubMed

    Casadio Tarabusi, C; Vickery, G

    1998-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part report on the pharmaceutical industry. Part II begins with a discussion of foreign direct investment and inter-firm networks, which covers international mergers, acquisitions, and minority participation; market shares of foreign-controlled firms; international collaboration agreements (with a special note on agreements in biotechnology); and licensing agreements. The final section of the report covers governmental policies on health and safety regulation, price regulation, industry and technology, trade, foreign investment, protection of intellectual property, and competition. PMID:9595345

  18. Low temperature rate coefficients for reactions of the butadiynyl radical, C4H, with various hydrocarbons. Part II: reactions with alkenes (ethylene, propene, 1-butene), dienes (allene, 1,3-butadiene) and alkynes (acetylene, propyne and 1-butyne).

    PubMed

    Berteloite, Coralie; Le Picard, Sébastien D; Balucani, Nadia; Canosa, André; Sims, Ian R

    2010-04-21

    The kinetics of the reactions of the linear butadiynyl radical, C4H (CCCCH), with a variety of unsaturated hydrocarbons have been studied over the temperature range of 39-300 K using a CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme, or reaction kinetics in uniform supersonic flow) apparatus combined with the pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique. The rate coefficients for all the reactions studied are found to all be in excess of 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) over the entire temperature range. They can be fitted with the following expressions (valid from 39 K to 300 K, with RMS deviations of the experimental points from the predicted values shown, to which should be added 10% possible systematic error) for reaction of C4H with alkenes: k(C2H4) = (1.95 +/- 0.17) x 10(-10) (T/298 K)(-0.40) exp(9.4 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1); k(C3H6) = (3.25 +/- 0.12) x 10(-10) (T/298 K)(-0.84) exp(-48.9 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1); k(1-C4H8) = (6.30 +/- 0.35) x 10(-10) (T/298 K)(-0.61) exp(-65.0 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1), for reaction of C4H with dienes: k(C3H4) = (3.70 +/- 0.34) x 10(-10) (T/298 K)(-1.18) exp(-91.1 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1); k(1,3-C4H6) = (5.37 +/- 0.30) x 10(-10) (T/298 K)(-1.25) exp(-116.8 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1), and for reaction of C4H with alkynes: k(C2H2) = (1.82 +/- 0.19) x 10(-10) (T/298 K)(-1.06) exp(-65.9 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1); k(C3H4) = (3.20 +/- 0.08) x 10(-10) (T/298 K)(-0.82) exp(-47.5 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1); k(1-C4H6) = (3.48 +/- 0.14) x 10(-10) (T/298 K)(-0.65) exp(-58.4 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). Possible reaction mechanisms and product channels are discussed in detail for each of these reactions. Potential implications of these results for models of low temperature chemical environments, in particular cold interstellar clouds and star-forming regions, are considered.

  19. Catalog of Infrared Observations. Part I: Data. Part II: Appendixes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, D. Y.; Schmitz, M.; Mead, J. M.

    The Catalog of Infrared Observations (CIO) is a compilation of infrared astronomical data obtained from an extensive literature search of astronomical journals and major astronomical catalogs and surveys. The literature searches are complete for years 1965 through 1986. The Catalog is published in two parts, with the observational data (roughly 200,000 observations of 20,000 individual sources) listed in Part I, and supporting appendices in Part II. The expanded Second Edition contains a new feature: complete IRAS 4-band data for all CIO sources detected, listed with the main Catalog observations, as well as in complete detail in the Appendix. The appendices include an atlas of infrared source positions, two bibliographies of infrared literature upon which the search was based, and an atlas of infrared spectral ranges, and IRAS data for the CIO sources. The complete CIO database is available in printed microfiche and magnetic tape formats.

  20. Custom impression trays. Part II: Removal forces.

    PubMed

    Dixon, D L; Breeding, L C; Moseley, J P

    1994-03-01

    When choosing a material for making custom impression trays, it is important to understand the forces to which the tray will be subjected during removal of the completed impression from the oral cavity. Such forces have not been recorded in the dental literature. The purpose of Part II of this three-part series was to record these forces in vitro, using two different tray-removal methods. A polymethyl methacrylate custom tray was used during this study. Results from this investigation indicated that it is easier to remove a completed impression, made with a custom tray, by a single point of anterior force application (224 N) than by force application evenly around the tray (514 N). The recorded force values from this investigation will be used in Part III of this series.

  1. Type II lepra reaction--an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Ray, Avas Chandra; Sen, Sumit; Banerjee, Sabyasachi; Mukhopadhyay, Jotideb

    2012-06-01

    Type II lepra reaction usually present with skin lesions. We report a 23 years old male patient presented with fever for two weeks with no visible skin lesion suggestive of leprosy and with no history of either completion or concurrent anti leprosy drug treatment was eventually turned out to be a case of Hansen's presenting with type II lepra reaction. PMID:23409423

  2. Copper(II)-Catalyzed Nitroaldol (Henry) Reactions: Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Murugavel, Govindarasu; Sadhu, Pradeep; Punniyamurthy, Tharmalingam

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled copper(II) complexes are described as effective catalysts for nitroaldol (Henry) reactions on water. The protocol involves a heterogeneous process and the catalysts can be recovered and recycled without loss of activity. Further, C2-symmetric N,N'-substituted chiral copper(II) salan complexes are found to be more effective catalysts than chiral copper(II) salen complexes for reactions in homogeneous catalysis, with high enantioselectivities. The reactions involve bifunctional catalysis, bearing the properties of a Brønsted base, as well as a Lewis acid, to effect the reaction in the absence of external additives.

  3. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part... effects of future real price increases for each fuel. The delivered price of an alternate fuel used...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part... effects of future real price increases for each fuel. The delivered price of an alternate fuel used...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part... effects of future real price increases for each fuel. The delivered price of an alternate fuel used...

  6. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part... effects of future real price increases for each fuel. The delivered price of an alternate fuel used...

  7. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part... effects of future real price increases for each fuel. The delivered price of an alternate fuel used...

  8. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease. Part II.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nishant; Vassallo, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-07-01

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases have a broad differential diagnosis. A wide variety of pathophysiological processes spanning the spectrum from airway obstruction to lung remodeling can lead to multifocal cyst development in the lung. Although lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis are perhaps more frequently seen in the clinic, disorders such as Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, follicular bronchiolitis, and light-chain deposition disease are increasingly being recognized. Obtaining an accurate diagnosis can be challenging, and management approaches are highly disease dependent. Unique imaging features, genetic tests, serum studies, and clinical features provide invaluable clues that help clinicians distinguish among the various etiologies, but biopsy is often required for definitive diagnosis. In part II of this review, we present an overview of the diffuse cystic lung diseases caused by lymphoproliferative disorders, genetic mutations, or aberrant lung development and provide an approach to aid in their diagnosis and management.

  9. Prediction of periventricular leukomalacia. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Biswanath; Bird, Geoffrey L.; Kuijpers, Marijn; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Wernovsky, Gil; Clancy, Robert R.; Licht, Daniel J.; Gaynor, J. William; Nataraj, Chandrasekhar

    2009-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of Part II is to analyze the dataset of extracted hemodynamic features (Case 3 of Part I) through computational intelligence (CI) techniques for identification of potential prognostic factors for periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) occurrence in neonates with congenital heart disease. Methods The extracted features (Case 3 dataset of Part I) were used as inputs to CI based classifiers, namely, multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and probabilistic neural network (PNN) in combination with genetic algorithms (GA) for selection of the most suitable features predicting the occurrence of PVL. The selected features were next used as inputs to a decision tree (DT) algorithm for generating easily interpretable rules of PVL prediction. Results Prediction performance for two CI based classifiers, MLP and PNN coupled with GA are presented for different number of selected features. The best prediction performances were achieved with 6 and 7 selected features. The prediction success was 100% in training and the best ranges of sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP) and accuracy (AC) in test were 60-73%, 74-84% and 71-74%, respectively. The identified features when used with the DTalgorithm gave best SN, SP and AC in the ranges of 87-90% in training and 80-87%, 74-79% and 79-82% in test. Among the variables selected in CI, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and pCO2 figured prominently similar to Part I. Decision tree based rules for prediction of PVL occurrence were obtained using the CI selected features. Conclusions The proposed approach combines the generalization capability of CI based feature selection approach and generation of easily interpretable classification rules of the decision tree. The combination of CI techniques with DT gave substantially better test prediction performance than using CI and DT separately. PMID:19162456

  10. [Main issues of psychoneuroimmunology: Part II].

    PubMed

    Mausch, K

    2000-01-01

    In psychoneuroimmunology links between psyche and the body are examined in the context of neurotransmitter, hormone and immuno-transmitter interaction. This allows for construction of models which show empirically verifiable links between the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. The earlier concepts of stress by Cannon and Selye focused on the physical and mental strain influence on the action of the nervous and endocrine systems. Ursin, Olff and Schedlowski introduced the concept of stress extended by an immune system reaction, which is an integral part of the alarm phase. A change in the amount of NK cells and their stress-influenced activity is an important defense mechanism of the body. It constitutes a component of the preparation for defense against potential pathogen penetration.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false II Appendix II to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix II to Part 261...

  12. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... citations affecting Table II to part 150, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... - C17) Chlorobenzene Chlorodifluoromethane Chloroform Chlorotoluene Dibromomethane Dibutylphenols...

  13. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... II to part 150, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of... - C17) Chlorobenzene Chlorodifluoromethane Chloroform Chlorotoluene Dibromomethane Dibutylphenols...

  14. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... citations affecting Table II to part 150, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... - C17) Chlorobenzene Chlorodifluoromethane Chloroform Chlorotoluene Dibromomethane Dibutylphenols...

  15. A New Road to Reactions: Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vos, Wobbe; Verdonk, Adri H.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a precipitation experiment which follows a yellow powder experiment discussed in part 1 (vol 62 no 3 p238-40). Advantages of using a Petri dish to perform the experiment, laboratory procedures used, instructional strategies, and implications for chemistry curriculum and instruction are discussed. (JN)

  16. Kinetics of rouleau formation. II. Reversible reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Samsel, R W; Perelson, A S

    1984-01-01

    Red blood cells aggregate face-to-face to form long, cylindrical, straight chains and sometimes branched structures called rouleaux. Here we extend a kinetic model developed by R. W. Samsel and A. S. Perelson (1982, Biophys. J. 37:493-514) to include both the formation and dissociation of rouleaux. We examine thermodynamic constraints on the rate constants of the model imposed by the principle of detailed balance. Incorporation of reverse reactions allows us to compute mean sizes of rouleaux and straight chain segments within rouleaux, as functions of time and at equilibrium. Using the Flory - Stockmayer method from polymer chemistry, we obtain a closed-form solution for the size distribution of straight chain segments within rouleaux at any point in the evolution of the reaction. The predictions of our theory compare favorably with data collected by D. Kernick , A.W.L. Jay , S. Rowlands , and L. Skibo (1973, Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 51:690-699) on the kinetics of rouleau formation. When rouleaux grow large, they may contain rings or loops and take on the appearance of a network. We demonstrate the importance of including the kinetics of ring closure in the development of realistic models of rouleaux formation. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 13 PMID:6426540

  17. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  1. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed.

  2. Resource Paper: Organosilicon Chemistry: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Robert; Barton, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews stereochemistry and reaction mechanisms of organosilicon compounds, their reactive intermediates, examples of bioactive organosilanes and those used in organic synthesis. Sources of commercial organosilicon compounds are listed. (CS)

  3. Talking about the Weather, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Allan A.

    1984-01-01

    This second part of a two-part article highlights some mathematics involved in the study of meteorology. Examples are given of the application of mathematics to the study of the atmosphere, with three problems discussed. (MNS)

  4. Reclaiming Kindergarten: Part II--Questions about Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullo, Dominic F.; Hughes, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Part II of "Reclaiming Kindergarten" continues the discussion related to responding to the crisis in today's kindergarten. In Part II, two policy questions are posed, the answers to which seek to respond to this continuing crisis. The questions center on issues related to engaging families in kindergarten and the need to consider a new early…

  5. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  6. Water Pollution: Part I, Municipal Wastewaters; Part II, Industrial Wastewaters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, K. E. M.

    This publication is an annotated bibliography of municipal and industrial wastewater literature. This publication consists of two parts plus appendices. Part one is entitled Municipal Wastewaters and includes publications in such areas as health effects of polluted waters, federal policy and legislation, biology and chemistry of polluted water,…

  7. Phenomenology of electromagnetic coupling. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.J.; Ludwigsen, A.P.; Kunz, K.S.

    1985-08-01

    This report is the second of a planned series which summarize efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory relating to phenomenology studies of back door coupling from several MHz to 10's of GHz. These studies are pertinent to high altitude EMP (HEMP), enhanced HEMP and microwave coupling. Part I dealt with coupling through apertures into large free-standing cavities having, at most, one interior cable. An overview of the effort is given, and a summary of the effects observed in Part I. The main effort since Part I has been devoted to Facilities Development, development of an interior coupling decomposition model and coupling experiments. Projected future effort is discussed.

  8. Biochemical Engineering. Part II: Process Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes types of industrial techniques involving biochemical products, specifying the advantages and disadvantages of batch and continuous processes, and contrasting biochemical and chemical engineering. See SE 506 318 for Part I. (AL)

  9. Fire prevention on airplanes. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatier, J

    1929-01-01

    This part of the report presents a detailed examination of spark prevention, fire extinguishers, and fuel tank location and design. A continued program of investigations and research is also proposed.

  10. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries.

  11. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries. PMID:10645833

  12. International Perspectives in Leadership Development: Part II.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    In the second part of this two-part series, leadership development perspectives are shared from the opening of the Penn Wharton China Center in Beijing. The symposium brought national leaders from Chinese academic settings and professional organizations together with thought leaders from the United States to discuss nursing leadership across the care continuum. Highlights of demographic shifts, clinical demands, and policy decisions are presented, with an eye toward future trends in professional development.

  13. Getting in Taped, Part I and Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cundy, H. M.; Higgins, J.

    1971-01-01

    This article is in two parts: discussion of mathematical concepts involved in converting the reading from the tape-recorder counter which counts the turns of the run-off spool to that from the counter which counts turns of the take-up spool; calculating the length of tape run off when given the reading from the tape-recorder counter of the run-off…

  14. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... affecting Table II to part 150, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... potential compatibility problems, this commodity is not assigned to a specific group in Figure 1 to 46 CFR part 150 (Compatibility Chart). 2 See Appendix I to 46 CFR part 150 (Exceptions to the Chart)....

  15. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... affecting Table II to part 150, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... potential compatibility problems, this commodity is not assigned to a specific group in Figure 1 to 46 CFR part 150 (Compatibility Chart). 2 See Appendix I to 46 CFR part 150 (Exceptions to the Chart)....

  16. The Metis Nation--Part Two II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorian, John

    1978-01-01

    This article deals with historical events involving the Metis people from the time Manitoba entered the Confederation to the conclusion of the 1885 battle at Fish Creek near Batoche, Saskatchewan. Part I is in the Summer, 1978 issue of the Northian. (Author/RTS)

  17. Inquiry and Living History, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coatney, Sharon; Smalley, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    In the first part of this article, the authors introduced the living history program. This yearly, weeklong program features living portrayals of famous people, which becomes a catalyst for teaching curricular standards, as well as providing the spark for inquiry. Successful implementation of this program requires providing teachers with…

  18. Faculty Handbook. Part II. Improving Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture Graduate School, Washington, DC.

    Part of a faculty handbook by the Graduate School of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, this section reviews and discusses research on adult characteristics and adult learning, (including effects of group structure), the setting of course objectives, conditions required for an effective learning experience, teaching methods, and techniques for…

  19. A Fundamental Breakdown. Part II: Manipulative Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, J. Scott; Mohr, Derek J.

    2005-01-01

    In the May, 2005, issue of "TEPE," the "Research to Practice" section initiated a two-part series focused on assessing fundamental locomotor and manipulative skills. The series was generated in response to research by Pappa, Evanggelinou, & Karabourniotis (2005), recommending that curricular programming in physical education at the elementary…

  20. Sexual Harassment, Parts I, II, and III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Joel M., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Three separate newsletter issues examine the issue of sexual harassment on college campuses. Part I contains a general introduction to the topic and two articles. The first of these discusses the definition of sexual harassment by the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the courts, the EEOC guidelines on conduct of a…

  1. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  2. Wound healing: part II. Clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Janis, Jeffrey; Harrison, Bridget

    2014-03-01

    Treatment of all wounds requires adequate wound bed preparation, beginning with irrigation and débridement. Complicated or chronic wounds may also require treatment adjuncts or specialized wound healing products. An extensive body of research and development has introduced novel wound healing therapies and scar management options. In this second of a two-part continuing medical education series on wound healing, the reader is offered an update on current wound healing technologies and recommendations for obtaining optimal outcomes.

  3. Treatment of superficial mycoses: review - part II*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes-Filho, Fred; Quaresma-Santos, Maria Victória Pinto; Amorim, Adriana Gutstein da Fonseca; Schechtman, Regina Casz; Azulay, David Rubem

    2013-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections of the hair, skin and nails are a major cause of morbidity in the world. Choosing the right treatment is not always simple because of the possibility of drug interactions and side effects. The first part of the article discusses the main treatments for superficial mycoses - keratophytoses, dermatophytosis, candidiasis, with a practical approach to the most commonly-used topical and systemic drugs , referring also to their dosage and duration of use. Promising new, antifungal therapeutic alternatives are also highlighted, as well as available options on the Brazilian and world markets. PMID:24474103

  4. Magnet hospitals: Part II. Institutions of excellence.

    PubMed

    Kramer, M; Schmalenberg, C

    1988-02-01

    The oft repeated charge today is to "focus on those who are succeeding!" That's what this report does. Using the eight characteristics identified by Peters and Waterman in their book In Search of Excellence, the study analyzes 16 magnet hospitals to ascertain to what extent they possess characteristics similar to the 'best run' companies in the corporate community. The authors suggest that these magnet hospitals may be dealing effectively with the nursing shortage by creating organizational conditions conducive to eliminating internal nurse shortage. Part I of this article appeared the January 1988 issue of JONA.

  5. Reaction of Molecular Hydrogen with Tetraaminecopper(II) Sulfate Monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Seiichi; Kori, Toshinari; Kida, Sigeo

    1994-02-01

    The reaction of tetraammincopper(II) sulfate monohydrate in a solid state with H 2 (10 MPa) was studied. The Cu(II) ion in the complex was reduced to Cu(0). The final product was a mixture of (NH 4) 2SO 4 and colloidal black Cu(0) which showed a remarkable reactivity as follows. In thermogravimetric analysis up to 440°C under nitrogen atmosphere, the above product reacted between the components very much differently from a control sample with the same composition. The six intermediate samples, taken at successive reaction times, were examined by powder diffraction method. As one of the intermediates, the copper double salt, (NH 4) 2Cu(SO 4) 2, was identified.

  6. Has the tsunami arrived? Part II.

    PubMed

    Halverson, Dean; Glowac, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare is an industry in the midst of significant change. After years of double-digit cost increases, the system has reached a tipping point. Where once only employers were heard crying out for change, the call is now coming from all levels of American society. The voice that is most important to effect change is the newest--that of the consumer. In part two of our overview of the healthcare tsunami, we hope to offer you some insights and practical ideas on how to improve the return on investment of your marketing. We believe those who work to understand the new market forces and react with insight will not just survive during the tsunami, they will thrive. PMID:19663358

  7. Biosimilars in Dermatology: Current Situation (Part II).

    PubMed

    Puig, L; Carretero, G; Daudén, E; Ferrándiz, C; Marrón, S E; Martorell, A; Pérez-Suárez, B; Rodriguez-Cerdeira, C; Ruiz-Villaverde, R; Sánchez-Carazo, J L; Velasco, M

    2015-09-01

    The first biosimilar version of a biologic agent used to treat psoriasis (infliximab) entered the Spanish market on February 16 of this year, and more biosimilars can be expected to follow in the coming months and years. Logically, this new situation will have economic repercussions and alter prescribing patterns among dermatologists. In this second part of the review, we will look at several somewhat contentious issues, such as the extrapolation of indications, interchangeability, and automatic substitution. We will also review the biosimilars with indications for psoriasis currently in the clinical development pipeline and assess their potential to offer comparable efficacy and safety to the reference product while contributing to the sustainability of the public health care system.

  8. Submodeling Simulations in Fusion Welds: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifaz, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    In part I, three-dimensional transient non-linear sub modeling heat transfer simulations were performed to study the thermal histories and thermal cycles that occur during the welding process at the macro, meso and micro scales. In the present work, the corresponding non-uniform temperature changes were imposed as load conditions on structural calculations to study the evolution of localized plastic strains and residual stresses at these sub-level scales. To reach the goal, a three-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic model (ABAQUS code) was developed. The sub-modeling technique proposed to be used in coupling phase-field (and/or digital microstructures) codes with finite element codes, was used to mesh a local part of the model with a refined mesh based on interpolation of the solution from an initial, relatively coarse, macro global model. The meso-sub-model is the global model for the subsequent micro sub-model. The strategy used to calculate temperatures, strains and residual stresses at the macro, meso and micro scale level, is very flexible to be used to any number of levels. The objective of this research was to initiate the development of microstructural models to identify fusion welding process parameters for preserving the single crystal nature of gas turbine blades during repair procedures. The multi-scale submodeling approach can be used to capture weld pool features at the macro-meso scale level, and micro residual stress and secondary dendrite arm spacing features at the micro scale level.

  9. A Physicist for All Seasons: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Frank

    2013-06-01

    The second part of this interview covers Frank Oppenheimer's move to the University of California at Berkeley and wartime work at the Westinghouse Research Laboratories in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, at the electromagnetic-separation plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and at Los Alamos, New Mexico (1941-1945); his postwar research at Berkeley (1945-1947); his appointment at the University of Minnesota in 1947 and firing two years later after being required to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee; his decade as a rancher in Colorado (1949-1959) and high-school science teacher toward the end of this period; his research at the University of Colorado in Boulder after 1959; his year as a Guggenheim Fellow at University College London in 1965; and his founding of the Exploratorium in San Francisco. California, in 1969. He also discusses his wartime relations with his older brother Robert and postwar events in Robert's life, including his Hearings before the Personnel Security Board of the Atomic Energy Commission in 1954.

  10. DICOM: key concepts--part II.

    PubMed

    Kabachinski, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    The objective of these two installments of IT World was to give a general overview of DICOM and to take a look at different parts of the standard to get a sense of its main themes. We found that the standard provides a common reference for all developers but does not impose a single type of implementation. This allows for innovation. The standard is also built for flexibility, able to adapt to new modalities that have a need to communicate. The speedy acceptance of DICOM by the medical imaging industry is opening new possibilities for healthcare organizations to increase the quality while decreasing the cost of patient care. All of the DICOM networked supporting medical equipment as well as the organization's computer systems made by multiple original equipment manufacturers and located at one site or many sites can communicate by means of DICOM. This gives us the opportunity for medical images to be captured and communicated quicker. The result enables physicians to make diagnoses and treatment decisions sooner. It's all good stuff and even more reason why we should endeavor to understand the basics of DICOM. DICOM is here to stay!

  11. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part II.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics - pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy - started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning - as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder - 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  12. Calculus of Elementary Functions, Part II. Student Text. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herriot, Sarah T.; And Others

    This course is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, including algebra, axiomatic geometry, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. This text, Part II, contains material designed to follow Part I. Chapters included in this text are: (6) Derivatives of Exponential and Related Functions; (7) Area and…

  13. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  14. Correctional Training. Institution Familiarization. Part II: The Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Prisons (Dept. of Justice), Washington, DC.

    Designed to assist training coordinators in the initial institution familiarization training for new employees in correctional institutions, this manual consists of two documents: a training coordinator's guide (Part I - CE 017 285) and this document, the training program (Part II). Four training areas are treated: (1) an introduction consisting…

  15. Minimizing Glovebox Glove Breaches: PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Andrade, R.M.; Taylor, D. J.; Stimmel, J. J.; Zaelke, R. L.; Balkey, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    As a matter of good business practices, a team of glovebox experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been assembled to proactively investigate processes and procedures that minimize unplanned breaches in the glovebox, e.g., glove failures. A major part of this effort involves the review of glovebox glove failures that have occurred at the Plutonium Facility and at the Chemical and Metallurgy Research Facility. Information dating back to 1993 has been compiled from formal records. This data has been combined with information obtained from a baseline inventory of about 9,000 glovebox gloves. The key attributes tracked include those related to location, the glovebox glove, type and location of breaches, the worker, and the consequences resulting from breaches. This glovebox glove failure analysis yielded results in the areas of the ease of collecting this type of data, the causes of most glove failures that have occurred, the effectiveness of current controls, and recommendations to improve hazard control systems. As expected, a significant number of breaches involve high-risk operations such as grinding, hammering, using sharps (especially screwdrivers), and assembling equipment. Surprisingly, tasks such as the movement of equipment and material between gloveboxes and the opening of cans are also major contributions of breaches. Almost half the gloves fail within a year of their install date. The greatest consequence for over 90% of glovebox glove failures is alpha contamination of protective clothing. Personnel self-monitoring at the gloveboxes continues to be the most effective way of detecting glovebox glove failures. Glove failures from these tasks can be reduced through changes in procedures and the design of remote-handling apparatus. The Nuclear Materials Technology Division management uses this information to improve hazard control systems to reduce the number of unplanned breaches in the glovebox further. As a result, excursions of contaminants

  16. Caring communications: how technology enhances interpersonal relations, Part II.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Roy L

    2008-01-01

    Part I of this 2-part series about technology's role in interpersonal communications examined how humans interact; proposed a caring theory of communication, collaboration, and conflict resolution; and delineated ways that technology--in general--supports this carative model of interpersonal relations. Part II will examine the barriers to adoption of carative technologies, describe the core capabilities required to overcome them, and discuss specific technologies that can support carative interpersonal relationships. PMID:18360212

  17. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II... STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A-II Appendix A-II to Part 541—Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543...

  18. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey, 1991-92. Part I: Benefits Excluding Pensions [and] Part II: Pensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Senior Administrative Officers--Universities of Ontario, Toronto.

    This report, which combined Part I and Part II of a benefit study, presents data from a survey of Ontario universities concerning fringe benefits offered in 1991-92. Part I is made up of a series of tables displaying the information on particular benefits institution-by-institution. The first five tables cover general aspects of benefits,…

  19. 30 CFR Appendix II to Subpart D of... - Appendix II to Subpart D of Part 18

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved Machines, and Permits To Use Experimental Equipment Pt. 18, Subpt. D, App. II Appendix II to Subpart D of Part 18 LIST OF FIGURES Figure No. Title 1 Typical layout drawing of a machine. 2 Sample bill...

  20. AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

  1. AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-17

    Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

  2. Photoinhibition of Chloroplast Reactions. II. Multiple Effects 1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L. W.; Kok, B.

    1966-01-01

    Ultraviolet light inhibits the photoreduction of 2,6-dichlorophenolindo-phenol or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate with water as the electron donor (evolution of oxygen) but not the photoreduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate with ascorbate as the electron donor. It inhibits photophosphorylation associated with either system. Experiments undertaken to test whether plastoquinone is the site of UV inhibition yielded inconclusive results. Visible light (> 420 mμ) causes the loss of all chloroplast activities, photosystem I being more sensitive than system II. The data suggests 2 modes of action for visible light. The one sensitized by system II results in damage resembling that of UV light. The other, sensitized by system I, results in the destruction of the reaction center of this system. PMID:16656346

  3. Al-TiC Composites Fabricated by a Thermally Activated Reaction Process in an Al Melt Using Al-Ti-C-CuO Powder Mixtures: Part II. Microstructure Control and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Hee; Lee, Jung-Moo; Kim, Su-Hyeon

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the processing parameters is important to minimize such undesirable microstructural features in Al/TiC composites as unreacted C, incomplete reaction products of Al3Ti and TiC aggregates, which originate from the pellet microstructure upon the combustion reaction of an Al-Ti-C-CuO pellet in an Al melt. In particular, the mean particle size of elemental powders is a key factor linked to the formation of TiC aggregates, which is significantly suppressed with smaller initial particles of Ti and C by mixing them homogenously by ball milling. Al-Cu-Mg alloys reinforced with up to 12 vol pct TiC are fabricated by the developed process, followed by extrusion. The composites after heat treatment exhibit high elastic modulus and an ultimate tensile strength of 93 GPa and 461 MPa, respectively, with a low coefficient of thermal expansion of 17.11 ppm/K.

  4. Type II reaction without erythema nodosum leprosum masquerading as lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Rahul; Dogra, Sunil; Kaur, Inderjeet; Yadav, Savita; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Budania, Anil

    2012-12-01

    Lepromatous leprosy is a multisystem disease that can involve many organ systems, with lymph nodes a common extra-cutaneous site to be affected. Rarely, multibacillary leprosy can be confused with other diseases like lymphomas and connective tissue diseases. Herein we report a patient of lepromatous leprosy with Type II lepra reaction involving lymph nodes who presented with generalised lymphadenopathy, acquired ichthyosis and constitutional symptoms but no cutaneous lesions to suggest erythema nodosum leprosum, and who was initially misdiagnosed as a case of Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:23614256

  5. Systems biology and the origins of life? part II. Are biochemical networks possible ancestors of living systems? networks of catalysed chemical reactions: non-equilibrium, self-organization and evolution.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The present article discusses the possibility that catalysed chemical networks can evolve. Even simple enzyme-catalysed chemical reactions can display this property. The example studied is that of a two-substrate proteinoid, or enzyme, reaction displaying random binding of its substrates A and B. The fundamental property of such a system is to display either emergence or integration depending on the respective values of the probabilities that the enzyme has bound one of its substrate regardless it has bound the other substrate, or, specifically, after it has bound the other substrate. There is emergence of information if p(A)>p(AB) and p(B)>p(BA). Conversely, if p(A)reaction, thus leading to the enhancement of catalysis. Hence a drift from quasi-equilibrium is, to a large extent, responsible for the production of information and enhancement of catalysis. Non-equilibrium of these simple systems must be an important aspect that leads to both self-organization and evolutionary processes. These conclusions can be extended to networks of catalysed chemical reactions. Such networks are, in fact, networks of networks, viz. meta-networks. In this formal representation, nodes are chemical reactions catalysed by poorly specific proteinoids, and links can be identified to the transport of metabolites from proteinoid to proteinoid. The concepts of integration and emergence can be applied to such situations and can be used to define the identity of these networks and therefore their evolution. Defined as open non-equilibrium structures, such biochemical networks possess two remarkable properties: (1) the probability of occurrence of their nodes is dependant upon the input and output of matter

  6. FORMATE—PYRUVATE EXCHANGE REACTION IN STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS II.

    PubMed Central

    Oster, M. O.; Wood, N. P.

    1964-01-01

    Oster, M. O. (A. & M. College of Texas, College Station), and N. P. Wood. Formate-pyruvate exchange reaction in Streptococcus faecalis. II. Reaction conditions for cell extracts. J. Bacteriol. 87:104–113. 1964.—In contrast to intact cells of Streptococcus faecalis, no stimulation of the formate-pyruvate exchange reaction was observed in cell extracts when yeast extract was added to the reaction mixture. A heated extract of Micrococcus lactilyticus, vitamin K5, ferrous sulfate, and ferrous ammonium sulfate stimulated an active exchange by protecting the system from oxygen. Tetrahydrofolate, 2,3-dimercaptopropanol, and sodium sulfide provided partial protection, whereas ascorbate, glutathione, sodium hydrosulfite, ammonium sulfide, and sodium bisulfite gave insufficient protection or were inhibitory. Oxidation-reduction (O-R) indicators were not inhibitory and were used to estimate the O-R potentials of reaction mixtures. A potential at least as negative as −125 mv was estimated to be necessary to preserve or initiate formate-pyruvate exchange activity. The reaction operated over a narrow pH range when strict anaerobic conditions were not maintained but, when the system was suitably poised, the pH range was broader. The influence of high phosphate concentrations was less under strictly anaerobic conditions, and orthophosphate could be replaced by small amounts of pyrophosphate. Effect of temperature, time, and amount of extract is presented. Addition of reduced benzyl viologen and hydrogen-saturated palladium in the buffer during 8 hr of dialysis prevented inactivation of extracts. Recovery of activity could be obtained after ammonium sulfate treatment when a combination of palladium chloride, neutral red, and hydrogen bubbling were used. PMID:14102842

  7. Recent Economic Perspectives on Political Economy, Part II.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Torun; Shepsle, Kenneth A

    2008-07-01

    In recent years some of the best theoretical work on the political economy of political institutions and processes has begun surfacing outside the political science mainstream in high quality economics journals. This two-part paper surveys these contributions from a recent five-year period. In Part I, the focus is on elections, voting and information aggregation, followed by treatments of parties, candidates, and coalitions. In Part II, papers on economic performance and redistribution, constitutional design, and incentives, institutions, and the quality of political elites are discussed. Part II concludes with a discussion of the methodological bases common to economics and political science, the way economists have used political science research, and some new themes and arbitrage opportunities.

  8. Recent Economic Perspectives on Political Economy, Part II*

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Torun; Shepsle, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years some of the best theoretical work on the political economy of political institutions and processes has begun surfacing outside the political science mainstream in high quality economics journals. This two-part paper surveys these contributions from a recent five-year period. In Part I, the focus is on elections, voting and information aggregation, followed by treatments of parties, candidates, and coalitions. In Part II, papers on economic performance and redistribution, constitutional design, and incentives, institutions, and the quality of political elites are discussed. Part II concludes with a discussion of the methodological bases common to economics and political science, the way economists have used political science research, and some new themes and arbitrage opportunities. PMID:23606754

  9. Sanctioned social violence: a psychoanalytic view. Part II.

    PubMed

    Kernberg, Otto F

    2003-08-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two papers. In Part I, the first paper, the author reviewed the influence on the development of socially sanctioned violence of psychodynamics of group psychology and mass psychology, the regressive pull of ideologies, personality features of social and political leadership, and historical trauma and social crises. In this Part II, the author explores, from a psychoanalytic perspective, the dehumanization processes related to fundamentalist ideologies and terrorism.

  10. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN TEACHER CHARACTERISTICS AND STUDENT BEHAVIOR. PART II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WALLEN, NORMAN E.

    A CONTINUATION OF A PREVIOUS STUDY--"RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN TEACHER CHARACTERISTICS AND STUDENT BEHAVIOR--PART I"--IS PRESENTED. A FURTHER ANALYSIS OF THE TEACHER MATRIX REVEALED THAT THOSE TEACHERS VIEWED TO BE NEAR THE WARM, PERMISSIVE END OF THE SCALE WERE NOT FOUND TO BE LESS WELL LIKED BY THE CHILDREN. THEY MADE LESS ACHIEVEMENT GAIN IN…

  11. Guide to the Archives of International Organizations. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walne, Peter, Comp.

    This compilation forms Part II of the guide according to the plan conceived by a working party of the Section of Archivists of International Organisations of the International Council on Archives in 1974-1975. The directory provides access to national and other archive and manuscript repositories that maintain the archives of international…

  12. Solid state chemistry of nitrogen oxides--part II: surface consumption of NO2.

    PubMed

    Ioppolo, S; Fedoseev, G; Minissale, M; Congiu, E; Dulieu, F; Linnartz, H

    2014-05-14

    Nitrogen oxides are considered to be important astrochemical precursors of complex species and prebiotics. However, apart from the hydrogenation of solid NO that leads to the surface formation of hydroxylamine, little is known about the full solid state reaction network involving both nitrogen and oxygen. Our study is divided into two papers, hereby called Part I and Part II. In the accompanying paper, we investigate the surface reactions NO + O/O2/O3 and NO + N with a focus on the formation of NO2 ice. Here, we complement this study by measurements of the surface destruction of solid NO2, e.g., NO2 + H/O/N. Experiments are performed in two separate ultra-high vacuum setups and therefore under different experimental conditions to better constrain the experimental results. Surface reaction products are monitored by means of Fourier Transform Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-RAIRS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) techniques using mass spectrometry. The surface destruction of solid NO2 leads to the formation of a series of nitrogen oxides such as NO, N2O, N2O3, and N2O4 as well as HNO, NH2OH, and H2O. When NO2 is mixed with an interstellar more relevant apolar (i.e., CO) ice, solid CO2 and HCOOH are also formed due to interactions between different reaction routes. The astrophysical implications of the full nitrogen and oxygen reaction network derived from Parts I and II are discussed.

  13. 77 FR 60743 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040..., Part II and III (Form 1040), Profit or Loss From Farming. DATES: Written comments should be received on... Number: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040). Abstract: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)...

  14. Primary charge separation in isolated photosystem II reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.; Toon, S. ); Govindjee ); O'Neil, M.P.; Wasielewski, M.R. )

    1992-08-24

    Primary charge-separation in isolated bacterial reaction center (RC) complex occurs in 2.8 ps at room temperature and 0.7--1.2 ps at 10 K. Because of similarities between the bacterial and photosystem II (PSII) RCs, it has been of considerable interest to obtain analogous charge-separation rates in the higher plant system. Our previous femtosecond transient absorption studies used PSII RC material stabilized with PEG or by exchanging dodecyl maltoside (DM) for Triton in the isolation procedure. These materials gave charge-separation 1/e times of 3.0 [plus minus] 0.6 ps at 4[degree]C and 1.4[plus minus] 0.2 ps at 15 K based on the risetime of transient absorption kinetics at 820 nm. These values were thought to represent the time required for formation of the P680[sup +]-Pheo[sup [minus

  15. Caterpillars and moths: Part II. Dermatologic manifestations of encounters with Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Hossler, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    Caterpillars and moths (order Lepidoptera) are uncommonly recognized causes of adverse cutaneous reactions, such as localized stings, papular dermatitis, and urticarial wheals. These reactions are typically mild and self-limited; however, in South America, the sting of Lonomia caterpillars can cause a potentially fatal hemorrhagic diathesis related to massive fibrinolysis. In addition, ocular inflammation and prominent arthralgias have been reported to be caused by caterpillar exposures. Therapies for mucocutaneous reactions to Lepidoptera are largely empiric, with the exception of antivenin against Lonomia obliqua envenomation. Part II of this two-part series on caterpillars and moths reviews the varied symptoms caused by Lepidopteran exposures, reviews the differential diagnosis, and discusses appropriate treatment algorithms.

  16. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 257 - Appendix II to Part 257

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to Part 257 A. Processes To Significantly Reduce Pathogens Aerobic digestion: The process is... of which temperatures average on a daily basis above 0 °C. Anaerobic digestion: The process is...: Liquid sludge is heated to temperatures of 180 °C for 30 minutes. Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion:...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 257 - Appendix II to Part 257

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to Part 257 A. Processes To Significantly Reduce Pathogens Aerobic digestion: The process is... of which temperatures average on a daily basis above 0 °C. Anaerobic digestion: The process is...: Liquid sludge is heated to temperatures of 180 °C for 30 minutes. Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion:...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 257 - Appendix II to Part 257

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to Part 257 A. Processes To Significantly Reduce Pathogens Aerobic digestion: The process is... of which temperatures average on a daily basis above 0 °C. Anaerobic digestion: The process is...: Liquid sludge is heated to temperatures of 180 °C for 30 minutes. Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion:...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 257 - Appendix II to Part 257

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to Part 257 A. Processes To Significantly Reduce Pathogens Aerobic digestion: The process is... of which temperatures average on a daily basis above 0 °C. Anaerobic digestion: The process is...: Liquid sludge is heated to temperatures of 180 °C for 30 minutes. Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion:...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 257 - Appendix II to Part 257

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to Part 257 A. Processes To Significantly Reduce Pathogens Aerobic digestion: The process is... of which temperatures average on a daily basis above 0 °C. Anaerobic digestion: The process is...: Liquid sludge is heated to temperatures of 180 °C for 30 minutes. Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion:...

  1. The Nature of Reinforcement: Part I. (Volume I), Part II. (Volume II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Robert, Ed.

    Part One of this report describes the first half of a conference, designed to examine the nature of reinforcement, which was held at the University of Pittsburgh in June 1969. The topics discussed include: "Reward in Human Learning: Theoretical Issues and Strategic Choice Points"; "Are Reinforcement Concepts Able to Provide Reinforcement for…

  2. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology, in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part II we review six topics: absorption, short bowel syndrome, smooth muscle function and intestinal motility, tumors, diagnostic imaging, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22807605

  3. Pharmacokinetic interactions with calcium channel antagonists (Part II).

    PubMed

    Schlanz, K D; Myre, S A; Bottorff, M B

    1991-12-01

    Since calcium channel antagonists are a diverse class of drugs frequently administered in combination with other agents, the potential for clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug interactions exists. These interactions occur most frequently via altered hepatic blood flow and impaired hepatic enzyme activity. Part I of the article, which appeared in the previous issue of the Journal, dealt with interactions between calcium antagonists and marker compounds, theophylline, midazolam, lithium, doxorubicin, oral hypoglycaemics and cardiac drugs. Part II examines interactions with cyclosporin, anaesthetics, carbamazepine and cardiovascular agents. PMID:1782739

  4. Treatment of cellulite: Part II. Advances and controversies.

    PubMed

    Khan, Misbah H; Victor, Frank; Rao, Babar; Sadick, Neil S

    2010-03-01

    Treatments for localized adiposities range from topical creams to liposuction. Most treatments lack a substantial proof of efficacy. The unpredictable treatment outcome can be related to the fact that cellulite adipose tissue is physiologically and biochemically different from subcutaneous tissue found elsewhere in the body. Part II of this two-part series on cellulite reviews the various treatment options that are currently available for human adipose tissue including, but not limited to, cellulite. It also focuses on newer techniques that can be potentially useful in the future for the treatment of cellulite.

  5. The Value of Imaging Part II: Value beyond Image Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Duong, Phuong-Anh T; Pastel, David A; Sadigh, Gelareh; Ballard, David; Sullivan, Joseph C; Bresnahan, Brian; Buch, Karen; Duszak, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Although image interpretation is an essential part of radiologists' value, there are other ways in which we contribute to patient care. Part II of the value of imaging series reviews current initiatives that demonstrate value beyond the image interpretation. Standardizing processes, reducing the radiation dose of our examinations, clarifying written reports, improving communications with patients and providers, and promoting appropriate imaging through decision support are all ways we can provide safer, more consistent, and higher quality care. As payers and policy makers push to drive value, research that demonstrates the value of these endeavors, or lack thereof, will become increasingly sought after and supported.

