Science.gov

Sample records for part iii heat

  1. Investigation of heat transfer due to isothermal heater in irregular porous cavity: Part III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.

    2017-07-01

    Heat transfer in porous medium is one of the intense filed of research for many years. This paper investigates the heat transfer in a porous cavity due to an isothermal block placed at top of left vertical wall. The right vertical wall of cavity is maintained at isothermal cold temperature. The governing partial differential equations are solved by employing finite element method. Results are discussed with respect to physical parameters in terms of contour plots of isothermal and streamlines. It is found that the heat transfer due to block at top of vertical surface makes the heat to be concentrated at upper side of porous domain.

  2. Electronic communication. Part III.

    PubMed

    Bergren, M D

    1995-02-01

    This is the concluding article of a three-part series on electronic communication for school nurses. The October 1994 column described electronic communication and the hardware and software required. The December 1994 column examined e-mail, bulletin boards, databases, and file transfers. This column will list many health and nursing resources available on-line. Some of the resources are available only through the Internet. Others are accessible by more than one route: dial-in, telnet, gopher, or world wide web. A few of the services, such as MEDLINE, are only accessed with purchased accounts (Glowniak & Bushway, 1994). The electronic resources of interest to school nurses are so numerous it would be impossible to cite all of them in a column of this length. Selected resources for the school health provider will be listed in alphabetical order.

  3. Two-dimensional finite element heat transfer model of softwood. Part III, Effect of moisture content on thermal conductivity

    Treesearch

    Hongmei Gu; John F. Hunt

    2007-01-01

    The anisotropy of wood creates a complex problem for solving heat and mass transfer problems that require analyses be based on fundamental material properties of the wood structure. Most heat transfer models for softwood use average thermal properties across either the radial or tangential direction and do not differentiate the effects of cellular alignment or...

  4. Environmental Beneficiation of Machining Wastes-Part III: Effects of Metal Working Fluids on the Spontaneous Heating of Machining Swarf.

    PubMed

    Kawatra, S Komar; Hess, Mathew J

    1999-05-01

    Machining swarf is a finely divided metal powder that is prone to spontaneous heating and, in some cases, spontaneous combustion. The fine particle size, large amount of particle surface area, and the presence of moisture all promote rapid oxidation. This hazard dramatically increases disposal costs for swarf and interferes with recycling efforts. A potential method for minimizing spontaneous heating and facilitating recycling of the swarf is to spray a fluid on the material that coats the particles and creates a barrier between the metal and oxygen. Surface coatings could be tested for their effects on the spontaneous heating potential of swarf by treating a sample of swarf with a fluid that would coat the particles, then monitoring its heating behavior. This paper describes the results of applying corrosion inhibitors and machining fluids to the swarf, and monitoring the spontaneous heating behavior using a testing method developed specifically for this purpose. The effects of different types of surfactants and the effects of surfactant concentration on the spontaneous heating of swarf are discussed.

  5. The PC Connection Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, David L.; Zilora, Karen S.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a series of four applications of data acquisition, system control, and data analysis using personal computers. Covers topics of pilot plant information and control, automation of drug safety evaluation, analysis and characterization of petroleum resources, and high-speed analog-digital conversion connections. Part three of a series on…

  6. Evaluation of manometric temperature measurement (MTM), a process analytical technology tool in freeze drying, part III: heat and mass transfer measurement.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaolin Charlie; Nail, Steven L; Pikal, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    This article evaluates the procedures for determining the vial heat transfer coefficient and the extent of primary drying through manometric temperature measurement (MTM). The vial heat transfer coefficients (Kv) were calculated from the MTM-determined temperature and resistance and compared with Kv values determined by a gravimetric method. The differences between the MTM vial heat transfer coefficients and the gravimetric values are large at low shelf temperature but smaller when higher shelf temperatures were used. The differences also became smaller at higher chamber pressure and smaller when higher resistance materials were being freeze-dried. In all cases, using thermal shields greatly improved the accuracy of the MTM Kv measurement. With use of thermal shields, the thickness of the frozen layer calculated from MTM is in good agreement with values obtained gravimetrically. The heat transfer coefficient "error" is largely a direct result of the error in the dry layer resistance (ie, MTM-determined resistance is too low). This problem can be minimized if thermal shields are used for freeze-drying. With suitable use of thermal shields, accurate Kv values are obtained by MTM; thus allowing accurate calculations of heat and mass flow rates. The extent of primary drying can be monitored by real-time calculation of the amount of remaining ice using MTM data, thus providing a process analytical tool that greatly improves the freeze-drying process design and control.

  7. Development of a Two-Dimensional Zonally Averaged Statistical-Dynamical Model. Part III: The Parameterization of the Eddy Fluxes of Heat and Moisture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Peter H.; Yao, Mao-Sung

    1990-07-01

    A number of perpetual January simulations are carried out with a two-dimensional (2-D) zonally averaged model employing various parameterizations of the eddy fluxes of heat (potential temperature) and moisture. The parameterizations are evaluated by comparing these results with the eddy fluxes calculated in a parallel simulation using a three-dimensional (3-D) general circulation model with zonally symmetric forcing. The 3-D model's performance in turn is evaluated by comparing its results using realistic (nonsymmetric) boundary conditions with observations.Branscome's parameterization of the meridional eddy flux of heat and Leovy's parameterization of the meridional eddy flux of moisture simulate the seasonal and latitudinal variations of these fluxes reasonably well, while somewhat underestimating their magnitudes. In particular, Branscome's parameterization underestimates the vertically integrated flux of heat by about 30%, mainly because it misses out the secondary peak in this flux near the tropopause; and Leovy's parameterization of the meridional eddy flux of moisture underestimates the magnitude of this flux by about 20%. The analogous parameterizations of the vertical eddy fluxes of heat and moisture are found to perform much more poorly, i.e., they give fluxes only one quarter to one half as strong as those calculated in the 3-D model. New parameterizations of the vertical eddy fluxes are developed that take into account the enhancement of the eddy mixing slope in a growing baroclinic wave due to condensation, and also the effect of eddy fluctuations in relative humidity. The new parameterizations, when tested in the 2-D model, simulate the seasonal, latitudinal, and vertical variations of the vertical eddy fluxes quite well, when compared with the 3-D model, and only underestimate the magnitude of the fluxes by 10% to 20%.

  8. Influence of the glass packing on the contamination of pharmaceutical products by aluminium. Part III: Interaction container-chemicals during the heating for sterilisation.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Denise; do Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Binotto, Regina; Becker, Emilene

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of chemicals with the container materials during heating for sterilisation was investigated, storing the components of parenteral nutrition solutions individually in sealed glass ampoules and in contact with a rubber stopper, and heating the system at 121 degrees C for 30 min. Subsequently, the aluminium content of the solutions was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The assay was also carried out with acids, alkalis and some complexing agents for Al. The containers were decomposed and also assayed for aluminium. 30 different commercial solutions for parenteral nutrition, stored either in glass or in plastic containers, were assayed measuring the aluminium present in the solutions and in the container materials. The results of all investigated container materials revealed an aluminium content of 1.57% Al in glass, 0.05% in plastic and 4.54% in rubber. The sterilisation procedure showed that even pure water was able to extract Al from glass and rubber, 22.5 +/- 13.3 microg/L and 79.4 +/- 22.7 microg/L respectively, while from plastic the aluminium leached was insignificant. The Al released from glass ampoules laid between 20 microg/L for leucine, ornithine and lysine solutions and 1500 microg/L for solutions of basic phosphates and bicarbonate; from rubber stoppers it reached levels over 500 microg/L for cysteine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and cystine solutions. Ion-exchange properties and influence of pH can explain the interaction of glass with some chemicals (salts, acids and alkalis), but only an affinity for aluminium could explain the action of some amino acids and other chemicals, as albumin and heparin, on glass and rubber, considering the aluminium release. Experiments with complexing agents for Al allowed to conclude that the higher the stability constant of the complex, the higher the Al release from the container material.

  9. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false III Appendix III to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix III to Part 261 ...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false III Appendix III to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix III to Part 261 ...

  11. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  12. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  13. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  14. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  15. 7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDING NO. 10, PRODUCER GAS & EXHAUSTER BLDG., PLANT A.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant A, Parts I, II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Producer Gas Plant, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  16. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  17. Heat/pressure seal for moving parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    Prototype seal keeps hot gases from leaking between large, adjacent parts in relative motion. Seal withstands temperatures greater than 1,000 degrees C (1800 degrees F) and accomodates heat and pressure caused distortion of parts. It is nonabrasive, creates little resistance to movement of parts, and causes minimal wear and damage to surface coatings.

  18. Validity Coefficients of Clinical Competence on NBME Part III Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Judith G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The relationship of National Board of Medical Examiners Part III examination performance for first-year residents with performance on medical school preadmission measures, performance on prior NBME examinations, and clinical performance during medical school was examined. (Author/MLW)

  19. 43. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDINGS H-1 TO H-10 INCL., GRINDING, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLANT 'B'.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of the District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  20. 38. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDINGS G-1 TO G-10 INCL., PURIFICATION, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLAN 'B'.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  1. Searching Lexis and Westlaw: Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Carl

    1986-01-01

    This last installment in a three-part series covers several important areas in the searching of legal information: online (group) training and customer service, documentation (search manuals and other aids), account representatives, microcomputer software, and pricing. Advantages and drawbacks of both the LEXIS and WESTLAW databases are noted.…

  2. Searching Lexis and Westlaw: Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Carl

    1986-01-01

    This last installment in a three-part series covers several important areas in the searching of legal information: online (group) training and customer service, documentation (search manuals and other aids), account representatives, microcomputer software, and pricing. Advantages and drawbacks of both the LEXIS and WESTLAW databases are noted.…

  3. Studies in Natural Illumination in Schoolrooms. Part III

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1929-11-01

    PI"C HEALTH BULLIN No. 188 STUDIESJIN ATURA ILUMINATION IN SCHOOLROOMSA f1-~7~PART III 20 U. 0 49990809 433 UngimED STATES ý-REASURY DE~PART1WENT... ilumination ratio of desk No. 14 for each month and hour of observation ---------------------------------------------- 55 29. Mean illumination ratio of desk

  4. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy, Part III: Lung Cancer, Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1985-01-01

    An update in cancer chemotherapy that deals with the various therapies of lung cancer is described. At present, the stage of the disease and cell type are the major factors that determine the treatment. Important differences in the biological behavior and response to treatment exist between small cell and non-small cell cancers. The small cell type is sensitive to many chemotherapeutic agents. Differences in response to chemotherapy and survival have been less among the non-small cell types. The treatment of non-small cell carcinomas including squamous cell, large cell, and adenocarcinoma are reviewed in Part I of this paper. Small cell lung cancer will be described in Part II, which will be published in a future issue of the journal. PMID:2414458

  5. A coupled numerical analysis of shield temperatures, heat losses and residual gas pressures in an evacuated super-insulation using thermal and fluid networks. Part III: Unsteady-state conditions (evacuation period)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H.

    2006-12-01

    This paper analyses the evacuation period of a 300 L super-insulated cryogenic storage tank for liquid nitrogen. Storage tank and radiation shields are the same as in part I of this paper. The present analysis extends application of stationary fluid networks to unsteady-states to determine local, residual gas pressures between shields and the evacuation time of a multilayer super-insulation. Parameter tests comprise magnitude of desorption from radiation shields, spacers and container walls and their influence on length of the evacuation period. Calculation of the integrals over time-dependent desorption rates roughly confirms weight losses of radiation shields obtained after heating and out-gassing the materials, as reported in the literature. After flooding the insulation space with dry N 2-gas, the evacuation time can enormously be reduced, from 72 to 4 h, to obtain a residual gas pressure of 0.01 Pa in-between shields of this storage tank. Permeation of nitrogen through container walls is of no importance for residual gas pressures. The simulations finally compare freezing H 2O-layers adsorbed on shields, spacers and container walls with flooding of the materials.

  6. GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe Life Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The GOES Type III Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was built as a life test unit for the loop heat pipes on the GOES N-Q series satellites. This propylene LHP was built by Dynatherm Corporation in 2000 and tested continuously for approximately 14 months. It was then put into storage for 3 years. Following the storage period, the LHP was tested at Swales Aerospace to verify that the loop performance hadn t changed. Most test results were consistent with earlier results. At the conclusion of testing at Swales, the LHP was transferred to NASA/GSFC for continued periodic testing. The LHP has been set up for testing in the Thermal Lab at GSFC since 2006. A group of tests consisting of start-ups, power cycles, and a heat transport limit test have been performed every six to nine months since March 2006. Tests results have shown no change in the loop performance over the five years of testing. This presentation will discuss the test hardware, test set-up, and tests performed. Test results to be presented include sample plots from individual tests, along with conductance measurements for all tests performed.

  7. Heats of Formation and Bond Energies in Group III Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Melius, Carl F.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We present heats of formation and bond energies for Group-III compounds obtained from calculations of molecular ground-state I electronic energies. Data for compounds of the form MXn are presented, where M = B, Al, Ga, and In, X = He H, Cl, and CH3, and n = 1-3. Energies for the B, Al, and Ga compounds are obtained from G2 predictions, while those for the In compounds are obtained from CCSD(T)/CBS calculations; these are the most accurate calculations for indium-containing compounds published to date. In most cases, the calculated thermochemistry is in good agreement with published values derived from experiments for those species that have well-established heats of formation. Bond energies obtained from the heats of formation follow the expected trend (Cl much greater than CH3 approx. H). However, the CH3M-(CH3)2 bond energies obtained for trimethylgallium and trimethylindium are considerably stronger (greater than 15 kcal/mol) than currently accepted values.

  8. Heat pipe design handbook, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrabek, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of heat pipes are examined. The subjects discussed are: (1) principles of operation, (2) heat pipe theory, (3) pressure gradient effects, (4) variable conductance, (5) design procedure, and (6) performance limit evaluation.

  9. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-Altitude Counties III Appendix III to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROVISIONS FOR ENGINE PROGRAMS Pt. 1068, App. III Appendix III to Part...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 265, App. III Appendix III to Part 265—EPA Interim Primary...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices III Appendix III to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices III Appendix III to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices III Appendix III to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices III Appendix III to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices III Appendix III to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping...

  16. 11. VIEW OF THE MANIPULATOR AND THE PARTS HEATING FURNACE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF THE MANIPULATOR AND THE PARTS HEATING FURNACE. THE PARTS OR METALS WERE HEATED PRIOR TO BEING PRESSED. THE MANIPULATOR ARM WAS USED TO INSERT AND REMOVE PARTS OR METALS FROM THE FURNACE. (2/9/79) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  17. 77 FR 60743 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040... Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Schedule F... Number: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040). Abstract: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)...

  18. Heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert; Hofler, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    A heat-driven acoustic cooling engine having no moving parts receives heat from a heat source. The acoustic cooling engine comprises an elongated resonant pressure vessel having first and second ends. A compressible fluid having a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave is contained in the resonant pressure vessel. The heat source supplies heat to the first end of the vessel. A first heat exchanger in the vessel is spaced-apart from the first end and receives heat from the first end. A first thermodynamic element is adjacent to the first heat exchanger and converts some of the heat transmitted by the first heat exchanger into acoustic power. A second thermodynamic element has a first end located spaced-apart from the first thermodynamic element and a second end farther away from the first thermodynamic element than is its first end. The first end of the second thermodynamic element heats while its second end cools as a consequence of the acoustic power. A second heat exchanger is adjacent to and between the first and second thermodynamic elements. A heat sink outside of the vessel is thermally coupled to and receives heat from the second heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one-fourth wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir.

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1037 - Emission Control Identifiers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... includes advanced hybrid technology components -ADVO—Vehicle includes other advanced technology components (i.e., non-hybrid system) -INV—Vehicle includes innovative technology components ... POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW HEAVY-DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 1037, App. III Appendix III...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1037 - Emission Control Identifiers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... includes advanced hybrid technology components -ADVO—Vehicle includes other advanced technology components (i.e., non-hybrid system) -INV—Vehicle includes innovative technology components ... POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW HEAVY-DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 1037, App. III Appendix III...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1037 - Emission Control Identifiers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... includes advanced hybrid technology components -ADVO—Vehicle includes other advanced technology components (i.e., non-hybrid system) -INV—Vehicle includes innovative technology components ... POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW HEAVY-DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 1037, App. III Appendix III...

  2. Heating with wind energy, part B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaier, U.; Czink, F.

    1983-06-01

    Wind energy resources for heating are surveyed. Ten locations in the countryside and three locations along the coast of West Germany were investigated. Wind velocities between 3 and 15 m/sec were found to be suitable. An international marketing analysis on wind energy convertering systems up to 20 kW is summarized. Over 200 manufacturers in 22 countries were contacted and 52 delivery offers were obtained, 4 of which were chosen according to the following criteria: power output on the order of 10 kW for 10 m/sec wind velocity, type description, dimensions, speed rise, security devices and price. Insufficient matching between wind converters and generators is pointed out, but it is concluded that the four systems chosen represent a good starting point solution.

  3. 12. VIEW OF THE MANIPULATOR AND PARTS HEATING FURNACE. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF THE MANIPULATOR AND PARTS HEATING FURNACE. THE METALS WERE HEATED PRIOR TO BEING PRESSED. THE ARM IS DRAPED WITH FIRE RESISTANT MATERIAL. (2/9/79) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  4. 19. VIEW OF THE BAKEOUT FURNACE, WHERE PARTS WERE HEATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF THE BAKE-OUT FURNACE, WHERE PARTS WERE HEATED UNDER A VACUUM TO HEAT TREAT OR TO BAKE OUT ANY IMPURITIES. (9/19/72) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  5. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches Standards...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches Standards...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., App. III Appendix III to Part 1042—Not-to-Exceed Zones (a) The following definitions apply for this Appendix III: (1) Percent power means the percentage of the maximum power achieved at Maximum Test Speed (or at Maximum Test Torque for constant-speed engines). (2) Percent speed means the percentage of...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., App. III Appendix III to Part 1042—Not-to-Exceed Zones (a) The following definitions apply for this Appendix III: (1) Percent power means the percentage of the maximum power achieved at Maximum Test Speed (or at Maximum Test Torque for constant-speed engines). (2) Percent speed means the percentage of...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., App. III Appendix III to Part 1042—Not-to-Exceed Zones (a) The following definitions apply for this Appendix III: (1) Percent power means the percentage of the maximum power achieved at Maximum Test Speed (or at Maximum Test Torque for constant-speed engines). (2) Percent speed means the percentage of...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false High-Altitude Counties III Appendix... Appendix III to Part 1068—High-Altitude Counties In some cases the standard-setting part includes requirements or other specifications that apply for high-altitude counties. The following counties have...

  14. Double diffusion in arbitrary porous cavity: Part III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad, N. Ameer; Salman Ahmed N., J.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Khan, T. M. Yunus; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.

    2017-07-01

    Investigation of heat and mass transfer in a porous cavity is carried out with respect to a small block placed at top corner of cavity along its left vertical surface. The block is heated isothermally to temperature Th and right vertical surface is maintained at isothermal temperature Tc. The left vertical surface is maintained at constant concentration Ch and right vertical surface at Cc such that Ch>Cc. The governing equations are non-dimensionalised and converted into simpler form of algebraic equations to facilitate its solution. It is found that the heat and mass transfer behaviour is substantially different from the case of block placed at bottom or at the center of left vertical surface.

  15. New method for strengthening surfaces of heat treated steel parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarelnyk, V.; Martsynkovskyy, V.; Gaponova, O.; Konoplianchenko, Ie; Belous, A.; Gerasimenko, V.; Zakharov, M.

    2017-08-01

    There is described a method for strengthening surfaces of heat-treated steel parts, which includes technological procedures of carburizing by electroerosive alloying process (CEEA) and also nitriding processes. The nitriding process is simultaneously carried out with the CEEA operation for a period of time sufficient to saturate the surface layer of a part with nitrogen to the depth of a heat-affected zone. Thus, the process of so-cold nitro-carburizing process performed by the EEL method (NCEEA) takes place. To reduce a surface roughness, the NCEEA process is carried out in at least two stages, with a decreasing a discharge energy value at each subsequent stage.

  16. Inactivation of human T-cell lymphotropic virus, type III by heat, chemicals, and irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinnan, G.V. Jr.; Wells, M.A.; Wittek, A.E.; Phelan, M.A.; Mayner, R.E.; Feinstone, S.; Purcell, R.H.; Epstein, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    Infectivity of human T-cell lymphotropic virus, Type III (HTLV-III) was inactivated by heat more rapidly if in liquid medium than if lyophilized and more rapidly at 60 than 56/sup 0/C. When HTLV-III was added to factor VIII suspension, then lyophilized and heated at 60/sup 0/C for 2 hours or longer there was elimination of 1 X 10(6) in vitro infectious units (IVIU) of virus. Much of the viral inactivation appeared to result from lyophilization. The application of water-saturated chloroform to the lyophilized material containing virus also resulted in elimination of infectivity. HTLV-III was efficiently inactivated by formalin, beta-propiolactone, ethyl ether, detergent, and ultraviolet light plus psoralen. The results are reassuring regarding the potential safety of various biological products.

  17. A Study of Scrap Heating By Burners. Part I: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Kamalesh; Irons, Gordon A.

    2013-02-01

    A furnace, approximately 1 m3 in capacity, was built to measure the efficiency of heat transfer from a propane-oxygen burner to different types of industrial steel scrap. Supplementary measurements were undertaken to measure the scrap density, size, and void fraction to insure complete combustion of the propane and to measure the extent of scrap oxidation. Local values of temperature in the scrap bed were measured along with the exit temperature of the off gas. The off gas temperature was a direct measurement of the overall efficiency of heating. It was found that smaller and denser scrap was heated more effectively. Configurations that increased the path length of the gas also increased the efficiency of heating. In Part II, a mathematical model is developed to compare with the measured temperatures.

  18. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called...

  19. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  20. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  1. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  2. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  3. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 265, App. III Appendix III to Part 265—EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium 0.05...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App....

  7. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App....

  8. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Inquiry/Application Log Sheet eR20MY94.003...

  9. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Inquiry/Application Log Sheet eR20MY94.003...

  10. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Inquiry/Application Log Sheet eR20MY94.003...

  11. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Inquiry/Application Log Sheet eR20MY94.003...

  12. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Inquiry/Application Log Sheet eR20MY94.003...

  13. Damascus Steel-Part III; The Wadsworth-Sherby mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Baker, H.H.; Peterson, D.T. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Clark, H.F. ); Yater, W.M. )

    1990-04-01

    Several blades have been forged from a Fe-1.6 wt% C alloy after heat treating to form austenite grain boundary allotriomorph (GBA) cementite (Cm). This is the Wadsworth--Sherby technique proposed as the mechanism for forming the pattern on Damascus blades. Both the forging temperature and the severity of metal flow during forging were systematically varied. The patterns obtained are compared to a genuine Damascus sword and shown to be macroscopically somewhat similar, but microscopically quite different. It is concluded that the Wadsworth--Sherby technique is probably not the technique used by ancient blacksmiths to produce the Damask pattern in their blades.

  14. Benchmarking the Sandia Pulsed Reactor III cavity neutron spectrum for electronic parts calibration and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.G.; Griffin, P.J.; Fan, W.C.

    1993-08-01

    The SPR III bare cavity spectrum and integral parameters have been determined with 24 measured spectrum sensor responses and an independent, detailed, MCNP transport calculation. This environment qualifies as a benchmark field for electronic parts testing.

  15. Toward a Model of Vocational Persistence Among Seminarians: Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Assumptions underlying model rely on Cartwright and Harary's (1960) definition of Heider's cognitive balance theory and Festinger's (1957) cognitive dissonance theory. Diagrams illustrate degree of balance between personal and reference group (curch authorities, classmates, family) attitudes. Parts I and II in earlier issues. (CJ)

  16. A Design that Inspires All. Education by Design: Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theimer, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Too many schools are still being built today as warehouses with windows; they get the job done on some minimal level, but beyond that, they simply do not excite the children who spend a great deal of their lives within their walls. Creating an environmentally friendly building is important, but that's only part of the equation. The author and his…

  17. Critical Thinking: The Art of Socratic Questioning, Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Richard; Elder, Linda

    2008-01-01

    In the last two articles, the authors introduced the concept of Socratic questioning and its relationship to critical thinking. They illuminated how understanding the concepts embedded in critical thinking naturally generates questions. For example, a thinker who understands the elements of thought asks questions which probe the parts of thinking.…

  18. Sequential Mathematics Course III. Part 1. Pilot Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This document outlines part one of the third year course of the newly implemented New York State Mathematics Curriculum. The three-year Sequential Mathematics sequence designed by New York State is a move in the direction of fusing the formerly separate topics found in algebra, geometry, and intermediate algebra/trigonometry, and introducing…

  19. Toward a Model of Vocational Persistence Among Seminarians: Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Assumptions underlying model rely on Cartwright and Harary's (1960) definition of Heider's cognitive balance theory and Festinger's (1957) cognitive dissonance theory. Diagrams illustrate degree of balance between personal and reference group (curch authorities, classmates, family) attitudes. Parts I and II in earlier issues. (CJ)

  20. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  1. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  2. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  3. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  4. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  5. Scary gas: intravascular, intracranial, and intraspinal ectopic gas (part III).

    PubMed

    Sandstrom, Claire K; Osman, Sherif F; Linnau, Ken F

    2017-08-01

    While ectopic gas can be a sign of dangerous disease requiring immediate medical or surgical intervention, it can also be an incidental and benign finding. Intravenous gas and spinal vacuum gas are common and almost always benign. Intravascular gas is most often related to instrumentation and, if intraarticular, can cause end-organ ischemia; however, treatment is usually supportive. Pneumocephalus arises from a communication with paranasal sinuses or mastoids more often than from meningeal infection and can usually be managed nonoperatively. In part 3 of this series, the different causes of ectopic gas in the vessels, skull, and spine are reviewed, as are the imaging features that can help to narrow the differential diagnosis.

  6. Revision of the Genus Paratylenchus Micoletzky, 1922 and Descriptions of New Species. Part III of Three parts-Gracilacus

    PubMed Central

    Raski, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Part III covers species with female stylet length >41 μm which are considered by this author to comprise the genus Gracilacus Raski, 1962. Seven new species of Gracilacus are described and further observations given on 14 other species. Paratylenchus strenzkei (Volz, 1951) Oostenbrink, 1960 is transferred to species inquirendae. A key to the species of Gracilacus is included. PMID:19308207

  7. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. Part III; Nonthermal Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Holman, Gordon; O'Flannagain, Aidan; Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the third part of a global flare energetics project, in which Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) data of 191 M and X-class flare events from the first 3.5 years of the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission are analyzed. We fit a thermal and a nonthermal component to RHESSI spectra, yielding the temperature of the differential emission measure (DEM) tail, the nonthermal power-law slope and flux, and the thermal nonthermal cross-over energy eco. From these parameters, we calculate the total nonthermal energy E(sub nt) in electrons with two different methods: (1) using the observed cross-over energy e(sub co) as low-energy cutoff, and (2) using the low-energy cut off e(sub wt) predicted by the warm thick-target bremsstrahlung model of Kontar et al. Based on a mean temperature of T(sub e) = 8.6 MK in active regions, we find low-energy cutoff energies of e(sub wt) = 6.2 +/-1.6 keV for the warm-target model, which is significantly lower than the cross-over energies e(sub co) = 21 +/- 6 keV. Comparing with the statistics of magnetically dissipated energies E(sub mag) and thermal energies E(sub th) from the two previous studies, we find the following mean (logarithmic) energy ratios with the warm-target model: E(sub nt) = 0.41E(sub mag), E(sub th) = 0.08 E(sub mag), and E(sub th) = 0.15 E(sub nt). The total dissipated magnetic energy exceeds the thermal energy in 95% and the nonthermal energy in 71% of the flare events, which confirms that magnetic reconnection processes are sufficient to explain flare energies. The nonthermal energy exceeds the thermal energy in 85% of the events, which largely confirms the warm thick-target model.

  8. Aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmospheric environment. Part III: personal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgen, E.; Levsen, K.; Angerer, J.; Schneider, P.; Heinrich, J.; Wichmann, H.-E.

    As part of a larger study, personal sampling of the aromatic hydrocarbons benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the isomeric xylenes (BTEX) was carried out by 55 nonsmoking volunteers for a period of 14 days. Thirty-nine persons lived in a rural area near Hannover (Germany) with hardly any traffic at all, while 16 persons lived in a high-traffic city street in Hannover. The personal exposure level of the persons in the rural area (some commuting to Hannover) was: 2.9, 24.8, 2.4 and 7.7 μg m -3 for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the sum of xylenes, respectively, while the corresponding data for the high traffic city streets were 4.0, 22.2, 2.8 and 9.7 μg m -3 (geometric means). Four microenvironments have been monitored which contribute to the total exposure to BTEX, i.e. the home, the outdoor air, the workplace and the car cabin. The most important microenvironment for non-working persons is the private home. The concentration of most BTEX in the private home is almost equal to the personal exposure level, demonstrating that the indoor pollution in the home makes by far the highest contribution to the total exposure. For working people (mostly office workers), the workplace is the second most important microenvironment contributing to the total BTEX exposure. Taking all working persons into consideration (independent of the location of their private home) the personal exposure level is higher by a factor of 1.2-1.4 than that of the workplace (for toluene this factor is 2.2). As already found by others, very high BTEX concentrations may be found in car cabins, in particular, if the engine is gasoline-driven. In the cabin of 44 cars in the rural/urban area average benzene concentrations (geometric mean) of 12/14 μg m -3 and a maximum value of ˜550 μg m -3 were found. On average, the participating volunteers drove their car for 45 min day -1 (i.e. 3% of the day). Nevertheless, the car cabin constitutes about 10% of the total benzene exposure. Refueling of the

  9. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. Part III; Nonthermal Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Holman, Gordon; O'Flannagain, Aidan; Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the third part of a global flare energetics project, in which Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) data of 191 M and X-class flare events from the first 3.5 years of the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission are analyzed. We fit a thermal and a nonthermal component to RHESSI spectra, yielding the temperature of the differential emission measure (DEM) tail, the nonthermal power-law slope and flux, and the thermal nonthermal cross-over energy eco. From these parameters, we calculate the total nonthermal energy E(sub nt) in electrons with two different methods: (1) using the observed cross-over energy e(sub co) as low-energy cutoff, and (2) using the low-energy cut off e(sub wt) predicted by the warm thick-target bremsstrahlung model of Kontar et al. Based on a mean temperature of T(sub e) = 8.6 MK in active regions, we find low-energy cutoff energies of e(sub wt) = 6.2 +/-1.6 keV for the warm-target model, which is significantly lower than the cross-over energies e(sub co) = 21 +/- 6 keV. Comparing with the statistics of magnetically dissipated energies E(sub mag) and thermal energies E(sub th) from the two previous studies, we find the following mean (logarithmic) energy ratios with the warm-target model: E(sub nt) = 0.41E(sub mag), E(sub th) = 0.08 E(sub mag), and E(sub th) = 0.15 E(sub nt). The total dissipated magnetic energy exceeds the thermal energy in 95% and the nonthermal energy in 71% of the flare events, which confirms that magnetic reconnection processes are sufficient to explain flare energies. The nonthermal energy exceeds the thermal energy in 85% of the events, which largely confirms the warm thick-target model.

  10. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  11. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  12. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  13. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  14. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  15. PROBABILITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR LIQUID WASTE TANKS - PART III

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Edwards, T.

    2010-12-09

    The liquid waste chemistry control program is designed to reduce the pitting corrosion occurrence on tank walls. The chemistry control program has been implemented, in part, by applying engineering judgment safety factors to experimental data. However, the simple application of a general safety factor can result in use of excessive corrosion inhibiting agents. The required use of excess corrosion inhibitors can be costly for tank maintenance, waste processing, and in future tank closure. It is proposed that a probability-based approach can be used to quantify the risk associated with the chemistry control program. This approach can lead to the application of tank-specific chemistry control programs reducing overall costs associated with overly conservative use of inhibitor. Furthermore, when using nitrite as an inhibitor, the current chemistry control program is based on a linear model of increased aggressive species requiring increased protective species. This linear model was primarily supported by experimental data obtained from dilute solutions with nitrate concentrations less than 0.6 M, but is used to produce the current chemistry control program up to 1.0 M nitrate. Therefore, in the nitrate space between 0.6 and 1.0 M, the current control limit is based on assumptions that the linear model developed from data in the <0.6 M region is applicable in the 0.6-1.0 M region. Due to this assumption, further investigation of the nitrate region of 0.6 M to 1.0 M has potential for significant inhibitor reduction, while maintaining the same level of corrosion risk associated with the current chemistry control program. Ongoing studies have been conducted in FY07, FY08, FY09 and FY10 to evaluate the corrosion controls at the SRS tank farm and to assess the minimum nitrite concentrations to inhibit pitting in ASTM A537 carbon steel below 1.0 molar nitrate. The experimentation from FY08 suggested a non-linear model known as the mixture/amount model could be used to predict

  16. Effect of Heat Sealing Temperature on Mechanical Properties and Molecular Structure at Heat-Sealed Parts of Polylactic Acid Film —Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yumi; Hashimoto, Yasuo; Tsujii, Tetsuya; Morimoto, Mitsuhiko; Kotaki, Masaya; Hamada, Hiroyuki

    Actual failure accidents of plastic bags often occur at the pin-hole and/or the crack, and also the edge that is just outside of the heat-sealed part becomes the failure initiation point. In this study, fracture mechanics tests and tear tests were performed to understand the resistance of heat-sealed parts and edge parts to introduced cracks. The fracture resistance and tear strength of the edge part was lower than that of the heat-sealed part, which was more obvious at higher heat sealing temperature. The optimum heat sealing temperature to obtain the balanced properties of heat-sealed polylactic acid (PLA) films was found to be 130°C.

  17. Costs and Their Assessment to Users of a Medical Library, Part III: Allocating Fixed Joint Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bres, E.; And Others

    Part III of the study describes a model for completing the cost assessment (justification) process by accounting for the fixed joint costs; a "fair" and equitable mechanism is developed in the context of game-theoretic approach. An n-person game is constructed in which the "players" are the institutions served by the library,…

  18. 48 CFR 14.201-4 - Part III-Documents, exhibits, and other attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Part III-Documents, exhibits, and other attachments. 14.201-4 Section 14.201-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... attachments. The contracting officer shall list the title, date, and number of pages for each attached...

  19. 48 CFR 1436.270-4 - Part III-Documents, exhibits and other attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Part III-Documents, exhibits and other attachments. 1436.270-4 Section 1436.270-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... (See FAR 22.404), SF-24—Bid Bond (See FAR 28.101), and other attachments by listing the title, date and...

  20. 48 CFR 15.204-4 - Part III-List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Part III-List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments. 15.204-4 Section 15.204-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL.... Section J, List of attachments. The contracting officer shall list the title, date, and number of pages...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... III to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION... Cheyenne Kimball Sioux STATE OF NEVADA Carson City Douglas Elko Esmeralda Eureka Humboldt Lander Lincoln Lyon Mineral Nye Pershing Storey Washoe White Pine STATE OF NEW MEXICO Bernalillo Catron Colfax...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... III to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION... Nebraska Banner Cheyenne Kimball Sioux State of Nevada Carson City Douglas Elko Esmeralda Eureka Humboldt Lander Lincoln Lyon Mineral Nye Pershing Storey Washoe White Pine State of New Mexico Bernalillo...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... III to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION... NEBRASKA Banner Cheyenne Kimball Sioux STATE OF NEVADA Carson City Douglas Elko Esmeralda Eureka Humboldt Lander Lincoln Lyon Mineral Nye Pershing Storey Washoe White Pine STATE OF NEW MEXICO Bernalillo...

  4. Heat Transfer from High-Temperature Surfaces to Fluids. III - Correlation of Heat-Transfer Data for Air Flowing in Silicon Carbide Tube with Rounded Entrance, Inside Diameter of 3/4 Inch, and Effective Length of 12 Inches. Part 3; Correlation of Heat-Transfer Data for Air Flowing in Silicon Carbide Tube with Rounded Entrance, Inside Diameter of 3/4 Inch, and Effective Length of 12 Inches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Eldon W.; Desmon, Leland G.

    1949-01-01

    A heat-transfer investigation was conducted with air flowing through an electrically heated silicon carbide tube with a rounded entrance, an inside diameter of 3/4 inch, and an effective heat-transfer length of 12 inches over a range of Reynolds numbers up to 300,000 and a range of average inside-tube-wall temperature up to 2500 R. The highest corresponding local outside-tube-wall temperature was 3010 R. Correlation of the heat-transfer data using the conventional Nueselt relation wherein physical properties of the fluid were evaluated at average bulk temperature resulted in a separation of data with tube-wall-temperature level. A satisfactory correlation of the heat-transfer data was obtained, however, by the use of modified correlation parameters wherein the mass velocity G (or product of average air density and velocity evaluated at bulk temperature P(sub b)V(sub b)) in the Reynolds number was replaced by the product of average air velocity evaluated at the bulk temperature and density evaluated at either the average inside-tube-wall temperature or the average film temperature; in addition, all the physical properties of air were correspondingly evaluated at either the average inside-tube-wall temperature or the average film temperature.

  5. Vibration analysis of shell-and-tube heat exchangers: an overview-Part 1: flow, damping, fluidelastic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Taylor, C. E.

    2003-11-01

    Design guidelines were developed to prevent tube failures due to excessive flow-induced vibration in shell-and-tube heat exchangers. An overview of vibration analysis procedures and recommended design guidelines is presented in this paper. This paper pertains to liquid, gas and two-phase heat exchangers such as nuclear steam generators, reboilers, coolers, service water heat exchangers, condensers, and moisture-separator-reheaters. Generally, a heat exchanger vibration analysis consists of the following steps: (i) flow distribution calculations, (ii) dynamic parameter evaluation (i.e. damping, effective tube mass, and dynamic stiffness), (iii) formulation of vibration excitation mechanisms, (iv) vibration response prediction, and (v) resulting damage assessment (i.e., comparison against allowables). The requirements applicable to each step are outlined in this paper. Part 1 of this paper covers flow calculations, dynamic parameters and fluidelastic instability.

  6. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report III Appendix III to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. III...

  7. Prediction of Sucessful Nursing Performance. Part III and Part IV. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwirian, Patricia M.; And Others

    As part of the three-phase national study to provide information to form a basis for predictions about successful nursing performance, a review was conducted of the performance of nursing school graduates at their first jobs. In March, 1976, questionnaires were mailed to a cohort of 1975 graduates who were selected by school officials as having…

  8. Factors Related to the Pronunciation of Vowel Clusters. Part III (of 3 Parts).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dale D.

    Children's pronunciations of vowel clusters in synthetic words were analyzed in relation to common English words containing the same vowel clusters. Subjects were 436 elementary students of both high and low reading levels from a suburban, an urban, and a rural community. Discussion of the problem and procedures of the study are found in Part 1,…

  9. Shell-and-tube heat exchangers in refrigeration. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.A.

    1996-12-01

    This article covers the basics of sizing and selecting shell-and-tube heat exchangers for refrigeration applications. The heat exchanger is an indispensable device in many instances where heat must be transferred from one fluid to another. Its use is necessary in many applications involving thermal energy transfer in both heating and cooling processes, and there are a variety of designs on the market. This article will focus on the shell-and-tube (S and T) type. While the ensuing discussion will deal with heat exchangers in this field, the discourse on shell-and-tube heat exchanger construction and operation is fundamental to all S and T applications.

  10. Explicit approximations to estimate the perturbative diffusivity in the presence of convectivity and damping. III. Cylindrical approximations for heat waves traveling inwards

    SciTech Connect

    Berkel, M. van; Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Zwart, H. J.; Inagaki, S.; Baar, M. R. de

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, a number of new explicit approximations are introduced to estimate the perturbative diffusivity (χ), convectivity (V), and damping (τ) in cylindrical geometry. For this purpose, the harmonic components of heat waves induced by localized deposition of modulated power are used. The approximations are based on the heat equation in cylindrical geometry using the symmetry (Neumann) boundary condition at the plasma center. This means that the approximations derived here should be used only to estimate transport coefficients between the plasma center and the off-axis perturbative source. If the effect of cylindrical geometry is small, it is also possible to use semi-infinite domain approximations presented in Part I and Part II of this series. A number of new approximations are derived in this part, Part III, based upon continued fractions of the modified Bessel function of the first kind and the confluent hypergeometric function of the first kind. These approximations together with the approximations based on semi-infinite domains are compared for heat waves traveling towards the center. The relative error for the different derived approximations is presented for different values of the frequency, transport coefficients, and dimensionless radius. Moreover, it is shown how combinations of different explicit formulas can be used to estimate the transport coefficients over a large parameter range for cases without convection and damping, cases with damping only, and cases with convection and damping. The relative error between the approximation and its underlying model is below 2% for the case, where only diffusivity and damping are considered. If also convectivity is considered, the diffusivity can be estimated well in a large region, but there is also a large region in which no suitable approximation is found. This paper is the third part (Part III) of a series of three papers. In Part I, the semi-infinite slab approximations have been treated. In Part II

  11. 16 CFR Appendix I to Part 305 - Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air... RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. I Appendix I to Part 305—Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air Conditioners Manufacturer's rated heating capacity (Btu's/hr.) Range of HSPF's Low High Single Package Units Heat...

  12. 16 CFR Appendix I to Part 305 - Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air... RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. I Appendix I to Part 305—Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air Conditioners Manufacturer's rated heating capacity (Btu's/hr.) Range of HSPF's Low High Single Package Units Heat...

  13. 16 CFR Appendix I to Part 305 - Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air... RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. I Appendix I to Part 305—Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air Conditioners Manufacturer's rated heating capacity (Btu's/hr.) Range of HSPF's Low High Single Package Units Heat...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 III Appendix III to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining the...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 III Appendix III to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 III Appendix III to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 III Appendix III to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 III Appendix III to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining...

  4. Centrifugal Modelling of Soil Structures. Part III. The Stability of River Banks and Flood Embankments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    CENTRIFUGAL MODELLING OF SOIL STRUCTURES. PART I1. THE STARILI--ETC(U) OCT T8 C J PADFIELD. A N SCHOFIELD DA-ERO-76GO-00U C L A S IF I E n N L...ASIIIIIIIII E]lllllEEEEEEE mEEEEEEmhhEEEE EEEEEEEEmhhEEI HhIL~ 222 LEVELA!>1 ; CENTRIFUGAL MODELLING OF SOIL STRUCTURES PART III THE STABILITY OF RIVER...8217WM 1. R NUMBER GOVI ACCESSION NO). 3. R ~CI PIENT . CATALOG NUMNL H .. PERIODCO RED Centrifugal Modelling of soil StructuresPrt = Final Technical The

  5. The atmospheric heat budget over the western part of the Tibetan plateau during MONEX, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Z.; Reiter, E. R.; Chen, L.

    1985-01-01

    The heat sources over the western part of the Tibetan Plateau for the period from May 19-August 31, 1979 are calculated. The use of the direct method to compute the total atmospheric heat source is examined. The values for the heat source over western, northwestern, and southwestern Tibet are presented. It is concluded that the atmospheric heat source is smaller during the summer than had been previously estimated; this difference is due to reduced drag coefficients. The northwestern and southwestern heat source values are compared, and it is observed that the northwestern heat source is independent on sensible heating and the southwestern heat source relates to the latent heat (LH). The calculated values correlate with the surface hydrology of these two regions. Time series analyses of the heat source components over the southwestern region reveal that LH is the primary modulator of the total atmospheric heat sources. The relation between the vertical heat distribution and Indian summer monsoons is studied.

  6. Heat pipe design handbook, part 2. [digital computer code specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrabek, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    The utilization of a digital computer code for heat pipe analysis and design (HPAD) is described which calculates the steady state hydrodynamic heat transport capability of a heat pipe with a particular wick configuration, the working fluid being a function of wick cross-sectional area. Heat load, orientation, operating temperature, and heat pipe geometry are specified. Both one 'g' and zero 'g' environments are considered, and, at the user's option, the code will also perform a weight analysis and will calculate heat pipe temperature drops. The central porous slab, circumferential porous wick, arterial wick, annular wick, and axial rectangular grooves are the wick configurations which HPAD has the capability of analyzing. For Vol. 1, see N74-22569.

  7. 76 FR 77982 - Applications for Eligibility Designation; Programs Under Parts A and F of Title III of the Higher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... (FSEOG), the Federal Work Study (FWS), the Student Support Services (SSS), or the Undergraduate... needy student enrollment and to average educational and general (E&G) expenditures for a specified base... Needy Students: For Part A SIP; TCCU; ANNH; Part A NASNTI; Part A AANAPISI; Title III, Part F HSI STEM...

  8. Heat flux to the limiter during disruptions and neutral beam injection in Doublet-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, T.; DeGrassie, J.; Taylor, T. S.; Hopkins, G.; Meyer, C.; Petrie, T. W.; Kahn, C.; Ejima, S.; D-III Physics Group

    1984-05-01

    The heat flux to the Doublet-III primary limiter has been monitored during plasma disruptions and during neutral beam injection. The surface temperature of the movable TiC-coated graphite limiter was measured with an Inframetrics thermal imaging system and a suitably filtered silicon photodiode spot detector. In addition, the floating electric potential of the limiter with respect to the vacuum vessel was measured. The heat pulse duration to the limiter was measured by the spot detector with a time response of ˜ 10 μs and these times were correlated with the plasma parameters. In limiter discharges, 20% of the plasma kinetic stored energy goes to the limiter during disruptions. The power balance during disruptions is also discussed. During neutral beam injection, the limiter is not heated uniformly; the ion drift side receives much more thermal flux than the electron drift side. The fraction of beam power going to the limiter is as high as ˜ 35% in normal limiter discharges.

  9. Characterization of heat transfer in nutrient materials, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, J. E.; Bannerot, R. B.; Chen, C. K.; Witte, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    The principles involved in food heating are discussed. The food heating system for Skylab is described. Thermal models of nutrient materials are analyzed including models in zero-g and low pressure conditions. Results are presented of parametric studies to establish the effect of individual parameters on the thermal response of the system.

  10. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe Part III: victims of the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    In Part I, neuroscience collaborators with the Nazis were discussed, and in Part II, neuroscience resistors were discussed. In Part III, we discuss the tragedy regarding european neuroscientists who became victims of the Nazi onslaught on “non-Aryan” doctors. Some of these unfortunate neuroscientists survived Nazi concentration camps, but most were murdered. We discuss the circumstances and environment which stripped these neuroscientists of their profession, then of their personal rights and freedom, and then of their lives. We include a background analysis of anti-Semitism and Nazism in their various countries, then discuss in depth seven exemplary neuroscientist Holocaust victims; including Germans Ludwig Pick, Arthur Simons, and Raphael Weichbrodt, Austrians Alexander Spitzer and Viktor Frankl, and Poles Lucja Frey and Wladyslaw Sterling. by recognizing and remembering these victims of neuroscience, we pay homage and do not allow humanity to forget, lest this dark period in history ever repeat itself.

  11. Dynamics of Synoptic Eddy and Low-Frequency Flow Interaction. Part III: Baroclinic Model Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L.-L.; Jin, F.-F.; Watanabe, M.

    2006-07-01

    In this three-part study, a linear closure has been developed for the synoptic eddy and low-frequency flow (SELF) interaction and demonstrated that internal dynamics plays an important role in generating the leading low-frequency modes in the extratropical circulation anomalies during cold seasons.In Part III, a new linearized primitive equation system is first derived for time-mean flow anomalies. The dynamical operator of the system includes a traditional part depending on the observed climatological mean state and an additional part from the SELF feedback closure utilizing the observed climatological properties of synoptic eddy activity. The latter part relates nonlocally all the anomalous eddy-forcing terms in equations of momentum, temperature, and surface pressure to the time-mean flow anomalies. Using the observational data, the closure was validated with reasonable success, and it was found that terms of the SELF feedback in the momentum and pressure equations tend to reinforce the low-frequency modes, whereas those in the thermodynamic equation tends to damp the temperature anomalies to make the leading modes equivalent barotropic. Through singular vector analysis of the linear dynamical operator, it is highlighted that the leading modes of the system resemble the observed patterns of the Arctic Oscillation, Antarctic Oscillation, and Pacific North American pattern, in which the SELF feedback plays an essential role, consistent with the finding of the barotropic model study in Part II.


  12. 16 CFR Appendix I to Part 305 - Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air... CONSERVATION ACT (âENERGY LABELING RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. I Appendix I to Part 305—Heating Performance and Cost for Central Air Conditioners Manufacturer's rated heating capacity (Btu's/hr.) Range of HSPF's...

  13. Characterization of heat transfer in nutrient materials, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, J. E.; Bannerot, R. B.; Chen, C. K.; Witte, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    A thermal model is analyzed that takes into account phase changes in the nutrient material. The behavior of fluids in low gravity environments is discussed along with low gravity heat transfer. Thermal contact resistance in the Skylab food heater is analyzed. The original model is modified to include: equivalent conductance due to radiation, radial equivalent conductance, wall equivalent conductance, and equivalent heat capacity. A constant wall-temperature model is presented.

  14. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report III Appendix III to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App....

  15. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec. 123 III Appendix III to Part 310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND... Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec....

  16. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec. 123 III Appendix III to Part 310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND... Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec....

  17. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec. 123 III Appendix III to Part 310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND... Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec....

  18. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec. 123 III Appendix III to Part 310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND... Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec....

  19. Numerical modeling of conjugate heat transfer on complex geometries with diagonal Cartesian method. Part 2: Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.D.; Lin, W.L.; Chen, C.J. |

    1999-05-01

    Part 1 of this study discusses the diagonal Cartesian method for temperature analysis. The application of this method to the analysis of flow and conjugate heat transfer in a compact heat exchanger is given in Part 2. In addition to a regular (i.e., Cartesian-oriented) fin arrangement, two complex fin arrangements are modeled using the diagonal Cartesian method. The pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of the different configurations are compared. It is found that enhanced heat transfer and reduced pressure drop can be obtained with the modified fin arrangements for this compact heat exchanger.

  20. 16 CFR Appendix D5 to Part 305 - Water Heaters-Heat Pump

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Water Heaters-Heat Pump D5 Appendix D5 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE... Appendix D5 to Part 305—Water Heaters—Heat Pump Range Information CAPACITY FIRST HOUR RATING Range...

  1. 16 CFR Appendix D5 to Part 305 - Water Heaters-Heat Pump

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Water Heaters-Heat Pump D5 Appendix D5 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS... LABELING RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. D5 Appendix D5 to Part 305—Water Heaters—Heat Pump Range Information...

  2. Investigational drug tracking: phases I-III and NDA submissions--Part II.

    PubMed

    Grant, K L

    1994-10-01

    The author catalogs over 800 investigational drugs/biologicals currently in Phase I, II or III clinical trials or drugs/biologicals submitted to the FDA as new drug applications. Part I of this article appeared in the September issue of Hospital Pharmacy. The list assists in predicting when new drugs will be marketed. The entries include generic/chemical name, investigational drug number, synonyms, trade names, manufacturers, clinical trial status, predicted approval year, indications or drug class, whether the drug has been developed through biotechnology, and references. Entries were gleaned from medical journals, stock market analysis publications, and the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association's Medicines in Development Series. The list is alphabetized by the generic/chemical name or investigational drug number and cross-indexed by the trade name and synonyms. The list reflects those drugs which were not FDA approved as of April 15, 1994. Part I concludes with the remaining alphabetical listing by generic/chemical name or investigational drug number.

  3. Transient heat transfer in superfluid helium. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1983-01-01

    Three classical problems associated with the ordinary diffusion equation concern the temperature in: (1) a half-space with clamped heat flux at the free face, (2) a half-space with clamped temperature at the free face, and (3) an infinite medium with a pulsed plane heat source. These problems are also important for the nonlinear diffusion equation based on the Gorter-Mellink relation, which describes heat transport in superfluid helium. A similarity solution to problem (1), the clamped-flux problem, has already been found and compared, with good agreement, with experimental data of van Sciver. (A similarity solution is one in which the profiles of temperature rise ..delta..T versus distance Z at different times t can be obtained from one another by suitable (different) stretching of the temperature and distance axes.) In this paper, similarity solutions are given in analytic form to problems (2) and (3), the clamped-temperature and pulsed-source problems.

  4. Transient heat transfer in superfluid helium, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresner, L.

    Three classical problems associated with the ordinary diffusion equation concern the temperature in: (1) a half-space with clamped heat flux at the free face; (2) a half-space with clamped temperature at the free face; and (3) an infinite medium with a pulsed plane heat source. These problems are also important for the nonlinear diffusion equation based on the Gorter-Mellink relation, which describes heat transport in superfluid helium. A similarity solution to problem (1), the clamped-flux problem, was found and compared, with good agreement, with experimental data of van Sciver. (A similarity solution is one in which the profiles of temperataure rise (RADICAL)T versus distance Z at different times t can be obtained from one another by suitable (different) stretching of the temperature and distance axes.) Similarity solutions are given in analytic form to problems (2) and (3), the clamped-temperature and pulsed-source problems.

  5. Control of power to an inductively heated part

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, D.R.; Frost, C.A.; Kahle, P.M.; Kelley, J.B.; Stanton, S.L.

    1997-05-20

    A process for induction hardening a part to a desired depth with an AC signal applied to the part from a closely coupled induction coil includes measuring the voltage of the AC signal at the coil and the current passing through the coil; and controlling the depth of hardening of the part from the measured voltage and current. The control system determines parameters of the part that are functions of applied voltage and current to the induction coil, and uses a neural network to control the application of the AC signal based on the detected functions for each part. 6 figs.

  6. Control of power to an inductively heated part

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Frost, Charles A.; Kahle, Philip M.; Kelley, J. Bruce; Stanton, Suzanne L.

    1997-01-01

    A process for induction hardening a part to a desired depth with an AC signal applied to the part from a closely coupled induction coil includes measuring the voltage of the AC signal at the coil and the current passing through the coil; and controlling the depth of hardening of the part from the measured voltage and current. The control system determines parameters of the part that are functions of applied voltage and current to the induction coil, and uses a neural network to control the application of the AC signal based on the detected functions for each part.

  7. Practical design of heat exchangers for dilution refrigerators: part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Y.; Fujii, G.; Ono, T.; Nagano, H.

    A dilution refrigerator with a He 3 circulation rate 80-730 μmols -1 and a minimum temperature of 2.85 mK which is continuously maintained has been built. Discrete heat exchangers with pressed metal (Cu and Ag) powder are used. The heat exchangers are newly developed, based on the analysis of Radebaugh and Siegwarth. The machine is designed for many purposes such as the base of nuclear cooling and studies of general solid state physics. The design, construction and performance of this refrigerator are described.

  8. Heating/drying using particulate medium: A review. Part 1: General and heat transfer parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Sotocinal, S.A.; Alikhani, Z.; Raghavan, G.S.V.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of particulate medium drying and heat treating of cereal grains. While the conventional air drying of grains is well documented, studies on the drying of grains using heated granular medium do not appear to exist. The scientific study of the different aspects of drying with a heated granular medium began in the early 1970`s. Progress on the utilization of particle-to-particle heat transfer was slow as evidenced by the fact that there is no commercial dryer using the method as of today. The first section of this paper deals with conduction heating and how it led to the use of granular medium in heating the grain. Starting with the earliest work on conduction heating reported by Kelly (1939), the developments in the heating of grain using granular media is discussed. For decades since Kelly`s report, work in the subject area dealt mostly with the theoretical aspects of solid-to-solid heat transfer. Thus, in the succeeding section of the paper, heat transfer parameters and mechanisms involved in the process are thoroughly investigated.

  9. Beam Heating of Samples: Modeling and Verification. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazmierczak, Michael; Gopalakrishnan, Pradeep; Kumar, Raghav; Banerjee Rupak; Snell, Edward; Bellamy, Henry; Rosenbaum, Gerd; vanderWoerd, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Energy absorbed from the X-ray beam by the sample requires cooling by forced convection (i.e. cryostream) to minimize temperature increase and the damage caused to the sample by the X-ray heating. In this presentation we will first review the current theoretical models and recent studies in the literature, which predict the sample temperature rise for a given set of beam parameters. It should be noted that a common weakness of these previous studies is that none of them provide actual experimental confirmation. This situation is now remedied in our investigation where the problem of x-ray sample heating is taken up once more. We have theoretically investigated, and at the same time, in addition to the numerical computations, performed experiments to validate the predictions. We have modeled, analyzed and experimentally tested the temperature rise of a 1 mm diameter glass sphere (sample surrogate) exposed to an intense synchrotron X-ray beam, while it is being cooled in a uniform flow of nitrogen gas. The heat transfer, including external convection and internal heat conduction was theoretically modeled using CFD to predict the temperature variation in the sphere during cooling and while it was subjected to an undulator (ID sector 19) X-ray beam at the APS. The surface temperature of the sphere during the X-ray beam heating was measured using the infrared camera measurement technique described in a previous talk. The temperatures from the numerical predictions and experimental measurements are compared and discussed. Additional results are reported for the two different sphere sizes and for two different supporting pin orientations.

  10. Beam Heating of Samples: Modeling and Verification. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazmierczak, Michael; Gopalakrishnan, Pradeep; Kumar, Raghav; Banerjee Rupak; Snell, Edward; Bellamy, Henry; Rosenbaum, Gerd; vanderWoerd, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Energy absorbed from the X-ray beam by the sample requires cooling by forced convection (i.e. cryostream) to minimize temperature increase and the damage caused to the sample by the X-ray heating. In this presentation we will first review the current theoretical models and recent studies in the literature, which predict the sample temperature rise for a given set of beam parameters. It should be noted that a common weakness of these previous studies is that none of them provide actual experimental confirmation. This situation is now remedied in our investigation where the problem of x-ray sample heating is taken up once more. We have theoretically investigated, and at the same time, in addition to the numerical computations, performed experiments to validate the predictions. We have modeled, analyzed and experimentally tested the temperature rise of a 1 mm diameter glass sphere (sample surrogate) exposed to an intense synchrotron X-ray beam, while it is being cooled in a uniform flow of nitrogen gas. The heat transfer, including external convection and internal heat conduction was theoretically modeled using CFD to predict the temperature variation in the sphere during cooling and while it was subjected to an undulator (ID sector 19) X-ray beam at the APS. The surface temperature of the sphere during the X-ray beam heating was measured using the infrared camera measurement technique described in a previous talk. The temperatures from the numerical predictions and experimental measurements are compared and discussed. Additional results are reported for the two different sphere sizes and for two different supporting pin orientations.

  11. REINFORCEMENT IN CLASSROOM LEARNING. PART II, STUDIES OF REINFORCEMENT IN SIMULATED CLASSROOM SITUATIONS. PART III, IDENTIFICATION OF REINFORCERS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRAVERS, ROBERT M.W.; AND OTHERS

    REINFORCEMENT CONCEPTS DERIVED LARGELY FROM RESEARCH OF SUBHUMAN SUBJECTS WERE TESTED FOR APPLICABILITY TO HUMAN-LEARNING SITUATIONS SIMILAR TO THOSE THAT OCCUR IN SCHOOLS. A SERIES OF EXPLORATORY STUDIES CONDUCTED IS DESCRIBED IN PART II OF THIS REPORT. IN PART III, TWO EXPERIMENTS CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE REINFORCING VALUE OF DIFFERENT STIMULI…

  12. Premium performance heating oil - Part 2, Field trial results

    SciTech Connect

    Jetter, S.M.; Hoskin, D.; McClintock, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    Limited field trial results of a heating oil additive package developed to minimize unscheduled maintenance indicate that it achieves its goal of keeping heating oil systems cleaner. The multifunctional additive package was developed to provide improved fuel oxidation stability, improved corrosion protection, and dispersency. This combination of performance benefits was chosen because we believed it would retard the formation of sludge, as well as allow sludge already present to be carried through the system without fouling the fuel system components (dispersency should keep sludge particles small so they pass through the filtering system). Since many unscheduled maintenance calls are linked to fouling of the fuel filtering system, the overall goal of this technology is to reduce these maintenance calls. Photographic evidence shows that the additive package not only reduces the amount of sludge formed, but even removes existing sludge from filters and pump strainers. This {open_quotes}clean-up{close_quotes} performance is provided trouble free: we found no indication that nozzle/burner performance was impaired by dispersing sludge from filters and pump strainers. Qualitative assessments from specific accounts that used the premium heating oil also show marked reductions in unscheduled maintenance.

  13. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  14. Development of advanced heat pump. Part 2: Preliminary test of two-stage compression heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwatsubo, Tetsushiro; Saikawa, Michinori; Hamamatsu, Teruhide

    1988-03-01

    A heat pump driven by electricity is one of the excellent electricity utilization systems and is promoted to be widely used. An advanced heat pump has been investigated to enlarge its applications in the field of hot water supply for domestic use which will be competitive with city gas and air conditioning in large scale buildings. An experimental unit with two-stage compression system was designed, which has the multi-function of air conditioning and hot water supply, and the trial system was fabricated. In the design, followings were considered; cooperative operations of two compressors by inverter driving, the temperature conditions of both the air for the air conditioning and the heat source, additional setting of the intermediate heat exchanger. The test operation was carried out with checking the start up procedure, the control sequence and so on. The probability of five operation modes: cooling, heating, hot water supply, cooling/hot water supply, and heating/hot water supply, were confirmed. In the mode of heating/hot water supply the hot water temperature was increased to 65 C, the excellent performance in hot water supply was demonstrated.

  15. Joining of parts via magnetic heating of metal aluminum powders

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Ian

    2013-05-21

    A method of joining at least two parts includes steps of dispersing a joining material comprising a multi-phase magnetic metal-aluminum powder at an interface between the at least two parts to be joined and applying an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The AMF has a magnetic field strength and frequency suitable for inducing magnetic hysteresis losses in the metal-aluminum powder and is applied for a period that raises temperature of the metal-aluminum powder to an exothermic transformation temperature. At the exothermic transformation temperature, the metal-aluminum powder melts and resolidifies as a metal aluminide solid having a non-magnetic configuration.

  16. Mass Spectrometry of 3D-printed plastic parts under plasma and radiative heat environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, W. F.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Bates, E. M.; Birmingham, W.; Takeno, J.; Knop, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present the design and preliminary results of a mass spectrometry system used to assess vacuum compatibility of 3D-printed parts, developed at the Dusty Plasma Laboratory of the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). A decrease in outgassing was observed when electroplated parts were inserted in the test chamber vs. non electroplated ones. Outgassing will also be tested under different environments such as plasma and radiative heat. Heat will be generated by a titanium getter pump placed inside a 90 degree elbow, such that titanium does not coat the part. A mirror inside the elbow will be used to throttle the heat arriving at the part. Plasma exposure of 3D printed parts will be achieved by placing the parts in a separate chamber connected to the spectrometer by a vacuum line that is differentially pumped. The signals from the mass spectrometer will be analyzed to see how the vacuum conditions fluctuate under different plasma discharges.

  17. 16 CFR Appendix D5 to Part 305 - Water Heaters-Heat Pump

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Water Heaters-Heat Pump D5 Appendix D5 to... CONCERNING DISCLOSURES REGARDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND WATER USE OF CERTAIN HOME APPLIANCES AND OTHER... Appendix D5 to Part 305—Water Heaters—Heat Pump Range Information CAPACITY FIRST HOUR RATING Range...

  18. Process of preparing metal parts to be heated by means of infrared radiance

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Howard Robinson; Blue, Craig A.

    2009-06-09

    A method for preparing metal for heating by infrared radiance to enable uniform and consistent heating. The surface of one or more metal parts, such as aluminum or aluminum alloy parts, is treated to alter the surface finish to affect the reflectivity of the surface. The surface reflectivity is evaluated, such as by taking measurements at one or more points on the surface, to determine if a desired reflectivity has been achieved. The treating and measuring are performed until the measuring indicates that the desired reflectivity has been achieved. Once the treating has altered the surface finish to achieve the desired reflectivity, the metal part may then be exposed to infrared radiance to heat the metal part to a desired temperature, and that heating will be substantially consistent throughout by virtue of the desired reflectivity.

  19. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos III Laser: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt PHAROS III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were tested using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The first campaign investigated impulse generation with the beam oriented almost normal to the target surface, with energies ranging from 23 to 376 J, and pulses of 5 to 30 ns FWHM. Air breakdown/ plasma dynamics were diagnosed with GOI cameras and color photography. Laser generated impulse was quantified with both vertical pendulums and piezoelectric pressure transducers using the standard performance metric, C{sub M}--the momentum coupling coefficient. Part 1 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 1 results including laser plasma diagnostics, pressure gage and vertical pendulum data.

  20. Tailoring of Microstructure and Properties of Titanium Parts with Local Rapid Heat Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-19

    local rapid heat treatment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER STCU Registration No: P-246 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr... Treatment (LRHT) of titanium parts, which allowed to improve a balance of its mechanical properties (tensile and fatigue). Employing three different...Tailoring of microstructure and properties of titanium parts with local rapid heat treatment ” Project manager: Dr. Pavlo E. Markovsky Tel

  1. Measurement of frost characteristics on heat exchanger fins. Part 2: Data and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Thomas, L.; Besant, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    Part 1 of this paper described the frost growth test facility and instrumentation. In Part 2, results are presented for typical operating conditions with frost growth on heat exchanger fins. Typical data are presented for frost height distributions on fins, increase in pressure loss for airflow through a finned test section, frost mass accumulation on fins, and heat rate. Special attention is given to the uncertainty in each of these measurements and calculations.

  2. Vibration transmission through rolling element bearings. Part III: Geared rotor system studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, T. C.; Singh, R.

    1991-11-01

    This paper extends the proposed bearing matrix formulation of Parts I and II to analyze the overall dynamics of a geared rotor system which includes a spur gear pair, shafts, rolling element bearing, a prime mover and a load (attached to the geared rotor system through flexible torsional couplings), a rigid or flexible casing, and compliant or massive mounts. Linear time-invariant, discrete dynamic models of a generic geared rotor system with proportional viscous damping are developed, by using lumped parameter and dynamic finite element techniques, which are then used to predict the vibration transmissibility through bearings and mounts, casing vibration motion, and dynamic response of the internal rotating system. Each rotating shaft is modeled as an Euler beam in the lumped parameter model and as a Timoshenko beam in the dynamic finite element model, but the gyroscopic moment is not included. Eigensolution and forced harmonic response studies due to rotating mass unbalance or kinematic transmission error excitation for the following example cases are obtained by using the formulation, and the results are compared with those of simple models currently available in the literature and/or experiment: case I, a single-stage rotor system with flexibly mounted rigid casing consisting of two bearings as a special case of the geared rotor system; case II, a spur gear pair drive supported by four bearings installed in a flexibly mounted rigid casing; and case III, an experimental set-up consisting of a high-precision gear and pinion, and four identical rolling element bearings contained in a flexible casing mounted rigidly on a massive foundation. Analytical predictions show that the theory is indeed capable of predicting bearing and mount moment transmissibilities in addition to the force transmissibilities. Also, flexural vibrations of the casing plate are predicted well as the theory is in good agreement with measurements made on case III; such predictions are not

  3. Nonlinear aspects of high heat flux nucleate boiling heat transfer. Part 2, Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sadasivan, P.; Unal, C.; Nelson, R.

    1994-04-01

    This paper describes the results of a study aimed at understanding nonlinear aspects of the macrolayer-controlled heat transfer process associated with high heat flux nucleate boiling and the critical heat flux. Simulations of realistic heater surfaces have been carried out by detailed microscopic modeling of the surfaces. Individual nucleation sites are allowed to activate or deactivate depending on the thermal conditions that prevail at the site. The results indicate that significant spatial and temporal temperature variations can occur on the surface, and that thermal interactions among sites can result in some sites operating extremely intermittently. Surface-averaged temperatures show highly nonlinear behavior. This suggests the possibility of the system exhibiting chaotic behavior under appropriate experimental conditions. It is proposed that such nonlinear behavior is one of the reasons why mechanistic predictive capabilities for the boiling process have remained elusive.

  4. Heat shock fusion protein-based immunotherapy for treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Mark H.; Kadish, Anna S.; Burk, Robert D.; Kim, Mimi Y.; Wadler, Scott; Streicher, Howard; Goldberg, Gary L.; Runowicz, Carolyn D.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives SGN-00101 (HspE7, Nventa, San Diego, CA) is a novel therapeutic vaccine consisting of a fusion protein containing an M. bovis BCG heat shock protein (Hsp65) covalently linked to the entire sequence of HPV 16 E7. This trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of HspE7 in women with CIN III. Methods HIV (−) women with biopsy-proven CIN III were eligible. Two cohorts were accrued; one cohort to establish efficacy and a second cohort with a longer follow-up period to improve the precision of the trial to estimate response rates. Each patient underwent 3 monthly subcutaneous vaccinations with 500 µg of HspE7 followed by monthly colposcopic follow-up for 1 month in cohort 1 and an extended observation period (2 months) in cohort 2. All patients then underwent a LEEP or cone biopsy of the cervix. A complete pathologic response (pCR) was defined as no evidence of CIN or CIN I (only HPV changes). A partial response (PR) was defined as colposcopic lesion regression of >50% in size. Cervicovaginal lavage samples were obtained at each visit for HPV typing using MY09/ MY11 HPV PCR. Results Seventy-two patients were registered and screened, of whom 64 were eligible. Fifty-eight patients completed the trial and were evaluable (31 in cohort 1, 27 in cohort 2). There were no significant epidemiologic or HPV type differences between the 2 cohorts so responses were combined for analysis. Of the 58 evaluable patients, 13 (22.5%) had a pCR; 32 (55%) had a PR and 11 (19%) had stable disease. Two (3.5%) patients in cohort 2 had microinvasive disease and were defined as progressive disease. Thirty-three of 58 (57%) of the patients were infected with HPV 16 prior to vaccination or in subsequent visits. There was no significant difference in regression in women infected with HPV 16 compared to those without HPV 16 infection (88% vs. 70%; p=0.12). Women who had a previous LEEP or ablation for CIN were 2.7 times more likely to have a complete response compared

  5. Heat transfer in porous medium embedded with vertical plate: Non-equilibrium approach - Part B

    SciTech Connect

    Quadir, G. A. E-mail: gaquadir@gmail.com; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum

    2016-06-08

    This work is continuation of the paper Part A. Due to large number of results, the paper is divided into two section with section-A (Part A) discussing the effect of various parameters such as heat transfer coefficient parameter, thermal conductivity ratio etc. on streamlines and isothermal lines. Section-B highlights the heat transfer characteristics in terms of Nusselt number The Darcy model is employed to simulate the flow inside the medium. It is assumed that the heat transfer takes place by convection and radiation. The governing partial differential equations are converted into non-dimensional form and solved numerically using finite element method.

  6. On the heat flux vector for flowing granular materials--part II: derivation and special cases

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2006-09-10

    Heat transfer plays a major role in the processing of many particulate materials. The heat flux vector is commonly modelled by the Fourier's law of heat conduction and for complex materials such as non-linear fluids, porous media, or granular materials, the coefficient of thermal conductivity is generalized by assuming that it would depend on a host of material and kinematical parameters such as temperature, shear rate, porosity or concentration, etc. In Part I, we will give a brief review of the basic equations of thermodynamics and heat transfer to indicate the importance of the modelling of the heat flux vector. We will also discuss the concept of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in granular and porous media. In Part II, we propose and subsequently derive a properly frame-invariant constitutive relationship for the heat flux vector for a (single phase) flowing granular medium. Standard methods in continuum mechanics such as representation theorems and homogenization techniques are used. It is shown that the heat flux vector in addition to being proportional to the temperature gradient (the Fourier's law), could also depend on the gradient of density (or volume fraction), and D (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient) in an appropriate manner. The emphasis in this paper is on the idea that for complex non-linear materials it is the heat flux vector which should be studied; obtaining or proposing generalized form of the thermal conductivity is not always appropriate or sufficient.

  7. Heating the Intergalactic Medium by X-Rays from Population III Binaries in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Ahn, Kyungjin; Wise, John H.; Norman, Michael L.; O'Shea, Brian W.

    2014-08-01

    Due to their long mean free path, X-rays are expected to have an important impact on cosmic reionization by heating and ionizing the intergalactic medium (IGM) on large scales, especially after simulations have suggested that Population III (Pop III) stars may form in pairs at redshifts as high as 20-30. We use the Pop III distribution and evolution from a self-consistent cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of the first galaxies and a simple Pop III X-ray binary model to estimate their X-ray output in a high-density region larger than 100 comoving (Mpc)3. We then combine three different methods—ray tracing, a one-zone model, and X-ray background modeling—to investigate the X-ray propagation, intensity distribution, and long-term effects on the IGM thermal and ionization state. The efficiency and morphology of photoheating and photoionization are dependent on the photon energies. The sub-kiloelectronvolt X-rays only impact the IGM near the sources, while the kiloelectronvolt photons contribute significantly to the X-ray background and heat and ionize the IGM smoothly. The X-rays just below 1 keV are most efficient in heating and ionizing the IGM. We find that the IGM might be heated to over 100 K by z = 10 and the high-density source region might reach 104 K, limited by atomic hydrogen cooling. This may be important for predicting the 21 cm neutral hydrogen signals. On the other hand, the free electrons from X-ray ionizations are not enough to contribute significantly to the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background to the Thomson scattering.

  8. Heating the intergalactic medium by X-rays from population III binaries in high-redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Ahn, Kyungjin; Wise, John H.; O'Shea, Brian W. E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu E-mail: jwise@gatech.edu

    2014-08-20

    Due to their long mean free path, X-rays are expected to have an important impact on cosmic reionization by heating and ionizing the intergalactic medium (IGM) on large scales, especially after simulations have suggested that Population III (Pop III) stars may form in pairs at redshifts as high as 20-30. We use the Pop III distribution and evolution from a self-consistent cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of the first galaxies and a simple Pop III X-ray binary model to estimate their X-ray output in a high-density region larger than 100 comoving (Mpc){sup 3}. We then combine three different methods—ray tracing, a one-zone model, and X-ray background modeling—to investigate the X-ray propagation, intensity distribution, and long-term effects on the IGM thermal and ionization state. The efficiency and morphology of photoheating and photoionization are dependent on the photon energies. The sub-kiloelectronvolt X-rays only impact the IGM near the sources, while the kiloelectronvolt photons contribute significantly to the X-ray background and heat and ionize the IGM smoothly. The X-rays just below 1 keV are most efficient in heating and ionizing the IGM. We find that the IGM might be heated to over 100 K by z = 10 and the high-density source region might reach 10{sup 4} K, limited by atomic hydrogen cooling. This may be important for predicting the 21 cm neutral hydrogen signals. On the other hand, the free electrons from X-ray ionizations are not enough to contribute significantly to the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background to the Thomson scattering.

  9. Mechanical Properties versus Morphology of Ordered Polymers. Volume III. Part I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    heat treament and a modified heat 115 treatment chamber is currently under construction. Therefore, the interpretation of our present heat treatment...laser Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Heat treated fibers have been produced with a modulus of 2100 grams per denier (g/d) and a...Fiber heat treatment ........... . . 114 B. Temperature Dependence of Tensile Properties .. . 119 C. Fiber Torsional Modulus . . ............ . 121 D

  10. A Study of Low-Wage Workers and Their Response to High Intensity Training. Volume III, Part 1 and Part 2: Appendices B 1-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Earl E.

    This document is the last of a three-volume study designed to examine low-wage, low-skilled workers, within the context of their work environment, and to develop ways of measuring the effects of skill advancement training upon the program participants. Volume III, Parts I and II, contains modified employee pre- and post-test interview schedules…

  11. Heat, Energy, and Order, Part Two of an Integrated Science Sequence, Student Guide, 1970 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Project Committee, OR.

    Part two of the first year in the Portland Project, a three-year high school integrated science curriculum, is contained in this student guide. This volume, one of four parts in the year course, involves activities relating to what is considered the most powerful unifying concept in science: energy. The macroscopic aspects of heat as embodied in…

  12. Heat, Energy, and Order, Part Two of an Integrated Science Sequence, Student Guide, 1970 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Project Committee, OR.

    Part two of the first year in the Portland Project, a three-year high school integrated science curriculum, is contained in this student guide. This volume, one of four parts in the year course, involves activities relating to what is considered the most powerful unifying concept in science: energy. The macroscopic aspects of heat as embodied in…

  13. Solar Energy School Heating Augmentation Experiment. Sections I, II, and III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    InterTechnology Corp., Warrenton, VA.

    An experimental solar heating system heats five modular classrooms at the Fauquier County High School in Warrenton, Virginia. The present report covers the operation, maintenance, and modifications to the system over the 1974-75 and 1975-76 heating seasons. The solar system has shown the capability of providing essentially 100 percent of the…

  14. Solar Energy School Heating Augmentation Experiment. Sections I, II, and III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    InterTechnology Corp., Warrenton, VA.

    An experimental solar heating system heats five modular classrooms at the Fauquier County High School in Warrenton, Virginia. The present report covers the operation, maintenance, and modifications to the system over the 1974-75 and 1975-76 heating seasons. The solar system has shown the capability of providing essentially 100 percent of the…

  15. Part I, FAB evaluation & application trials AFUE measurements: Part II, Integrated heating system (IHS) development

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, R.W.; Fisher, L.

    1996-07-01

    An oil burner/boiler efficiency test stand has been set up in the BNL oil heat laboratory which can measure the Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) of burner/boiler combinations in accordance with ASHRAE and DOE standards. Measurements include both steady state efficiencies and heat-up and cool-down characteristics so that cycling effects can be included in an estimate of seasonal average performance. In addition to AFUE measurements, the direct conversion of fuel energy content to enthalpy increase in the boiler water is monitored. The system is largely automated, with most control functions under computer control and data taken electronically and permanently recorded on disks for future reference. To date, a retention-head burner and a fan atomized burner (FAB) have been tested in a steel boiler, the latter operating at two different fuel flow rates. The results are presented below, and verify that the very tight construction of the FAB`s fan results in a significant decrease in off-cycle sensible heat losses. Tests were also performed on a center-flue water heater fired with a conventional retention-head burner and with an FAB. The tests conformed to DOE standard procedures for hot water heaters, and the results are discussed below.

  16. Acuity and case management: a healthy dose of outcomes, part III.

    PubMed

    Huber, Diane L; Craig, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This is the third of a 3-part series presenting 2 effective applications--acuity and dosage--that describe how the business case for case management (CM) can be made. In Part I, dosage and acuity concepts were explained as client need-severity, CM intervention-intensity, and CM activity-dose prescribed by amount, frequency, duration, and breadth of activities. Concepts were presented that related the practice of CM to the use of evidence-based practice (EBP), knowledge, and methods and the development of instruments that measure and score pivotal CM actions. Part I also featured a specific exemplar, the CM Acuity Tool, and described how to use acuity to identify and score the complexity of a CM case. Part II further explained dosage and 2 acuity instruments, the Acuity Tool and AccuDiff. Part III presents linkage to EBP and practical applications. The information contained in the 3-part series applies to all CM practice settings and contains ideas and recommendations useful to CM generalists, specialists, supervisors, and business and outcomes managers. The Acuity Tools Project was developed from frontline CM practice in one large, national telephonic CM company. Dosage: A literature search failed to find research into dosage of a behavioral intervention. The Huber-Hall model was developed and tested in a longitudinal study of CM models in substance abuse treatment and reported in the literature. Acuity: A structured literature search and needs assessment launched the development of the suite of acuity tools. A gap analysis identified that an instrument to assign and measure case acuity specific to CM activities was needed. Clinical experts, quality specialists, and business analysts (n = 7) monitored the development and testing of the tools, acuity concepts, scores, differentials, and their operating principles and evaluated the validity of the acuity tools' content related to CM activities. During the pilot phase of development, interrater reliability testing of

  17. Committee of the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics Geometry Conference, Part III: Geometric Transformation Groups and Other Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durst, Lincoln K., Ed.

    This is Part III of the first volume of the proceedings of the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM) Geometry Conference, held at Santa Barbara in June, 1967. The purpose of the conference was to consider the status of geometry in colleges at the undergraduate level. The conference, attended by undergraduate mathematics…

  18. [Investigation of biologically active compounds at the Department of Organic Chemistry of University of Debrecen 1992-2009. Part III].

    PubMed

    Antus, Sándor

    2010-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the beginning of the carbohydrate chemistry in Hungary with special regard to the results achieved at the Department of Organic Chemistry of University of Debrecen and summarizes the most important synthetic and pharmaceutical results obtained in this field between 1992-2009, part III.

  19. The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on nurse stress and burnout: a qualitative and quantitative study, part III.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Katz, Joanne; Wiley, Susan; Capuano, Terry; Baker, Debra M; Deitrick, Lynn; Shapiro, Shauna

    2005-01-01

    Part III of the study on mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) describes qualitative data and discusses the implications of the findings. Study analysis revealed that nurses found MBSR helpful. Greater relaxation and self-care and improvement in work and family relationships were among reported benefits. Challenges included restlessness, physical pain, and dealing with difficult emotions.

  20. Institute for High Heat Flux Removal (IHHFR). Phases I, II, and III

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    2014-08-31

    The IHHFR focused on interdisciplinary applications as it relates to high heat flux engineering issues and problems which arise due to engineering systems being miniaturized, optimized, or requiring increased high heat flux performance. The work in the IHHFR focused on water as a coolant and includes: (1) the development, design, and construction of the high heat flux flow loop and facility; (2) test section development, design, and fabrication; and, (3) single-side heat flux experiments to produce 2-D boiling curves and 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements for single-side heated test sections. This work provides data for comparisons with previously developed and new single-side heated correlations and approaches that address the single-side heated effect on heat transfer. In addition, this work includes the addition of single-side heated circular TS and a monoblock test section with a helical wire insert. Finally, the present work includes: (1) data base expansion for the monoblock with a helical wire insert (only for the latter geometry), (2) prediction and verification using finite element, (3) monoblock model and methodology development analyses, and (4) an alternate model development for a hypervapotron and related conjugate heat transfer controlling parameters.

  1. Prediction of residual stress and distortion from residual stress in heat treated and machined aluminum parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Robert

    Parts machined from relatively large thickness cross sections can experience significant deformations from high residual stresses that develop in the part during the heat treatment used to form the aluminum alloy. Uphill quenching is a process that can create a part with low residual stress and stable dimensions when the process is controlled properly. The uphill quenching process involves a solution heat treat, quench, cool to liquid nitrogen, steam blast, and then age to final temper. In this thesis two parts were modeled using ANSYS. The first part underwent the uphill quench process in the rough machined state. The second part was modeled in the stock material shape and only underwent a solution heat treat, quench, and age to final temper. After the residual stress in the second part was predicted the excess material was removed by killing the associated elements and the deformation of the final machined part was predicted. For both parts analyzed measurements were made and compared against predictions with fairly good results.

  2. A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part III: Radiative Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2001-08-01

    In Part III of a series of papers describing the extended time high-cloud observations from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) supporting the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment, the visible and infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds over Salt Lake City, Utah, are examined. Using {approx}860 h of combined ruby (0.694 {micro}m) lidar and midinfrared (9.5-11.5 {micro}m) radiometer data collected between 1992 and 1999 from visually identified cirrus clouds, the visible optical depths {tau} and infrared layer emittance epsilon of the varieties of midlatitude cirrus are characterized. The mean and median values for the cirrus sample are 0.75 {+-} 0.91 and 0.61 for {tau}, and 0.30 {+-} 0.22 and 0.25 for epsilon. Other scattering parameters studied are the visible extinction and infrared absorption coefficients, and their ratio, and the lidar backscatter-to-extinction ratio, which has a mean value of 0.041 sr{sup -1}. Differences among cirrus clouds generated by general synoptic (e.g., jet stream), thunderstorm anvil, and orographic mechanisms are found, reflecting basic cloud microphysical effects. The authors draw parameterizations in terms of midcloud temperature T{sub m} and physical cloud thickness {Delta}z for epsilon and {tau}: both macrophysical variables are needed to adequately address the impact of the adiabatic process on ice cloud content, which modulates radiative transfer as a function of temperature. For the total cirrus dataset, the authors find epsilon = 1 -exp [-8.5 x 10{sup -5} (T{sub m} + 80 C) {Delta}z]. These parameterizations, based on a uniquely comprehensive dataset, hold the potential for improving weather and climate model predictions, and satellite cloud property retrieval methods.

  3. Computation Method of Heat Loads in Cryogenic Parts of High Temperature Superconductor Synchronous Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taku, Seigo; Maki, Naoki

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) synchronous machines are expected to have higher efficiency and smaller size than normal conductor synchronous machines, and are being developed mainly in USA and Germany. This paper describes a computation method of heat loads in cryogenic parts of HTS synchronous machines, and the evaluation study results of heat loads in HTS synchronous motors for blowers, in which Bi-2223 are used at 30K, using the computation method. From the evaluated heat loads, the required capacity of the refrigerator for HTS synchronous machines may be determined.

  4. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation and Topological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-06-01

    A comprehensive numerical model has been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details of the model and results from the analysis of General Motors' prototype TEG were described in part I of the study. In part II of this study, parametric evaluations are considered to assess the influence of heat exchanger, geometry, and thermoelectric module configurations to achieve optimization of the baseline model. The computational tool is also adapted to model other topologies such as transverse and circular configurations (hexagonal and cylindrical) maintaining the same volume as the baseline TEG. Performance analysis of these different topologies and parameters is presented and compared with the baseline design.

  5. Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Je-Chin; Schobeiri, M.T.

    1995-12-31

    The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect of Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

  6. Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Je-Chin Han; Schobeiri, M.T.

    1995-10-01

    The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect on Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

  7. Heating and Ventilating III, 11-4. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Engineer School, Fort Belvoir, VA.

    This third course in a four-course series on heating and ventilating for the secondary/postsecondary level is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. The three lessons in the course cover these topics: (1) Warm-Air Heating, (2)…

  8. Association Between Health Symptoms and Particulate Matter from Traffic and Residential Heating − Results from RHINE III in Tartu

    PubMed Central

    Pindus, Mihkel; Orru, Hans; Maasikmets, Marek; Kaasik, Marko; Jõgi, Rain

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traffic and residential heating are the main sources of particulate matter (PM) in Northern Europe. Wood is widely used for residential heating and vehicle numbers are increasing. Besides traffic exhaust, studded tires produce road dust that is the main source of traffic-related PM10. Several studies have associated total PM mass with health symptoms; however there has been little research on the effects of PM from specific sources. Objective: To study the health effects resulting from traffic and local heating PM. Methods: Data on respiratory and cardiac diseases were collected within the framework of RHINE III (2011/2012) in Tartu, Estonia. Respondents’ geocoded home addresses were mapped in ArcGIS and linked with local heating-related PM2.5, traffic-related PM10 and total PM2.5 concentrations. Association between self-reported health and PM was assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: The annual mean modelled exposure for local heating PM2.5 was 2.3 μg/m3, for traffic PM10 3.3 μg/m3 and for all sources PM2.5 5.6 μg/m3. We found relationship between traffic induced PM10 as well as all sources induced PM2.5 with cardiac disease, OR=1.45 (95% CI 1.06−1.93) and 1.42 (95% CI 1.02−1.95), respectively. However, we did not find any significant association between residential heating induced particles and self-reported health symptoms. People with longer and better confirmed exposure period were also significantly associated with traffic induced PM10, all sources induced PM2.5 and cardiac diseases. Conclusion: Traffic-related PM10 and all sources induced PM2.5 associated with cardiac disease; whereas residential heating induced particles did not. PMID:27843509

  9. Association Between Health Symptoms and Particulate Matter from Traffic and Residential Heating - Results from RHINE III in Tartu.