  6. The Value of Imaging Part II: Value beyond Image Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Duong, Phuong-Anh T; Pastel, David A; Sadigh, Gelareh; Ballard, David; Sullivan, Joseph C; Bresnahan, Brian; Buch, Karen; Duszak, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Although image interpretation is an essential part of radiologists' value, there are other ways in which we contribute to patient care. Part II of the value of imaging series reviews current initiatives that demonstrate value beyond the image interpretation. Standardizing processes, reducing the radiation dose of our examinations, clarifying written reports, improving communications with patients and providers, and promoting appropriate imaging through decision support are all ways we can provide safer, more consistent, and higher quality care. As payers and policy makers push to drive value, research that demonstrates the value of these endeavors, or lack thereof, will become increasingly sought after and supported. PMID:26683509

  7. Part I. Evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for electron transfer and following chemical reaction from a global analysis of current-potential-time data. Part II. Electro-catalytic detection in high-performance liquid chromatography of vitamin B[sub 12] and other molecules of biological and environmental interest

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.T.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous evaluation of electron transfer rate constant, k[sup 0], following chemical reaction rate constant, k[sub f], electron transfer coefficient, [alpha] and standard potential, E[sup 0][prime] for an electrochemical reaction following the EC mechanism is described. A mathematical model for the current response to a potential step is developed, starting with the Butler-Volmer equation for electrode kinetics and concentration expressions for the redox couple. The resulting integral equations are solved numerically via the Step Function method. Current-potential and current-time curves are simulated and tested under limiting conditions. The four parameters of the system are evaluated by fitting simulated current-voltage-time (i-E-t) surface to the theoretical equation. The method is applied to study an important biological molecule, viz., methyl cobalamin, in DMSO. Included in the discussion part is the use of kinetic zone diagrams to depict chronoamperometric current response as a function of dimensionless rate constants for the EC reaction scheme. This compact display of the influence of the two rate constants on current in all time windows can be used to select the best data for analysis. Theoretical limits of measurable rate constants can be estimated from the zone diagram. The development of a dropping mercury electrode detector for High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and its application to analysis of B[sub 12] and other vitamins is described. This EC detector is able to achieve high levels of sensitivity by exploiting the catalytic hydrogen evolution undergone by many nitrogenous organic molecules. Vitamin B[sub 12], thiamine, riboflavin and niacinamide were analyzed individually and in mixtures on reverse phase C18 column. Preliminary results from the analysis of commercial multivitamin preparations are also discussed.

  8. AIDS, public health and the panic reaction (Part II).

    PubMed

    Priya, R

    1994-01-01

    Salient points of AIDS control in India are summarized. An autonomous national AIDS control organization has been set up, which received a sizable loan from the World Bank. As a result, the central health budget became skewed with one-fourth of its expenditures going for AIDS and not enough spent on general health services. Among issues inadequately addressed are: 1) HIV surveillance; 2) diagnosis of AIDS; 3) appropriate and safe medical care; 4) wasteful expenditure; 5) educating health workers; and 6) blood bank services. HIV surveillance and testing centers have been attached to a few large hospitals and medical colleges, but more testing and treatment services will be needed. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends testing only after informed consent has been obtained; however, in India this is impossible because of the high rate of illiteracy. Instead, counseling is provided by special social workers and testing is prescribed by doctors. Special AIDS clinics might be the solution, although they lead to isolation and stigmatization of patients. Doctors and nurses should be made aware about the importance of informed consent and counseling to encourage voluntary and anonymous testing. The present WHO definition of AIDS for diagnosis is too general and is based on the African experience. Its use may lead to misdiagnosis of many cases of tuberculosis, diarrhea, and malnutrition as AIDS. Clinical criteria applicable to the Indian reality need to be developed urgently. Private practitioners have also entered HIV testing, but often they rely only on the ELISA test without confirmation which might result in a high rate of false positives. General medical care of AIDS cases have to be strengthened with routine sterilization to avoid wasteful expenditures, health workers have to be reeducated, blood bank services need to be streamlined, and more AIDS-related research is also required.

  9. Gas Atomization of Amorphous Aluminum Powder: Part II. Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baolong; Lin, Yaojun; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2009-12-01

    The optimal processing parameters that are required to atomize amorphous Al were established on the basis of numerical simulations in part I of this study. In this part II, the characterization of cooling rate experienced by gas-atomized, Al-based amorphous powders was studied via experiments. An experimental investigation was implemented to validate the numerical predictions reported in part I of this study. The cooling rate experienced by the powders, for example, was experimentally determined on the basis of dendrite arm spacing correlations, and the results were compared with the numerical predictions. The experimental studies were completed using commercial Al 2024 as a baseline material and Al90Gd7Ni2Fe1 metallic glass (MG). The results showed that the cooling rate of droplets increases with decreasing particle size, with an increasing proportion of helium in the atomization gas and with increasing melt superheat. The experimental results reported in this article suggest good agreement between experiments and numerical simulations.

  10. Care of the patient with chronic pain: part II.

    PubMed

    Wells-Federman, C L

    2000-01-01

    Chronic nonmalignant pain frequently results in significant physical, behavioral, psychological, social, and spiritual issues for patients and their families. It is often misunderstood and unsuccessfully managed. Advanced practice nurses who are knowledgeable about chronic pain and the complex biopsychosocial-spiritual needs of this patient population serve an important role in recognizing these patients and intervening appropriately in their care. The purpose of this two-part article is to provide that information. Part I [Clinical Excellence for Nurse Practitioners, 3 (4), 192-204] outlined the pathophysiology, assessment, biopsychosocial-spiritual aspects, and pharmacologic treatment of chronic pain. In Part II, a variety of nonpharmacologic and self-management interventions one can use in the primary care setting to treat these difficult health problems are introduced. PMID:11858295

  11. Reactions of Pd(II) and Pt(II) Complexes With Tetraethylthiouram Disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, G.; Molins, E.; Miravitlles, C.

    1997-01-01

    The reactions of tetraethylthiouram disulfide (DTS), an inhibitor of the nephrotoxicity of Pt(II) drugs, an efficient agent in the treatment of chronic alcoholism, in the treatment of HIV infections, AIDS and heavy metal toxicity, and a fungicide and herbicide, with K2[PtCl4], in ratio 1:1 and 1:2, gave the compounds [PtCl2DTS] and [Pt(S2CNEt2)2] respectively. The reaction of the complexes K2[PdCl4], Pd(AcO)2 and [PdCl2(PhCN)2], where PhCN = Benzonitrile, with tetraethylthiouram disulfide in ratio 1:1 or 1:2, yielded orange crystals identified as [Pd(S2CNEt2)2]. The crystals were suitable for study by X-ray diffraction. The -S-S- bridge in the tetraethylthiouram disulfude molecule was broken and the two molecules of the thiocarbamate derivative were bound to the Pd(II) by the equivalents sulfur atoms. All the compounds were characterized by IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies. PMID:18475812

  12. Substrate-mediated proton relay mechanism for the religation reaction in topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Kyohei; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kondo, Daiki; Sato, Akimasa; Yang, Moon Young; Kamiya, Katsumasa; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    The DNA religation reaction of yeast type II topoisomerase (topo II) was investigated to elucidate its metal-dependent general acid/base catalysis. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations were performed for the topo II religation reaction, and the proton transfer pathway was examined. We found a substrate-mediated proton transfer of the topo II religation reaction, which involves the 3' OH nucleophile, the reactive phosphate, water, Arg781, and Tyr782. Metal A stabilizes the transition states, which is consistent with a two-metal mechanism in topo II. This pathway may be required for the cleavage/religation reaction of topo IA and II and will provide a general explanation for the catalytic mechanism in the topo IA and II.

  13. Primary charge separation in isolated photosystem II reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.; Toon, S.; Govindjee; O`Neil, M.P.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1992-08-24

    Primary charge-separation in isolated bacterial reaction center (RC) complex occurs in 2.8 ps at room temperature and 0.7--1.2 ps at 10 K. Because of similarities between the bacterial and photosystem II (PSII) RCs, it has been of considerable interest to obtain analogous charge-separation rates in the higher plant system. Our previous femtosecond transient absorption studies used PSII RC material stabilized with PEG or by exchanging dodecyl maltoside (DM) for Triton in the isolation procedure. These materials gave charge-separation 1/e times of 3.0 {plus_minus} 0.6 ps at 4{degree}C and 1.4{plus_minus} 0.2 ps at 15 K based on the risetime of transient absorption kinetics at 820 nm. These values were thought to represent the time required for formation of the P680{sup +}-Pheo{sup {minus}} state. Recent results of Hastings et al. obtained at high data acquisition rates and low flash intensities, suggest that the Pheo{sup {minus}} state may form more slowly. In light of this work, we have carried out additional time domain studies of both electron transport and energy transfer phenomena in stabilized DM PSII RCs at room temperature. We used a 1-kHz repetition rate femtosecond transient absorption spectrometer with a 200 fs instrumental time resolution and compared the results with those obtained by others using frequency domain hole-burning techniques.

  14. Polycystic ovary syndrome: a review for dermatologists: Part II. Treatment.

    PubMed

    Buzney, Elizabeth; Sheu, Johanna; Buzney, Catherine; Reynolds, Rachel V

    2014-11-01

    Dermatologists are in a key position to treat the manifestations of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The management of PCOS should be tailored to each woman's specific goals, reproductive interests, and particular constellation of symptoms. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is recommended. In part II of this continuing medical education article, we present the available safety and efficacy data regarding treatments for women with acne, hirsutism, and androgenetic alopecia. Therapies discussed include lifestyle modification, topical therapies, combined oral contraceptives, antiandrogen agents, and insulin-sensitizing drugs. Treatment recommendations are made based on the current available evidence.

  15. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Deepjyoti; Backhaus, Scott N.; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-02-13

    Limited placement of real-time monitoring devices in the distribution grid, recent trends notwithstanding, has prevented the easy implementation of demand-response and other smart grid applications. Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the grid from nodal voltage measurements. In this work (Part II), the learning of the operational radial structure is coupled with the problem of estimating nodal consumption statistics and inferring the line parameters in the grid. Based on a Linear-Coupled(LC) approximation of AC power flows equations, polynomial time algorithms are designed to identify the structure and estimate nodal load characteristics and/or line parameters in the grid using the available nodal voltage measurements. Then the structure learning algorithm is extended to cases with missing data, where available observations are limited to a fraction of the grid nodes. The efficacy of the presented algorithms are demonstrated through simulations on several distribution test cases.

  16. Arm-free paraplegic standing--Part II: Experimental results.

    PubMed

    Matjacić, Z; Bajd, T

    1998-06-01

    In Part I, we proposed an approach for restoring unsupported standing to thoracic-level paraplegics. The theoretical analysis and simulation of an underactuated double inverted pendulum, representing the standing subject, showed that arm-free standing might be achieved. Here in Part II, we present the mechanical apparatus which we used in our experiments and experimental results from tests of the balance-control strategy. We demonstrate that an intact and a paraplegic subject could perform quiet standing with the ankle stiffness set to 8 Nm/degree or even less (the intact subject). Both were also able to recover from disturbances, imposed by the artificial ankle joint of the apparatus. Introducing cognitive auditory feedback greatly improved the standing abilities of both subjects. PMID:9631321

  17. Oxidation Reactions of Dithiocarbamate Complexes of Ruthenium(II).

    PubMed

    Leung, Wa-Hung; Chim, Joyce L. C.; Hou, Hongwei; Hun, Tom S. M.; Williams, Ian D.; Wong, Wing-Tak

    1997-09-24

    The reaction of Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(DMSO)(2) (Et(2)dtc = N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate; DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide) with t-BuNC gave trans-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(CN-t-Bu)(2), 1. Complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n with a = 9.753(2) Å, b = 11.583(2) Å, c = 12.974(2) Å, and beta = 91.8(2) degrees for Z = 2. The crystal structure of 1 shows the trans disposition of the two isocyanides; the mean Ru-S and Ru-C distances are 2.409 and 1.977(2) Å, respectively. Treatment of [Ru(diene)Cl(2)](n)() with Na(Et(2)dtc) afforded Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(diene) (diene = bicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-diene (NBD), 2, 1,5-cyclooctadiene (COD), 3). Complex 2 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P&onemacr; with a = 7.316(1) Å, b = 10.346(1) Å, c = 15.123(2) Å, alpha = 103.69(2) degrees, beta = 93.54(2) degrees, and gamma = 100.61(2) degrees for Z = 2. The mean Ru-S and Ru-C distances in 2 are 2.416 and 2.137 Å, respectively. The reaction of cis-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(CO)(2) with iodine gave the 2:1 molecular iodine complex cis-Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(CO)(2).(1)/(2)I(2) 4, which crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with a = 7.347(2), b = 22.227(2) Å, c = 12.891(2) Å, and beta =95.98 (2) degrees for Z = 4. The mean Ru-S and Ru-C and the I-I distances in complex 4 are 2.427, 1.903, and 2.745(1) Å, respectively. Treatment of Ru(Et(2)dtc)(2)(DMSO)(2) with I(2) gave the linear Ru(II)-Ru(III)-Ru(III) trimer [Ru(3)(Et(2)dtc)(6)(DMSO)(2)](I(3))(2), 5, which crystallizes in the triclinic space group P&onemacr; with a = 14.125(3) Å, b = 20.829(6) Å, c = 13.658(3) Å, alpha = 97.57(2) degrees, beta = 110.01(2) degrees, and gamma = 71.25(2) degrees for Z = 2. The structure of complex 6 can be viewed as consisting of a {Ru(2)(III)(Et(2)dtc)(4)}(2+) core and a {Ru(II)(Et(2)dtc)(2)(DMSO)(2)} moiety, which are linked together via the two dithiocarbamate sulfurs of the latter. While the two Ru(III) centers are connected by a Ru-Ru single bond (Ru-Ru = 2.826(2) Å), there is no direct

  18. The subthalamic nucleus part II: modelling and simulation of activity.

    PubMed

    Heida, Tjitske; Marani, Enrico; Usunoff, Kamen G

    2008-01-01

    Part I of The Subthalamic Nucleus (volume 198) (STN) accentuates the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections.The light and electron microscopical cytology focuses on the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types present in the STN. The cytochemistry encompasses enzymes, NO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins, and receptors (dopamine, cannabinoid, opioid, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, cholinergic, and calcium channels). The ontogeny of the subthalamic cell cord is also reviewed. The topography concerns the rat, cat, baboon and human STN. The descriptions of the connections are also given from a historical point of view. Recent tracer studies on the rat nigro-subthalamic connection revealed contralateral projections. This monograph (Part II of the two volumes) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) starts with a systemic model of the basal ganglia to evaluate the position of the STN in the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways. A summary of in vitro studies is given, describing STN spontaneous activity as well as responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing inputs and high-frequency stimulation. STN bursting activity and the underlying ionic mechanisms are investigated. Deep brain stimulation used for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease is discussed in terms of the elements that are influenced and its hypothesized mechanisms. This part of the monograph explores the pedunculopontine-subthalamic connections and summarizes attempts to mimic neurotransmitter actions of the pedunculopontine nucleus in cell cultures and high-frequency stimulation on cultured dissociated rat subthalamic neurons. STN cell models - single- and multi-compartment models and system-level models are discussed in relation to subthalamic function and dysfunction. Parts I and II are compared. PMID:18727495

  19. PREREM: an interactive data preprocessing code for INREM II. Part I: user's manual. Part II: code structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, M.T.; Fields, D.E.

    1981-05-01

    PREREM is an interactive computer code developed as a data preprocessor for the INREM-II (Killough, Dunning, and Pleasant, 1978a) internal dose program. PREREM is intended to provide easy access to current and self-consistent nuclear decay and radionuclide-specific metabolic data sets. Provision is made for revision of metabolic data, and the code is intended for both production and research applications. Documentation for the code is in two parts. Part I is a user's manual which emphasizes interpretation of program prompts and choice of user input. Part II stresses internal structure and flow of program control and is intended to assist the researcher who wishes to revise or modify the code or add to its capabilities. PREREM is written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 System and much of the code will require revision before it can be run on other machines. The source program length is 950 lines (116 blocks) and computer core required for execution is 212 K bytes. The user must also have sufficient file space for metabolic and S-factor data sets. Further, 64 100 K byte blocks of computer storage space are required for the nuclear decay data file. Computer storage space must also be available for any output files produced during the PREREM execution. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

  20. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being

  1. Highly enantioselective Henry reactions of aromatic aldehydes catalyzed by an amino alcohol-copper(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Qin, Dan-Dan; Lai, Wen-Han; Hu, Di; Chen, Zheng; Wu, An-An; Ruan, Yuan-Ping; Zhou, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Hong-Bin

    2012-08-20

    Amino alcohol-Cu(II) catalyst: Highly enantioselective Henry reactions between aromatic aldehydes and nitromethane have been developed. The reactions were catalyzed by an easily available and operationally simple amino alcohol-copper(II) catalyst. In total, 38 substrates were tested and the R-configured products were obtained in good yields with excellent enantioselectivities. PMID:22791567

  2. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1037 - Power Take-Off Test Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Power Take-Off Test Cycle II Appendix II to Part 1037 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW HEAVY-DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 1037, App. II Appendix II to Part...

  3. 19 CFR Annex II to Part 351 - Deadlines for Parties in Countervailing Administrative Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Deadlines for Parties in Countervailing Administrative Reviews II Annex II to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex II Annex II to Part 351—Deadlines for...

  4. 31 CFR Appendix II(f) to Part 13 - Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overhead and Administrative Costs II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13—Overhead and Administrative Costs Date: Select Only...

  5. 31 CFR Appendix II(f) to Part 13 - Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Overhead and Administrative Costs II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13—Overhead and Administrative Costs Date: Select Only...

  6. 31 CFR Appendix II(f) to Part 13 - Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overhead and Administrative Costs II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13—Overhead and Administrative Costs Date: Select Only...

  7. A Survey of Optometry Graduates to Determine Practice Patterns: Part II: Licensure and Practice Establishment Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleimann, Robert L.; Smith, Lee W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of Part II of a two-volume study of optometry graduates conducted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry is presented. Part II includes the analysis of the graduates' licensure and practice establishment experiences. (MLW)

  8. Excited states of the 5-chlorophyll photosystem II reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, R.; Raetsep, M.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Small, G.J.

    1999-11-04

    Results of 4.2 K hole burning, chemical reduction (sodium dithionite, in dark and with illumination), and oxidation (ferricyanide) experiments are reported for the isolated PS II reaction center containing five chlorophyll (Chl) molecules (RC-5). Q{sub y} states at 679.6 and 668.3 nm are identified as being highly localized on pheophytin a of the D{sub 1} branch (Pheo{sub 1}) and pheophytin a of the D{sub 2} branch (Pheo{sub 2}), respectively. The Pheo{sub 1}-Q{sub x} and Pheo{sub 2}-Q{sub x} transitions were found to lie on the low and high energy sides of the single Pheo-Q{sub x} absorption band, at 544.4 and 541.2 nm, respectively. The Q{sub y} band of the 684 nm absorbing Chl, which is more apparent in absorption in RC-5 than in RC-6 samples, is assigned to the peripheral Chl on the D{sub 1} side. The results are consistent with that peripheral Chl being Chl{sub z}. The results indicate that P680, the primary electron donor, is the main acceptor for energy transfer from the Pheo{sub 1}-Q{sub y} state and that excitation energy transfer from the Pheo{sub 1}-Q{sub y} state and P680* to the 684 nm Chl is inefficient. It is concluded that the procedure used to prepare RC-5 has only a small effect on the energies of the Q{sub y} states associated with the core cofactors of the 6-Chl RC as well as the 684 nm Chl. Implications of the results for the multimer model are considered. In that model the Q{sub y}-states of the core are significantly delocalized over several cofactors. The results presented provide no support for this model.

  9. Well-defined N-heterocyclic carbenes-palladium(II) precatalysts for cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Marion, Nicolas; Nolan, Steven P

    2008-11-18

    Metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions, notably those permitting C-C bond formation, have witnessed a meteoritic development and are now routinely employed as a powerful synthetic tool both in academia and in industry. In this context, palladium is arguably the most studied transition metal, and tertiary phosphines occupy a preponderant place as ancillary ligands. Seriously challenging this situation, the use of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) as alternative ligands in palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions is rapidly gaining in popularity. These two-electron donor ligands combine strong sigma-donating properties with a shielding steric pattern that allows for both stabilization of the metal center and enhancement of its catalytic activity. As a result, the number of well-defined NHC-containing palladium(II) complexes is growing, and their use in coupling reactions is witnessing increasing interest. In this Account, we highlight the advantages of this family of palladium complexes and review their synthesis and applications in cross-coupling chemistry. They generally exhibit high stability, allowing for indefinite storage and easy handling. The use of well-defined complexes permits a strict control of the Pd/ligand ratio (optimally 1/1), avoiding the use of excess costly ligand that usually requires end-game removal. Furthermore, it partly removes the "black box" character often associated with cross-coupling chemistry and catalyst formation. In the present Account, four main classes of NHC-containing palladium(II) complexes will be presented: palladium dimers with bridging halogens, palladacycles, palladium acetates and acetylacetonates, and finally pi-allyl complexes. These additional ligands are best described as a protecting shell that will be discarded going from the palladium(II) precatalyst to the palladium(0) true catalyst. The synthesis of all these precatalysts generally requires simple and short synthetic procedures. Their catalytic activity in

  10. Rapid reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with superoxide radical in seawater and simulated freshwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansard, S.P.; Easter, H.D.; Voelker, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Superoxide radical (O2-) has been proposed to be an important participant in oxidation-reduction reactions of metal ions in natural waters. Here, we studied the reaction of nanomolar Mn(II) with O 2- in seawater and simulated freshwater, using chemiluminescence detection of O2- to quantify the effect of Mn(II) on the decay kinetics of O2-. With 3-24 nM added [Mn(II)] and <0.7 nM [O2-], we observed effective second-order rate constants for the reaction of Mn(II) with O2- of 6 ?? 106 to 1 ?? 107 M -1???s-1 in various seawater samples. In simulated freshwater (pH 8.6), the effective rate constant of Mn(II) reaction with O 2- was somewhat lower, 1.6 ?? 106 M -1???s-1. With higher initial [O2-], in excess of added [Mn(II)], catalytic decay of O 2- by Mn was observed, implying that a Mn(II/III) redox cycle occurred. Our results show that reactions with nanomolar Mn(II) could be an important sink of O2- in natural waters. In addition, reaction of Mn(II) with superoxide could maintain a significant fraction of dissolved Mn in the +III oxidation state. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. A guide to clinical trials. Part II: interpreting medical research.

    PubMed

    Highleyman, Liz

    2006-01-01

    Part I of this two-part article, which appeared in the Summer 2005 issue of BETA, provided an overview of the clinical trial process. Part II covers features of clinical trials and interpretation of study results. Clinical trials provide the foundation for evidence-based medicine, or medical decision-making guided by data from formal research. Medical professionals keep up with the latest information by reading peer-reviewed medical journals and attending conferences. Likewise, HIV positive people can keep abreast of the state of the art by following the medical literature and community publications like BETA. Trials offer important information about a therapy's benefits and risks in a population, but they cannot predict how well a given treatment will work for a specific person. Healthcare providers, therefore, must still rely heavily on clinical experience, intuition, and a careful evaluation of the various factors unique to each individual case--the practice of medicine remains an art as well as a science. PMID:16610119

  12. Numerical evaluation of the production of radionuclides in a nuclear reactor (Part II).

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, S; Walsh, P

    1998-04-01

    A computer program called LAURA has been developed to predict the production rates of any member of a nuclei network undergoing spontaneous decay and/or induced neutron transformation in a nuclear reactor. The theoretical bases for the development of LAURA were discussed in Part I. In particular, in Part I, we described how an expression based on the Rubinson (1949) approach is used to evaluate the depletion function. In this paper (Part II), we describe the full simulation of radionuclide production including the decomposition of a reaction network into independent linear chains, provisions for periodic reactor shutdown and restart, and implementation of an approximate solution given by Raykin and Shlyakhter (1989) to account for the effect of feedback due to alpha decay. Also included are some examples which demonstrate possible uses for LAURA.

  13. The Reaction between Iron(II) Iodide and Potassium Dichromate(VI) in Acidified Aqueous Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" teaching lesson explores the possible reaction between the ions in a reaction mixture consisting of iron(II) iodide and potassium dichromate(VI) in acidified aqueous solution. The electrode potentials will be used to deduce any spontaneous reactions under standard thermodynamic conditions (298 K, 1 bar (approximately…

  14. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 Manufacturers... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT...

  15. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted In-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 Manufacturers... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted In-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 Manufacturers... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT...

  17. Branch Flow Model: Relaxations and Convexification-Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Farivar, M; Low, SH

    2013-08-01

    We propose a branch flow model for the analysis and optimization of mesh as well as radial networks. The model leads to a new approach to solving optimal power flow (OPF) that consists of two relaxation steps. The first step eliminates the voltage and current angles and the second step approximates the resulting problem by a conic program that can be solved efficiently. For radial networks, we prove that both relaxation steps are always exact, provided there are no upper bounds on loads. For mesh networks, the conic relaxation is always exact but the angle relaxation may not be exact, and we provide a simple way to determine if a relaxed solution is globally optimal. We propose convexification of mesh networks using phase shifters so that OPF for the convexified network can always be solved efficiently for an optimal solution. We prove that convexification requires phase shifters only outside a spanning tree of the network and their placement depends only on network topology, not on power flows, generation, loads, or operating constraints. Part I introduces our branch flow model, explains the two relaxation steps, and proves the conditions for exact relaxation. Part II describes convexification of mesh networks, and presents simulation results.

  18. II: Through the Western Part of the City: Charlottenburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Dieter

    Until 1920 the city we now call Berlin was a collection of independent towns and villages — among them Charlottenburg, which was one of the most important and was the proud sister of Berlin, Prussia’s and Germany’s capital, where the wealthy and innovative bourgeoisie lived. Werner von Siemens, Germany’s pioneer in the modern electrical industry, was a prime example of that elite. His castle-like villa was located not far from today’s Ernst-Reuter-Platz at Otto-Suhr-Allee 10-16, and important parts of his enterprise expanded into the “meadows outside of Charlottenburg” during the second half of the 19th century. It was no accident that the efforts to unite Berlin’s two colleges for trade and construction (both founded around 1800) led to the foundation of a modern Technical College in Charlottenburg in 1879, today’s Technical University of Berlin. Its magnificent main building (figure 1), which was opened in 1882 by the German Emperor, was an expression of the great self-confidence of this new institution of higher learning and of Charlottenburg’s bourgeoisie. Although large parts of the building were destroyed by bombs during World War II, you can still get an impression of its monumentality from what survived at number 135 Strasse des 17. Juni.

  19. Revision of the Genus Paratylenchus Micoletzky, 1922 and Descriptions of New Species. Part II of Three Parts

    PubMed Central

    Raski, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Part II covers species with average female stylet length of 22-38 μm. Seven new species are described and further observations are given on 12 other species. A key to the species covered in Parts I and II is included. Paratylenchus curvitatus van der Linde, 1938, is transferred to species inquirendae. PMID:19308171

  20. Organic Reaction Mechanisms in the Sixth Form Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Presents the mechanistic ideas underlying reactions between nucleophiles and carbonyl compounds as well as some popular misconceptions. Relates reactions of carboxylic acid derivatives to those of aldehydes and ketones. Discusses leaving group ability and the ability of carbonyl oxygen to accept a negative charge. (Author/MVL)

  1. Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan's Educational Metatheory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Roland M.

    2009-04-01

    This paper is the second of two parts and continues the conversation which had called for a shift in the conceptual focus of science education towards philosophy of education, with the requirement to develop a discipline-specific “philosophy” of science education. In Part I, conflicting conceptions of science literacy were identified with disparate “visions” tied to competing research programs as well as school-based curricular paradigms. The impasse in the goals of science education and thereto, the contending views of science literacy, were themselves associated with three underlying fundamental aims of education (knowledge-itself; personal development; socialization) which, it was argued, usually undercut the potential of each other. During periods of “crisis-talk” and throughout science educational history these three aims have repeatedly attempted to assert themselves. The inability of science education research to affect long-term change in classrooms was correlated not only to the failure to reach a consensus on the aims (due to competing programs and to the educational ideologies of their social groups), but especially to the failure of developing true educational theories (largely neglected since Hirst). Such theories, especially metatheories, could serve to reinforce science education’s growing sense of academic autonomy and independence from socio-economic demands. In Part II, I offer as a suggestion Egan’s cultural-linguistic theory as a metatheory to help resolve the impasse. I hope to make reformers familiar with his important ideas in general, and more specifically, to show how they can complement HPS rationales and reinforce the work of those researchers who have emphasized the value of narrative in learning science.

  2. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  3. Autocatalysis-driven clock reaction II: kinetics of the pentathionate-periodate reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Horváth, Attila K

    2014-10-23

    The pentathionate-periodate reaction has been investigated by spectrophotometrically monitoring the total amount of iodine evolved in the presence of phosphoric acid/dihydrogen phosphate buffer at 468 nm. The majority of the main characteristics of the title system is very reminiscent of that found recently in the pentathionate-iodate reaction, a system that led us to classify generally the clock reactions. Along with the pentathionate-iodate reaction the title system is proposed to belong to the autocatalysis-driven clock reactions as well. The kinetic model of the pentathionate-iodate system published recently was implemented by the necessary reactions of periodate to compose a 24-step kinetic model in which the mechanisms of the pentathionate-iodine, pentathionate-iodate, bisulfite-periodate, bisulfite-iodate, iodide-periodate, and the well-known Dushman reactions are combined. A thorough analysis revealed that the direct pentathionate-periodate reaction plays a role only to produce iodide ion via a finite sequence of reactions, and once its concentration reaches a certain level, the reaction is almost exclusively governed by the pentathionate-iodine, the iodide-periodate, and the Dushman reactions. As expected strong catalytic effect of the buffer composition is also found that can readily be explained by its well-known catalytic influence on the Dushman reaction. PMID:25268333

  4. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 280 - List of Agencies Designated To Receive Notifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 04333 Maryland (EPA Form), Science and Health Advisory Group, Office of Environmental Programs, 201 West... Notifications II Appendix II to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Designated To Receive Notifications Alabama (EPA Form), Alabama Department of Environmental...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 280 - List of Agencies Designated To Receive Notifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 04333 Maryland (EPA Form), Science and Health Advisory Group, Office of Environmental Programs, 201 West... Notifications II Appendix II to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Designated To Receive Notifications Alabama (EPA Form), Alabama Department of Environmental...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 280 - List of Agencies Designated To Receive Notifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 04333 Maryland (EPA Form), Science and Health Advisory Group, Office of Environmental Programs, 201 West... Notifications II Appendix II to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Designated To Receive Notifications Alabama (EPA Form), Alabama Department of Environmental...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 280 - List of Agencies Designated To Receive Notifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 04333 Maryland (EPA Form), Science and Health Advisory Group, Office of Environmental Programs, 201 West... Notifications II Appendix II to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Designated To Receive Notifications Alabama (EPA Form), Alabama Department of Environmental...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 280 - List of Agencies Designated To Receive Notifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 04333 Maryland (EPA Form), Science and Health Advisory Group, Office of Environmental Programs, 201 West... Notifications II Appendix II to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Designated To Receive Notifications Alabama (EPA Form), Alabama Department of Environmental...

  9. Reactions of atomic hydrogen with formic acid and carbon monoxide in solid parahydrogen II: Deuterated reaction studies.

    PubMed

    Wonderly, William R; Anderson, David T

    2014-09-11

    It is difficult to determine whether the measured rate constant for reaction of atomic hydrogen with formic acid reported in Part 1 reflects the H atom quantum diffusion rate or the rate constant for the tunneling reaction step. In Part 2 of this series, we present kinetic studies of the postphotolysis H atom reactions with deuterated formic acid (DCOOD) to address this ambiguity. Short duration 193 nm in situ photolysis of DCOOD trapped in solid parahydrogen results in partial depletion of the DCOOD precursor and photoproduction of primarily CO, CO2, DOCO, HCO and mobile H atoms. At 1.9 K we observe post-irradiation growth in the concentrations of DOCO and HCO that can be explained by H atom tunneling reactions with DCOOD and CO, respectively. Conducting experiments with different deuterium isotopomers of formic acid (DCOOD, DCOOH, HCOOD and HCOOH) provides strong circumstantial evidence the reaction involves H atom abstraction from the alkyl group of formic acid. Further, the anomalous temperature dependence measured for the H + HCOOH reaction in Part 1 is also observed for the analogous reactions with deuterated formic acid. The rate constants extracted for H atom reactions with DCOOD and HCOOH are equivalent to within experimental uncertainty. This lack of a kinetic isotope effect in the measured rate constant is interpreted as evidence the reactions are diffusion limited; the measured rate constant reflects the H atom diffusion rate and not the tunneling reaction rate. Whether or not H atom reactions with chemical species in solid parahydrogen are diffusion limited is one of the outstanding questions in this field, and this work makes significant strides toward showing the reaction kinetics with formic acid are diffusion limited.

  10. The Mechanochemical Reaction of Palladium(II) Chloride with a Bidentate Phosphine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David E.; Carrie, Philippa; Fawkes, Kelli L.; Rebner, Bruce; Xing, Yao

    2010-01-01

    This experiment describes the reaction of palladium(II) chloride with 1,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)pentane by grinding the two powders together in the solid state. The product is the precursor for the metalation reaction at one of the methylene carbon atoms of the ligand's backbone. The final product is known to be a catalyst for Suzuki-Miyaura…

  11. Kinetic transitions in diffusion-reaction space. II. Geometrical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, John J.

    1999-02-01

    We extend the stochastic master equation approach described earlier [J. J. Kozak and R. Davidson, J. Chem. Phys. 101, 6101 (1994)] to examine the influence on reaction efficiency of multipolar correlations between a fixed target molecule and a diffusing coreactant, the latter constrained to move on the surface of a host medium (e.g., a colloidal catalyst or molecular organizate) modeled as a Cartesian shell [Euler characteristic, χ=2]. Our most comprehensive results are for processes involving ion pairs, and we find that there exists a transition between two qualitatively different types of behavior in diffusion-reaction space, viz., a regime where the coreactant's motion is totally correlated with respect to the target ion, and a regime where the coreactant's motion is effectively uncorrelated. This behavior emerges both in the situation where correlations between the ion pair are strictly confined to the surface of the host medium or where correlations can be propagated through the host medium. The effects of system size are also examined and comparisons with diffusion-reaction processes taking place on surfaces characterized by Euler characteristic χ=0 are made. In all cases studied, the most dramatic effects on the reaction efficiency are uncovered in the regime where the Onsager (thermalization) length is comparable to the mean displacement of the coreactant, a conclusion consistent with results reported in earlier work.

  12. Organoapatites: materials for artificial bone. II. Hardening reactions and properties.

    PubMed

    Stupp, S I; Mejicano, G C; Hanson, J A

    1993-03-01

    This article reports on chemical reactions and the properties they generated in artificial bone materials termed "organoapatites." These materials are synthesized using methodology we reported in the previous article of this series. Two different processes were studied here for the transition from organoapatite particles to implants suitable for the restoration of the skeletal system. One process involved the hardening of powder compacts by beams of blue light derived from a lamp or a laser and the other involved pressure-induced interdiffusion of polymers. In both cases, the hardening reaction involved the formation of a polyion complex between two polyelectrolytes. In the photo-induced reaction an anionic electrolyte polymerizes to form the coulombic network and in the pressure-induced one, pressure forms the complex by interdiffusion of two polyions. Model reactions were studied using various polycations. Based on these results the organoapatite selected for the study was that containing dispersed poly(L-lysine) and sodium acrylate as the anionic monomer. The organomineral particles can be pressed at room temperature into objects of great physical integrity and hydrolytic stability relative to anorganic controls. The remarkable fact about these objects is that intimate molecular dispersion of only 2-3% by weight organic material provides integrity to the mineral network in an aqueous medium and also doubles its tensile strength. This integrity is essentially nonexistent in "anorganic" samples prepared by the same methodology used in organoapatite synthesis. The improvement in properties was most effectively produced by molecular bridges formed by photopolymerization. The photopolymerization leads to the "hardening" of pellets prepared by pressing of organoapatite powders. The reaction was found to be more facile in the microstructure of the organomineral, and it is potentially useful in the surgical application of organoapatites as artificial bone.

  13. Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Deisenhofer, J.

    1988-01-12

    Photosynthetic organisms are able to oxidize organic or inorganic compounds upon the absorption of light, and they use the extracted electron for the fixation of carbon dioxide. The most important oxidation product is oxygen due to the splitting of water. In eukaryotes these processes occur in photosystem II of chloroplasts. Among prokaryotes photosynthetic oxygen evolution is restricted to cyanobacteria and prochloron-type organisms. How water is split in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II belongs to the most important question to be answered. The primary charge separation occurs in the reaction center of photosystem II. This reaction center is a complex consisting of peripheral and integral membrane proteins, several chlorophyll A molecules, two pheophytin A molecules, two and three plastoquinone molecules, and one non-heme iron atom. The location of the photosystem II reaction center is still a matter of debate. Nakatani et al. (l984) concluded from fluorescence measurements that a protein of apparent molecular weight 47,000 (CP47) is the apoprotein of the photosystem II reaction center. A different view emerged from work with the photosynthetic reaction centers from the purple bacteria. The amino acid sequence of the M subunit of the reaction center from Phodopseudomonas (Rps.) sphaeroides has sequence homologies with the D1 protein from spinach. A substantial amount of structural information can be obtained with the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, which can be crystallized. Here the authors discuss the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the purple bacterium Rps. viridis and describe the role of those amino acids that are conserved between the bacterial and photosystem II reaction center.

  14. Autism and EMF? Plausibility of a pathophysiological link part II.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Martha R; Sage, Cindy

    2013-06-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASCs) are defined behaviorally, but they also involve multileveled disturbances of underlying biology that find striking parallels in the physiological impacts of electromagnetic frequency and radiofrequency radiation exposures (EMF/RFR). Part I (Vol 776) of this paper reviewed the critical contributions pathophysiology may make to the etiology, pathogenesis and ongoing generation of behaviors currently defined as being core features of ASCs. We reviewed pathophysiological damage to core cellular processes that are associated both with ASCs and with biological effects of EMF/RFR exposures that contribute to chronically disrupted homeostasis. Many studies of people with ASCs have identified oxidative stress and evidence of free radical damage, cellular stress proteins, and deficiencies of antioxidants such as glutathione. Elevated intracellular calcium in ASCs may be due to genetics or may be downstream of inflammation or environmental exposures. Cell membrane lipids may be peroxidized, mitochondria may be dysfunctional, and various kinds of immune system disturbances are common. Brain oxidative stress and inflammation as well as measures consistent with blood-brain barrier and brain perfusion compromise have been documented. Part II of this paper documents how behaviors in ASCs may emerge from alterations of electrophysiological oscillatory synchronization, how EMF/RFR could contribute to these by de-tuning the organism, and policy implications of these vulnerabilities. It details evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction, immune system dysregulation, neuroinflammation and brain blood flow alterations, altered electrophysiology, disruption of electromagnetic signaling, synchrony, and sensory processing, de-tuning of the brain and organism, with autistic behaviors as emergent properties emanating from this pathophysiology. Changes in brain and autonomic nervous system electrophysiological function and sensory processing predominate, seizures

  15. Part I. Molecular dichroism, optical and catalysis studies of several metalloporphyrins. Part II. Solid state studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sito, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    Part 1. Tetra(4-N-methylpyridyl)porphyrinatopalladium (II), [Pd-TMpyP][sup 4+], was prepared by a new technique, purified and intercalated with calf thymus DNA. The Soret and Q band regions were studied using Circular Dichroism (CD) and magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD). The MCD measurements in Soret and Q band regions and CD of the Q band regions are reported for the first time. The known photocatalyst, tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyinato-zinc(II), was covalently bonded to the surfaces of both iodinated (Ia) and chlorinated (Ib) cross-linked poly(siloxane) materials. Thermal catalytic activity was found to be present, and it was quantitatively measured using olefin oxidation of styrene to acetophenone. The zinc porphyrin supported on iodinated poly(siloxane) showed an over 12-fold increase in catalytic activity, as measured by turnover numbers, compared to the chlorinated support material. Part II. The plasmas produced by ablation of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] single-phase high T[sub C] bulk superconductors when exposed to XeCl excimer laser pulses have been studied. The luminescence of the laser-induced vapor plume have been analyzed using optical emission spectroscopy. Excited atomic neutral and single ionized species (Cu/Cu[sup +], Ba/Ba[sup +], Y/Y[sup +]) as well as some molecular emission bands (CuO, YO) were observed within the experimental resolution of an optical multichannel analyzer detection system. A liquid mediated pulse laser irradiation procedure was used in the attempt to form thin layers of carbides and nitrides of silicon. A boron doped single crystal (100) of silicon was irradiated while immersed in cyclohexane or liquid ammonia. Irradiation of the samples was carried out using a 308 nm excimer laser. The laser pulses had energy densities of 0.5 to 3.0 J cm[sup [minus]2] and the number of pulses used ranged from 1 to 50. The specimens were analyzed using specular reflectance and auger electron spectroscopies.

  16. A New Road to Reaction, Part 3. Teaching the Heat Effect of Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vos, Wobbe; Verdonk, Adri H.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the need to present beginning chemistry students with a variety of experiences dealing with chemical reactions to develop the individual student's concept of these processes. Presents information and experiments dealing with the heat effect of chemical reactions. Includes a discussion on exothermic and endothermic processes in laboratory…

  17. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted In-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted In-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II to Part 541 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  18. Selenium-ligated palladium(II) complexes as highly active catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling reactions: the Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Zheng, Chong

    2004-08-19

    Three selenium-ligated Pd(II) complexes were readily synthesized and shown to be extremely active catalysts for the Heck reaction of various aryl bromides, including deactivated and heterocyclic ones. The catalytic activity of the selenide-based Pd(II) complexes not only rivals but vastly outperforms that of the corresponding phosphorus and sulfur analogues. Practical advantages of the selenium-based catalysts include their straightforward synthesis and high activity in the absence of any additives as well as the enhanced stability of the selenide ligands toward air oxidation. PMID:15330667

  19. Selenium-ligated palladium(II) complexes as highly active catalysts for carbon-carbon coupling reactions: the Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Kinney, Elizabeth P; Zheng, Chong

    2004-08-19

    Three selenium-ligated Pd(II) complexes were readily synthesized and shown to be extremely active catalysts for the Heck reaction of various aryl bromides, including deactivated and heterocyclic ones. The catalytic activity of the selenide-based Pd(II) complexes not only rivals but vastly outperforms that of the corresponding phosphorus and sulfur analogues. Practical advantages of the selenium-based catalysts include their straightforward synthesis and high activity in the absence of any additives as well as the enhanced stability of the selenide ligands toward air oxidation.