    PubMed

    Pindus, Mihkel; Orru, Hans; Maasikmets, Marek; Kaasik, Marko; Jõgi, Rain

    2016-01-01

    Traffic and residential heating are the main sources of particulate matter (PM) in Northern Europe. Wood is widely used for residential heating and vehicle numbers are increasing. Besides traffic exhaust, studded tires produce road dust that is the main source of traffic-related PM10. Several studies have associated total PM mass with health symptoms; however there has been little research on the effects of PM from specific sources. To study the health effects resulting from traffic and local heating PM. Data on respiratory and cardiac diseases were collected within the framework of RHINE III (2011/2012) in Tartu, Estonia. Respondents' geocoded home addresses were mapped in ArcGIS and linked with local heating-related PM2.5, traffic-related PM10 and total PM2.5 concentrations. Association between self-reported health and PM was assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis. The annual mean modelled exposure for local heating PM2.5 was 2.3 μg/m(3), for traffic PM10 3.3 μg/m(3) and for all sources PM2.5 5.6 μg/m(3). We found relationship between traffic induced PM10 as well as all sources induced PM2.5 with cardiac disease, OR=1.45 (95% CI 1.06-1.93) and 1.42 (95% CI 1.02-1.95), respectively. However, we did not find any significant association between residential heating induced particles and self-reported health symptoms. People with longer and better confirmed exposure period were also significantly associated with traffic induced PM10, all sources induced PM2.5 and cardiac diseases. Traffic-related PM10 and all sources induced PM2.5 associated with cardiac disease; whereas residential heating induced particles did not.

  10. A&M. Radioactive parts security storage area, heat removal storage casks. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Radioactive parts security storage area, heat removal storage casks. Plan, section, and details. Ralph M. Parsons 1480-7 ANP/GE-3-720-S-1. Date: November 1958. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index no. 034-0720-60-693-107459 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. 16 CFR Appendix D5 to Part 305 - Water Heaters-Heat Pump

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Water Heaters-Heat Pump D5 Appendix D5 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE CONCERNING DISCLOSURES REGARDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND WATER USE OF CERTAIN HOME APPLIANCES AND OTHER PRODUCTS REQUIRED UNDER THE ENERGY POLICY...

  12. Mixed-convective, conjugate heat transfer during molten salt quenching of small parts

    SciTech Connect

    Chenoweth, D.R.

    1997-02-01

    It is common in free quenching immersion heat treatment calculations to locally apply constant or surface-averaged heat-transfer coefficients obtained from either free or forced steady convection over simple shapes with small temperature differences from the ambient fluid. This procedure avoids the solution of highly transient, non-Boussinesq conjugate heat transfer problems which often involve mixed convection, but it leaves great uncertainty about the general adequacy of the results. In this paper we demonstrate for small parts (dimensions of the order of inches rather than feet) quenched in molten salt, that it is feasible to calculate such nonuniform surface heat transfer from first principles without adjustable empirical parameters. We use literature physical property salt data from the separate publications of Kirst et al., Nissen, Carling, and Teja, et al. for T<1000 F, and then extrapolate it to the initial part temperature. The reported thermal/chemical breakdown of NaNO{sub 2} for T>800 F is not considered to be important due to the short time the surface temperature exceeds that value for small parts. Similarly, for small parts, the local Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers are below the corresponding critical values for most if not all of the quench, so that we see no evidence of the existence of significant turbulence effects, only some large scale unsteadiness for brief periods. The experimental data comparisons from the open literature include some probe cooling-rate results of Foreman, as well as some cylinder thermal histories of Howes.

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rounds to 15 mi./gal1 1 The model type fuel economy values rounded to the nearest mile per gallon, are... Vehicle config. sales Ajax 1 M-4 3500 2.73 16.1001 16 15,000 Ajax 2 A-3 3500 2.56 15.9020 16 35,000 Boredom III 4 M-4 4000 3.08 14.2343 14 10,000 Ajax 3 M-4 4000 3.36 15.0000 15 15,000 Boredom III 8...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rounds to 15 mi./gal1 1 The model type fuel economy values rounded to the nearest mile per gallon, are... Vehicle config. sales Ajax 1 M-4 3500 2.73 16.1001 16 15,000 Ajax 2 A-3 3500 2.56 15.9020 16 35,000 Boredom III 4 M-4 4000 3.08 14.2343 14 10,000 Ajax 3 M-4 4000 3.36 15.0000 15 15,000 Boredom III 8...

  15. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part III. Determining which practices are most effective and installing materials

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    The training program is designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic manual. Subjects covered in Part III are: determining which practices are most efficient and economical; installing energy-saving materials; and improving efficiency of equipment.

  16. Technical Reports (Part I). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information Systems of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center (WN-REC) funded by a Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant. These reports describe methods of interpreting the printouts from the Student Information System;…

  17. Water Ingestion into Axial Flow Compressors. Part III. Experimental Results and Discussion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    specifications, or other data, is not to be re- garded by implication or otherwise as in any manner licensing the holder or any other person or corporation , or...arises a large change In gas phase and liquid phase (a) mass flow and (b) temperatura and also a change in gas phase composition. In regime (iii) one

  18. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Appendix III: (1) Percent power means the percentage of the maximum power achieved at Maximum Test Speed (or at Maximum Test Torque for constant-speed engines). (2) Percent speed means the percentage of Maximum Test Speed. (b) Figure 1 of this Appendix illustrates the default NTE zone for commercial marine...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Appendix III: (1) Percent power means the percentage of the maximum power achieved at Maximum Test Speed (or at Maximum Test Torque for constant-speed engines). (2) Percent speed means the percentage of Maximum Test Speed. (b) Figure 1 of this Appendix illustrates the default NTE zone for commercial marine...

  20. Heat shock factor 1 binds to and transcribes satellite II and III sequences at several pericentromeric regions in heat-shocked cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eymery, Angeline; Souchier, Catherine; Vourc'h, Claire; Jolly, Caroline

    2010-07-01

    Cells respond to stress by activating the synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) which protect the cells against the deleterious effects of stress. This mechanism is controlled by the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). In parallel to HSP gene transcription, in human cells, HSF1 also binds to and transcribes satellite III repeated sequences present in numerous copies in the 9q12 pericentromeric region of chromosome 9. These HSF1 accumulation sites are termed nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). In tumor cells, however, the number of nSBs is higher than the number of 9q12 copies, suggesting the existence of other HSF1 targets. In this paper, we were interested in characterizing these other HSF1 binding sites. We show that HSF1 indeed binds to the pericentromeric region of 14 chromosomes, thereby directing the formation of 'secondary nSBs'. The appearance of secondary nSBs depends on the number of satellite sequences present in the target locus, and on the cellular amount of HSF1 protein. Moreover, secondary nSBs also correspond to transcription sites, thus demonstrating that heat shock induces a genome-wide transcription of satellite sequences. Finally, by analyzing published transcriptomic data, we show that the derepression of these large heterochromatic blocks does not significantly affect the transcription of neighboring genes.

  1. Heat Wave Tendency in the Western Part of Turkey and Its Relation to Circulation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagatan, Kazim; Unal, Yurdanur

    2010-05-01

    Climate change is one of the most important global issues today due to the rapid increase in greenhouse gasses as a result of industrialization. As a result of changes of climate system components, extreme variations in temperature, humidity and precipitation occur. Since more extreme events such as extreme precipitation and temperature, droughts, flood and heat waves can have catastrophic consequences, forecasting and detailed understanding of the impact of these variations are crucial for the human being. In order to detect climate change impact, this study focuses on heat waves in the western part of Turkey between 1975 and 2006 period. In this study, the selected region lies west of 30o longitude over Turkey, and the heat waves and their frequency are determined for the months April to October (7 months) between years of 1975 and 2006 on 32 stations located on the western part of Turkey. A certain day is accepted as an extreme day when maximum temperature is above the 85 percentile. Only those days in which maximum temperature exceeds the score of the 85th percentile are counted to build the series representative of heat wave counts in a year. Temperature is combined with humidity and apparent temperature is found for each day for each station. Then the same procedure is repeated for apparent temperature for 32 stations in the period of 32 years. 85% threshold values for temperature are taken as a lower limit for each station, and then heat waves are determined in the time interval between 1975 and 2006 by imposing a constraint such that extreme temperatures prevail at least for three consecutive days. It is found that in the western part of Turkey, 85% values go beyond 30oC except in the region along the Bosporus since channelling effect along the Bosporus and latitudinal solar radiation variations are controlling factors of daily maximum temperatures. For warm days, general average of relative humidity changes around 60% for this region. Finally, 85

  2. Increased immunogenicity is an integral part of the heat shock response following renal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bidmon, Bettina; Kratochwill, Klaus; Rusai, Krisztina; Kuster, Lilian; Herzog, Rebecca; Eickelberg, Oliver; Aufricht, Christoph

    2012-05-01

    Renal ischemia increases tubular immunogenicity predisposing to increased risk of kidney allograft rejection. Ischemia-reperfusion not only disrupts cellular homeostasis but also induces the cytoprotective heat shock response that also plays a major role in cellular immune and defense processes. This study therefore tested the hypothesis that upregulation of renal tubular immunogenicity is an integral part of the heat shock response after renal ischemia. Expressions of 70 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were assessed in normal rat kidney (NRK) cells following ATP depletion (antimycin A for 3 h) and heat (42°C for 24 h). In vitro, transient Hsp70 transfection and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) transcription factor decoy treatment were performed. In vivo, ischemic renal cortex was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats following unilateral renal artery clamping for 45 min and 24 h recovery. Upregulation of Hsp70 was closely and significantly correlated with upregulation of MHC class II and/or ICAM-1 following ATP depletion and heat injury. Bioinformatics analysis searching the TRANSFAC database predicted HSF-1 binding sites in these genes. HSF-1 decoy significantly reduced the expression of immunogenicity markers in stressed NRK cells. In the in vivo rat model of renal ischemia, concordant upregulation of MHC class II molecules and Hsp70 suggests biological relevance of this link. The results demonstrate that upregulation of renal tubular immunogenicity is an integral part of the heat shock response after renal ischemia. Bioinformatic analysis predicted a molecular link to tubular immunogenicity at the level of the transcription factor HSF-1 that was experimentally verified by HSF-1 decoy treatment. Future studies in HSF-1 knockout mice are needed.

  3. HEAT: High accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry. III. Additional improvements and overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, M. E.; Vazquez, J.; Ruscic, B.; Wilson, A. K.; Gauss, J.; Stanton, J. F.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. t Mainz; The Univ. of Texas; Univ. of North Texas

    2008-01-01

    Effects of increased basis-set size as well as a correlated treatment of the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer approximation are studied within the context of the high-accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry (HEAT) theoretical model chemistry. It is found that the addition of these ostensible improvements does little to increase the overall accuracy of HEAT for the determination of molecular atomization energies. Fortuitous cancellation of high-level effects is shown to give the overall HEAT strategy an accuracy that is, in fact, higher than most of its individual components. In addition, the issue of core-valence electron correlation separation is explored; it is found that approximate additive treatments of the two effects have limitations that are significant in the realm of <1 kJ mol{sup -1} theoretical thermochemistry.

  4. Reduction of Iron-Oxide-Carbon Composites: Part III. Shrinkage of Composite Pellets during Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  5. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part III. Shrinkage of composite pellets during reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  6. [Study of chemical constituents in active parts of Mentha spicata III].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Tong; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Zheng, Jian; Wu, Bin; Yang, Xiao-Ke; Wu, Li-Jun

    2006-04-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Mentha spicata. The chemical constituents were isolated by silica gel column chromatography, and identified by physical and chemical characters and spectroscopic analysis. Compounds I - V were obtained and their structures were elucidated as protocatechuic aldehyde (I), protocatechuic acid (II), chrysoeriol (III), 5, 6-dihydroxy-7, 8, 3', 4'-tetramethoxyflavone (IV), nodifloretin (V). Compound I and II were first isolated from the genus Mentha. Compound Ill, IV and V were isolated from M. spicata for the first time.

  7. Electron-cyclotron-heating results on JFT-2, and their implications for the Doublet III ECH design

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Moeller, C.P.

    1982-03-01

    Electron cyclotron heating experiments are described in which 28 GHz microwave power is injected into the JFT-2 tokamak. Ordinary mode power injected from the low field side increased the central electron temperature from 600 eV to 1000 eV with 110 kW, for densities below the ordinary mode cutoff density of 1.0 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/. Extraordinary mode power launched obliquely from the high field side increased the temperature from 600 eV to 1200 eV with 85 kW, for densities well below the extraordinary mode cutoff density, and effective heating was maintained close to the cutoff density of 1.6 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/. The extraordinary mode launched obliquely was also found to heat more efficiently and to a higher density than the extraordinary wave launched perpendicularly. On this basis, the Doublet III ECH experiments which will use up to 2 MW of 60 GHz power are designed to make use of oblique inside launch of a pure extraordinary mode. The waveguide transmission system to accomplish this is discussed.

  8. Thermal conductance and basal metabolic rate are part of a coordinated system for heat transfer regulation

    PubMed Central

    Naya, Daniel E.; Spangenberg, Lucía; Naya, Hugo; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Thermal conductance measures the ease with which heat leaves or enters  an organism's body. Although the analysis of this physiological variable in relation to climatic and ecological factors can be traced to studies by Scholander and colleagues, only small advances have occurred ever since. Here, we analyse the relationship between minimal thermal conductance estimated during summer (Cmin) and several ecological, climatic and geographical factors for 127 rodent species, in order to identify the exogenous factors that have potentially affected the evolution of thermal conductance. In addition, we evaluate whether there is compensation between Cmin and basal metabolic rate (BMR)—in such a way that a scale-invariant ratio between both variables is equal to one—as could be expected from the Scholander–Irving model of heat transfer. Our major findings are (i) annual mean temperature is the best single predictor of mass-independent Cmin. (ii) After controlling for the effect of body mass, there is a strong positive correlation between log10 (Cmin) and log10 (BMR). Further, the slope of this correlation is close to one, indicating an almost perfect compensation between both physiological variables. (iii) Structural equation modelling indicated that Cmin values are adjusted to BMR values and not the other way around. Thus, our results strongly suggest that BMR and thermal conductance integrate a coordinated system for heat regulation in endothermic animals and that summer conductance values are adjusted (in an evolutionary sense) to track changes in BMRs. PMID:23902915

  9. An International Round-Robin Study, Part II: Thermal Diffusivity, Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Bottner, Harold; Konig, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolett, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Partricia; Sharp, J; Lo, Jason; Keinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo I.

    2013-01-01

    For bulk thermoelectrics, figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In recent years, the most significant improvements in ZT were mainly due to successful reduction of thermal conductivity. However, thermal conductivity cannot be measured directly at high temperatures. The combined measurements of thermal diffusivity and specific heat and density are required. It has been shown that thermal conductivity is the property with the greatest uncertainty and has a direct influence on the accuracy of the figure of merit. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) has conducted two international round-robins since 2009. This paper is Part II of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk bismuth telluride. The main focuses in Part II are on thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity.

  10. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  11. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  12. A Study of Scrap Heating by Burners: Part II—Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Kamalesh; Irons, Gordon A.

    2013-02-01

    A computational fluid dynamics code was developed to model the heating of a bed of porous steel scrap by combustion gases from a burner. The code accounted for nonuniform void fraction in the bed; turbulent, non-Darcian flow, heat transfer from the gas to the scrap; and radiation. The measured bed porosity values were used in the code. Because steel scrap pieces are very irregular in shape and size, the effective particle diameter was fitted to measurements made in a 1-m3 capacity furnace, as reported in part I. It was found that the lower porosity of the scrap was the most beneficial in increasing the efficiency of heat transfer to the scrap bed because the interfacial area is larger. The effect of particle size was much smaller. It was found that the configurations that increased the residence time or path length of the gases increased the efficiency. The measured porosity of the bed approached unity at the walls, so this provided an easy path for the gas to short-circuit the bed, which limited the effectiveness of decreasing the porosity to increase heat-transfer efficiency. Similarly, simulations of nonuniform scrap distributions reduced efficiency of heat transfer due to short circuiting. The implications of the findings for industrial operations are discussed.

  13. Are plastic heat exchangers feasible for solar water heaters? Part 2: Material choices

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R.; Mantell, S.; Davidson, J.

    1999-07-01

    Development of low cost plastic heat exchangers for solar water heating depends, at least in part, on the suitability of polymers for this demanding environment. Since the heat exchanger is in contact with pressurized potable water, some technical issues must be addressed that are not necessarily relevant to the development of polymer-based collectors. These include long-term pressure and temperature capabilities; compatibility with municipal drinking water and propylene glycol, and compliance with applicable plumbing codes. In this paper, polymers that are most appropriate for this application are identified. Because polymer strength, stiffness, and thermal conductivity requirements depend on the heat exchanger design, no single polymer emerged as ideal for every heat exchanger component. Fiber reinforced PolyPhthalAmide (PPA) and PolyPhenylene Sulphide (PPS) are recommended for fittings and manifolds. Unreinforced high temperature nylon (HTN) is recommended for thin walled tubes (either straight or coiled). Cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) is also recommended for coiled tubes. The selection process was based on three criteria levels: (1) polymer compatibility with potable water, (2) polymer behavior in hot water or propylene glycol, and (3) polymer attributes such as strength, stiffness, thermal conductivity and cost.

  14. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part III. Game Design as a Collaborative Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this three part series, four professors who teach graduate level courses on the design of instructional video games discuss their perspectives on preparing instructional designers to optimize game-based learning. Part I set the context for the series and one of four panelists discussed what he believes instructional designers should know about…

  15. Behind the scene with the fathead team: Part III. Molecular, biochemical, and in vitro analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a research team focused on aquatic toxicity testing using fathead minnows as a model species, this presentation is the third in the three-part series, giving an overview of the types of field and laboratory studies as well as sample processing our team conducts at the ...

  16. Pre-Career Curriculum Guide for Deaf-Blind. Parts I-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, LaVernya K.; And Others

    The two-volume document provides a pre-career curriculum guide for professionals and teachers working with deaf-blind students. Part 1 contains professionals and teachers working with deaf-blind students. Part I contains introductory information. Pointed out is the void in providing adequate programs for deaf-blind students over the age of 10.…

  17. Basic Metrics--Part I, II and III. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyes, Joan

    Individualized classroom activities for use in learning centers to teach junior and senior high school students about the metric system are provided. The activities are organized into three sequential parts, each of which takes from four to six hours to complete. There is a teacher's guide and a student booklet for each part. The teachers' guides…

  18. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part III. Game Design as a Collaborative Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this three part series, four professors who teach graduate level courses on the design of instructional video games discuss their perspectives on preparing instructional designers to optimize game-based learning. Part I set the context for the series and one of four panelists discussed what he believes instructional designers should know about…

  19. Basic Metrics--Part I, II and III. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyes, Joan

    Individualized classroom activities for use in learning centers to teach junior and senior high school students about the metric system are provided. The activities are organized into three sequential parts, each of which takes from four to six hours to complete. There is a teacher's guide and a student booklet for each part. The teachers' guides…

  20. Pre-Career Curriculum Guide for Deaf-Blind. Parts I-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, LaVernya K.; And Others

    The two-volume document provides a pre-career curriculum guide for professionals and teachers working with deaf-blind students. Part 1 contains professionals and teachers working with deaf-blind students. Part I contains introductory information. Pointed out is the void in providing adequate programs for deaf-blind students over the age of 10.…

  1. User Feedback Procedures; Part III of Scientific Report No. ISR-18, Information Storage and Retrieval...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Dept. of Computer Science.

    Part Three of this five part report on Salton's Magical Automatic Retriever of Texts (SMART) project contains four papers. The first: "Variations on the Query Splitting Technique with Relevance Feedback" by T. P. Baker discusses some experiments in relevance feedback performed with variations on the technique of query splitting. The…

  2. Behind the scene with the fathead team: Part III. Molecular, biochemical, and in vitro analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a research team focused on aquatic toxicity testing using fathead minnows as a model species, this presentation is the third in the three-part series, giving an overview of the types of field and laboratory studies as well as sample processing our team conducts at the ...

  3. CONTEMPORARY ARABIC READERS--III. FORMAL ARABIC, PART 2. NOTES AND GLOSSARIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCARUS, ERNEST N.; AND OTHERS

    THIS COMPANION BOOK TO "FORMAL ARABIC, PART 1" CONTAINS THE GRAMMATICAL NOTES AND AN INDIVIDUAL VOCABULARY LISTING FOR EACH OF THE 26 SELECTIONS INCLUDED IN "PART 1." ALL WORDS ARE GLOSSED EXCEPT FOR THE FIRST 500 WORDS OF LANDAU'S "A WORD COUNT OF MODERN ARABIC PROSE," AMERICAN COUNCIL OF LEARNED SOCIETIES, NEW YORK,…

  4. English as a Second Language Resource Manual, Volume III, Part Two. Supplement 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC.

    This is the second part of a two-part volume of supplementary materials intended for use in the Department of State's Intensive English as a Second Language, Cultural Orientation, and Pre-Employment Training Program for United States-bound Southeast Asian refugees. It contains classroom activities developed for the English as a second language…

  5. Land-Grant College Education, 1910 to 1920. Part III: Agriculture. Bulletin, 1925, No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, C. John, Ed.

    1925-01-01

    This bulletin represents the third of a 5-part survey of land-grant college education. Other parts are: (1) History and Educational Objectives of Land-Grant College Education; (2) The Liberal Arts and Sciences and Miscellaneous Subjects in Land-Grant Colleges; (4) Engineering and Mechanic Arts in Land-Grant Colleges; and (5) Home Economics in…

  6. Effect of two-scale roughness on boundary layer transition over a heated flat plate: Part 1 -- Surface heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pinson, M.W.; Wang, T.

    2000-04-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate surface heat transfer and boundary layer development associated with flow over a flat test surface covered with two roughness scales. Two-scale roughness was used because in-service aeroengines commonly display larger roughness concentrated at the leading edge with smaller roughness distributed downstream. The first scale, covering up to the first 5 cm of the test surface, was in the form of a sandpaper strip, an aluminum strip, or a cylinder. The second roughness scale covered the remainder of the test surface (2 m) in the form of sandpaper or a smooth surface. In Part 1, the surface heat transfer results are examined. Even though the roughness scales were hydraulically smooth, they induced significantly earlier transition onset, with the two-dimensional roughness causing earlier transition than three-dimensional roughness. All of the rough/smooth cases unexpectedly triggered earlier transition than rough/rough cases. This indicated that the scale of the step-change at the joint between two roughness scales was predominant over the downstream roughness on inducing early transition. Reducing the overall height of the step change was shown to have a greater effect on transition than the specific geometry of the roughness scale.

  7. Active Control of Low-Speed Fan Tonal Noise Using Actuators Mounted in Stator Vanes: Part III Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Remington, Paul J.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    A test program to demonstrate simplification of Active Noise Control (ANC) systems relative to standard techniques was performed on the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan from May through September 2001. The target mode was the m = 2 circumferential mode generated by the rotor-stator interaction at 2BPF. Seven radials (combined inlet and exhaust) were present at this condition. Several different error-sensing strategies were implemented. Integration of the error-sensors with passive treatment was investigated. These were: (i) an in-duct linear axial array, (ii) an induct steering array, (iii) a pylon-mounted array, and (iv) a near-field boom array. The effect of incorporating passive treatment was investigated as well as reducing the actuator count. These simplified systems were compared to a fully ANC specified system. Modal data acquired using the Rotating Rake are presented for a range of corrected fan rpm. Simplified control has been demonstrated to be possible but requires a well-known and dominant mode signature. The documented results here in are part III of a three-part series of reports with the same base title. Part I and II document the control system and error-sensing design and implementation.

  8. History of Lung Diseases of Coal Miners in Great BritainPART III, 1920-1952*

    PubMed Central

    Meiklejohn, Andrew

    1952-01-01

    All sciences are connected; they lend each other material aid as parts of one great whole, each doing its own work not for itself alone but for the other parts, as the eye guides the whole body and the foot sustains it and leads it from place to place. As with an eye torn out or a foot cut off, so it is with the different departments of knowledge; none can attain its proper result separately, since all are parts of one and the same complete wisdom. ROGER BACON (1214-1294). PMID:14944741

  9. Influence of mold surface temperature on polymer part warpage in rapid heat cycle molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, G. R.; Pacher, G. A.; Pichler, A.; Friesenbichler, W.; Gruber, D. P.

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic mold surface temperature control was examined for its influence on the warpage. A test mold, featuring two different rapid heat cycle molding (RHCM) technologies was used to manufacture complex plate-shaped parts having different ribs, varying thin-wall regions, and both, circular and rectangular cut-outs. The mold's nozzle side is equipped with the areal heating and cooling technology BFMOLD®, where the heating/cooling channels are replaced by a ball-filled slot near the cavity surface flooded through with hot and cold water sequentially. Two local electrical ceramic heating elements are installed into the mold's ejection side. Based on a 23 full-factorial design of experiments (DoE) plan, varying nozzle temperature (Tnozzle), rapid heat cycle molding temperature (TRHCM) and holding pressure (pn), specimens of POM were manufactured systematically. Five specimens were examined per DoE run. The resulting warpage was measured at 6 surface line scans per part using the non-contact confocal topography system FRT MicroProf®. Two warpage parameters were calculated, the curvature of a 2nd order approximation a, and the vertical deflection at the profile center d. Both, the influence strength and the acting direction of the process parameters and their interactions on a and d were calculated by statistical analysis. Linear mathematical process models were determined for a and d to predict the warpage as a function of the process parameter settings. Finally, an optimum process setting was predicted, based on the process models and Microsoft Excel GRG solver. Clear and significant influences of TRHCM, pn, Tnozzle, and the interaction of TRHCM and pn were determined. While TRHCM was dominant close to the gate, pn became more effective as the flow length increased.

  10. Chromium(III) nanoparticles affect hormone and immune responses in heat-stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Zha, Longying; Zeng, Jingwen; Sun, Suxia; Deng, Hong; Luo, Haiji; Li, Wanli

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of chromium nanoparticles (CrNano) on the hormone and immune responses of rats in heat stress condition. A total of 80 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four dietary treatment groups (n = 20). The first group was offered a basal diet as a control. The second, third, and fourth groups received basal diet supplemented with 150, 300, and 450 microg/kg Cr, respectively, in the form of CrNano. At the end of the 8-week trial, growth performance, food utilization, and sera concentrations of hormones, immunoglobulins, and alexins were determined. Lymphocyte proliferation activity, antibody response to injected sheep red blood cells (SRBCs), and phagocytosis of peritoneal macrophages were determined by (3)H-thymidine uptake method, plaque-forming cells (PFC) assay, and ingesting chicken red blood cells test, respectively. The results indicated that rats that received CrNano exhibited no changes in growth rate and food efficiency compared to the control group. However, dietary supplementation of 150, 300, and 450 microg/kg Cr from CrNano significantly decreased serum concentrations of insulin and cortisol, increased sera levels of insulin-like growth factor I and immunoglobulin G, and enhanced the lymphoproliferative response, anti-SRBC PFC response, and phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages. These results suggest that dietary supplementation of Cr as CrNano affects hormone and immune status in heat-stressed rats.

  11. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  12. Preliminary energy sector assessments of Jamaica. Volume III: renewable energy. Part II: solar energy - agricultural

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The study is concerned with the use of solar heat for drying agricultural products (crops, timber, and fish). The study finds that Jamaica has an ideal climate for solar agricultural product drying with the following methods offering the greatest promise; sun drying using open barbeques; drying in transparent buildings (with or without attached collectors) for small operations; new drying systems using solar air heaters with forced air drying; preheating air for existing commercial fossil-fueled dryers; and fish drying via chemical dehydration with solar regeneration of the chemical. The primary needs are to develop and construct environmentally suitable solar dryers and to train engineers in solar system design and installation.

  13. Elementary heating events - magnetic interactions between two flux sources. III. Energy considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galsgaard, K.; Parnell, C. E.

    2005-08-01

    The magnetic field plays a crucial role in heating the solar corona - this has been known for many years - but the exact energy release mechanism(s) is(are) still unknown. Here, we investigate in detail, using resistive, non-ideal, MHD models, the process of magnetic energy release in a situation where two initially independent flux systems are forced into each other. Work done by the foot point motions goes into building a current sheet in which magnetic reconnection releases some of the free magnetic energy leading to magnetic connectivity changes. The scaling relations of the energy input and output are determined as functions of the driving velocity and the strength of fluxes in the independent flux systems. In particular, it is found that the energy injected into the system is proportional to the distance travelled. Similarly, the rate of Joule dissipation is related to the distance travelled. Hence, rapidly driven foot points lead to bright, intense, but short-lived events, whilst slowly driven foot points produce weaker, but longer-lived brightenings. Integrated over the lifetime of the events both would produce the same heating if all other factors were the same. A strong overlying field has the effect of creating compact flux lobes from the sources. These appear to lead to a more rapid injection of energy, as well as a more rapid release of energy. Thus, the stronger the overlying field the more compact and more intense the heating. This means observers need to know not only the flux of the magnetic fragments involved in an event, but also their rate and direction of movement, as well as the strength and orientation of the surrounding field to be able to predict the energy dissipated. Furthermore, it is found that rough estimates of the available energy can be obtained from simple models, starting from initial potential situations, but that the time scale for the energy release and, therefore its impact on the coronal plasma, can only be determined from

  14. Chromospheric heating by acoustic shocks - A confrontation of GHRS observations of Alpha Tauri (K5 III) with ab initio calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, P. G.; Cuntz, M.

    1993-01-01

    We compare ab initio calculations of semiforbidden C II line profiles near 2325 A with recently published observations of the inactive red giant Alpha Tau (K5 III) obtained using the GHRS on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our one-dimensional, time-dependent calculations assume that the chromosphere is heated by stochastic acoustic shocks generated by photospheric convection. We calculate various models using results from traditional (mixing length) convection zone calculations as input to hydrodynamical models. The semiforbidden C II line profiles and ratios provide sensitive diagnostics of chromospheric velocity fields, electron densities, and temperatures. We identify major differences between observed and computed line profiles which are related to basic gas dynamics and which are probably not due to technical modeling restrictions. If the GHRS observations are representative of chromospheric conditions at all epochs, then one (or more) of our model assumptions must be incorrect. Several possibilities are examined. We predict time variability of semiforbidden C II lines for comparison with observations. Based upon data from the IUE archives, we argue that photospheric motions associated with supergranulation or global pulsation modes are unimportant in heating the chromosphere of Alpha Tau.

  15. Current Status of Biomedical Book Reviewing: Part III. Duplication Patterns in Biomedical Book Reviewing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-chih

    1974-01-01

    This is the third part of a comprehensive, quantitative study of biomedical book reviewing. The data base of the total project was built from statistics of 3,347 reviews of 2,067 biomedical books appearing in all 1970 issues of fifty-four reviewing journals. This part of the study explores the duplication patterns in book reviewing among these media. It is found that 35.17% (727 books) of the 2,067 titles were reviewed more than once in 1970, these titles accounting for 2,007 of the total of 3,347 reviews. For the most part, reviews of the most frequently reviewed titles appeared in such journals as British Medical Journal, Annals of Internal Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, and New England Journal of Medicine. These five journals covered 93.53% of the 727 books reviewed more than once in 1970. PMID:4471577

  16. Mathematical modeling of the heat treatment and combustion of a coal particle. III. Volatile escape stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkhjargal, Kh.; Salomatov, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    The present paper is a continuation of previous publications of the authors in this journal in which two phases of the multistage process of combustion of a coal particle were considered in detail with the help of mathematical modeling: its radiation-convection heating and drying. In the present work, the escape dynamics of volatiles is investigated. The physico-mathematical model of the thermodestruction of an individual coal particle with a dominant influence of endothermal effects has been formulated. Approximate-analytical solutions of this model that are of paramount importance for detailed analysis of the influence of the physical and regime parameters on the escape dynamics of volatiles have been found. The results obtained form the basis for engineering calculations of the volatile escape stage and can be used successfully in the search for effective regimes of burning of various solid fuels, in particular, Shivé-Ovoos coal of Mongolia.

  17. Cardiac electrophysiological experiments in numero, Part III: Simulation of arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    Malik, M; Camm, A J

    1991-12-01

    This paper is the third and final part of a series of articles reviewing mathematical and computer models of the electrophysiological processes. This section reviews the arrhythmia simulation and discusses models of arrhythmogenic processes, fibrillation and defibrillation, and of heart-pacemaker interaction. The models of arrhythmogenesis are classified into three main sections: models of reentry and vortex reentry, models of myocardial electrotonic interactions, and models of macroreentrant supraventricular tachycardias. This final part of the review discusses the future potential of mathematical and computer models of different cardiac processes.

  18. Doublet III Neutral Beam Heating Project: Final report for the period FY78 through FY81

    SciTech Connect

    Colleraine, A.

    1987-05-01

    The Neutral Beam Project final scope of work consisted of procurement, fabrication, assembly, test, and installation of two neutral beam injection systems for the DIII machine. One of these NBIS was installed and operated at the 210/sup 0/ location; the second was placed at the 330/sup 0/ location. The Doublet III Neutral Beam Administrative Plan defined the technical, cost, and schedule requirements necessary to achieve the program objectives. These requirements are presented in the form of Baseline Definitions: Technical, Cost, Schedule which are contained in this Administrative Plan. These Baselines formed the basis for control of not only the overall program but of each major participant. GA, LBL, and TRW were assigned specific scopes of work within the Baselines to be accomplished in order to meet the overall program objectives. To accomplish these work scopes, GA, LBL, and TRW each established within their own project organization, a system for controlling and accomplishing work which is compatible with and complementary to the overall management system at GA. 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Mathematics Through Science, Part III: An Experimental Approach to Functions. Teacher's Commentary. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Elroy J., Jr.; And Others

    The purpose of this project is to teach learning and understanding of mathematics at the ninth grade level through the use of science experiments. This part of the program contains significant amounts of material normally found in a beginning algebra class. The material should be found useful for classes in general mathematics as a preparation for…

  20. Providing for Energy Efficiency in Homes and Small Buildings, Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Vocational Instructional Materials, Athens, GA.

    Presented is part three of a training program designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy efficient buildings. Alternatives are provided in this program to allow for specific instruction in…

  1. Photophysical Study of a Series of Cyanines Part III. The Direct Photooxidation Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepaja, Shukri; Strub, Henry; Lougnot, Daniel-Joseph

    1983-01-01

    The main degradative pathway of tricarbocyanine dyes in aerated solutions is demonstrated to be a photooxidation; using sensitization techniques and specific quenchers, this reaction is established to proceed via singlet oxygen for a part, and the site at which this species attacks the polymethinic skeleton is unambiguously determined. The major photoproduct is identified as being 1,3,3-trimethyl-2-indolinone.

  2. Wetlands & Wildlife: Alaska Wildlife Curriculum Teacher Information Manual, Parts I-II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigman, Marilyn; And Others

    This document consists of a teacher manual and a set of information cards. The teacher manual is designed to educate Alaskan students about the important functions of Alaska's wetlands and about the fish and wildlife that live there. Part I of the manual explores Alaska's wetland habitats, the plants and animals that live there, and the…

  3. Helping Students with Recursion: Teaching Strategies. Part III: Teaching Students about Embedded Recursion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riordon, Tim

    1984-01-01

    Describes activities designed to teach students about embedded recursion. Topics cover providing intuitions about embedded recursions, predicting embedded recursions, seeing patterns and processes, presenting graphic designs containing embedded copies of themselves, and exploring graphics, numerical, and word examples. Parts I and II are in…

  4. Beyond the Evident Content Goals Part III. An Undercurrent-Enhanced Approach to Trigonometric Identities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugdale, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    The third in a series of 3 articles, a study of 30 students was conducted to test the effect of restructuring a unit on trigonometric identities around microcomputer activities based on the themes of educational undercurrents identified in Part II. Experimental-group students scored significantly higher relating trigonometric functions to their…

  5. Beyond the Evident Content Goals Part III. An Undercurrent-Enhanced Approach to Trigonometric Identities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugdale, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    The third in a series of 3 articles, a study of 30 students was conducted to test the effect of restructuring a unit on trigonometric identities around microcomputer activities based on the themes of educational undercurrents identified in Part II. Experimental-group students scored significantly higher relating trigonometric functions to their…

  6. 48 CFR 14.201-4 - Part III-Documents, exhibits, and other attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., exhibits, and other attachments. 14.201-4 Section 14.201-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Part III—Documents, exhibits, and other attachments. Section J, List of documents, exhibits, and other attachments. The contracting officer shall list the title, date, and number of pages for each...

  7. 48 CFR 15.204-4 - Part III-List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Exhibits, and Other Attachments. 15.204-4 Section 15.204-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Receipt of Proposals and Information 15.204-4 Part III—List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments. Section J, List of attachments. The contracting officer shall list the title, date, and number of...

  8. Tone Systems of Tibeto-Burman Languages of Nepal. Part III, Texts, I. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, F. K., Ed.

    The present volume, the third of a four-part report on the Tibeto-Burman languages of Nepal, includes text materials on Burung, by Warren Glover; on Tamang, by Doreen Taylor, and on Thakali, by Annemarie Hari and Anita Maibaum. For each language, a list of included texts is given, with the native language divided into sequentially-numbered…

  9. Microcomputer Instruction in Special Education and the Fine and Practical Arts. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannwitt, Barbara

    1984-01-01

    The last of a three-part series on computer-assisted instruction (CAI), this report describes microcomputer applications in special education, music, visual arts, speech arts and drama, home economics, and industrial/vocational arts. Under each subject heading, current and developing computer applications are discussed and specific courseware…

  10. Broadcasting Stations of the World; Part III. Frequency Modulation Broadcasting Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Washington, DC.

    This third part of "Broadcasting Stations of the World", which lists all reported radio broadcasting and television stations, with the exception of those in the United States which broadcast on domestic channels, covers frequency modulation broadcasting stations. It contains two sections: one indexed alphabetically by country and city, and the…

  11. LEXICOGRAPHY. HISTORY OF ENGLISH, PART ONE. LANGUAGE CURRICULUM III, STUDENT VERSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    AN OUTLINE OF THE NEED FOR AND USES OF LEXICOGRAPHY AND A HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, PART 1, WERE COMBINED IN THIS CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR NINTH-GRADE STUDENTS. THE FIRST SECTION, THE OUTLINE ON LEXICOGRAPHY, GAVE A BRIEF HISTORY OF DICTIONARY COMPILATION AND DESCRIBED THE NEED FOR DICTIONARIES AND THEIR USES. WAYS WERE SUGGESTED FOR STUDENTS…

  12. About the International System of Units (SI) Part III. SI Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubrecht, Gordon J., II; French, Anthony P.; Iona, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Before discussing more details of SI, we will summarize the essentials in a few tables that can serve as ready references. If a unit isn't listed in Tables I-IV, it is not part of SI or specifically allowed for use with SI. The units and symbols that are sufficient for most everyday applications are given in bold.

  13. Soldier Protection Demonstration III - Field Testing and Analysis of Personal Cooling Systems for Heat Mitigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    unable to swallow the sensor but still chose to take part in the demonstration, they were given the option to use the sensor as a suppository . At...important to note that more accurate core temperature measurements may be collected via self administration of the sensor as a suppository immediately... suppository method also eliminates any temperature variation due to gastrointestinal motility and changing location. The only negative rationales for

  14. Changes in the hemolymph protein profiles in Galleria mellonella infected with Bacillus thuringiensis involve apolipophorin III. The effect of heat shock.

    PubMed

    Taszłow, Paulina; Wojda, Iwona

    2015-02-01

    This report concerns the effect of heat shock on host-pathogen interaction in Galleria mellonella infected with Bacillus thuringiensis. We show enhanced activity against Gram-positive bacteria in the hemolymph of larvae pre-exposed to heat shock before infection with B. thuringiensis. Heat shock influenced the protein pattern in the hemolymph of infected larvae: more peptides with a molecular weight below 10 kDa were detected in comparison with nonshocked animals. Additionally, we noticed that the amount of apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) in the hemolymph decreased transiently following infection, which was considerably higher in larvae pre-exposed to heat shock. On the other hand, its expression in the fat body showed a consequent infection-induced decline, observed equally in shocked and nonshocked animals. This suggests that the amount of apoLp-III in the hemolymph of G. mellonella larvae is regulated at multiple levels. We also report that this protein is more resistant to degradation in the hemolymph of larvae pre-exposed to heat shock in comparison to nonshocked larvae. Two-dimensional analysis revealed the presence of three isoforms of apoLp-III, all susceptible to proteolytic degradation. However, one of them was the most abundant, both in the protease-treated and untreated hemolymph. Taking into consideration that, in general, apoLp-III has a stimulative effect on different immune-related hemolymph proteins and peptides, the reported findings bring us closer to understanding the effect of heat shock on the resistance of G. mellonella to infection.

  15. Microstructural engineering applied to the controlled cooling of steel wire rod: Part III. Mathematical model-formulation and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P. C.; Hawbolt, E. B.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1991-11-01

    In this final part of the study, a mathematical model incorporating heat flow, microstructural phenomena, and structure-composition-mechanical property relationships has been developed to compute the yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of steel rod control cooled on a Stelmor line. The predictive capability of the model, in terms of temperature response, microstructural evolution, and strength of the rods, has been tested by comparison to measurements from an extensive set of laboratory and plant trials. Thus, the model has been shown to simulate the complex heat flow and microstructural phenomena in the steel rod very well, although improvements need to be sought in the characterization of the austenite-ferrite transformation kinetics and of pearlite interlamellar spacing. The latter variable has a significant influence on the strength of eutectoid steels. Nonetheless, the model consistently is capable of predicting the strengths of plain-carbon steel rods ranging from 1020 to 1080 to within ± 10 pet.

  16. The Health of Healthcare, Part III: Dissolving (curing) the cancer in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Deane

    2013-01-01

    In a previous part of this "The Health of Healthcare" series, the etiology of sickness in our healthcare system was established as cancer. This article offers a method to "cure" healthcare, taken from strategic management thinking called VOSIE. In this article, the use of VOSIE is described as well as who needs to apply this cure: the public. A unifying mantra is suggested: Think and decide.

  17. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-06-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the "elevator technique". All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the "Journal of Ultrasonography".

  18. Starting a hospital-based home health agency: Part III--Marketing.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, P

    1993-10-01

    Successfully marketing home healthcare involves not only community awareness, but the system's support as well--nurses, physicians, administration, social services. Working together with common goals and commitments is essential to the program's success. Addressing questions and concerns ensures a successful business start-up and ongoing implementation. A service benefit profile, target markets, and a feasibility analysis are provided in this final section of a three-part series on establishing a home health agency.

  19. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part III--kinetics and energy assessment.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, D H

    2005-06-01

    Historically, clinical applications of measurements of force and energy followed electromyography and kinematics in temporal sequence. This sequence is mirrored by the order of topics included in this trilogy on the Evolution of Clinical Gait Analysis, with part I [Sutherland DH. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part I: kinesiological EMG. Gait Posture 2001;14:61-70.] devoted to Kinesiological EMG and part II [Sutherland DH. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part II - kinematics. Gait Posture 2002;16(2):159-179.] to Kinematics. This final review in the series will focus on kinetics as it relates to gait applications. Kinematic measurements give the movements of the body segments, which can be compared with normal controls to identify pathological gait patterns, but they do not deal with the forces controlling the movements. As a major goal of scientifically minded clinicians is to understand the biomechanical forces producing movements, the objective measurement of ground reaction forces is essential. The force plate (platform) is now an indispensable tool in a state-of-the-art motion analysis laboratory. Nonetheless, it is not a stand-alone instrument as both kinematic and EMG measurements are needed for maximum clinical implementation and interpretation of force plate measurements. The subject of energy assessment is also given mention, as there is a compelling interest in whether walking has been made easier with intervention. The goals of this manuscript are to provide a historical background, recognize some of the important contributors, and describe the current multiple uses of the force plate in gait analysis. The widespread use of force plates for postural analyses is an important and more recent application of this technology, but this review will be restricted to measurements of gait rather than balance activities. Finally, this manuscript presents my personal perspective and discusses the developments and contributors that have shaped my

  20. CSU Solar Housee III solar heating and cooling system performance. Annual report: technical summary, 1 October 1978-30 September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D.S.; Ward, J.C.; Oberoi, H.S.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this study was to test and evaluate the practicality of an integrated flat-plate state-of-the-art liquid-heating solar collector and absorption cooling system installed on Colorado State University (CSU) Solar House III. This objective was accomplished by designing and installing a complete solar heating and cooling system (including appropriate data acquisition equipment and instrumentation), performing a detailed analysis and evaluation of all aspects of the solar system, and comparing the seasonal performance of the system with two other solar heating and cooling systems installed in adjacent buildings with virtually identical thermal characteristics.