  20. Pulse radiolysis studies of the reactions of CO3*- and NO2* with nitrosyl(II)myoglobin and nitrosyl(II)hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Boccini, Francesca; Domazou, Anastasia S; Herold, Susanna

    2006-03-23

    The reactions of carbonate radical anion [CO3*-, systematic name: trioxidocarbonate*1-] with nitrosyl(II)hemoglobin (HbFe(II)NO) and nitrosyl(II)myoglobin (MbFe(II)NO) were studied by pulse radiolysis in N2O-saturated 0.25 M sodium bicarbonate solutions at pH 10.0 and room temperature. The reactions proceed in two steps: outer-sphere oxidation of the nitrosyliron(II) proteins to their corresponding nitrosyliron(III) forms and subsequent dissociation of NO*. The second-order rate constants measured for the first reaction steps were (4.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(8) and (1.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), for MbFe(II)NO and HbFe(II)NO, respectively. The reactions between nitrogen dioxide and MbFe(II)NO or HbFe(II)NO were studied by pulse radiolysis in N2O-saturated 0.1 M phosphate buffer pH 7.4 containing 5 mM nitrite. Also for the reactions of this oxidant with the nitrosyliron(II) forms of Mb and Hb a two-step reaction was observed: oxidation of the iron was followed by dissociation of NO*. The second-order rate constants measured for the first reaction steps were (2.9 +/- 0.3) x 10(7) and (1.8 +/- 0.3) x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), for MbFe(II)NO and HbFe(II)NO, respectively. Both radicals appear to be able to oxidize the iron(II) centers of the proteins directly. Only for the reactions with HbFe(II)NO it cannot be excluded that, in a parallel reaction, CO3*- and NO2* first react with amino acid(s) of the globin, which then oxidize the nitrosyliron(II) center. PMID:16539414

  1. Elastodynamic analysis of a gear pump. Part II: Meshing phenomena and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.; Rivola, A.

    2010-10-01

    A non-linear lumped kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps is presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machines. Two main sources of noise and vibration can be considered: pressure and gear meshing. Fluid pressure distribution on gears, which is time-varying, is computed and included as a resultant external force and torque acting on the gears. Parametric excitations due to time-varying meshing stiffness, the tooth profile errors (obtained by a metrological analysis), the backlash effects between meshing teeth, the lubricant squeeze and the possibility of tooth contact on both lines of action were also included. Finally, the torsional stiffness and damping of the driving shaft and the non-linear behaviour of the hydrodynamic journal bearings were also taken into account. Model validation was carried out on the basis of experimental data concerning case accelerations and force reactions. The model can be used in order to analyse the pump dynamic behaviour and to identify the effects of modifications in design and operation parameters, in terms of vibration and dynamic forces. Part I is devoted to the calculation of the gear eccentricity in the steady-state condition as result of the balancing between mean pressure loads, mean meshing force and bearing reactions, while in Part II the meshing phenomena are fully explained and the main simulation results are presented.

  2. A Biological Interpretation of Transient Anomalous Subdiffusion. II. Reaction Kinetics☆

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reaction kinetics in a cell or cell membrane is modeled in terms of the first passage time for a random walker at a random initial position to reach an immobile target site in the presence of a hierarchy of nonreactive binding sites. Monte Carlo calculations are carried out for the triangular, square, and cubic lattices. The mean capture time is expressed as the product of three factors: the analytical expression of Montroll for the capture time in a system with a single target and no binding sites; an exact expression for the mean escape time from the set of lattice points; and a correction factor for the number of targets present. The correction factor, obtained from Monte Carlo calculations, is between one and two. Trapping may contribute significantly to noise in reaction rates. The statistical distribution of capture times is obtained from Monte Carlo calculations and shows a crossover from power-law to exponential behavior. The distribution is analyzed using probability generating functions; this analysis resolves the contributions of the different sources of randomness to the distribution of capture times. This analysis predicts the distribution function for a lattice with perfect mixing; deviations reflect imperfect mixing in an ordinary random walk. PMID:17905849

  3. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  7. 31 CFR Appendix II to Part 13 - Form of Bill for Reimbursement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 13. Access to all records, accounts, receipts, etc., pertaining to the costs herein billed will be... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Form of Bill for Reimbursement II.... II Appendix II to Part 13—Form of Bill for Reimbursement I hereby request that ______...

  8. 31 CFR Appendix II to Part 13 - Form of Bill for Reimbursement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR 13. Access to all records, accounts, receipts, etc., pertaining to the costs herein billed will be... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Form of Bill for Reimbursement II.... II Appendix II to Part 13—Form of Bill for Reimbursement I hereby request that ______...

  9. 31 CFR Appendix II to Part 13 - Form of Bill for Reimbursement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR 13. Access to all records, accounts, receipts, etc., pertaining to the costs herein billed will be... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Form of Bill for Reimbursement II.... II Appendix II to Part 13—Form of Bill for Reimbursement I hereby request that ______...

  10. 31 CFR Appendix II to Part 13 - Form of Bill for Reimbursement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR 13. Access to all records, accounts, receipts, etc., pertaining to the costs herein billed will be... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Form of Bill for Reimbursement II.... II Appendix II to Part 13—Form of Bill for Reimbursement I hereby request that ______...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... during idle at its warm idle speed as described in 40 CFR 1065.510. (b) Test nonhandheld engines with one... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... during idle at its warm idle speed as described in 40 CFR 1065.510. (b) Test nonhandheld engines with one... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... during idle at its warm idle speed as described in 40 CFR 1065.510. (b) Test nonhandheld engines with one... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... during idle at its warm idle speed as described in 40 CFR 1065.510. (b) Test nonhandheld engines with one... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  16. The Transit of Educational Theory II: Herbartianism Comes to America. Part I, The People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkel, Harold B.

    1969-01-01

    Part I concentrates on the persons who were the chief importers and disseminators of the German educational theory and their interrelations. The doctrines of Herbartianism are considered in Part II. (DE)

  17. Effective Absorption Cross-Sections in Porphyridium cruentum: Implications for Energy Transfer between Phycobilisomes and Photosystem II Reaction Centers.

    PubMed

    Ley, A C

    1984-02-01

    Effective absorption cross-sections for O(2) production by Porphyridium cruentum were measured at 546 and 596 nanometers. Although all photosystem II reaction centers are energetically coupled to phycobilisomes, any single phycobilisome acts as antenna for several photosystem II reaction centers. The cross-section measured in state I was 50% larger than that measured in state II.

  18. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation, Cl. Thermoluminescence: Part II. Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.

    1979-01-01

    Presents part two on the use of the detection of thermoluminescence as an analytical tool for the chemistry laboratory and allied science. This part discusses instrumentation used and investigates recent developments in instrumentation for thermoluminescence. (HM)

  19. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance Under proposed 40 CFR part 191, subpart A... combined annual dose equivalent to any member of the public due to: (i) operations covered by 40 CFR...

  20. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance Under proposed 40 CFR part 191, subpart A... combined annual dose equivalent to any member of the public due to: (i) operations covered by 40 CFR...

  1. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance Under proposed 40 CFR part 191, subpart A... combined annual dose equivalent to any member of the public due to: (i) operations covered by 40 CFR...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance Under proposed 40 CFR part 191, subpart A... combined annual dose equivalent to any member of the public due to: (i) operations covered by 40 CFR...

  3. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 960 - NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. II Appendix II to Part 960—NRC and EPA Requirements for Preclosure Repository Performance Under proposed 40 CFR part 191, subpart A... combined annual dose equivalent to any member of the public due to: (i) operations covered by 40 CFR...

  4. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level II, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part one of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level II of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.…

  5. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level II, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part two of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level II of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.…

  6. Coping With the Problems of a Technological Age, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This is another report in a series of programs dealing with the problems of a technological age. It is assumed that teachers will use both parts of this report. Part I deals with the problems of technology and how it affects our lives. It also discusses the energy crisis created, in part, by technology and deals specifically with coal and…

  7. A Conversation with William A. Fowler Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, John

    2005-06-01

    Physicist William A.Fowler initiated an experimental program in nuclear astrophysics after World War II. He recalls here the Steady State versus Big Bang controversy and his celebrated collaboration with Fred Hoyle and Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge on nucleosynthesis in stars. He also comments on the shift away from nuclear physics in universities to large accelerators and national laboratories.

  8. Biomechanics and muscle coordination of human walking: part II: lessons from dynamical simulations and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Felix E; Neptune, Richard R; Kautz, Steven A

    2003-02-01

    Principles of muscle coordination in gait have been based largely on analyses of body motion, ground reaction force and EMG measurements. However, data from dynamical simulations provide a cause-effect framework for analyzing these measurements; for example, Part I (Gait Posture, in press) of this two-part review described how force generation in a muscle affects the acceleration and energy flow among the segments. This Part II reviews the mechanical and coordination concepts arising from analyses of simulations of walking. Simple models have elucidated the basic multisegmented ballistic and passive mechanics of walking. Dynamical models driven by net joint moments have provided clues about coordination in healthy and pathological gait. Simulations driven by muscle excitations have highlighted the partial stability afforded by muscles with their viscoelastic-like properties and the predictability of walking performance when minimization of metabolic energy per unit distance is assumed. When combined with neural control models for exciting motoneuronal pools, simulations have shown how the integrative properties of the neuro-musculo-skeletal systems maintain a stable gait. Other analyses of walking simulations have revealed how individual muscles contribute to trunk support and progression. Finally, we discuss how biomechanical models and simulations may enhance our understanding of the mechanics and muscle function of walking in individuals with gait impairments.

  9. Natalizumab-related anaphylactoid reactions in MS patients are associated with HLA class II alleles

    PubMed Central

    de la Hera, Belén; Urcelay, Elena; Brassat, David; Chan, Andrew; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Salmen, Anke; Villar, Luisa Maria; Álvarez-Cermeño, José Carlos; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Fernández, Oscar; Oliver, Begoña; Saiz, Albert; Ara, Jose Ramón; Vigo, Ana G.; Arroyo, Rafael; Meca, Virginia; Malhotra, Sunny; Fissolo, Nicolás; Horga, Alejandro; Montalban, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to investigate potential associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II alleles and the development of anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with natalizumab. Methods: HLA class I and II genotyping was performed in patients with MS who experienced anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions and in patients who did not develop infusion-related allergic reactions following natalizumab administration. Results: A total of 119 patients with MS from 3 different cohorts were included in the study: 54 with natalizumab-related anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions and 65 without allergic reactions. HLA-DRB1*13 and HLA-DRB1*14 alleles were significantly increased in patients who developed anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions (pM-H = 3 × 10−7; odds ratio [OR]M-H = 8.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.40–23.64), with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 82%. In contrast, the HLA-DRB1*15 allele was significantly more represented in patients who did not develop anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions to natalizumab (pM-H = 6 × 10−4; ORM-H = 0.2, 95% CI = 0.08–0.50), with a PPV of 81%. Conclusions: HLA-DRB1 genotyping before natalizumab treatment may help neurologists to identify patients with MS at risk for developing serious systemic hypersensitivity reactions associated with natalizumab administration. PMID:25520955

  10. AN OUTLINE OF SERBO-CROATIAN NOMINAL MORPHOLOGY, PART II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BIDWELL, CHARLES E.

    THE PAPER DESCRIBES MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SERBOCROATIAN NUMERALS, PRONOUNS, AND ADJECTIVES (NOUNS ARE DESCRIBED IN PART I). THE FIRST PART OF THE PAPER DISCUSSES AT SOME LENGTH STRESS PATTERNS OCCURRING IN SERBOCROATIAN NOUN PARADIGMS. THE PATTERNS ARE BASED ON THE DESCRIPTION OF STRESS SHIFTS GIVEN IN THE STANDARD TEXTBOOKS. NEXT, THE…

  11. Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan's Educational Metatheory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Roland M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second of two parts and continues the conversation which had called for a shift in the conceptual focus of science education towards philosophy of education, with the requirement to develop a discipline-specific "philosophy" of science education. In Part I, conflicting conceptions of science literacy were identified with…

  12. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 153 - Metric Units Used in Part 153

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Pt. 153, App. II Appendix II to.../cm2. ......do kPa 1×10 3 N/m 2. Temperature Degree Celsius °C 5/9 (°F-32). Viscosity...

  13. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 153 - Metric Units Used in Part 153

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Pt. 153, App. II Appendix II to.../cm2. ......do kPa 1×10 3 N/m 2. Temperature Degree Celsius °C 5/9 (°F-32). Viscosity...

  14. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 153 - Metric Units Used in Part 153

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Pt. 153, App. II Appendix II to.../cm2. ......do kPa 1×10 3 N/m 2. Temperature Degree Celsius °C 5/9 (°F-32). Viscosity...

  15. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 153 - Metric Units Used in Part 153

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Pt. 153, App. II Appendix II to.../cm2. ......do kPa 1×10 3 N/m 2. Temperature Degree Celsius °C 5/9 (°F-32). Viscosity...

  16. Internal Auditing in Federal, State, and Local Governments (Part II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Susan; Wilson, Guy

    1981-01-01

    This second part of an annotated bibliography of reports, books, and journal articles concerned with internal auditing in government contexts reviews the available literature for an understanding of the types of internal audit, methods and practices, and other facets. (FM)

  17. Putting Teeth in the Developmental Tiger. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Rennie

    1979-01-01

    The second in a three-part series outlining Greenville Technical College's developmental studies program, this segment discusses the growth and functions of the Developmental Studies Division's counseling service, the Student Success Center. (Author/DR)

  18. Classroom Demonstrations of Polymer Principles Part II. Polymer Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This is part two in a series on classroom demonstrations of polymer principles. Described is how large molecules can be assembled from subunits (the process of polymerization). Examples chosen include both linear and branched or cross-linked molecules. (RH)

  19. Astronomy Books of 1984: Part II--The Technical List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1985-01-01

    An annotated bibliography of astronomy books is presented. These books (most of which are designed for research astronomers and graduate students) demand substantial background in astronomy and physics. Nontechnical books are reviewed in part I (SE 537 910). (JN)

  20. Designing SoTL Studies--Part II: Practicality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartsch, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter suggests solutions to common practical problems in designing SoTL studies. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of different types of designs are discussed. [Part I available at EJ1029363.

  1. Ultrastructure - function relationship in Chlamydomonas reinhartii thylakoids, by means of a comparison between the wild type and the F34 mutant which lacks the photosystem II reaction center.

    PubMed

    Olive, J; Wollman, F A; Bennoun, P; Recouvreur, M

    1979-08-31

    The F34 mutant strain of Chlamydomonas reinhartii is deficient in photosystem II reaction centers. The E fracture faces of the thylakoid membranes of this mutant show a considerable reduction in the number of particles present ant in their size compared with the wild type. We conclude that the polypeptides associated with photosystem II reaction centers, which are missing in SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns of proteins from this mutant strain, are part of the EF particles and are required for assembly of these particles. PMID:492157

  2. Influence of an internal trifluoromethyl group on the rhodium(II)-catalyzed reactions of vinyldiazocarbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Valerij A; Supurgibekov, Murat B; Davies, Huw M L; Sieler, Joachim; Zakharova, Valerija M

    2013-05-01

    Incorporation of a trifluoromethyl group into the structure of 4-(alkoxycarbonyl)vinyldiazocarbonyl compounds greatly decreases the tendency of the carbenoid intermediates formed during Rh(II)-catalyzed reactions to undergo intermolecular processes. Instead, they are prone to experience intramolecular [1,5]- and [1,3]-electrocyclizations to produce reactive cyclopropenes and furans, and these are capable of further transformations. PMID:23614681

  3. REDUCTION OF NITROSOBENZENES AND N-HYDROXYLANILINES BY FE (II) SPECIES: ELUCIDATION OF REACTION MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been a substantial effort toward understanding the reduction of nitroaromatics in Fe(II)-treated ferric oxide systems, little has been done to gain insight into the factors controlling the transformation of their reaction intermediates, nitrosobenzenes and N-hydroxylani...

  4. Conformational behavior of insect pheromones and analogues. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koča, Jaroslav; Carlsen, Per H. J.

    1992-04-01

    The conformational potential energy surface paths of the sex pheromone, Ipsenol, to the Bark Beetle, Ips typographus, and of a series of analogues have been elucidated using the program DAISY. The following structures were calculated: 2-methyl-6-methylene-7-octen-4-ol (Ipsenol, ( II)), 2-methyl-6-methylene-2,7-octadiene-4-ol acetate ( III), 2-methyl-6-methylene-3,7-octadien-2-ol ( IV), 2-methyl-6-methylene-1,7-octadien-3-ol ( V), 5-(3-furanyl)-2-methyl-1-penten-3-ol ( VI) and 1-(3-furanyl)-4-methyl-3-penten-2-ol ( VII). As a measure of the conformational flexibility of the molecules the flexibility coefficients, f, were determined. The f values for the molecules were determined to be: II, 0.145; III, 0.144; IV, 1.240; V, 0.133; VI, 0.825; and VII, 0.451. The molecular mechanics method was used for energy calculations in conjunction with DAISY. Low-energy conformations (conformational channels) together with energy barriers for conformational changes are presented.

  5. Being prepared: bioterrorism and mass prophylaxis: part II.

    PubMed

    Weant, Kyle A; Bailey, Abby M; Fleishaker, Elise L; Justice, Stephanie B

    2014-01-01

    Although several biological agents have been recognized as presenting a significant threat to public health if used in a bioterrorist attack, those that are of greatest importance are known as the Category A agents: Bacillus anthracis (anthrax); variola major (smallpox); Yersinia pestis (plague); Francisella tularensis (tularemia); ribonucleic acid viruses (hemorrhagic fevers); and Clostridium botulinum (botulism toxin). In the previous issue, Part I of this review focused on the clinical presentation and treatment of anthrax, plague, and tularemia. In this second part of this 2-part review of these agents, the focus is on the clinical presentation and treatment of smallpox, viral hemorrhagic fevers, and botulism toxin. The utilization of mass prophylaxis to limit the morbidity and mortality associated with all these agents is also discussed along with the role emergency care personnel play in its implementation.

  6. Cutaneous tuberculosis: diagnosis, histopathology and treatment - Part II*

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Josemir Belo; Figueiredo, Ana Roberta; Ferraz, Cláudia Elise; de Oliveira, Márcia Helena; da Silva, Perla Gomes; de Medeiros, Vanessa Lucília Sileira

    2014-01-01

    The evolution in the knowledge of tuberculosis' physiopathology allowed not only a better understanding of the immunological factors involved in the disease process, but also the development of new laboratory tests, as well as the establishment of a histological classification that reflects the host's ability to contain the infectious agent. At the same time, the increasing bacilli resistance led to alterations in the basic tuberculosis treatment scheme in 2009. This article critically examines laboratory and histological investigations, treatment regimens for tuberculosis and possible adverse reactions to the most frequently used drugs. PMID:25054739

  7. Operational strategies for dispatchable combined cycle plants, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.P.; Landis, F.P.

    1996-11-01

    The Brush Cogeneration Facility is a dual-unit, combined cycle, cogeneration plant, operating in a dual cycling, automatically-dispatchable mode. Part I of this report described the contract, including automatic generation control (AGC) by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO), and the operation of Unit One. This part of the report covers the operation of Unit Two. Unit two is still in its operating infancy, but is showing that fuel efficiency and low emissions levels are not incompatible with cycling, load-following service. 1 fig.

  8. Biomedical research ethics: an Islamic view part II.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Raafat Y

    2007-12-01

    In part I of this article I discussed why Islam rejects secularization and this is not because the ethical principles embedded in Islam's teachings are archaic and out of touch with current realities. In addition, I pointed out the agreement between general broad principles of research ethics and Islamic teachings concerning life; which showed clearly that Islam has addressed the regulation of ethics in research more than 14 centuries ago. In this part, I will address two controversial issues concerning women's rights and age of consent for children as possible research subjects in a Muslim community.

  9. Karst geomorphology: From hydrological functioning to palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Waele, Jo; Gutierrez, Francisco; Audra, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    In January 2015, the first part of the special issue on karst, entitled "Karst geomorphology: From hydrological functioning to palaeoenvironmental reconstructions" was published (Geomorphology, Vol. 229). This second part of the special issue comprises seven research papers covering a broad geographical canvas including Japan, Slovenia, France, Spain, Croatia, and Poland-Ukraine. Both issues mainly emanate from the contributions presented in the Karst session of the 8th International Conference of Geomorphology (International Association of Geomorphologists), held in Paris in August 2013, enriched with some invited papers.

  10. Studies in photochemical smog chemistry. I. Atmospheric chemistry of toluene. II. Analysis of chemical reaction mechanisms for photochemical smog

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    This study focuses on two related topics in the gas phase organic chemistry of importance in urban air pollution. Part I describes an experimental and modeling effort aimed at developing a new explicit reaction mechanism for the atmospheric photooxidation of toluene. This mechanism is tested using experimental data from both indoor and outdoor smog chamber facilities. The predictions of the new reaction mechanism are found to be in good agreement with both sets of experimental data. Additional simulations performed with the new mechanism are used to investigate various mechanistic paths, and to gain insight into areas where the understanding is not complete. The outdoor experimental facility, which was built to provide the second set of experimental data, consists of a 65 cubic meter teflon smog chamber together with full instrumentation capable of measuring ozone, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), carbon monoxide, relative humidity, temperature, aerosol size distributions, and of course toluene and its photooxidation products. In Part II, a theoretical analysis of lumped chemical reaction mechanisms for photochemical smog is presented. Included is a description of a new counter species analysis technique which can be used to analyze any complex chemical reaction mechanism. Finally, a new lumped mechanism for photochemical smog is developed and tested against experimental data from two smog chamber facilities. Advantages of this mechanism relative to the existing lumped mechanisms are discussed.

  11. CONTEMPORARY ARABIC READERS--II. ARABIC ESSAYS, PART 1. TEXTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCARUS, ERNEST N.; AND OTHERS

    INTENDED FOR INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL STUDENTS, "PART 1" OF THIS SECOND VOLUME IN THE "CONTEMPORARY ARABIC READERS" SERIES PRESENTS A COLLECTION OF 20 ESSAYS WRITTEN BY OUTSTANDING ARAB LITERARY FIGURES. SUBJECTS RANGE FROM POLITICAL AND RELIGIOUS PHILOSOPHY IN THE ARAB WORLD TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND REFORMS IN AGRICULTURE AND THE WRITING SYSTEM. THE…

  12. Laboratory Animal Housing--Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runkle, Robert S.

    1963-01-01

    In recent years, the use of laboratory animals for bio-medical research has shown marked increase. Economic and efficient housing is a necessity. This two part report established guidelines for design and selection of materials for conventional animal housing. Contents include--(1) production and breeding facilities, (2) quarantine facilities, (3)…

  13. Aesthetic Pursuits: Windows, Frames, Words, Images--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Ken

    2005-01-01

    In Part I of this study (Burke, 2005), the author presented the essentials of Image Presentation Theory--IPT--and its application to the analytical explication of various spatial designs in and psychological responses to images, from the illusions of depth in what is referred to as "windows" in cinema theory to the more patterned abstractions of…

  14. Searching for the Right Way to Begin Class: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawry, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Part I, "Searching for the Right Way to Begin Class," described the various iterations of beginning class rituals the author used over the years. Those rituals began with a prayer to the Holy Spirit as was required at the Catholic women's college Marymount in Tarrytown, New York, where he first taught out of graduate school in 1965. That was…

  15. Professional development implications of Ebola virus disease education: part II.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elaine L; Kerner, Robert L; Schindler, Jaclyn S; DeVoe, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series that explores how one large, integrated health care system swiftly responded to the emerging threat of Ebola virus disease. In this second article, the educational and training activities that were developed are described.

  16. Topics in Finance: Part II--Financial Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judy

    2010-01-01

    The second article in a series designed to supplement the introductory financial management course, this essay addresses financial statement analysis, including its impact on stock valuation, disclosure, and managerial behavior. [For "Topics in Finance Part I--Introduction and Stockholder Wealth Maximization," see EJ1060345.

  17. Developing a Positive Self-Concept. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibrowski, Lee; Slater, Shirley

    This publication supplements an earlier publication, "What Do You Like about Yourself? Developing a Positive Self-Concept" that presented an introduction to self-concept and included activities that could be used with students of all ages. This particular document, divided into two parts, includes additional ideas and activities that relate to…

  18. DIY Soundcard Based Temperature Logging System. Part II: Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates some simple applications of how temperature logging systems may be used to monitor simple heat experiments, and how the data obtained can be analysed to get some additional insight into the physical processes. [For "DIY Soundcard Based Temperature Logging System. Part I: Design," see EJ1114124.

  19. Kids in Mental Institutions. Part II. Program 131.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    The second of a two-part radio program on children in mental institutions presents transcripts of interviews with psychiatrists and emotionally disturbed adolescents. Subjects addressed include use of drugs, behavior modification, music, and theatre therapy in institutions. The transcript concludes with a narrated tour of Sheppard-Pratt, an…

  20. Summary of Gary Becker's IALL '93 Copyright Workshop, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Irene

    1994-01-01

    This article covers the second part of a workshop on registering copyrighted materials, off-air video recording, using copyrighted videotapes in the classroom, and computer software copyright. The Copyright Law provides for the protection of the authors of creative works, while at the same time providing certain exemptions for educators and…

  1. Curriculum Guide for Hospitality Education. Part II. Exemplary Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalani, Henry

    This second of a two-part study designed to develop a hospitality education program model for Hawaii's community colleges is based on the primary data gathered in a survey of the hospitality industry characteristics, manpower requirements, and employment demands. (Survey data is reported in volume 1 of the study.) The introductory section of this…

  2. Finding Out about Archaeology: Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archaeological Inst. of America, Boston, MA.

    This packet of materials presents selected, descriptive bibliographies for children and young adults. Instructional materials for the use of teachers and parents are also included. Focusing on the subject of archaeology, part 1 of the annotated bibliography presents instructional materials coded for appropriate grade level use. Each entry…

  3. Entrepreneurship Education and Training: Can Entrepreneurship Be Taught? Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Colette; Hill, Frances; Leitch, Claire

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - Despite a growing body of literature in the field, there is still considerable uncertainty as to whether entrepreneurs are born are made, which has led to an ongoing debate in the entrepreneurship academy about whether we can actually teach individuals to be entrepreneurs. With this in mind, this two-part paper aims to address the…

  4. The Need for Ocean Literacy in the Classroom: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoedinger, Sarah; Cava, Francesca; Jewell, Beth

    2006-01-01

    As mentioned in Part I, certain classroom activities can help students learn about the ocean and empower them to make informed decisions about their impacts on the environment. One such activity focuses on harmful algal blooms (HABs). In this article, the authors include background information on HABs and then present two activities. Activity 1 is…

  5. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  6. German women in chemistry, 1925-1945 (Part II).

    PubMed

    Johnson, J A

    1998-01-01

    The paper traces the role of German women into the chemistry profession from 1925 to 1945, examining their relative numbers and experience in higher education, in academic and industrial careers as well as in professional organizations such as the Verein Deutscher Chemikerinnen. The paper examines the effect of the 1930s Depression, National Socialism, and World War II on women chemists, considering both general trends as well as the experiences and achievements of several individual women in a variety of situations. Finally, it considers the longterm consequences of these developments, such as the Nazi expulsion of Jewish women, destruction of women's organizations and devaluing of women's achievements, in limiting the recognition and participation of German women chemists after 1945.

  7. German women in chemistry, 1925-1945 (part II).

    PubMed

    Johnson, J A

    1998-12-01

    The paper traces the role of German women into the chemistry profession from 1925 to 1945, examining their relative numbers and experience in higher education, in academic and industrial careers as well as in professional organizations such as the Verein Deutscher Chemikerinnen. The paper examines the effect of the 1930s Depression, National Socialism, and World War II on women chemists, considering both general trends as well as the experiences and achievements of several individual women in a variety of situations. Finally, it considers the longterm consequences of these developments, such as the Nazi expulsion of Jewish women, destruction of women's organizations and devaluing of women's achievements, in limiting the recognition and participation of German women chemists after 1945.

  8. Part I. Mechanisms of injury associated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy; Part II. Exsolution of volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Danny Dwayne

    Part I - Shock waves are focused in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) machines to strengths sufficient to fracture kidney stones. Substantial side effects-most of them acute-have resulted from this procedure, including injury to soft tissue. The focusing of shock waves through various layers of tissue is a complex process which stimulates many bio-mechano-chemical responses.This thesis presents results of an in vitro study of the initial mechanical stimulus. Planar nitrocellulose membranes of order 10 um thick were used as models of thin tissue structures. Two modes of failure were recorded: Failure due to cavitation collapsing on or near the membranes, and failure induced by altering the structure of shock waves. Tests were done in water at and around F2 to characterize the extent of cavitation damage, and was found to be confined within the focal region, 1.2 cm along the axis of focus.Scattering media were used to simulate the effects of acoustic nonuniformity of tissue and to alter the structure of focusing shock waves. 40 um diameter (average) hollow glass spheres were added to ethylene glycol, glycerine and castor oil to vary the properties of the scattering media. Multiple layer samples of various types of phantom tissue were tested in degassed castor oil to gauge the validity of the scattering media. The scattering media and tissue samples increased the rise time decreased strain rate in a similar fashion. Membranes were damaged by the decreased strain rate and accumulated effects of the altered structure: After about 20 or so shocks immersed in the scattering media and after about 100 shocks behind the tissue samples. The mode of failure was tearing with multiple tears in some cases from about .1 cm to about 3 cm depending of the number of shocks and membrane thickness.Part II - This work examines the exsolution of volatiles-carbon dioxide from water-in a cylindrical test cell under different pressure conditions. Water was supersaturated with

  9. 31 CFR Appendix II(f) to Part 13 - Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Overhead and Administrative Costs II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PROCEDURES FOR PROVIDING ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS IN PROTECTING FOREIGN DIPLOMATIC...

  10. 31 CFR Appendix II to Part 13 - Form of Bill for Reimbursement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Form of Bill for Reimbursement II Appendix II to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PROCEDURES FOR PROVIDING ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS IN PROTECTING FOREIGN DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS Pt. 13,...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents II Appendix II to Part 258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... 258—List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents Common name 1 CAS RN 2 Chemical...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents II Appendix II to Part 258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... 258—List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents Common name 1 CAS RN 2 Chemical...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents II Appendix II to Part 258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... 258—List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents Common name 1 CAS RN 2 Chemical...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 258 - List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true List of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents II Appendix II to Part 258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... of Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents Common name 1 CAS RN 2 Chemical abstracts...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine II Appendix II to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Screening Limits for Total Chlorine Terrain-adjusted effective stack height (m) Noncomplex Terrain Urban...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix II to Part 805 - Employees Required To Submit Statements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Employees Required To Submit Statements II Appendix II to Part 805 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL...—Employees Required To Submit Statements Statements of employment and financial interests are required of...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix II to Part 805 - Employees Required To Submit Statements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employees Required To Submit Statements II Appendix II to Part 805 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL...—Employees Required To Submit Statements Statements of employment and financial interests are required of...

  18. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 150 - Explanation of Figure 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. II Appendix II to Part 150—Explanation of Figure 1 Definition of a..., the inorganic acids. The cargo groups in the compatibility chart are separated into two categories: 1... certain Reactive Groups. Cargo Groups do not react hazardously with one another. Using the...

  19. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 150 - Explanation of Figure 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. II Appendix II to Part 150—Explanation of Figure 1 Definition of a..., the inorganic acids. The cargo groups in the compatibility chart are separated into two categories: 1... certain Reactive Groups. Cargo Groups do not react hazardously with one another. Using the...

  20. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 150 - Explanation of Figure 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, App. II Appendix II to Part 150—Explanation of Figure 1 Definition of a..., the inorganic acids. The cargo groups in the compatibility chart are separated into two categories: 1... certain Reactive Groups. Cargo Groups do not react hazardously with one another. Using the...

  1. Kinetics and mechanisms for reactions of Fe(II) with iron(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byong-Hun; Dempsey, Brian A; Burgos, William D

    2003-08-01

    Uptake of Fe(II) onto hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), corundum (alpha-Al2O3), amorphous ferric oxide (AFO), and a mixture of hematite and AFO was measured. Uptake was operationally divided into adsorption (extractable by 0.5 N HCl within 20 h) and fixation (extractable by 3.0 N HCl within 7 d). For 0.25 mM Fe(II) onto 25 mM iron(III) hematite at pH 6.8: (i) 10% of Fe(II) was adsorbed within 1 min; (ii) 20% of Fe(II) was adsorbed within 1 d; (iii) uptake slowly increased to 24% of Fe(II) during the next 24 d, almost all adsorbed; (iv) at 30 d, the uptake increased to 28% of Fe(II) with 6% of total Fe(II) fixed; and (v) uptake slowly increased to 30% of Fe(II) by 45 d with 10% of total Fe(II) fixed. Similar results were observed for 0.125 mM Fe(II) onto 25 mM iron(III) hematite, except that percent of adsorption and fixation were increased. There was adsorption but no fixation for 0.25 mM Fe(II) onto corundum [196.2 mM Al(III)] at pH 6.8, for 0.125 mM Fe(II) onto 25 mM iron(III) hematite at pH 4.5, and for 0.25 mM Zn(II) onto 25 mM iron(III) hematite at pH 6.8. A small addition of AFO to the hematite suspension increased Fe(II) fixation when 0.25 mM Fe(II) was reacted with 25 mM iron(III) hematite and 0.025 mM Fe(III) AFO at pH 6.8. Reaction of 0.125 mM Fe(II) with 2.5 mM Fe(III) AFO resulted in rapid adsorption of 30% of added Fe(II), followed by conversion of AFO to goethite and a decrease in adsorption without Fe(II) fixation. The fixation of Fe(II) by hematite at pH 6.8 is consistent with interfacial electron transfer and the formation of new mineral phases. We propose that electron transfer from adsorbed Fe(II) to structural Fe(III) in hematite results in oxidation of Fe(II) to AFO on the surface of hematite and that solid-phase contact among hematite, AFO, and structural Fe(II) produces magnetite (Fe3O4). The unique interactions of Fe(II) with iron(III) oxides would be environmentally important to understand the fate of redox-sensitive chemicals.

  2. Fragrance contact dermatitis: a worldwide multicenter investigation (Part II).

    PubMed

    Larsen, W; Nakayama, H; Fischer, T; Elsner, P; Frosch, P; Burrows, D; Jordan, W; Shaw, S; Wilkinson, J; Marks, J; Sugawara, M; Nethercott, M; Nethercott, J

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of responses to selected fragrance materials in patients who were fragrance sensitive. 178 patients were evaluated in 8 centers worldwide with a fragrance mix (FM) and 20 other fragrance materials. Reaction to the fragrance mixture (FM) occurred in 78.7% of the subjects. Substances reacting at a rate of 2% or higher included jasmine absolute, geranium oil bourbon, l-citronellol, spearmint oil, 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta-gamma-2-benzopyran, omega-6-hexadecenlactone, dimethyltetrahydrobenzaldehyde (isomer mixture), and alpha-amylcinnamaldehyde. These chemicals should be furthur evaluated to corroborate their allergenicity. We are constantly looking for new fragrance allergens to extend the diagnostic capability of the fragrance mix (FM).

  3. Achieving hemostasis in dermatology-Part II: Topical hemostatic agents

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Jaimie B.; Kaur, Ravneet R.; Siegel, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Bleeding is a common occurrence during any dermatologic surgery that disrupts blood vessels. The complications of excess bleeding can include delayed wound healing, hematoma formation, infection, dehiscence, and necrosis. In part one of this review, we discussed the pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative management of patients undergoing dermatologic surgery. In Part two, we discuss traditional and new topical hemostatic agents used to achieve hemostasis in dermatological procedures and surgery. We will evaluate the caustic and non-caustic hemostatic agents as well as hemostatic dressings. The mechanisms of action, side effect profile, and advantages and disadvantages of the topical hemostatic agents are provided. Sources for this article were found searching the English literature in PubMed for the time period 1940 to March 2012. A thorough bibliography search was also performed and key references examined. PMID:23984226

  4. GSTARS computer models and their applications, Part II: Applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, F.J.M.; Yang, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    In part 1 of this two-paper series, a brief summary of the basic concepts and theories used in developing the Generalized Stream Tube model for Alluvial River Simulation (GSTARS) computer models was presented. Part 2 provides examples that illustrate some of the capabilities of the GSTARS models and how they can be applied to solve a wide range of river and reservoir sedimentation problems. Laboratory and field case studies are used and the examples show representative applications of the earlier and of the more recent versions of GSTARS. Some of the more recent capabilities implemented in GSTARS3, one of the latest versions of the series, are also discussed here with more detail. ?? 2008 International Research and Training Centre on Erosion and Sedimentation and the World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research.

  5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy: Part II. Advantages of FT-IR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    This is Part II in a series on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Described are various advantages of FT-IR spectroscopy including energy advantages, wavenumber accuracy, constant resolution, polarization effects, and stepping at grating changes. (RH)

  6. Effect of commission structure on decision making. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Barvick, W.M.

    1983-11-24

    Economic and technological changes in the past decade have rendered ineffective public-utility regulation an unaffordable luxury. In this article, the second of two, the author continues his examination of the responsibilities of the state public utility commission, focusing attention on the relationship between the commission and its staff. Problems of personnel management and decision making via ex parte contacts prompt the author to propose a structure that separates the commission from the investigative and advocacy functions of the staff. 7 references.

  7. Variance analysis. Part II, The use of computers.

    PubMed

    Finkler, S A

    1991-09-01

    This is the second in a two-part series on variance analysis. In the first article (JONA, July/August 1991), the author discussed flexible budgeting, including the calculation of price, quantity, volume, and acuity variances. In this second article, the author focuses on the use of computers by nurse managers to aid in the process of calculating, understanding, and justifying variances. PMID:1919788

  8. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  9. Reactions of the terminal Ni(II)-OH group in substitution and electrophilic reactions with carbon dioxide and other substrates: structural definition of binding modes in an intramolecular Ni(II)...Fe(II) bridged site.

    PubMed

    Huang, Deguang; Holm, R H

    2010-04-01

    A singular feature of the catalytic C-cluster of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase is a sulfide-bridged Ni...Fe locus where substrate is bound and transformed in the reversible reaction CO + H(2)O right harpoon over left harpoon CO(2) + 2H(+) + 2e(-). A similar structure has been sought in this work. Mononuclear planar Ni(II) complexes [Ni(pyN(2)(Me2))L](1-) (pyN(2)(Me2) = bis(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-2,6-pyridinedicarboxamidate(2-)) derived from a NNN pincer ligand have been prepared including L = OH(-) (1) and CN(-) (7). Complex 1 reacts with ethyl formate and CO(2) to form unidentate L = HCO(2)(-) (5) and HCO(3)(-) (6) products. A binucleating macrocycle was prepared which specifically binds Ni(II) at a NNN pincer site and five-coordinate Fe(II) at a triamine site. The Ni(II) macrocyle forms hydroxo (14) and cyanide complexes (15) analogous to 1 and 7. Reaction of 14 with FeCl(2) alone and with ethyl formate and 15 with FeCl(2) affords molecules with the Ni(II)-L-Fe(II) bridge unit in which L = mu(2):eta(1)-OH(-) (17) and mu(2):eta(2)-HCO(2)(-) (18) and -CN(-) (19). All bridges are nonlinear (17, 140.0 degrees ; 18, M-O-C 135.9 degrees (Ni), 120.2 degrees (Fe); 19, Ni-C-N 170.3 degrees , Fe-N-C 141.8 degrees ) with Ni...Fe separations of 3.7-4.8 A. The Ni(II)Fe(II) complexes, lacking appropriate Ni-Fe-S cluster structures, are not site analogues, but their synthesis and reactivity provide the first demonstration that molecular Ni(II)...Fe(II) sites and bridges can be attained, a necessity in the biomimetic chemistry of C-clusters. PMID:20218565

  10. Male hypogonadism. Part II: etiology, pathophysiology, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Seftel, A

    2006-01-01

    Male hypogonadism has a multifactorial etiology that includes genetic conditions, anatomic abnormalities, infection, tumor, and injury. Defects in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may also result from type II diabetes mellitus and treatment with a range of medications. Circulating testosterone levels have been associated with sexual function, cognitive function, and body composition. Apart from reduced levels of testosterone, clinical hallmarks of hypogonadism include absence or regression of secondary sex characteristics, reduced fertility (oligospermia, azoospermia), anemia, muscle wasting, reduced bone mass (and bone mineral density), and/or abdominal adiposity. Some patients, particularly those with partial androgen deficiency of the aging male, also experience sexual dysfunction, reduced sense of vitality, depressed mood, increased irritability, difficulty concentrating, and/or hot flushes in certain cases of acute onset. As many patients with male hypogonadism-like patients with erectile dysfunction-do not seek medical attention, it is important for clinicians to be acquainted with the signs and symptoms of hypogonadism, and to conduct appropriate laboratory testing and other assessments to determine the causes and inform the treatment of this condition.

  11. The museum maze in oral pathology demystifed: part II.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Ganavi, Bs

    2013-01-01

    Museum technology is perpetually changing due to current requirements and added inventions for our comfort and furbished display of specimens. Hence numerous methods of specimen preservation have been put on trial by diverse people in the medical feld as are the inventions. But only few have caught people's interest and are popularized today. This part provides unique insights into specialized custom-made techniques, evolution of recent advances like plastination and virtual museum that have popularized as visual delights. Plastination gives handy, perennial life-like acrylic specimens, whereas virtual museum takes museum feld to the electronic era making use of computers and virtual environment. PMID:24685810

  12. The career plateau--the differential diagnosis: Part II.

    PubMed

    Potts, L E

    1990-08-01

    This is the second article in a three-part series. The first article defined the problem of career plateauing and the heightened awareness of hospital administrators of a long-term concern for nurses and other health care professional. Career plateauing is the point in an organizational career where an individual is unlikely to experience additional hierarchical mobility. This article presents strategies for change for the organization, the manager, and the employee. The third article will summarize a research study the author is currently completing on the development of an inventory to measure the career needs of hospital nurses.

  13. Tourette's syndrome, Part II: Contemporary approaches to assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Scahill, L; Ort, S I; Hardin, M T

    1993-08-01

    Clinical assessment of a child with Tourette's syndrome (TS) includes a careful review of motor and phonic tics. In addition, commonly associated problems of such as obsessive-compulsive symptoms, or symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (inattention, impulsiveness, and overactivity) should also be evaluated. Treatment almost always includes education of the child, family, and school personnel concerning the natural history and behavioral boundaries of the disorder. Other treatment interventions depend to a great extent on the primary source of impairment. This article, the second of two parts, presents three illustrative cases and reviews current treatment interventions for children and adolescents with TS.

  14. The museum maze in oral pathology demystifed: part II.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Ganavi, Bs

    2013-09-01

    Museum technology is perpetually changing due to current requirements and added inventions for our comfort and furbished display of specimens. Hence numerous methods of specimen preservation have been put on trial by diverse people in the medical feld as are the inventions. But only few have caught people's interest and are popularized today. This part provides unique insights into specialized custom-made techniques, evolution of recent advances like plastination and virtual museum that have popularized as visual delights. Plastination gives handy, perennial life-like acrylic specimens, whereas virtual museum takes museum feld to the electronic era making use of computers and virtual environment.

  15. Responsive Persistence Part II. Practices of Postmodern Therapists.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Olga; Dienhart, Anna; Turner, Jean

    2013-10-01

    This article, a companion to Part I of this series of articles, discusses how therapists informed by social constructionist and postmodern ideas enact persistence in their work with families. Transcripts and video-recordings of therapy interaction facilitated by selected major champions for three postmodern (collaborative) therapies: Michael White (narrative therapy), Harlene Anderson (collaborative language systems approach), and Bill O'Hanlon (solution-oriented therapy) were examined for persistence practices. The article offers a range of possible ways in which postmodern therapists may enact their influence in facilitating generative and helpful conversations with families and remain responsive to clients' preferences and understandings. Implications for family therapy practice, training, and supervision are discussed.

  16. Nanoparticles and the blood coagulation system. Part II: safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Ilinskaya, Anna N; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2013-06-01

    Nanoparticle interactions with the blood coagulation system can be beneficial or adverse depending on the intended use of a nanomaterial. Nanoparticles can be engineered to be procoagulant or to carry coagulation-initiating factors to treat certain disorders. Likewise, they can be designed to be anticoagulant or to carry anticoagulant drugs to intervene in other pathological conditions in which coagulation is a concern. An overview of the coagulation system was given and a discussion of a desirable interface between this system and engineered nanomaterials was assessed in part I, which was published in the May 2013 issue of Nanomedicine. Unwanted pro- and anti-coagulant properties of nanoparticles represent significant concerns in the field of nanomedicine, and often hamper the development and transition into the clinic of many promising engineered nanocarriers. This part will focus on the undesirable effects of engineered nanomaterials on the blood coagulation system. We will discuss the relationship between the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (e.g., size, charge and hydrophobicity) that determine their negative effects on the blood coagulation system in order to understand how manipulation of these properties can help to overcome unwanted side effects.

  17. Restoring immune tolerance in neuromyelitis optica: Part II.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Steinman, Larry; Behne, Jacinta M; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; Chin, Peter S; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Healey, Donald; Kim, James I; Kranz, David M; Lutterotti, Andreas; Martin, Roland; Schippling, Sven; Villoslada, Pablo; Wei, Cheng-Hong; Weiner, Howard L; Zamvil, Scott S; Smith, Terry J; Yeaman, Michael R

    2016-10-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMO/SD) and its clinical variants have at their core the loss of immune tolerance to aquaporin-4 and perhaps other autoantigens. The characteristic phenotype is disruption of astrocyte function and demyelination of spinal cord, optic nerves, and particular brain regions. In this second of a 2-part article, we present further perspectives regarding the pathogenesis of NMO/SD and how this disease might be amenable to emerging technologies aimed at restoring immune tolerance to disease-implicated self-antigens. NMO/SD appears to be particularly well-suited for these strategies since aquaporin-4 has already been identified as the dominant autoantigen. The recent technical advances in reintroducing immune tolerance in experimental models of disease as well as in humans should encourage quantum leaps in this area that may prove productive for novel therapy. In this part of the article series, the potential for regulatory T and B cells is brought into focus, as are new approaches to oral tolerization. Finally, a roadmap is provided to help identify potential issues in clinical development and guide applications in tolerization therapy to solving NMO/SD through the use of emerging technologies. Each of these perspectives is intended to shine new light on potential cures for NMO/SD and other autoimmune diseases, while sparing normal host defense mechanisms. PMID:27648464

  18. Histologic features of alopecias: part II: scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Bernárdez, C; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of disorders of the hair and scalp can generally be made on clinical grounds, but clinical signs are not always diagnostic and in some cases more invasive techniques, such as a biopsy, may be necessary. This 2-part article is a detailed review of the histologic features of the main types of alopecia based on the traditional classification of these disorders into 2 major groups: scarring and nonscarring alopecias. Scarring alopecias are disorders in which the hair follicle is replaced by fibrous scar tissue, a process that leads to permanent hair loss. In nonscarring alopecias, the follicles are preserved and hair growth can resume when the cause of the problem is eliminated. In the second part of this review, we describe the histologic features of the main forms of scarring alopecia. Since a close clinical-pathological correlation is essential for making a correct histopathologic diagnosis of alopecia, we also include a brief description of the clinical features of the principal forms of this disorder. PMID:25439143

  19. Dirac structures in Lagrangian mechanics Part II: Variational structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Hiroaki; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2006-12-01

    Part I of this paper introduced the notion of implicit Lagrangian systems and their geometric structure was explored in the context of Dirac structures. In this part, we develop the variational structure of implicit Lagrangian systems. Specifically, we show that the implicit Euler-Lagrange equations can be formulated using an extended variational principle of Hamilton called the Hamilton-Pontryagin principle. This variational formulation incorporates, in a natural way, the generalized Legendre transformation, which enables one to treat degenerate Lagrangian systems. The definition of this generalized Legendre transformation makes use of natural maps between iterated tangent and cotangent spaces. Then, we develop an extension of the classical Lagrange-d'Alembert principle called the Lagrange-d'Alembert-Pontryagin principle for implicit Lagrangian systems with constraints and external forces. A particularly interesting case is that of nonholonomic mechanical systems that can have both constraints and external forces. In addition, we define a constrained Dirac structure on the constraint momentum space, namely the image of the Legendre transformation (which, in the degenerate case, need not equal the whole cotangent bundle). We construct an implicit constrained Lagrangian system associated with this constrained Dirac structure by making use of an Ehresmann connection. Two examples, namely a vertical rolling disk on a plane and an L- C circuit are given to illustrate the results.

  20. Histologic features of alopecias: part II: scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Bernárdez, C; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of disorders of the hair and scalp can generally be made on clinical grounds, but clinical signs are not always diagnostic and in some cases more invasive techniques, such as a biopsy, may be necessary. This 2-part article is a detailed review of the histologic features of the main types of alopecia based on the traditional classification of these disorders into 2 major groups: scarring and nonscarring alopecias. Scarring alopecias are disorders in which the hair follicle is replaced by fibrous scar tissue, a process that leads to permanent hair loss. In nonscarring alopecias, the follicles are preserved and hair growth can resume when the cause of the problem is eliminated. In the second part of this review, we describe the histologic features of the main forms of scarring alopecia. Since a close clinical-pathological correlation is essential for making a correct histopathologic diagnosis of alopecia, we also include a brief description of the clinical features of the principal forms of this disorder.

  1. Restoring immune tolerance in neuromyelitis optica: Part II.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Steinman, Larry; Behne, Jacinta M; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; Chin, Peter S; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Healey, Donald; Kim, James I; Kranz, David M; Lutterotti, Andreas; Martin, Roland; Schippling, Sven; Villoslada, Pablo; Wei, Cheng-Hong; Weiner, Howard L; Zamvil, Scott S; Smith, Terry J; Yeaman, Michael R

    2016-10-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMO/SD) and its clinical variants have at their core the loss of immune tolerance to aquaporin-4 and perhaps other autoantigens. The characteristic phenotype is disruption of astrocyte function and demyelination of spinal cord, optic nerves, and particular brain regions. In this second of a 2-part article, we present further perspectives regarding the pathogenesis of NMO/SD and how this disease might be amenable to emerging technologies aimed at restoring immune tolerance to disease-implicated self-antigens. NMO/SD appears to be particularly well-suited for these strategies since aquaporin-4 has already been identified as the dominant autoantigen. The recent technical advances in reintroducing immune tolerance in experimental models of disease as well as in humans should encourage quantum leaps in this area that may prove productive for novel therapy. In this part of the article series, the potential for regulatory T and B cells is brought into focus, as are new approaches to oral tolerization. Finally, a roadmap is provided to help identify potential issues in clinical development and guide applications in tolerization therapy to solving NMO/SD through the use of emerging technologies. Each of these perspectives is intended to shine new light on potential cures for NMO/SD and other autoimmune diseases, while sparing normal host defense mechanisms.

  2. Kinetics of exciplex formation/dissipation in reaction following Weller Scheme II

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorenko, S. G.; Burshtein, A. I.

    2014-09-21

    Creation of exciplexes from the charged products of photoionization is considered by means of Integral Encounter Theory. The general kinetic equations of such a reaction following the Weller scheme II are developed. The special attention is given to the particular case of irreversible remote ionization of primary excited electron donor. Kinetics of exciplex formation is considered at fast biexponential geminate transformation of exciplexes in cage that gives way to subsequent bulk reaction of equilibrated reaction products controlled by power law recombination of ions. It is shown that the initial geminate stage of exciplex kinetics is observed only in diffusion controlled regime of the reaction and disappears with increasing mobility of ions in passing to kinetic regime. The quantum yield of exciplexes is studied along with their kinetics.

  3. Thermal cycling distortion of metal ceramics: Part II--Etiology.

    PubMed

    Campbell, S D; Pelletier, L B

    1992-08-01

    The three-dimensional geometry of conventional fixed prostheses complicates the study of the thermal cycling distortion in metal ceramic alloys. Any explanation of the etiology of thermal cycling distortion in metal ceramic restorations must account for the observed magnitude, timing, and direction of the deformation. The simplified experimental geometry developed in Part I was applied to elucidate the etiologic factors involved in metal ceramic deformation. Techniques to minimize the thermal cycling distortion were also studied. It was found that all of the significant distortion occurred during the first thermal cycling of the alloy (oxidation) and that no distortion resulted from the application of body porcelain. The specimens that were cold worked and then oxidized had significantly more distortion than any other group. A significant reduction in distortion was observed when the initial thermal cycling was completed before the specimens were cold worked. It was determined that the release of casting- and cold working-induced stresses had a synergistic effect. PMID:1501176

  4. Solar box-cooker: Part II-analysis and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Thulasi Das, T.C. ); Karmakar, S. ); Rao, D.P. )

    1994-03-01

    Based on the model proposed in the companion paper (Part I), a method is outlined simulation of the solar box-cookers loaded with one, two, or four vessels. The relative importance of various heat-exchange rates in the cooker were examined. The effect of parameters such as the thickness and size of the absorber plate, emissivity of the vessel, insulation thickness, and cooking time were studied. Cookers of three sizes were simulated to assess their adequacy in cooking. The studies indicate that the black paint on the vessels could be avoided if weathered stainless steel or aluminum vessels are used. The cooker with inner dimensions of 0.6 x 0.6 x 0.1 m[sup 3] was found to be adequate to cook lunch and dinner on a clear day even in the winter months. Experimental studies carried out to obtain the heat-transfer coefficients, required for simulation, are presented.

  5. Gas dynamics of a supersonic radial jet. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarev, V. F.; Klinkov, S. V.; Zaikovskii, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the radial distributions of the pressure measured with a Pitot tube for the case of a radial jet with/without swirling of the input flow in the pre-chamber; the length of the supersonic part of the jet, dependency of the jet thickness as a function of the distance from the nozzle outlet, and approximating analytical formula for the jet thickness that generalizes the experimental data. Experimental data demonstrated that at the deposition distances lower than 4-6 gauges from the nozzle outlet, the solid particle velocity and temperature are almost uniform over the jet cross section. This means that the target surface can be allocated here without loss in coating quality and deposition coefficient. The maximal recommended distance where the deposition is still possible is the length of l s0 ~ 16 gauges.

  6. Ultrasensitivity part II: multisite phosphorylation, stoichiometric inhibitors, and positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, James E; Ha, Sang Hoon

    2014-11-01

    In this series of reviews, we are examining ultrasensitive responses, the switch-like input-output relationships that contribute to signal processing in a wide variety of signaling contexts. In the first part of this series, we explored one mechanism for generating ultrasensitivity, zero-order ultrasensitivity, where the saturation of two converting enzymes allows the output to switch from low to high over a tight range of input levels. In this second installment, we focus on three conceptually distinct mechanisms for ultrasensitivity: multisite phosphorylation, stoichiometric inhibitors, and positive feedback. We also examine several related mechanisms and concepts, including cooperativity, reciprocal regulation, coherent feed-forward regulation, and substrate competition, and provide several examples of signaling processes where these mechanisms are known or are suspected to be applicable. PMID:25440716

  7. Deformational plagiocephaly, brachycephaly, and scaphocephaly. Part II: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Gary F

    2011-01-01

    Cranial deformation is the most common cause of abnormal head shape. Intentional and unintentional alterations of cranial form are associated with the application of external pressure to the growing infant head, and such changes have been recorded throughout man's history. Recent changes in Western sleeping practices, instituted to reduce the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome, have led to a dramatic rise in cranial deformation and renewed interest in this subject. This 2-part review presents a pragmatic clinical approach to this topic including a critical review of the literature as it applies to each aspect of this common diagnosis: historical perspective, terminology, differential diagnosis, etiopathogenesis and predisposing factors, and prevention and treatment. PMID:21187782

  8. Planar LTCC transformers for high voltage flyback converters: Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, Daryl; Schare, Joshua M., Ph.D.; Slama, George; Abel, David

    2009-02-01

    This paper is a continuation of the work presented in SAND2007-2591 'Planar LTCC Transformers for High Voltage Flyback Converters'. The designs in that SAND report were all based on a ferrite tape/dielectric paste system originally developed by NASCENTechnoloy, Inc, who collaborated in the design and manufacturing of the planar LTCC flyback converters. The output/volume requirements were targeted to DoD application for hard target/mini fuzing at around 1500 V for reasonable primary peak currents. High voltages could be obtained but with considerable higher current. Work had begun on higher voltage systems and is where this report begins. Limits in material properties and processing capabilities show that the state-of-the-art has limited our practical output voltage from such a small part volume. In other words, the technology is currently limited within the allowable funding and interest.

  9. Photochemical redox reactions of copper(II)-alanine complexes in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Jui; Hsu, Chao-Sheng; Wang, Po-Yen; Lin, Yi-Liang; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Wu, Chien-Hou

    2014-05-19

    The photochemical redox reactions of Cu(II)/alanine complexes have been studied in deaerated solutions over an extensive range of pH, Cu(II) concentration, and alanine concentration. Under irradiation, the ligand-to-metal charge transfer results in the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) and the concomitant oxidation of alanine, which produces ammonia and acetaldehyde. Molar absorptivities and quantum yields of photoproducts for Cu(II)/alanine complexes at 313 nm are characterized mainly with the equilibrium Cu(II) speciation where the presence of simultaneously existing Cu(II) species is taken into account. By applying regression analysis, individual Cu(I) quantum yields are determined to be 0.094 ± 0.014 for the 1:1 complex (CuL) and 0.064 ± 0.012 for the 1:2 complex (CuL2). Individual quantum yields of ammonia are 0.055 ± 0.007 for CuL and 0.036 ± 0.005 for CuL2. Individual quantum yields of acetaldehyde are 0.030 ± 0.007 for CuL and 0.024 ± 0.007 for CuL2. CuL always has larger quantum yields than CuL2, which can be attributed to the Cu(II) stabilizing effect of the second ligand. For both CuL and CuL2, the individual quantum yields of Cu(I), ammonia, and acetaldehyde are in the ratio of 1.8:1:0.7. A reaction mechanism for the formation of the observed photoproducts is proposed.

  10. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 2: Iron- and Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors arising during wine production are frequently removed by Cu(II) fining. In part 1 of this study ( 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b00641 ), the reaction of H2S and thiols with Cu(II) was examined; however, the interaction of iron and copper is also known to play an important synergistic role in mediating non-enzymatic wine oxidation. The interaction of these two metals in the oxidation of H2S and thiols (cysteine, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, and 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol) was therefore examined under wine-like conditions. H2S and thiols (300 μM) were reacted with Fe(III) (100 or 200 μM) alone and in combination with Cu(II) (25 or 50 μM), and concentrations of H2S and thiols, oxygen, and acetaldehyde were monitored over time. H2S and thiols were shown to be slowly oxidized in the presence of Fe(III) alone and were not bound to Fe(III) under model wine conditions. However, Cu(II) added to model wine containing Fe(III) was quickly reduced by H2S and thiols to form Cu(I) complexes, which then rapidly reduced Fe(III) to Fe(II). Oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of oxygen regenerated Fe(III) and completed the iron redox cycle. In addition, sulfur-derived oxidation products were observed, and the formation of organic polysulfanes was demonstrated. PMID:27133088

  11. The Role of Regulatory Agencies and Intellectual Property: Part II.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Kevin E

    2015-07-01

    Patent law and antitrust law have traditionally been areas of the law involving at least some inherent tension. Champions of antitrust argue that the patent "monopoly" must be strictly limited as an exception to the general legal principle that competition should be unfettered. Patent lawyers argue that patents are the result of an exercise of congressional authority, enshrined in the Constitution, reflecting the policy decision by the Founders that granting a limited exclusionary right was justified by the public benefits derived from full disclosure of the patented invention. In the modern era these competing values have played out in the context of so-called ANDA litigation, involving disputes between branded pharmaceutical companies and generic competitors. Settlement of such litigation has been identified by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and private parties encouraged by the FTC's position, as an antitrust violation, in large part because such settlements are viewed as frustrating the congressional purpose in promoting early generic competition. After almost a decade of fighting these battles in the federal courts, the Supreme Court addressed the issue directly. The result is that such settlements are not per se illegal but are also not protected by the presumption of patent validity for activities within the "scope of the patent." Rather, the court decided that these agreements should be assessed for antitrust liability under the "rule of reason" used in other antitrust contexts. PMID:25775920

  12. Medicine at the crossroads. Part II. Summary of completed project

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    Medicine at the crossroads (a.k.a. The Future of Medicine) is an 8-part series of one-hour documentaries which examines the scientific and social forces that have shaped the practice of medicine around the world. The series was developed and produced over a five-year period and in eleven countries. Among the major issues examined in the series are the education of medical practitioners and the communication of medical issues. The series also considers the dilemmas of modern medicine, including the treatment of the elderly and the dying, the myth of the quick fix in the face of chronic and incurable diseases such as HIV, and the far-reaching implications of genetic treatments. Finally, the series examines the global progress made in medical research and application, as well as the questions remaining to be answered. These include not only scientific treatment, but accessibility and other critical topics affecting the overall success of medical advances. Medicine at the crossroads is a co-production of Thirteen/WNET and BBC-TV in association with Television Espafiola SA (RTVE) and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Stefan Moore of Thirteen/WNET and Martin Freeth of BBC-TV are series producers. George Page is executive in charge of medicine at the crossroads. A list of scholarly advisors and a program synopses is attached.

  13. Part II: magnetic field produced by a current dipole.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D; Hosaka, H

    1976-01-01

    To understand the MCG, electrical models of the heart must be used in which the basic building-block is usually the current dipole. The dipole's magnetic field is generally made up of two parts: 1. the contribution by the dipole element itself, which is mathematically simple; 2. the contribution by the current generated in the volume conductor by the dipole, which is complicated and depends on the boundaries; for special boundaries this contribution is zero to Bz, the component of magnetic field which is normal to the boundary. This applies to the boundaries of the semi-infinite volume conductor, the infinite slab, and the sphere. This property allows great simplification in solving the magnetic forward and inverse problems. Because of its importance, it is proven with electrolytic tank experiments. Based on this property, a method is presented for estimating the presence of those dipole combinations which produce a suppressed surface potential; it consists of a visual examination of an "arrow" display of Bz.

  14. Sleep apnoea in patients with heart failure: part II: therapy.

    PubMed

    Bordier, Philippe

    2009-10-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is generally recommended for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea. CPAP lowers the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with severe obstructive sleep apnoea. At least 50% of patients presenting with chronic heart failure (HF) have sleep apnoea; a subset of these patients may have obstructive sleep apnoea and may derive a survival benefit from CPAP. However, this population is also prone to developing central sleep apnoea, Cheyne-Stokes respiration or both (CSA/CSR), for which CPAP lowers the apnoea-hypopnoea index only partially and for which the overall effect of CPAP on survival remains to be determined, particularly as it has been observed to increase the mortality rate in subsets of patients. Other treatments may prove effective in patients with chronic HF and CSA/CSR, although none, thus far, has been found to confer a survival benefit. New ventilatory modes include bi-level positive airway pressure and automated adaptive servoventilation, the latter being most effective against CSA/CSR. Measures that can alleviate CSA/CSR indirectly include beta-adrenergic blockers and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, nocturnal supplemental oxygen and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The effects of theophylline, acetazolamide and nocturnal CO(2) have also been studied. The second part of this review describes the applications and effects of therapies that are available for sleep apnoea in patients with chronic HF.

  15. The Role of Regulatory Agencies and Intellectual Property: Part II.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Kevin E

    2015-03-16

    Patent law and antitrust law have traditionally been areas of the law involving at least some inherent tension. Champions of antitrust argue that the patent "monopoly" must be strictly limited as an exception to the general legal principle that competition should be unfettered. Patent lawyers argue that patents are the result of an exercise of congressional authority, enshrined in the Constitution, reflecting the policy decision by the Founders that granting a limited exclusionary right was justified by the public benefits derived from full disclosure of the patented invention. In the modern era these competing values have played out in the context of so-called ANDA litigation, involving disputes between branded pharmaceutical companies and generic competitors. Settlement of such litigation has been identified by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and private parties encouraged by the FTC's position, as an antitrust violation, in large part because such settlements are viewed as frustrating the congressional purpose in promoting early generic competition. After almost a decade of fighting these battles in the federal courts, the Supreme Court addressed the issue directly. The result is that such settlements are not per se illegal but are also not protected by the presumption of patent validity for activities within the "scope of the patent." Rather, the court decided that these agreements should be assessed for antitrust liability under the "rule of reason" used in other antitrust contexts.

  16. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted. PMID:27679727

  17. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted.

  18. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted. PMID:27679727

  19. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted.

  20. Process maps for plasma spray. Part II: Deposition and properties

    SciTech Connect

    XIANGYANG,JIANG; MATEJICEK,JIRI; KULKARNI,ANAND; HERMAN,HERBERT; SAMPATH,SANJAY; GILMORE,DELWYN L.; NEISER JR.,RICHARD A

    2000-03-28

    This is the second paper of a two part series based on an integrated study carried out at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of the study is the fundamental understanding of the plasma-particle interaction, droplet/substrate interaction, deposit formation dynamics and microstructure development as well as the deposit property. The outcome is science-based relationships, which can be used to link processing to performance. Molybdenum splats and coatings produced at 3 plasma conditions and three substrate temperatures were characterized. It was found that there is a strong mechanical/thermal interaction between droplet and substrate, which builds up the coatings/substrate adhesion. Hardness, thermal conductivity, and modulus increase, while oxygen content and porosity decrease with increasing particle velocity. Increasing deposition temperature resulted in dramatic improvement in coating thermal conductivity and hardness as well as increase in coating oxygen content. Indentation reveals improved fracture resistance for the coatings prepared at higher deposition temperature. Residual stress was significantly affected by deposition temperature, although not significant by particle energy within the investigated parameter range. Coatings prepared at high deposition temperature with high-energy particles suffered considerably less damage in wear tests. Possible mechanisms behind these changes are discussed within the context of relational maps which are under development.

  1. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part I - Observations, Part II - Control Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the first in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. Part I of this document deals with physical observations which should be performed during each routine control test. Part II…

  2. Why does Bangladesh remain so poor? Part II: eight answers.

    PubMed

    Maloney, C

    1985-01-01

    Bangladeshis of varying background all over the country were asked why they think poverty persists to such an extent in Bangladesh. Their answers provide a new perspective on the situation. The initial response often blames outside and natural causes -- floods, droughts, lack of resources, low demand for the country's exports, or historic exploitation. It is true that Bangladesh has virtually no mineral resources except gas. Yet, the soil, water, and human labor add up to a huge potential. The Third Five Year Plan emphasizes use of the soil, irrigation, tanks, rivers, and human labor. These provide the only hope for reducing poverty a little during the next 5 years. Bangladeshis as well as foreign observers most commonly cite overpopulation as the cause of poverty. Population growth is a cause of present poverty in Bangladesh but is not the only cause of poverty. The Third Five Year Plan goal to reduce annual growth to 1.8% is ambitious, but even if it is achieved the population will double in a few decades. As it would most likely be impossible for Bangladesh to support such numbers and maintain political and economic stability, such growth will have to be prevented. Poverty in Bangladesh is party a result of the long history of low urbanization, weak institutions, spotty and inadequate physical infrastructure, and insufficient entrapreneurship. Other reasons cited as causes of persisting poverty include illiteracy, idleness, class exploitation, the selfishness of individuals, and a lack of trust among people. All of the efforts of the poor themselves, various agencies, and the government, as examined in the 1st part of this discussion, fail to indicate any reason to hope that poverty in Bangladesh can be dramatically reduced any time soon. The Third Five Year Plan foresees a possible reduction of the number of those in poverty by 10%. According to the Plan itself, those in or near poverty comprise 85% of the people. The conditions under which the people of some

  3. Is extreme learning machine feasible? A theoretical assessment (part II).

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaobo; Liu, Xia; Fang, Jian; Xu, Zongben

    2015-01-01

    An extreme learning machine (ELM) can be regarded as a two-stage feed-forward neural network (FNN) learning system that randomly assigns the connections with and within hidden neurons in the first stage and tunes the connections with output neurons in the second stage. Therefore, ELM training is essentially a linear learning problem, which significantly reduces the computational burden. Numerous applications show that such a computation burden reduction does not degrade the generalization capability. It has, however, been open that whether this is true in theory. The aim of this paper is to study the theoretical feasibility of ELM by analyzing the pros and cons of ELM. In the previous part of this topic, we pointed out that via appropriately selected activation functions, ELM does not degrade the generalization capability in the sense of expectation. In this paper, we launch the study in a different direction and show that the randomness of ELM also leads to certain negative consequences. On one hand, we find that the randomness causes an additional uncertainty problem of ELM, both in approximation and learning. On the other hand, we theoretically justify that there also exist activation functions such that the corresponding ELM degrades the generalization capability. In particular, we prove that the generalization capability of ELM with Gaussian kernel is essentially worse than that of FNN with Gaussian kernel. To facilitate the use of ELM, we also provide a remedy to such a degradation. We find that the well-developed coefficient regularization technique can essentially improve the generalization capability. The obtained results reveal the essential characteristic of ELM in a certain sense and give theoretical guidance concerning how to use ELM.

  4. Stress analysis in oral obturator prostheses, part II: photoelastic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Moreno, Amália; Zahoui, Abbas; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2014-06-01

    In part I of the study, two attachment systems [O-ring; bar-clip (BC)] were used, and the system with three individualized O-rings provided the lowest stress on the implants and the support tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution, through the photoelastic method, on implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses associated with different attachment systems: BOC--splinted implants with a bar connected to two centrally placed O-rings, and BOD--splinted implants with a BC connected to two distally placed O-rings (cantilever). One photoelastic model of the maxilla with oral-sinus-nasal communication with three parallel implants was fabricated. Afterward, two implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses with the two attachment systems described above were constructed. Each assembly was positioned in a circular polariscope and a 100-N axial load was applied in three different regions with implants by using a universal testing machine. The results were obtained through photograph record analysis of stress. The BOD system exhibited the highest stress concentration, followed by the BOC system. The O-ring, centrally placed on the bar, allows higher mobility of the prostheses and homogeneously distributes the stress to the region of the alveolar ridge and implants. It can be concluded that the use of implants with O-rings, isolated or connected with a bar, to rehabilitate maxillectomized patients allows higher prosthesis mobility and homogeneously distributes the stress to the alveolar ridge region, which may result in greater chewing stress distribution to implants and bone tissue. The clinical implication of the augmented bone support loss after maxillectomy is the increase of stress in the attachment systems and, consequently, a higher tendency for displacement of the prosthesis. PMID:24972360

  5. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    PubMed Central

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G.; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell’Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, José Antonio; Castaño, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; López, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning – as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder – 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  6. Global Thermohaline Circulation. Part II: Sensitivity with Interactive Atmospheric Transports.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Stone, Peter H.; Marotzke, Jochem

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid coupled ocean-atmosphere model is used to investigate the stability of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to an increase in the surface freshwater forcing in the presence of interactive meridional transports in the atmosphere. The ocean component is the idealized global general circulation model used in Part I. The atmospheric model assumes fixed latitudinal structure of the heat and moisture transports, and the amplitudes are calculated separately for each hemisphere from the large-scale sea surface temperature (SST) and SST gradient, using parameterizations based on baroclinic stability theory. The ocean-atmosphere heat and freshwater exchanges are calculated as residuals of the steady-state atmospheric budgets.Owing to the ocean component's weak heat transport, the model has too strong a meridional SST gradient when driven with observed atmospheric meridional transports. When the latter are made interactive, the conveyor belt circulation collapses. A flux adjustment is introduced in which the efficiency of the atmospheric transports is lowered to match the too low efficiency of the ocean component.The feedbacks between the THC and both the atmospheric heat and moisture transports are positive, whether atmospheric transports are interactive in the Northern Hemisphere, the Southern Hemisphere, or both. However, the feedbacks operate differently in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, because the Pacific THC dominates in the Southern Hemisphere, and deep water formation in the two hemispheres is negatively correlated. The feedbacks in the two hemispheres do not necessarily reinforce each other because they have opposite effects on low-latitude temperatures. The model is qualitatively similar in stability to one with conventional `additive' flux adjustment, but quantitatively more stable.

  7. Stress analysis in oral obturator prostheses, part II: photoelastic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Moreno, Amália; Zahoui, Abbas; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2014-06-01

    In part I of the study, two attachment systems [O-ring; bar-clip (BC)] were used, and the system with three individualized O-rings provided the lowest stress on the implants and the support tissues. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution, through the photoelastic method, on implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses associated with different attachment systems: BOC-splinted implants with a bar connected to two centrally placed O-rings, and BOD-splinted implants with a BC connected to two distally placed O-rings (cantilever). One photoelastic model of the maxilla with oral-sinus-nasal communication with three parallel implants was fabricated. Afterward, two implant-retained palatal obturator prostheses with the two attachment systems described above were constructed. Each assembly was positioned in a circular polariscope and a 100-N axial load was applied in three different regions with implants by using a universal testing machine. The results were obtained through photograph record analysis of stress. The BOD system exhibited the highest stress concentration, followed by the BOC system. The O-ring, centrally placed on the bar, allows higher mobility of the prostheses and homogeneously distributes the stress to the region of the alveolar ridge and implants. It can be concluded that the use of implants with O-rings, isolated or connected with a bar, to rehabilitate maxillectomized patients allows higher prosthesis mobility and homogeneously distributes the stress to the alveolar ridge region, which may result in greater chewing stress distribution to implants and bone tissue. The clinical implication of the augmented bone support loss after maxillectomy is the increase of stress in the attachment systems and, consequently, a higher tendency for displacement of the prosthesis.

  8. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Joshua A.; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  9. Cadenced IRAC Monitoring of Infrared-Variable AGNs, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Fouesneau, Morgan; Hora, Joseph; Krick, Jessica; Smith, Howard; Surace, Jason

    2008-03-01

    We have analyzed IRAC imaging data from all 97 Spitzer visits to a very well-studied field, the IRAC Dark Calibration Field (IRAC-CF) near the north ecliptic pole. With this extensive dataset we have already identified a unique sample of 30 IR-variable galaxies which we are now working to characterize with respect to variability amplitudes and timescales, panchromatic SEDs, and host morphologies, among other quantities. Unfortunately, the continual change in spacecraft roll angle means that our sources are typically observed for at most six months at a time by each IRAC FOV in succession -- in other words, the visibility windows are exactly out of phase. Thus the existing data, despite the fact that they extend over more than four years, present large, unavoidable gaps that frustrate the time-delay analysis we wish to perform on exactly the timescales known to be common in active galaxies. This has only changed beginning in 2007 July: since that time cadenced IRAC observations have been carried out in synchrony with the IRAC-CF dark-calibration observations as part of our approved Cycle-4 program (PID 40553). Here we are proposing to continue this successful AGN monitoring campaign until the end of the cryogenic mission. The resulting timelines (covering 1500 days thus far and expected to run ultimately to some 2200+ days), will be a unique legacy of the Spitzer mission. This dataset, especially for the sizable, unbiased AGN sample we now have, holds unique promise for measuring the colors and temperatures of IR-varying AGN, and will have much to say about the underlying physical models of the infrared AGN emission. Accordingly we ask for just 8 h to gather IRAC photometry in the temporal gaps that would otherwise accrue in Cycle 5.

  10. Oxygen isotope indicators of selenate reaction with Fe(II) and Fe(III) hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Schellenger, Alexandra E P; Larese-Casanova, Philip

    2013-06-18

    Selenate (SeO(4)(2-)) reduction to elemental selenium is an important Se immobilization process in subsurface environments that could be mediated by Fe(II)-rich minerals or selenate-respiring microorganisms. We report the kinetic isotope effects for (18)O within selenate during abiotic reactions with iron-bearing hydroxides within laboratory experiments. Selenate was reduced to Se(0) by a green rust (chloride interlayer type) and ferrous hydroxide, the two known environmentally relevant mineral reductants for selenate. Reaction kinetics are described by a rapid, low-fractionating uptake step caused by diffusive exchange between selenate and chloride followed by a slower, high-fractionating reduction step caused by electron transfer from structural Fe(II). The dual-phase kinetics cannot be described with the traditional Rayleigh fractionation model; however, well after the initial uptake step, the extent of selenate reaction is well correlated with δ(18)O values in accordance with the Rayleigh model. Selenate-(18)O enrichment (εO) was nearly identical for reaction with chloride green rust (22.7 ± 2.2‰) and ferrous hydroxide (22.1 ± 1.1‰) which suggests a common reduction mechanism by structural Fe(II). The minor enrichment due to anion exchange alone (1.4 ± 0.2‰) was confirmed using iowaite, a nonredox active Mg(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxide. Our εO results may contribute to Se isotope forensics to identify selenate reduction within field sites and to possibly distinguish between abiotic and biotic reduction processes.

  11. Students' Chemical Information Project, October 1967 - September 1968. Final Report: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaghan, A.; And Others

    Part II of the Students' Chemical Information Project (SCIP), designed to spread the use of computer-based information services among research scientists and technologists, contains details of the project operations, statistics, results of questionnaires and research reports from liaison scientists (See LI 002 562 for Part I). Chapter I: Operation…

  12. Extending the use of rubber dam isolation: alternative procedures. Part II.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    1993-01-01

    This paper, in three parts, describes additional modified rubber dam utilizations that are generally not attempted with restrictive orthodox application methods. Part II covers alternative means of retention, with the emphasis on nuisance-free and easy application, during the preparatory, impression, and cementation phases of cast restorations.

  13. Studies in Enrollment Trends and Patterns. Part II--Summer Quarter: 1940-1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Calvin F.; Watson, F. Jean

    This is the second part of a report on major facets of institutional change at the University of Washington. Part II is a detailed analysis of Summer Quarter students and covers: class differentials in enrollment trends; trends in undergraduate students by major field and college; trends in graduate and professional students by major field and…

  14. Literacy and Deaf Students in Taiwan: Issues, Practices and Directions for Future Research--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsiu Tan; Andrews, Jean F.; Liu, Chun Jung

    2014-01-01

    In Part I, we underscore the issues surrounding young deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) learners of literacy in Taiwan who use sign to support their learning of Chinese literacy. We also described the linguistic features of Chinese writing and the visual codes used by DHH children. In Part II, we describe the reading and writing practices used with…

  15. An Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) Part II: Pilot Clinical Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajo, Lenin C.; Candler, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) is an intervention approach for children with reading difficulties that emphasizes reading as an important occupation of children. Part I presented the theoretical basis of the OPARI. Part II describes a pilot clinical application of the OPARI. Guided by Schkade and…

  16. Charting the Course for a Nursing Online Journal Club: Part II.

    PubMed

    Moonan, Marilyn; Bukoye, Bola; Clapp, Alison; Shermont, Herminia; O'Sullivan Oliveira, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    In a pediatric inpatient setting, an interdisciplinary team designed and implemented an online journal club to discuss current nursing trends and research, as well as to foster evidence-based practice. This article is Part II of a two-part series in which the implementation process is described. PMID:26790492

  17. Ligand- and base-free Pd(II)-catalyzed controlled switching between oxidative Heck and conjugate addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sarah E; Boehnke, Julian; Glen, Pauline E; Levey, Steven; Patrick, Lisa; Jordan-Hore, James A; Lee, Ai-Lan

    2013-04-19

    A simple change of solvent allows controlled and efficient switching between oxidative Heck and conjugate addition reactions on cyclic Michael acceptor substrates, catalyzed by a cationic Pd(II) catalyst system. Both reactions are ligand- and base-free and tolerant of air and moisture, and the controlled switching sheds light on some of the factors which favor one reaction over the other.

  18. Nurse staffing in a decentralized organization: part II.

    PubMed

    Althaus, J N; Hardyck, N M; Pierce, P B; Rodgers, M S

    1982-04-01

    It must be emphasized that none of the steps described in this planning process emerged overnight. Rather, they were achieved through a process of evolution, sometimes through trial and error, and always with consultation and participation by many members of the hospital nursing staff. Participation by many in the process of planning for a workable staffing system has been essential to its success. Indeed, creative scheduling by the head nurse is possible because of the way in which the system has been organized. The fact that head nurses are responsible for staffing their own units makes it infinitely easier for them to see what they need to make their units operate effectively and efficiently. Creative scheduling includes the possibility of arranging nurses' hours outside the rigid three-shift schedule used by so many hospitals. Many El Camino nurses now report for work at different hours. In addition, the use of flexible work weeks has proven valuable. Some head nurses now allow for a ten-hour, four-day work week; in emergency staffing situations there have, on occasion, been twelve-hour days. Even as this system evolves, it faces change. Just as the requirements for staff cannot be rigid, so must problem solving be flexible and constantly under review. The fact that El Camino believes in constant monitoring of its system is essential to its success. A key philosophical foundation of decentralization is that it must be subject to change. This is no less true in staffing than in other parts of the decentralization structure. By agreeing that change is constant and necessary and that participation is required at all levels of the staffing planning process, we have constructed the outlines of a system that will work in the future as well as it does in the present. Our system centers around the head nurses. It involves their planning; thus it also involves the support of those members of the nursing staff who can provide essential information. But the decisions

  19. PROBABILITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR WASTE TANKS - PART II

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Edwards, T.

    2010-12-09

    As part of an ongoing study to evaluate the discontinuity in the corrosion controls at the SRS tank farm, a study was conducted this year to assess the minimum concentrations below 1 molar nitrate, see Figure 1. Current controls on the tank farm solution chemistry are in place to prevent the initiation and propagation of pitting and stress corrosion cracking in the primary steel waste tanks. The controls are based upon a series of experiments performed with simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks, namely ASTM A537 carbon steel (A537). During FY09, an experimental program was undertaken to investigate the risk associated with reducing the minimum molar nitrite concentration required to confidently inhibit pitting in dilute solutions (i.e., less than 1 molar nitrate). The experimental results and conclusions herein provide a statistical basis to quantify the probability of pitting for the tank wall exposed to various solutions with dilute concentrations of nitrate and nitrite. Understanding the probability for pitting will allow the facility to make tank-specific risk-based decisions for chemistry control. Based on previous electrochemical testing, a statistical test matrix was developed to refine and solidify the application of the statistical mixture/amount model to corrosion of A537 steel. A mixture/amount model was identified based on statistical analysis of recent and historically collected electrochemical data. This model provides a more complex relationship between the nitrate and nitrite concentrations and the probability of pitting than is represented by the model underlying the current chemistry control program, and its use may provide a technical basis for the utilization of less nitrite to inhibit pitting at concentrations below 1 molar nitrate. FY09 results fit within the mixture/amount model, and further refine the nitrate regime in which the model is applicable. The combination of visual observations and cyclic

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance physics for clinicians: Part II.

    PubMed

    Biglands, John D; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Ridgway, John P

    2012-09-20

    This is the second of two reviews that is intended to cover the essential aspects of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) physics in a way that is understandable and relevant to clinicians using CMR in their daily practice. Starting with the basic pulse sequences and contrast mechanisms described in part I, it briefly discusses further approaches to accelerate image acquisition. It then continues by showing in detail how the contrast behaviour of black blood fast spin echo and bright blood cine gradient echo techniques can be modified by adding rf preparation pulses to derive a number of more specialised pulse sequences. The simplest examples described include T2-weighted oedema imaging, fat suppression and myocardial tagging cine pulse sequences. Two further important derivatives of the gradient echo pulse sequence, obtained by adding preparation pulses, are used in combination with the administration of a gadolinium-based contrast agent for myocardial perfusion imaging and the assessment of myocardial tissue viability using a late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) technique. These two imaging techniques are discussed in more detail, outlining the basic principles of each pulse sequence, the practical steps required to achieve the best results in a clinical setting and, in the case of perfusion, explaining some of the factors that influence current approaches to perfusion image analysis. The key principles of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) are also explained in detail, especially focusing on timing of the acquisition following contrast agent bolus administration, and current approaches to achieving time resolved MRA. Alternative MRA techniques that do not require the use of an endogenous contrast agent are summarised, and the specialised pulse sequence used to image the coronary arteries, using respiratory navigator gating, is described in detail. The article concludes by explaining the principle behind phase contrast imaging techniques

  1. Information technology in chemistry research and education: Part I. Ab initio studies on the hydrolysis of aromatic diazonium ions. Part II. Theoretical study and molecular modeling of non-covalent interactions. Part III. Applying information technology in chemistry education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhengyu

    Part I of this dissertation studies the bonding in chemical reactions, while Part II studies the bonding related to inter- and intra-molecular interactions. Part III studies the application of IT technology in chemistry education. Part I of this dissertation (chapter 1 and chapter 2) focuses on the theoretical studies on the mechanism of the hydrolysis reactions of benzenediazonium ion and guaninediazonium ion. The major conclusion is that in hydrolysis reactions the "unimolecular mechanism" actually has to involve the reacting solvent molecule. Therefore, the unimolecular pathway can only serve as a conceptual model but will not happen in the reality. Chapter I concludes that the hydrolysis reaction of benzenediazonium ion takes the direct SN2Ar mechanism via a transition state but without going through a pre-coordination complex. Chapter 2 concludes that the formation of xanthine from the dediazoniation reaction of guaninediazonium ion in water takes the SN2Ar pathway without a transition state. And oxanine might come from an intermediate formed by the bimolecular deprotonation of the H atom on N3 of guaninediazonium ion synchronized with the pyrimidine ring opening reaction. Part II of this dissertation includes chapters 3, 4, and 5. Chapter 3 studies the quadrupole moment of benzene and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. We concluded that the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction is important in the arene-arene interactions. Our study shows the most stable structure of benzene dimer is the point-to-face T-shaped structure. Chapter 4 studies the intermolecular interactions that result in the disorder of the crystal of 4-Chloroacetophenone-(4-methoxyphenylethylidene). We analyzed all the nearest neighbor interactions within that crystal and found that the crystal structure is determined by its thermo-dynamical properties. Our calculation perfectly reproduced the percentage of parallel-alignment of the crystal. Part III of this dissertation is focused on the

  2. Redox Reactions between Mn(II) and Hexagonal Birnessite Change Its Layer Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaiyan; Zhu, Mengqiang; Li, Wei; Elzinga, Evert J; Villalobos, Mario; Liu, Fan; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Xionghan; Sparks, Donald L

    2016-02-16

    Birnessite, a phyllomanganate and the most common type of Mn oxide, affects the fate and transport of numerous contaminants and nutrients in nature. Birnessite exhibits hexagonal (HexLayBir) or orthogonal (OrthLayBir) layer symmetry. The two types of birnessite contain contrasting content of layer vacancies and Mn(III), and accordingly have different sorption and oxidation abilities. OrthLayBir can transform to HexLayBir, but it is still vaguely understood if and how the reverse transformation occurs. Here, we show that HexLayBir (e.g., δ-MnO2 and acid birnessite) transforms to OrthLayBir after reaction with aqueous Mn(II) at low Mn(II)/Mn (in HexLayBir) molar ratios (5-24%) and pH ≥ 8. The transformation is promoted by higher pH values, as well as smaller particle size, and/or greater stacking disorder of HexLayBir. The transformation is ascribed to Mn(III) formation via the comproportionation reaction between Mn(II) adsorbed on vacant sites and the surrounding layer Mn(IV), and the subsequent migration of the Mn(III) into the vacancies with an ordered distribution in the birnessite layers. This study indicates that aqueous Mn(II) and pH are critical environmental factors controlling birnessite layer structure and reactivity in the environment.