  1. Specific heat anomaly in ferroelectric: Bis(imidazolium) pentachloroantimonate(III) (C3 N2 H5)2[SbCl5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przesławski, J.; Piecha-Bisiorek, A.; Jakubas, R.

    2016-04-01

    Single crystals of ferroelectric bis(imidazolium) pentachloroantimonate(III) (C3N2H5)2 [SbCl5 ] have been grown and the heat capacity was measured by the use of AC calorimetric method. The temperature dependence of excess heat capacity and excess entropy in the ferroelectric phase can be described in the frame of the classical Landau-Devonshire theory of phase transitions. The results of experimental studies were analyzed and the α, γ and δ values of the Landau potential coefficients were calculated. The temperature dependence of the order parameter was also evaluated from the heat capacity data.

  2. Building Worlds and Learning Astronomy on Facebook Part III: Testing, Launch, and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harold, J.; Hines, D.; Vidugiris, E.; Goldman, K. H.

    2015-11-01

    James Harold (SSI), Dean Hines (STScI/SSI) and a team at the National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute are developing Starchitect, an end-to-end stellar and planetary evolution game for the Facebook platform. Supported by NSF and NASA, and based in part on a prototype presented at ASP several years ago, Starchitect uses the “sporadic play” model of games such as Farmville, where players might only take actions a few times a day, but may continue playing for months. This paper is an update to a presentation at last year's ASP conference.

  3. Dissociation of manganese(III) oxide as part of a thermochemical water splitting cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Todd Michael

    A three-step thermochemical cycle to produce renewable hydrogen was proposed, which utilizes manganese(III) oxide and thermal energy to produce hydrogen. Most work on the cycle has focused on the hydrogen generating and product recovery steps with little work on the dissociation. It is essential to understand the dissociation because the feasibility of the cycle is based on this reaction having a high conversion. Because of the importance of the reduction step, this reaction has been selected as the topic of this dissertation. Additionally, because the dispersion of Mn2O3 particles into an Aerosol Flow Reactor (AFR) is important, feeding concepts were developed as well. Two powder feeding systems were developed: a Spinning Wheel Feeder (SWF) and a Fluidized Bed Feeder (FBF). Results of statistical particle size distribution studies indicated that the FBF was the better choice to disperse Mn2O3 powder. Additionally, results in an AFR demonstrated that the FBF was able to produce higher dissociation conversions. A study in a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) indicated multiple mechanisms were controlling Mn2O3 dissociation. The first half reaction of the dissociation was calculated to be controlled by an Avrami-Erofeev mechanism and had an activation energy of 106.4+/-1.9 kJ/mol. The second half reaction had a duel mechanism utilizing an Avrami-Erofeev and Order of Reaction (OOR) mechanism. The mechanisms had activation energies of 251.2+/-6.5 and 110.7+/-24.6 kJ/mol respectively. Mn2O3 dissociation investigations were done in an AFR. They revealed oxygen is a significant factor and to effectively control the dissociation with temperature and gas flow rate, the oxygen concentration must be below 0.25%. Experimental runs that had oxygen concentrations less than 0.25% were used to calculate reaction rate constants. The Avrami-Erofeev mechanisms were combined into a single mechanism. Rate constants for the Avrami-Erofeev and OOR mechanisms were 1.8E7+/-1.3E7 and 5.6E3

  4. Biomechanical considerations in high myopia: Part III--Therapy for high myopia.

    PubMed

    Bell, G R

    1993-05-01

    Clinical procedures for the treatment of high myopia are updated in this third part of a report on high myopia. After a discussion of testing techniques and refractive approaches for high myopia, an examination of therapeutic drug experiences shows their relative merits. The author believes that more investigation of beta blocker and epinephrine topical solutions is needed pertaining to the treatment of high myopia. Theoretically, such agents could improve deficient arterial perfusion of the highly myopic eye, and could be helpful in retarding scleral creep. Lifestyle recommendations include patient advice on accommodative reduction and proper exercise techniques. Low impact aerobics may have merit for highly myopic patients since the improved cardiovascular efficiency they can provide may improve the deficient arterial perfusion of their retinas. A summary of the three-part report on high myopia concludes the article. The physiological patterns of high myopia dovetail into the biomechanical considerations showing that a scleral pathogenesis hypothesis of myopic development is a viable working theory. The author's clinical procedures reflect the influence of that theory. If research were redirected from deprivation studies to investigating biomechanical considerations and pharmacological approaches to high myopia, the author contends that dramatically improved treatment regimens could result.

  5. Managing the multicultural laboratory, Part III: Putting the cross-cultural tools to work.

    PubMed

    Ketchum, S M

    1993-01-01

    This third article provides two case studies that enable laboratory managers to see how the cross-cultural model postulated by Dr. Geert Hofstede can be practically applied to two important issues--staff training and conflict resolution between employees. In addition, the opinions of several managers from a variety of industries are presented to add realism and perspective. This encourages laboratory managers to step outside the laboratory environment and learn from other managers who have years of experience supervising culturally diverse groups of employees. Part I of this series explained what is meant by "culture" and featured the research-based model set forth by Dutch social psychologist and management consultant, Dr. Geert Hofstede. His four dimensions of culture (Power Distance, Masculinity/Femininity, Individualism/Collectivism, and Uncertainty Avoidance) provide a useful framework for understanding the different values, attitudes, and behaviors exhibited by those of different cultural backgrounds. Part II presented advice in the form of 13 anecdotes from experienced cross-cultural managers. Issues of performance management, interpersonal skills, and language and safety were explored in light of the four dimensions. In this third article, abbreviated reference tables adapted from Hofstede's research are presented that make these cross-cultural data more useful for management decision making. Laboratory managers will receive practical, "real world" advice that will help them to positively resolve conflicts and to take full advantage of staff training opportunities.

  6. The health of Canada's children. Part III: Public policy and the social determinants of children's health.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Dennis

    2010-03-01

    The health of Canada's children does not compare well with other wealthy industrialized nations. Significant inequalities in health exist among Canadian children, and many of these inequalities are due to variations in Canadian children's life circumstances - the social determinants of health. The present article describes the social determinants of children's health and explains how the quality of these social determinants is shaped, in large part, by public policy decisions. The specific public policies that shape the quality of Canadian children's health are examined, and Canadian approaches in comparison with other wealthy developed nations are described. Policy directions that would improve the quality of the social determinants of children's health are presented and barriers to their implementation are considered.

  7. Dental caries: A complete changeover, PART III: Changeover in the treatment decisions and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Carounanidy, Usha; Sathyanarayanan, R

    2010-01-01

    Comprehensive management of dental caries should involve the management of disease as well as the lesion. Current decision making process in cariology is influenced by numerous factors such as the size/ depth/ activity of the carious lesion and age/ the caries risk status of the patient. Treatment decisions should involve planning the non-operative/ preventive treatment for non-cavitated or early cavitated lesions and also formulating operative treatment for cavitated lesions. Apart from these two responsibilities, a clinician should also be knowledgeable enough to decide when not to interfere in the caries dynamics and how frequently to recall the patient for follow-ups. The non-operative treatment prescriptions vary in dose, intensity and mode of delivery according to the caries risk status. Minimal invasion and maximal conservation of tooth structure has become the essence of current operative treatments. This part of the series elaborates on the paradigm shift in the management of dental caries. PMID:21217948

  8. The threat of avian influenza A (H5N1). Part III: Antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cinatl, Jindrich; Michaelis, Martin; Doerr, Hans W

    2007-12-01

    Among emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, influenza constitutes one of the major threats to mankind. In this review series epidemiologic, virologic and pathologic concerns raised by infections of humans with avian influenza virus A/H5N1 as well as treatment options are discussed. The third part discusses therapeutic options. Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors are the most promising agents despite uncertainty about efficacy. Dosage increase, prolonged treatment or combination therapies may increase treatment efficacy and/or inhibit resistance formation. Immune system dysregulation contributes to H5N1 disease. Although current evidence does not support the use of anti-inflammatory drugs beneficial effects cannot be excluded at later disease stages.

  9. Responsible conduct of radiology research. Part III. Exemptions from regulatory requirements for human research.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jeffrey A

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this series of articles is to explain the ethical and legal basis for responsible conduct of radiology research and the rules that an investigator needs to follow. In this article (part three of the series), the situations in which human research in radiology is exempt from regulatory requirements are explained. There are several situations in which an activity falls under the regulatory definition of research but is exempt from the research regulations. Investigators who conduct exempt research should know the regulatory criteria for the exemptions. In the case of research that is potentially exempt from the Department of Health and Human Services regulations, the institutional review board or an authority other than the investigator should make the determination of whether a proposed research activity is exempt from the regulations. For research exempt from Food and Drug Administration regulations, investigators should follow institutional guidance and seek input from the institutional review board or Food and Drug Administration for questionable cases.

  10. Bioelectrical impedance techniques in medicine. Part III: Impedance imaging. First section: general concepts and hardware.

    PubMed

    Rigaud, B; Morucci, J P

    1996-01-01

    Measurement accuracy is a key point in impedance imaging and is mainly limited by factors that take place in the acquisition system. This part is a review of hardware solutions developed in acquisition systems for electrical impedance tomography (EIT). The general principles of EIT along with the changes that have taken place in the last decade, in terms of measurement strategy, and a certain number of definitions are introduced. The major hardware error sources that occur in the front end of EIT systems are presented. A review of the various alternatives published in the literature that are used to drive current, including current and voltage approaches, and the main solutions recommended in the literature to overcome the key point drawbacks of voltage measurement systems, including voltage buffers, instrumentation amplifiers, and demodulators, are provided. Some calibration procedures and approaches for the evaluation of the performance of EIT systems are also presented.

  11. [A systematic analysis of the Ottoman Red Crescent periodical (Part III)].

    PubMed

    Okutan, Yahya

    2002-01-01

    Founded in 1877, the Ottoman Red Crescent Society rendered a lot of important services in military and civil areas in the Ottoman Empire. The Ottoman Red Crescent Society not only gave health services for the soldiers, but it also attempted to obey the international acts signed for the war captives and to rescue them together with the countries involved under the supervision of the international Red Cross. In the civilian area, the Ottoman Red Crescent Society also played an active role to meet the casualties' needs, such as food, clothes, and accommodation following natural disasters like earthquake, flood, fire etc. The Ottoman Red Crescent Society published a monthly newsletter called Osmanli Hilâl-i Ahmer Mecmuasi to announce its services more effectively to the public since 15 September 1921 (12 Muharrem 1340). The publication of the newsletter continued as Türkiye Hilâl-i Ahmer Mecmuas' after the 15th issue. Starting with the 85th issue on September 15th, 1928 (30 Rebiülevvel 1347) it was printed with Latin alphabet instead of Arabic letters. A brief translation in French and in English exist in the end of each issue. In the second part of this research, news about the Red Crescent Society's organization; financial supports for the Society and, in return, material and financial aids by the Society; local organizations providing aid to the Society; money collected during Bairams; plays and balls arranged by the Society; and the activities of the womens' branch of the Red Crescent Society, are introduced. The third and last part of the study deals with the comments of visitors about the Red Crescent Society; and news and activities of the European Red Cross Societies.

  12. The thermal and metallurgical state of steel strip during hot rolling: Part III. Microstructural evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devadas, C.; Samarasekera, I. V.; Hawbolt, E. B.

    1991-02-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to compute the changes in the austenite grain size during rolling in a hot-strip mill. The heat-transfer model described in the first of this series of papers has been employed to calculate the temperature distribution through the thickness which serves as a basis for the microstructure model. Single-and double-hit compression tests have been conducted at temperatures of 900 °C, 850°C, 950 °C, and 875 °C on 0.34 and 0.05 pct carbon steels to determine the degree of recrystallization by metallographic evaluation of quenched samples and by measuring the magnitude of fractional softening. The Institut de Recherches de la Sidérurgie Francaise, (IRSID) Saint Germain-en-Laye, France equation has been found to yield the best characterization of the observed recrystallization kinetics. The equations representing static recrystallization kinetics, recrystallized grain size, and grain growth kinetics have been incorporated in the model. The principle of additivity has been invoked to permit application of the isothermal recrystallization data to the nonisothermal cooling conditions. The model has been validated by comparing predicted austenite grain sizes with measurements made on samples quenched after one to four passes of rolling on the CANMET pilot mill. The austenite grain size evolution during rolling of a 0.34 pct carbon steel on Stelco’s Lake Erie Works (LEW) hot-strip mill has been computed with the aid of the model. The grain size decreased from an initial value of 180 μm to 35 μm in the first pass due to the high reduction of 46 pct. The changes in austenite grain size in subsequent passes were found to be small in comparison because of the lower per pass reductions. It has been shown that the equation employed to represent grain growth kinetics in the interstand region has a significant influence on the computed final grain size. Altering the rolling schedule had a negligible influence on the final grain size for a

  13. Guidelines for clinical engineering programs--Part III: the risk of electrical shock in hospitals; Part IV: isolated power in anesthetizing locations? History of an appeal.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, M

    1981-01-01

    This four-part series presents guidelines for: electrically isolated inputs and outputs; measuring the performance of hospital biomedical engineering programs; evaluation the risk of electric shock in hospitals; and for isolated power in anesthetizing locations. Parts I and II, covering the first two topics above, were published in the Oct.-Dec. 1980 issue of this Journal. Part III constitutes an attempt to place the risk of electric shock in hospitals in a quantitative perspective. Arguments are presented that indicate that electrical safety precautions usually take up a larger share of the hospital's biomedical equipment safety budget than is justified by the actual hazard levels. Part IV reviews the need for isolated power in anesthetizing locations. Three independently proposed revisions to the 1973 edition of NFPA Standard 56A would have significantly simplified the safety requirements for hospital anesthetizing locations (a) by reducing the area in flammable locations classified as hazardous to the internationally accepted "zone of risk," and (b) by permitting the use of conventional electrical power rather than isolated power in locations where the risk of electrical accidents can be shown to be no greater than it is in other areas of the hospital. Despite extensive technical testimony supported with substantial supporting documentation, the revisions were vetoed by the Technical Committee after they were voted into the document by a floor vote of the general membership attending the NFPA Annual Meeting in Anaheim in 1978. The chronology of the major events surrounding the subsequent appeal of this veto is traced back to 1974, and an analysis is presented of what are considered to be shortcomings in the NFPA appeals process revealed by this particular case history.

  14. Measuring solar reflectance Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-05-14

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective 'cool colored' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland U.S. latitudes, this metric RE891BN can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {le} 5:12 [23{sup o}]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool-roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear-sky air mass one global horizontal ('AM1GH') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer.

  15. Measuring solar reflectance - Part I: Defining a metric that accurately predicts solar heat gain

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-09-15

    Solar reflectance can vary with the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight, which in turn depend on surface orientation, solar position and atmospheric conditions. A widely used solar reflectance metric based on the ASTM Standard E891 beam-normal solar spectral irradiance underestimates the solar heat gain of a spectrally selective ''cool colored'' surface because this irradiance contains a greater fraction of near-infrared light than typically found in ordinary (unconcentrated) global sunlight. At mainland US latitudes, this metric R{sub E891BN} can underestimate the annual peak solar heat gain of a typical roof or pavement (slope {<=} 5:12 [23 ]) by as much as 89 W m{sup -2}, and underestimate its peak surface temperature by up to 5 K. Using R{sub E891BN} to characterize roofs in a building energy simulation can exaggerate the economic value N of annual cool roof net energy savings by as much as 23%. We define clear sky air mass one global horizontal (''AM1GH'') solar reflectance R{sub g,0}, a simple and easily measured property that more accurately predicts solar heat gain. R{sub g,0} predicts the annual peak solar heat gain of a roof or pavement to within 2 W m{sup -2}, and overestimates N by no more than 3%. R{sub g,0} is well suited to rating the solar reflectances of roofs, pavements and walls. We show in Part II that R{sub g,0} can be easily and accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer or version 6 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. (author)

  16. Electron diffraction based analysis of phase fractions and texture in nanocrystalline thin films, part III: application examples.

    PubMed

    Lábár, J L; Adamik, M; Barna, B P; Czigány, Zs; Fogarassy, Zs; Horváth, Z E; Geszti, O; Misják, F; Morgiel, J; Radnóczi, G; Sáfrán, G; Székely, L; Szüts, T

    2012-04-01

    In this series of articles, a method is presented that performs (semi)quantitative phase analysis for nanocrystalline transmission electron microscope samples from selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns. Volume fractions and degree of fiber texture are determined for the nanocrystalline components. The effect of the amorphous component is minimized by empirical background interpolation. First, the two-dimensional SAED pattern is converted into a one-dimensional distribution similar to X-ray diffraction. Volume fractions of the nanocrystalline components are determined by fitting the spectral components, calculated for the previously identified phases with a priori known structures. These Markers are calculated not only for kinematic conditions, but the Blackwell correction is also applied to take into account dynamic effects for medium thicknesses. Peak shapes and experimental parameters (camera length, etc.) are refined during the fitting iterations. Parameter space is explored with the help of the Downhill-SIMPLEX. The method is implemented in a computer program that runs under the Windows operating system. Part I presented the principles, while part II elaborated current implementation. The present part III demonstrates the usage and efficiency of the computer program by numerous examples. The suggested experimental protocol should be of benefit in experiments aimed at phase analysis using electron diffraction methods.

  17. Capsicum--production, technology, chemistry, and quality. Part III. Chemistry of the color, aroma, and pungency stimuli.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, V S

    1986-01-01

    The spice capsicum, the fruits of the genus Capsicum (Family Solanaceae), is a very popular food additive in many parts of the world, valued for the important sensory attributes of color, pungency, and aroma. A large number of varieties are widely cultivated and traded. The characteristic carotenoids of the bright red paprika and cayenne-type chillies, the high character impact aroma stimuli, the methoxy pyrazine of green bell capsicum, the esters of ripe tabasco and the highly potent pungency stimuli, and the capsaicinoids of African and other Asian varieties of chillies, have been of great interest to chemists and biochemists. Research workers in other disciplines such as genetics and breeding, agriculture, and technology have been interested in this spice to develop new varieties with combinations of different optimal levels of the stimuli for the sensory attributes and to maximize production of storable products for specific end uses. Physiologists have been intensely studying the action of the highly potent pungency stimuli and social psychologists the curious aspect of growing acceptance and preference for the initially unacceptable pungency sensation. In the sequential review of all these aspects of the fruit spice Capsicum, the earlier two parts covered history, botany, cultivation and primary processing, and processed products, standards, world production, and trade. In Part III, the chemistry, the compositional variations, synthesis and biosynthesis of the functional components, the carotenoids, the volatiles, and the capsaicinoids are comprehensively reviewed.

  18. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  19. The Systemic Theory of Living Systems and Relevance to CAM: the Theory (Part III)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Western medical science lacks a solid philosophical and theoretical approach to disease cognition and therapeutics. My first two articles provided a framework for a humane medicine based on Modern Biophysics. Its precepts encompass modern therapeutics and CAM. Modern Biophysics and its concepts are presently missing in medicine, whether orthodox or CAM, albeit they probably provide the long sought explanation that bridges the abyss between East and West. Key points that differentiate Systemic from other systems' approaches are ‘Intelligence’, ‘Energy’ and the objective ‘to survive’. The General System Theory (GST) took a forward step by proposing a departure from the mechanistic biological concept—of analyzing parts and processes in isolation—and brought us towards an organismic model. GST examines the system's components and results of their interaction. However, GST still does not go far enough. GST assumes ‘Self-Organization’ as a spontaneous phenomenon, ignoring a causative entity or central controller to all systems: Intelligence. It also neglects ‘Survive’ as the directional motivation common to any living system, and scarcely assigns ‘Energy’ its true inherent value. These three parameters, Intelligence, Energy and Survive, are vital variables to be considered, in our human quest, if we are to achieve a unified theory of life. PMID:16136205

  20. Uterine sarcoma part III-Targeted therapy: The Taiwan Association of Gynecology (TAG) systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chen, Jen-Ruei; Wang, Peng-Hui; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chen, Yi-Jen; Ng, Heung-Tat

    2016-10-01

    Uterine sarcoma is a very aggressive and highly lethal disease. Even after a comprehensive staging surgery or en block cytoreduction surgery followed by multimodality therapy (often chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy), many patients relapse or present with distant metastases, and finally die of diseases. The worst outcome of uterine sarcomas is partly because of their rarity, unknown etiology, and highly divergent genetic aberration. Uterine sarcomas are often classified into four distinct subtypes, including uterine leiomyosarcoma, low-grade uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma, high-grade uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma, and undifferentiated uterine sarcoma. Currently, evidence from tumor biology found that these tumors showed alternation and/or mutation of genomes and the intracellular signal pathway. In addition, some preclinical studies showed promising results for targeting receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, various kinds of growth factor pathways, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway, transforming growth factor β/bone morphogenetic protein signal pathway, aurora kinase A, MDM2 proto-oncogene, histone deacetylases, sex hormone receptors, certain types of oncoproteins, and/or loss of tumor suppressor genes. The current review is attempted to summarize the recurrent advance of targeted therapy for uterine sarcomas. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Stratigraphic sections of the Phosphoria formation in Idaho, 1947-48, Part III

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Malley, F.W.; Davidson, D.F.; Hoppin, R.A.; Sheldon, R.P.

    1951-01-01

    .The U.S. Geological Survey has measured and sampled the Phosphoria formation at many localities in Idaho and other western states. These data will not be fully synthesized and analyzed for several years but segments of the data, accompanied by little or no interpretation, are published as preliminary reports as they are assembled. This report, which contains abstracts of many of the sections in southeastern Idaho (fig. 1), is one of this series and is the third report of data gathered in Idaho during 1947 and 1948. The field and laboratory procedures adopted in these investigations are described rather fully in a companion report (McKelvey and others, 1953). Many people have taken part in this investigation, which was organized and supervised by V. E. McKelvey. D. A. Bostwick, R. M. Campbell, R. A. Gulbrandsen, R. A. Harris, R. L. Parker, R. A. Smart, J. E. Smedley, R. H. Thurston, and R. G. Waring participated in the description of strata and collection of samples referred to in this report. D. B. Dimick, Jack George, W. S. Hunziker, J. E. Jones, H. A. Larsen, and T. K. Rigby assisted in the preparation of trenches and collection, crushing, and splitting of samples in the field. The laboratory preparation of samples for chemical analysis was done in Denver, Colo., under the direction of W. P. Huleatt.

  2. The anniversary year: Part III. The ACD role in dental journalism.

    PubMed

    Rovelstad, G H

    1990-01-01

    Thus, the challenge to proprietary dental journalism was made and corrective action presented. The Journal of Dental Research was identified as a model and given encouragement and support. The Journal of the American College of Dentists became a regular part of the dental literature. The College established formal relations with the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the College indirectly gave birth through the W.J. Gies Endowment Fund for the Journal of Dental Research to the William J. Gies Foundation for the Advancement of Dentistry, Inc. These actions crossed all disciplines of the dental profession and in the 1930's identified the College as an organization to be reckoned with for professional matters. J. Ben Robinson stated it very well in his Presidential Address on the afternoon of November 3rd, 1935: "The College, from its modest beginning fifteen years ago, has rapidly and substantially grown to occupy an important place in the profession. As its duty has become clearer, and its responsibilities better understood, additional problems have been accepted and assigned to committees for investigation, study and report. The ensuing results have contributed materially to the advancement of the profession by clarifying thought, establishing sound trends of endeavor, and strengthening the positions of dentistry in many important relations... The American College of Dentists exist for the prime purpose of fostering professionalism as an ideal, and of promoting education, literature, and organization along lines that will ensure high standards in all relations....(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Evaluation of peripheral neuropathy. Part III: vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2005-01-01

    In this, the third of a 3-part series on peripheral neuropathy, the syndromes of vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathy are discussed. Vasculitis is a frequent cause of neuropathy in the setting of a connective tissue disease. The infectious neuropathies most likely to be encountered in the United States are those due to varicella-zoster virus, human immunodeficiency virus, Lyme disease, hepatitis C virus, and, most recently, West Nile virus. Inherited neuropathies are divided into 2 main types: predominant motor or predominant sensory. The former are generally classed as the Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases and the latter as the hereditary sensory neuropathies. Each category has a number of different subtypes. If the results of routine screening tests are negative, the clinician must consider special testing for unusual disorders, including evaluations for underlying autoimmune or malignant disorders, genetic tests for inherited neuropathies, and other unusual or selectively ordered tests. These tests are very expensive and should be ordered only after the common causes of neuropathy are excluded. Unless the neuropathy can be substantially alleviated or cured, symptomatic treatment (most often for pain) plays a significant role for these patients.

  4. High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part B. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco), and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasibility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part B of Volume 3 contains the following contents: (1) project impact assessment which covers geological impacts, hydrology, ecological impacts, air quality and meteorology, land use, archaeology, aesthetics, acoustics, socioeconomic impacts, and peat resources; (2) impact mitigation which covers hydrology, ecology, air quality, archaeology, acoustics, and socioeconomics; (3) conclusions; and (4) appendices. 2 figures, 18 tables.

  5. Circuit modeling of the electrical impedance: part III. Disuse following bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, C A

    2013-05-01

    Multifrequency measurements of the electrical impedance of muscle have been extended to the study of disuse following bone fracture, and analyzed using the five-element circuit model used earlier in the study of the effects of disease. Eighteen subjects recovering from simple fractures on upper or lower limbs were examined (ten males, eight females, aged 18-66). Muscles on uninjured contralateral limbs were used as comparison standards, and results are presented in terms of the ratios p(injured)/p(uninjured), where p stands for the circuit parameter r1, r2, r3, 1/c1 or 1/c2. These are strikingly similar to the diseased-to-healthy ratios for patients with neuromuscular disease, reported in part I of this series. In particular, r1 is virtually unaffected and the ratios for r2, r3, 1/c1 and 1/c2 can be as large as in serious disease. Furthermore, the same pattern of relationships between the parameters is found, suggesting that there is a common underlying mechanism for the impedance changes. Atrophy and fibrosis are examined as candidates for that mechanism, but it is argued that their effects are too small to explain the observed changes. Fundamental considerations aside, the sensitivity, reproducibility and technical simplicity of the technique recommend its use for in-flight assessments of muscles during orbital or interplanetary missions.

  6. Figures and institutions of the neurological sciences in Paris from 1800 to 1950. Part III: neurology.

    PubMed

    Broussolle, E; Poirier, J; Clarac, F; Barbara, J-G

    2012-04-01

    We present a short historical review of the major figures, their administrative functions and their works that contributed to make Paris a renowned centre of physiology and neurology during the xixth and the first half of the xxth century. We purposely chose to focus on the period 1800-1950, as 1800 corresponds to the actual beginning of neurosciences, and 1950 marks their exponential rise. Our presentation is divided into four chapters, matching the main disciplines which have progressed and contributed the most to the knowledge we have of the brain sciences: anatomy, physiology, neurology, and psychiatry-psychology. The present article is the third of four parts of this review, and deals with neurology. A special credit should be given to Jean-Martin Charcot who founded the Salpêtrière School of neurology and became one of the world's most important neurologists of the xixth century. We provide below the biographical sketches of Armand Trousseau, Guillaume Benjamin Amand Duchenne, Jean-Martin Charcot, Alfred Vulpian, Désiré-Magloire Bourneville, Paul Richer, Henri Parinaud, Albert Pitres, Jules Joseph Dejerine, Mrs. Augusta Dejerine-Klumpke, Édouard Brissaud, Pierre Marie, Georges Édouard Brutus Gilles de la Tourette, Joseph Babinski, André Thomas, Georges Marinesco, Achille Alexandre Souques, Georges Guillain and Charles Foix. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. History of clubfoot treatment; part III (twentieth century): back to the future.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2017-09-06

    Clubfoot is one of the most common congenital orthopaedic anomalies and was described by Hippocrates in the year 400 BC. From manipulation in antiquity to splint and plaster in the Renaissance the treatment had improved before tenotomy. Many surgical treatments were tested during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and will be explained in this manuscript; however, the pathology still continues to challenge the paediatric orthopedic surgeon as it has a notorious tendency to relapse, irrespective of whether the foot is treated with conservative or operative means. Part of the reason that the foot relapses is the surgeon's failure to recognize the underlying pathoanatomy. Clubfoot is often automatically assumed to be an equinovarus deformity, however, other permutations and combinations, such as calcaneovalgus, equinovalgus and calcaneovarus, are possible. Out of these combinations, calcaneovalgus occurs most frequently, followed by equinovarus deformity. In more than 90% of the cases, calcaneovalgus responds to conservative treatment, which involves passive manipulation and usually does not require casting or operative intervention as has been demonstrated by Ponseti.

  8. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit E: Successful Selling. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit E focuses on personal (face-to-face)…

  9. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit D: Marketing Management. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit D focuses on market management. It…

  10. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit A: Managing the Business. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit A focuses on the management process. It…

  11. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit H: Business Protection. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in part III is operating a business. Unit H focuses on business protection. It…

  12. A Study of Future Communications Concepts and Technologies for the National Airspace System-Part III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, Denise S.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wichgersm Joel M.; Haynes, Brian; Roy, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating current and anticipated wireless communications concepts and technologies that the National Airspace System (NAS) may need in the next 50 years. NASA has awarded three NASA Research Announcements (NAR) studies with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. This paper will present progress made in the studies and describe the communications challenges and opportunities that have been identified as part of the study. NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project integrates solutions for a safe, efficient and high-capacity airspace system through joint research efforts and partnerships with other government agencies. The CTD Project is one of two within NASA's Airspace Systems Program and is managed by the NASA Ames Research Center. Research within the CTD Project is in support the 2011 NASA Strategic Plan Sub-Goal 4.1: Develop innovative solutions and advanced technologies, through a balanced research portfolio, to improve current and future air transportation. The focus of CTD is on developing capabilities in traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations and airport surface operations. Important to its research is the development of human/automation information requirements and decisionmaking guidelines for human-human and human-machine airportal decision-making. Airborne separation, oceanic intrail climb/descent and interval management applications depend on location and intent information of surrounding aircraft. ADS-B has been proposed to provide the information exchange, but other candidates such as satellite-based receivers, broadband or airborne internet, and cellular communications are possible candidate's.

  13. AICRG, Part III: The influence of antibiotic use on the survival of a new implant design.

    PubMed

    Morris, Harold F; Ochi, Shigeru; Plezia, Richard; Gilbert, Harry; Dent, C Daniel; Pikulski, James; Lambert, Paul M

    2004-01-01

    The American College of Surgeons guidelines suggest that complex oral surgery may benefit from prophylactic antibiotic coverage. The use of preoperative antibiotics, postoperative antibiotics, or both during implant placement is a widely accepted practice in the United States, whereas dentists in other countries rarely use antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to determine if antibiotic coverage at the time of implant placement improves the survival of the Ankylos implant. As part of a comprehensive, multicentered, multidisciplinary, prospective, independent, international clinical study, designed and coordinated in the United States by the Ankylos Implant Clinical Research Group (AICRG), the use of preoperative (several regimens) and postoperative antibiotics (yes/no) were carefully documented to assess their influence on improving survival. A total of 1500 Ankylos implants were placed and followed for a period of 3 to 5 years. The decision to use antibiotics and the regimen to be employed was made by the treating surgeon. Failure was defined as removal of the implant for any reason. All data were entered into a computerized database for analysis. The use of preoperative antibiotics produced no significant improvement (P = .21, Fisher's exact test) in survival compared with those placed without antibiotic coverage. There was no significant difference between the regimens defined as AHA-1990, AHA-1997, and Peterson's recommendations. The results of this study suggest that there was little or no advantage to providing antibiotic coverage when placing this implant. These findings also suggest that the use of antibiotics for implant placement may not be as beneficial as once believed. If validated by other studies, the elimination of this practice for routine implant placement would represent a small but significant step forward in the reduction of unnecessary antibiotic use.

  14. [Validation of the questionnaire for adolescents concerning ailments of lumbosacral region. Part III: validity].

    PubMed

    Baczkiewicz, Maja; Demczuk-Włodarczyk, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    The third part of the series of articles includes the results of validity and coherence check conducted over the LBP questionnaire designed for pupils aged 13-18. 22 adolescents aged 13-17 were randomly chosen from the group of 124 pupils, who filled in the questionnaire using stratification to 3 groups: without LBP, LBP in a life time, but not in the week preceding the testing and LBP in the preceding week. The validity of questions was tested by comparison to the data obtained from parents and in clinical testing conducted by a physiotherapist, which took place within two weeks from the first questionnaire session. The questions were found valid if the answers or indexes counted from the answers were consistent with data from clinical testing and from parents. For birth date, height and weight data from parents were used. Data from clinical testing served to verify: height, weight, presence and location of pain (local symptoms of overloading were palpated), faulty posture and directional preference according to McKenzie. With reference to some questions the coherence check was performed, by comparing the answers to questions logically linked. As a result of validity and coherence check rejected were the questions about: intensive growth period (small number of answers together with many incoherent ones), about beginning of pain episode (lack of coherence), about directional preference (differences with clinical testing) and about faulty posture (not consistent with findings in clinical testing). On the other hand the question about presence of LBP proved to be highly specific, good results were also found as to the questions about birth date, height and weight. The rest of the questions tested were found acceptable.

  15. HLA alleles and haplotypes among the Lakota Sioux: report of the ASHI minority workshops, part III.

    PubMed

    Leffell, Mary S; Fallin, M Daniele; Hildebrand, William H; Cavett, Joshua W; Iglehart, Brian A; Zachary, Andrea A

    2004-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II alleles were defined for 302 Lakota Sioux American Indians as part of the American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics coordinated studies on minority populations. The study group was comprised of adult volunteers from the Cheyenne River and Ogala Sioux tribes residing, respectively, on the Cheyenne River and Pine Ridge Reservations in South Dakota. Of the participants, 263 (87%) claimed full American Indian ancestry through both maternal and paternal grandparents. The study group included 25 nuclear families that were informative for genotyping. HLA phenotypes from 202 adults with no other known first-degree relative included in the study were used for calculation of allele and haplotype frequencies by maximum likelihood estimation. HLA-A, -B, and -Cw alleles were found to be in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. Deviation from equilibrium was observed for DRB1 alleles (p=0.01), but could be attributed to the sample size and the occurrence of some genotypes with low expected frequencies. Polymorphism among the Sioux was limited with four to seven alleles comprising >80% of those observed at each locus. Several alleles were found at high frequency (0.05-0.30) among the Sioux that are also prevalent in other Native Americans and Alaska Natives, including: A*2402, *3101, and *0206; B*3501,*3901, *5101, and *2705; Cw*0702, *0404, and *03041; DRB1*0407, *0404, *1402, and *16021; and DQB1*0301, *0302, and *0402. DRB1*0811, which has been only previously described in Navajo and Tlingit Indians, was found to occur at a frequency of 0.119 among the Sioux. Two new alleles were defined among the Sioux: Cw*0204 and DRB1*040703, which were found in two and four individuals, respectively. In the haplotype analyses, significant linkage disequilibrium (p<0.00001) was seen in all pairwise comparisons of loci and numerous two and three locus haplotypes were found to have strong, positive linkage disequilibrium values. The two most

  16. On the heat flux vector for flowing granular materials--Part I: effective thermal conductivity and background

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2006-09-10

    Heat transfer plays a major role in the processing of many particulate materials. The heat flux vector is commonly modelled by the Fourier’s law of heat conduction and for complex materials such as nonlinear fluids, porous media, or granular materials, the coeffcient of thermal conductivity is generalized by assuming that it would depend on a host of material and kinematical parameters such as temperature, shear rate, porosity or concentration, etc. In Part I, we will give a brief review of the basic equations of thermodynamics and heat transfer to indicate the importance of the modelling of the heat flux vector. We will also discuss the concept of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in granular and porous media. In Part II, we propose and subsequently derive a properly frame-invariant constitutive relationship for the heat flux vector for a (single phase) flowing granular medium. Standard methods in continuum mechanics such as representation theorems and homogenization techniques are used. It is shown that the heat flux vector in addition to being proportional to the temperature gradient (the Fourier’s law), could also depend on the gradient of density (or volume fraction), and D (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient) in an appropriate manner. The emphasis in this paper is on the idea that for complex non-linear materials it is the heat flux vector which should be studied; obtaining or proposing generalized form of the thermal conductivity is not always appropriate or suffcient.

  17. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part III. Innovativeness, applications, economy, development scenarios, politics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    important role of ET is combined with the existence in the society of an adequate infrastructure which recreates the full development cycle of high technology embracing: people, institutions, finances and logistics, in this also science, higher education, education, continuous training, dissemination and outreach, professional social environment, legal basis, political support and lobbying, innovation structures, applications, industry and economy. The digest of chosen development tendencies in ET was made here from the academic perspective, in a wider scale and on this background the national one, trying to situate this branch in the society, determine its changing role to build a new technical infrastructure of a society based on knowledge, a role of builder of many practical gadgets facilitating life, a role of a big future integrator of today's single bricks into certain more useful unity. This digest does not have a character of a systematic analysis of ET. It is a kind of an arbitrary utterance of the authors inside their field of competence. The aim of this paper is to take an active part in the discussion of the academic community in this country on the development strategy of ET, choice of priorities for cyclically rebuilding economy, in competitive environments. The review paper was initiated by the Committee of Electronics and Telecommunications of Polish Academy of Sciences and was published in Polish as introductory chapter of a dedicated expertise, printed in a book format. This version makes the included opinions available for a wider community.

  18. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Subpart A reference Applies tosubpart III Comment § 63.1 YES Except that § 63.1(c)(2) is not applicable to the extent area sources are not subject to subpart III. § 63.2 YES Definitions are modified and supplemented by § 63.1292. § 63.3 YES § 63.4 YES § 63.5 YES § 63.6 (a)-(d) YES § 63.6(e) (1)-(2) YES § 63.6(e...

  19. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Subpart A reference Applies tosubpart III Comment § 63.1 YES Except that § 63.1(c)(2) is not applicable to the extent area sources are not subject to subpart III. § 63.2 YES Definitions are modified and supplemented by § 63.1292. § 63.3 YES § 63.4 YES § 63.5 YES § 63.6 (a)-(d) YES § 63.6(e) (1)-(2) YES § 63.6(e...

  20. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tosubpart III Comment § 63.1 YES Except that § 63.1(c)(2) is not applicable to the extent area sources are not subject to subpart III. § 63.2 YES Definitions are modified and supplemented by § 63.1292. § 63.3 YES § 63.4 YES § 63.5 YES § 63.6 (a)-(d) YES § 63.6(e) (1)-(2) YES § 63.6(e)(3) NO Owners and...

  1. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tosubpart III Comment § 63.1 YES Except that § 63.1(c)(2) is not applicable to the extent area sources are not subject to subpart III. § 63.2 YES Definitions are modified and supplemented by § 63.1292. § 63.3 YES § 63.4 YES § 63.5 YES § 63.6 (a)-(d) YES § 63.6(e) (1)-(2) YES § 63.6(e)(3) NO Owners and...

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reference Applies tosubpart III Comment § 63.1 YES Except that § 63.1(c)(2) is not applicable to the extent area sources are not subject to subpart III. § 63.2 YES Definitions are modified and supplemented by § 63.1292. § 63.3 YES § 63.4 YES § 63.5 YES § 63.6 (a)-(d) YES § 63.6(e) (1)-(2) YES § 63.6(e)(3) NO...

  3. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjective to Variable Accelerations. Part 1; Start-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Rogers, Paul; Hoff, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The effect of accelerating forces on the performance of loop heat pipes (LHP) is of interest and importance to terrestrial and space applications. They are being considered for cooling of military combat vehicles and for spinning spacecraft. In order to investigate the effect of an accelerating force on LHP operation, a miniature LHP was installed on a spin table. Variable accelerating forces were imposed on the LHP by spinning the table at different angular speeds. Several patterns of accelerating forces were applied, i.e. continuous spin at different speeds and periodic spin at different speeds and frequencies. The resulting accelerations ranged from 1.17 g's to 4.7 g's. This paper presents the first part of the experimental study, i.e. the effects of a centrifugal force on the LHP start-up. Tests were conducted by varying the heat load to the evaporator, sink temperature, magnitude and frequency of centrifugal force, and LHP orientation relative to the direction of the accelerating force. The accelerating force seems to have little effect on the loop start-up in terms of temperature overshoot and superheat at boiling incipience. Changes in these parameters seem to be stochastic with or without centrifugal accelerating forces. The LHP started successfully in all tests.

  4. Study of the Need for Educational Manpower for Handicapped Children and Youth: Part D - Volume III, Phase III. State Analysis Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Raymond D.; And Others

    The document is the third of three volumes (see also EC 032 850 and EC 032 851) OF State Analysis Reports resulting from Phase III of the Study of the Need for Educational Manpower for Handicapped Children and Youth, which involved a validation study and state surveys related to the Manpower Requirements Projection Model (MRPM). Included in the…

  5. Contribution of heat transfer to turbine blades and vanes for high temperature industrial gas turbines. Part 2: Heat transfer on serpentine flow passage.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, K; Aoki, S

    2001-05-01

    The improvement of the heat transfer coefficient of the 1st row blades in high temperature industrial gas turbines is one of the most important issues to ensure reliable performance of these components and to attain high thermal efficiency of the facility. This paper deals with the contribution of heat transfer to increase the turbine inlet temperature of such gas turbines in order to attain efficient and environmentally benign engines. Following the experiments described in Part 1, a set of trials was conducted to clarify the influence of the blade's rotating motion on the heat transfer coefficient for internal serpentine flow passages with turbulence promoters. Test results are shown and discussed in this second part of the contribution.

  6. Advanced heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds, Phase III - demonstration of BCSRHP mobile regenerator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    Under Phase I of the subject contract, feasibility studies and basic engineering studies were performed for a Brayton Cycle Solvent Recovery Heat Pump (BCSRBP) system to prevent pollution from small source emitters. It was determined that the cost of a complete system, including adsorbers and regeneration process, would be far too much for the small emission source in most cases. This {open_quotes}integrated{close_quotes} approach was therefore not feasible. However, it was concluded that the expensive portion of the Brayton cycle process, the regenerator, could be shared by mounting it on a trailer that could be transported to different sites to regenerate an adsorber. Under Phase II of the project a mobile regenerator (BCSRI-IP) was designed and built to serve a large number of sites. Adsorbers were designed to control emissions for a week or more between regenerations. The purpose of phase III was to demonstrate the cost effectiveness and efficiency of the shared (decoupled) BRAYSORB{reg_sign} solvent recovery system in energy use and emission control compared to other control technologies through a performance testing program at representative industrial and commercial host sites in Southern California. NUCON was the prime contractor for the demonstration portion of this project. Support and funding were received from Southern California Edison Company, South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the U.S. Department of Energy in addition to the contribution by NUCON. Contractual arrangements were completed with each of the host sites and permits for both the stationary and mobile equipment were acquired. The adsorbers were installed at each host site and the appropriate interface connections were made. The mobile regenerator was transported to Southern California for the demonstration.

  7. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  8. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  9. Heat and power networks in process design, part II, design procedure for equipment selection and process matching

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, D.W.; Linnhoff, B.

    1983-09-01

    In Part I, criteria for heat engine and heat pump placement in chemical process networks were derived, based on the ''temperature interval'' (T.I) analysis of the heat exchanger network problem. Using these criteria, this paper gives a method for identifying the best outline design for any combined system of chemical process, heat engines, and heat pumps. The method eliminates inferior alternatives early, and positively leads on to the most appropriate solution. A graphical procedure based on the T.I. analysis forms the heart of the approach, and the calculations involved are simple enough to be carried out on, say, a programmable calculator. Application to a case study is demonstrated. Optimization methods based on this procedure are currently under research.

  10. Contribution of heat transfer to turbine blades and vanes for high temperature industrial gas turbines. Part 1: Film cooling.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, K; Aoki, S

    2001-05-01

    This paper deals with the contribution of heat transfer to increase the turbine inlet temperature of industrial gas turbines in order to attain efficient and environmentally benign engines. High efficiency film cooling, in the form of shaped film cooling and full coverage film cooling, is one of the most important cooling technologies. Corresponding heat transfer tests to optimize the film cooling effectiveness are shown and discussed in this first part of the contribution.

  11. Mechanochemical effect in the iron(III) spin crossover complex [Fe(3-MeO-salenEt2]PF6 as studied by heat capacity calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Sorai, Michio; Burriel, Ramón; Westrum, Edgar F; Hendrickson, David N

    2008-04-10

    Magnetic and thermal properties of the iron(III) spin crossover complex [Fe(3MeO-salenEt)(2)]PF(6) are very sensitive to mechanochemical perturbations. Heat capacities for unperturbed and differently perturbed samples were precisely determined by adiabatic calorimetry at temperatures in the 10-300 K range. The unperturbed compound shows a cooperative spin crossover transition at 162.31 K, presenting a hysteresis of 2.8 K. The anomalous enthalpy and entropy contents of the transition were evaluated to be Delta(trs)H = 5.94 kJ mol(-1) and Delta(trs)S = 36.7 J K(-1) mol(-1), respectively. By mechanochemical treatments, (1) the phase transition temperature was lowered by 1.14 K, (2) the enthalpy and entropy gains at the phase transition due to the spin crossover phenomenon were diminished to Delta(trs)H = 4.94 kJ mol(-1) and Delta(trs)S = 31.1 J K(-1) mol(-1), and (3) the lattice heat capacities were larger than those of the unperturbed sample over the whole temperature range. In spite of different mechanical perturbations (grinding with a mortar and pestle and grinding in a ball-mill), two sets of heat capacity measurements provided basically the same results. The mechanochemical perturbation exerts its effect more strongly on the low-spin state than on the high-spin state. It shows a substantial increase of the number of iron(III) ions in the high-spin state below the transition temperature. The heat capacities of the diamagnetic cobalt(III) analogue [Co(3MeO-salenEt)(2)]PF(6) also were measured. The lattice heat capacity of the iron compounds has been estimated from either the measurements on the cobalt complex using a corresponding states law or the effective frequency distribution method. These estimations have been used for the evaluation of the transition anomaly.

  12. RF thermal and new cold part design studies on TTF-III input coupler for Project-X

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Shilun; Adolphsen, Chris E.; Li, Zenghai; Solyak, Nikolay A.; Gonin, Ivan V.

    2015-05-15

    An RF power coupler is one of the key components in a superconducting (SC) linac. It provides RF power to the SC cavity and interconnects different temperature layers (1.8 K, 4.2 K, 70 K and 300 K). The TTF-III coupler is one of the most promising candidates for the High Energy (HE) linac of Project X, but it cannot meet the average power requirements because of the relatively high temperature rise on the warm inner conductor, so some design modifications will be required. In this paper, we describe our simulation studies on the copper coating thickness on the warm inner conductor with RRR values of 10 and 100. Our purpose is to rebalance the dynamic and static loads, and finally lower the temperature rise along the warm inner conductor. Additionally, to get stronger coupling, better power handling and less multipacting probability, one new cold part design was proposed using a 60 mm coaxial line; the corresponding multipacting simulation studies have also been investigated.

  13. A Comparative Study on Safe Pile Capacity as Shown in Table 1 of IS 2911 (Part III): 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakrashi, Somdev

    2017-06-01

    Code of practice for design and construction of under reamed pile foundations: IS 2911 (Part-III)—1980 presents one table in respect of safe load for bored cast in situ under reamed piles in sandy and clayey soils including black cotton soils, stem dia. of pile ranging from 20 to 50 cm and its effective length being 3.50 m. A comparative study, was taken up by working out safe pile capacity for one 400 dia., 3.5 m long bored cast in situ under reamed pile based on subsoil properties obtained from soil investigation work as well as subsoil properties of different magnitudes of clayey, sandy soils and comparing the same with the safe pile capacity shown in Table 1 of that IS Code. The study reveals that safe pile capacity computed from subsoil properties, barring a very few cases, considerably differs from that shown in the aforesaid code and looks forward for more research work and study to find out a conclusive explanation of this probable anomaly.

  14. A Study on an In-Process Laser Localized Pre-Deposition Heating Approach to Reducing FDM Part Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurapatti Ravi, Abinesh

    Material extrusion based rapid prototyping systems have been used to produce prototypes for several years. They have been quite important in the additive manufacturing field, and have gained popularity in research, development and manufacturing in a wide field of applications. There has been a lot of interest in using these technologies to produce end use parts, and Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) has gained traction in leading the transition of rapid prototyping technologies to rapid manufacturing. But parts built with the FDM process exhibit property anisotropy. Many studies have been conducted into process optimization, material properties and even post processing of parts, but were unable to solve the strength anisotropy issue. To address this, an optical heating system has been proposed to achieve localized heating of the pre- deposition surface prior to material deposition over the heated region. This occurs in situ within the build process, and aims to increase the interface temperature to above glass transition (Tg), to trigger an increase in polymer chain diffusion, and in extension, increase the strength of the part. An increase in flexural strength by 95% at the layer interface has been observed when the optical heating method was implemented, thereby improving property isotropy of the FDM part. This approach can be designed to perform real time control of inter-filament and interlayer temperatures across the build volume of a part, and can be tuned to achieve required mechanical properties.

  15. Vibration analysis of shell-and-tube heat exchangers: an overview-Part 2: vibration response, fretting-wear, guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Taylor, C. E.

    2003-11-01

    Design guidelines were developed to prevent tube failures due to excessive flow-induced vibration in shell-and-tube heat exchangers. An overview of vibration analysis procedures and recommended design guidelines is presented in this paper. This paper pertains to liquid, gas and two-phase heat exchangers such as nuclear steam generators, reboilers, coolers, service water heat exchangers, condensers, and moisture-separator-reheaters. Part 2 of this paper covers forced vibration excitation mechanisms, vibration response prediction, resulting damage assessment, and acceptance criteria.

  16. Wear, creep, and frictional heating of femoral implant articulating surfaces and the effect on long-term performance--Part II, Friction, heating, and torque.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J A; Schwartz, G; Lynch, G; Gir, S

    1988-04-01

    In Part I, (J.A. Davidson and G. Schwartz, "Wear, creep, and frictional heating of femoral implant articulating surfaces and the effect on long-term performance--Part I, A review," J. Biomed. Mater. Res., 21, 000-000 (1987) it was shown that lubrication of the artificial hip joint was complex and that long-term performance is governed by the combined wear, creep, and to a lesser extent, oxidation degradation of the articulating materials. Importantly, it was shown that a tendency for heating exists during articulation in the hip joint and that elevated temperatures can increase the wear, creep, and oxidation degradation rate of UHMWPE. The present study was performed to examine closely the propensity to generate heat during articulation in a hip joint simulator. The systems investigated were polished Co-Cr-Mo alloy articulating against UHMWPE, polished alumina ceramic against UHMWPE, and polished alumina against itself. Frictional torque was also evaluated for each system at various levels of applied loads. A walking load history was used in both the frictional heating and torque tests. The majority of tests were performed with 5 mL of water lubricant. However, the effect of various concentrations of hyaluronic acid was also evaluated. Results showed frictional heating to occur in all three systems, reaching an equilibrium after roughly 30 min articulation time. Ceramic systems showed reduced levels of heating compared to the cobalt alloy-UHMWPE system. The level of frictional torque for each system ranked similar to their respective tendencies to generate heat. Hyaluronic acid had little effect, while dry conditions and the presence of small quantities of bone cement powder in water lubricant significantly increased frictional torque.

  17. Elasto-dynamic analysis of a gear pump-Part III: Experimental validation procedure and model extension to helical gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns external gear pumps for automotive applications, which operate at high speed and low pressure. In previous works of the authors (Part I and II, [1,2]), a non-linear lumped-parameter kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps was presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machine. The two main sources of noise and vibration are considered: pressure pulsation and gear meshing. The model has been used in order to foresee the influence of working conditions and design modifications on vibration generation. The model's experimental validation is a difficult task. Thus, Part III proposes a novel methodology for the validation carried out by the comparison of simulations and experimental results concerning forces and moments: it deals with the external and inertial components acting on the gears, estimated by the model, and the reactions and inertial components on the pump casing and the test plate, obtained by measurements. The validation is carried out comparing the level of the time synchronous average in the time domain and the waterfall maps in the frequency domain, with particular attention to identify system resonances. The validation results are satisfactory globally, but discrepancies are still present. Moreover, the assessed model has been properly modified for the application to a new virtual pump prototype with helical gears in order to foresee gear accelerations and dynamic forces. Part IV is focused on improvements in the modelling and analysis of the phenomena bound to the pressure evolution around the gears in order to achieve results closer to the measured values. As a matter of fact, the simulation results have shown that a variable meshing stiffness has a notable contribution on the dynamic behaviour of the pump but this is not as important as the pressure phenomena. As a consequence, the original model was modified with the

  18. Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part III--Practitioners and Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulin, David; Martinez, David; Aenchbacher, Amy; Aiello, Rocco; Doyle, Mike; Hilgenbrinck, Linda; Busse, Sean; Cappuccio, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In Part III of the feature, physical educators and adapted physical educators offer current best practices as models of implementation for readers. Contributions included are: (1) Answer to the Dear Colleague Letter from the Anchorage School District's Adapted Sport Program (David Poulin); (2) Georgia's Adapted Physical Educators Response to the…

  19. Proceedings of the EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions (Dearborn, Michigan, April 5-7, 1984). Part III: Taking the Humanities to Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    Part III of the proceedings contains 12 presentations. They are: "The Role of Business Language in the Traditional Curriculum" (Michel Rocchi); "Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions Belong in the Liberal Arts" (Robert A. Kreiter); "How Much and How Far? Commercial French and the Student, Instructor, Administrator, and the Business…

  20. Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part III--Practitioners and Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulin, David; Martinez, David; Aenchbacher, Amy; Aiello, Rocco; Doyle, Mike; Hilgenbrinck, Linda; Busse, Sean; Cappuccio, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In Part III of the feature, physical educators and adapted physical educators offer current best practices as models of implementation for readers. Contributions included are: (1) Answer to the Dear Colleague Letter from the Anchorage School District's Adapted Sport Program (David Poulin); (2) Georgia's Adapted Physical Educators Response to the…

  1. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (83rd, Phoenix, Arizona, August 9-12, 2000). Miscellaneous, Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Miscellaneous, part III section of the proceedings contains the following 11 papers: "The Relationship between Health and Fitness Magazine Reading and Eating-Disordered Weight-Loss Methods among High School Girls" (Steven R. Thomsen, Michelle M. Weber, and Lora Beth Brown); "A Practical Exercise for Teaching Ethical Decision…

  2. The solar assisted air-source heat pump system, part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, T.

    1980-11-01

    A new heat pump heating and air conditioning system was proposed and tested. It features the effective utilization of climatic conditions as its heat sources and sinks, to improve the thermodynamic efficiencies. Reduced electricity consumption, utility load leveling and the least environmental pollutions are expected. The outdoor unit of this heat pump is composed of aluminum panels that are painted black to enhance the radiative heat exchange and fixed almost perpendicularly to improve the natural convective heat transfer with air. The working fluid is halocarbon and commonly used in the heat transfer circuits and the refrigeration cycle. In the heating cycle, the liquid refrigerant evaporates in the passages of the panel. When insolation to the panels is sufficient to meet the heat pump evaporator capacity, the panel temperature will be almost the same as the outdoor air temperature. Thus little convective heat loss to the surrounding air occurs. As the insolation decreases the panel temperature falls several degrees below the outdoor air to absorb heat out of the air until the equilibrium condition is reached.

  3. Information technology in chemistry research and education: Part I. Ab initio studies on the hydrolysis of aromatic diazonium ions. Part II. Theoretical study and molecular modeling of non-covalent interactions. Part III. Applying information technology in chemistry education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhengyu

    Part I of this dissertation studies the bonding in chemical reactions, while Part II studies the bonding related to inter- and intra-molecular interactions. Part III studies the application of IT technology in chemistry education. Part I of this dissertation (chapter 1 and chapter 2) focuses on the theoretical studies on the mechanism of the hydrolysis reactions of benzenediazonium ion and guaninediazonium ion. The major conclusion is that in hydrolysis reactions the "unimolecular mechanism" actually has to involve the reacting solvent molecule. Therefore, the unimolecular pathway can only serve as a conceptual model but will not happen in the reality. Chapter I concludes that the hydrolysis reaction of benzenediazonium ion takes the direct SN2Ar mechanism via a transition state but without going through a pre-coordination complex. Chapter 2 concludes that the formation of xanthine from the dediazoniation reaction of guaninediazonium ion in water takes the SN2Ar pathway without a transition state. And oxanine might come from an intermediate formed by the bimolecular deprotonation of the H atom on N3 of guaninediazonium ion synchronized with the pyrimidine ring opening reaction. Part II of this dissertation includes chapters 3, 4, and 5. Chapter 3 studies the quadrupole moment of benzene and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. We concluded that the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction is important in the arene-arene interactions. Our study shows the most stable structure of benzene dimer is the point-to-face T-shaped structure. Chapter 4 studies the intermolecular interactions that result in the disorder of the crystal of 4-Chloroacetophenone-(4-methoxyphenylethylidene). We analyzed all the nearest neighbor interactions within that crystal and found that the crystal structure is determined by its thermo-dynamical properties. Our calculation perfectly reproduced the percentage of parallel-alignment of the crystal. Part III of this dissertation is focused on the

  4. Curie point depth and heat flow from spectral analysis of aeromagnetic data over the northern part of Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saada, Saada Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    The present work aims to estimate the Curie point depth and the surface heat flow for the northern part of the Western Desert using aeromagnetic data. Applying spectral analysis to aeromagnetic anomalies has provided equitable promising geological results, useful for further geothermal or petroleum exploration. The total intensity aeromagnetic map was first reduced to the north magnetic pole to correct the shape and position of different magnetic anomalies over their causative bodies. Secondly, the short wavelengths were removed to enhance the deeper long wavelengths related to the deep sources. Spectral analysis indicates that the area is underlined by an average Curie point depth of about 27 km. This implies an average thermal heat flow (53 mW/m2) lower than the average global heat flow. The investigated area was divided into eighteen blocks, where the average depths to centroid and top of the magnetic source were estimated for each block. The results of this work show a general depth increase of the magnetic boundaries from 24.5 km in the southern area to 33 km at the northern part. The calculated surface heat flow decreases from about 56 to 42 mW/m2 in the same direction. Consequently, this area is characterized by its low geothermal gradient and surface heat flow. This low geothermal gradient indicates that the upper mantle contributes to the magnetic features at the northern offshore parts. This work also recommends by deep drilling for petroleum exploration and production within the Egyptian Mediterranean Sea exploration strip.

  5. Heat-Resistant Alloys for Ordnance Materiel and Aircraft and Naval Engine Parts (N-102): Part 1 - Heat Resistant Alloys of the 21%Cr:9%Ni Type

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-06-29

    26&r:12£Ni Alloy 29 Stress -Strain- Rupture Data From 1200°F Tests . . 29 Stross-Strain- Rupture Data From IA00°F Tests 30 Stross-Strain- Rupture ...ample for most industrial applications. Stress -strain- rupture and creep *?" ^^^^^"ffiS? „tress values and guilty cbaractcristies at ^\\^J’&M ?.? . 10.5...TT, Table 4 Comparative Elevated Temperature Ductility Heat Composition -US*, a SS B2 ——Elongation During Stress - Rupture Tests - % in 2"— —-1200

  6. Heating temperature dependence of Cr(III) oxidation in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth salts and subsequent Cr(VI) leaching behavior.

    PubMed

    Verbinnen, Bram; Billen, Pieter; Van Coninckxloo, Michiel; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2013-06-04

    In this paper, the temperature dependence of Cr(III) oxidation in high temperature processes and the subsequent Cr(VI) leaching was studied using synthetic mixtures. It was experimentally shown that in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth salts, oxidation of Cr(III) takes place, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. Heating of synthetic mixtures of Cr2O3 and Na, K, or Ca salts led to elevated leaching of Cr(VI); in the presence of Na, more than 80% of the initial Cr(III) amount was converted to Cr(VI) at 600-800 °C. Kinetic experiments allowed explanation of the increase in Cr(VI) leaching for increasing temperatures up to 600-800 °C. After reaching a maximum in Cr(VI) leaching at temperatures around 600-800 °C, the leaching decreased again, which could be explained by the formation of a glassy phase that prevents leaching of the formed Cr(VI). By way of illustration, Cr(VI) formation and leaching was evaluated for a case study, the fabrication of ceramic material from contaminated sludge. Based on the proposed reaction mechanisms, countermeasures to prevent Cr oxidation (addition of NH4H2PO4, heating under inert atmosphere) were proposed and successfully tested for synthetic mixtures and for the case study.

  7. Structure property relationships in polymer blends and composites. Part I. Polymer/POSS composites. Part II. Poly(ethylene terephthalate) ionomer/polyamide 6 blends. Part III. Elastomer/boron nitride composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Subramanian

    Multiphase polymer systems are an increasingly important technical area of polymer science. By definition, a multiphase system is one that has two or more distinct phases. From the standpoint of commercial applications and developments, polymer blending represents one of the easiest ways to achieve properties not available in individual materials. This work discusses the structure property relationships in polymer certain blends and composites. Polymer/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSSRTM) blends and copolymers have gained significant attention in the last decade due the unique properties of the inorganic-organic hybrid structure of POSS. The majority of the research in polymer/POSS has been in the form of copolymers and thermosets. The criteria for the reinforcement of polymers using POSS as a filler material is not been discussed in literature. Part I of the thesis will highlight the effect of blending POSS with different polymers and discuss the rules for reinforcement of polymers when using POSS as a filler material. Part II of the thesis will discuss the structure property relationships in poly(ethylene terephthalate) ionomer/polyamide 6 blends. Part III will discuss the control of coefficient of thermal expansion of elastomers using boron nitride as a filler material.

  8. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjective to Variable Accelerations. Part 2; Temperature Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Kaya, Taril; Rogers, Paul; Hoff, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The effect of accelerating forces on the performance of loop heat pipes (LHP) is of interest and importance to terrestrial and space applications. LHP's are being considered for cooling of military combat vehicles and for spinning spacecraft. In order to investigate the effect of an accelerating force on LHP operation, a miniature LHP was installed on a spin table. Variable accelerating forces were imposed on the LHP by spinning the table at different angular speeds. Several patterns of accelerating forces were applied, i.e. continuous spin at different speeds and periodic spin at different speeds and frequencies. The resulting accelerations ranged from 1.17 g's to 4.7 g's. This paper presents the second part of the experimental study, i.e. the effect of an accelerating force on the LHP operating temperature. It has been known that in stationary tests the LHP operating temperature is a function of the evaporator power and the condenser sink temperature when the compensation temperature is not actively controlled. Results of this test program indicate that any change in the accelerating force will result in a chance in the LHP operating temperature through its influence on the fluid distribution in the evaporator, condenser and compensation chamber. However, the effect is not universal, rather it is a function of other test conditions. A steady, constant acceleration may result in an increase or decrease of the operating temperature, while a periodic spin will lead to a quasi-steady operating temperature over a sufficient time interval. In addition, an accelerating force may lead to temperature hysteresis and changes in the temperature oscillation. In spite of all these effects, the LHP continued to operate without any problems in all tests.

  9. Errors in the Simulated Heat Budget of CGCMs in the Eastern Part of the Tropical Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazel, J.; Masarik, M. T.; Mechoso, C. R.; Small, R. J.; Curchitser, E. N.

    2014-12-01

    The simulation of the tropical climate by coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (CGCMs) shows severe warm biases in the sea-surface temperature (SST) field of the southeastern part of the Pacific and the Atlantic (SEP and SEA, respectively). The errors are strongest near the land mass with a broad plume extending west, Also, the equatorial cold tongue is too strong and extends too far to the west. The simulated precipitation field generally shows a persistent double Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Tremendous effort has been made to improve CGCM performance in general and to address these tropical errors in particular. The present paper start by comparing Taylor diagrams of the SST errors in the SEP and SEA by CGCMs participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phases 3 and 5 (CMIP3 and CMIP5, respectively). Some improvement is noted in models that perform poorly in CMIP3, but the overall performance is broadly similar in the two intercomparison projects. We explore the hypothesis that an improved representation of atmosphere-ocean interaction involving stratocumulus cloud decks and oceanic upwelling is essential to reduce errors in the SEP and SEA. To estimate the error contribution by clouds and upwelling, we examine the upper ocean surface heat flux budget. The resolution of the oceanic component of the CGCMs in both CMIP3 and CMIP5 is too coarse for a realistic representation of upwelling. Therefore, we also examine simulations by the Nested Regional Climate Model (nRCM) system, which is a CGCM with a very high-resolution regional model embedded in coastal regions. The nRCM consists of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM, run at 1°) coupled to the global Parallel Ocean Program Model (POP, run at 1°) to which the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS6, run at 5-10 km) is nested in selected coastal regions.

  10. Two-dimensional finite element heat transfer model of softwood. Part I, Effective thermal conductivity

    Treesearch

    John F. Hunt; Hongmei Gu

    2006-01-01

    The anisotropy of wood complicates solution of heat and mass transfer problems that require analyses be based on fundamental material properties of the wood structure. Most heat transfer models use average thermal properties across either the radial or tangential direction and do not differentiate the effects of cellular alignment, earlywood/latewood differences, or...

  11. Heat Transfer Measurements during DC Casting of Aluminium Part I: Measurement Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, J. A.; Bergström, T.

    A method for determination of surface heat transfer to the cooling water and mould based on in-situ temperature measurements in the DC cast ingot has been developed. Three or more steel mantled coaxial thermocouples (0.5 mm diam.) are mounted on a wire frame called a "harp". Allowing the "harp" to freeze into the solid ingots during the casting time-temperature plots T1 (t), T2(t), T3 (t) are obtained for three moving points positioned typically 3, 7 and 11 mm from the ingot surface. From these measurements surface temperature, heat flux and heat transfer coefficients are computed as functions of vertical distance. The computer program is based on steady-state two-dimensional heat balances with convective terms for two fixed volume elements: one around thermocouple T1 and one surface element. A special numerical smoothing procedure is incorporated. The heat of solidification is taken into account.

  12. In-plant demonstration of optimization of energy utilization in beck dyeing of carpet. Proposed Part III, Phase III extension of DOE contract

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    A proposal to demonstrate on a commercial scale an optimized procedure for beck dyeing of carpet to improve energy utilization is discussed. The proposal is for Phase III. A number of energy conserving procedural and equipment modification including lower dyeing temperature, lower liquor ratio, lower air exhaust flows, and recycle of hot spent dyebaths will be demonstrated in the plant dyeings. Pilot-scale experiments suggest that these modifications will reduce direct energy consumption in carpet dyeing by 400 Btu per pound of carpet processed. Adoption of the modified process by only 50% of the carpet industry would yield an annual reduction in energy consumption of 1 x 10/sup 12/ Btu's (1.7 x 10/sup 5/ BOE). The pilot-scale experiments also indicate that a cost savings of approximately 2 cents per pound of carpet dyed can be achieved with the suggested modifications. The demonstrated technology will have application in other types of nylon and polyester fiber dyeing. The Salem Carpet Mills carpet dyeing facility at Chickamauga, Georgia, will be the site of the demonstration.

  13. Microstructural engineering applied to the controlled cooling of steel wire rod: Part I. Experimental design and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P. C.; Hawbolt, E. B.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a mathematical model which incorporates heat flow, phase transformation kinetics, and property-structure-composition relationships to predict the mechanical properties of steel rod being control cooled under industrial conditions. Thus, the principles of microstructural engineering have been brought to bear on this interdisciplinary problem by combining computer modeling with laboratory measurements of heat flow, austenite decomposition kinetics, microstructure and mechanical properties, and industrial trials to determine heat transfer and obtain rod samples under known conditions. Owing to the length and diversity of the study, it is reported in three parts,[8191]the first of which is concerned with the heat flow measurements. A relatively simple and reliable technique, involving a preheated steel rod instrumented with a thermocouple secured at its centerline, has been devised to determine the cooling rate in different regions of the moving bed of rod loops on an operating Stelmor line. The measured thermal response of the rod has been analyzed by two transient conduction models (lumped and distributed parameter, respectively) to yield overall heat-transfer coefficients for radiation and convection. The adequacy of the technique has been checked by cooling instrumented rods under well-defined, air crossflow conditions in the laboratory and comparing measured heat-transfer coefficients to values predicted from well-established equations. The industrial thermal measurements have permitted the characterization of a coefficient to account for radiative interaction among adjacent rod loops near the edge and at the center of the bed.

  14. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling and Baseline Model Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-04-01

    A numerical model has been developed to simulate coupled thermal and electrical energy transfer processes in a thermoelectric generator (TEG) designed for automotive waste heat recovery systems. This model is capable of computing the overall heat transferred, the electrical power output, and the associated pressure drop for given inlet conditions of the exhaust gas and the available TEG volume. Multiple-filled skutterudites and conventional bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from exhaust into usable electrical power. Heat transfer between the hot exhaust gas and the hot side of the TEMs is enhanced with the use of a plate-fin heat exchanger integrated within the TEG and using liquid coolant on the cold side. The TEG is discretized along the exhaust flow direction using a finite-volume method. Each control volume is modeled as a thermal resistance network which consists of integrated submodels including a heat exchanger and a thermoelectric device. The pressure drop along the TEG is calculated using standard pressure loss correlations and viscous drag models. The model is validated to preserve global energy balances and is applied to analyze a prototype TEG with data provided by General Motors. Detailed results are provided for local and global heat transfer and electric power generation. In the companion paper, the model is then applied to consider various TEG topologies using skutterudite and bismuth telluride TEMs.

  15. Mist/steam cooling in a heated horizontal tube -- Part 2: Results and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Wang, T.; Gaddis, J.L.

    2000-04-01

    Experimental studies on mist/steam cooling in a heated horizontal tube have been performed. Wall temperature distributions have been measured under various main steam flow rates, droplet mass ratios, and wall heat fluxes. Generally, the heat transfer performance of steam can be significantly improved by adding mist into the main flow. An average enhancement of 100% with the highest local heat transfer enhancement of 200% is achieved with 5% mist. When the test section is mildly heated, an interesting wall temperature distribution is observed: the wall temperature increases first, then decreases, and finally increases again. A three-stage heat transfer model with transition boiling, unstable liquid fragment evaporation, and dry-wall mist cooling has been proposed and has shown some success in predicting the wall temperature of the mist/steam flow. The PDPA measurements have facilitated better understanding and interpreting of the droplet dynamics and heat transfer mechanisms. Furthermore, this study has shed light on how to generate appropriate droplet sizes to achieve effective droplet transportation, and has shown that it is promising to extend present results to a higher temperature and higher pressure environment.

  16. Heat transfer in porous medium embedded with vertical plate: Non-equilibrium approach - Part A

    SciTech Connect

    Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Quadir, G. A.

    2016-06-08

    Heat transfer in a porous medium embedded with vertical flat plate is investigated by using thermal non-equilibrium model. Darcy model is employed to simulate the flow inside porous medium. It is assumed that the heat transfer takes place by natural convection and radiation. The vertical plate is maintained at isothermal temperature. The governing partial differential equations are converted into non-dimensional form and solved numerically using finite element method. Results are presented in terms of isotherms and streamlines for various parameters such as heat transfer coefficient parameter, thermal conductivity ratio, and radiation parameter.

  17. Ability to Discriminate Between Sustainable and Unsustainable Heat Stress Exposures-Part 2: Physiological Indicators.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Villalba, Ximena P; Wu, Yougui; Ashley, Candi D; Bernard, Thomas E

    2017-06-08

    There are times when it is not practical to assess heat stress using environmental metrics and metabolic rate, and heat strain may provide an alternative approach. Heat strain indicators have been used for decades as tools for monitoring physiological responses to work in hot environments. Common indicators of heat strain are body core temperature (assessed here as rectal temperature Tre), heart rate (HR), and average skin temperature (Tsk). Data collected from progressive heat stress trials were used to (1) demonstrate if physiological heat strain indicators (PHSIs) at the upper limit of Sustainable heat stress were below generally accepted limits; (2) suggest values for PHSIs that demonstrate a Sustainable level of heat stress; (3) suggest alternative PHSIs; and (4) determine if metabolic rate was an effect modifier. Two previous progressive heat stress studies included 176 trials with 352 pairs of Sustainable and Unsustainable exposures over a range of relative humidities and metabolic rates using 29 participants. To assess the discrimination ability of PHSIs, conditional logistic regression and stepwise logistic regression were used to find the best combinations of predictors of Unsustainable exposures. The accuracy of the models was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curves. Current recommendations for physiological heat strain limits were associated with probabilities of Unsustainable greater than 0.5. Screening limits for Sustainable heat stress were Tre of 37.5°C, HR of 105 bpm, and Tsk of 35.8°C. Tsk alone resulted in an area under the curve of 0.85 and the combination of Tsk and HR (area under the curve = 0.88) performed the best. The adjustment for metabolic rate was statistically significant for physiological strain index or ∆Tre-sk as main predictors, but its effect modification was negligible and could be ignored. Based on the receiver operating characteristic curve, PHSIs (Tre, HR, and Tsk) can accurately predict Unsustainable heat

  18. Pepper heat shock protein 70a interacts with the type III effector AvrBsT and triggers plant cell death and immunity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) function as molecular chaperones and are essential for the maintenance and/or restoration of protein homeostasis. The genus Xanthomonas type III effector protein AvrBsT induces hypersensitive cell death in pepper (Capsicum annuum). Here, we report the identification of the pepper CaHSP70a as an AvrBsT-interacting protein. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirm the specific interaction between CaHSP70a and AvrBsT in planta. The CaHSP70a peptide-binding domain is essential for its interaction with AvrBsT. Heat stress (37°C) and Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) infection distinctly induce CaHSP70a in pepper leaves. Cytoplasmic CaHSP70a proteins significantly accumulate in pepper leaves to induce the hypersensitive cell death response by Xcv (avrBsT) infection. Transient CaHSP70a overexpression induces hypersensitive cell death under heat stress, which is accompanied by strong induction of defense- and cell death-related genes. The CaHSP70a peptide-binding domain and ATPase-binding domain are required to trigger cell death under heat stress. Transient coexpression of CaHSP70a and avrBsT leads to cytoplasmic localization of the CaHSP70a-AvrBsT complex and significantly enhances avrBsT-triggered cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana. CaHSP70a silencing in pepper enhances Xcv growth but disrupts the reactive oxygen species burst and cell death response during Xcv infection. Expression of some defense marker genes is significantly reduced in CaHSP70a-silenced leaves, with lower levels of the defense hormones salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Together, these results suggest that CaHSP70a interacts with the type III effector AvrBsT and is required for cell death and immunity in plants.

  19. Pepper Heat Shock Protein 70a Interacts with the Type III Effector AvrBsT and Triggers Plant Cell Death and Immunity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) function as molecular chaperones and are essential for the maintenance and/or restoration of protein homeostasis. The genus Xanthomonas type III effector protein AvrBsT induces hypersensitive cell death in pepper (Capsicum annuum). Here, we report the identification of the pepper CaHSP70a as an AvrBsT-interacting protein. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays confirm the specific interaction between CaHSP70a and AvrBsT in planta. The CaHSP70a peptide-binding domain is essential for its interaction with AvrBsT. Heat stress (37°C) and Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) infection distinctly induce CaHSP70a in pepper leaves. Cytoplasmic CaHSP70a proteins significantly accumulate in pepper leaves to induce the hypersensitive cell death response by Xcv (avrBsT) infection. Transient CaHSP70a overexpression induces hypersensitive cell death under heat stress, which is accompanied by strong induction of defense- and cell death-related genes. The CaHSP70a peptide-binding domain and ATPase-binding domain are required to trigger cell death under heat stress. Transient coexpression of CaHSP70a and avrBsT leads to cytoplasmic localization of the CaHSP70a-AvrBsT complex and significantly enhances avrBsT-triggered cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana. CaHSP70a silencing in pepper enhances Xcv growth but disrupts the reactive oxygen species burst and cell death response during Xcv infection. Expression of some defense marker genes is significantly reduced in CaHSP70a-silenced leaves, with lower levels of the defense hormones salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Together, these results suggest that CaHSP70a interacts with the type III effector AvrBsT and is required for cell death and immunity in plants. PMID:25491184

  20. Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems, Part of Indoor Air Quality Design Tools for Schools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The main purposes of a Heating, Ventilation, and Air-Conditioning system are to help maintain good indoor air quality through adequate ventilation with filtration and provide thermal comfort. HVAC systems are among the largest energy consumers in schools.

  1. Numerical modeling of conjugate heat transfer on complex geometries with diagonal Cartesian method. Part 1: Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.L.; Carlson, K.D.; Chen, C.J. |

    1999-05-01

    In this study, a diagonal Cartesian method for thermal analysis is developed for simulation of conjugate heat transfer over complex boundaries. This method uses diagonal line segments in addition to Cartesian coordinates. The velocity fields are also modeled using the diagonal Cartesian method. The transport equations are discretized with the finite analytic (FA) method. The current work is validated by simulating a rotated lid-driven cavity flow with conjugate heat transfer, and accurate results are obtained.

  2. Heat transfer in nonequilibrium boundary layer flow over a partly catalytic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Hui

    2016-11-01

    Surface catalysis has a huge influence on the aeroheating performance of hypersonic vehicles. For the reentry flow problem of a traditional blunt vehicle, it is reasonable to assume a frozen boundary layer surrounding the vehicles' nose, and the catalytic heating can be decoupled with the heat conduction. However, when considering a hypersonic cruise vehicle flying in the medium-density near space, the boundary layer flow around its sharp leading-edge is likely to be nonequilibrium rather than frozen due to rarefied gas effects. As a result, there will be a competition between the heat conduction and the catalytic heating. In this paper, the theoretical modeling and the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method are employed to study the corresponding rarefied nonequilibrium flow and heat transfer phenomena near the leading edge of the near space hypersonic vehicles. It is found that even under identical rarefication degree, the nonequilibrium degree of the flow and the corresponding heat transfer performance of the sharp leading edges could be different from that of the big blunt noses. A generalized model is preliminarily proposed to describe and to evaluate the competitive effects between the homogeneous recombination of atoms inside the nonequilibrium boundary layer and the heterogeneous recombination of atoms on the catalytic wall surface. The introduced nonequilibrium criterion and the analytical formula are validated and calibrated by the DSMC results, and the physical mechanism is discussed.

  3. Compensation of skeletal Class III malocclusion by isolated extraction of mandibular teeth: Part 2: Skeletal, dentoalveolar and soft tissue parameters in comparison with nonextraction Class III therapies.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Bernd; Gaida, Sarah; Dathe, Henning

    2016-03-01

    To retrospectively compare two compensatory approaches taken in skeletal Class III patients during the main treatment stage, including a study group of multiband treatment plus isolated extraction of mandibular teeth and a control group of multiband treatment without extraction of teeth. The extraction group included 22 (12 female, 10 male) patients receiving compensatory multiband treatment for a mean of 3.47 ± 1.14 years and 16.22 ± 1.92 years old at debonding. The nonextraction group included 24 (14 female, 10 male) patients undergoing multiband treatment for 2.76 ± 1.28 years and 15.38 ± 1.46 years old at debonding. Lateral cephalograms obtained at baseline and upon completion of active treatment were traced for skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue parameters. Welch and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze intergroup differences (initial values, final values, initial-to-final changes) and within-group differences (p < 0.05). Upon completion of active treatment, the only significant intergroup differences were noted for U1NA and L1ML. Significant within-group changes over the courses of treatment were seen for SNB, MLNL, U1NA, U1NL, L1NB, L1ML, H-angle, ULipEL, and LLipEL (extraction group) or for SNB, ANB, individual ANB, Wits appraisal, U1NA, U1NL, H-angle, Naslab-a, ULipEL, and LLipEL (nonextraction group). Parameters that changed by significantly different amounts in both groups included Wits appraisal, L1NB, L1ML, and LLipEL. The added value of isolated extraction therapy basically lies in increasing the potential for retruding the lower incisor inclinations, so that compensatory treatment becomes an option even in selected patients presenting with adverse occlusal situations that would otherwise require orthognathic surgery. Given the successful outcomes in both groups, which had been established by Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores, it was possible to define the skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue characteristics of successful treatment more

  4. Study of the Need for Educational Manpower for Handicapped Children and Youth: Part A - Phase III. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Raymond D.; And Others

    Phase III of the Study of the Need for Educational Manpower for Handicapped Children and Youth, in demonstrating the feasibility of the Manpower Requirements Projection Model (MRPM), gathered data in the states necessary for implementation of the model. The MRPM was developed to enable state or local administrators of special education to estimate…

  5. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-05-01

    In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

  6. Heat and fluid flow in complex joints during gas metal arc welding—Part I: Numerical model of fillet welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Kim, C.-H.; DebRoy, T.

    2004-05-01

    Gas metal arc (GMA) fillet welding is one of the most important processes for metal joining because of its high productivity and amiability to automation. This welding process is characterized by the complicated V-shaped joint geometry, a deformable weld pool surface, and the additions of hot metal droplets. In the present work, a three-dimensional numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model was developed to examine the temperature profiles, velocity fields, weld pool shape and size, and the nature of the solidified weld bead geometry during GMA fillet welding. The model solved the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy using a boundary fitted curvilinear coordinate system. Apart from the direct transport of heat from the welding arc, additional heat from the metal droplets was modeled considering a volumetric heat source. The deformation of the weld pool surface was calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. Part I of this article is focused on the details of the numerical model such as coordinate transformation and calculation of volumetric heat source and free surface profile. An application of the model to GMA fillet welding of mild steel is described in an accompanying article (W. Zhang, C.-H. Kim and T. DebRoy, J. Appl Phys. 95, 5220 (2004)).

  7. [Operative treatment of traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spinal column: Part III: Follow up data].

    PubMed

    Reinhold, M; Knop, C; Beisse, R; Audigé, L; Kandziora, F; Pizanis, A; Pranzl, R; Gercek, E; Schultheiss, M; Weckbach, A; Bühren, V; Blauth, M

    2009-03-01

    In this third and final part, the Spine Study Group (AG WS) of the German Trauma Association (DGU) presents the follow-up (NU) data of its second, prospective, internet-based multicenter study (MCS II) for the treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal injuries including 865 patients from 8 trauma centers. Part I described in detail the epidemiologic data of the patient collective and the subgroups, whereas part II analyzed the different methods of treatment and radiologic findings. The study period covered the years 2002 to 2006 including a 30-month follow-up period from 01.01.2004 until 31.05.2006. Follow-up data of 638 (74%) patients were collected with a new internet-based database system and analyzed. Results in part III will be presented on the basis of the same characteristic treatment subgroups (OP, KONS, PLASTIE) and surgical treatment subgroups (Dorsal, Ventral, Kombi) in consideration of the level of injury (thoracic spine, thoracolumbar junction, lumbar spine). After the initial treatment and discharge from hospital, the average duration of subsequent inpatient rehabilitation was 4 weeks, which lasted significantly longer in patients with persistent neurologic deficits (mean 10.9 weeks) or polytraumatized patients (mean 8.6 weeks). Following rehabilitation on an inpatient basis, subsequent outpatient rehabilitation lasted on average 4 months. Physical therapy was administered significantly longer to patients with neurologic deficits (mean 8.7 months) or type C injuries (mean 8.6 months). The level of injury had no influence of the duration of the inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. A total of 382 (72.2%) patients who were either operated from posterior approach only or in a combined postero-anterior approach had an implant removal after an average 12 months. During the follow-up period 56 (8.8%) patients with complications were registered and of these 18 (2.8%) had to have surgical revision. The most common complications reported were infection, loss

  8. Heat treatment of NPP steam turbine parts from steel 26KhN3M2FAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, I. A.

    2007-05-01

    The process of final heat treatment of nuclear-power-plant steam turbine parts produced from steel 26KhN3M2FAA is developed. The quality of the metal of a commercially produced disk is studied. Conditions for obtaining a high set of mechanical properties in steel 26KhN3M2FAA combined with a reduced temperature of the ductile-brittle transition (semibrittleness temperature) are determined.

  9. Review of recent research on heat transfer with mixtures. Part 1: Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.P.; Chato, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    During the past 10 years, interest in heat transfer with mixtures has increased for several reasons. First, the use of zeotropic refrigerant mixtures (ZERMs) as working fluids in heat pump and refrigeration systems indicates potential advantages in efficiency and capacity. Second, ZERMs are prospective substitutes for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigerants (such as R12, R-11, and R-22). However, before the refrigerant mixtures will be put to use in heat pump, refrigerator, and air conditioning systems, the problem of possibly changed heat transfer performance and pressure drop in condensation processes has to be considered to realize the claimed advantages. Thus, it is necessary to study the mechanisms of condensation with mixtures. In this paper, a companion to one on boiling and evaporation, the recent research on condensation heat transfer with mixtures is reviewed. The main points are the thermal resistance of the vapor diffusion layer affecting the condensation, the influence of the flow direction of vapor on the condensation, the turbulence in the vapor generated by the fins, and the enhancement of the condensation performance of mixtures. This review is mainly concerned with the condensation of miscible mixtures, especially ZERMs. Only a few selected papers related to immiscible mixtures are reviewed here.

  10. Heat Transfer Investigation of Air Flow in Microtubes-Part II: Scale and Axial Conduction Effects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Kandlikar, Satish G

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the scale effects are specifically addressed by conducting experiments with air flow in different microtubes. Three stainless steel tubes of 962, 308, and 83 μm inner diameter (ID) are investigated for friction factor, and the first two are investigated for heat transfer. Viscous heating effects are studied in the laminar as well as turbulent flow regimes by varying the air flow rate. The axial conduction effects in microtubes are experimentally explored for the first time by comparing the heat transfer in SS304 tube with a 910 μm ID/2005 μm outer diameter nickel tube specifically fabricated using an electrodeposition technique. After carefully accounting for the variable heat losses along the tube length, it is seen that the viscous heating and the axial conduction effects become more important at microscale and the present models are able to predict these effects accurately. It is concluded that neglecting these effects is the main source of discrepancies in the data reported in the earlier literature.

  11. Calculation of turbulent boundary layers with heat transfer and pressure gradient utilizing a compressibility transformation. Part 3: Computer program manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J.; Boccio, J.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program is described capable of determining the properties of a compressible turbulent boundary layer with pressure gradient and heat transfer. The program treats the two-dimensional problem assuming perfect gas and Crocco integral energy solution. A compressibility transformation is applied to the equation for the conservation of mass and momentum, which relates this flow to a low speed constant property flow with simultaneous mass transfer and pressure gradient. The resulting system of describing equations consists of eight ordinary differential equations which are solved numerically. For Part 1, see N72-12226; for Part 2, see N72-15264.