  3. Newton’s second law, radiation reaction and type II Einstein-Maxwell fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Ezra T.

    2011-12-01

    Considering perturbations of the Reissner-Nordström metric while keeping the perturbations in the class of type II Einstein-Maxwell metrics, we perform a spherical harmonic expansion of all the variables up to the quadrupole term. This leads to rather surprising results. Referring to the source of the metric as a type II particle (analogous to referring to a Schwarzschild-Reissner-Nordström or Kerr-Newman particle), we see immediately that the Bondi momentum of the particle takes the classical form of mass times velocity plus an electromagnetic radiation reaction term, while the Bondi mass loss equation becomes the classical gravitational and electromagnetic (electric and magnetic) dipole and quadrupole radiation. The Bondi momentum loss equation turns into Newton’s second law of motion containing the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac radiation reaction force plus a momentum recoil (rocket) force, while the reality condition on the Bondi mass aspect yields the conservation of angular momentum. Two things must be pointed out: (1) these results, (equations of motion, etc) take place, not in the spacetime of the type II metric but in an auxiliary space referred to as {H}-space, whose physical meaning is rather obscure and (2) this analysis of the type II field equations is a very special case of a similar analysis of the general asymptotically flat Einstein-Maxwell equations. Although the final results are similar (though not the same), the analysis uses different equations (specifically, the type II field equations) and is vastly simpler than the general case. Without a great deal of the technical structures needed in the general case, one can see rather easily where the basic results reside in the type II field equations.

  4. Pd(II)-Catalyzed C–H Activation/C–C Cross-Coupling Reactions: Versatility and Practicality

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Engle, Keary M.; Wang, Dong-Hui; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, palladium-catalyzed C–H activation/C–C bond forming reactions have emerged as promising new catalytic transformations; however, development in this field is still at an early stage compared to the state of the art in cross-coupling reactions using aryl and alkyl halides. This Review begins with a brief introduction of four extensively investigated modes of catalysis for forming C–C bonds from C–H bonds: Pd(II)/Pd(0), Pd(II)/Pd(IV), Pd(0)/Pd(II)/Pd(IV) and Pd(0)/Pd(II) catalysis. More detailed discussion is then directed towards the recent development of Pd(II)-catalyzed coupling of C–H bonds with organometallic reagents through a Pd(II)/Pd(0) catalytic cycle. Despite much progress made to date, improving the versatility and practicality of this new reaction remains a tremendous challenge. PMID:19557755

  5. Guidelines for clinical engineering programs--Part I: guidelines for electrical isolation; Part II: performance evaluation of clinical engineering programs.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, M

    1980-01-01

    This series presents guidelines for: electrically isolated inputs and outputs; measuring the performance of hospital biomedical engineering programs; evaluating the risk of electric shock in hospitals; and for isolated power in anesthetizing locations. In Part I, specific recommendations are given for the use of insulated approach, battery-powered monitors in surgery, and for isolation requirements for devices connected to cardiac leads. In Part II, checklists are provided for the self-evaluation of an in-house, biomedical engineering staff. Parts III and IV, in future issues of this Journal, will include discussion of the theoretical electrical hazard potential in reference to the use of isolated power systems. The question of whether isolated power should be required in all anesthetizing locations will be discussed in Part IV.

  6. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part II. Defects.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography (SXRT) has been applied to the study of defects within three-dimensional printed titanium parts. These parts were made using the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V) as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The samples represent a selection of complex shapes with a variety of internal morphologies. Inspection via SXRT has revealed a number of defects which may not otherwise have been seen. The location and nature of such defects combined with detailed knowledge of the process conditions can contribute to understanding the interplay between design and manufacturing strategy. This fundamental understanding may subsequently be incorporated into process modelling, prediction of properties and the development of robust methodologies for the production of defect-free parts.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part II. Defects.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography (SXRT) has been applied to the study of defects within three-dimensional printed titanium parts. These parts were made using the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V) as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The samples represent a selection of complex shapes with a variety of internal morphologies. Inspection via SXRT has revealed a number of defects which may not otherwise have been seen. The location and nature of such defects combined with detailed knowledge of the process conditions can contribute to understanding the interplay between design and manufacturing strategy. This fundamental understanding may subsequently be incorporated into process modelling, prediction of properties and the development of robust methodologies for the production of defect-free parts. PMID:27359151

  8. Helping Children Cope with Fears and Stress. Part I: Discussion and Activities. Part II: Facilitator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward H.; And Others

    How fears, phobias, anxiety and stress develop in elementary school students and how these students can be assisted in coping with fears and stress are discussed in this book. Part 1, "Discussion and Activities," contains six sections. Section 1 presents an overview of fears, and stress in children. Section 2 presents 12 fear-specific activities…

  9. The Didactics of Biology. A Selected Bibliography for 1979. Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmann, Antonin, Ed.; Lipertova, Pavla, Ed.

    Selected articles on various aspects of biology teaching published in 1979 have been annotated in this two-part bibliography. Entries from 18 journals representing 11 different countries are presented according to a topic area classification scheme listed in the table of contents. Countries represented include: Australia; Bulgaria; Czechoslovakia;…

  10. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey 1994-96. Part I: Benefits Excluding Pensions [and] Part II: Pensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This report presents data from a survey of Ontario (Canada) universities concerning employment benefits offered in 1994-96. Part 1 covers benefits other than pensions. Tables display the information on particular benefits institution-by-institution including: administration and insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes, life and…

  11. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey, 1993-94, Part I, Benefits Excluding Pensions [and] Part II: Pensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Senior Administrative Officers--Universities of Ontario, Toronto.

    This report presents data from a survey of Ontario (Canada) universities concerning employment benefits offered in 1993-94. Part I covers benefits other than pensions. Tables display the information on particular benefits institution-by-institution including: administration and insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes,…

  12. Competing retention pathways of uranium upon reaction with Fe(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, Michael S.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Jones, Morris; Ilton, Eugene S.; Cerrato, Jose M.; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Biogeochemical retention processes, including adsorption, reductive precipitation, and incorporation into host minerals, are important in contaminant transport, remediation, and geologic deposition of uranium. Recent work has shown that U can become incorporated into iron (hydr)oxide minerals, with a key pathway arising from Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite, (Fe(OH)3•nH2O) to goethite (α-FeO(OH)); this is a possible U retention mechanism in soils and sediments. Several key questions, however, remain unanswered regarding U incorporation into iron (hydr)oxides and this pathway’s contribution to U retention, including: (i) the competitiveness of U incorporation versus reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2; (ii) the oxidation state of incorporated U; (iii) the effects of uranyl aqueous speciation on U incorporation; and, (iv) the mechanism of U incorporation. Here we use a series of batch reactions conducted at pH ~7, [U(VI)] from 1 to 170 μM, [Fe(II)] from 0 to 3 mM, and [Ca] at 0 or 4 mM) coupled with spectroscopic examination of reaction products of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation to address these outstanding questions. Uranium retention pathways were identified and quantified using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of EXAFS spectra showed that 14 to 89% of total U was incorporated into goethite, upon reaction with Fe(II) and ferrihydrite. Uranium incorporation was a particularly dominant retention pathway at U concentrations ≤ 50 μM when either uranyl-carbonato or calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes were dominant, accounting for 64 to 89% of total U. With increasing U(VI) and Fe(II) concentrations, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) became more prevalent, but U incorporation remained a functioning retention pathway. These findings highlight the potential importance of U(V) incorporation within

  13. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  14. [Toxic liver injuries--a current view on pathogenesis. Part II].

    PubMed

    Bak, Marek; Kicińska-Krogulska, Magdalena; Czerniak, Paweł; Michowicz, Aleksandra; Krakowiak, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Liver plays an important role in biological detoxication of xenobiotics. During this process, one can observe the inactivation and successful elimination of metabolites and toxic substances. The metabolic reactions responsible for detoxications include phases I and II. The phase I reactions increase polarity of xenobiotics through inserting new functional groups to xenobiotic molecules, while during phase II conjugation to endogenous hydrophilic molecules results in potent increase in polarity and water solubility. Phase III involves the transport process mediated by transmembranous transporter proteins, which remove a large number of xenobiotics from blood into liver. Oxidative stress and oxidation of lipids may lead to liver injury. Functional impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is associated with intensive production of reactive oxygen species. The underlying mechanisms during mitochondrial dysfunction may lead to cellular necrosis and apoptosis.

  15. Effect of Mn(II) on reactions catalyzed by lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Bono, J J; Goulas, P; Boe, J F; Portet, N; Seris, J L

    1990-08-28

    The effect of manganese on lignin peroxidase activity was studied. The enzyme was produced with a new process using an air-lift-type reactor. The experiments were performed with veratryl alcohol and a dimeric lignin model compound. It was shown that when Mn(II).lactate complex was present the amount of veratraldehyde formed and the uptake of oxygen were significantly enhanced during the aerobic oxidation of veratryl alcohol. A similar effect can be obtained with superoxide dismutase. These results strongly suggest that the superoxide anion can occur during the reaction; its scavenging by Mn(II) or superoxide dismutase generates H2O2. In contrast, no evidence for the formation of superoxide anion was found during oxidation of the lignin model, compound veratrylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether.

  16. Processing of complex sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride parts by microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggans, J.O.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kimrey, H.D. ); Holcombe, C.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted over the last several years assessing the use of microwave heating for processing reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). Although SRBSN test specimens up to 500g have been processed by using microwave heating, samples have been limited to simple shapes such as tiles. In this study, microwave packaging techniques were developed to process complex SRBSN parts and multiple samples within a single cycle. Physical and mechanical properties of test samples were measured. Comparison studies were performed using conventional furnace processing to establish baseline values and expected statistical variation.

  17. Processing of complex sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride parts by microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggans, J.O.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kimrey, H.D.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1993-06-01

    Several studies have been conducted over the last several years assessing the use of microwave heating for processing reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). Although SRBSN test specimens up to 500g have been processed by using microwave heating, samples have been limited to simple shapes such as tiles. In this study, microwave packaging techniques were developed to process complex SRBSN parts and multiple samples within a single cycle. Physical and mechanical properties of test samples were measured. Comparison studies were performed using conventional furnace processing to establish baseline values and expected statistical variation.

  18. Stochastic theory of nonequilibrium steady states. Part II: Applications in chemical biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Min; Qian, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical theory of nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) has a natural application in open biochemical systems which have sustained source(s) and sink(s) in terms of a difference in their chemical potentials. After a brief introduction in Section 1, in Part II of this review, we present the widely studied biochemical enzyme kinetics, the workhorse of biochemical dynamic modeling, in terms of the theory of NESS (Section 2.1). We then show that several phenomena in enzyme kinetics, including a newly discovered activation-inhibition switching (Section 2.2) and the well-known non-Michaelis-Menten-cooperativity (Section 2.3) and kinetic proofreading (Section 2.4), are all consequences of the NESS of driven biochemical systems with associated cycle fluxes. Section 3 is focused on nonlinear and nonequilibrium systems of biochemical reactions. We use the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC), one of the most important biochemical signaling networks, as an example (Section 3.1). It starts with a brief introduction of the Delbrück-Gillespie process approach to mesoscopic biochemical kinetics (Sections 3.2 and 3.3). We shall discuss the zeroth-order ultrasensitivity of PdPC in terms of a new concept - the temporal cooperativity (Sections 3.4 and 3.5), as well as PdPC with feedback which leads to biochemical nonlinear bistability (Section 3.6). Also, both are nonequilibrium phenomena. PdPC with a nonlinear feedback is kinetically isomorphic to a self-regulating gene expression network, hence the theory of NESS discussed here could have wide applications to many other biochemical systems.

  19. "Why not stoichiometry" versus "Stoichiometry--why not?" Part II: GATES in context with redox systems.

    PubMed

    Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna Maria; Asuero, Agustin G; Toporek, Marcin; Michałowski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Redox equilibria and titration play an important role in chemical analysis, and the formulation of an accurate mathematical description is a challenge. This article is devoted to static and (mainly) dynamic redox systems; the dynamic systems are represented by redox titrations. An overview addresses earlier approaches to static redox systems (redox diagram plots, including Pourbaix diagrams) and to titration redox systems, thereby covering a gap in the literature. After this short review, the generalized approach to electrolytic systems (GATES) is introduced, with generalized electron balance (GEB) as its inherent part within GATES/GEB. Computer simulation, performed according to GATES/GEB, enables following the changes in potential and pH of the solution, together with chemical speciation at each step of a titration, thus providing better insight into this procedure. The undeniable advantages of GATES/GEB over earlier approaches are indicated. Formulation of GEB according to two approaches (I and II) is presented on the respective examples. A general criterion distinguishing between non-redox and redox systems is presented. It is indicated that the formulation of GEB according to Approach II does not need the knowledge of oxidation degrees of particular elements; knowledge of the composition, expressed by chemical formula of the species and its charge, is sufficient for this purpose. Approach I to GEB, known also as the "short" version of GEB, is applicable if oxidation degrees for all elements of the system are known beforehand. The roles of oxidants and reductants are not ascribed to particular components forming a system and to the species thus formed. This is the complete opposite of earlier approaches to redox titrations, based on the stoichiometric redox reaction, formulated for this purpose. GEB, perceived as a law of matter conservation, is fully compatible with other (charge and concentration) balances related to the system in question. The applicability

  20. Starting a hospital-based home health agency: Part II--Key success factors.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, P

    1993-09-01

    In Part II of a three-part series, the financial, technological and legislative issues of a hospital-based home health-agency are discussed. Beginning a home healthcare service requires intensive research to answer key environmental and operational questions--need, competition, financial projections, initial start-up costs and the impact of delayed depreciation. Assessments involving technology, staffing, legislative and regulatory issues can help project service volume, productivity and cost-control.

  1. Part I. Synthesis and characterization of C2 substituted imidazolium room temperature ionic liquids. Part II. Survey and analysis of organic chemistry textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, Elliot G.

    Part I. Among room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), those derived from the imidazolium cation are the most common. RTILs have generally been viewed solely as solvents, but they are able to participate in certain types of reactions, particularly due to the relatively high acidity at the imidazolium C2. Deprotonation affords N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs), which can cause unwanted side reactions. Consequently, the major limitation of imidazolium RTILs is that they cannot be used as solvents in highly basic reactions such as the Baylis-Hillman and Grignard reactions. This work reveals a convenient route for the preparation of C2-substituted imidazolium ionic liquids. This method involves the alkylation of N-heterocyclic carbenes, which are readily generated from the C2-unsubstituted imidazolium ionic liquids. It works well for nonfunctionalized alkyl chlorides and less well for alkyl bromides and iodides, likely due to competing elimination reactions. The resulting C2-substituted salts can be transformed into ionic liquids via standard anion metathesis reactions. Part II. Recent advances in media and the increasingly encyclopedic nature of traditional textbooks have made their role in college classes uncertain. In an effort to discover what is really being taught in organic chemistry courses across the US, a survey of organic chemistry professors in all 50 states was conducted to determine what material is covered in their organic chemistry courses for science majors. Survey Monkey, an online survey program, was used to construct a short 10-item survey which was sent to organic chemistry professors at various types of institutions across the nation. We sent out 2417 surveys and received 489 responses. The results of this survey revealed what topics the professors believe is core material and what they feel is extraneous. Additionally, this research identifies the things these professors would like to see changed in the organic chemistry texts. From the open

  2. Reaction Mechanism of Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II Revealed by Mutagenesis, X-ray Crystallography, and Computational Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Klusak, Vojtech; Barinka, Cyril; Plechanovova, Anna; Mlcochova, Petra; Konvalinka, Jan; Rulisek, Lubomir; Lubkowski, Jacek

    2009-05-29

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII, EC 3.4.17.21) is a zinc-dependent exopeptidase and an important therapeutic target for neurodegeneration and prostate cancer. The hydrolysis of N-acetyl-l-aspartyl-l-glutamate (N-Ac-Asp-Glu), the natural dipeptidic substrate of the GCPII, is intimately involved in cellular signaling within the mammalian nervous system, but the exact mechanism of this reaction has not yet been determined. To investigate peptide hydrolysis by GCPII in detail, we constructed a mutant of human GCPII [GCPII(E424A)], in which Glu424, a putative proton shuttle residue, is substituted with alanine. Kinetic analysis of GCPII(E424A) using N-Ac-Asp-Glu as substrate revealed a complete loss of catalytic activity, suggesting the direct involvement of Glu424 in peptide hydrolysis. Additionally, we determined the crystal structure of GCPII(E424A) in complex with N-Ac-Asp-Glu at 1.70 {angstrom} resolution. The presence of the intact substrate in the GCPII(E424A) binding cavity substantiates our kinetic data and allows a detailed analysis of GCPII/N-Ac-Asp-Glu interactions. The experimental data are complemented by the combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations (QM/MM) which enabled us to characterize the transition states, including the associated reaction barriers, and provided detailed information concerning the GCPII reaction mechanism. The best estimate of the reaction barrier was calculated to be {Delta}G {approx} 22({+-}5) kcal{center_dot}mol{sup -1}, which is in a good agreement with the experimentally observed reaction rate constant (k{sub cat} {approx} 1 s{sup -1}). Combined together, our results provide a detailed and consistent picture of the reaction mechanism of this highly interesting enzyme at the atomic level.

  3. Managing the care of health and the cure of disease--Part II: Integration.

    PubMed

    Glouberman, S; Mintzberg, H

    2001-01-01

    The development of appropriate levels of integration in the system of health care and disease cure will require stronger collective cultures and enhanced communication among the key actors. Part II of this paper uses this line of argument to reframe four major issues in this system: coordination of acute cure and of community care, and collaboration in institutions and in the system at large.

  4. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 235 - Official Board Commentary on Regulation II

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... II (12 CFR part 235) provides background material to explain the Board's intent in adopting a... or code that can be used to access funds in an account to make Internet purchases. Similarly, the...'s account. For example, if an account holder buys goods or services over the Internet using...

  5. Thermoelectric Properties of Pristine and Doped Graphene Nanosheets and Graphene Nanoribbons: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muley, Sarang V.; Ravindra, N. M.

    2016-06-01

    In Part II of this study, approaches to improve the thermoelectric figure of merit ( ZT) of graphene nanosheets and nanoribbons is discussed. The presence of vacancies in graphene is found to increase the ZT of zigzag graphene nanoribbons significantly. Graphene can be a promising material with much better thermoelectric performance than conventional thermoelectrics.

  6. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 235 - Official Board Commentary on Regulation II

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... II (12 CFR part 235) provides background material to explain the Board's intent in adopting a... transactions would warrant further scrutiny. 5. In determining which fraud-prevention technologies to implement or retain, an issuer must consider the cost-effectiveness of the technology, that is, the...

  7. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 235 - Official Board Commentary on Regulation II

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... II (12 CFR part 235) provides background material to explain the Board's intent in adopting a... transactions would warrant further scrutiny. 5. In determining which fraud-prevention technologies to implement or retain, an issuer must consider the cost-effectiveness of the technology, that is, the...

  8. Fort Lewis College Indian Tuition Grants: Part II. Legislative Council Report to the Colorado General Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State General Assembly, Denver. Legislative Council.

    The objective of Part II of the Colorado Legislative Council's Committee on American Indian Enrollment Problems report is to recommend policies and procedures for dealing with American Indian tuitions and Indian education at Fort Lewis College. The committee members worked with the Colorado congressional delegation and representatives of the U.S.…

  9. Student Performance on the NBME Part II Subtest and Subject Examination in Obstetrics-Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metheny, William P.; Holzman, Gerald B.

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of the scores of 342 third-year medical students on the National Board of Medical Examiners subject examination and the Part II subtest on obstetrics-gynecology found significantly better performance on the former, suggesting a need to interpret the scores differently. (Author/MSE)

  10. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 390 - Sample Capital Construction Fund Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... II to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER..., represented by the Maritime Administrator, Department of Transportation (“Maritime Administrator”), and ___, a... described in Schedule B hereof; 4. The Maritime Administrator and the Party desire to enter into...

  11. Instructional Climates in Preschool Children Who Are At-Risk. Part II: Perceived Physical Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Leah E.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Goodway, Jacqueline D.

    2009-01-01

    In Part II of this study, we examined the effect of two 9-week instructional climates (low-autonomy [LA] and mastery motivational climate [MMC]) on perceived physical competence (PPC) in preschoolers (N = 117). Participants were randomly assigned to an LA, MMC, or comparison group. PPC was assessed by a pretest, posttest, and retention test with…

  12. Studies on the Reaction of Iron(II) with NO in a Noncoordinating Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Begel, Svetlana; Puchta, Ralph; Sutter, Jörg; Heinemann, Frank W; Dahlenburg, Lutz; Eldik, Rudi van

    2015-07-20

    In an earlier study we investigated the reaction of iron(II) chloride with NO in a strongly coordinating ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide [emim][dca] and showed that the actual reactive species in solution was [Fe(II)(dca)5Cl](4-). For the present report we investigated in detail how this reaction could proceed in a noncoordinating ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethylsulfonate [emim][OTf]. The donor ability of OTf(-) is much lower than that of dca(-), such that the solubility of FeCl2 in [emim][OTf] strongly depended on other donors like water or chloride ions present or added to the ionic liquid. On increasing the chloride concentration in [emim][OTf], the tetrachloridoferrate complex [emim]2[FeCl4] was formed, as verified by X-ray crystallography. This complex undergoes reversible binding of NO, for which the UV-vis spectral characteristics of the green-brown nitrosyl product resembled that found for the corresponding nitrosyl complexes formed in water and [emim][dca] as solvents. A detailed analysis of the spectra revealed that the {Fe-NO}(7) species has Fe(II)-NO(•) character in contrast to Fe(III)-NO(-) as found for the other solvents. The formation constant, however, is much higher than in [emim][dca], lying closer to the value found for water as solvent. Surprisingly, the Mössbauer spectrum found in [emim][OTf] is very unusual and unsimilar to that found in water and [emim][dca] as solvents, pointing at a different electron density distribution between Fe and NO in {Fe-NO}.7 First, the high isomer shift points to the presence of iron(II) species in solution, thus indicating that upon NO binding no oxidation to iron(III) occurs. Second, the negligible quadrupole splitting suggests a high local symmetry around the iron center. The nitrosyl product is suggested to be [Fe(II)Cl3NO](-), which is supported by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and IR measurements. The nature of the Fe(II) complexes formed in [emim

  13. Electronic structure aspects of the complete O2 transfer reaction between Ni(II) and Mn(II) complexes with cyclam ligands.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Rivera, Jhon; Caballol, Rosa; Calzado, Carmen J

    2015-01-28

    This work explores the electronic structure aspects involving the complete intermolecular O2 transfer between Ni(ii) and Mn(ii) complexes, both containing N-tetramethylated cyclams (TMC). The energy of the low-lying states of reactants, intermediates and products is established at the CASSCF level and also the DDCI level when possible. The orthogonal valence bond analysis of the wave functions obtained from CASSCF and DDCI calculations indicates the dominant superoxide nature of all the adducts participating in the reaction, and consequently that the whole reaction can be described as the transfer of the superoxide O2(-) between Ni(ii) and Mn(ii) complexes, without any additional change in the electronic structure of the fragments.

  14. Kinetics of FeS precipitation: Part 1. Competing reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickard, David

    1995-11-01

    The kinetics of the fast precipitation reaction between aqueous iron (II) and dissolved sulfide at 25°C can be interpreted in terms of two competing reactions. The first may be represented by Fe 2+ + H2S → FeS(s) + 2 H+ This can be described by an observed rate law - d[aH 2S]/dt = k11[aH 2S] where k' 1, is the observed first order rate constant with a value of 90 ± 10 s -1, [ cH 2S] is the concentration of dissolved H 2S in moles per liter, and t is time in seconds. The rate law is consistent with an Eigen-Wilkins model of the process in which the rate is described by d[FeS]/dt = - d[ aH2S]/dt = k1[ aFe2+][aH 2S], where aH 2S and aFe 2+ are the formally dimensionless hydrogen sulfide and Fe(II) activities which are represented on a moles·liter -1 scale for experimental and practical convenience. The logarithm of k1, the theoretical Eigen-Wilkins reaction rate constant, has a value of 7 ± 1 liters·mole -1·s -1. The second reaction may be represented by Fe 2 + 2HS - → Fe(HS) 2(s) The rate of this reaction may be described by an observed rate law of the form - d[aHS -]/ dt = k21[aHS -] 2 where [ aHS -] is the formally dimensionless bisulfide activity which is represented on a moles·liter -1 scale for experimental convenience. The observed second order rate constant, k' 2, has a value of 1.3 × 10 7 liters·mole -1·s -1 at 25°C. The result is consistent with an Eigen-Wilkins model of the process in which k21[aFe 2+][aHS -] 2 where aFe 2+ is the dissolved Fe(II) activity and the logarithm of k2, the Eigen-Wilkins reaction rate constant, has a value of 12.5 ± 1 liters 2·mole -2·s -1. The theoretical interpretation of both reactions suggests that the rates are direct functions of the ion activity products of the iron sulfide precipitates. The second stage of the reaction involves the condensation of Fe(SH) 2 to FeS with the release of dissolved sulfide back to solution: Fe(SH) 2( s)→FeS( s)+H 2S This reaction is relatively slow and results in a

  15. In vitro performance of Class I and II composite restorations: a literature review on nondestructive laboratory trials--part II.

    PubMed

    Dietschi, D; Argente, A; Krejci, I; Mandikos, M

    2013-01-01

    A literature review was conducted on adhesive Class I and II restorations and nondestructive in vitro tests using the PubMed/Medline database for the 1995-2010 period. The first part of this review has presented and critically appraised selected literature dealing with the quality and in vitro behavior of adhesive Class II restorations using photoelasticity, finite element analysis, and microleakage study protocols. This second part reviews additional parameters, which are deformation and fracture resistance to cyclic loading, shrinkage stress and tooth deformation following restoration placement, bond strength (microtensile, tensile, and shear tests), and marginal and internal adaptation. In addition, a "relevance score" has been proposed that aims to classify the different study protocols according, firstly, to the resulting quality, quantity, and consistency of the evidence and then, secondly, to their potential clinical relevance, as estimated by their ability to simulate oral and biomechanical strains. The highest clinical relevance was attributed to marginal and internal adaptation studies, following cyclic loading in a moist environement. However, a combination of in vitro protocols will have an even greater predictive potential and has to be considered as a crucial preclinical research approach with which to investigate the numerous restorative configurations that cannot be efficiently and rapidly tested in vivo. PMID:23725090

  16. Formation of layered Fe(II)-Al(III)-hydroxides during reaction of Fe(II) with aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, Evert J

    2012-05-01

    The reactivity of aqueous Fe(II) with aluminum oxide in anoxic solutions was investigated with batch kinetic experiments combined with Fe K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to characterize Fe(II) sorption products. Formation of Fe(II)-Al(III)-layered double hydroxides with an octahedral sheet structure similar to nikischerite (NaFe(II)(6) Al(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(18) (H(2)O)(12)) was observed within a few hours during sorption at pH 7.5 and aqueous Fe(II) concentrations of 1-3 mM. These Fe(II) phases are composed of brucite-like Fe(II)(OH)(2) sheets with partial substitution of Al(III) for Fe(II), charge balanced by anions coordinated along the basal planes. Their fast rate of formation suggests that these previously unrecognized Fe(II) phases, which are structurally and compositionally similar to green rust, may be an important sink of Fe(II) in suboxic and anoxic geochemical environments, and impact the fate of structurally compatible trace metals, such as Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II), as well as redox-reactive species including Cr(VI) and U(VI). Further studies are required to assess the thermodynamics, formation kinetics, and stability of these Fe(II) minerals under field conditions. PMID:22409244

  17. Fluoridonitrosyl complexes of technetium(I) and technetium(II). Synthesis, characterization, reactions, and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Balasekaran, Samundeeswari Mariappan; Spandl, Johann; Hagenbach, Adelheid; Köhler, Klaus; Drees, Markus; Abram, Ulrich

    2014-05-19

    A mixture of [Tc(NO)F5](2-) and [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+) is formed during the reaction of pertechnetate with acetohydroxamic acid (Haha) in aqueous HF. The blue pentafluoridonitrosyltechnetate(II) has been isolated in crystalline form as potassium and rubidium salts, while the orange-red ammine complex crystallizes as bifluoride or PF6(-) salts. Reactions of [Tc(NO)F5](2-) salts with HCl give the corresponding [Tc(NO)Cl4/5](-/2-) complexes, while reflux in neat pyridine (py) results in the formation of the technetium(I) cation [Tc(NO)(py)4F](+), which can be crystallized as hexafluoridophosphate. The same compound can be synthesized directly from pertechnetate, Haha, HF, and py or by a ligand-exchange procedure starting from [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](HF2). The technetium(I) cation [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+) can be oxidized electrochemically or by the reaction with Ce(SO4)2 to give the corresponding Tc(II) compound [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](2+). The fluorido ligand in [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+) can be replaced by CF3COO(-), leaving the "[Tc(NO)(NH3)4](2+) core" untouched. The experimental results are confirmed by density functional theory calculations on [Tc(NO)F5](2-), [Tc(NO)(py)4F](+), [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+), and [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](2+).

  18. On the ortho-positronium quenching reactions promoted by Fe(II), Fe(III), Co(III), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) cyanocomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantola Lazzarini, Anna L.; Lazzarini, Ennio

    The o-Ps quenching reactions promoted in aqueous solutions by the following six cyanocomplexes: [Fe(CN) 6] 4-; [Co(CN) 6] 3-; [Zn(CN) 4] 2-; [Cd(CN) 6] 2-; [Fe(CN) 6] 3-; [Ni(CN) 4] 2- were investigated. The first four reactions probably consist in o-Ps addition across the CN bond, their rate constants at room temperature, Tr, being ⩽(0.04±0.02) × 10 9 M -1 s -1, i.e. almost at the limit of experimental errors. The rate constant of the fifth reaction, in o-Ps oxydation, at Tr is (20.3±0.4) × 10 9 M -1 s -1. The [Ni(CN) 4] 2-k value at Tr, is (0.27±0.01) × 10 9 M -1 s -1, i.e. 100 times less than the rate constants of o-Ps oxydation, but 10 times larger than those of the o-Ps addition across the CN bond. The [Ni(CN) 4] 2- reaction probably results in formation of the following positronido complex: [Ni(CN) 4Ps] 2-. However, it is worth noting that the existence of such a complex is only indirectly deduced. In fact it arises from comparison of the [Ni(CN) 4] 2- rate constant with those of the Fe(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Co(III) cyanocomplexes, which, like the Ni(II) cyanocomplex, do not promote o-Ps oxydation or spin exchange reactions.

  19. Three polymorphic Cd(II) coordination polymers obtained from the solution and mechanochemical reactions of 3-cyanopentane-2,4-dione with Cd(II) acetate.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Jun; Nishikiori, Shin-ichi; Kuroda, Reiko; Yuge, Hidetaka

    2013-03-01

    We previously reported that monomeric and polymeric metal complexes are obtained from solution and mechanochemical reactions of 3-cyano-pentane-2,4-dione (CNacacH) with 3d metal acetates (M = Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II)). A common feature found in all complexes was that their structural base is trans-[M(CNacac)(2)]. Here, we report that the reactions of CNacacH with Cd(II) acetate in the solution and solid states afford different coordination polymers composed of trans-[Cd(CNacac)(2)] and cis-[Cd(CNacac)(2)] units, respectively. From a methanol solution containing CNacacH (L) and Cd(OAc)(2)⋅2 H(2)O (M), a coordination polymer (Cd-1) in which trans-[Cd(CNacac)(2)] units are three-dimensionally linked was obtained. In contrast, two different coordination polymers, Cd-2 and Cd-3, were obtained from mechanochemical reactions of CNacacH with Cd(OAc)(2)⋅2 H(2)O at M/L ratios of 1:1 and 1:2, respectively. In Cd-2, cis-[Cd(CNacac)(2)] units are two-dimensionally linked, whereas the units are linked three-dimensionally in Cd-3. Furthermore, Cd-1 and Cd-2 converted to Cd-3 by applying an annealing treatment and grinding with a small amount of liquid, respectively, in spite of the polymeric structures. These phenomena, 1) different structures are formed from solution and mechanochemical reactions, 2) two polymorphs are formed depending on the M/L ratio, and 3) structural transformation of resulting polymeric structures, indicate the usability of mechanochemical method in the syntheses of coordination polymers as well as the peculiar structural flexibility of cadmium-CNacac polymers.

  20. The basic science of dermal fillers: past and present Part II: adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Erin; Hui, Andrea; Meehan, Shane; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2012-09-01

    The ideal dermal filler should offer long-lasting aesthetic improvement with a minimal side-effect profile. It should be biocompatible and stable within the injection site, with the risk of only transient undesirable effects from injection alone. However, all dermal fillers can induce serious and potentially long-lasting adverse effects. In Part II of this paper, we review the most common adverse effects related to dermal filler use.

  1. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  6. The British reaction to dementia praecox 1893-1913. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Ion, R M; Beer, M D

    2002-09-01

    Emil Kraepelin introduced the concept of dementia praecox in 1893. The eventual acceptance of the concept brought a degree of clarity and order previously unknown to psychiatric nosology. The pre-Kraepelin era had been dominated by concepts such as mania, melancholia and adolescent insanity. After Kraepelin these ideas were abandoned in favour of the two great concepts of dementia praecox and manic depressive insanity, both of which remain active within modern psychiatry in the form of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This two-part study focuses on the early British reaction to Kraepelin's concept, from 1893, when he first introduced it, to 1913 when it gained general recognition. It examines the struggle experienced by the proponents of dementia praecox before the concept's acceptance by most British psychiatrists in 1913. It argues that both clinical/professional and linguistic factors influenced the British response to dementia praecox. Part 1 of this study describes the backdrop to the development of Kraepelin's ideas and examines the response to the concept in the British psychiatric textbooks and journals of the period. Part 2 will explore reaction to the concept in the professional meetings of the period, and will also examine and evaluate the key issues arising from the debate.

  7. Crystallization of the oxygen-evolving reaction centre of photosystem II in nine different detergent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Adir, N

    1999-04-01

    Oxygen-evolving photosystem II reaction centres (RCII) isolated from both spinach and pea have been crystallized. A single crystal form grew from RCII monomers in the presence of nine different three-component mixtures of non-ionic detergents and heptane-1,2, 3-triol. The crystals grew as hexagonal rods with dimensions of up to 1 x 0.3 x 0.3 mm. The crystals diffracted to a maximum resolution of 6.5 A and belong to a hexagonal space group with unit-cell parameters a = 495, b = 495, c = 115 A, alpha = beta = 90, gamma = 120 degrees. The growth of a single crystal form in the presence of such a large variety of detergents suggests a very limited range of crystal lattice formation sites in the RCII complex. PMID:10089326

  8. [Study on color reaction of copper(II)-neocuprine-glutathione-alcohol system].

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Liu, G; Zhang, Z; Liu, S; Wang, L

    2000-06-01

    The colour reaction of glutathione with copper(II)-neocuproine-alcohol was investigated in the present paper. The absorbance increased distinctly by about 13.8% when alcohol was added to the system. The maximum absorption wavelength lambda max of [Cu (neocuproine)2]+ was at 456 nm and the apparent molar absorptivity was 1.2 x 10(4) L.mol-1.cm-1 in the selected system. Linear dynamic relationship was obtained in the concentration range of 2-24 micrograms.mL-1 for glutathione. The regression equation was as following: A = 0.0104 + 0.0385c. The correlation coefficients was 0.9998. The recoveries obtained were between 98.5% and 99.9%. The relative standard deviations were less than 0.9% for all analyses. This method was used to determine glutathione in soybean extracts by the electromagnetic field technique and satisfactory results were obtained.

  9. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-08-17

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I discussed the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  10. Pseudoelasticity and thermoelasticity of nickel-titanium alloys: a clinically oriented review. Part II: Deactivation forces.

    PubMed

    Santoro, M; Nicolay, O F; Cangialosi, T J

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to organize a systematic reference to help orthodontists evaluate commonly used orthodontic nickel-titanium alloys. Part I of the article reviewed the data available in the literature regarding the temperature transitional ranges of the alloys. The thermomechanical behavior of these compounds is, in fact, strictly dependent upon the correlation between the temperature transitional range and the oral temperature range. Part II focuses on the mechanical characteristics of the alloys, such as the magnitude of the forces delivered and correlations with the temperature transitional range and oral temperature.

  11. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation and Topological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-06-01

    A comprehensive numerical model has been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details of the model and results from the analysis of General Motors' prototype TEG were described in part I of the study. In part II of this study, parametric evaluations are considered to assess the influence of heat exchanger, geometry, and thermoelectric module configurations to achieve optimization of the baseline model. The computational tool is also adapted to model other topologies such as transverse and circular configurations (hexagonal and cylindrical) maintaining the same volume as the baseline TEG. Performance analysis of these different topologies and parameters is presented and compared with the baseline design.

  12. Paleotectonic investigations of the Mississippian System in the United States: Parts I and II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Lawrence C.; Connor, Carol Waite; Others,

    1979-01-01

    This professional paper is the fifth in a series of paleotectonic studies each covering a geologic system in the conterminous United States. Part I provides a region-by-region discussion of data concerning the Mississippian System and an explanation and documentation for the maps and sections contained in part III. Part II of the paper provides a summary of the Mississippian System, presents interregional interpretations permitted by this study, and includes sections on notable features of the system. The maps contained in the separate case as part III may be divided into two groups: (1) a sequence of factual or basic maps that shows, with a minimum of interpretation, the Mississippian System as it occurs today, and (2) interpretive maps that attempt a reasonable reconstruction of the original extent of the system, its tectonics, environment, and geography.

  13. Alchemical poetry in medieval and early modern Europe: a preliminary survey and synthesis. Part II - Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Didier

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a preliminary description of medieval and early modern alchemical poetry composed in Latin and in the principal vernacular languages of western Europe. It aims to distinguish the various genres in which this poetry flourished, and to identify the most representative aspects of each cultural epoch by considering the medieval and early modern periods in turn. Such a distinction (always somewhat artificial) between two broad historical periods may be justified by the appearance of new cultural phenomena that profoundly modified the character of early modern alchemical poetry: the ever-increasing importance of the prisca theologia, the alchemical interpretation of ancient mythology, and the rise of neo-Latin humanist poetry. Although early modern alchemy was marked by the appearance of new doctrines (notably the alchemical spiritus mundi and Paracelsianism), alchemical poetry was only superficially modified by criteria of a scientific nature, which therefore appear to be of lesser importance. This study falls into two parts. Part I provides a descriptive survey of extant poetry, and in Part II the results of the survey are analysed in order to highlight such distinctive features as the function of alchemical poetry, the influence of the book market on its evolution, its doctrinal content, and the question of whether any theory of alchemical poetry ever emerged. Part II is accompanied by an index of the authors and works cited in both parts. PMID:21797075

  14. A protein dynamics study of photosystem II: the effects of protein conformation on reaction center function.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, Sergej; Bruce, Doug

    2006-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study photosystem II structure and function. Structural information obtained from simulations was combined with ab initio computations of chromophore excited states. In contrast to calculations based on the x-ray structure, the molecular-dynamics-based calculations accurately predicted the experimental absorbance spectrum. In addition, our calculations correctly assigned the energy levels of reaction-center (RC) chromophores, as well as the lowest-energy antenna chlorophyll. The primary and secondary quinone electron acceptors, Q(A) and Q(B), exhibited independent changes in position over the duration of the simulation. Q(B) fluctuated between two binding sites similar to the proximal and distal sites previously observed in light- and dark-adapted RC from purple bacteria. Kinetic models were used to characterize the relative influence of chromophore geometry, site energies, and electron transport rates on RC efficiency. The fluctuating energy levels of antenna chromophores had a larger impact on quantum yield than did their relative positions. Variations in electron transport rates had the most significant effect and were sufficient to explain the experimentally observed multi-component decay of excitation in photosystem II. The implications of our results are discussed in the context of competing evolutionary selection pressures for RC structure and function.

  15. Validity of NBME Parts I and II for the Selection of Residents: The Case of Orthopaedic Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Susan M.

    The predictive validity of scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Part I and Part II examinations for the selection of residents in orthopaedic surgery was investigated. Use of NBME scores has been criticized because of the time lag between taking Part I and entering residency and because Part I content is not directly linked to…

  16. Research Papers Sponsored by the Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs. Volume II: Philanthropic Fields of Interest, Part II-Additional Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC.

    Twelve papers discuss future changes and trends in philanthropic giving and activities. The report is Volume II, Part II of a five volume series examining the relationship between nonprofit institutions and their donors. The opening paper reviews the needs for better definition of the government's role in contracting and grant making, and for…

  17. Engineered Photosystem II reaction centers optimize photochemistry versus photoprotection at different solar intensities.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, David J; Gimpel, Javier; Ananyev, Gennady M; Mayfield, Stephen P; Dismukes, G Charles

    2014-03-12

    The D1 protein of Photosystem II (PSII) provides most of the ligating amino acid residues for the Mn4CaO5 water-oxidizing complex (WOC) and half of the reaction center cofactors, and it is present as two isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. These isoforms, D1:1 and D1:2, confer functional advantages for photosynthetic growth at low and high light intensities, respectively. D1:1, D1:2, and seven point mutations in the D1:2 background that are native to D1:1 were expressed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We used these nine strains to show that those strains that confer a higher yield of PSII charge separation under light-limiting conditions (where charge recombination is significant) have less efficient photochemical turnover, measured in terms of both a lower WOC turnover probability and a longer WOC cycle period. Conversely, these same strains under light saturation (where charge recombination does not compete) confer a correspondingly faster O2 evolution rate and greater protection against photoinhibition. Taken together, the data clearly establish that PSII primary charge separation is a trade-off between photochemical productivity (water oxidation and plastoquinone reduction) and charge recombination (photoprotection). These trade-offs add up to a significant growth advantage for the two natural isoforms. These insights provide fundamental design principles for engineering of PSII reaction centers with optimal photochemical efficiencies for growth at low versus high light intensities.