  12. SCRAM: A scoring and ranking system for persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic substances for the North American Great Lakes. Part III: Acute and subchronic or chronic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Snyder, E M; Snyder, S A; Giesy, J P; Blonde, S A; Hurlburt, G K; Summer, C L; Mitchell, R R; Bush, D M

    2000-01-01

    In Part I of this series (Snyder: et al., 1999a), the Chemical Scoring and Ranking Assessment Model (SCRAM) was introduced. This system produces scores for chemicals based on their bioaccumulation potential, environmental persistence, and toxicity. In Part II, scoring of the potential for a chemical to persist in the environment and bioaccumulate was described (Snyder et al., 1999b). In Part III, scoring of chemical toxicity is discussed, including definitions and descriptions of effects that are scored, specific scoring instructions, the basis for the criteria and scores, and specific conditions or concerns regarding the types of data used for scoring. A score for each chemical screened is determined from available test data from acute or subchronic and chronic toxicity tests conducted on aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Subchronic and chronic human health effects, including carcinogenicity, are also considered. Part IV includes an evaluation of the performance of the scoring and ranking system (Snyder: et al., 1999c).

  13. Sauna, shower, and ice water immersion. Physiological responses to brief exposures to heat, cool, and cold. Part III. Body temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, K

    1989-04-01

    Nine active winter swimmer men were subjected to four exposures each imitating a form of hot or cold exposures or their combination practiced among the Finns: (A) sauna and head-out ice water immersion; (B) sauna and 15 degrees C shower; (C) sauna and room temperature; (D) head-out ice water immersion and room temperature. All exposures were repeated and ended with recovery at room temperature. Body core and surface temperatures were recorded. One surface probe was placed between the scapulae to detect any signs of thermogenic activity by brown adipose tissue upon cold exposures. In the sauna control of core temperature was lost at esophageal temperature Tes 38 degrees C where the mean skin temperature exceeded the Tes. The brief ice water immersions did not disturb the thermal balance of the body core. The interscapular surface temperature recording provided circumstantial evidence of functioning thermogenic tissue in the area.

  14. The National Council for Geographic Education Competency-Based Geography Test. Secondary Level. Form I. Parts I, II, and III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurfman, Dana G.; And Others

    A 3-part test measures the geography knowledge, skills, and understanding of secondary level students. Part 1, map skills and location, contains 20 questions involving the use of three maps: an imaginary sketch map, a contour map, and a political map of the world. Part 2 consists of 20 questions covering physical geography. Students analyze…

  15. Investigation of heat transfer due to isothermal heater in irregular porous cavity: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.

    2017-07-01

    The present work is undertaken to investigate the effect of isothermal block placed at center of left vertical surface of porous cavity. The block is heated with isothermal temperature and right vertical surface of cavity is maintained at lowest temperature in domain. Finite element method is used to convert the governing equations into a simpler form. It is found that the heat transfer behavior for present case is different from that of the case when isothermal block is placed at bottom or top of the cavity.

  16. Steady state boiling crisis in a helium vertically heated natural circulation loop - Part 1: Critical heat flux, boiling crisis onset and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 2-m high two-phase helium natural circulation loop operating at 4.2 K and 1 atm. The same loop was used in two experiments with different heated section internal diameter (10 and 6 mm). The power applied on the heated section wall was controlled in increasing and decreasing sequences, and temperature along the section, mass flow rate and pressure drop evolutions were recorded. The values of critical heat flux (CHF) were found at different positions of the test section, and the post-CHF regime was studied. The predictions of CHF by existing correlations were good in the downstream portion of the section, however CHF anomalies have been observed near the entrance, in the low quality region. In resonance with this, the re-wetting of the surface has distinct hysteresis behavior in each of the two CHF regions. Furthermore, hydraulics effects of crisis, namely on friction, were studied (Part 2). This research is the starting point to future works addressing transients conducing to boiling crisis in helium natural circulation loops.

  17. Part I. Bacteriorhodopsin-related materials work for molecular electronics. Part II. Volumetric optical memory based on the branched photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin. Part III. The role of calcium in the bacteriorhodopsin binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Jeffrey Alan

    Part I. A protocol for the routine isolation and purification of purple membrane sheets containing the integral membrane protein, bacteriorhodopsin, was developed based upon modifications of protocols already in the literature. This simplified protocol is geared toward the facile isolation of protein for use in molecular electronic devices. Methods for the incorporation of bacteriorhodopsin into various polymeric supports were also developed, primarily in the form of dried films and hydrated cubes. This work also represents the first reported production of dried films of the deionized protein, or blue membrane. Part II. An architecture for a volumetric optical memory based on the branched-photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin is presented. The branching reaction circumvents problems associated with destructive reading and writing processes and allows access to a stable, long-lived state, separated both temporally and energetically from the main photocycle, thereby making long-term data storage possible. The state, denoted as Q, can only be accessed by exposing the protein to two different wavelengths of light in the proper sequence, with the appropriate temporal separation (roughly 2 ms between the light pulses). The Q-state (assigned as a binary one) is transparent to both writing and reading processes, making them rigorously non-destructive. Bacteriorhodopsin in its resting state is assigned as a binary zero. A differential absorption reading process is used to determine the state of each volumetric binary element. Preliminary results are reported. Part III. The nature of the chromophore binding site of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin is analyzed by using all-valence electron MNDO and MNDO-PSDCI molecular orbital theory to interpret previously reported linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopic measurements. It is concluded that the unique two-photon properties of the chromophore are due in part to the electrostatic field associated with a Casp{2+} ion near the

  18. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  19. Preliminary energy sector assessments of Jamaica. Volume III: renewable energy. Part I: solar energy - commercial and industrial

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This study concerns commercial and industrial solar applications, specifically solar water heating and solar air cooling. The study finds that solar domestic water heating and boiler make-up water preheating are technically feasible and, depending on the displaced energy source (electrical or various fuel types), economically justified; and that solar hot water installations could displace the equivalent of 189,842 barrels of fuel oil per year. However, solar cooling requires high performance collectors not currently manufactured in Jamaica, and feasibility studies indicate that solar cooling in the near term is not economically justified.

  20. Are plastic heat exchangers feasible for solar water heaters? Part 1: A review of the technology, codes and standards, and commercial products

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.; Oberreit, D.; Liu, W.; Mantell, S.

    1999-07-01

    As a first step toward assessing the possibility of using plastic heat exchangers in solar water heating systems, the authors present product design specifications for water-to-water and antifreeze-to-water heat exchangers, review the plumbing codes and standards as they apply to use of heat exchangers and polymer components, and discuss the suitability of commercially available plastic heat exchangers. Analysis of overall heat transfer shows that a counterflow, tube-in-shell heat exchanger made of thin wall plastic tubes is capable of meeting the thermal requirements of a solar water heating system with less than a 50% increase in heat transfer surface area compared to a commercial copper heat exchanger. The plumbing codes allow use of approved polymer heat exchangers or piping in domestic solar water heating systems. Single wall heat exchangers can be used with a non-toxic heat transfer fluid, such as propylene glycol. Unfortunately, commercially available plastic heat exchangers are either prohibitively expensive, too small, or incapable of withstanding the pressure and temperature requirements of this application. A review of polymer materials for this application is given in part 2 of this paper.

  1. Vocational-Technical Physics Project. Thermometers: I. Temperature and Heat, II. Expansion Thermometers, III. Electrical Thermometers. Field Test Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth Technical Inst., Winston-Salem, NC.

    This vocational physics individualized student instructional module on thermometers consists of the three units: Temperature and heat, expansion thermometers, and electrical thermometers. Designed with a laboratory orientation, experiments are included on linear expansion; making a bimetallic thermometer, a liquid-in-gas thermometer, and a gas…

  2. Vocational-Technical Physics Project. Thermometers: I. Temperature and Heat, II. Expansion Thermometers, III. Electrical Thermometers. Field Test Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth Technical Inst., Winston-Salem, NC.

    This vocational physics individualized student instructional module on thermometers consists of the three units: Temperature and heat, expansion thermometers, and electrical thermometers. Designed with a laboratory orientation, experiments are included on linear expansion; making a bimetallic thermometer, a liquid-in-gas thermometer, and a gas…

  3. Laminar Convection in Binary Mixture of Hydromagnetic Flow with Radiative Heat Transfer - Part Two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogulu, A.; Bestman, A. R.; Alabraba, M. A.

    1992-09-01

    The hydromagnetic flow in a vertical channel with heat and mass transfer is studied when chemical reaction is present. For the general integral equation for radiative flux and in the absence of the Dufour term, the problem is reduced to a set of coupled integral equations which are solved iteratively. The results are compared with the solutions obtained when chemical reaction is absent.

  4. A New Road to Reaction, Part 3. Teaching the Heat Effect of Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vos, Wobbe; Verdonk, Adri H.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the need to present beginning chemistry students with a variety of experiences dealing with chemical reactions to develop the individual student's concept of these processes. Presents information and experiments dealing with the heat effect of chemical reactions. Includes a discussion on exothermic and endothermic processes in laboratory…

  5. Measurement of frost characteristics on heat exchanger fins. Part 1: Test facility and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.; Chen, H.; Besant, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    A special test facility was developed to characterize frost growing on heat exchanger fins where the cold surfaces and the air supply conditions were similar to those experienced in freezers, i.e., cold surface temperatures ranging from {minus}35 C to {minus}40 C, air supply temperatures from {minus}10 C to {minus}20 C, and 80% to 100% relative humidity (RH). This test facility included a test section with removable fins to measure the frost height and mass concentration. Frost height on heat exchanger fins was measured using a new automated laser scanning system to measure the height of frost and its distribution on selected fins. The increase in air pressure loss resulting from frost growth on the fins was measured directly in the test loop. The frost mass accumulation distribution was measured for each test using special pre-etched fins that could be easily subdivided and weighed. The total heat rate was measured using a heat flux meter. These frost-measuring instruments were calibrated and the uncertainty of each is stated.

  6. Ability to Discriminate Between Sustainable and Unsustainable Heat Stress Exposures-Part 1: WBGT Exposure Limits.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Villalba, Ximena P; Wu, Yougui; Ashley, Candi D; Bernard, Thomas E

    2017-06-08

    Heat stress exposure limits based on wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) were designed to limit exposures to those that could be sustained for an 8-h day using limited data from Lind in the 1960s. In general, Sustainable exposures are heat stress levels at which thermal equilibrium can be achieved, and Unsustainable exposures occur when there is a steady increase in core temperature. This paper addresses the ability of the ACGIH® Threshold Limit Value (TLV®) to differentiate between Sustainable and Unsustainable heat exposures, to propose alternative occupational exposure limits, and ask whether an adjustment for body surface area improves the exposure decision. Two progressive heat stress studies provided data on 176 trials with 352 pairs of Sustainable and Unsustainable exposures over a range of relative humidities and metabolic rates using 29 participants wearing woven cotton clothing. To assess the discrimination ability of the TLV, the exposure metric was the difference between the observed WBGT and the TLV adjusted for metabolic rate. Conditional logistic regression models and receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) along with ROC's area under the curve (AUC) were used. Four alternative models for an occupational exposure limit were also developed and compared to the TLV. For the TLV, the odds ratio (OR) for Unsustainable was 2.5 per 1°C-WBGT [confidence interval (CI) 2.12-2.88]. The AUC for the TLV was 0.85 (CI 0.81-0.89). For the alternative models, the ORs were also about 2.5/°C-WBGT, with AUCs between 0.84 and 0.88, which were significantly different from the TLV's AUC but have little practical difference. This study (1) confirmed that the TLV is appropriate for heat stress screening; (2) demonstrated the TLV's discrimination accuracy with an ROC AUC of 0.85; and (3) established the OR of 2.5/°C-WBGT for unsustainable exposures. The TLV has high sensitivity, but its specificity is very low, which is protective. There were no important

  7. Heat treatment of nuclear reactor pump part in integrated furnace facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    A flexible heat treating system is meeting strict work specifications while accommodating the production flow pattern requirements and floor space needs of Advanced Metal Treating, Inc., Butler, Wis. Modular design and appropriate furnace configurations allow realization of the most efficient heat treat processing and energy use in a relatively small production area. The totally-integrated system (Pacemaker--manufactured by Lindberg, A Unit of General Signal, Chicago) consists of an electric integral-quench furnace with companion draw furnaces, washer unit and a material transfer car. With its one-side, inout configuration, the furnace operates with a minimum of drawing and washing equipment. The integral-quench furnace has a work chamber dimension of 30 by 48 by 30 inches (76.2 x 122 x 76.2 cm). The firm has two of these units, plus three in-out draw furnaces, one washer, one transfer car and two endothermic gas generators.

  8. Finite element modeling of borehole heat exchanger systems. Part 2. Numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diersch, H.-J. G.; Bauer, D.; Heidemann, W.; Rühaak, W.; Schätzl, P.

    2011-08-01

    Single borehole heat exchanger (BHE) and arrays of BHE are modeled by using the finite element method. Applying BHE in regional discretizations optimal conditions of mesh spacing around singular BHE nodes are derived. Optimal meshes have shown superior to such discretizations which are either too fine or too coarse. The numerical methods are benchmarked against analytical and numerical reference solutions. Practical application to a borehole thermal energy store (BTES) consisting of 80 BHE is given for the real-site BTES Crailsheim, Germany. The simulations are controlled by the specifically developed FEFLOW-TRNSYS coupling module. Scenarios indicate the effect of the groundwater flow regime on efficiency and reliability of the subsurface heat storage system.

  9. Variation in mouthguard thickness due to different heating conditions during fabrication: part 2.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Koide, Kaoru; Mizuhashi, Fumi

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine changes in the thickness of mouthguard sheets under different heating conditions during fabrication. Mouthguards were fabricated with polyolefin-polystyrene co-polymer (OS) and olefin co-polymer (OL) sheets (4.0-mm thick) utilizing a vacuum-forming machine under the following three conditions: (A) the sheet was moulded when it sagged 15 mm below the sheet frame (i.e. the normally used position); (B) the sheet frame was lowered to and heated at 30 mm below the top of the post and moulded when it sagged by 15 mm; and (C) the sheet frame was lowered to and heated at 50 mm below the top of the post and moulded when it sagged by 15 mm. The working model was trimmed to a height of 20 mm at the incisor and 15 mm at the first molar. Post-moulding thickness was determined for the incisal portion (incisal edge and labial surface) and molar portion (cusp, central groove and buccal surface). Dimensions were measured, and differences in the change in thickness due to heating condition were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Under condition C, OS and OL decreased in thickness from 0.36-0.54 mm to 0.26-0.30 mm, respectively, at the incisal portion and from 0.34-0.66 mm to 0.17-0.47 mm, respectively, at the molar portion. It may be clinically useful when moulding a mouthguard to maintain the thickness of the incisal and molar portions by adjusting the height of the sheet frame.

  10. Two-dimensional finite element heat transfer model of softwood. Part II, Macrostructural effects

    Treesearch

    Hongmei Gu; John F. Hunt

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional finite element model was used to study the effects of structural features on transient heat transfer in softwood lumber with various orientations. Transient core temperature was modeled for lumber samples “cut” from various locations within a simulated log. The effects of ring orientation, earlywood to latewood (E/L) ratio, and ring density were...

  11. The Development of a Model State Data Analysis Plan (SDAP). (Phase I.) Part III: The SDAP Data Compendium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scientific Educational Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This document is the third part of a 3-part report on the development of a generic State Educational Agency Data Analysis Plan (SDAP). It consists of a compendium of data available by program within the studied State education agencies. The compendium provides a direct comparison of the information elements that are available by program in the two…

  12. Analytic Corrections to CFD Heating Predictions Accounting for Changes in Surface Catalysis. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Inger, George R.

    1996-01-01

    A new approach for combining the insight afforded by integral boundary-layer analysis with comprehensive (but time intensive) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flowfield solutions of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is described. The approach extracts CFD derived quantities at the wall and at the boundary layer edge for inclusion in a post-processing boundary-layer analysis. It allows a designer at a work-station to address two questions, given a single CFD solution. (1) How much does the heating change for a thermal protection system (TPS) with different catalytic properties than was used in the original CFD solution? (2) How does the heating change at the interface of two different TPS materials with an abrupt change in catalytic efficiency? The answer to the second question is particularly important, because abrupt changes from low to high catalytic efficiency can lead to localized increase in heating which exceeds the usually conservative estimate provided by a fully catalytic wall assumption. Capabilities of this approach for application to Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) design are demonstrated. If the definition of surface catalysis is uncertain early in the design process, results show that fully catalytic wall boundary conditions provide the best baseline for CFD design points.

  13. The heat wave of June 2007 in Athens, Greece - Part 2: Modeling study and sensitivity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotroni, V.; Lagouvardos, K.; Retalis, A.

    2011-04-01

    In the frame of this paper a heat wave that resulted in record high temperatures in Athens Greece is analysed. Namely the analysis focuses in the ability of three widely used planetary boundary layer parameterisations to reproduce the heat wave temperatures. The simulations were performed with the Pennsylvania State University - National Center for Atmospheric Research MM5 model that is also used for operational weather forecasting at the National Observatory of Athens since 2002. The 2-m temperature at a grid increment of 1-km over the highly complex terrain of the Athens Area is statistically verified against the available surface station observations. The results of the analysis showed that the two nonlocal schemes, namely Blackadar and MRF succeeded much better than the local scheme ETA to reproduce the heat wave 2-m temperature although they considerably underestimated the maximum observed temperatures. In addition, it was found that the model grid points characterised by "urban" land-use provided better statistical verification results, with reduced cold bias. Further, in order to study the role of the initial skin temperature conditions on the 2-m temperature forecasts, satellite observed skin temperatures have been used to initialise the high resolution simulations. This sensitivity test showed that when using the satellite observed skin temperature in the model initial conditions, the simulation of the 2-m temperature is positively affected during the early stages of the simulation while later on the model physical parameterisations are decisive for the time evolution of temperature.

  14. Mist/steam cooling in a heated horizontal tube -- Part 1: Experimental system

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Wang, T.; Gaddis, J.L.

    2000-04-01

    To improve the airfoil cooling significantly for the future generation of advanced turbine systems (ATS), a fundamental experimental program has been developed to study the heat transfer mechanisms of mist/steam cooling under highly superheated wall temperatures. The mist/steam mixture was obtained by blending fine water droplets (3 {approximately} 15 {micro}m in diameter) with the saturated steam at 1.5 bars. Two mist generation systems were tested by using the pressure atomizer and the steam-assisted pneumatic atomizer, respectively. The test section, heated directly by a DC power supply, consisted of a thin-walled ({approximately} 0.9 mm), circular stainless steel tube with an ID of 20 mm and a length of 203 mm. Droplet size and distribution were measured by a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA) system through view ports grafted at the inlet and the outlet of the test section. Mist transportation and droplet dynamics were studied in addition to the heat transfer measurements. The experiment was conducted with steam Reynolds numbers ranging from 10,000 to 35,000, wall superheat up to 300 C, and droplet mass ratios ranging from 1 {approximately} 6%.

  15. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mouradian, E. M.

    1983-12-31

    Thermal analyses for the preliminary design phase of the Receiver of the Carrizo Plains Solar Power Plant are presented. The sodium reference operating conditions (T/sub in/ = 610/sup 0/F, T/sub out/ = 1050/sup 0/F) have been considered. Included are: Nominal flux distribution on receiver panal, Energy input to tubes, Axial temperature distribution; sodium and tubes, Sodium flow distribution, Sodium pressure drop, orifice calculations, Temperature distribution in tube cut (R-0), Backface structure, and Nonuniform sodium outlet temperature. Transient conditions and panel front face heat losses are not considered. These are to be addressed in a subsequent design phase. Also to be considered later are the design conditions as variations from the nominal reference (operating) condition. An addendum, designated Appendix C, has been included describing panel heat losses, panel temperature distribution, and tube-manifold joint thermal model.

  16. Calculation of inviscid surface streamlines and heat transfer on shuttle type configurations. Part 2: Description of computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.; Jones, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    A description of the computer program used for heating rate calculation for blunt bodies in hypersonic flow is given. The main program and each subprogram are described by defining the pertinent symbols involved and presenting a detailed flow diagram and complete computer program listing. Input and output parameters are discussed in detail. Listings are given for the computation of heating rates on (1) a blunted 15 deg half-angle cone at 20 deg incidence and Mach 10.6, (2) a blunted 70 deg slab delta wing at 10 deg incidence and Mach 8, and (3) the HL-10 lifting body at 20 deg incidence and Mach 10. In addition, the computer program output for two streamlines on the blunted 15 deg half-angle cone is listed. For Part 1, see N71-36186.

  17. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics: An International Round-Robin Study, Part II: Thermal Diffusivity, Specific Heat, and Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D.; Böttner, Harald; König, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolet, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Patricia; Sharp, Jeff; Lo, Jason; Kleinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo

    2013-06-01

    For bulk thermoelectrics, improvement of the figure of merit ZT to above 2 from the current values of 1.0 to 1.5 would enhance their competitiveness with alternative technologies. In recent years, the most significant improvements in ZT have mainly been due to successful reduction of thermal conductivity. However, thermal conductivity is difficult to measure directly at high temperatures. Combined measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat, and mass density are a widely used alternative to direct measurement of thermal conductivity. In this work, thermal conductivity is shown to be the factor in the calculation of ZT with the greatest measurement uncertainty. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group, under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT), has conducted two international round-robins since 2009. This paper, part II of our report on the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk bismuth telluride, focuses on thermal diffusivity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity measurements.

  18. Double-blind, single-dose, cross-over study of the effects of pramipexole, pergolide, and placebo on rest tremor and UPDRS part III in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Navan, Prithiva; Findley, Leslie J; Jeffs, Jim A R; Pearce, Ronald K B; Bain, Peter G

    2003-02-01

    Tremor is one of the cardinal signs of Parkinson's disease (PD) but its response to antiparkinsonian medication is variable. It has been postulated that pramipexole may have a stronger antiparkinsonian tremor effect than pergolide, another direct acting dopamine agonist medication, possibly because the former has preferential affinity for the dopamine D3 receptor. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the effects of a single oral dose of either pramipexole (Pr) or pergolide (Pe) or placebo (Pl) on parkinsonian tremor and the motor (part III) subsection of the UPDRS. Ten patients (6 men, 4 women), mean age 65.3 years, mean duration from diagnosis of 2.6 years, with tremor dominant PD were recruited. On three separate occasions a single dose of pramipexole (salt) 500 microg, pergolide 500 microg or placebo were administered in random order to each patient, who were pretreated with domperidone and had their antiparkinsonian medication withheld from midnight before study. After each medication patients were assessed at baseline and then every 30 min for 4 hr using a 0 to 10 tremor rating scale and the UPDRS (part III) in a double-blind protocol. Adverse effects were systematically recorded. The results demonstrate that 500 microg of either pramipexole or pergolide reduced PD rest tremor scores to a similar degree, which at peak effect was significantly greater than placebo (respectively Pe v Pl: P < 0.006, Pr v Pl: P < 0.033). The two active drugs also had weaker beneficial effects on the UPDRS part III. Pergolide, however, was significantly more likely than pramipexole to cause nausea (P = 0.005) or vomiting (P = 0.014).

  19. Estimation of energetic efficiency of heat supply in front of the aircraft at supersonic accelerated flight. Part II. Mathematical model of the trajectory boost part and computational results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latypov, A. F.

    2009-03-01

    The fuel economy was estimated at boost trajectory of aerospace plane during energy supply to the free stream. Initial and final velocities of the flight were given. A model of planning flight above cold air in infinite isobaric thermal wake was used. The comparison of fuel consumption was done at optimal trajectories. The calculations were done using a combined power plant consisting of ramjet and liquid-propellant engine. An exergy model was constructed in the first part of the paper for estimating the ramjet thrust and specific impulse. To estimate the aerodynamic drag of aircraft a quadratic dependence on aerodynamic lift is used. The energy for flow heating is obtained at the sacrifice of an equivalent decrease of exergy of combustion products. The dependencies are obtained for increasing the range coefficient of cruise flight at different Mach numbers. In the second part of the paper, a mathematical model is presented for the boost part of the flight trajectory of the flying vehicle and computational results for reducing the fuel expenses at the boost trajectory at a given value of the energy supplied in front of the aircraft.

  20. Extending the collisional fluid equations into the long mean-free-path regime in toroidal plasmas. III. Parallel heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.

    2006-09-15

    It is illustrated that plasma transport processes in the direction of the magnetic field are local in the vicinity of the magnetic island in the long mean-free-path regime where the collisionality parameter {nu}{sub *} is larger than 10{sup -2}, and the width of the island is about 3% of the minor radius or smaller. This is because the plasma temperature variation on the magnetic surface that results from the magnetic reconnection is gentle. Both the electron and the ion parallel transport fluxes including parallel heat flow in the banana regime where {nu}{sub *}<1 are calculated using a model Coulomb collision operator that conserves momentum.

  1. Investigation of heat transfer due to isothermal heater in irregular porous cavity: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum

    2017-07-01

    An investigation is carried out to predict the heat transfer characteristics in an irregular square porous cavity having a small isothermal heater placed at bottom left corner of cavity. The heater is of step shape with vertical right and horizontal top edges which are maintained at an isothermal temperature and right vertical surface of domain is maintained at cold temperature. The top and bottom edges of porous domain are maintained adiabatically. The governing equations are solved iteratively with the help of finite element method. Results are discussed with respect to isothermal and streamline distribution inside the porous domain.

  2. COYOTE II - a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part I - theoretical background

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.; Hogan, R.E.

    1994-10-01

    The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, COYOTE II, is presented in detail. COYOTE II is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems and other types of diffusion problems. A general description of the boundary value problems treated by the program is presented. The finite element formulation and the associated numerical methods used in COYOTE II are also outlined. Instructions for use of the code are documented in SAND94-1179; examples of problems analyzed with the code are provided in SAND94-1180.

  3. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 1; Improved Method and Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Petty, Grant W.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Bell, Thomas L.; Braun, Scott A.; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Johnson, Daniel E.; hide

    2006-01-01

    A revised Bayesian algorithm for estimating surface rain rate, convective rain proportion, and latent heating profiles from satellite-borne passive microwave radiometer observations over ocean backgrounds is described. The algorithm searches a large database of cloud-radiative model simulations to find cloud profiles that are radiatively consistent with a given set of microwave radiance measurements. The properties of these radiatively consistent profiles are then composited to obtain best estimates of the observed properties. The revised algorithm is supported by an expanded and more physically consistent database of cloud-radiative model simulations. The algorithm also features a better quantification of the convective and nonconvective contributions to total rainfall, a new geographic database, and an improved representation of background radiances in rain-free regions. Bias and random error estimates are derived from applications of the algorithm to synthetic radiance data, based upon a subset of cloud-resolving model simulations, and from the Bayesian formulation itself. Synthetic rain-rate and latent heating estimates exhibit a trend of high (low) bias for low (high) retrieved values. The Bayesian estimates of random error are propagated to represent errors at coarser time and space resolutions, based upon applications of the algorithm to TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) data. Errors in TMI instantaneous rain-rate estimates at 0.5 -resolution range from approximately 50% at 1 mm/h to 20% at 14 mm/h. Errors in collocated spaceborne radar rain-rate estimates are roughly 50%-80% of the TMI errors at this resolution. The estimated algorithm random error in TMI rain rates at monthly, 2.5deg resolution is relatively small (less than 6% at 5 mm day.1) in comparison with the random error resulting from infrequent satellite temporal sampling (8%-35% at the same rain rate). Percentage errors resulting from sampling decrease with increasing rain rate, and sampling errors in

  4. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. K.

    1983-12-31

    The auxiliary heat transport systems of the Carrisa Plains Solar Power Plant (CPSPP) comprise facilities which are used to support plant operation and provide plant safety and maintenance. The facilities are the sodium purification system, argon cover gas system, sodium receiving and filling system, sodium-water reaction product receiving system, and safety and maintenance equipment. The functions of the facilities of the auxiliary system are described. Design requirements are established based on plant operating parameters. Descriptions are given on the system which will be adequate to perform the function and satisfy the requirements. Valve and equipment lists are included in the appendix.

  5. Multi-Evaporator Miniature Loop Heat Pipe for Small Spacecraft Thermal Control. Part 2; Validation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Douglas, Donya; Hoang, Triem

    2010-01-01

    Under NASA s New Millennium Program Space Technology 8 (ST 8) Project, Goddard Space Fight Center has conducted a Thermal Loop experiment to advance the maturity of the Thermal Loop technology from proof of concept to prototype demonstration in a relevant environment , i.e. from a technology readiness level (TRL) of 3 to a level of 6. The thermal Loop is an advanced thermal control system consisting of a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) with multiple evaporators and multiple condensers designed for future small system applications requiring low mass, low power, and compactness. The MLHP retains all features of state-of-the-art loop heat pipes (LHPs) and offers additional advantages to enhance the functionality, performance, versatility, and reliability of the system. An MLHP breadboard was built and tested in the laboratory and thermal vacuum environments for the TRL 4 and TRL 5 validations, respectively, and an MLHP proto-flight unit was built and tested in a thermal vacuum chamber for the TRL 6 validation. In addition, an analytical model was developed to simulate the steady state and transient behaviors of the MLHP during various validation tests. The MLHP demonstrated excellent performance during experimental tests and the analytical model predictions agreed very well with experimental data. All success criteria at various TRLs were met. Hence, the Thermal Loop technology has reached a TRL of 6. This paper presents the validation results, both experimental and analytical, of such a technology development effort.

  6. Thermal Imaging Applied to Cryocrystallography: Cryocooling and Beam Heating (Part I)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward; Bellamy, Henry; Rosenbaum, Gerd; vanderWoerd, Mark; Kazmierczak, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Thermal imaging provides a non-invasive method to study both the cryocooling process and the heating due to the X-ray beam interaction with a sample. The method has been used successfully to image cryocooling in a number of experimental situations, i.e. cooling as a function of sample volume and as a function of cryostream orientation. Although there are experimental limitations to the method, it has proved a powerful technique to aid cryocrystallography development. Due to the rapid spatial temperature information provided about the sample it is also a powerful tool in the testing of mathematical models. Recently thermal imaging has been used to measure the temperature distribution on both a model and typical crystal samples illuminated with an X-ray beam produced by an undulator. A brief overview of thermal imaging and previous results will be presented. In addition, a detailed description of the calibration and experimental aspects of the beam heating measurements will be described. This will complement the following talk on the mathematical modeling and analysis of the results.

  7. Thermal Imaging Applied to Cryocrystallography: Cryocooling and Beam Heating (Part I)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward; Bellamy, Henry; Rosenbaum, Gerd; vanderWoerd, Mark; Kazmierczak, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Thermal imaging provides a non-invasive method to study both the cryocooling process and the heating due to the X-ray beam interaction with a sample. The method has been used successfully to image cryocooling in a number of experimental situations, i.e. cooling as a function of sample volume and as a function of cryostream orientation. Although there are experimental limitations to the method, it has proved a powerful technique to aid cryocrystallography development. Due to the rapid spatial temperature information provided about the sample it is also a powerful tool in the testing of mathematical models. Recently thermal imaging has been used to measure the temperature distribution on both a model and typical crystal samples illuminated with an X-ray beam produced by an undulator. A brief overview of thermal imaging and previous results will be presented. In addition, a detailed description of the calibration and experimental aspects of the beam heating measurements will be described. This will complement the following talk on the mathematical modeling and analysis of the results.

  8. Toxicological evaluation of an electrically heated cigarette. Part 2: Chemical composition of mainstream smoke.

    PubMed

    Stabbert, R; Voncken, P; Rustemeier, K; Haussmann, H-J; Roemer, E; Schaffernicht, H; Patskan, G

    2003-01-01

    The chemical composition of mainstream smoke from an electrically heated cigarette (EHC) and that of mainstream smoke from the University of Kentucky Reference Cigarette 1R4F was analyzed. In contrast to the 1R4F, which is a conventional, lit-end cigarette, the EHC is smoked in a microprocessor-controlled lighter with electrical heater elements. The electrical heating causes the tobacco under the heater element to burn at a low temperature during each puff. A comprehensive list of chemical constituents was analyzed in mainstream smoke. The list is a combination of those compounds suggested for analysis in cigarette smoke by a US Consumer Product Safety Commission proposal in 1993, and those cigarette smoke constituents identified by the International Agency on Research on Cancer as being present in cigarette smoke and characterized as carcinogens. The low pyrolysis/combustion temperature of tobacco in the EHC causes distinct shifts in the composition of the smoke compared with a conventional cigarette. A significant drop was seen in the yields of almost all toxicologically relevant constituents. On a per cigarette basis almost two-thirds of the constituents were reduced by at least 80%, whereas on an equal total particulate matter basis about two-thirds of the constituents were reduced by at least 50%, with many constituents reduced by more than 90%. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A Latent Heat Retrieval and its Effects on the Intensity and Structure Change of Hurricane Guillermo (1997). Part I: The Algorithm and Observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guimond, Stephen R.; Bourassa, mark A.; Reasor, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    The release of latent heat in clouds is an essential part of the formation and I intensification ohurricanes. The community knows very little about the intensity and structure of latent heating due largely to inadequate observations. In this paper, a new method for retrieving the latent heating field in hurricanes from airborne Dopple radar is presented and fields from rapidly intensifying Hurricane Guillermo (1997) are shown.

  10. A Latent Heat Retrieval and its Effects on the Intensity and Structure Change of Hurricane Guillermo (1997). Part I: The Algorithm and Observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guimond, Stephen R.; Bourassa, mark A.; Reasor, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    The release of latent heat in clouds is an essential part of the formation and I intensification ohurricanes. The community knows very little about the intensity and structure of latent heating due largely to inadequate observations. In this paper, a new method for retrieving the latent heating field in hurricanes from airborne Dopple radar is presented and fields from rapidly intensifying Hurricane Guillermo (1997) are shown.

  11. Fast ignition when heating the central part of an inertial confinement fusion target by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the ignition and burning of a precompressed laser fusion target when it is rapidly heated by an ion beam with the formation of a temperature peak in the central part of the target. We present the results of our comprehensive numerical simulations of the problem that include the following components: (1) the target compression under the action of a profiled laser pulse, (2) the heating of the compressed target with spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a beam of high-energy ions, and (3) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum target compression and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of the compressed-target heating by an ion beam. The dependences of the threshold energies of the igniting ion beam and the thermonuclear gain on the width of the Gaussian beam ion energy spectrum have been established. The peculiarities of fast ignition by an ion beam related to the spatial distribution of parameters for the target precompressed by a laser pulse are discussed.

  12. Phase 1 development of an aquifer heat storage facility. Part 1: Summary and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasim, A.; Weissenbach, B.

    1982-03-01

    A surface aquifer pilot plan was defined. Several versions of construction were drafted and the costs were calculated for variable site conditions. Aquifer heat storage facilities larger than 5,000 cu m (water equivalent) are cheaper than any known storage concept. Simultaneous with technical and economic studies, problems of chemical mass transport in two typical soil materials (calcareous gravel water and red marl water) were investigated in lab tests. Special attention was paid to the biological behavior of a wet gravel bed in view of the possibility of clogging by slime. Recommendations are given to ensure safe operation of the storage plant. Corrosion in the storage facility was considered for various materials. Results show that cement structures are preferred.

  13. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 1; Method and Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Yang, Song; Petty, Grant W.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Bell, Thomas L.; Braun, Scott A.; Wang, Yansen; Lang, Stephen E.; Johnson, Daniel E.

    2004-01-01

    A revised Bayesian algorithm for estimating surface rain rate, convective rain proportion, and latent heating/drying profiles from satellite-borne passive microwave radiometer observations over ocean backgrounds is described. The algorithm searches a large database of cloud-radiative model simulations to find cloud profiles that are radiatively consistent with a given set of microwave radiance measurements. The properties of these radiatively consistent profiles are then composited to obtain best estimates of the observed properties. The revised algorithm is supported by an expanded and more physically consistent database of cloud-radiative model simulations. The algorithm also features a better quantification of the convective and non-convective contributions to total rainfall, a new geographic database, and an improved representation of background radiances in rain-free regions. Bias and random error estimates are derived from applications of the algorithm to synthetic radiance data, based upon a subset of cloud resolving model simulations, and from the Bayesian formulation itself. Synthetic rain rate and latent heating estimates exhibit a trend of high (low) bias for low (high) retrieved values. The Bayesian estimates of random error are propagated to represent errors at coarser time and space resolutions, based upon applications of the algorithm to TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) data. Errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates at 0.5 deg resolution range from approximately 50% at 1 mm/h to 20% at 14 mm/h. These errors represent about 70-90% of the mean random deviation between collocated passive microwave and spaceborne radar rain rate estimates. The cumulative algorithm error in TMI estimates at monthly, 2.5 deg resolution is relatively small (less than 6% at 5 mm/day) compared to the random error due to infrequent satellite temporal sampling (8-35% at the same rain rate).

  14. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... determine the load ratings shown on the vessel's wire rope certificates for all wire rope and wire rope... shall apply to the use of wire rope as a part of the ship's cargo handling gear: (1) Eye splices in wire...) Wire rope and wire rope slings exhibiting any of the defects or conditions specified in......

  15. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... determine the load ratings shown on the vessel's wire rope certificates for all wire rope and wire rope... shall apply to the use of wire rope as a part of the ship's cargo handling gear: (1) Eye splices in wire...) Wire rope and wire rope slings exhibiting any of the defects or conditions specified in......

  16. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... determine the load ratings shown on the vessel's wire rope certificates for all wire rope and wire rope... shall apply to the use of wire rope as a part of the ship's cargo handling gear: (1) Eye splices in wire...) Wire rope and wire rope slings exhibiting any of the defects or conditions specified in......

  17. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... determine the load ratings shown on the vessel's wire rope certificates for all wire rope and wire rope... shall apply to the use of wire rope as a part of the ship's cargo handling gear: (1) Eye splices in wire...) Wire rope and wire rope slings exhibiting any of the defects or conditions specified in......

  18. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shall apply to the use of wire rope as a part of the ship's cargo handling gear: (1) Eye splices in wire... provide the same level of safety may be used; (2) Except for eye splices in the ends of wires, each...

  19. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume III, Part 1, High-level Manpower for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Guy

    This document, the first part of the third volume of a study concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, appraises the high-level manpower needs of the region. The report is divided into two sections: the first includes the major comments on the position of high-level manpower in…

  20. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume III, Part 2, Language Policy and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard

    This document, the second part of the third volume of a study concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, discusses the problems aroused by language in the region. Chapters I-IV cover assumptions of the study, common problems of the region, current solutions, and future outlook.…

  1. PHYSALIS: a new method for particle flow simulation. Part III: convergence analysis of two-dimensional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huaxiong; Takagi, Shu

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, we study the convergence property of PHYSALIS when it is applied to incompressible particle flows in two-dimensional space. PHYSALIS is a recently proposed iterative method which computes the solution without imposing the boundary conditions on the particle surfaces directly. Instead, a consistency equation based on the local (near particle) representation of the solution is used as the boundary conditions. One of the important issues needs to be addressed is the convergence properties of the iterative procedure. In this paper, we present the convergence analysis using Laplace and biharmonic equations as two model problems. It is shown that convergence of the method can be achieved but the rate of convergence depends on the relative locations of the cages. The results are directly related to potential and Stokes flows. However, they are also relevant to Navier-Stokes flows, heat conduction in composite media, and other problems.

  2. Schinus terebinthifolius countercurrent chromatography (Part III): Method transfer from small countercurrent chromatography column to preparative centrifugal partition chromatography ones as a part of method development.

    PubMed

    das Neves Costa, Fernanda; Hubert, Jane; Borie, Nicolas; Kotland, Alexis; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2017-03-03

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) and centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) are support free liquid-liquid chromatography techniques sharing the same basic principles and features. Method transfer has previously been demonstrated for both techniques but never from one to another. This study aimed to show such a feasibility using fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius berries dichloromethane extract as a case study. Heptane - ethyl acetate - methanol -water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was used as solvent system with masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids as target compounds. The optimized separation methodology previously described in Part I and II, was scaled up from an analytical hydrodynamic CCC column (17.4mL) to preparative hydrostatic CPC instruments (250mL and 303mL) as a part of method development. Flow-rate and sample loading were further optimized on CPC. Mobile phase linear velocity is suggested as a transfer invariant parameter if the CPC column contains sufficient number of partition cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Interface simulation of strained and non-abrupt III-V quantum wells. Part 1: band profile calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, C.

    1996-01-01

    This work presents a program, based on the Van de Walle-Martin model solid theory, able to compute the most important physical quantities of any In 1- xGa xAs yP 1- y quaternary epitaxially strained growth on any In 1- zGa zAs wP 1- w hypothetical substrate. The adopted interface-band alignment procedure is extensively described. The effect of strain on several examples of ideal heterostructures characterized by abrupt interfaces is discussed in detail. Furthermore, the problem of a composition gradient spread over some monolayers at the interfaces of III-V quantum wells and superlattices, due to the technological problems in group V switches in the present epitaxial techniques is treated extensively. The interface layers are thus non-intentionally strained on the substrate lattice parameter causing a local change in the bands profile along the growth direction. The differences between an ideal rectangular potential and the real profile are shown. The output files of this program consist in the band profiles for electrons, heavy and light holes, which will be used by the program PLSIMUL (described in a subsequent article) to compute the corresponding quantized levels to be compared with experimental 4 K photoluminescence data.

  4. Predictability in orbital reconstruction. A human cadaver study, part III: Implant-oriented navigation for optimized reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Leander; Essig, Harald; Schreurs, Ruud; Jansen, Jesper; Maal, Thomas J J; Gooris, Peter J J; Becking, Alfred G

    2015-12-01

    Navigation-assisted orbital reconstruction remains a challenge, because the surgeon focuses on a two-dimensional multiplanar view in relation to the preoperative planning. This study explored the addition of navigation markers in the implant design for three-dimensional (3D) orientation of the actual implant position relative to the preoperative planning for more fail-safe and consistent results. Pre-injury computed tomography (CT) was performed for 10 orbits in human cadavers, and complex orbital fractures (Class III/IV) were created. The orbits were reconstructed using preformed orbital mesh through a transconjunctival approach under image-guided navigation and navigation by referencing orientating markers in the implant design. Ideal implant positions were planned using preoperative CT scans. Implant placement accuracy was evaluated by comparing the planned and realized implant positions. Significantly better translation (3.53 mm vs. 1.44 mm, p = 0.001) and rotation (pitch: -1.7° vs. -2.2°, P = 0.52; yaw: 10.9° vs. 5.9°, P = 0.02; roll: -2.2° vs. -0.5°, P = 0.16) of the placed implant relative to the planned position were obtained by implant-oriented navigation. Navigation-assisted surgery can be improved by using navigational markers on the orbital implant for orientation, resulting in fail-safe reconstruction of complex orbital defects and consistent implant positioning.

  5. Two-dimensional air exfiltration and heat transfer through fiberglass insulation. Part 1: Numerical model and experimental facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Besant, R.W.; Tao, Y.X.

    1998-10-01

    A numerical model, employing a local-averaging formulation, was developed for heat transfer and water vapor deposition within fiberglass insulation under air exfiltration and frosting conditions.Frost growth on the cold surface was modeled using special frost growth boundary conditions. Non-isotropic permeability effects that occur in fiberglass boards were included in the model for porous medium flow because tests showed that the permeability for flow parallel to the plane of the boards was 69% higher than perpendicular to the insulation boards. Transient heat and moisture transfer processes within a thick layer of fiberglass insulation were modeled for steady exfiltration of humid air (60--84% rh) with a two-dimensional airflow during winter temperature conditions. In order to validate the numerical model, laboratory apparatus was constructed with a test cell 135 mm high, 600 mm wide and 275 mm deep. This allowed a two-dimensional moist air exfiltration [0.5 to 1.5 L/(m{sup 2}{center_dot}s)] through a fiberglass insulation slab for a temperature range {minus}20 C to 21.5 C from the cold outside surface to the warm inside surface. Using this apparatus, the transient temperature profiles, moisture accumulation profiles, and heat-flux at the cold side of the fiberglass insulation were measured during the air exfiltration process. Part 1 outlines the theoretical/numerical model and describe the experimental test facilities and the properties of the fiberglass insulation tested. Part 2 of this paper presents the comparisons of experimental data and corresponding simulation results.

  6. COYOTE : a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part I, theoretical background.

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, Micheal W.; Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

    2010-03-01

    The need for the engineering analysis of systems in which the transport of thermal energy occurs primarily through a conduction process is a common situation. For all but the simplest geometries and boundary conditions, analytic solutions to heat conduction problems are unavailable, thus forcing the analyst to call upon some type of approximate numerical procedure. A wide variety of numerical packages currently exist for such applications, ranging in sophistication from the large, general purpose, commercial codes, such as COMSOL, COSMOSWorks, ABAQUS and TSS to codes written by individuals for specific problem applications. The original purpose for developing the finite element code described here, COYOTE, was to bridge the gap between the complex commercial codes and the more simplistic, individual application programs. COYOTE was designed to treat most of the standard conduction problems of interest with a user-oriented input structure and format that was easily learned and remembered. Because of its architecture, the code has also proved useful for research in numerical algorithms and development of thermal analysis capabilities. This general philosophy has been retained in the current version of the program, COYOTE, Version 5.0, though the capabilities of the code have been significantly expanded. A major change in the code is its availability on parallel computer architectures and the increase in problem complexity and size that this implies. The present document describes the theoretical and numerical background for the COYOTE program. This volume is intended as a background document for the user's manual. Potential users of COYOTE are encouraged to become familiar with the present report and the simple example analyses reported in before using the program. The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, COYOTE, is presented in detail. COYOTE is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems

  7. High temperature thermal conductivity measurements of UO/sub 2/ by Direct Electrical Heating. Final report. [MANTRA-III

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, B

    1980-10-01

    High temperature properties of reactor type UO/sub 2/ pellets were measured using a Direct Electrical Heating (DEH) Facility. Modifications to the experimental apparatus have been made so that successful and reproducible DEH runs may be carried out while protecting the pellets from oxidation at high temperature. X-ray diffraction measurements on the UO/sub 2/ pellets have been made before and after runs to assure that sample oxidation has not occurred. A computer code has been developed that will model the experiment using equations that describe physical properties of the material. This code allows these equations to be checked by comparing the model results to collected data. The thermal conductivity equation for UO/sub 2/ proposed by Weilbacher has been used for this analysis. By adjusting the empirical parameters in Weilbacher's equation, experimental data can be matched by the code. From the several runs analyzed, the resulting thermal conductivity equation is lambda = 1/4.79 + 0.0247T/ + 1.06 x 10/sup -3/ exp(-1.62/kT/) - 4410. exp(-3.71/kT/) where lambda is in w/cm K, k is the Boltzman constant, and T is the temperature in Kelvin.

  8. Organizational Infrastructure in the Collegiate Athletic Training Setting, Part III: Benefits of and Barriers in the Medical and Academic Models.

    PubMed

    Eason, Christianne M; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

    2017-01-01

     Academic and medical models are emerging as alternatives to the athletics model, which is the more predominant model in the collegiate athletic training setting. Little is known about athletic trainers' (ATs') perceptions of these models.  To investigate the perceived benefits of and barriers in the medical and academic models.  Qualitative study.  National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III.  A total of 16 full-time ATs (10 men, 6 women; age = 32 ± 6 years, experience = 10 ± 6 years) working in the medical (n = 8) or academic (n = 8) models.  We conducted semistructured telephone interviews and evaluated the qualitative data using a general inductive approach. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were completed to satisfy data credibility.  In the medical model, role congruency and work-life balance emerged as benefits, whereas role conflict, specifically intersender conflict with coaches, was a barrier. In the academic model, role congruency emerged as a benefit, and barriers were role strain and work-life conflict. Subscales of role strain included role conflict and role ambiguity for new employees. Role conflict stemmed from intersender conflict with coaches and athletics administrative personnel and interrole conflict with fulfilling multiple overlapping roles (academic, clinical, administrative).  The infrastructure in which ATs provide medical care needs to be evaluated. We found that the medical model can support better alignment for both patient care and the wellbeing of ATs. Whereas the academic model has perceived benefits, role incongruence exists, mostly because of the role complexity associated with balancing teaching, patient-care, and administrative duties.

  9. Pediatric Sepsis – Part V: Extracellular Heat Shock Proteins: Alarmins for the Host Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, John S; Lahni, Patrick M.; Wong, Hector R.; Wheeler, Derek S.

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that facilitate the proper folding and assembly of nascent polypeptides and assist in the refolding and stabilization of damaged polypeptides. Through these largely intracellular functions, the HSPs maintain homeostasis and assure cell survival. However, a growing body of literature suggests that HSPs have important effects in the extracellular environment as well. Extracellular HSPs are released from damaged or stressed cells and appear to act as local “danger signals” that activate stress response programs in surrounding cells. Importantly, extracellular HSPs have been shown to activate the host innate and adaptive immune response. With this in mind, extracellular HSPs are commonly included in a growing list of a family of proteins known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or alarmins, which trigger an immune response to tissue injury, such as may occur with trauma, ischemia-reperfusion injury, oxidative stress, etc. Extracellular HSPs, including Hsp72 (HSPA), Hsp27 (HSPB1), Hsp90 (HSPC), Hsp60 (HSPD), and Chaperonin/Hsp10 (HSPE) are especially attractrive candidates for DAMPs or alarmins which may be particularly relevant in the pathophysiology of the sepsis syndrome. PMID:24765217

  10. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA booster subcritical assembly, Part III : low enriched uranium conversion analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-05-12

    This study investigates the performance of the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly, located in Belarus, during operation with high (90%), medium (36%), and low (21%) enriched uranium fuels in the assembly's fast zone. The YALINA Booster is a zero-power, subcritical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was constructed for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven subcritical systems, and to serve as a fast neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinides. The first part of this study analyzes the assembly's performance with several fuel types. The MCNPX and MONK Monte Carlo codes were used to determine effective and source neutron multiplication factors, effective delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, neutron flux profiles and spectra, and neutron reaction rates produced from the use of three neutron sources: californium, deuterium-deuterium, and deuterium-tritium. In the latter two cases, the external neutron source operates in pulsed mode. The results discussed in the first part of this report show that the use of low enriched fuel in the fast zone of the assembly diminishes neutron multiplication. Therefore, the discussion in the second part of the report focuses on finding alternative fuel loading configurations that enhance neutron multiplication while using low enriched uranium fuel. It was found that arranging the interface absorber between the fast and the thermal zones in a circular rather than a square array is an effective method of operating the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly without downgrading neutron multiplication relative to the original value obtained with the use of the high enriched uranium fuels in the fast zone.

  11. Early Pottery Making in Northern Coastal Peru. Part III: Mössbauer Study of Sicán Pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, I.; Häusler, W.; Hutzelmann, T.; Riederer, J.; Wagner, U.

    2003-09-01

    Sicán blackware from a 1000-year old elite tomb at Huaca Loro was characterised by neutron activation analysis, optical thin-section microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. A number of blackware fragments from the later site of Puerto Pobre (ca. AD 1460-1550) were included in the analysis for comparison and found to be of different origin. The black surface of the specimens from Huaca Loro is mostly due to carbon deposition during firing in a reducing environment. Part of the pottery was merely dried at temperatures below 400°C, perhaps because it was made in haste for funeral use.

  12. Toxicological evaluation of an electrically heated cigarette. Part 4: Subchronic inhalation toxicology.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, P M; Teredesai, A; Vanscheeuwijck, P M; Verbeeck, J; Schepers, G; Radtke, F; Kuhl, P; Gomm, W; Anskeit, E; Patskan, G

    2003-01-01

    The biological activity of mainstream smoke from an electrically heated cigarette (EHC) with controlled combustion and from the University of Kentucky Reference Cigarette 1R4F was determined in Sprague Dawley rats exposed nose-only for 90 days, 6 h a day, 7 days per week. For an equivalent response comparison between the two cigarette types, two doses were chosen for the EHC where the anticipated results were in the dynamic range of the 1R4F dose-response curve (four concentrations) for most end points. The number of cigarettes smoked per m(3) of diluted smoke resulted in total particulate matter concentrations of 40 and 90 microg l (-1) for the EHC and 40-170 microg l (-1) for the 1R4F. Biomonitoring indicated achievement of target doses. Mainstream smoke yields were lower for the EHC, with the exception of formaldehyde. No smoke-related mortality, remarkable in-life observations or abnormal gross pathological findings were observed. Smoke- and dose-related clinical pathology and organ weight changes included: increases in segmented neutrophils, some liver parameters and lung and adrenal weight relative to body weight; and decreases in lymphocytes, glucose concentration and spleen weight. Smoke-related histopathological findings in the respiratory tract included epithelial cell hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia, atrophy and accumulation of pigmented alveolar macrophages; they were mostly dose-dependent, more pronounced in the upper than lower respiratory tract and completely or partially reversed by 6 weeks post-inhalation. Qualitatively, the biological effects seen for the EHC and the 1R4F were comparable and similar to those observed in other mainstream smoke inhalation studies. Quantitatively, the biological activity of the EHC mainstream smoke was, on average, 65% lower than that of the 1R4F mainstream smoke on an equal cigarette basis and equivalent activity on an equal TPM basis. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Kinga Lemieszek, Marta; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-02

    (Arrhenatherum elatius). Some plant-pathogenic strains of P. agglomerans are tumourigenic, inducing gall formation on table beet, an ornamental plant gypsophila (Gypsophila paniculata), wisteria, Douglas-fir and cranberry. Recently, a Pantoea species closely related to P. agglomerans has been identified as a cause of bacterial blight disease in the edible mushroom Pleurotus eryngii cultivated in China. The genetically governed determinants of plant pathogenicity in Pantoea agglomerans include such mechanisms as the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) system, phytohormones, the quorum-sensing (QS) feedback system and type III secretion system (T3SS) injecting the effector proteins into the cytosol of a plant cell.

  14. The effects of national health care reform on local businesses--Part III: secondary research questions--discoveries and implications.

    PubMed

    Rotarius, Timothy; Liberman, Aaron; Perez, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    This is the third part of a 3-part examination of what may potentially be expected from the 2010 national health care reform legislation. Political researchers and pundits have speculated endlessly on the many changes mandated by the 2010 national health care reform legislation, styled the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. A review and assessment of this legislation at several levels (federal, state, state agency, local region, and individual business leaders) were undertaken. The results of this expanded analysis suggest strongly that nationally members of the business community and their employees will benefit from the legislation early on (years 1 through 3) and then likely will be impacted adversely as the payment mechanisms driving the legislation are tightened by new federal regulations (years 4 onward). As a result of this research, it is surmised that businesses will be immediately impacted by the legislation, with small business owners being the prime beneficiaries of the new legislation, owing to the availability of coverage to approximately 32 million individuals who previously had no access to coverage. In that regard, the soon-to-be newly insured population also will be a prime beneficiary of the legislation as the limitations on chronic illnesses and other preexisting conditions will be reduced or eliminated by the legislation.

  15. Global ocean tides. Part III. The semidiurnal principal solar tide (S2), atlas of tidal charts and maps. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiderski, E.W.

    1981-03-15

    In Part I of this report (AD-A060 913), a unique hydrodynamical interpolation technique was introduced, extensively tested, and evaluated in order to compute partial global ocean tides in great detail and with a high degree of accuracy. This novel method has been applied to construct the semidiurnal principal solar (S2) ocean tide with a relative accuracy of better than 5 cm anywhere in the open oceans. The resulting tidal amplitudes and phases are tabulated on a 1 deg x 1 deg grid system in an atlas of 42 deg x 71 deg overlapping charts covering the whole oceanic globe. A corresponding atlas of global corange and cotidal maps is included to provide the reader with a quick general overview of the major tidal phenomena. The specifying hydrodynamical parameters of the model are listed along with quoted sources of empirical tide data, and significant tidal features are explained and discussed. The S2 ocean tide is found to resemble closely the corresponding lunar M2 tide presented in Part II of this report (AD-A084 694).

  16. A Trimodality Comparison of Volumetric Bone Imaging Technologies. Part III: SD, SEE, LSC Association With Fragility Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Andy K. O.; Beattie, Karen A.; Min, Kevin K. H.; Merali, Zamir; Webber, Colin E.; Gordon, Christopher L.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Cheung, Angela M. W.; Adachi, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Part II of this 3-part series demonstrated 1-yr precision, standard error of the estimate, and 1-yr least significant change for volumetric bone outcomes determined using peripheral (p) quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and peripheral magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) modalities in vivo. However, no clinically relevant outcomes have been linked to these measures of change. This study examined 97 women with mean age of 75 ± 9 yr and body mass index of 26.84 ± 4.77 kg/m2, demonstrating a lack of association between fragility fractures and standard deviation, least significant change and standard error of the estimate-based unit differences in volumetric bone outcomes derived from both pMRI and pQCT. Only cortical volumetric bone mineral density and cortical thickness derived from high-resolution pQCT images were associated with an increased odds for fractures. The same measures obtained by pQCT erred toward significance. Despite the smaller 1-yr and short-term precision error for measures at the tibia vs the radius, the associations with fractures observed at the radius were larger than at the tibia for high-resolution pQCT. Unit differences in cortical thickness and cortical volumetric bone mineral density able to yield a 50% increase in odds for fractures were quantified here and suggested as a reference for future power computations. PMID:25129407

  17. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 2; Evaluation of Estimates Using Independent Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song; Olson, William S.; Wang, Jian-Jian; Bell, Thomas L.; Smith, Eric A.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    2004-01-01

    Rainfall rate estimates from space-borne k&ents are generally accepted as reliable by a majority of the atmospheric science commu&y. One-of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRh4M) facility rain rate algorithms is based upon passive microwave observations fiom the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). Part I of this study describes improvements in the TMI algorithm that are required to introduce cloud latent heating and drying as additional algorithm products. Here, estimates of surface rain rate, convective proportion, and latent heating are evaluated using independent ground-based estimates and satellite products. Instantaneous, OP5resolution estimates of surface rain rate over ocean fiom the improved TMI algorithm are well correlated with independent radar estimates (r approx. 0.88 over the Tropics), but bias reduction is the most significant improvement over forerunning algorithms. The bias reduction is attributed to the greater breadth of cloud-resolving model simulations that support the improved algorithm, and the more consistent and specific convective/stratiform rain separation method utilized. The bias of monthly, 2.5 deg. -resolution estimates is similarly reduced, with comparable correlations to radar estimates. Although the amount of independent latent heating data are limited, TMI estimated latent heating profiles compare favorably with instantaneous estimates based upon dual-Doppler radar observations, and time series of surface rain rate and heating profiles are generally consistent with those derived from rawinsonde analyses. Still, some biases in profile shape are evident, and these may be resolved with: (a) additional contextual information brought to the estimation problem, and/or; (b) physically-consistent and representative databases supporting the algorithm. A model of the random error in instantaneous, 0.5 deg-resolution rain rate estimates appears to be consistent with the levels of error determined from TMI comparisons to collocated radar

  18. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation. PMID:27630924

  19. Devices for the diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders. Part III: Thermography, ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and electromyographic biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Mohl, N D; Ohrbach, R K; Crow, H C; Gross, A J

    1990-04-01

    This last article in the three-part series on devices for the diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) compared the claimed diagnostic usefulness of thermography with the present scientific evidence. In a similar manner, the therapeutic efficacy of ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and electromyographic biofeedback was also reviewed. This evaluation concluded that the application of thermography to the diagnosis of TMD is limited by variations within and among subjects and by intrinsic problems with controls of the test environment. It also concluded that evidence that therapeutic ultrasound alone is useful for the treatment of TMD is lacking, that positive clinical results of electrical stimulation may not be due to specific therapeutic effects, and that it is doubtful that the use of electrical stimulation devices can produce a position of the mandible that has any diagnostic or therapeutic significance. There is evidence, however, that relaxation training, assisted by EMG biofeedback, can reduce daytime muscle activity.

  20. Systematics of the parasitic wasp genus Oxyscelio Kieffer (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae s.l.), part III: African fauna

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Roger A.; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F.; Austin, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract African species of Oxyscelio (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae s.l.) are revised. A total of 14 species are recognized, 13 of which are described as new: Oxyscelio absentiae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio galeri Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio gyri Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio idoli Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio intensionis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio io Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio kylix Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio lunae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio nemesis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio pulveris Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio quassus Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio teli Burks, sp. n. and Oxyscelio xenii Burks, sp. n. The genus Freniger Szabó, syn. n. is recognized as part of an endemic African species group of Oxyscelio with incomplete hind wing venation, and Oxyscelio bicolor (Szabó), comb. n. is therefore recognized as the only previously described species of Oxyscelio from Africa. The Oxyscelio crateris and Oxyscelio cuculli species groups, previously known from southeast Asia, are represented in Africa by seven and one species respectively. PMID:27081336

  1. Anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine: Part III: the “unstable” cervical spine †

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Marion

    1990-01-01

    In this, the last of the three part series on the anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine, the clinical entity-instability-is addressed. A summative definition of instability, addressing both the clinical and radiographic issues, is presented based on current available literature. The etiology of instability is discussed as it pertains to three possible mechanisms: acute trauma, latent evidence of trauma and repetitive microtrauma. The anatomical, clinical and radiographic aspects in each of these meachanisms is discussed. A case report is presented to illustrate the salient features of this potentially disastrous condition. The conclusion emphasizes the importance of defineable limits in each of the presented definitions, calling for future research into the clinical and radiographic correlations of abnormal cervical motion. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  2. Advanced control strategies for heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration systems—An overview: Part I: Hard control

    SciTech Connect

    D. Subbaram Naidu; Craig G. Rieger

    2011-02-01

    A chronological overview of the advanced control strategies for heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) is presented in this article. The overview focuses on hard-computing or control techniques, such as proportional-integral-derivative, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive, and robust; soft-computing or control techniques, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms; and on the fusion or hybrid of hard- and soft-control techniques. Thus, it is to be noted that the terminology “hard” and “soft” computing/control has nothing to do with the “hardware” and “software” that is being generally used. Part I of a two-part series focuses on hard-control strategies, and Part II focuses on softand fusion-control in addition to some future directions in HVAC&R research. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic, and any omission of other works is purely unintentional.

  3. Functional role of inorganic trace elements in angiogenesis part III: (Ti, Li, Ce, As, Hg, Va, Nb and Pb).

    PubMed

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Orangi, Jafar; Asatourian, Armen; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-02-01

    Many essential elements exist in nature with significant influence on human health. Angiogenesis is vital in developmental, repair, and regenerative processes, and its aberrant regulation contributes to pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to explore the role of these elements in such a vital process. This is third in a series of reviews that serve as an overview of the role of inorganic elements in regulation of angiogenesis and vascular function. Here we will review the roles of titanium, lithium, cerium, arsenic, mercury, vanadium, niobium, and lead in these processes. The roles of other inorganic elements in angiogenesis were discussed in part I (N, Fe, Se, P, Au, and Ca) and part II (Cr, Si, Zn, Cu, and S) of these series. The methods of exposure, structure, mechanisms, and potential activities of these elements are briefly discussed. An electronic search was performed on the role of these elements in angiogenesis from January 2005 to April 2014. These elements can promote and/or inhibit angiogenesis through different mechanisms. The anti-angiogenic effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles comes from the inhibition of angiogenic processes, and not from its toxicity. Lithium affects vasculogenesis but not angiogenesis. Nanoceria treatment inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. Vanadium treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced cytotoxic effects through interactions with DNA. The negative impact of mercury on endothelial cell migration and tube formation activities was dose and time dependent. Lead induced IL-8 production, which is known to promote tumor angiogenesis. Thus, understanding the impact of these elements on angiogenesis will help in development of new modalities to modulate angiogenesis under various conditions.

  4. Functional Role of Inorganic Trace Elements in in Angiogenesis Part III: (Ti, Li, Ce, As, Hg, Va, Nb and Pb)

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, M. A.; Orangi, J.; Asatourian, A.; Sorenson, C.M.; Sheibani, N.

    2016-01-01

    Many essential elements exist in nature with significant influence on human health. Angiogenesis is vital to developmental, repair, and regenerative processes, and its aberrant regulation contributes to pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to explore the role of these elements in such a vital process. This is third in a series of reviews that serve as an overview of the role of inorganic elements in regulation of angiogenesis and vascular function. Here we will review the roles of titanium, lithium, cerium, arsenic, mercury, vanadium, niobium, and lead in these processes. The roles of other inorganic elements in angiogenesis were discussed in part I and part II of these series. The methods of exposure, structure, mechanisms, and potential activities of these elements are briefly discussed. An electronic search was performed on the role of these elements in angiogenesis from January 2005-April 2014. These elements can promote and/or inhibit angiogenesis through different mechanisms. The anti-angiogenic effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles comes from the inhibition of angiogenic processes, and not from its toxicity. Lithium affects vasculogenesis but not angiogenesis. Nanoceria treatment inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. Vanadium treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced cytotoxic effects through interactions with DNA. The negative impact of Mercury on cell migration and tube formation activities was dose and time dependent. Lead induced IL-8 production, which is known to promote tumor angiogenesis. Thus, understanding the impact of these elements on angiogenesis will help in development of new modalities to modulate angiogenesis under various conditions. PMID:26638864

  5. Cooling/heating augmentation during turbine startup/shutdown using a seal positioned by thermal response of turbine parts and consequent relative movement thereof

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher

    2000-01-01

    In a turbine rotor, a thermal mismatch between various component parts of the rotor occurs particularly during transient operations such as shutdown and startup. A thermal medium flows past and heats or cools one part of the turbine which may have a deleterious thermal mismatch with another part. By passively controlling the flow of cooling medium past the one part in response to relative movement of thermally responsive parts of the turbine, the flow of thermal medium along the flow path can be regulated to increase or reduce the flow, thereby to regulate the temperature of the one part to maintain the thermal mismatch within predetermined limits.

  6. Evaluation of the Tobacco Heating System 2.2. Part 1: Description of the system and the scientific assessment program.

    PubMed

    Smith, Maurice R; Clark, Bruce; Lüdicke, Frank; Schaller, Jean-Pierre; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2016-11-30

    This publication introduces a series of eight other publications describing the non-clinical assessment and initial clinical study of a candidate modified risk tobacco product (MRTP) - the Tobacco Heating System 2.2 (THS2.2). This paper presents background information on tobacco harm reduction, to complement the approaches aimed at increasing smoking cessation and reducing smoking initiation to reduce the morbidity and mortality caused by cigarette smoking. THS2.2 heats tobacco without combustion, and the resulting formation of harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHC) is greatly reduced compared with cigarette smoke. Assessment of the THS2.2 aerosol in vitro and in vivo reveals reduced toxicity and no new hazards. Additional mechanistic endpoints, measured as part of in vivo studies, confirmed reduced impact on smoking-related disease networks. The clinical study confirmed the reduced exposure to HPHCs in smokers switching to THS2.2, and the associated transcriptomic study confirmed the utility of a gene expression signature, consisting of only 11 genes tested in the blood transcriptome of subjects enrolled in the clinical study, as a complementary measure of exposure response. The potential of THS2.2 as an MRTP is demonstrated by the assessment and additional publications cited in this series.

  7. Infrared and millimetre-wave scintillometry in the suburban environment - Part 2: Large-area sensible and latent heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, H. C.; Evans, J. G.; Grimmond, C. S. B.

    2015-03-01

    A millimetre-wave scintillometer was paired with an infrared scintillometer, enabling estimation of large-area evapotranspiration across northern Swindon, a suburban area in the UK. Both sensible and latent heat fluxes can be obtained using this "two-wavelength" technique, as it is able to provide both temperature and humidity structure parameters, offering a major advantage over conventional single-wavelength scintillometry. The first paper of this two-part series presented the measurement theory and structure parameters. In this second paper, heat fluxes are obtained and analysed. These fluxes, estimated using two-wavelength scintillometry over an urban area, are the first of their kind. Source area modelling suggests the scintillometric fluxes are representative of 5-10 km2. For comparison, local-scale (0.05-0.5 km2) fluxes were measured by an eddy covariance station. Similar responses to seasonal changes are evident at the different scales but the energy partitioning varies between source areas. The response to moisture availability is explored using data from 2 consecutive years with contrasting rainfall patterns (2011-2012). This extensive data set offers insight into urban surface-atmosphere interactions and demonstrates the potential for two-wavelength scintillometry to deliver fluxes over mixed land cover, typically representative of an area 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than for eddy covariance measurements. Fluxes at this scale are extremely valuable for hydro-meteorological model evaluation and assessment of satellite data products.

  8. Infrared and millimetre-wave scintillometry in the suburban environment - Part 2: Large-area sensible and latent heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, H. C.; Evans, J. G.; Grimmond, C. S. B.

    2014-11-01

    A millimetre-wave scintillometer was paired with an infrared scintillometer enabling estimation of large-area evaporation across northern Swindon, a suburban area in the UK. Both sensible and latent heat fluxes can be obtained using this technique, as it is able to provide both temperature and humidity structure parameters, offering a major advantage over conventional single-wavelength scintillometry. The first paper of this two-part series presented the measurement theory and results of the structure parameters. In this second paper, heat fluxes are obtained and analysed. These fluxes, estimated using two-wavelength scintillometry over an urban area, are the first of their kind. Source area modelling suggests the scintillometric fluxes are representative of 5-10 km2. For comparison, local-scale (0.05-0.5 km2) fluxes were measured by an eddy covariance station. Similar responses to seasonal changes are evident at the different scales but the energy partitioning varies between source areas. The response to moisture availability is explored using data from two consecutive years with contrasting rainfall patterns (2011-2012). This extensive dataset offers insight into urban surface-atmosphere interactions and demonstrates the potential for two-wavelength scintillometry to deliver fluxes over mixed land cover, typically representative of an area 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than for eddy covariance measurements. Fluxes at this scale are extremely valuable for hydro-meteorological model evaluation and assessment of satellite data products.

  9. Organic Rankine Cycle for Residual Heat to Power Conversion in Natural Gas Compressor Station. Part I: Modelling and Optimisation Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaczykowski, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    Basic organic Rankine cycle (ORC), and two variants of regenerative ORC have been considered for the recovery of exhaust heat from natural gas compressor station. The modelling framework for ORC systems has been presented and the optimisation of the systems was carried out with turbine power output as the variable to be maximized. The determination of ORC system design parameters was accomplished by means of the genetic algorithm. The study was aimed at estimating the thermodynamic potential of different ORC configurations with several working fluids employed. The first part of this paper describes the ORC equipment models which are employed to build a NLP formulation to tackle design problems representative for waste energy recovery on gas turbines driving natural gas pipeline compressors.

  10. Impact of Heating Rate During Exposure of Laser Molten Parts on the Processing Window of PA12 Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummer, Dietmar; Drexler, Maximilian; Wudy, Katrin

    The additive component manufacturing by selective beam melting of thermoplastic polymer powders can be divided essentially into the following sub-processes: Powder coating, exposure and material consolidation. The mechanical and geometrical properties of a part produced by the selective melting of polymer powders depend toa large extent on these sub-processes. To increase process repeatability basic knowledge about the mutual interactions within the sub-process is of major interest. In the following article the exposure process is focused. Therefore the time dependent energy input into the powder bed is analyzed in its impact on the usable processing window of PA12powder. Thereby parameters like surface temperature, density and strength of molten layers as well as complex body specimens are quantified for varying exposure heating rates. Therefore methods of statistical design of experiments are used. Due to these investigations the derivation of new, the time dependent material behavior of polymers fitting processing strategies is possible.

  11. Numerical modeling of landfill gas and heat transport in the deformable MSW landfill body. Part 1. Development of the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsyi, D. V.

    2015-06-01

    The article is devoted to studying the parameters of wells that are used as part of vertical gas extraction systems for degassing landfills. To this end, approaches to modeling the main processes occurring in the landfill's porous medium are considered. The considered approaches served as a basis for elaborating a thermophysical gas and heat transport model that takes into account variation in the hydrodynamic properties of wastes resulting from their secondary settlement. The adequacy of the results obtained using the developed model is confirmed by the data of classic works. The effect the secondary settlement of wastes has on the distribution of pressure and temperature in the landfill body is determined. It is shown that compaction of wastes due to their secondary settlement results in a growth of pressure by 40% on the average.

  12. New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science: Part III: Operational applications and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Cedric; Margot, Pierre

    2009-11-20

    The research reported in this series of article aimed at (1) automating the search of questioned ink specimens in ink reference collections and (2) at evaluating the strength of ink evidence in a transparent and balanced manner. These aims require that ink samples are analysed in an accurate and reproducible way and that they are compared in an objective and automated way. This latter requirement is due to the large number of comparisons that are necessary in both scenarios. A research programme was designed to (a) develop a standard methodology for analysing ink samples in a reproducible way, (b) comparing automatically and objectively ink samples and (c) evaluate the proposed methodology in forensic contexts. This report focuses on the last of the three stages of the research programme. The calibration and acquisition process and the mathematical comparison algorithms were described in previous papers [C. Neumann, P. Margot, New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science-Part I: Development of a quality assurance process for forensic ink analysis by HPTLC, Forensic Sci. Int. 185 (2009) 29-37; C. Neumann, P. Margot, New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science-Part II: Development and testing of mathematical algorithms for the automatic comparison of ink samples analysed by HPTLC, Forensic Sci. Int. 185 (2009) 38-50]. In this paper, the benefits and challenges of the proposed concepts are tested in two forensic contexts: (1) ink identification and (2) ink evidential value assessment. The results show that different algorithms are better suited for different tasks. This research shows that it is possible to build digital ink libraries using the most commonly used ink analytical technique, i.e. high-performance thin layer chromatography, despite its reputation of lacking reproducibility. More importantly, it is possible to assign evidential value to ink evidence in a transparent way using a probabilistic model. It is therefore

  13. US Transuranium Registry report on the SU Am content of a whole body. Part III: Gamma-ray measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, H.E.; Spitz, H.B.; Rieksts, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    The SU Am measurements on the donor's body, followed by an analysis of each bone of the skeleton, have provided the best available calibration factors for measuring the SU Am content in the skeletons of the living. These calibration factors have already been useful in measuring the skeletal burden of several workers in the nuclear industry. This study has shown that differential linear scanning provides good results on the content of various parts of the skeleton. Previously used methods of head or leg counting for estimating total skeletal content of SU Am were also found to provide good results. These studies confirm previous recommendations that in-vivo measurement of the skull probably provides the best estimate of SU Am in the skeleton; however, other positions such as the knee are also found to be bilaterally symmetrical for identical bones on the right and left sides of the body. A comparison of measurements on the donor's body with those of other people with skeletal burdens of SU Am shows that differences in skeletal distribution do exist and are probably due to the age of the person, the duration of the skeletal SU Am burden, and perhaps the physical activity of the person. Additional measurements and studies are planned on the remaining half of the skeleton and they should further improve the accuracy of in-vivo measurements of SU Am in the human skeleton.

  14. Preformulation considerations for controlled release dosage forms. Part III. Candidate form selection using numerical weighting and scoring.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowski, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Two numerical methods, Decision Analysis (DA) and Potential Problem Analysis (PPA) are presented as alternative selection methods to the logical method presented in Part I. In DA properties are weighted and outcomes are scored. The weighted scores for each candidate are totaled and final selection is based on the totals. Higher scores indicate better candidates. In PPA potential problems are assigned a seriousness factor and test outcomes are used to define the probability of occurrence. The seriousness-probability products are totaled and forms with minimal scores are preferred. DA and PPA have never been compared to the logical-elimination method. Additional data were available for two forms of McN-5707 to provide complete preformulation data for five candidate forms. Weight and seriousness factors (independent variables) were obtained from a survey of experienced formulators. Scores and probabilities (dependent variables) were provided independently by Preformulation. The rankings of the five candidate forms, best to worst, were similar for all three methods. These results validate the applicability of DA and PPA for candidate form selection. DA and PPA are particularly applicable in cases where there are many candidate forms and where each form has some degree of unfavorable properties.

  15. Injury and the orchestral environment: part III. the role of psychosocial factors in the experience of musicians undertaking rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Dale Ll; Barrett, Margaret S; Ackermann, Bronwen J

    2014-09-01

    Workplace rehabilitation in the orchestral setting poses a number of challenges that arise in part due to a poor fit between generic injury insurance and medical care and the elite performance requirements of professional musicians. Currently, the orchestral profession lacks information and strategies to best deal with the unique challenges of this complex rehabilitation environment. In order to inform future directions for research and suggest possible changes of practice, the researchers conducted a qualitative case-study aimed at understanding the injury and rehabilitation experiences of professional musicians. In-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with three chronically injured professional cellists from a single Australian orchestra. After initial data analysis, further interviews were undertaken with a set of five orchestral management staff as a means of data triangulation. All data were analysed using a themes-based analysis-of-narrative approach. The findings indicate that injury concealment played a considerable role in the development of chronic injuries for these musicians, and management staff felt that this concealment may be the norm amongst orchestral musicians. The musicians in this study suffered emotional and psychological trauma as the result of their injuries, and two participants felt socially marginalised. During rehabilitation, the musicians in this study encountered difficulties with medical staff not understanding the elite performance requirements of orchestral work. The article proposes recommendations that may assist in dealing with the complex challenges of injury rehabilitation in the orchestral environment.

  16. Numerical Modeling of Hailstorms and Hailstone Growth. Part III: Simulation of an Alberta Hailstorm--Natural and Seeded Cases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Richard D.

    1987-07-01

    This paper reports on simulations of a multicellular hailstorm case observed during the 1983 Alberta Hail Project. The field operations on that day concentrated on two successive feeder cells which were subjected to controlled seeding experiments. The fist of these cells received the placebo treatment and the second was seeded with dry ice. The principal tool of this study is a modified version of the two-dimensional, time dependent hail category model described in Part I of this series of papers. It is with this model that hail growth processes are investigated, including the simulated effects of cloud seeding techniques as practiced in Alberta.The model simulation of the natural case produces a very good replication of the observed storm, particularly the placebo feeder cell. This is evidenced, in particular, by the high degree of fidelity of the observed and modeled radar reflectivity in terms of magnitudes, structure, and evolution. The character of the hailfall at the surface and the scale of the storm are captured nicely by the model, although cloud-top heights are generally too high, particularly for the mature storm system.Seeding experiments similar to those conducted in the field have also been simulated. These involve seeding the feeder cell early in its active development phase with dry ice (CO2) or silver iodide (AgI) introduced near cloud top. The model simulations of these seeded cases capture some of the observed seeding signatures detected by radar and aircraft. In these model experiments, CO2 seeding produced a stronger response than AgI seeding relative to inhibiting hail formation. For both seeded cases, production of precipitating ice was initially enhanced by the seeding, but retarded slightly in the later stages, the net result being modest increases in surface rainfall, with hail reduced slightly. In general, the model simulations support several subhypotheses of the operational strategy of the Alberta Research Council regarding the earlier

  17. Nosocomial transmission and infection control aspects of parasitic and ectoparasitic diseases. Part III. Ectoparasites/summary and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Lettau, L A

    1991-03-01

    As a rule, both the standard of hygiene and sanitation prevalent in hospitals in the United States and the rarity of parasitic diseases compared to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections, reduce the hazard of nosocomial acquisition of parasites to relatively trivial levels. However, abetted by the resultant low index of suspicion on the part of clinical staff, certain parasitic microorganisms may at times cause significant morbidity and even mortality in both normal and immunocompromised patients, as summarized in this review. Also, the nosocomial acquisition of parasites may be somewhat underappreciated because the incubation period for clinical illness may be days to weeks and thus a hospital-acquired infection may not be recognized as such, particularly if the parasite is endemic locally. Parasitic diseases have been a much more significant problem in certain special facilities, such as custodial institutions for the mentally ill or retarded, where crowding, poor environmental sanitation, and low levels of personal hygiene have in the past allowed the rapid dissemination and endemic occurrence of a large variety of parasitic infections. It is likely that nosocomial transmission of parasites may be an even greater problem in some hospitals in the tropics, where strict hygienic standards are costly or otherwise more difficult to maintain, and where often an increased proportion of the patient population harbors one or more parasites. However, the exact magnitude of the problem in tropical hospitals is also more difficult to determine because nosocomial acquisition of a parasitic infection may not be distinguished easily versus exogenous infection or reactivation of latent infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. The three-dimensional easy morphological (3-DEMO) classification of scoliosis – Part III, correlation with clinical classification and parameters

    PubMed Central

    Negrini, Stefano; Negrini, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Background In the first part of this study we proposed a new classification approach for spinal deformities (3-DEMO classification). To be valid, a classification needs to describe adequately the phenomenon considered (construct validity): a way to verify this issue is comparison with already existing classifications (concurrent and criterion validity). Aim To compare the 3-DEMO classification and the numerical results of its classificatory parameters with the existing clinical classifications and the Cobb degrees on the frontal and sagittal planes respectively. Methods 118 subjects (96 females) with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (age 15.9 ± 3.1, 37.4 ± 12.5° Cobb) have been classified according to 3-DEMO, SRS-Ponseti, King and Lenke classifications as well as according to sagittal configuration. For all patients we computed the values of the 3-DEMO parameters and the classical Cobb degrees measurements in the frontal and sagittal planes. Statistical analysis comprised Chi Square and Regression analysis, including a multivariate stepwise regression. Results Three of the four 3-DEMO parameters (Direction, Sagittal and Frontal Shift) correlated with SRS-Ponseti, King and sagittal configuration classifications, but not with Lenke's one. Feeble correlations have been found among numerical parameters, while the stepwise regression allowed us to develop almost satisfactory models to obtain 3-DEMO parameters from classical Cobb degrees measurements. Discussion These results support the hypothesis of a possible clinical significance of the 3-DEMO classification, even if follow-up studies are needed to better understand these possible correlations and ultimately the classification usefulness. The most interesting 3D parameters appear to be Direction and mainly Phase, the latter being not at all correlated with currently existing classifications. Nevertheless, Shift cannot be easily appreciated on classical frontal and sagittal radiographs, even if it could presumably

  19. The three-dimensional easy morphological (3-DEMO) classification of scoliosis - Part III, correlation with clinical classification and parameters.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Stefano; Negrini, Alberto

    2007-03-19

    In the first part of this study we proposed a new classification approach for spinal deformities (3-DEMO classification). To be valid, a classification needs to describe adequately the phenomenon considered (construct validity): a way to verify this issue is comparison with already existing classifications (concurrent and criterion validity). To compare the 3-DEMO classification and the numerical results of its classificatory parameters with the existing clinical classifications and the Cobb degrees on the frontal and sagittal planes respectively. 118 subjects (96 females) with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (age 15.9 +/- 3.1, 37.4 +/- 12.5 degrees Cobb) have been classified according to 3-DEMO, SRS-Ponseti, King and Lenke classifications as well as according to sagittal configuration. For all patients we computed the values of the 3-DEMO parameters and the classical Cobb degrees measurements in the frontal and sagittal planes. Statistical analysis comprised Chi Square and Regression analysis, including a multivariate stepwise regression. Three of the four 3-DEMO parameters (Direction, Sagittal and Frontal Shift) correlated with SRS-Ponseti, King and sagittal configuration classifications, but not with Lenke's one. Feeble correlations have been found among numerical parameters, while the stepwise regression allowed us to develop almost satisfactory models to obtain 3-DEMO parameters from classical Cobb degrees measurements. These results support the hypothesis of a possible clinical significance of the 3-DEMO classification, even if follow-up studies are needed to better understand these possible correlations and ultimately the classification usefulness. The most interesting 3D parameters appear to be Direction and mainly Phase, the latter being not at all correlated with currently existing classifications. Nevertheless, Shift cannot be easily appreciated on classical frontal and sagittal radiographs, even if it could presumably be calculated.

  20. "Why Not Stoichiometry" versus "Stoichiometry—Why Not?" Part III: Extension of GATES/GEB on Complex Dynamic Redox Systems.

    PubMed

    Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M; Michałowski, Tadeusz; Toporek, Marcin; Asuero, Agustin G

    2015-01-01

    In the third part of a series of articles issued under a common title, some examples of complex dynamic redox systems are presented and considered from analytical and physico-chemical viewpoints; the analysis is a leitmotiv for detailed, physico-chemical considerations. All attainable physico-chemical knowledge is involved in algorithms applied for resolution of the systems, realized with use of iterative computer programs. The first redox system (System I) is related to titration of FeSO4 + H2C2O4 with KMnO4 solution in acidic (H2SO4) medium, where simultaneous determination of both analytes from a single curve of potentiometric titration is possible. The possibility of the formation of precipitates (FeC2O4 and/or MnC2O4) in this system is taken into considerations. The second system (System II) relates to the complete analytical procedure involved in the iodometric determination of Cu; four consecutive steps of this analysis are considered. As a reasonable tool for explanation of processes occurring during simulated redox titration, speciation diagrams are suggested. This explanation is based on graphical presentation of results obtained from the calculations. The calculations made for this purpose are performed in accordance with principles of the generalized approach to electrolytic systems (GATES) with generalized electron balance (GEB) or GATES/GEB and realized with use of iterative computer programs offered by MATLAB. The reactions proceeding in this system can be formulated, together with their efficiencies, at any stage of the titration. Stoichiometry is considered as the derivative concept when put in context with GATES/GEB. The article illustrates the enormous possibilities and advantages offered by GATES/GEB.

  1. Regularities pertinent to heat transfer between torch gas layers and steam boiler firebox waterwalls. Part I. Geometrical and physical torch model as a source of heat radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. N.

    2014-09-01

    The progress seen in the 19th-21st centuries in the development of methods for calculating heat transfer in torch furnaces, fireboxes, and combustion chambers is analyzed. Throughout the 20th century, calculations of heat transfer were carried out based on the law for radiation from solid bodies deduced by Y. Stefan and L. Boltzmann. It is shown that the use of this law for calculating heat transfer of a torch (a gaseous source of radiation) in heating furnaces and power-generating installations leads to incorrect results. It is substantiated that there is crisis of methods for calculating heat transfer in torch furnaces and power-generating installations. Geometrical and physical torch models in the form of radiating cylindrical gas volumes as sources of heat radiation are proposed for overcoming this crisis.