  18. In vitro degradation of the 32kDa PS II reaction centre protein

    SciTech Connect

    Eckenswiller, L.C.; Greenberg, B.M. )

    1989-04-01

    The 32kDa thylakoid membrane protein is an integral component of the PS II reaction centre. The protein, although stable in the dark, undergoes light dependent turnover. Light from the UV, visible and far-red spectral regions induce 32kDa protein degradation. To better understand 32kDa protein metabolism, an in vitro degradation system is being developed. It consists of isolated thylakoid membranes than contain radiolabelled protein. The 32kDa protein is actively and specifically degraded when the thylakoid preparation is exposed to UV or visible radiation. The protein is stable in the dark. The herbicides (atrazine and DCMU) inhibit degradation in the in vitro system as they do in vivo. Additionally, several methods of isolating thylakoids are being compared to optimize the 32kDa protein degradation reaction. The preparations will be evaluated based on their ability to permit light dependent degradation of the 32kDa protein without affecting the other membrane components.

  19. New Lewis-Acidic Molybdenum(II) and Tungsten(II) Catalysts for Intramolecular Carbonyl Ene and Prins Reactions. Reversal of the Stereoselectivity of Cyclization of Citronellal.

    PubMed

    Kocovský, Pavel; Ahmed, Ghafoor; Srogl, Jirí; Malkov, Andrei V.; Steele, John

    1999-04-16

    New Mo(II) complexes BnEt(3)N(+)[Mo(CO)(4)ClBr(2)](-) (A) and Mo(CO)(5)(OTf)(2) (B) and their W(II) congeners D and E have been developed as catalysts for the title reactions. Unlike other Lewis acids, the latter catalysts exhibit cis-stereoselectivity in the cyclization of citronellal (1 --> 3 with A and 1 --> 5 with B). Isotopic labeling allowed formulation of the reaction mechanism, according to which these complexes act as bulky Lewis acids, eta(1)-coordinated to the carbonyl oxygen. The stereochemistry appears to be controlled by the protruding ligand L(p), which dictates the boatlike transition state III. The kinetically formed cis-alkenol 3 can be equilibrated by [Mo(CO)(4)Br(2)](2) (C) or ZnCl(2) to its trans-epimer 2 via a retro-ene reaction.

  20. Anion Effects in Oxidative Aliphatic Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage Reactions of Cu(II) Chlorodiketonate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Sushma L; Miłaczewska, Anna; Borowski, Tomasz; James, Christopher D; Tierney, David L; Popova, Marina; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2016-07-18

    Aliphatic oxidative carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions involving Cu(II) catalysts and O2 as the terminal oxidant are of significant current interest. However, little is currently known regarding how the nature of the Cu(II) catalyst, including the anions present, influence the reaction with O2. In previous work, we found that exposure of the Cu(II) chlorodiketonate complex [(6-Ph2TPA)Cu(PhC(O)CClC(O)Ph)]ClO4 (1) to O2 results in oxidative aliphatic carbon-carbon bond cleavage within the diketonate unit, leading to the formation of benzoic acid, benzoic anhydride, benzil, and 1,3-diphenylpropanedione as organic products. Kinetic studies of this reaction revealed a slow induction phase followed by a rapid decay of the absorption features of 1. Notably, the induction phase is not present when the reaction is performed in the presence of a catalytic amount of chloride anion. In the studies presented herein, a combination of spectroscopic (UV-vis, EPR) and density functional theory (DFT) methods have been used to examine the chloride and benzoate ion binding properties of 1 under anaerobic conditions. These studies provide evidence that each anion coordinates in an axial position of the Cu(II) center. DFT studies reveal that the presence of the anion in the Cu(II) coordination sphere decreases the barrier for O2 activation and the formation of a Cu(II)-peroxo species. Notably, the chloride anion more effectively lowers the barrier associated with O-O bond cleavage. Thus, the nature of the anion plays an important role in determining the rate of reaction of the diketonate complex with O2. The same type of anion effects were observed in the O2 reactivity of the simple Cu(II)-bipyridine complex [(bpy)Cu(PhC(O)C(Cl)C(O)Ph)ClO4] (3). PMID:27377103

  1. Transcription analysis of class II human leukocyte antigen genes from normal and immunodeficient B lymphocytes, using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, M; van Hoef, A; Gorski, J

    1990-01-01

    The RNA transcript levels of all human leukocyte antigen class II loci were determined from class II congenital immunodeficient B cells by polymerase chain reaction amplification of cDNA. No mRNA was observed under conditions in which 0.01% normal levels could be visualized. Pre-mRNA could be amplified from normal B cells but not from immunodeficient B cells, indicating a transcription defect. Images PMID:2113177

  2. Case managers' roles and functions: Commission for Case Manager Certification's 2004 research, part II.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein A; Downey, William T; Huber, Diane L

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC) conducted its third case managers' role and functions study in 2004 for the purpose of validating the currency and relevancy of the certified case manager examination. The results of this study are shared in an article of 2 parts. Part I, which was published in the previous issue of this journal, discussed the process the CCMC used for the development of the Case Managers' Role and Functions Survey Instrument and the identification of new 6 essential functions and 6 knowledge areas that describe case management practice. These findings were based on the survey of a large national sample of practicing case managers. Part II continues the analysis of the results and focuses on identifying the empirical (statistically derived) activity and knowledge domains of case management practice, using exploratory factor analysis. It discusses the similarities and differences found among various subgroups of case managers who were compared on the basis of certain demographic variables. In addition, Part II summarizes future changes in the field of case management as perceived by those who participated in the study.

  3. Case managers' roles and functions: Commission for Case Manager Certification's 2004 research, part II.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Hussein A; Downey, William T; Huber, Diane L

    2006-01-01

    The Commission for Case Manager Certification (CCMC) conducted its third case managers' role and functions study in 2004 for the purpose of validating the currency and relevancy of the certified case manager examination. The results of this study are shared in an article of 2 parts. Part I, which was published in the previous issue of this journal, discussed the process the CCMC used for the development of the Case Managers' Role and Functions Survey Instrument and the identification of new 6 essential functions and 6 knowledge areas that describe case management practice. These findings were based on the survey of a large national sample of practicing case managers. Part II continues the analysis of the results and focuses on identifying the empirical (statistically derived) activity and knowledge domains of case management practice, using exploratory factor analysis. It discusses the similarities and differences found among various subgroups of case managers who were compared on the basis of certain demographic variables. In addition, Part II summarizes future changes in the field of case management as perceived by those who participated in the study. PMID:16582699

  4. Gas-phase ligand loss and ligand substitution reactions of platinum(II) complexes of tridentate nitrogen donor ligands.

    PubMed

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A J; McFadyen, W David

    2004-01-01

    The source of protons associated with the ligand loss channel of HX((n - 1)+) from [Pt(II)(dien)X](n+) (X = Cl, Br and I for n = 1 and X = NC(5)H(5) for n = 2) in the gas phase was investigated by deuterium-labelling studies. The results of these studies indicate that these protons originate from both the amino groups and the carbon backbone of the dien ligand. In some instances (e.g. X = Br and I), the protons lost from the carbon backbone can be even more abundant than the protons lost from the amino groups. The gas-phase substitution reactions of coordinatively saturated [Pt(II)(L(3))L(a)](2+) complexes (L(3) = tpy or dien) were also examined using ion-molecule reactions. The outcome of the ion-molecule reactions depends on both the ancillary ligand (L(3)) as well as the leaving group (L(a)). [Pt(II)(tpy)L(a)](2+) complexes undergo substitution reactions, with a faster rate when L(a) is a good leaving group, while the [Pt(II)(dien)L(a)](2+) complex undergoes a proton transfer reaction. PMID:15164352

  5. Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2005-12-01

    A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

  6. Reaction mechanism of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes: umbrella sampling QM/MM MD study.

    PubMed

    Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2014-07-15

    Biologically relevant interactions of piano-stool ruthenium(II) complexes with ds-DNA are studied in this article by hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computational technique. The whole reaction mechanism is divided into three phases: (i) hydration of the [Ru(II) (η(6) -benzene)(en)Cl](+) complex, (ii) monoadduct formation between the resulting aqua-Ru(II) complex and N7 position of one of the guanines in the ds-DNA oligomer, and (iii) formation of the intrastrand Ru(II) bridge (cross-link) between two adjacent guanines. Free energy profiles of all the reactions are explored by QM/MM MD umbrella sampling approach where the Ru(II) complex and two guanines represent a quantum core, which is described by density functional theory methods. The combined QM/MM scheme is realized by our own software, which was developed to couple several quantum chemical programs (in this study Gaussian 09) and Amber 11 package. Calculated free energy barriers of the both ruthenium hydration and Ru(II)-N7(G) DNA binding process are in good agreement with experimentally measured rate constants. Then, this method was used to study the possibility of cross-link formation. One feasible pathway leading to Ru(II) guanine-guanine cross-link with synchronous releasing of the benzene ligand is predicted. The cross-linking is an exergonic process with the energy barrier lower than for the monoadduct reaction of Ru(II) complex with ds-DNA.

  7. Reaction mechanism of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes: umbrella sampling QM/MM MD study.

    PubMed

    Futera, Zdeněk; Burda, Jaroslav V

    2014-07-15

    Biologically relevant interactions of piano-stool ruthenium(II) complexes with ds-DNA are studied in this article by hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computational technique. The whole reaction mechanism is divided into three phases: (i) hydration of the [Ru(II) (η(6) -benzene)(en)Cl](+) complex, (ii) monoadduct formation between the resulting aqua-Ru(II) complex and N7 position of one of the guanines in the ds-DNA oligomer, and (iii) formation of the intrastrand Ru(II) bridge (cross-link) between two adjacent guanines. Free energy profiles of all the reactions are explored by QM/MM MD umbrella sampling approach where the Ru(II) complex and two guanines represent a quantum core, which is described by density functional theory methods. The combined QM/MM scheme is realized by our own software, which was developed to couple several quantum chemical programs (in this study Gaussian 09) and Amber 11 package. Calculated free energy barriers of the both ruthenium hydration and Ru(II)-N7(G) DNA binding process are in good agreement with experimentally measured rate constants. Then, this method was used to study the possibility of cross-link formation. One feasible pathway leading to Ru(II) guanine-guanine cross-link with synchronous releasing of the benzene ligand is predicted. The cross-linking is an exergonic process with the energy barrier lower than for the monoadduct reaction of Ru(II) complex with ds-DNA. PMID:24865949

  8. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinga, K.R.

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  9. A legacy of struggle: the OSHA ergonomics standard and beyond, Part II.

    PubMed

    Delp, Linda; Mojtahedi, Zahra; Sheikh, Hina; Lemus, Jackie

    2014-11-01

    The OSHA ergonomics standard issued in 2000 was repealed within four months through a Congressional resolution that limits future ergonomics rulemaking. This section continues the conversation initiated in Part I, documenting a legacy of struggle for an ergonomics standard through the voices of eight labor, academic, and government key informants. Part I summarized important components of the standard; described the convergence of labor activism, research, and government action that laid the foundation for a standard; and highlighted the debates that characterized the rulemaking process. Part II explores the anti-regulatory political landscape of the 1990s, as well as the key opponents, power dynamics, and legal maneuvers that led to repeal of the standard. This section also describes the impact of the ergonomics struggle beyond the standard itself and ends with a discussion of creative state-level policy initiatives and coalition approaches to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) in today's sociopolitical context.

  10. Compassionate care: enhancing physician-patient communication and education in dermatology: Part II: Patient education.

    PubMed

    Hong, Judith; Nguyen, Tien V; Prose, Neil S

    2013-03-01

    Patient education is a fundamental part of caring for patients. A practice gap exists, where patients want more information, while health care providers are limited by time constraints or difficulty helping patients understand or remember. To provide patient-centered care, it is important to assess the needs and goals, health beliefs, and health literacy of each patient. This allows health care providers to individualize education for patients. The use of techniques, such as gaining attention, providing clear and memorable explanations, and assessing understanding through "teach-back," can improve patient education. Verbal education during the office visit is considered the criterion standard. However, handouts, visual aids, audiovisual media, and Internet websites are examples of teaching aids that can be used as an adjunct to verbal instruction. Part II of this 2-part series on patient-physician interaction reviews the importance and need for patient education along with specific guidelines and techniques that can be used.

  11. Advances in explosives analysis—part II: photon and neutron methods

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Greenfield, Margo T.; McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2015-10-07

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased dramatically since publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis [Moore DS, Goodpaster JV, Anal Bioanal Chem 395:245–246, 2009]. Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. Our review consists of two parts. Part I discussed methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers,more » electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. In Part II, we review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons.« less

  12. Advances in explosives analysis—part II: photon and neutron methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Greenfield, Margo T.; McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2015-10-07

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased dramatically since publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis [Moore DS, Goodpaster JV, Anal Bioanal Chem 395:245–246, 2009]. Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. Our review consists of two parts. Part I discussed methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers, electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. In Part II, we review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons.

  13. A hybrid phenomenological model for ferroelectroelastic ceramics. Part II: Morphotropic PZT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, S.; Neumeister, P.; Balke, H.

    2016-10-01

    In this part II of a two part series, the rate-independent hybrid phenomenological constitutive model introduced in part I is modified to account for the material behavior of morphotropic lead zirconate titanate ceramics (PZT ceramics). The modifications are based on a discussion of the available literature results regarding the micro-structure of these materials. In particular, a monoclinic phase and a highly simplified representation of the hierarchical structure of micro-domains and nano-domains observed experimentally are incorporated into the model. It is shown that experimental data for the commercially available morphotropic PZT material PIC151 (PI Ceramic GmbH, Lederhose, Germany) can be reproduced and predicted based on the modified hybrid model.

  14. Part I - Viscous evolution of point vortex equilibria Part II - Effects of body elasticity on stability of fish motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Fangxu

    2011-12-01

    Vortex dynamics and solid-fluid interactions are two of the most important and most studied topics in fluid dynamics for their relevance to a wide range of applications from geophysical flows to locomotion in moving fluids. In this work, we investigate two problems in two parts: Part I studies the viscous evolution of point vortex equilibria; Part II studies the effects of body elasticity on the passive stability of submerged bodies. In Part I, we describe the viscous evolution of point vortex configurations that, in the absence of viscosity, are in a state of fixed or relative equilibrium. In particular, we examine four cases, three of them correspond to relative equilibria in the inviscid point vortex model and one corresponds to a fixed equilibrium. Our goal is to elucidate the dominant transient dynamical features of the flow. A multi-Gaussian "core growing" type of model is typically used in high fidelity numerical simulations, but we propose to implement it as a low-order model for the flow field. We show that all four configurations immediately begin to rotate unsteadily. We then examine in detail the qualitative and quantitative evolution of the structures as they evolve, and for each case show the sequence of topological bifurcations that occur both in a fixed reference frame, and in an appropriately chosen rotating reference frame. Comparisons between the cases help to reveal different features of the viscous evolution for short and intermediate time scales of vortex structures. We examine the dynamical evolution of passive particles in the viscously evolving flows and interpret it in relation to the evolving streamline patterns. Although the low-order multi-Gaussian model does not exactly coincide with the Navier-Stokes solution, the two results show remarkable resemblances in many aspects. In Part II, we examine the effects of body geometry and elasticity on the passive stability of motion in a perfect fluid. Our main motivation is to understand the

  15. Tendon Transfers Part II: Transfers for Ulnar Nerve Palsy and Median Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sammer, Douglas M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives After reading this article (part II of II), the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the anatomy and function of the median and ulnar nerves in the forearm and hand. 2. Describe the clinical deficits associated with injury to each nerve. 3. Describe the indications, benefits, and drawbacks for various tendon transfer procedures used to treat median and ulnar nerve palsy.4. Describe the treatment of combined nerve injuries. 5. Describe postoperative care and possible complications associated with these tendon transfer procedures. Summary This article discusses the use of tendon transfer procedures for treatment of median and ulnar nerve palsy as well as combined nerve palsies. Postoperative management and potential complications are also discussed. PMID:19730287

  16. PIC Simulations in Low Energy Part of PIP-II Proton Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady

    2014-07-01

    The front end of PIP-II linac is composed of a 30 keV ion source, low energy beam transport line (LEBT), 2.1 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and medium energy beam transport line (MEBT). This configuration is currently being assembled at Fermilab to support a complete systems test. The front end represents the primary technical risk with PIP-II, and so this step will validate the concept and demonstrate that the hardware can meet the specified requirements. SC accelerating cavities right after MEBT require high quality and well defined beam after RFQ to avoid excessive particle losses. In this paper we will present recent progress of beam dynamic study, using CST PIC simulation code, to investigate partial neutralization effect in LEBT, halo and tail formation in RFQ, total emittance growth and beam losses along low energy part of the linac.

  17. Japanese American reactions to World War II incarceration redress: Just world belief, locus of control, and coping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jackie H J; Nagata, Donna K; Akiyama, Mark

    2015-07-01

    This study examines second generation (Nisei) Japanese Americans' reactions to government redress for their unjust incarceration during World War II. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore the roles of individual difference factors-Belief in a Just World (BJW), Locus of Control (LOC)-and Incarceration-Related Coping in predicting (a) reported redress-related Suffering Relief and (b) Positive Redress Impacts. Findings show that BJW was a stronger predictor of redress reactions than LOC, with higher BJW associated with more affirmative views of redress. In addition, Incarceration-Related Coping mediated a majority of the relationships between the individual difference factors and redress reactions.

  18. PA impairment due to HIV infection. Part II: Building a professional support network. Forum.

    PubMed

    Behar, M; Bogstad, J R; Gage, L; James, D A; Mott, J S

    1989-11-01

    Several members of the AAPA's Lesbian and Gay Physician Assistants Caucus who participated in the roundtable PAs and HIV-Antibody Testing: The Need for Guidelines When the Practitioner Is at Risk (1989;13[5]:146-158) met with members of the 12-Step/Caduceus Caucus to begin developing a cooperative effort to assist PAs who test positive for antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus, and to explore other HIV-associated impairment issues. Part II focuses on concerns of the provider who is HIV-antibody positive as well as ways PA groups can cooperate to raise the profession's conciousness further and recommend guidelines and policy.

  19. Determination of trace amounts of mercury(II) in water samples using a novel kinetic catalytic ligand substitution reaction of hexacyanoruthenate(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Radhey M.; Agarwal, Abhinav; Prasad, Surendra

    2009-11-01

    A simple, sensitive, selective and rapid kinetic catalytic method has been developed for the determination of Hg(II) ions at micro-level. This method is based on the catalytic effect of Hg(II) ion on the rate of substitution of cyanide in hexacyanoruthenate(II) with nitroso-R-salt (NRS) in aqueous medium and provides good accuracy and precision. The concentration of Hg(II) catalyst varied from 4.0 to 10.0 × 10 -6 M and the progress of reaction was followed spectrophotometrically at 525 nm ( λmax of purple-red complex [Ru(CN) 5NRS] 3-, ɛ = 3.1 × 10 3 M -1 s -1) under the optimized reaction conditions; 8.75 × 10 -5 M [Ru(CN) 64-], 3.50 × 10 -4 M [nitroso-R-salt], pH 7.00 ± 0.02, ionic strength, I = 0.1 M (KCl), temp 45.0 ± 0.1 °C. The linear calibration curves, i.e. calibration equations between the absorbance at fixed times ( t = 15, 20 and 25 min) versus concentration of Hg(II) ions were established under the optimized experimental conditions. The detection limit was found to be 1.0 × 10 -7 M of Hg(II). The effect of various foreign ions on the proposed method has also been studied and discussed. The method has been applied to the determination of mercury(II) in aqueous solutions.

  20. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography - Part II: 2-Methylfuran.

    PubMed

    Tran, Luc-Sy; Togbé, Casimir; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2014-03-01

    This is Part II of a series of three papers which jointly address the combustion chemistry of furan and its alkylated derivatives 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) under premixed low-pressure flame conditions. Some of them are considered to be promising biofuels. With furan as a common basis studied in Part I of this series, the present paper addresses two laminar premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of MF which were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) for equivalence ratios φ=1.0 and 1.7, identical conditions to those for the previously reported furan flames. Mole fractions of reactants, products as well as stable and reactive intermediates were measured as a function of the distance above the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a comprehensive reaction mechanism for all three fuels given in Part I and described in the three parts of this series. A comparison of the experimental results and the simulation shows reasonable agreement, as also seen for the furan flames in Part I before. This set of experiments is thus considered to be a valuable additional basis for the validation of the model. The main reaction pathways of MF consumption have been derived from reaction flow analyses, and differences to furan combustion chemistry under the same conditions are discussed.

  1. Combustion chemistry and flame structure of furan group biofuels using molecular-beam mass spectrometry and gas chromatography – Part II: 2-Methylfuran

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Luc-Sy; Togbé, Casimir; Liu, Dong; Felsmann, Daniel; Oßwald, Patrick; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    This is Part II of a series of three papers which jointly address the combustion chemistry of furan and its alkylated derivatives 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) under premixed low-pressure flame conditions. Some of them are considered to be promising biofuels. With furan as a common basis studied in Part I of this series, the present paper addresses two laminar premixed low-pressure (20 and 40 mbar) flat argon-diluted (50%) flames of MF which were studied with electron-ionization molecular-beam mass spectrometry (EI-MBMS) and gas chromatography (GC) for equivalence ratios φ=1.0 and 1.7, identical conditions to those for the previously reported furan flames. Mole fractions of reactants, products as well as stable and reactive intermediates were measured as a function of the distance above the burner. Kinetic modeling was performed using a comprehensive reaction mechanism for all three fuels given in Part I and described in the three parts of this series. A comparison of the experimental results and the simulation shows reasonable agreement, as also seen for the furan flames in Part I before. This set of experiments is thus considered to be a valuable additional basis for the validation of the model. The main reaction pathways of MF consumption have been derived from reaction flow analyses, and differences to furan combustion chemistry under the same conditions are discussed. PMID:24518895

  2. Joint toxicity of tetracycline with copper(II) and cadmium(II) to Vibrio fischeri: effect of complexation reaction.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fei; Zhao, Yanping; Gu, Xueyuan; Gu, Cheng; Lee, Charles C C

    2015-03-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotic and heavy metals commonly occurs in the environment. Tetracycline (TC), a common antibiotic, can behave as an efficient organic ligand to complex with cations. In this paper, the joint toxicity of TC with two commonly existing metals, copper(II) and cadmium(II), towards a luminescent bacteria, Vibrio fischeri, are investigated. Results showed that coexistence of TC and Cu(II) showed a significant antagonistic effect, while TC and Cd(II) showed a synergistic effect. The aqueous speciation of TC with two metal cations was calculated using a chemical equilibrium software Visual MINTEQ and results indicated that a strong complexation exist between TC and Cu(II), while much weaker interaction between TC and Cd(II). Traditional joint toxicity prediction model based on independent action failed to predict the combined toxicity of TC with metals. A new method based on speciation calculation was used to evaluate the joint toxicity of ligands and cations. It is assumed that the metal-ligand complexes are non-toxic to V. fischeri and the joint toxicity is determined by the sum of toxic unit of free metal-ions and free organic ligands. It explained the joint toxicity of the mixed systems reasonably well. Meanwhile, citric acid (CA) and fulvic acid (FA) were also introduced in this study to provide a benchmark comparison with TC. Results showed it is also valid for mixed systems of CA and FA with metals except for the Cd-CA mixture.

  3. Reactions of copper(II)-phenol systems with O2: models for TPQ biosynthesis in copper amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Kae; Ertem, Mehmed Z; Sugimoto, Hideki; Kunishita, Atsushi; Tano, Tetsuro; Fujieda, Nobutaka; Cramer, Christopher J; Itoh, Shinobu

    2011-03-01

    Copper(II) complexes supported by a series of phenol-containing bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amine N(3) ligands (denoted as L(o)H, L(m)H, and L(p)H) have been synthesized, and their O(2) reactivity has been examined in detail to gain mechanistic insights into the biosynthesis of the TPQ cofactor (2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalaninequinone, TOPA quinone) in copper-containing amine oxidases. The copper(II) complex of L(o)H (ortho-phenol derivative) involves a direct phenolate to copper(II) coordination and exhibits almost no reactivity toward O(2) at 60 °C in CH(3)OH. On the other hand, the copper(II) complex of L(m)H (meta-phenol derivative), which does not involve direct coordinative interaction between the phenol moiety and the copper(II) ion, reacts with O(2) in the presence of triethylamine as a base to give a methoxy-substituted para-quinone derivative under the same conditions. The product structure has been established by detailed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) (including (18)O-labeling experiment) analyses. Density functional theory predicts that the reaction involves (i) intramolecular electron transfer from the deprotonated phenol (phenolate) to copper(II) to generate a copper(I)-phenoxyl radical; (ii) the addition of O(2) to this intermediate, resulting in an end-on copper(II) superoxide; (iii) electrophilic substitution of the phenolic radical to give a copper(II)-alkylperoxo intermediate; (iv) O-O bond cleavage concomitant with a proton migration, giving a para-quinone derivative; and (v) Michael addition of methoxide from copper(II) to the para-quinone ring and subsequent O(2) oxidation. This reaction sequence is similar to that proposed for the biosynthetic pathway leading to the TPQ cofactor in the enzymatic system. The generated para-quinone derivative can act as a turnover catalyst for aerobic oxidation of benzylamine to N-benzylidene benzylamine. Another type of copper(II

  4. A framework for biodynamic feedthrough analysis--part II: validation and application.

    PubMed

    Venrooij, Joost; van Paassen, Marinus M; Mulder, Mark; Abbink, David A; Mulder, Max; van der Helm, Frans C T; Bulthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-09-01

    Biodynamic feedthrough (BDFT) is a complex phenomenon, that has been studied for several decades. However, there is little consensus on how to approach the BDFT problem in terms of definitions, nomenclature, and mathematical descriptions. In this paper, the framework for BDFT analysis, as presented in Part I of this dual publication, is validated and applied. The goal of this framework is twofold. First of all, it provides some common ground between the seemingly large range of different approaches existing in BDFT literature. Secondly, the framework itself allows for gaining new insights into BDFT phenomena. Using recently obtained measurement data, parts of the framework that were not already addressed elsewhere, are validated. As an example of a practical application of the framework, it will be demonstrated how the effects of control device dynamics on BDFT can be understood and accurately predicted. Other ways of employing the framework are illustrated by interpreting the results of three selected studies from the literature using the BDFT framework. The presentation of the BDFT framework is divided into two parts. This paper, Part II, addresses the validation and application of the framework. Part I, which is also published in this journal issue, addresses the theoretical foundations of the framework. The work is presented in two separate papers to allow for a detailed discussion of both the framework's theoretical background and its validation.

  5. Isolation of a photosystem II reaction center consisting of D-1 and D-2 polypeptides and cytochrome b-559

    SciTech Connect

    Nanba, O.; Satoh, K.

    1987-01-01

    A photosystem II reaction center complex consisting of D-1 and D-2 polypeptides and cytochrome b-559 was isolated from spinach grana thylakoids, treated with 4% (wt/vol) Triton X-100, by ion-exchange chromatography using DEAE-Toyopearl 650S. The isolated complex appears to contain five chlorophyll a, two pheophytin a, one ..beta..-carotene, and one or two cytochrome b-559 heme(s) (molar ratio) and exhibits a reversible absorbance change attributable to the photochemical accumulation of reduced pheophytin typical for the intermediary electron acceptor of photosystem II reaction center. These results strongly suggest that the site of primary charge separation in photosystem II is located on the heterodimer composed of D-1 and D-2 subunits.

  6. Microwave assisted synthesis of biarlys by Csbnd C coupling reactions with a new chitosan supported Pd(II) catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Talat; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-10-01

    In this study a new type chitosan-based support has been produced for Pd(II) catalyst and its catalytic performance in Suzuki Csbnd C reactions has been studied under microwave irradiation without using any solvent. The chemical identification of the catalyst was performed using TG/DTG, FTIR, UV-Vis ICP-OES, SEM/EDAX, 13C NMR, molar conductivity, XRD and magnetic moment techniques. The performance of this new Pd(II) catalyst was studied in Suzuki Csbnd C reactions. The Pd(II) catalyst exhibited a good catalytic performance in very short time (4 min) by giving high TONs and TOFs with low amount of the catalyst (0.015 mol%). The catalyst also had reusability and did not lose its activity until six runs.

  7. LSENS, A General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code for Homogeneous Gas-Phase Reactions. Part 2; Code Description and Usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part II of a series of three reference publications that describe LSENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part II describes the code, how to modify it, and its usage, including preparation of the problem data file required to execute LSENS. Code usage is illustrated by several example problems, which further explain preparation of the problem data file and show how to obtain desired accuracy in the computed results. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions. Part I (NASA RP-1328) derives the governing equations and describes the numerical solution procedures for the types of problems that can be solved by LSENS. Part III (NASA RP-1330) explains the kinetics and kinetics-plus-sensitivity-analysis problems supplied with LSENS and presents sample results.

  8. Cationic Pd(II)-catalyzed C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions at room temperature: synthetic and mechanistic studies

    PubMed Central

    Nishikata, Takashi; Abela, Alexander R; Huang, Shenlin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cationic palladium(II) complexes have been found to be highly reactive towards aromatic C–H activation of arylureas at room temperature. A commercially available catalyst [Pd(MeCN)4](BF4)2 or a nitrile-free cationic palladium(II) complex generated in situ from the reaction of Pd(OAc)2 and HBF4, effectively catalyzes C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions between aryl iodides, arylboronic acids and acrylates under milder conditions than those previously reported. The nature of the directing group was found to be critical for achieving room temperature conditions, with the urea moiety the most effective in promoting facile coupling reactions at an ortho C–H position. This methodology has been utilized in a streamlined and efficient synthesis of boscalid, an agent produced on the kiloton scale annually and used to control a range of plant pathogens in broadacre and horticultural crops. Mechanistic investigations led to a proposed catalytic cycle involving three steps: (1) C–H activation to generate a cationic palladacycle; (2) reaction of the cationic palladacycle with an aryl iodide, arylboronic acid or acrylate, and (3) regeneration of the active cationic palladium catalyst. The reaction between a cationic palladium(II) complex and arylurea allowed the formation and isolation of the corresponding palladacycle intermediate, characterized by X-ray analysis. Roles of various additives in the stepwise process have also been studied. PMID:27340491

  9. Part I: Sound color in the music of Gyorgy Kurtag, Part II: "Leopard's Path," thirteen visions for chamber ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iachimciuc, Igor

    The dissertation is in two parts, a theoretical study and a musical composition. In Part I the music of Gyorgy Kurtag is analyzed from the point of view of sound color. A brief description of what is understood by the term sound color, and various ways of achieving specific coloristic effects, are presented in the Introduction. An examination of Kurtag's approaches to the domain of sound color occupies the chapters that follow. The musical examples that are analyzed are selected from Kurtag's different compositional periods, showing a certain consistency in sound color techniques, the most important of which are already present in the String Quartet, Op. 1. The compositions selected for analysis are written for different ensembles, but regardless of the instrumentation, certain principles of the formation and organization of sound color remain the same. Rather than relying on extended instrumental techniques, Kurtag creates a large variety of sound colors using traditional means such as pitch material, register, density, rhythm, timbral combinations, dynamics, texture, spatial displacement of the instruments, and the overall musical context. Each sound color unit in Kurtag's music is a separate entity, conceived as a complete microcosm. Sound color units can either be juxtaposed as contrasting elements, forming sound color variations, or superimposed, often resulting in a Klangfarbenmelodie effect. Some of the same gestural figures (objets trouves) appear in different compositions, but with significant coloristic modifications. Thus, the principle of sound color variations is not only a strong organizational tool, but also a characteristic stylistic feature of the music of Gyorgy Kurtag. Part II, Leopard's Path (2010), for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, cimbalom, and piano, is an original composition inspired by the painting of Jesse Allen, a San Francisco based artist. The composition is conceived as a cycle of thirteen short movements. Ten of these movements are

  10. Best of International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress 2013: stereotactic body radiation therapy. Part II: nonspinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon S; Chang, Eric L; Ryu, Samuel; Chung, Hans; Slotman, Ben J; Teh, Bin S; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-09-01

    The 11th biennial International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress represented another historical gathering of professionals in the field of stereotactic radiosurgery. This congress was held on 16-20 June 2013 in Toronto (ON, Canada), and the chairman was Arjun Sahgal, co-chair was Michael Schwartz and president of the society was Jean Regis. The congress attracted 550 attendants from all over the world and over 300 abstracts were presented. Among the abstracts presented, 62 (36 oral) were pertaining to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Exciting new findings were presented by colleagues from North America, Europe and Asia. This short conference scene (part II) provides a summary of the best abstracts on SBRT for nonspinal tumors presented in the congress. A separate conference scene on SBRT for spinal tumors (part I) also appears in this issue of Future Oncology. PMID:23980677

  11. Design of site specific radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging. (Parts I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dort, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Part I. Synthetic methods were developed for the preparation of several iodinated benzoic acid hydrazides as labeling moieties for indirect tagging of carbonyl-containing bio-molecules and potential tumor-imaging agents. Biodistribution studies conducted in mice on the derivatives having the I-125 label ortho to a phenolic OH demonstrated a rapid in vivo deiodination. Part II. The reported high melanin binding affinity of quinoline and other heterocyclic antimalarial drugs led to the development of many analogues of such molecules as potential melanoma-imaging agents. Once such analogue iodochloroquine does exhibit high melanin binding, but has found limited clinical use due to appreciable accumulation in non-target tissues such as the adrenal cortex and inner ear. This project developed a new series of candidate melanoma imaging agents which would be easier to radio-label, could yield higher specific activity product, and which might demonstrate more favorable pharmacokinetic and dosimetric characteristics compared to iodochloroquine.

  12. A personal retrospective: in the eye of the accreditation storm (Part I of II).

    PubMed

    Stanley, Judith A

    2009-04-01

    Intended for those who already see the value of standards for correctional health care and the impact accreditation can have on the field, this article is a personal reflection from the perspective of a recently retired director of accreditation for the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. Based on 11 years in that role, the author discusses issues and controversies in the field. Part I addresses the relationships between correctional and community health care, explores the essence and role of standards, and examines aspects of accreditation. Part II (to be published in Volume 15, Issue 3) focuses on the current "revolution'' in correctional health care, keys to continued progress, and how to deal with correctional health care puzzles.

  13. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part II - size estimations for selected markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Robert

    2014-04-01

    In a series of two contributions, decisive business-related aspects of the current process status to transfer research results on diffractive optical elements (DOEs) into commercial solutions are discussed. In part I, the focus was on the patent landscape. Here, in part II, market estimations concerning DOEs for selected applications are presented, comprising classical spectroscopic gratings, security features on banknotes, DOEs for high-end applications, e.g., for the semiconductor manufacturing market and diffractive intra-ocular lenses. The derived market sizes are referred to the optical elements, itself, rather than to the enabled instruments. The estimated market volumes are mainly addressed to scientifically and technologically oriented optical engineers to serve as a rough classification of the commercial dimensions of DOEs in the different market segments and do not claim to be exhaustive.

  14. Analysis of cornea curvature using radial basis functions - Part II: Fitting to data-set.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, G W; Płociniczak, Ł; Schiesser, W E

    2016-10-01

    In part I we discussed the solution of corneal curvature using a 2D meshless method based on radial basis functions (RBFs). In Part II we use these methods to fit a full nonlinear thin membrane model to a measured data-set in order to generate a topological mathematical description of the cornea. In addition, we show how these results can lead to estimations for corneal radius of curvature and certain physical properties of the cornea; namely, tension and elasticity coefficient. Again all calculations and graphics generation were performed using the R language programming environment. The model describes corneal topology extremely well, and the estimated properties fall well within the expected range of values. The method is straight forward to implement and offers scope for further analysis using more detailed 3D models that include corneal thickness. PMID:27570056

  15. Exploring Cancer Therapeutics with Natural Products from African Medicinal Plants, Part II: Alkaloids, Terpenoids and Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Nwodo, Justina N; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Simoben, Conrad V; Ntie-Kang, Fidele

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stands as second most common cause of disease-related deaths in humans. Resistance of cancer to chemotherapy remains challenging to both scientists and physicians. Medicinal plants are known to contribute significantly to a large population of Africa, which is to a very large extent linked to folkloric claims which is part of their livelihood. In this review paper, the potential of naturally occurring anti-cancer agents from African flora has been explored, with suggested modes of action, where such data is available. Literature search revealed plant-derived compounds from African flora showing anti-cancer and/or cytotoxic activities, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo. This corresponds to 400 compounds (from mildly active to very active) covering various compound classes. However, in this part II, we only discussed the three major compound classes which are: flavonoids, alkaloids and terpenoids.

  16. Common emergencies in cancer medicine: infectious and treatment-related syndromes, Part II.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. R.; Stelzer, K. J.; Douglas, J. G.; Koh, W. J.; Wood, L. V.; Panicker, R.

    1994-01-01

    This article completes a summary of the common medical emergencies that can occur as a result of infectious processes (Part I) and antitumor treatment secondary to chemotherapy, biological response modifiers, or radiotherapy (Part II). The use of high-dose cytotoxic agents, coupled with the common instillation of indwelling central venous access devices, have altered the spectrum of infectious etiologies that are appreciated in clinical practice. In addition, a myriad of cytotoxic agents and radiotherapeutic treatment schemes are used widely in clinical oncologic practice. While most of their related side effects are not considered life-threatening emergencies, they can be fatal if not recognized early and treated promptly. Moreover, some of these infectious and treatment-related sequelae can be prevented. This article highlights some of these clinical observations. PMID:7807572

  17. Light-curing considerations for resin-based composite materials: a review. Part II.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2010-10-01

    As discussed in Part I, the type of curing light and curing mode impact the polymerization kinetics of resin-based composite (RBC) materials. Major changes in light-curing units and curing modes have occurred. The type of curing light and mode employed affects the polymerization shrinkage and associated stresses, microhardness, depth of cure, degree of conversion, and color change of RBCs. These factors also may influence the microleakage in an RBC restoration. Apart from the type of unit and mode used, the polymerization of RBCs is also affected by how a light-curing unit is used and handled, as well as the aspects associated with RBCs and the environment. Part II discusses the various clinical issues that should be considered while curing RBC restorations in order to achieve the best possible outcome. PMID:20960988

  18. Signal classification using global dynamical models, Part II: SONAR data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kremliovsky, M.; Kadtke, J.

    1996-06-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a numerical method for nonlinear signal detection and classification which made use of techniques borrowed from dynamical systems theory. Here in Part II of the paper, we will describe an example of data analysis using this method, for data consisting of open ocean acoustic (SONAR) recordings of marine mammal transients, supplied from NUWC sources. The purpose here is two-fold: first to give a more operational description of the technique and provide rules-of-thumb for parameter choices; and second to discuss some new issues raised by the analysis of non-ideal (real-world) data sets. The particular data set considered here is quite non-stationary, relatively noisy, is not clearly localized in the background, and as such provides a difficult challenge for most detection/classification schemes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Double Mutation in Photosystem II Reaction Centers and Elevated CO2 Grant Thermotolerance to Mesophilic Cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarca, Jorge; Shlyk-Kerner, Oksana; Kaftan, David; Goldberg, Eran; Dulebo, Alexander; Gidekel, Manuel; Gutierrez, Ana; Scherz, Avigdor

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic biomass production rapidly declines in mesophilic cyanobacteria grown above their physiological temperatures largely due to the imbalance between degradation and repair of the D1 protein subunit of the heat susceptible Photosystem II reaction centers (PSIIRC). Here we show that simultaneous replacement of two conserved residues in the D1 protein of the mesophilic Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, by the analogue residues present in the thermophilic Thermosynechococcus elongatus, enables photosynthetic growth, extensive biomass production and markedly enhanced stability and repair rate of PSIIRC for seven days even at 43°C but only at elevated CO2 (1%). Under the same conditions, the Synechocystis control strain initially presented very slow growth followed by a decline after 3 days. Change in the thylakoid membrane lipids, namely the saturation of the fatty acids is observed upon incubation for the different strains, but only the double mutant shows a concomitant major change of the enthalpy and entropy for the light activated QA−→QB electron transfer, rendering them similar to those of the thermophilic strain. Following these findings, computational chemistry and protein dynamics simulations we propose that the D1 double mutation increases the folding stability of the PSIIRC at elevated temperatures. This, together with the decreased impairment of D1 protein repair under increased CO2 concentrations result in the observed photothermal tolerance of the photosynthetic machinery in the double mutant PMID:22216094

  20. Spectral, photophysical, and stability properties of isolated photosystem II reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.; Picorel, R.; Rubin, A.B.; Connolly, J.S. )

    1988-06-01

    Photosystem II reaction center (RC) preparations isolated from spinach (Spinacea oleracea) by the Nanba-Satoh procedure are quite labile, even at 4{degree}C in the dark. Simple spectroscopic criteria were developed to characterize the native state of the material. Degradation of the RC results in (a) blue-shifting of the red-most absorption maximum, (b) a shift of the 77 K fluorescence maximum from {approximately}682 nm to {approximately}670 nm, and (c) a shift of fluorescence lifetime components from 1.3-4 nanoseconds and >25 nanoseconds to {approximately}6-7 nanoseconds. Fluorescence properties at 77 K seem to be a more sensitive spectral indicator of the integrity of the material. The >25 nanosecond lifetime component is assigned to P680{sup +} Phenophytin{sup -}recombination luminescence, which suggest a correlation between the observed spectral shifts and the photochemical competence of the preparation. Substitution of lauryl maltoside for Triton X-100 immediately after RC isolation stabilizes the RCs and suggests that Triton may be responsible for the instability.

  1. What is beta-carotene doing in the photosystem II reaction centre?

    PubMed Central

    Telfer, Alison

    2002-01-01

    During photosynthesis carotenoids normally serve as antenna pigments, transferring singlet excitation energy to chlorophyll, and preventing singlet oxygen production from chlorophyll triplet states, by rapid spin exchange and decay of the carotenoid triplet to the ground state. The presence of two beta-carotene molecules in the photosystem II reaction centre (RC) now seems well established, but they do not quench the triplet state of the primary electron-donor chlorophylls, which are known as P(680). The beta-carotenes cannot be close enough to P(680) for triplet quenching because that would also allow extremely fast electron transfer from beta-carotene to P(+)(680), preventing the oxidation of water. Their transfer of excitation energy to chlorophyll, though not very efficient, indicates close proximity to the chlorophylls ligated by histidine 118 towards the periphery of the two main RC polypeptides. The primary function of the beta-carotenes is probably the quenching of singlet oxygen produced after charge recombination to the triplet state of P(680). Only when electron donation from water is disturbed does beta-carotene become oxidized. One beta-carotene can mediate cyclic electron transfer via cytochrome b559. The other is probably destroyed upon oxidation, which might trigger a breakdown of the polypeptide that binds the cofactors that carry out charge separation. PMID:12437882

  2. Kinetics of hepatic phase I and II biotransformation reactions in eight finfish species.

    PubMed

    González, Jaime Fernando; Reimschuessel, Renate; Shaikh, Badar; Kane, Andrew S

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic microsomes and cytosols of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), red tilapia (Oreochromis sp.), largemouth bass (Micropterussalmoides), striped bass (Morone saxatilis), hybrid striped bass (M. saxatilis x M. crysops), and bluegill (Lepomis macrochuris) (n=8) were used to study the kinetics of phase I (ECOD, EROD, PROD, BROD) and phase II (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT)-, sulfotransferase (ST)- and glutathione-s-transferase (GST)-mediated) reactions. The best catalytic efficiency for ECOD and GST activities was performed by channel catfish, Atlantic salmon, rainbow trout and tilapia. The highest EROD catalytic efficiency was for Atlantic salmon. None of the species had either PROD or BROD activities. Rainbow trout had very similar UDPGT catalytic efficiency to tilapia, channel catfish, Atlantic salmon, largemouth bass and bluegill. Sulfotransferase conjugation had no significant differences among the species. In summary, tilapia, channel catfish, Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout had the best biotransforming capabilities; striped bass, hybrid striped bass and bluegill were low metabolizers and largemouth bass shared some capabilities with both groups.

  3. Nacre II:. AN Update and Extension of the Nacre Compilation of Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2013-03-01

    The status of a new evaluation of astrophysical nuclear reaction rates, referred as NACRE- II, is reported. It includes 19 radiative capture and 15 transfer reactions on targets with mass numbers A < 16. This work is meant to supersede the NACRE compilation. Post-NACRE experimental data are taken into account. Extrapolations of the astrophysical S-factor to largely sub-Coulomb energies are based on the use of the potential model and of the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) for capture and transfer reactions, respectively. Adopted rates and their lower and upper limits are provided. Here, we illustrate with some results the general procedure followed in the construction of NACRE-II.

  4. Novel mechanistic aspects on the reaction between low spin Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes and hydrogen peroxide-spectrophotometric tracer of intraperoxo intermediate catalyzed reaction.

    PubMed

    Awad, Aida M; Shaker, Ali Mohamad; Zaki, Ahmad Borhan El-Din; Nassr, Lobna Abdel-Mohsen Ebaid

    2008-12-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with some Fe(II) Schiff base complexes were investigated spectrophotometrically in aqueous solution at pH 8 and 35 degrees C under pseudo-first-order conditions. The used ligands were derived from salicylaldehyde or o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde and some amino acids (l-leucine, l-iso-leucine, l-serine, l-methionine and dl-tryptophan). It was found that the formation of the purple interaperoxo complex appears only above pH 7.5. The reaction consists of two steps. The first step involves reversible formation of the intraperoxo intermediate which renders irreversible at pH 8. The second step consists of inner-sphere electron transfer. The suggested scheme illustrated first-order kinetics at low [H(2)O(2)] and zero-order at high [H(2)O(2)]. Moreover, the activation parameters of the reaction were evaluated. PMID:18394952

  5. Progress report on LLTR Series II Test A-2 (Part 1). [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Freede, W.J.; Neely, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    This document contains a complete set of valid and final digital and analog data plots for LLTR Series II, Test A-2. Included is an Accuracy Statement regarding this data as required by Revision 0 of the GE Test Request, Specification No. 23A2062. The Series II, Sodium-Water Reaction Test A-2 was performed in the Large Leak Test Rig (LLTR) at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). This was the third of three planned double-edged guillotine (DEG) rupture tests of a single tube which will be followed by a number of small leak tests. The test article is the LLTI which is a full-size diameter internals, shortened in length and prototypic of the CRBR steam generator. It is installed in the Large Leak Test Vessel (LLTV). The overall test program was formulated by General Electric (GE) as Test Requester to establish steam generator design and to verify analytical models/codes to estimate the effect of large leak accidents in an LMFBR demonstration plant steam generator and system.

  6. Delivery systems for biopharmaceuticals. Part II: Liposomes, Micelles, Microemulsions and Dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana C; Lopes, Carla M; Lobo, José M S; Amaral, Maria H

    2015-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are a generation of drugs that include peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and cell products. According to their particular molecular characteristics (e.g. high molecular size, susceptibility to enzymatic activity), these products present some limitations for administration and usually parenteral routes are the only option. To avoid these limitations, different colloidal carriers (e.g. liposomes, micelles, microemulsions and dendrimers) have been proposed to improve biopharmaceuticals delivery. Liposomes are promising drug delivery systems, despite some limitations have been reported (e.g. in vivo failure, poor long-term stability and low transfection efficiency), and only a limited number of formulations have reached the market. Micelles and microemulsions require more studies to exclude some of the observed drawbacks and guarantee their potential for use in clinic. According to their peculiar structures, dendrimers have been showing good results for nucleic acids delivery and a great development of these systems during next years is expected. This is the Part II of two review articles, which provides the state of the art of biopharmaceuticals delivery systems. Part II deals with liposomes, micelles, microemulsions and dendrimers.

  7. Delivery systems for biopharmaceuticals. Part II: Liposomes, Micelles, Microemulsions and Dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana C; Lopes, Carla M; Lobo, José M S; Amaral, Maria H

    2015-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are a generation of drugs that include peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and cell products. According to their particular molecular characteristics (e.g. high molecular size, susceptibility to enzymatic activity), these products present some limitations for administration and usually parenteral routes are the only option. To avoid these limitations, different colloidal carriers (e.g. liposomes, micelles, microemulsions and dendrimers) have been proposed to improve biopharmaceuticals delivery. Liposomes are promising drug delivery systems, despite some limitations have been reported (e.g. in vivo failure, poor long-term stability and low transfection efficiency), and only a limited number of formulations have reached the market. Micelles and microemulsions require more studies to exclude some of the observed drawbacks and guarantee their potential for use in clinic. According to their peculiar structures, dendrimers have been showing good results for nucleic acids delivery and a great development of these systems during next years is expected. This is the Part II of two review articles, which provides the state of the art of biopharmaceuticals delivery systems. Part II deals with liposomes, micelles, microemulsions and dendrimers. PMID:26278524

  8. Mineral resources of parts of the Departments of Antioquia and Caldas, Zone II, Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.B.; Feininger, Tomas; Barrero, L.; Dario, Rico H.; ,; Alvarez, A.

    1970-01-01

    The mineral resources of an area of 40,000 sq km, principally in the Department of Antioquia, but including small parts of the Departments of Caldas, C6rdoba, Risaralda, and Tolima, were investigated during the period 1964-68. The area is designated Zone II by the Colombian Inventario Minero Nacional(lMN). The geology of approximately 45 percent of this area, or 18,000 sq km, has been mapped by IMN. Zone II has been a gold producer for centuries, and still produces 75 percent of Colombia's gold. Silver is recovered as a byproduct. Ferruginous laterites have been investigated as potential sources of iron ore but are not commercially exploitable. Nickeliferous laterite on serpentinite near Ure in the extreme northwest corner of the Zone is potentially exploitable, although less promising than similar laterites at Cerro Matoso, north of the Zone boundary. Known deposits of mercury, chromium, manganese, and copper are small and have limited economic potentia1. Cement raw materials are important among nonmetallic resources, and four companies are engaged in the manufacture of portland cement. The eastern half of Zone II contains large carbonate rock reserves, but poor accessibility is a handicap to greater development at present. Dolomite near Amalfi is quarried for the glass-making and other industries. Clay saprolite is abundant and widely used in making brick and tiles in backyard kilns. Kaolin of good quality near La Union is used by the ceramic industry. Subbituminous coal beds of Tertiary are an important resource in the western part of the zone and have good potential for greater development. Aggregate materials for construction are varied and abundant. Deposits of sodic feldspar, talc, decorative stone, and silica are exploited on a small scale. Chrysotils asbestos deposits north of Campamento are being developed to supply fiber for Colombia's thriving asbestos-cement industry, which is presently dependent upon imported fiber. Wollastonite and andalusite are

  9. COYOTE II: A Finite Element Computer Program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part 2, User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.; Hogan, R.E.

    1994-10-01

    User instructions are given for the finite element computer program, COYOTE II. COYOTE II is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems including the effects of enclosure radiation and chemical reaction. The theoretical background and numerical methods used in the program are documented in SAND94-1173. Examples of the use of the code are presented in SAND94-1180.

  10. Analysis of Radionuclide Releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achim, Pascal; Monfort, Marguerite; Le Petit, Gilbert; Gross, Philippe; Douysset, Guilhem; Taffary, Thomas; Blanchard, Xavier; Moulin, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    The present part of the publication (Part II) deals with long range dispersion of radionuclides emitted into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident that occurred after the March 11, 2011 tsunami. The first part (Part I) is dedicated to the accident features relying on radionuclide detections performed by monitoring stations of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization network. In this study, the emissions of the three fission products Cs-137, I-131 and Xe-133 are investigated. Regarding Xe-133, the total release is estimated to be of the order of 6 × 1018 Bq emitted during the explosions of units 1, 2 and 3. The total source term estimated gives a fraction of core inventory of about 8 × 1018 Bq at the time of reactors shutdown. This result suggests that at least 80 % of the core inventory has been released into the atmosphere and indicates a broad meltdown of reactor cores. Total atmospheric releases of Cs-137 and I-131 aerosols are estimated to be 1016 and 1017 Bq, respectively. By neglecting gas/particulate conversion phenomena, the total release of I-131 (gas + aerosol) could be estimated to be 4 × 1017 Bq. Atmospheric transport simulations suggest that the main air emissions have occurred during the events of March 14, 2011 (UTC) and that no major release occurred after March 23. The radioactivity emitted into the atmosphere could represent 10 % of the Chernobyl accident releases for I-131 and Cs-137.

  11. Advanced diagnostic methods in oral and maxillofacial pathology. Part II: immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent methods.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Richard C K; Daniels, Troy E; Greenspan, John S; Regezi, Joseph A

    2002-01-01

    The practice of pathology is currently undergoing significant change, in large part due to advances in the analysis of DNA, RNA, and proteins in tissues. These advances have permitted improved biologic insights into many developmental, inflammatory, metabolic, infectious, and neoplastic diseases. Moreover, molecular analysis has also led to improvements in the accuracy of disease diagnosis and classification. It is likely that, in the future, these methods will increasingly enter into the day-to-day diagnosis and management of patients. The pathologist will continue to play a fundamental role in diagnosis and will likely be in a pivotal position to guide the implementation and interpretation of these tests as they move from the research laboratory into diagnostic pathology. The purpose of this 2-part series is to provide an overview of the principles and applications of current molecular biologic and immunologic tests. In Part I, the biologic fundamentals of DNA, RNA, and proteins and methods that are currently available or likely to become available to the pathologist in the next several years for their isolation and analysis in tissue biopsies were discussed. In Part II, advances in immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence methods and their application to modern diagnostic pathology are reviewed. PMID:11805778

  12. Mesoscale simulation of polymer reaction equilibrium: Combining dissipative particle dynamics with reaction ensemble Monte Carlo. II. Supramolecular diblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lísal, Martin; Brennan, John K.; Smith, William R.

    2009-03-01

    We present an alternative formulation of the reaction ensemble dissipative particle dynamics (RxDPD) method [M. Lísal, J. K. Brennan, and W. R. Smith, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 16490 (2006)], a mesoscale simulation technique for studying polymer systems in reaction equilibrium. The RxDPD method combines elements of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and reaction ensemble Monte Carlo (RxMC), and is primarily targeted for the prediction of the system composition, thermodynamic properties, and phase behavior of reaction equilibrium polymer systems. The alternative formulation of the RxDPD method is demonstrated by considering a supramolecular diblock copolymer (SDC) melt in which two homopolymers, An and Bm, can reversibly bond at terminal binding sites to form a diblock copolymer, AnBm. We consider the effect of the terminal binding sites and the chemical incompatibility between A- and B-segments on the phase behavior. Both effects are found to strongly influence the resulting phase behavior. Due to the reversible nature of the binding, the SDC melt can be treated as the reaction equilibrium system An+Bm⇌AnBm. To simulate the An+Bm⇌AnBm melt, the system contains, in addition to full An, Bm, and AnBm polymers, two fractional polymers: one fractional polymer either fAn or fBm, and one fractional polymer fAnBm, which have fractional particles at the ends of the polymer chains. These fractional particles are coupled to the system via a coupling parameter. The time evolution of the system is governed by the DPD equations of motion, accompanied by random changes in the coupling parameter. Random changes in the coupling parameter mimic forward and reverse reaction steps as in the RxMC approach, and they are accepted with a probability derived from the expanded ensemble grand canonical partition function. Unlike the original RxDPD method that considers coupling of entire fractional polymers to the system, the expanded ensemble framework allows a stepwise coupling, thus

  13. Heterogeneous Reduction of PuO2 with Fe(II): Importance of the Fe(III) Reaction Product

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rai, Dhanpat; Buck, Edgar C.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2011-05-01

    Abstract Heterogeneous reduction of actinides in higher and more soluble oxidation states to lower more insoluble oxidation states by reductants such as Fe(II) has been the subject of intensive study for more than two decades. However, Fe(II)-induced reduction of sparingly soluble Pu(IV) to the more soluble lower oxidation state Pu(III) has been much less studied even though such reactions can potentially increase the mobility of Pu in the subsurface. Thermodynamic calculations are presented that show how differences in the free energy of various possible solid-phase Fe(III) reaction products can greatly influence aqueous Pu(III) concentrations resulting from reduction of PuO2(am) by Fe(II). We present the first experimental evidence that reduction of PuO2(am) to Pu(III) by Fe(II) was enhanced when the Fe(III) mineral goethite was spiked into the reaction. The effect of goethite on reduction of Pu(IV) was demonstrated by measuring the time-dependence of total aqueous Pu concentration, its oxidation state, and system pe/pH. We also re-evaluated established protocols for determining Pu(III) [(Pu(III) + Pu(IV)) - Pu(IV)] by using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene extractions; the study showed that it is important to eliminate dissolved oxygen from the TTA solutions for accurate determinations. More broadly, this study highlights the importance of the Fe(III) reaction product in actinide reduction rate and extent by Fe(II).

  14. Charge separation, stabilization, and protein relaxation in photosystem II core particles with closed reaction center.

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak, M; Sander, J; Nowaczyk, M; Müller, M G; Rögner, M; Holzwarth, A R

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence kinetics of cyanobacterial photosystem II (PSII) core particles with closed reaction centers (RCs) were studied with picosecond resolution. The data are modeled in terms of electron transfer (ET) and associated protein conformational relaxation processes, resolving four different radical pair (RP) states. The target analyses reveal the importance of protein relaxation steps in the ET chain for the functioning of PSII. We also tested previously published data on cyanobacterial PSII with open RCs using models that involved protein relaxation steps as suggested by our data on closed RCs. The rationale for this reanalysis is that at least one short-lived component could not be described in the previous simpler models. This new analysis supports the involvement of a protein relaxation step for open RCs as well. In this model the rate of ET from reduced pheophytin to the primary quinone Q(A) is determined to be 4.1 ns(-1). The rate of initial charge separation is slowed down substantially from approximately 170 ns(-1) in PSII with open RCs to 56 ns(-1) upon reduction of Q(A). However, the free-energy drop of the first RP is not changed substantially between the two RC redox states. The currently assumed mechanistic model, assuming the same early RP intermediates in both states of RC, is inconsistent with the presented energetics of the RPs. Additionally, a comparison between PSII with closed RCs in isolated cores and in intact cells reveals slightly different relaxation kinetics, with a approximately 3.7 ns component present only in isolated cores.

  15. On the heat flux vector for flowing granular materials--part II: derivation and special cases

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2006-09-10

    Heat transfer plays a major role in the processing of many particulate materials. The heat flux vector is commonly modelled by the Fourier's law of heat conduction and for complex materials such as non-linear fluids, porous media, or granular materials, the coefficient of thermal conductivity is generalized by assuming that it would depend on a host of material and kinematical parameters such as temperature, shear rate, porosity or concentration, etc. In Part I, we will give a brief review of the basic equations of thermodynamics and heat transfer to indicate the importance of the modelling of the heat flux vector. We will also discuss the concept of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in granular and porous media. In Part II, we propose and subsequently derive a properly frame-invariant constitutive relationship for the heat flux vector for a (single phase) flowing granular medium. Standard methods in continuum mechanics such as representation theorems and homogenization techniques are used. It is shown that the heat flux vector in addition to being proportional to the temperature gradient (the Fourier's law), could also depend on the gradient of density (or volume fraction), and D (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient) in an appropriate manner. The emphasis in this paper is on the idea that for complex non-linear materials it is the heat flux vector which should be studied; obtaining or proposing generalized form of the thermal conductivity is not always appropriate or sufficient.

  16. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  17. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields.

    PubMed

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  18. Music in the exercise domain: a review and synthesis (Part II)

    PubMed Central

    Karageorghis, Costas I.; Priest, David-Lee

    2011-01-01

    Since a 1997 review by Karageorghis and Terry, which highlighted the state of knowledge and methodological weaknesses, the number of studies investigating musical reactivity in relation to exercise has swelled considerably. In this two-part review paper, the development of conceptual approaches and mechanisms underlying the effects of music are explicated (Part I), followed by a critical review and synthesis of empirical work (spread over Parts I and II). Pre-task music has been shown to optimise arousal, facilitate task-relevant imagery and improve performance in simple motoric tasks. During repetitive, endurance-type activities, self-selected, motivational and stimulative music has been shown to enhance affect, reduce ratings of perceived exertion, improve energy efficiency and lead to increased work output. There is evidence to suggest that carefully selected music can promote ergogenic and psychological benefits during high-intensity exercise, although it appears to be ineffective in reducing perceptions of exertion beyond the anaerobic threshold. The effects of music appear to be at their most potent when it is used to accompany self-paced exercise or in externally valid conditions. When selected according to its motivational qualities, the positive impact of music on both psychological state and performance is magnified. Guidelines are provided for future research and exercise practitioners. PMID:22577473

  19. Radiation induced redox reactions and fragmentation of constituent ions in ionic liquids II. Imidazolium cations.

    SciTech Connect

    Shkrob, I. A.; Marin, T. W.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Hatcher, J.; Wishart, J.

    2011-04-14

    In part 1 of this study, radiolytic degradation of constituent anions in ionic liquids (ILs) was examined. The present study continues the themes addressed in part 1 and examines the radiation chemistry of 1,3-dialkyl substituted imidazolium cations, which currently comprise the most practically important and versatile class of ionic liquid cations. For comparison, we also examined 1,3-dimethoxy- and 2-methyl-substituted imidazolium and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium cations. In addition to identification of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and selective deuterium substitution, we analyzed stable radiolytic products using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESMS). Our EPR studies reveal rich chemistry initiated through 'ionization of the ions': oxidation and the formation of radical dications in the aliphatic arms of the parent cations (leading to deprotonation and the formation of alkyl radicals in these arms) and reduction of the parent cation, yielding 2-imidazolyl radicals. The subsequent reactions of these radicals depend on the nature of the IL. If the cation is 2-substituted, the resulting 2-imidazolyl radical is relatively stable. If there is no substitution at C(2), the radical then either is protonated or reacts with the parent cation forming a C(2)-C(2) {sigma}{sigma}*-bound dimer radical cation. In addition to these reactions, when methoxy or C{sub {alpha}}-substituted alkyl groups occupy the N(1,3) positions, their elimination is observed. The elimination of methyl groups from N(1,3) was not observed. Product analyses of imidazolium liquids irradiated in the very-high-dose regime (6.7 MGy) reveal several detrimental processes, including volatilization, acidification, and oligomerization. The latter yields a polymer with m/z of 650 {+-} 300 whose radiolytic yield increases with dose (0.23 monomer units per 100 eV for 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium

  20. Fe(II) Oxidation Is an Innate Capability of Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria That Involves Abiotic and Biotic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans K.; Clark, Iain C.; Blazewicz, Steven J.; Iavarone, Anthony T.

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetically diverse species of bacteria can catalyze the oxidation of ferrous iron [Fe(II)] coupled to nitrate (NO3−) reduction, often referred to as nitrate-dependent iron oxidation (NDFO). Very little is known about the biochemistry of NDFO, and though growth benefits have been observed, mineral encrustations and nitrite accumulation likely limit growth. Acidovorax ebreus, like other species in the Acidovorax genus, is proficient at catalyzing NDFO. Our results suggest that the induction of specific Fe(II) oxidoreductase proteins is not required for NDFO. No upregulated periplasmic or outer membrane redox-active proteins, like those involved in Fe(II) oxidation by acidophilic iron oxidizers or anaerobic photoferrotrophs, were observed in proteomic experiments. We demonstrate that while “abiotic” extracellular reactions between Fe(II) and biogenic NO2−/NO can be involved in NDFO, intracellular reactions between Fe(II) and periplasmic components are essential to initiate extensive NDFO. We present evidence that an organic cosubstrate inhibits NDFO, likely by keeping periplasmic enzymes in their reduced state, stimulating metal efflux pumping, or both, and that growth during NDFO relies on the capacity of a nitrate-reducing bacterium to overcome the toxicity of Fe(II) and reactive nitrogen species. On the basis of our data and evidence in the literature, we postulate that all respiratory nitrate-reducing bacteria are innately capable of catalyzing NDFO. Our findings have implications for a mechanistic understanding of NDFO, the biogeochemical controls on anaerobic Fe(II) oxidation, and the production of NO2−, NO, and N2O in the environment. PMID:23687275

  1. Fe(II) oxidation is an innate capability of nitrate-reducing bacteria that involves abiotic and biotic reactions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Hans K; Clark, Iain C; Blazewicz, Steven J; Iavarone, Anthony T; Coates, John D

    2013-07-01

    Phylogenetically diverse species of bacteria can catalyze the oxidation of ferrous iron [Fe(II)] coupled to nitrate (NO(3)(-)) reduction, often referred to as nitrate-dependent iron oxidation (NDFO). Very little is known about the biochemistry of NDFO, and though growth benefits have been observed, mineral encrustations and nitrite accumulation likely limit growth. Acidovorax ebreus, like other species in the Acidovorax genus, is proficient at catalyzing NDFO. Our results suggest that the induction of specific Fe(II) oxidoreductase proteins is not required for NDFO. No upregulated periplasmic or outer membrane redox-active proteins, like those involved in Fe(II) oxidation by acidophilic iron oxidizers or anaerobic photoferrotrophs, were observed in proteomic experiments. We demonstrate that while "abiotic" extracellular reactions between Fe(II) and biogenic NO(2)(-)/NO can be involved in NDFO, intracellular reactions between Fe(II) and periplasmic components are essential to initiate extensive NDFO. We present evidence that an organic cosubstrate inhibits NDFO, likely by keeping periplasmic enzymes in their reduced state, stimulating metal efflux pumping, or both, and that growth during NDFO relies on the capacity of a nitrate-reducing bacterium to overcome the toxicity of Fe(II) and reactive nitrogen species. On the basis of our data and evidence in the literature, we postulate that all respiratory nitrate-reducing bacteria are innately capable of catalyzing NDFO. Our findings have implications for a mechanistic understanding of NDFO, the biogeochemical controls on anaerobic Fe(II) oxidation, and the production of NO(2)(-), NO, and N(2)O in the environment.

  2. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions: part II--an approach to intradermal proliferations and horizontally oriented lesions.

    PubMed

    Sade, Shachar; Al Habeeb, Ayman; Ghazarian, Danny

    2010-05-01

    Melanocytic lesions show great morphological diversity in their architecture and the cytomorphological appearance of their composite cells. Whereas functional melanocytes show a dendritic cytomorphology and territorial isolation, lesional nevomelanocytes and melanoma cells typically show epithelioid, spindled or mixed cytomorphologies, and a range of architectural arrangements. Spindling is common to melanocytic lesions, and may either be a characteristic feature or a divergent appearance. The presence of spindle cells may mask the melanocytic nature of a lesion, and is often disconcerting, either due to its infrequent appearance in a particular lesion or its interpretation as a dedifferentiated phenotype. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions follow the full spectrum of potential biological outcomes, and difficulty may be experienced judging the nature of a lesion due to a lack of consistently reliable features to predict biological behaviour. Over time, recognition of numerous histomorphological features that may portend a more aggressive lesion have been identified; however, the translation of these features into a diagnostic entity requires a gestalt approach. Although most spindle cell melanocytic lesions may reliably be resolved through this standard approach, problem areas do exist for the surgical pathologist or dermatopathologist. With this review (part II of II), we complete our discussion of spindle cell melanocytic lesions, in order to: (1) model a systematic approach to such lesions; and (2) provide familiarity with those melanocytic lesions which either typically or occasionally display a spindled cytomorphology.

  3. Correlations among the Reiss Screen, the Adaptive Behavior Scale Part II, and the Aberrant Behavior Checklist.

    PubMed

    Walsh, K K; Shenouda, N

    1999-05-01

    Relations among instruments used in community mental health services for people with developmental disabilities were explored with 284 individuals. Correlation coefficients among the instrument subscales were interpreted in terms of statistical significance and effect size. Of the 157 coefficients, 44% were significant, p < .001, and 35% represented large effects, r > .50. Reiss Screen subscale scores correlated with Irritability, Lethargy, and Hyperactivity on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) and with Social Behavior and Disturbing Interpersonal Behavior on the ABS Part II. Stepwise regression analyses predicting Reiss Screen scores from the ABS and ABC resulted in a significant regression, with an overall adjusted R2 of .67. Variance was largely accounted for by two ABS domains and two ABC subscales.

  4. Implementing AORN recommended practices for a safe environment of care, part II.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Lynne

    2014-09-01

    Construction in and around a working perioperative suite is a challenge beyond merely managing traffic patterns and maintaining the sterile field. The AORN "Recommended practices for a safe environment of care, part II" provides guidance on building design; movement of patients, personnel, supplies, and equipment; environmental controls; safety and security; and control of noise and distractions. Whether the OR suite evolves through construction, reconstruction, or remodeling, a multidisciplinary team of construction experts and health care professionals should create a functional plan and communicate at every stage of the project to maintain a safe environment and achieve a well-designed outcome. Emergency preparedness, a facility-wide security plan, and minimization of noise and distractions in the OR also help enhance the safety of the perioperative environment. PMID:25172563

  5. Repository Planning, Design, and Engineering: Part II-Equipment and Costing.

    PubMed

    Baird, Phillip M; Gunter, Elaine W

    2016-08-01

    Part II of this article discusses and provides guidance on the equipment and systems necessary to operate a repository. The various types of storage equipment and monitoring and support systems are presented in detail. While the material focuses on the large repository, the requirements for a small-scale startup are also presented. Cost estimates and a cost model for establishing a repository are presented. The cost model presents an expected range of acquisition costs for the large capital items in developing a repository. A range of 5,000-7,000 ft(2) constructed has been assumed, with 50 frozen storage units, to reflect a successful operation with growth potential. No design or engineering costs, permit or regulatory costs, or smaller items such as the computers, software, furniture, phones, and barcode readers required for operations have been included. PMID:26886768

  6. Fundamental two-stage formulation for Bayesian system identification, Part II: Application to ambient vibration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng-Liang; Au, Siu-Kui

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental theory has been developed for a general two-stage Bayesian system identification problem in the companion paper (Part I). This paper applies the theory to the particular case of structural system identification using ambient vibration data. In Stage I, the modal properties are identified using the Fast Bayesian FFT method. Given the data, their posterior distribution can be well approximated by a Gaussian distribution whose mean and covariance matrix can be computed efficiently. In Stage II, the structural model parameters (e.g., stiffness, mass) are identified incorporating the posterior distribution of the natural frequencies and mode shapes in Stage I and their conditional distribution based on the theoretical structural finite element model. Synthetic and experimental data are used to illustrate the proposed theory and applications. A number of factors commonly relevant to structural system identification are studied, including the number of measured degrees of freedom, the number of identifiable modes and sensor alignment error.

  7. Implementing AORN recommended practices for a safe environment of care, part II.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Lynne

    2014-09-01

    Construction in and around a working perioperative suite is a challenge beyond merely managing traffic patterns and maintaining the sterile field. The AORN "Recommended practices for a safe environment of care, part II" provides guidance on building design; movement of patients, personnel, supplies, and equipment; environmental controls; safety and security; and control of noise and distractions. Whether the OR suite evolves through construction, reconstruction, or remodeling, a multidisciplinary team of construction experts and health care professionals should create a functional plan and communicate at every stage of the project to maintain a safe environment and achieve a well-designed outcome. Emergency preparedness, a facility-wide security plan, and minimization of noise and distractions in the OR also help enhance the safety of the perioperative environment.

  8. Psychoeducational Interventions with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Part II. Effects of Information and Skills Training on Health-Related Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Ivan L.; Bradlyn, Andrew S.; Kato, Pamela M.

    2003-01-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a model that was used as a framework for reviewing studies of psychoeducational interventions intended to influence illness- and treatment-related behaviors and attitudes in pediatric cancer patients. In Part II, we distinguish between interventions that attempt to influence patients' behaviors just by…

  9. The Mental Health Recovery Movement and Family Therapy, Part II: A Collaborative, Appreciative Approach for Supporting Mental Health Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehart, Diane R.

    2012-01-01

    A continuation of Part I, which introduced mental health recovery concepts to family therapists, Part II of this article outlines a collaborative, appreciative approach for working in recovery-oriented contexts. This approach draws primarily upon postmodern therapies, which have numerous social justice and strength-based practices that are easily…

  10. Higher Education in Poland Part II: Rules of Admissions, Student Activities, and Curriculums. Bulletin, 1964, No. 22. OE-14099

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Seymour M.; Apanasewicz, Nellie

    1964-01-01

    The previously published "Higher Education in Poland, Part I: Organization and Administration," and the present volume constitute an Office of Education study on the Polish system of higher learning. Part II explains the functioning of Polish institutions under control of the Ministry of Higher Education and other ministries, and enumerates the…

  11. Modeling of optical spectra of the light-harvesting CP29 antenna complex of photosystem II--part II.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ximao; Kell, Adam; Pieper, Jörg; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2013-06-01

    Until recently, it was believed that the CP29 protein from higher plant photosystem II (PSII) contains 8 chlorophylls (Chl's) per complex (Ahn et al. Science 2008, 320, 794-797; Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1999, 96, 10056-10061) in contrast to the 13 Chl's revealed by the recent X-ray structure (Pan et al. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 2011, 18, 309-315). This disagreement presents a constraint on the interpretation of the underlying electronic structure of this complex. To shed more light on the interpretation of various experimental optical spectra discussed in the accompanying paper (part I, DOI 10.1021/jp4004328 ), we report here calculated low-temperature (5 K) absorption, fluorescence, hole-burned (HB), and 300 K circular dichroism (CD) spectra for CP29 complexes with a different number of pigments. We focus on excitonic structure and the nature of the low-energy state using modeling based on the X-ray structure of CP29 and Redfield theory. We show that the lowest energy state is mostly contributed to by a612, a611, and a615 Chl's. We suggest that in the previously studied CP29 complexes from spinach (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol.2000, 71, 574-589) two Chl's could have been lost during the preparation/purification procedure, but it is unlikely that the spinach CP29 protein contains only eight Chl's, as suggested by the sequence homology-based study (Bassi et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.1999, 96, 10056-10061). The likely Chl's missing in wild-type (WT) CP29 complexes studied previously (Pieper et al. Photochem. Photobiol. 2000, 71, 574-589) include a615 and b607. This is why the nonresonant HB spectra shown in that reference were ~1 nm blue-shifted with the low-energy state mostly localized on about one Chl a (i.e., a612) molecule. Pigment composition of CP29 is discussed in the context of light-harvesting and excitation energy transfer.

  12. NACRE II: An Update of the NACRE Compilation of Atarget<16 Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2011-10-01

    We report on the status of a new evaluation of the rates in astrophysical conditions of 19 capture and 15 transfer reactions on stable targets with mass numbers A<16, referred as NACRE-II. This work is meant to supersede the NACRE compilation. Post-NACRE experimental data are taken into account. Extrapolations of the astrophysical S-factor to largely sub-Coulomb energies are based on the use of the potential model and of the distorted wave Born approximation for capture and transfer reactions, respectively. Adopted rates and their lower and upper limits are provided. Here, we illustrate the general procedure followed in the NACRE-II construction with two examples.

  13. Synthesis of novel Schiff base ligands from gluco- and galactochloraloses for the Cu(II) catalyzed asymmetric Henry reaction.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Sevda; Telli, Fatma Ç; Salman, Yeşim; Astley, Stephen T

    2015-04-30

    A series of chiral Schiff base ligands has been prepared using aminochloralose derivatives of glucose and galactose. These ligands were used as catalysts in the asymmetric Henry reaction in the presence of Cu(II) ions giving yields of up to 95%. An interesting solvent dependency on enantiomeric control was observed with the best enantiomeric excesses (up to 91%) being obtained in the presence of water. PMID:25742867

  14. Chemoselective chromium(II)-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of dichlorinated heteroaromatics with functionalized aryl grignard reagents.

    PubMed

    Steib, Andreas K; Kuzmina, Olesya M; Fernandez, Sarah; Malhotra, Sushant; Knochel, Paul

    2015-01-26

    Chromium(II) chloride catalyzes the chemoselective cross-coupling reaction of dichloropyridines with a range of functionalized (hetero)aromatic Grignard reagents at room temperature. Functional groups, such as esters and acetals, are well tolerated in this transformation. Previously challenging substrates, quinolines and isoquinolines, participate in the selective Cr-catalyzed cross-coupling in cyclopentyl methyl ether (CPME) as the solvent. The effective purging of Cr salts is demonstrated by using various solid supports. PMID:25470669

  15. Mineral surface catalysis of reactions between Fe II and oxime carbamate pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strathmann, Timothy J.; Stone, Alan T.

    2003-08-01

    This study examines the reduction of oxime carbamate pesticides (oxamyl, methomyl, and aldicarb) by Fe II in aqueous suspensions containing twelve different (hydr)oxide and aluminosilicate minerals. In the absence of Fe II, mineral surfaces have no apparent effect on the pathways or rates of oxime carbamate degradation. In anoxic suspensions containing Fe II and mineral surfaces, rates of oxime carbamate reduction are significantly faster than in equivalent mineral-free homogeneous solutions. Rates increase with increasing surface area loading (mineral surface area per volume of suspension) and pH. Kinetic trends are interpreted in terms of changes in Fe II speciation. Quantitative modeling indicates a first-order dependence on total adsorbed Fe II concentration and no significant dependence on adsorbed oxime carbamate concentration. Bimolecular rate constants describing the reactivity of adsorbed Fe II with dissolved oxamyl decrease in the following order: silicon dioxide #2 > silicon dioxide #1 ≫ hematite #2 > titanium dioxide #1 > hematite #1 > titanium dioxide #2 > silicon dioxide #3 > aluminum oxide > kaolinite #1 > kaolinite #2 > goethite ≫ titanium dioxide #3. Possible factors responsible for the increased reactivity of adsorbed Fe II, as well as for the relative reactivity of Fe II adsorbed on different surfaces, are discussed. Results from this study demonstrate that mineral surfaces present in subsurface environments can substantially catalyze the reduction of oxime carbamate pesticides by Fe II. Overall rates of pesticide degradation may be under predicted by > 1 order of magnitude if the effects of mineral surfaces are not accounted for.

  16. State-of-the-art human gene therapy: part II. Gene therapy strategies and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gao, Guangping

    2014-09-01

    In Part I of this Review (Wang and Gao, 2014), we introduced recent advances in gene delivery technologies and explained how they have powered some of the current human gene therapy applications. In Part II, we expand the discussion on gene therapy applications, focusing on some of the most exciting clinical uses. To help readers to grasp the essence and to better organize the diverse applications, we categorize them under four gene therapy strategies: (1) gene replacement therapy for monogenic diseases, (2) gene addition for complex disorders and infectious diseases, (3) gene expression alteration targeting RNA, and (4) gene editing to introduce targeted changes in host genome. Human gene therapy started with the simple idea that replacing a faulty gene with a functional copy can cure a disease. It has been a long and bumpy road to finally translate this seemingly straightforward concept into reality. As many disease mechanisms unraveled, gene therapists have employed a gene addition strategy backed by a deep knowledge of what goes wrong in diseases and how to harness host cellular machinery to battle against diseases. Breakthroughs in other biotechnologies, such as RNA interference and genome editing by chimeric nucleases, have the potential to be integrated into gene therapy. Although clinical trials utilizing these new technologies are currently sparse, these innovations are expected to greatly broaden the scope of gene therapy in the near future.

  17. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part II: Thermal modeling and analysis of experimental observations.

    PubMed

    Feig, Justin S G; Solanki, Prem K; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy. PMID:27343139

  18. Interview-Based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Ranney, Megan L.; Meisel, Zachary; Choo, Esther K.; Garro, Aris; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research. PMID:26284572

  19. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part II.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J; Long-Boyle, Janel

    2016-05-01

    Part I of this article included a pertinent review of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), the role of postgraft immunosuppression in alloHCT, and the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of the calcineurin inhibitors and methotrexate. In this article (Part II), we review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of mycophenolic acid (MPA), sirolimus, and the antithymocyte globulins (ATG). We then discuss target concentration intervention (TCI) of these postgraft immunosuppressants in alloHCT patients, with a focus on current evidence for TCI and on how TCI may improve clinical management in these patients. Currently, TCI using trough concentrations is conducted for sirolimus in alloHCT patients. Several studies demonstrate that MPA plasma exposure is associated with clinical outcomes, with an increasing number of alloHCT patients needing TCI of MPA. Compared with MPA, there are fewer pharmacokinetic/dynamic studies of rabbit ATG and horse ATG in alloHCT patients. Future pharmacokinetic/dynamic research of postgraft immunosuppressants should include '-omics'-based tools: pharmacogenomics may be used to gain an improved understanding of the covariates influencing pharmacokinetics as well as proteomics and metabolomics as novel methods to elucidate pharmacodynamic responses.

  20. Tobacco control and gender in south-east Asia. Part II: Singapore and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Martha; Barraclough, Simon

    2003-12-01

    In the World Health Organization's Western Pacific Region, being born male is the single greatest risk marker for tobacco use. While the literature demonstrates that risks associated with tobacco use may vary according to sex, gender refers to the socially determined roles and responsibilities of men and women, who initiate, continue and quit using tobacco for complex and often different reasons. Cigarette advertising frequently appeals to gender roles. Yet tobacco control policy tends to be gender-blind. Using a broad, gender-sensitivity framework, this contradiction is explored in four Western Pacific countries. Part I of the study presented the rationale, methodology and design of the study, discussed issues surrounding gender and tobacco, and analysed developments in Malaysia and the Philippines (see the previous issue of this journal). Part II deals with Singapore and Vietnam. In all four countries gender was salient for the initiation and maintenance of smoking. Yet, with a few exceptions, gender was largely unrecognized in control policy. Suggestions for overcoming this weakness in order to enhance tobacco control are made.

  1. Hospital reimbursement incentives: is there a more effective option?--Part II.

    PubMed

    Weil, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    As discussed in Part I of this article, hospital executives in Canada, Germany, and the United States manage their facilities' resources to maximize the incentives inherent in their respective reimbursement system and thereby increase their bottom line. It was also discussed that an additional supply of available hospitals, physicians, and other services will generate increased utilization. Part II discusses how the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 will eventually fail since it neither controls prices nor utilization (e.g., imaging, procedures, ambulatory surgery, discretionary spending). This article concludes with the discussion of the German multipayer approach with universal access and global budgets that might well be a model for U.S. healthcare in the future. Although the German healthcare system has a number of shortfalls, its paradigm could offer the most appropriate compromise when selecting the economic incentives to reduce the percentage of the U.S. gross domestic product expenditure for healthcare from 17.4% to roughly 12.0%. PMID:23547503

  2. Interview-based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting.

    PubMed

    Ranney, Megan L; Meisel, Zachary F; Choo, Esther K; Garro, Aris C; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow Guthrie, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research.

  3. Hospital reimbursement incentives: is there a more effective option?--Part II.

    PubMed

    Weil, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    As discussed in Part I of this article, hospital executives in Canada, Germany, and the United States manage their facilities' resources to maximize the incentives inherent in their respective reimbursement system and thereby increase their bottom line. It was also discussed that an additional supply of available hospitals, physicians, and other services will generate increased utilization. Part II discusses how the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 will eventually fail since it neither controls prices nor utilization (e.g., imaging, procedures, ambulatory surgery, discretionary spending). This article concludes with the discussion of the German multipayer approach with universal access and global budgets that might well be a model for U.S. healthcare in the future. Although the German healthcare system has a number of shortfalls, its paradigm could offer the most appropriate compromise when selecting the economic incentives to reduce the percentage of the U.S. gross domestic product expenditure for healthcare from 17.4% to roughly 12.0%.

  4. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part II: Thermal modeling and analysis of experimental observations.

    PubMed

    Feig, Justin S G; Solanki, Prem K; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy.

  5. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Pharmacogenomics of Immunosuppressants in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Part II.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Bemer, Meagan J; Long-Boyle, Janel

    2016-05-01

    Part I of this article included a pertinent review of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), the role of postgraft immunosuppression in alloHCT, and the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of the calcineurin inhibitors and methotrexate. In this article (Part II), we review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenomics of mycophenolic acid (MPA), sirolimus, and the antithymocyte globulins (ATG). We then discuss target concentration intervention (TCI) of these postgraft immunosuppressants in alloHCT patients, with a focus on current evidence for TCI and on how TCI may improve clinical management in these patients. Currently, TCI using trough concentrations is conducted for sirolimus in alloHCT patients. Several studies demonstrate that MPA plasma exposure is associated with clinical outcomes, with an increasing number of alloHCT patients needing TCI of MPA. Compared with MPA, there are fewer pharmacokinetic/dynamic studies of rabbit ATG and horse ATG in alloHCT patients. Future pharmacokinetic/dynamic research of postgraft immunosuppressants should include '-omics'-based tools: pharmacogenomics may be used to gain an improved understanding of the covariates influencing pharmacokinetics as well as proteomics and metabolomics as novel methods to elucidate pharmacodynamic responses. PMID:26620047

  6. Discover Health Services Near You! The North Dakota Story: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Safratowich, Michael; Markland, Mary J.; Rieke, Judith L.

    2010-01-01

    Since the 2003 launch of NC Health Info, the National Library of Medicine has encouraged the development of Go Local databases. A team of Go Local enthusiasts at North Dakota’s only medical school library wanted to obtain NLM funding and build a resource for their rural state. Although short on staff, money, and time, the team found a way to realize a Go Local database that serves the state’s residents and helps them “Discover Health Services Near You!” A team approach and collaboration with health providers and organizations worked well in this small rural state. North Dakota’s Go Local project offers a low-cost model that stresses collaboration, teamwork and technology. Part I which appeared in the last issue describes the rural setting, explains how the project was conceived, and the processes necessary to begin building the database. Part II which appears in this issue details how records were created including developing the input style guide and indexing decisions, the NLM testing and review process, the maintenance and auditing process, and publicity and promotion of the project. PMID:20436944

  7. Genetically engineered plants and foods: a scientist's analysis of the issues (part II).

    PubMed

    Lemaux, Peggy G

    2009-01-01

    Genetic engineering provides a means to introduce genes into plants via mechanisms that are different in some respects from classical breeding. A number of commercialized, genetically engineered (GE) varieties, most notably canola, cotton, maize and soybean, were created using this technology, and at present the traits introduced are herbicide and/or pest tolerance. In 2007 these GE crops were planted in developed and developing countries on more than 280 million acres (113 million hectares) worldwide, representing nearly 10% of rainfed cropland. Although the United States leads the world in acres planted with GE crops, the majority of this planting is on large acreage farms. In developing countries, adopters are mostly small and resource-poor farmers. For farmers and many consumers worldwide, planting and eating GE crops and products made from them are acceptable and even welcomed; for others GE crops raise food and environmental safety questions, as well as economic and social issues. In Part I of this review, some general and food issues related to GE crops and foods were discussed. In Part II, issues related to certain environmental and socioeconomic aspects of GE crops and foods are addressed, with responses linked to the scientific literature.

  8. Project for the National Program of Early Diagnosis of Endometrial Cancer Part II

    PubMed Central

    Bohîlțea, RE; Ancăr, V; Rădoi, V; Furtunescu, F; Bohîlțea, LC

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Endometrial cancer recorded a peak incidence in ages 60-64 years in Romania. Since 2013, an increased trend of endometrial cancer occurrence has been registered in urban areas as compared with rural ones. Unfortunately, most of the cancer cases are diagnosed too late, in an advanced stage of the disease, resulting into diminished lifetime expectancy. The first part of the article concentrated on issues such as: the description of the study, results, and discussions regarding the study, definitions and terms, risk factors specific for endometrial carcinomas, presentation of the activities of the Program, etc. Objective: Drafting a national program that will serve as an early diagnosis method of endometrial cancer. This second part of the study continues with the presentation of the activities of the Program, analyzes the human resources and materials needed to implement the Program, presents the strategies and the indicators specific for the implementation of the project. Methods and Results: A standardization of the diagnostic steps was proposed and the focus was on 4 key elements for the early diagnosis of endometrial cancer: The first steps were approached in the first part of the study and the second part of the study investigated the proper monitoring of precursor endometrial lesions or cancer associated endometrial lesions and screening high risk populations (Lynch syndrome, Cowden syndrome). Discussion: Improving medical practice based on diagnostic algorithms and programs improves and increases the lifetime expectancy, due to the fact that endometrial cancer is early diagnosed and treated before it causes serious health problems or even death. Abbreviations: ASCCP = American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, CT = Computerized Tomography, HNPCC = Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch syndrome), IHC = Immunohistochemistry, MSI = Microsatellites instability, MSI-H/ MSI-L = high (positive test)/ low (negative test

  9. Modulating the Redox Potential of the Stable Electron Acceptor, QB, in Mutagenized Photosystem II Reaction Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Zoee; Sayre, Richard

    2011-02-10

    One of the unique features of electron transfer processes in photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers (RC) is the exclusive transfer of electrons down only one of the two parallel cofactor branches. In contrast to the RC core polypeptides (psaA and psaB) of photosystem I (PSI), where electron transfer occurs down both parallel redox-active cofactor branches, there is greater protein-cofactor asymmetry between the PSII RC core polypeptides (D1 and D2). We have focused on the identification of protein-cofactor relationships that determine the branch along which primary charge separation occurs (P680+/pheophytin-(Pheo)). We have previously shown that mutagenesis of the strong hydrogen-bonding residue, D1-E130, to less polar residues (D1-E130Q,H,L) shifted the midpoint potential of the PheoD1/PheoD1- couple to more negative values, reducing the quantum yield of primary charge separation. We did not observe, however, electron transfer down the inactive branch in D1-E130 mutants. The protein residue corresponding to D1-E130 on the inactive branch is D2-Q129 which presumably has a reduced hydrogen-bonding interaction with PheoD2 relative to the D1-E130 residue with PheoD1. Analysis of the recent 2.9 Å cyanobacterial PSII crystal structure indicated, however, that the D2-Q129 residue was too distant from the PheoD2 headgroup to serve as a possible hydrogen bond donor and directly impact its midpoint potential as well as potentially determine the directionality of electron transfer. Our objective was to characterize the function of this highly conserved inactive branch residue by replacing it with a nonconservative leucine or a conservative histidine residue. Measurements of Chl fluorescence decay kinetics and thermoluminescence studies indicate that the mutagenesis of D2-Q129 decreases the redox gap between QA and QB due to a lowering of the redox potential of QB. The

  10. Non-photochemical Fluorescence Quenching in Photosystem II Antenna Complexes by the Reaction Center Cation Radical.

    PubMed

    Paschenko, V Z; Gorokhov, V V; Grishanova, N P; Korvatovskii, B N; Ivanov, M V; Maksimov, E G; Mamedov, M D

    2016-06-01

    In direct experiments, rate constants of photochemical (kP) and non-photochemical (kP(+)) fluorescence quenching were determined in membrane fragments of photosystem II (PSII), in oxygen-evolving PSII core particles, as well as in core particles deprived of the oxygen-evolving complex. For this purpose, a new approach to the pulse fluorometry method was implemented. In the "dark" reaction center (RC) state, antenna fluorescence decay kinetics were measured under low-intensity excitation (532 nm, pulse repetition rate 1 Hz), and the emission was registered by a streak camera. To create a "closed" [P680(+)QA(-)] RC state, a high-intensity pre-excitation pulse (pump pulse, 532 nm) of the sample was used. The time advance of the pump pulse against the measuring pulse was 8 ns. In this experimental configuration, under the pump pulse, the [P680(+)QA(-)] state was formed in RC, whereupon antenna fluorescence kinetics was measured using a weak testing picosecond pulsed excitation light applied to the sample 8 ns after the pump pulse. The data were fitted by a two-exponential approximation. Efficiency of antenna fluorescence quenching by the photoactive RC pigment in its oxidized (P680(+)) state was found to be ~1.5 times higher than that of the neutral (P680) RC state. To verify the data obtained with a streak camera, control measurements of PSII complex fluorescence decay kinetics by the single-photon counting technique were carried out. The results support the conclusions drawn from the measurements registered with the streak camera. In this case, the fitting of fluorescence kinetics was performed in three-exponential approximation, using the value of τ1 obtained by analyzing data registered by the streak camera. An additional third component obtained by modeling the data of single photon counting describes the P680(+)Pheo(-) charge recombination. Thus, for the first time the ratio of kP(+)/kP = 1.5 was determined in a direct experiment. The mechanisms of higher

  11. Survey of Land-Grant Colleges and Universities. Bulletin, 1930, No. 9. Volume II. [Part I - Part VI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education, United States Department of the Interior, 1930

    1930-01-01

    The attached document covers the initial sections of the second volume of the Survey of Land-Grant Colleges and Universities, from Part I to Part VI. Part I, Arts and sciences, contains the following chapters: (1) Introduction; (2) Arts and science organization; (3) Specialization; (4) Enrollments and salaries; (5) Articulation with secondary…

  12. North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part II: Inter-annual to decadal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Kim, Who M.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Bleck, Rainer; Böning, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Danilov, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Gusev, Anatoly; Heimbach, Patrick; Howard, Armando; Ilicak, Mehmet; Jung, Thomas; Karspeck, Alicia R.; Kelley, Maxwell; Large, William G.; Leboissetier, Anthony; Lu, Jianhua; Madec, Gurvan; Marsland, Simon J.; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; Nurser, A. J. George; Pirani, Anna; Romanou, Anastasia; Salas y Mélia, David; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Sun, Shan; Treguier, Anne-Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Yashayaev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Simulated inter-annual to decadal variability and trends in the North Atlantic for the 1958-2007 period from twenty global ocean - sea-ice coupled models are presented. These simulations are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The study is Part II of our companion paper (Danabasoglu et al., 2014) which documented the mean states in the North Atlantic from the same models. A major focus of the present study is the representation of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability in the participating models. Relationships between AMOC variability and those of some other related variables, such as subpolar mixed layer depths, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Labrador Sea upper-ocean hydrographic properties, are also investigated. In general, AMOC variability shows three distinct stages. During the first stage that lasts until the mid- to late-1970s, AMOC is relatively steady, remaining lower than its long-term (1958-2007) mean. Thereafter, AMOC intensifies with maximum transports achieved in the mid- to late-1990s. This enhancement is then followed by a weakening trend until the end of our integration period. This sequence of low frequency AMOC variability is consistent with previous studies. Regarding strengthening of AMOC between about the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, our results support a previously identified variability mechanism where AMOC intensification is connected to increased deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic, driven by NAO-related surface fluxes. The simulations tend to show general agreement in their temporal representations of, for example, AMOC, sea surface temperature (SST), and subpolar mixed layer depth variabilities. In particular, the observed variability of the North Atlantic SSTs is captured well by all models. These findings indicate that simulated variability and trends are primarily dictated by the atmospheric datasets which

  13. [ENDOTHELIAL MONOCYTEACTIVATING FACTOR II CANCELS OXIDATIVE STRESS, CONSTITUTIVE NOS UNCOUPLING AND INDUCED VIOLATIONS OF CARDIAC HEMODYNAMICS IN HYPERTENSION (PART II)].

    PubMed

    Dorofeyeva, N A; Kotsuruba, A V; Mogilnitskaya, L A; Malyna, A E; Kornelyuk, A I; Sagach, V F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of EMAP II on free radical state of the heart and blood vessels, to restore cNOS coupling and cardiac hemodynamics in spontaneously hypertensive rats. It was found that, due to the combined inhibition of oxidative and nitrosative stress, EMAP I quickly restores impaired in hypertension constitutive de novo synthesis of NO by restoring cNOS coupling. Restoration by EMAP II of constitutive de novo synthesis NO abolished cardiac and endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In hypertension, the introduction of EMAP II helped to improve the performance of the pumping function of the heart (stroke volume increased by 18.2 %, cardiac output -22 %), an arterial stiffness decreased by 23.2 %, process of relaxation of the left ventricle improved, due to decreased in 4,7 times myocardial end-diastolic stiffness. PMID:26495731

  14. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part II: Analysis by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Castorena, Joe L; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a decedent's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray (SEM/EDX) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In part I of this 2-part series, GSR results performed by SEM/EDX in undisputed cases of suicidal handgun wounds were studied. In part II, the same population was studied, deceased persons with undisputed suicidal handgun wounds, but GSR testing was performed using ICP-AES. A total of 102 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and the results of the GSR testing. This study found that 50% of cases where the deceased was known to have fired a handgun immediately prior to death had positive GSR results by ICP/AES, which did not differ from the results of GSR testing by SEM/EDX. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon were positive for GSR by either method, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether someone has discharged a firearm and is not useful as a determining factor of whether or not a wound is self-inflicted or non-self-inflicted. While a positive GSR result may be of use, a negative result is not helpful in the medical examiner setting as a negative result indicates that either a person fired a weapon prior to death or a person did not fire a weapon prior to death.

  15. Rare or remarkable microfungi from Oaxaca (south Mexico)--Part II.

    PubMed

    Ale-Agha, N; Jensen, M; Brassmann, M; Kautz, S; Eilmus, S; Ballhorn, D J

    2008-01-01

    Microfungi were collected in southern Mexico in the vicinity of Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca in 2007. In 2006, samples were gathered from Acacia myrmecophytes [(Remarkable microfungi from Oaxaca of Acacia species) Part I]. In the present investigation [Part II], we collected microfungi from different parts of a variety of wild and cultivated higher plants belonging to the families Anacardiaceae, Caricaceae, Fabaceae, Moraceae, and Nyctaginacae. The microfungi found here live as parasites or saprophytes. Interestingly, the species Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. and Magn.) Briosi and Cavara has repeatedly been used to cause fungal infections of Phaseolus lunatus leaves in laboratory experiments. We could now find the same fungus as parasite on the same host plants under field conditions showing that results obtained in the laboratory are also relevant in nature. Most of the fungal species collected belong to the classes Ascomycotina, Basidiomycotina and Deuteromycotina. Until now, some of the microfungi identified in this study have been rarely observed before or have been reported for the first time in Mexico, for example: Pestalotia acaciae Thüm. on Acacia collinsii Safford; Corynespora cassiicola (Berk. and M.A. Curtis) C.T. Wei on Carica papaya L.; Botryosphaeria ribis Grossenb. and Duggar and Cercosporella leucaenae (Raghu Ram and Mallaiah) U. Braun (new for Mexico) and Camptomeris leucaenae (F. Stevens and Dalbey) Syd. (new for Mexico) on Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit.; Oidium clitoriae Narayanas. and K. Ramakr. and Phakopsora cf. pachyrhizi Sydow and Sydow (new for Mexico) on Clitoria ternatea L.; Botryosphaeria obtusa (Schw.) Shoemaker on Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC.; Cylindrocladium scoparium Morg. on Ficus benjamina L.; Acremonium sp. on Bougainvillea sp. All specimens are located in the herbarium ESS. Mycotheca Parva collection G.B. Feige and N. Ale-Agha. PMID:19226752

  16. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  17. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 1: Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors as a result of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and low-molecular-weight thiols are commonly encountered in wine production. These odors are usually removed by the process of Cu(II) fining, a process that remains poorly understood. The present study aims to elucidate the underlying mechanisms by which Cu(II) interacts with H2S and thiol compounds (RSH) under wine-like conditions. Copper complex formation was monitored along with H2S, thiol, oxygen, and acetaldehyde concentrations after the addition of Cu(II) (50 or 100 μM) to air-saturated model wine solutions containing H2S, cysteine, 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, or 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (300 μM each). The presence of H2S and thiols in excess to Cu(II) led to the rapid formation of ∼1.4:1 H2S/Cu and ∼2:1 thiol/Cu complexes, resulting in the oxidation of H2S and thiols and reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I), which reacted with oxygen. H2S was observed to initially oxidize rather than form insoluble copper sulfide. The proposed reaction mechanisms provide insight into the extent to which H2S can be selectively removed in the presence of thiols in wine. PMID:27133282

  18. Carbon-carbon cross-coupling reactions catalyzed by a two-coordinate nickel(II)-bis(amido) complex via observable Ni(I) , Ni(II) , and Ni(III) intermediates.

    PubMed

    Lipschutz, Michael I; Tilley, T Don

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the development of more sustainable catalytic systems based on abundant first-row metals, especially nickel, for cross-coupling reactions has attracted significant interest. One of the key intermediates invoked in these reactions is a Ni(III) -alkyl species, but no such species that is part of a competent catalytic cycle has yet been isolated. Herein, we report a carbon-carbon cross-coupling system based on a two-coordinate Ni(II) -bis(amido) complex in which a Ni(III) -alkyl species can be isolated and fully characterized. This study details compelling experimental evidence of the role played by this Ni(III) -alkyl species as well as those of other key Ni(I) and Ni(II) intermediates. The catalytic cycle described herein is also one of the first examples of a two-coordinate complex that competently catalyzes an organic transformation, potentially leading to a new class of catalysts based on the unique ability of first-row transition metals to accommodate two-coordinate complexes.

  19. Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries--Part II: Gaseous pollutants' assessment.

    PubMed

    Branco, P T B S; Nunes, R A O; Alvim-Ferraz, M C M; Martins, F G; Sousa, S I V

    2015-10-01

    This study, Part II of the larger study "Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries", aimed to: (i) evaluate nursery schools' indoor concentrations of several air pollutants in class and lunch rooms; and (ii) analyse them according to guidelines and references. Indoor continuous measurements were performed, and outdoor concentrations were obtained to determine indoor/outdoor ratios. The influence of outdoor air seemed to be determinant on carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) indoor concentrations. The peak concentrations of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOC) registered (highest concentrations of 204 and 2320 µg m(-3) respectively), indicated the presence of specific indoor sources of these pollutants, namely materials emitting formaldehyde and products emitting VOC associated to cleaning and children's specific activities (like paints and glues). For formaldehyde, baseline constant concentrations along the day were also found in some of the studied rooms, which enhances the importance of detailing the study of children's short and long-term exposure to this indoor air pollutant. While CO, NO2 and O3 never exceeded the national and international reference values for IAQ and health protection, exceedances were found for formaldehyde and VOC. For this reason, a health risk assessment approach could be interesting for future research to assess children's health risks of exposure to formaldehyde and to VOC concentrations in nursery schools. Changing cleaning schedules and materials emitting formaldehyde, and more efficient ventilation while using products emitting VOC, with the correct amount and distribution of fresh air, would decrease children's exposure. PMID:26342590

  20. Synthesis of Calcium(II) Amidinate Precursors for Atomic Layer Deposition through a Redox Reaction between Calcium and Amidines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bok; Yang, Chuanxi; Powers, Tamara; Davis, Luke M; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G

    2016-08-22

    We have prepared two new Ca(II) amidinates, which comprise a new class of ALD precursors. The syntheses proceed by a direct reaction between Ca metal and the amidine ligands in the presence of ammonia. Bis(N,N'-diisopropylformamidinato)calcium(II) (1) and bis(N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinato)calcium(II) (2) adopt dimeric structures in solution and in the solid state. X-ray crystallography revealed asymmetry in one of the bridging ligands to afford the structure [(η(2) -L)Ca(μ-η(2) :η(2) -L)(μ-η(2) :η(1) -L)Ca(η(2) -L)]. These amidinate complexes showed unprecedentedly high volatility as compared to the widely employed and commercially available Ca(II) precursor, [Ca3 (tmhd)6 ]. In CaS ALD with 1 and H2 S, the ALD window was approximately two times wider and lower in temperature by about 150 °C than previously reported with [Ca3 (tmhd)6 ] and H2 S. Complexes 1 and 2, with their excellent volatility and thermal stability (up to at least 350 °C), are the first homoleptic Ca(II) amidinates suitable for use as ALD precursors.

  1. Synthesis of Calcium(II) Amidinate Precursors for Atomic Layer Deposition through a Redox Reaction between Calcium and Amidines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Bok; Yang, Chuanxi; Powers, Tamara; Davis, Luke M; Lou, Xiabing; Gordon, Roy G

    2016-08-22

    We have prepared two new Ca(II) amidinates, which comprise a new class of ALD precursors. The syntheses proceed by a direct reaction between Ca metal and the amidine ligands in the presence of ammonia. Bis(N,N'-diisopropylformamidinato)calcium(II) (1) and bis(N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinato)calcium(II) (2) adopt dimeric structures in solution and in the solid state. X-ray crystallography revealed asymmetry in one of the bridging ligands to afford the structure [(η(2) -L)Ca(μ-η(2) :η(2) -L)(μ-η(2) :η(1) -L)Ca(η(2) -L)]. These amidinate complexes showed unprecedentedly high volatility as compared to the widely employed and commercially available Ca(II) precursor, [Ca3 (tmhd)6 ]. In CaS ALD with 1 and H2 S, the ALD window was approximately two times wider and lower in temperature by about 150 °C than previously reported with [Ca3 (tmhd)6 ] and H2 S. Complexes 1 and 2, with their excellent volatility and thermal stability (up to at least 350 °C), are the first homoleptic Ca(II) amidinates suitable for use as ALD precursors. PMID:27351794

  2. Au@Cu(II)-MOF: Highly Efficient Bifunctional Heterogeneous Catalyst for Successive Oxidation-Condensation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Si; Jin, Fa-Zheng; Ma, Hui-Chao; Li, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Ming-Yang; Kan, Jing-Lan; Chen, Gong-Jun; Dong, Yu-Bin

    2016-07-01

    A new composite Au@Cu(II)-MOF catalyst has been synthesized via solution impregnation and full characterized by HRTEM, SEM-EDS, XRD, gas adsorption-desorption, XPS, and ICP analysis. It has been shown here that the Cu(II)-framework can be a useful platform to stabilize and support gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The obtained Au@Cu(II)-MOF exhibits a bifunctional catalytic behavior and is able to promote selective aerobic benzyl alcohol oxidation-Knoevenagel condensation in a stepwise way. PMID:27322613

  3. Empowering or Disabling? Emotional Reactions to Assessment amongst Part-Time Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramp, Andy; Lamond, Catherine; Coleyshaw, Liz; Beck, Sue

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on emotional reactions to learning and assessment. It draws on a qualitative research project involving first-generation adult students on a foundation degree programme. Endorsing the notion of emotional reactions as situated in participants' lived power relations, we map out emotional patterns to Semester 1 and then explore…

  4. Synthesis and reaction of monomeric germanium(II) and lead(II) dimethylamide and the synthesis of germanium(II) hydrazide by cleavage of one N-H bond of hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Jana, Anukul; Roesky, Herbert W; Schulzke, Carola; Samuel, Prinson P; Döring, Alexander

    2010-06-21

    The beta-diketiminate substituted germanium(II) and lead(II) dimethylamides, LGeNMe(2) (1) and LPbNMe(2) (2), [L = CH{(CMe)(2)(2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)N)(2)}] have been synthesized by the reaction of LiNMe(2) with LGeCl and LPbCl respectively. Reaction of compound 1 with an equivalent amount of elemental sulfur leads to the germanium analogue of thioamide, LGe(S)NMe(2) (3). 2 reacts with 2-benzoyl pyridine (PhCOPy-2) to form the lead(II) alkoxide LPbOC(NMe(2))Ph(2-Py) (4) by nucleophilic addition of "NMe(2)" to the carbon oxygen double bond. The reaction of stable N-heterocyclic germylene L(1)Ge [L(1) = CH{(C=CH(2))(CMe)(2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)N)(2)}] with hydrazine yields the germanium(II) substituted hydrazide LGeNHNH(2) (5) by cleavage of one N-H bond of hydrazine. Finally, attempts to isolate lead(II) hydride LPbH from the reaction of 2 with phenylsilane (PhSiH(3)) failed, and instead LPbN(2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)){C(CH(3))CHC(CH(3))=N(2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3))} (6) was obtained in very low yield. We are able to prove this only by single crystal X-ray structural analysis. Compounds 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 were characterized by microanalysis, electron impact (EI) mass spectrometry, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore compounds 1, 2, 5, and 6 were characterized by single crystal X-ray structural analysis, with the result that they are exhibiting monomeric structures in the solid state with trigonal-pyramidal environment at the metal center and a stereochemically active lone pair.

  5. Electrophilic Pt(II) complexes: precision instruments for the initiation of transformations mediated by the cation-olefin reaction.

    PubMed

    Felix, Ryan J; Munro-Leighton, Colleen; Gagné, Michel R

    2014-08-19

    A discontinuity exists between the importance of the cation-olefin reaction as the principal C-C bond forming reaction in terpene biosynthesis and the synthetic tools for mimicking this reaction under catalyst control; that is, having the product identity, stereochemistry, and functionality under the control of a catalyst. The main reason for this deficiency is that the cation-olefin reaction starts with a reactive intermediate (a carbocation) that reacts exothermically with an alkene to reform the reactive intermediate; not to mention that reactive intermediates can also react in nonproductive fashions. In this Account, we detail our efforts to realize catalyst control over this most fundamental of reactions and thereby access steroid like compounds. Our story is organized around our progress in each component of the cascade reaction: the metal controlled electrophilic initiation, the propagation and termination of the cyclization (the cyclase phase), and the turnover deplatinating events. Electrophilic Pt(II) complexes efficiently initiate the cation-olefin reaction by first coordinating to the alkene with selection rules that favor less substituted alkenes over more substituted alkenes. In complex substrates with multiple alkenes, this preference ensures that the least substituted alkene is always the better ligand for the Pt(II) initiator, and consequently the site at which all electrophilic chemistry is initiated. This control element is invariant. With a suitably electron deficient ligand set, the catalyst then activates the coordinated alkene to intramolecular addition by a second alkene, which initiates the cation-olefin reaction cascade and generates an organometallic Pt(II)-alkyl. Deplatination by a range of mechanisms (β-H elimination, single electron oxidation, two-electron oxidation, etc.) provides an additional level of control that ultimately enables A-ring functionalizations that are orthogonal to the cyclase cascade. We particularly focus on

  6. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1068 - Emission-Related Parameters and Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROVISIONS FOR ENGINE PROGRAMS Pt. 1068, App. II Appendix II.... Compression ratio. 2. Type of air aspiration (natural, Roots-blown, supercharged, turbocharged). 3. Valves... bottom-dead center). II. Intake Air System. 1. Roots blower/supercharger/turbocharger calibration....

  7. When the Whole is Greater than the Sum of its Parts: Transport + Reaction in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valocchi, A. J.

    2009-05-01

    Many significant problems in hydrogeology and environmental subsurface science require that we understand the transport of multiple constituents that undergo geochemical and biogeochemical reactions. Over the past several decades, our research has tended to be either 'transport-centric,' in which multi-dimensional spatially variable flow is considered while the reaction processes are lumped into a source/sink term; or 'reaction- centric,' in which a large number of coupled equilibrium and kinetic reactions are considered while transport processes are represented as a series of batch reactors. These distinct approaches fail to recognize that strong coupling of transport with reactions can lead to novel organized patterns of behavior, even for seemingly complicated systems with multiple nonlinear reactions. This presentation will include several examples of how the feedback among transport and reaction processes can lead to simplified self-organized patterns of behavior. For a mixture of chemical species undergoing competitive ion exchange and sorption reactions, this feedback leads to chromatographic separation into a series of traveling fronts, separated by zones of constant composition. Traveling wave behavior also emerges when reaction is controlled by the advective and dispersive mixing of two or more chemicals. Non-equilibrium sorption reactions can be manifested as enhanced spreading of a field-scale contaminant plume, which needs to be compared with other processes that lead to enhanced spreading, such as small-scale physical heterogeneity. These behavior patterns can be calculated with simple analytical formulas, allowing assessment of practical problems such as prediction of contaminant transit time, stable plume size for natural attenuation, and effectiveness of engineered in situ bioremediation.

  8. Databases and tools for nuclear astrophysics applications. BRUSsels Nuclear LIBrary (BRUSLIB), Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REactions II (NACRE II) and Nuclear NETwork GENerator (NETGEN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Goriely, S.; Jorissen, A.; Chen, G. L.; Arnould, M.

    2013-01-01

    An update of a previous description of the BRUSLIB + NACRE package of nuclear data for astrophysics and of the web-based nuclear network generator NETGEN is presented. The new version of BRUSLIB contains the latest predictions of a wide variety of nuclear data based on the most recent version of the Brussels-Montreal Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model. The nuclear masses, radii, spin/parities, deformations, single-particle schemes, matter densities, nuclear level densities, E1 strength functions, fission properties, and partition functions are provided for all nuclei lying between the proton and neutron drip lines over the 8 ≤ Z ≤ 110 range, whose evaluation is based on a unique microscopic model that ensures a good compromise between accuracy, reliability, and feasibility. In addition, these various ingredients are used to calculate about 100 000 Hauser-Feshbach neutron-, proton-, α-, and γ-induced reaction rates based on the reaction code TALYS. NACRE is superseded by the NACRE II compilation for 15 charged-particle transfer reactions and 19 charged-particle radiative captures on stable targets with mass numbers A < 16. NACRE II features the inclusion of experimental data made available after the publication of NACRE in 1999 and up to 2011. In addition, the extrapolation of the available data to the very low energies of astrophysical relevance is improved through the systematic use of phenomenological potential models. Uncertainties in the rates are also evaluated on this basis. Finally, the latest release v10.0 of the web-based tool NETGEN is presented. In addition to the data already used in the previous NETGEN package, it contains in a fully documented form the new BRUSLIB and NACRE II data, as well as new experiment-based radiative neutron capture cross sections. The full new versions of BRUSLIB, NACRE II, and NETGEN are available electronically from the nuclear database at http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/NuclearData. The nuclear material is presented in

  9. Degradation of octylphenol and nonylphenol by ozone - part I: direct reaction.

    PubMed

    Ning, Bo; Graham, Nigel J D; Zhang, Yanping

    2007-06-01

    This aqueous reaction between ozone and two alkylphenols (APs), namely octylphenol (OP) and nonylphenol (NP), has been investigated. Both compounds are important endocrine disrupting chemicals, which arise from the biodegradation of alkylphenol ethoxylates and are often found at relatively high concentrations in wastewater effluents. In this paper the results of an experimental study are presented which provide values for the reaction rate constants between molecular ozone and undissociated OP and NP, and overall reaction rate constants for the degradation of the two APs at pH values in the range of 7-9. The kinetic rate constants for OP and NP degradation by molecular ozone were 4.33(+/-0.18) x 10(4) and 3.90(+/-0.10) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), and the reaction stoichiometry was similar in both cases and equal to approximately 1.3:1 ([O3]:[AP]). The overall second order reaction rate constants for the two APs increased significantly with increasing pH, which is believed to be mainly due to the increasing influence of indirect radical reaction with increasing pH; this aspect is considered in more detail in a companion paper. A preliminary investigation of the reaction mechanism suggests that an initial product of ozonation is hydroxyl-alkyl phenol. PMID:17349676

  10. Multiscale modeling, simulations, and experiments of coating growth on nanofibers. Part II. Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Buldum, A.; Clemons, C.B.; Dill, L.H.; Kreider, K.L.; Young, G.W.; Zheng, X.; Evans, E.A.; Zhang, G.; Hariharan, S.I.

    2005-08-15

    This work is Part II of an integrated experimental/modeling investigation of a procedure to coat nanofibers and core-clad nanostructures with thin-film materials using plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition. In the experimental effort, electrospun polymer nanofibers are coated with aluminum materials under different operating conditions to observe changes in the coating morphology. This procedure begins with the sputtering of the coating material from a target. Part I [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 044303 (2005)] focused on the sputtering aspect and transport of the sputtered material through the reactor. That reactor level model determines the concentration field of the coating material. This field serves as input into the present species transport and deposition model for the region surrounding an individual nanofiber. The interrelationships among processing factors for the transport and deposition are investigated here from a detailed modeling approach that includes the salient physical and chemical phenomena. Solution strategies that couple continuum and atomistic models are used. At the continuum scale, transport dynamics near the nanofiber are described. At the atomic level, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the deposition and sputtering mechanisms at the coating surface. Ion kinetic energies and fluxes are passed from the continuum sheath model to the MD simulations. These simulations calculate sputtering and sticking probabilities that in turn are used to calculate parameters for the continuum transport model. The continuum transport model leads to the definition of an evolution equation for the coating-free surface. This equation is solved using boundary perturbation and level set methods to determine the coating morphology as a function of operating conditions.

  11. Niacin Alternatives for Dyslipidemia: Fool's Gold or Gold Mine? Part II: Novel Niacin Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Goel, Harsh; Dunbar, Richard L

    2016-04-01

    Two cardiovascular outcome trials established niacin 3 g daily prevents hard cardiac events. However, as detailed in part I of this series, an extended-release (ER) alternative at only 2 g nightly demonstrated no comparable benefits in two outcome trials, implying the alternative is not equivalent to the established cardioprotective regimen. Since statins leave a significant treatment gap, this presents a major opportunity for developers. Importantly, the established regimen is cardioprotective, so the pathway is likely beneficial. Moreover, though effective, the established cardioprotective regimen is cumbersome, limiting clinical use. At the same time, the ER alternative has been thoroughly discredited as a viable substitute for the established cardioprotective regimen. Therefore, by exploiting the pathway and skillfully avoiding the problems with the established cardioprotective regimen and the ER alternative, developers could validate cardioprotective variations facing little meaningful competition from their predecessors. Thus, shrewd developers could effectively tap into a gold mine at the grave of the ER alternative. The GPR109A receptor was discovered a decade ago, leading to a large body of evidence commending the niacin pathway to a lower cardiovascular risk beyond statins. While mediating niacin's most prominent adverse effects, GPR109A also seems to mediate anti-lipolytic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-atherogenic effects of niacin. Several developers are investing heavily in novel strategies to exploit niacin's therapeutic pathways. These include selective GPR109A receptor agonists, niacin prodrugs, and a niacin metabolite, with encouraging early phase human data. In part II of this review, we summarize the accumulated results of these early phase studies of emerging niacin mimetics. PMID:26932224

  12. Critical Illness in Pregnancy: Part II: Common Medical Conditions Complicating Pregnancy and Puerperium.

    PubMed

    Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K; Karnad, Dilip R; Bandi, Venkata; Hall, Nicole; Belfort, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The first of this two-part series on critical illness in pregnancy dealt with obstetric disorders. In Part II, medical conditions that commonly affect pregnant women or worsen during pregnancy are discussed. ARDS occurs more frequently in pregnancy. Strategies commonly used in nonpregnant patients, including permissive hypercapnia, limits for plateau pressure, and prone positioning, may not be acceptable, especially in late pregnancy. Genital tract infections unique to pregnancy include chorioamnionitis, group A streptococcal infection causing toxic shock syndrome, and polymicrobial infection with streptococci, staphylococci, and Clostridium perfringens causing necrotizing vulvitis or fasciitis. Pregnancy predisposes to VTE; D-dimer levels have low specificity in pregnancy. A ventilation-perfusion scan is preferred over CT pulmonary angiography in some situations to reduce radiation to the mother's breasts. Low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparins form the mainstay of treatment; vitamin K antagonists, oral factor Xa inhibitors, and direct thrombin inhibitors are not recommended in pregnancy. The physiologic hyperdynamic circulation in pregnancy worsens many cardiovascular disorders. It increases risk of pulmonary edema or arrhythmias in mitral stenosis, heart failure in pulmonary hypertension or aortic stenosis, aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome, or valve thrombosis in mechanical heart valves. Common neurologic problems in pregnancy include seizures, altered mental status, visual symptoms, and strokes. Other common conditions discussed are aspiration of gastric contents, OSA, thyroid disorders, diabetic ketoacidosis, and cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy. Studies confined to pregnant women are available for only a few of these conditions. We have, therefore, reviewed pregnancy-specific adjustments in the management of these disorders. PMID:26020727

  13. Niacin Alternatives for Dyslipidemia: Fool's Gold or Gold Mine? Part II: Novel Niacin Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Goel, Harsh; Dunbar, Richard L

    2016-04-01

    Two cardiovascular outcome trials established niacin 3 g daily prevents hard cardiac events. However, as detailed in part I of this series, an extended-release (ER) alternative at only 2 g nightly demonstrated no comparable benefits in two outcome trials, implying the alternative is not equivalent to the established cardioprotective regimen. Since statins leave a significant treatment gap, this presents a major opportunity for developers. Importantly, the established regimen is cardioprotective, so the pathway is likely beneficial. Moreover, though effective, the established cardioprotective regimen is cumbersome, limiting clinical use. At the same time, the ER alternative has been thoroughly discredited as a viable substitute for the established cardioprotective regimen. Therefore, by exploiting the pathway and skillfully avoiding the problems with the established cardioprotective regimen and the ER alternative, developers could validate cardioprotective variations facing little meaningful competition from their predecessors. Thus, shrewd developers could effectively tap into a gold mine at the grave of the ER alternative. The GPR109A receptor was discovered a decade ago, leading to a large body of evidence commending the niacin pathway to a lower cardiovascular risk beyond statins. While mediating niacin's most prominent adverse effects, GPR109A also seems to mediate anti-lipolytic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-atherogenic effects of niacin. Several developers are investing heavily in novel strategies to exploit niacin's therapeutic pathways. These include selective GPR109A receptor agonists, niacin prodrugs, and a niacin metabolite, with encouraging early phase human data. In part II of this review, we summarize the accumulated results of these early phase studies of emerging niacin mimetics.

  14. Water formation at low temperatures by surface O2 hydrogenation II: The reaction network.

    PubMed

    Cuppen, H M; Ioppolo, S; Romanzin, C; Linnartz, H

    2010-10-14

    Water is abundantly present in the Universe. It is the main component of interstellar ice mantles and a key ingredient for life. Water in space is mainly formed through surface reactions. Three formation routes have been proposed in the past: hydrogenation of surface O, O(2), and O(3). In a previous paper [Ioppolo et al., Astrophys. J., 2008, 686, 1474] we discussed an unexpected non-standard zeroth-order H(2)O(2) production behaviour in O(2) hydrogenation experiments, which suggests that the proposed reaction network is not complete, and that the reaction channels are probably more interconnected than previously thought. In this paper we aim to derive the full reaction scheme for O(2) surface hydrogenation and to constrain the rates of the individual reactions. This is achieved through simultaneous H-atom and O(2) deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions for astronomically relevant temperatures. Different H/O(2) ratios are used to trace different stages in the hydrogenation network. The chemical changes in the forming ice are followed by means of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). New reaction paths are revealed as compared to previous experiments. Several reaction steps prove to be much more efficient (H + O(2)) or less efficient (H + OH and H(2) + OH) than originally thought. These are the main conclusions of this work and the extended network concluded here will have profound implications for models that describe the formation of water in space.

  15. Differential diagnosis of white matter lesions: Nonvascular causes-Part II.

    PubMed

    Weidauer, S; Nichtweiss, M; Hattingen, E

    2014-06-01

    The knowledge of characteristic lesion patterns is important in daily practice imaging, as the radiologist increasingly is required to provide precise differential diagnosis despite unspecific clinical symptoms like cognitive impairment and missed elaborated neurological workup. This part II dealing with nonvascular white matter changes of proven cause and diagnostic significance aimed to assist the evaluation of diseases exhibiting lesions exclusively or predominantly located in the white matter. The etiologies commented on are classified as follows: (a) toxic-metabolic, (b) leukodystrophies and mitochondriopathies, (c) infectious, (d) neoplastic, and (e) immune mediated. The respective mode of lesion formation is characterized, and typical radiological findings are displayed. More or less symmetrical lesion patterns on the one hand as well as focal and multifocal ones on the other are to be analyzed with reference to clinical data and knowledge of predilection sites characterizing major disease categories. Complementing spinal cord imaging may be useful not only in acute and relapsing demyelinating diseases but in certain leukodystrophies as well. In neuromyelitis optica (NMO), the detection of a specific antibody and some recently published observations may lead to a new understanding of certain deep white matter lesions occasionally complicating systemic autoimmune disease.

  16. The Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma, Part II: Reparative Adaptational Impacts.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Yael; Norris, Fran H; Lindert, Jutta; Paisner, Vera; Kronenberg, Sefi; Engdahl, Brian; Richter, Julia

    2015-05-01

    The impacts of the Holocaust on children of survivors have been widely investigated. However, consensus is limited, and no validated measures have been tailored with or to them. We aimed to develop and validate a scale that measures these specific impacts (Part II of the Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma). We studied 484 adult children of survivors who participated in a cross-sectional web-based survey in English or Hebrew; of these, 191 participated in a clinical interview. Exploratory factor analyses of 58 items to reduce and refine the measure yielded a 36-item scale, Reparative Adaptational Impacts, that had excellent internal consistency (α = .91) and congruence between English and Hebrew versions (φ ≥ .95). Associations between impacts and SCID-based diagnoses of major depressive episode, posttraumatic stress disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder were moderate to strong (ds = 0.48-0.89). Strong associations also emerged between severity of offspring's reparative adaptational impacts and intensity of their parents' posttrauma adaptational styles (Multiple R = .72), with intensity of victim style, especially the mother's, having the strongest effect (β = .31-.33). Having both research and clinical relevance for assessing Holocaust survivors' offspring, future studies might investigate the scale's generalizability to other populations affected by mass trauma. PMID:25985110

  17. The Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma, Part II: Reparative Adaptational Impacts.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Yael; Norris, Fran H; Lindert, Jutta; Paisner, Vera; Kronenberg, Sefi; Engdahl, Brian; Richter, Julia

    2015-05-01

    The impacts of the Holocaust on children of survivors have been widely investigated. However, consensus is limited, and no validated measures have been tailored with or to them. We aimed to develop and validate a scale that measures these specific impacts (Part II of the Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma). We studied 484 adult children of survivors who participated in a cross-sectional web-based survey in English or Hebrew; of these, 191 participated in a clinical interview. Exploratory factor analyses of 58 items to reduce and refine the measure yielded a 36-item scale, Reparative Adaptational Impacts, that had excellent internal consistency (α = .91) and congruence between English and Hebrew versions (φ ≥ .95). Associations between impacts and SCID-based diagnoses of major depressive episode, posttraumatic stress disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder were moderate to strong (ds = 0.48-0.89). Strong associations also emerged between severity of offspring's reparative adaptational impacts and intensity of their parents' posttrauma adaptational styles (Multiple R = .72), with intensity of victim style, especially the mother's, having the strongest effect (β = .31-.33). Having both research and clinical relevance for assessing Holocaust survivors' offspring, future studies might investigate the scale's generalizability to other populations affected by mass trauma.

  18. Theory of sorption hysteresis in nanoporous solids: Part II Molecular condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazant, Martin Z.; Bažant, Zdeněk P.

    2012-09-01

    Motivated by the puzzle of sorption hysteresis in Portland cement concrete or cement paste, we develop in Part II of this study a general theory of vapor sorption and desorption from nanoporous solids, which attributes hysteresis to hindered molecular condensation with attractive lateral interactions. The classical mean-field theory of van der Waals is applied to predict the dependence of hysteresis on temperature and pore size, using the regular solution model and gradient energy of Cahn and Hilliard. A simple "hierarchical wetting" model for thin nanopores is developed to describe the case of strong wetting by the first monolayer, followed by condensation of nanodroplets and nanobubbles in the bulk. The model predicts a larger hysteresis critical temperature and enhanced hysteresis for molecular condensation across nanopores at high vapor pressure than within monolayers at low vapor pressure. For heterogeneous pores, the theory predicts sorption/desorption sequences similar to those seen in molecular dynamics simulations, where the interfacial energy (or gradient penalty) at nanopore junctions acts as a free energy barrier for snap-through instabilities. The model helps to quantitatively understand recent experimental data for concrete or cement paste wetting and drying cycles and suggests new experiments at different temperatures and humidity sweep rates.

  19. Reproduction in the space environment: Part II. Concerns for human reproduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, R. T.; Santy, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Long-duration space flight and eventual colonization of our solar system will require successful control of reproductive function and a thorough understanding of factors unique to space flight and their impact on gynecologic and obstetric parameters. Part II of this paper examines the specific environmental factors associated with space flight and the implications for human reproduction. Space environmental hazards discussed include radiation, alteration in atmospheric pressure and breathing gas partial pressures, prolonged toxicological exposure, and microgravity. The effects of countermeasures necessary to reduce cardiovascular deconditioning, calcium loss, muscle wasting, and neurovestibular problems are also considered. In addition, the impact of microgravity on male fertility and gamete quality is explored. Due to current constraints, human pregnancy is now contraindicated for space flight. However, a program to explore effective countermeasures to current constraints and develop the required health care delivery capability for extended-duration space flight is suggested. A program of Earth- and space-based research to provide further answers to reproductive questions is suggested.

  20. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure . Part II; Severe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a finite element analysis and the testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part II of the paper considers the final test to failure of the test article in the presence of an intentionally inflicted severe discrete source damage under the wing up-bending loading condition. Finite element analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during the test and demonstrate that the hybrid wing body test article was able to redistribute and support the required design loads in a severely damaged condition.