  2. Heating of BDE-209 and BDE-47 in plant oil in presence of o,p'-DDT or iron(III) chloride can produce monochloro-polybromo diphenyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Bendig, Paul; Blumenstein, Marina; Vetter, Walter

    2012-05-01

    Heating processes of food can alter the concentrations and composition of organohalogen compounds. In this study the fate of two polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) and 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) was analyzed when heated in plant oil with and without additional compounds. When the PBDEs were heated in pure plant oil, no transformation was observed. Heating of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) together with ortho,para'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (o,p'-DDT) or iron(III) chloride in plant oil resulted in the formation of monochloro-nonabromodiphenyl ethers (Br(9)Cl-DEs). Almost 10% of the initial amount of BDE-209 was transferred into Br(9)Cl-DEs. Heating BDE-47 in the presence of iron(III) chloride produced two monochlorinated transformation products which were tentatively identified as 2,2',4-tribromo-4'-chlorodiphenyl ether (4'-Cl-BDE-17) and 2,4,4'-tribromo-2'-chlorodiphenyl ether (2'-Cl-BDE-28). However, the reactivity was smaller and no Br→Cl exchange was observed with o,p'-DDT. The conditions used in our experiments (200 °C; heating 30 min-3 h) indicate that such reactivity may also occur during cooking of fish, meat and other food samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Incommunicado detention and torture in Spain, Part III: 'Five days is enough': the concept of torturing environments.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sales, Pau; Navarro-Lashayas, Miguel Angel; Plaza, Angeles; Morentin, Benito; Barrios Salinas, Oihana

    2016-01-01

    Torture is changing in western societies, evolving from pain-producing torture to more subtle mixed psychological methods that are harder to detect. Despite this, there is not an adequate understanding of the complexities of contemporary psychological techniques used in coercive interrogation and torture. The interrogation and torture techniques used on 45 detainees held in short-term incommunicado detention in Spain during the period 1980-2012 were analyzed. The list of torture categories set out in the Istanbul Protocol (IP) were assessed quantitatively. Software-aided qualitative analysis of the testimonies was conducted, using both inferential and deductive approaches to deduce a classification of torture techniques from the point of view of the survivor. The most frequent methods according to the IP categories used against detainees were isolation and manipulation of environment (100%), humiliation (93%), psychological techniques to break down the individual (91%), threats (89%) and forced positions and physical exercises until extenuation (80%). Additionally, with a frequency of between 51 and 70%, mild but constant blows, being forced to witness the torture of others, hooding (mainly dry asphyxia) and unacceptable undue conditions of detention were also frequent. Sexual torture was also widespread with sexual violence (42%), forced nudity (38%) and rape (7%). Qualitative analysis showed that most detainees were submitted to coercive interrogation using a wide array of deceptive techniques. This is often a central part of the torturing process, frequently used in conjunction with many other methods. It was found that giving false or misleading information or making false accusations was most frequently used, followed by maximization of responsibility or facts and giving false information regarding relatives or friends. Different patterns of harsh interrogation, ill-treatment and torture are described that appear to have been tailored to the profile of Basque

  4. SCAI/AATS/ACC/STS operator and institutional requirements for transcatheter valve repair and replacement, Part III: Pulmonic valve.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Ziyad M; Ruiz, Carlos E; Zahn, Evan; Ringel, Richard; Aldea, Gabriel S; Bacha, Emile A; Bavaria, Joseph; Bolman, R Morton; Cameron, Duke E; Dean, Larry S; Feldman, Ted; Fullerton, David; Horlick, Eric; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Moon, Marc R; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Trento, Alfredo; Tommaso, Carl L

    2015-07-01

    surgeons was formed to include a majority of members with no relevant RWI and to be led by an interventional cardiology cochair and a surgical cochair with no relevant RWI. Authors with relevant RWI were not permitted to draft or vote on text or recommendations pertaining to their RWI. RWI were reviewed on all conference calls and updated as changes occurred. Author and peer reviewer RWI pertinent to this document are disclosed in the Appendices. In addition, to ensure complete transparency, authors' comprehensive disclosure information (including RWI not pertinent to this document) is available in Appendix AII. The work of the writing committee was supported exclusively by the partnering societies without commercial support. SCAI, AATS, ACC, and STS believe that adherence to these recommendations will maximize the chances that these therapies will become a successful part of the armamentarium for treating valvular heart disease in the United States. In addition, these recommendations will hopefully facilitate optimum quality during the delivery of this therapy, which will be important to the development and successful implementation of future, less invasive approaches to structural heart disease. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The American College of Cardiology Foundation and The American Association for Thoracic Surgery.

  5. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part III. Investigation of European standard methods.

    PubMed

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Larry A; Kashon, Michael L; Harper, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Lee et al. (Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2014a;58:60-73) introduced an approach to measure pump pulsation (PP) using a real-world sampling train, while the European Standards (EN) (EN 1232-1997 and EN 12919-1999) suggest measuring PP using a resistor in place of the sampler. The goal of this study is to characterize PP according to both EN methods and to determine the relationship of PP between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods. Additional test parameters were investigated to determine whether the test conditions suggested by the EN methods were appropriate for measuring pulsations. Experiments were conducted using a factorial combination of personal sampling pumps (six medium- and two high-volumetric flow rate pumps), back pressures (six medium- and seven high-flow rate pumps), resistors (two types), tubing lengths between a pump and resistor (60 and 90 cm), and different flow rates (2 and 2.5 l min(-1) for the medium- and 4.4, 10, and 11.2 l min(-1) for the high-flow rate pumps). The selection of sampling pumps and the ranges of back pressure were based on measurements obtained in the previous study (Lee et al., 2014a). Among six medium-flow rate pumps, only the Gilian5000 and the Apex IS conformed to the 10% criterion specified in EN 1232-1997. Although the AirChek XR5000 exceeded the 10% limit, the average PP (10.9%) was close to the criterion. One high-flow rate pump, the Legacy (PP=8.1%), conformed to the 10% criterion in EN 12919-1999, while the Elite12 did not (PP=18.3%). Conducting supplemental tests with additional test parameters beyond those used in the two subject EN standards did not strengthen the characterization of PPs. For the selected test conditions, a linear regression model [PPEN=0.014+0.375×PPNIOSH (adjusted R2=0.871)] was developed to determine the PP relationship between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods

  6. Estimation of energetic efficiency of heat supply in front of the aircraft at supersonic accelerated flight. Part 1. Mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latypov, A. F.

    2008-12-01

    Fuel economy at boost trajectory of the aerospace plane was estimated during energy supply to the free stream. Initial and final flight velocities were specified. The model of a gliding flight above cold air in an infinite isobaric thermal wake was used. The fuel consumption rates were compared at optimal trajectory. The calculations were carried out using a combined power plant consisting of ramjet and liquid-propellant engine. An exergy model was built in the first part of the paper to estimate the ramjet thrust and specific impulse. A quadratic dependence on aerodynamic lift was used to estimate the aerodynamic drag of aircraft. The energy for flow heating was obtained at the expense of an equivalent reduction of the exergy of combustion products. The dependencies were obtained for increasing the range coefficient of cruise flight for different Mach numbers. The second part of the paper presents a mathematical model for the boost interval of the aircraft flight trajectory and the computational results for the reduction of fuel consumption at the boost trajectory for a given value of the energy supplied in front of the aircraft.

  7. Methyl CpG level at distal part of heat-shock protein promoter HSP70 exhibits epigenetic memory for heat stress by modulating recruitment of POU2F1-associated nucleosome-remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) complex.

    PubMed

    Kisliouk, Tatiana; Cramer, Tomer; Meiri, Noam

    2017-05-01

    Depending on its stringency, exposure to heat in early life leads to either resilience or vulnerability to heat stress later in life. We hypothesized that epigenetic alterations in genes belonging to the cell proteostasis pathways are attributed to long-term responses to heat stress. Epigenetic regulation of the mRNA expression of the molecular chaperone heat-shock protein (HSP) 70 (HSPA2) was evaluated in the chick hypothalamus during the critical period of thermal-control establishment on day 3 post-hatch and during heat challenge on day 10. Both the level and duration of HSP70 expression during heat challenge a week after heat conditioning were more pronounced in chicks conditioned under harsh versus mild temperature. Analyzing different segments of the promoter in vitro indicated that methylation of a distal part altered its transcriptional activity. In parallel, DNA-methylation level of this segment in vivo was higher in harsh- compared to mild-heat-conditioned chicks. Hypermethylation of the HSP70 promoter in high-temperature-conditioned chicks was accompanied by a reduction in both POU Class 2 Homeobox 1 (POU2F1) binding and recruitment of the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) chromatin-remodeling complex. As a result, histone H3 acetylation levels at the HSP70 promoter were higher in harsh-temperature-conditioned chicks than in their mild-heat-conditioned counterparts. These results suggest that methylation level of a distal part of the HSP70 promoter and POU2F1 recruitment may reflect heat-stress-related epigenetic memory and may be useful in differentiating between individuals that are resilient or vulnerable to stress. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part III. Effectively effecting and sustaining change.

    PubMed

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    Reaping the optimal rewards from any quality improvement project mandates sustainability after the initial implementation. In Part III of this three-part ATS Seminars series, we discuss strategies to create a culture for change, improve cooperation and interaction between multidisciplinary teams of clinicians, and position the intensive care unit (ICU) optimally within the hospital environment. Coaches are used throughout other industries to help professionals assess and continually improve upon their practice; use of this strategy is as of yet infrequent in health care, but would be easily transferable and potentially beneficial to ICU managers and clinicians alike. Similarly, activities focused on improving teamwork are commonplace outside of health care. Simulation training and classroom education about key components of successful team functioning are known to result in improvements. In addition to creating an ICU environment in which individuals and teams of clinicians perform well, ICU managers must position the ICU to function well within the hospital system. It is important to move away from the notion of a standalone ("siloed") ICU to one that is well integrated into the rest of the institution. Creating a "pull-system" (in which participants are active in searching out needed resources and admitting patients) can help ICU managers both provide better care for the critically ill and strengthen relationships with non-ICU staff. Although not necessary, there is potential upside to creating a unified critical care service to assist with achieving these ends.

  9. Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Sudhagar; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Togore, Sam; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

  10. The model SIRANE for atmospheric urban pollutant dispersion. PART III: Validation against NO2 yearly concentration measurements in a large urban agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulhac, L.; Nguyen, C. V.; Volta, P.; Salizzoni, P.

    2017-10-01

    We present a validation study of an updated version of the SIRANE model, whose results have been systematically compared to concentrations of nitrogen dioxide collected over the whole urban agglomeration of Lyon. We model atmospheric dispersion of nitrogen oxides emitted by road traffic, industries and domestic heating. The meteorological wind field is computed by a pre-processor using data collected at a ground level monitoring station. Model results are compared with hourly concentrations measured at 15 monitoring stations over the whole year (2008). Further 75 passive diffusion samplers were used during 3 periods of 2 weeks to get a detailed spatial distribution over the west part of the city. An analysis of the model results depending on the variability of the meteorological input allows us to identify the causes for peculiar bad performances of the model and to identify possible improvements of the parameterisations implemented in it.

  11. APEX-CHAMP+ high-J CO observations of low-mass young stellar objects. III. NGC 1333 IRAS 4A/4B envelope, outflow, and ultraviolet heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, Umut A.; Kristensen, Lars E.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Belloche, Arnaud; van Kempen, Tim A.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Güsten, Rolf; van der Marel, Nienke

    2012-06-01

    Context. The NGC 1333 IRAS 4A and IRAS 4B sources are among the most well-studied Stage 0 low-mass protostars, which drive prominent bipolar outflows. Spectrally resolved molecular emission lines provide crucial information about the physical and chemical structure of the circumstellar material as well as the dynamics of the different components. Most studies have so far concentrated on the colder parts (T ≤ 30 K) of these regions. Aims: The aim is to characterize the warmer parts of the protostellar envelope using the new generation of submillimeter instruments. This will allow us to quantify the feedback of the protostars on their surroundings in terms of shocks, ultraviolet (UV) heating, photodissociation, and outflow dispersal. Methods: The dual frequency 2 × 7 pixel 650/850 GHz array receiver CHAMP+ mounted on APEX was used to obtain a fully sampled, large-scale ~4' × 4' map at 9″ resolution of the IRAS 4A/4B region in the 12CO J = 6-5 line. Smaller maps were observed in the 13CO 6-5 and [C i] J = 2-1 lines. In addition, a fully sampled 12CO J = 3-2 map made with HARP-B on the JCMT is presented and deep isotopolog observations are obtained at selected outflow positions to constrain the optical depth. Complementary Herschel-HIFI and ground-based lines of CO and its isotopologs, from J = 1-0 up to 10-9 (Eu/k ≈ 300 K), are collected at the source positions and used to construct velocity-resolved CO ladders and rotational diagrams. Radiative-transfer models of the dust and lines are used to determine the temperatures and masses of the outflowing and photon-heated gas and infer the CO abundance structure. Results: Broad CO emission-line profiles trace entrained shocked gas along the outflow walls, which have an average temperature of ~100 K. At other positions surrounding the outflow and the protostar, the 6-5 line profiles are narrow indicating UV excitation. The narrow 13CO 6-5 data directly reveal the UV heated gas distribution for the first time. The

  12. ASIST 2003: Part III: Posters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three posters address topics including access to information; metadata; personal information management; scholarly information communication; online resources; content analysis; interfaces; Web queries; information evaluation; informatics; information needs; search effectiveness; digital libraries; diversity; automated indexing; e-commerce;…

  13. ASIST 2003: Part III: Posters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three posters address topics including access to information; metadata; personal information management; scholarly information communication; online resources; content analysis; interfaces; Web queries; information evaluation; informatics; information needs; search effectiveness; digital libraries; diversity; automated indexing; e-commerce;…

  14. The Mushroom Place. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlichter, Carol

    1978-01-01

    The final installment of a series of articles on the "Mushroom Place" learning center program, which involves creative thinking activities for young, gifted students, describes "Doing It the Hard Way," a performance task which involves the actual construction of objects from a selected set of materials in the absence of the usual project tools.…

  15. A Child's Brain: Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Robert

    1982-01-01

    This article, the last in a series about the human brain, focuses on the skin and its importance for the brain. Physiological functions of the skin, concerning touch and body protection, are explained, as well as its social role in nonverbal communication. Suggestions for student discussions are given. (PP)

  16. The Mushroom Place. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlichter, Carol

    1978-01-01

    The final installment of a series of articles on the "Mushroom Place" learning center program, which involves creative thinking activities for young, gifted students, describes "Doing It the Hard Way," a performance task which involves the actual construction of objects from a selected set of materials in the absence of the usual project tools.…

  17. Novel, cyclic heat dissipation method for the correction of natural temperature gradients in sap flow measurements. Part 2. Laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Acosta, J Leonardo; Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy; Lubczynski, Maciek W

    2012-07-01

    Sap flow measurements conducted with thermal dissipation probes (TDPs) are vulnerable to natural temperature gradient (NTG) bias. Few studies, however, attempted to explain the dynamics underlying the NTG formation and its influence on the sensors' signal. This study focused on understanding how the TDP signals are affected by negative and positive temperature influences from NTG and tested the novel cyclic heat dissipation (CHD) method to filter out the NTG bias. A series of three experiments were performed in which gravity-driven water flow was enforced on freshly cut stem segments of Fagus sylvatica L., while an artificial temperature gradient (ATG) was induced. The first experiment sought to confirm the incidence of the ATG on sensors. The second experiment established the mis-estimations caused by the biasing effect of the ATG on standard TDP measurements. The third experiment tested the accuracy of the CHD method to account for the ATG biasing effect, as compared with other cyclic correction methods. During experiments, sap flow measured by TDP was assessed against gravimetric measurements. The results show that negative and positive ATGs were comparable in pattern but substantially larger than field NTGs. Second, the ATG bias caused an overestimation of the standard TDP sap flux density of ∼17 cm(3) cm(-2) h(-1) by 76%, and the sap flux density of ∼2 cm(3) cm(-2) h(-1) by over 800%. Finally, the proposed CHD method successfully reduced the max. ATG bias to 25% at ∼11 cm(3) cm(-2) h(-1) and to 40% at ∼1 cm(3) cm(-2) h(-1). We concluded that: (i) the TDP method is susceptible to NTG especially at low flows; (ii) the CHD method successfully corrected the TDP signal and resulted in generally more accurate sap flux density estimates (mean absolute percentage error ranging between 11 and 21%) than standard constant power TDP method and other cyclic power methods; and (iii) the ATG enforcing system is a suitable way of re-creating NTG for future tests.

  18. Computational modelling and analysis of heat and mass transfer in MHD flow past the upper part of a paraboloid of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnaneswara Reddy, M.; Sandeep, N.

    2017-05-01

    The flow and heat transfer nature of MHD dissipative flow past the upper part of a non-melting paraboloid of revolution with non-uniform heat source/sink, thermophoresis and Brownian moment effects are investigated numerically. The buoyancy induced on the flow is considered in such way that the surface is neither vertical/horizontal nor wedge/cone. The equations governing the flow are solved numerically by employing the RKF integration scheme after suitable transformations. Graphical results are obtained to discuss the behaviour of flow, temperature and concentration fields at various parameters of interest. The reduced wall friction, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are computed. It is found that the non-uniform heat source/sink parameters regulate the thermal boundary layer. Thermophoresis and Brownian moment parameters act as controlling parameters of heat and mass transfer rate.

  19. Reflecting Equity and Diversity. Part I: Guidelines and Procedure for Evaluating Bias in Instructional Materials. Part II: Bias Awareness Training Worksheets. Part III: Bias Awareness and Procedure Training Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bebermeyer, Jim; Edmond, Mary, Ed.

    Reflecting a need to prepare students for working in diverse organizations, this document was developed to increase school officials' awareness of bias in instructional materials and help them select bias-free materials. A number of the examples illustrate situations dealing with diversity in the workplace. The guide is divided into three parts:…

  20. Heat and moisture exchangers and breathing system filters: their use in anaesthesia and intensive care. Part 2 - practical use, including problems, and their use with paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, A R

    2011-01-01

    Heat and moisture exchangers and breathing system filters are intended to replace the normal warming, humidifying and filtering functions of the upper airways. The first part of this review considered the history, principles of operation and efficiency of these devices. The aim of this part of the review is to summarise recent guidelines on the use of these devices and outline the problems that can occur. In particular, the effect of these devices on gas analysis, dead space, resistance to gas flow and blockage of the breathing system is considered. In children, it is important to consider the addition of dead space and resistance to gas flow. A body weight of 2.5 kg is probably the lower weight limit for use with heat and moisture exchangers, and 3 kg for filters. The resistance to gas flow of a heat- and moisture-exchanging filter added to a Mapleson F breathing system can cause a delay in the induction of anaesthesia.

  1. Experimental study on bubble dynamics and wall heat transfer arising from a single nucleation site at subcooled flow boiling conditions – Part 2: Data analysis on sliding bubble characteristics and associated wall heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Yooa, Junsoo; Estrada-Perez, Carlos E.; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2016-04-28

    In this second of two companion papers presents an analysis of sliding bubble and wall heat transfer parameters measured during subcooled boiling in a square, vertical, upward flow channel. Bubbles were generated only from a single nucleation site for better observation of both the sliding bubbles’ characteristics and their impact on wall heat transfer through optical measurement techniques. Specific interests include: (i) bubbles departure and subsequent growth while sliding, (ii) bubbles release frequency, (iii) coalescence of sliding bubbles, (iv) sliding bubbles velocity, (v) bubbles size distribution and (vi) wall heat transfer influenced by sliding bubbles. Our results showed that sliding bubbles involve two distinct growth behaviors: (i) at low mass fluxes, sliding bubbles grew fast near the nucleation site, subsequently shrank, and then grew again, (ii) as mass flux increased, however, sliding bubbles grew more steadily. The bubbles originating from the single nucleation site coalesced frequently while sliding, which showed close relation with bubbles release frequency. The sliding bubble velocity near the nucleation site consistently decreased by increasing mass flux, while the observation often became reversed as the bubbles slid downstream due to the effect of interfacial drag. The sliding bubbles moved faster than the local liquid (i.e., ur<0) at low mass flux conditions, but it became reversed as the mass flux increased. The size distribution of sliding bubbles followed Gaussian distribution well both near and far from the nucleation site. The standard deviation of bubble size varied insignificantly through sliding compared to the changes in mean bubble size. Lastly, the sliding bubbles enhanced the wall heat transfer and the effect became more noticeable as inlet subcooling/mass flux decreased or wall heat flux increased. Particularly, the sliding bubble characteristics such as bubble growth behavior observed near the nucleation site played a

  2. Experimental study on bubble dynamics and wall heat transfer arising from a single nucleation site at subcooled flow boiling conditions – Part 2: Data analysis on sliding bubble characteristics and associated wall heat transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Yooa, Junsoo; Estrada-Perez, Carlos E.; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2016-04-28

    In this second of two companion papers presents an analysis of sliding bubble and wall heat transfer parameters measured during subcooled boiling in a square, vertical, upward flow channel. Bubbles were generated only from a single nucleation site for better observation of both the sliding bubbles’ characteristics and their impact on wall heat transfer through optical measurement techniques. Specific interests include: (i) bubbles departure and subsequent growth while sliding, (ii) bubbles release frequency, (iii) coalescence of sliding bubbles, (iv) sliding bubbles velocity, (v) bubbles size distribution and (vi) wall heat transfer influenced by sliding bubbles. Our results showed that slidingmore » bubbles involve two distinct growth behaviors: (i) at low mass fluxes, sliding bubbles grew fast near the nucleation site, subsequently shrank, and then grew again, (ii) as mass flux increased, however, sliding bubbles grew more steadily. The bubbles originating from the single nucleation site coalesced frequently while sliding, which showed close relation with bubbles release frequency. The sliding bubble velocity near the nucleation site consistently decreased by increasing mass flux, while the observation often became reversed as the bubbles slid downstream due to the effect of interfacial drag. The sliding bubbles moved faster than the local liquid (i.e., ur<0) at low mass flux conditions, but it became reversed as the mass flux increased. The size distribution of sliding bubbles followed Gaussian distribution well both near and far from the nucleation site. The standard deviation of bubble size varied insignificantly through sliding compared to the changes in mean bubble size. Lastly, the sliding bubbles enhanced the wall heat transfer and the effect became more noticeable as inlet subcooling/mass flux decreased or wall heat flux increased. Particularly, the sliding bubble characteristics such as bubble growth behavior observed near the nucleation site played

  3. Effect of heat treatment upon the fatigue-crack growth behavior of Alloy 718 weldments. Part I. Macroscopic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    James, L A; Mills, W J

    1981-05-01

    Gas-tungsten-arc weldments in Alloy 718 were studied in fatigue-crack growth tests conducted at five temperatures over the range 24 to 649{sup 0}C. In general, crack growth rates increased with increasing temperature, and weldments given the conventional post-weld heat-treatment generally exhibited crack growth rates that were higher than for weldments given the modified (INEL) heat-treatment. Limited testing in the as-welded condition revealed crack growth rates significantly lower than observed for the heat-treated cases, and this was attributed to residual stresses. Three different heats of filler wire were utilized, and no heat-to-heat variations were noted. 9 figures, 6 tables.

  4. Fundamental study of cold heat-storage system of O/W-type emulsion having cold latent-heat-dispersion material. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shinichi; Nozu, Shigeru

    1995-02-01

    This paper deals with thermal properties of an oil (tetradecane, C{sub 14}H{sub 30}, melting point 278.9K)/water emulsion as a latent heat-storage material having a low melting point. The measured results of the physical properties of the test emulsion, that is, thermal conductivity, specific heat, latent heat, and density, are discussed for the temperature region of solid and liquid phases of the dispersion material (tetradecane). It is clarified that Eucken`s equation can be applied to the estimation of the thermal conductivity of the emulsion. Moreover, it is established that tetradecane as the dispersion material exhibits a supercooling phenomenon which influences the thermal properties. Useful correlation equations of the thermal properties for the emulsion were proposed in terms of temperature and concentration ratio of the emulsion constituents.

  5. Two-Phase Flow in High-Heat-Flux Micro-Channel Heat Sink for Refrigeration Cooling Applications. Part 1: Micro-Channel Heat Sink for Direct Refrigeration Cooling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    film evaporation (sometimes called convective boiling ) as the dominant heat transfer mechanism...0.55) or high quality (0.55 < x,. < 1.0) flows (depending on flow rate), where the heat transfer is dominated by annular film evaporation . Because of...a residual liquid film at the heated wall. In general, higher average heat transfer coefficients are possible with subcooled flow boiling than

  6. Conceptual design of a laser-fusion power plant. Part II. Two technical options: 1. JADE reactor; 2. Heat transfer by heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    A laser fusion reactor concept is described that employs liquid metal walls. The concept envisions a porous medium, called the JADE, of specific geometry lining the reactor cavity. Some advantages and disadvantages of the concept are pointed out. The possibility of using heat pipes for passive cooling in ICF reactors is discussed. Some of the problems are outlined. (MOW)

  7. Predictive modeling of infrared radiative heating in tomato dry-peeling process: Part II. Model validation and sensitivity analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A predictive mathematical model was developed to simulate heat transfer in a tomato undergoing double sided infrared (IR) heating in a dry-peeling process. The aims of this study were to validate the developed model using experimental data and to investigate different engineering parameters that mos...

  8. Development of Simultaneous Corrosion Barrier and Optimized Microstructure in FeCrAl Heat-Resistant Alloy for Energy Applications. Part 1: The Protective Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Chao, J.; González-Carrasco, J. L.; Capdevila, C.

    2015-09-01

    Coarse-grained Fe-based oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are a class of advanced materials for combined cycle gas turbine systems to deal with operating temperatures and pressures of around 1100°C and 15-30 bar in aggressive environments, which would increase biomass energy conversion efficiencies up to 45% and above. This two-part paper reports the possibility of the development of simultaneous corrosion barrier and optimized microstructure in a FeCrAl heat-resistant alloy for energy applications. The first part reports the mechanism of generating a dense, self-healing α-alumina layer by thermal oxidation, during a heat treatment that leads to a coarse-grained microstructure with a potential value for high-temperature creep resistance in a FeCrAl ODS ferritic alloy, which will be described in more detail in the second part.

  9. Influence of lubricant oil on heat transfer performance of refrigerant flow boiling inside small diameter tubes. Part II: Correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenjian; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Wang, Kaijian

    2007-10-15

    The predictive ability of the available state-of-the-art heat transfer correlations of refrigerant-oil mixture is evaluated with the present experiment data of small tubes with inside diameter of 6.34 mm and 2.50 mm. Most of these correlations can be used to predict the heat transfer coefficient of 6.34 mm tube, but none of them can predict heat transfer coefficient of 2.50 mm tube satisfactorily. A new correlation of two-phase heat transfer multiplier with local properties of refrigerant-oil mixture is developed. This correlation approaches the actual physical mechanism of flow boiling heat transfer of refrigerant-oil mixture and can reflect the actual co-existing conditions of refrigerant and lubricant oil. More than 90% of the experiment data of both test tubes have less than {+-}20% deviation from the prediction values of the new correlations. (author)

  10. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel PART I : Proposal of a heat source model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Woong; Jang, Beom Seon; Kim, Yong Tai; Chun, Kwang San

    2013-09-01

    The use of I-Core sandwich panel has increased in cruise ship deck structure since it can provide similar bending strength with conventional stiffened plate while keeping lighter weight and lower web height. However, due to its thin plate thickness, i.e. about 4~6 mm at most, it is assembled by high power CO2 laser welding to minimize the welding deformation. This research proposes a volumetric heat source model for T-joint of the I-Core sandwich panel and a method to use shell element model for a thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation. This paper, Part I, focuses on the heat source model. A circular cone type heat source model is newly suggested in heat transfer analysis to realize similar melting zone with that observed in experiment. An additional suggestion is made to consider negative defocus, which is commonly applied in T-joint laser welding since it can provide deeper penetration than zero defocus. The proposed heat source is also verified through 3D thermal elasto-plastic analysis to compare welding deformation with experimental results. A parametric study for different welding speeds, defocus values, and welding powers is performed to investigate the effect on the melting zone and welding deformation. In Part II, focuses on the proposed method to employ shell element model to predict welding deformation in thermal elasto-plastic analysis instead of solid element model.

  11. Geologic and hydrologic characterization and evaluation of the Basin and Range Province relative to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste: Part III, Geologic and hydrologic evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, M.S.; Sargent, Kenneth A.; Brady, Bruce T.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the first phase in evaluating the geology and hydrology of the Basin and Range Province for potential suitability of geohydrologic environments for isolation of high-level radioactive waste. The evaluation of the Province applies the guidelines, discussed in Part I (Bedinger, Sargent, and Reed, 1983) of this report to the geologic and hydrologic information compiled for the Province in Part II (Sargent and Bedinger, 1983).The geologic and hydrologic factors considered in the Province evaluation include distribution of potential host rocks, tectonic conditions and data on ground-water hydrology. Potential host media considered include argillaceous rocks, tuff, basaltic rocks, granitic rocks, evaporites, and the unsaturated zone. The tectonic factors considered are Quaternary faults, late Cenozoic volcanics, seismic activity, heat flow, and late Cenozoic rates of vertical uplift. Hydrologic conditions considered include length of flow path from potential host rocks to discharge areas, interbasin and geothermal flow systems and thick unsaturated sections as potential host media.The Basin and Range Province was divided into 12 subprovinces; each subprovince is evaluated separately and prospective areas for further study are identified. About onehalf of the Province appears to have combinations of potential host rocks, tectonic conditions, and ground-water hydrology that merit consideration for further study.The prospective areas for further study in each subprovince are summarized in a brief list of the potentially favorable factors and the issues of concern. Data compiled for the entire Province do not permit a complete evaluation of the favorability for high-level waste isolation. The evaluations here are intended to identify broad regions that contain potential geohydrologic environments containing multiple natural barriers to radionuclide migration.

  12. Ten Year Operating Test Results and Post-Test Analysis of a 1/10 Segment Stirling Sodium Heat Pipe, Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John, H; Minnerly, Kenneth, G; Dyson, Christopher, M.

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, Stirling cycle heat sources; and with the resurgence of space nuclear power both as reactor heat removal elements and as radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly, long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high-temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc., has carried out a sodium heat pipe 10-year life test to establish long-term operating reliability. Sodium heat pipes have demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 87,000 hr (10 yr) at nearly 700 C. These life test results have demonstrated the potential for high-temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and post-test analysis of the heat pipe and sodium working fluid are described.

  13. The thermal and metallurgical state of steel strip during hot rolling: Part I. Characterization of heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devadas, C.; Samarasekera, I. V.; Hawbolt, E. B.

    1991-02-01

    A technique using intrinsic thermocouples was developed to monitor the thermal response of steel samples during hot rolling. A series of hot-rolling tests was conducted with the thermocoupleinstrumented samples on CANME’s pilot mill to simulate individual stands of Stelco’s Lake Erie Works hot-strip mill. A mathematical model of heat transfer in the roll bite has been employed to back calculate the roll/strip interface heat-transfer coefficients for lubricated and unlubricated conditions. The influence of reduction, rolling speed, and prerolling on roll-strip heat transfer has also been examined. For unlubricated rolling tests, the heat-transfer coefficient in the roll bite increased with time, reaching a steady-state value of 57 kW/m2 °C. The corresponding number for the lubricated tests was 31 kW/m2 °C. The observed variation in the interface heat-transfer coefficient with increasing strain and interface pressure points to a strong dependence on the real area of contact between the strip and rolls. Therefore, it appears that heat transfer between the two surfaces occurs primarily by conduction across asperity contacts. The high heat-transfer coefficients attained at the roll/strip interface promote chilling of the strip to a depth of approximately one-eighth of the thickness. To validate the overall heattransfer model, predicted surface temperatures of the strip have been compared with interstand temperature measurements obtained on the industrial mill using pyrometers.

  14. Vial freeze-drying, part 1: new insights into heat transfer characteristics of tubing and molded vials.

    PubMed

    Hibler, Susanne; Wagner, Christophe; Gieseler, Henning

    2012-03-01

    In order to optimize a freeze-drying cycle, information regarding the heat transfer characteristics of the container system is imperative. Two most recently developed tubing (TopLyo™) and molded (EasyLyo™) vial designs were compared with a standard serum tubing and molded vial, a polymer vial (TopPac™), and an amber molded EasyLyo™. In addition, the impact of methodology on the determination of reliable vial heat transfer coefficient (K(v) ) data is examined in detail. All K(v) s were gravimetrically determined by sublimation tests with pure water at 50, 100, 200, and 400 mTorr. In contrast to the traditional assumption that molded vials exhibit inefficient heat transfer characteristics, these vials showed a very similar performance compared with their serum tubing counterparts in the relevant pressure range for freeze-drying. At 100 mTorr, the TopLyo™ center vials show only 4% higher K(v) values than the EasyLyo™ center vials. All glass vials outmatch the polymer vial in terms of heat transfer, up to 30% elevated heat transfer for the TopLyo™ center vials at 400 mTorr. Sublimation tests have demonstrated to be a valuable tool to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of vials, but results are dependent on methodology. New developments in molded vial manufacturing lead to improved heat transfer performance.

  15. Economics of place-based monitoring under the safe drinking water act, part III: performance evaluation of place-based monitoring strategies.

    PubMed

    Brands, Edwin; Rajagopal, R

    2008-08-01

    The goals of environmental legislation and associated regulations are to protect public health, natural resources, and ecosystems. In this context, monitoring programs should provide timely and relevant information so that the regulatory community can implement legislation in a cost-effective and efficient manner. The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of 1974 attempts to ensure that public water systems (PWSs) supply safe water to its consumers. As is the case with many other federal environmental statutes, SDWA monitoring has been implemented in relatively uniform fashion across the USA. In this three part series, we present over 30 years of evidence to demonstrate unique patterns in water quality contaminants over space and time, develop alternative place-based monitoring approaches that exploit such patterns, and evaluate the economic performance of such approaches to current monitoring practice. Part III: Place-based (PBA) and current SDWA monitoring approaches were implemented on test datasets (1995-2001) from 19 water systems and evaluated based on the following criteria: percent of total detections, percent detections above threshold values (e.g. 20, 50, 90% of MCL), and cost. The PBA outperformed the current SDWA monitoring requirements in terms of total detections, missed only a small proportion of detections below the MCL, and captured all detections above 50% of the MCL. Essentially the same information obtained from current compliance monitoring requirements can be gained at approximately one-eighth the cost by implementing the PBA. Temporal sampling strategies were implemented on test datasets (1995-2001) from four water systems and evaluated by the following criteria: parameter estimation, percent deviation from "true" 90th, 95th, and 99th percentiles, and number of samples versus accuracy of the estimate. Non event-based (NEB) strategies were superior in estimating percentiles 1-50, but underestimated the higher percentiles. Event-based strategies were

  16. Evaluation of Contact Heat Transfer Coefficient and Phase Transformation during Hot Stamping of a Hat-Type Part

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung-Kyu; Lee, Seong Hyeon; Choi, Hyunjoo

    2015-01-01

    Using an inverse analysis technique, the heat transfer coefficient on the die-workpiece contact surface of a hot stamping process was evaluated as a power law function of contact pressure. This evaluation was to determine whether the heat transfer coefficient on the contact surface could be used for finite element analysis of the entire hot stamping process. By comparing results of the finite element analysis and experimental measurements of the phase transformation, an evaluation was performed to determine whether the obtained heat transfer coefficient function could provide reasonable finite element prediction for workpiece properties affected by the hot stamping process. PMID:28788046

  17. Heat Transfer and Flow on the First Stage Blade Tip of a Power Generation Gas Turbine. Part 2; Simulation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, A. A.; Bunker, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study has been performed to investigate the detailed distribution of convective heat transfer coefficients on the first stage blade tip surface for a geometry typical of large power generation turbines (>1OOMW). This paper is concerned with the numerical prediction of the tip surface heat transfer. Good comparison with the experimental measured distribution was achieved through accurate modeling of the most important features of the blade passage and heating arrangement as well as the details of experimental rig likely to affect the tip heat transfer. A sharp edge and a radiused edge tip were considered. The results using the radiused edge tip agreed better with the experimental data. This improved agreement was attributed to the absence of edge separation on the tip of the radiused edge blade.

  18. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 1. Single tube uniformly heated tests: Part 1, Technical discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate flow instability in circular tubes under vertical down-flow conditions. The test section L/D ratio range was 86 to 270. The maximum test section surface heat flux was one million Btu/hr-ft{sup 2}. Over 1700 data points were obtained. The effect of flowrate, inlet temperature, exit pressure, and heat flux on the initiation of flow instability was determined. In addition, the data was used to evaluate various methods of predicting the onset of flow instability. Using the measured wall temperatures, surface temperatures and heat transfer coefficients have been obtained. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient along the tube under both single and two phase conditions were developed.

  19. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Walnut Street Heating Plant; Order Granting in Part and Denying in Part Petition for Objection to Title V Operating Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Petition Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-petition-database.

  20. Simulating the thermal operating conditions in the thermal wells of ground-source heat-pump heat supply systems. Part I: Porous moisture freezing processes in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, G. P.; Peskov, N. V.; Lichman, V. A.; Gornov, V. F.; Kolesova, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    The mathematical models laid down in the new blocks of the INSOLAR.GSHP.12 software system simulating unsteady operating conditions of ground-source heat-pump (GSHP) heat supply systems are presented. The new model blocks take into account the effect the freezing of porous moisture in soil has on the GSHP system performance efficiency. Illustration is given to the need of taking into account the porous moisture freezing/thawing processes in soil, and the results from investigations devoted to the opening possibilities of constructing adaptive GSHP systems with controlled intensity of heat transfer in the soil-thermal well system are presented. The development of software simulating the porous moisture phase state variation processes in soil was preceded by development of mathematical equations representing the thermal conditions of soil body involving porous moisture freezing/thawing processes. A description of these equations is also given in the article. In constructing the mathematical model, the notion "effective thermal conductivity" of soil was introduced for taking into account the latent heat of phase transition that releases during the freezing of moisture. The above-mentioned effective thermal conductivity of soil involves two components: the soil thermal conductivity coefficient itself and an additional term modifying the thermal conductivity value for taking into account the influence of phase transition. For quantitatively evaluating the soil effective thermal conductivity component that takes into account the influence of phase transition, the soil freezing zone radius around the thermal well was determined. The obtained analytic solutions have been implemented in the form of computer program blocks, after which a "numerical experiment" was carried out for estimating the effect the porous moisture freezing/thawing processes have on the soil thermal conditions. It was demonstrated during that experiment that the soil thermal conductivities determined

  1. High Efficiency Water Heating Technology Development Final Report. Part I, Lab/Field Performance Evaluation and Accelerated Life Testing of a Hybrid Electric Heat Pump Water Heater (HPWH)

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D.; Murphy, Richard W.; Rice, C. Keith; Linkous, Randall Lee

    2016-04-01

    DOE has supported efforts for many years with the objective of getting a water heater that uses heat pump technology (aka a heat pump water heater or HPWH) successfully on the residential equipment market. The most recent previous effort (1999-2002) produced a product that performed very well in ORNL-led accelerated durability and field tests. The commercial partner for this effort, Enviromaster International (EMI), introduced the product to the market under the trade name Watter$aver in 2002 but ceased production in 2005 due to low sales. A combination of high sales price and lack of any significant infrastructure for service after the sale were the principal reasons for the failure of this effort. What was needed for market success was a commercial partner with the manufacturing and market distribution capability necessary to allow economies of scale to lead to a viable unit price together with a strong customer service infrastructure. General Electric certainly meets these requirements, and knowing of ORNL s expertise in this area, approached ORNL with the proposal to partner in a CRADA to produce a high efficiency electric water heater. A CRADA with GE was initiated early in Fiscal Year, 2008. GE initially named its product the Hybrid Electric Water Heater (HEWH).

  2. Heat Transfer in a Complex Trailing Edge Passage for a High Pressure Turbine Blade - Part 1: Experimental Measurements. Part 1; Experimental Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Ronald S.; Wetzel, Todd G.; Rigby, David L.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study has been performed to investigate the detailed heat transfer coefficient distributions within a complex blade trailing edge passage. The experimental measurements are made using a steady liquid crystal thermography technique applied to one major side of the passage. The geometry of the trailing edge passage is that of a two-pass serpentine circuit with a sharp 180-degree turning region at the tip. The upflow channel is split by interrupted ribs into two major subchannels, one of which is turbulated. This channel has an average aspect ratio of roughly 14:1. The spanwise extent of the channel geometry includes both area convergence from root to tip, as well as taper towards the trailing edge apex. The average section Reynolds numbers tested in this upflow channel range from 55,000 to 98,000. The tip section contains a turning vane near the extreme comer. The downflow channel has an aspect ratio of about 5:1, and also includes convergence and taper. Turbulators of varying sizes are included in this channel also. Both detailed heat transfer and pressure distribution measurements are presented. The pressure measurements are incorporated into a flow network model illustrating the major loss contributors.

  3. Three dimensional numerical simulation of shell-and-tube heat exchangers. Part 1: Foundation and fluid mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Prithiviraj, M.; Andrews, M.J.

    1998-06-01

    A three-dimensional, colocated, fully implicit, control volume based calculation procedure, HEATX, has been used to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in shell-and-tube heat exchangers. The three-dimensional numerical model uses the distributed resistance method along with volumetric porosities and surface permeabilities to model the tubes in the heat exchanger. Turbulence effects are modeled using a modified {kappa}-{var_epsilon} model with additional source terms for turbulence generation and dissipation by tubes. Shell and baffle walls are modeled using the wall function approach. Tubes and baffles are modeled using volumetric porosities and surface permeabilities. Baffle-shell and baffle-tube leakages are modeled using a Bernoulli type formulation. Specialized geometry generators compute baffle, nozzle, and tube region porosities and permeabilities. This article presents the foundation and fluid mechanics of the problem. A subsequent article will discuss modeling of shell-side and tube-side heat transfer. The three-dimensional numerical model is validated by comparison of computed pressure drops with the experiments conducted at Argonne National Labs in E shell type heat exchangers. The effect of baffle cut and baffle spacing on the pressure drop is studied. Good agreement is obtained between the computed results and the experiments.

  4. Influence of lubricant oil on heat transfer performance of refrigerant flow boiling inside small diameter tubes. Part I: Experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenjian; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Wang, Kaijian

    2007-10-15

    Two-phase flow pattern and heat transfer characteristics of refrigerant-oil mixture flow boiling inside small tubes with inside diameters of 6.34 mm and 2.50 mm are investigated experimentally. The test condition of nominal oil concentration is from 0% to 5%, mass flux from 200 to 400 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, heat flux from 3.2 to 14 kW m{sup -2}, evaporation temperature of 5 C, inlet quality from 0.1 to 0.8, and quality change from 0.1 to 0.2. Wavy, wavy-annular, annular and mist-annular flow pattern in 6.34 mm tube are observed, while only slug-annular and annular flow pattern are observed in 2.50 mm tube. Oil presence can make annular flow to form early and to retard to diminish in quality direction at nominal oil concentration {>=}3%. Augmentation effect of oil on heat transfer coefficient becomes weakened or even diminishes for small diameter tube while detrimental effect of oil on small tube performance becomes more significant than large tube. For both test tubes, variation of heat transfer coefficient and enhanced factor with oil concentration is irregular. Two-phase heat transfer multiplier with refrigerant-oil mixture properties increases consistently and monotonically with local oil concentration at different vapor quality. (author)

  5. Effect of heat treatment upon the fatigue-crack growth behavior of Alloy 718 weldments. Part II. Microscopic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W J; James, L A

    1981-05-01

    The microstructural features that influenced the room and elevated temperature fatigue-crack growth behavior of as-welded, conventional heat-treated, and modified heat-treated Alloy 718 GTA weldments were studied. Electron fractographic examination of fatigue fracture surfaces revealed that operative fatigue mechanisms were dependent on microstructure, temperature and stress intensity factor. All specimens exhibited three basic fracture surface appearances at temperatures up to 838{sup 0}C: crystallographic faceting at low stress intensity range ({Delta}K) levels, striation formation at intermediate values, and dimples coupled with striations in the highest {Delta}K regime. At 649{sup 0}C, the heat-treated welds exhibited extensive intergranular cracking. Laves and {delta}particles in the conventional heat-treated material nucleated microvoids ahead of the advancing crack front and caused an overall acceleration in crack growth rates at intermediate and high {Delta}K levels. The modified heat treatment removed many of these particles from the weld zone, thereby improving its fatigue resistance. The dramatically improved fatigue properties exhibited by the as-welded material was attributed to compressive residual stresses introduced by the welding process. 16 figures.

  6. Heat-Transfer Coupling For Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesmith, Bill J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed welded heat-transfer coupling joins set of heat pipes to thermoelectric converter. Design avoids difficult brazing operation. Includes pair of mating flanged cups. Upper cup integral part of housing of thermoelectric converter, while lower cup integral part of plate supporting filled heat pipes. Heat pipes prefilled. Heat of welding applied around periphery of coupling, far enough from heat pipes so it would not degrade working fluid or create excessive vapor pressure in the pipes.

  7. Steady state boiling crisis in a helium vertically heated natural circulation loop - Part 2: Friction pressure drop lessening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 2-m high two-phase helium natural circulation loop operating at 4.2 K and 1 atm. Two heated sections with different internal diameter (10 and 6 mm) were tested. The power applied on the heated section wall was controlled in increasing and decreasing sequences, and temperature along the section, mass flow rate and pressure drop evolutions were registered. The post-CHF regime was studied watching simultaneously the evolution of boiling crisis onset along the test section and the evolution of pressure drop and mass flow rate. A significant lessening of friction was observed simultaneous to the development of the post-CHF regime, accompanied by a mass flow rate increase, which lets suppose that the vapor film in the film boiling regime acts as a lubricant. A model was created based on this idea and on heat transfer considerations. The predictions by this model are satisfactory for the low quality post-CHF regime.

  8. CFD MODELING OF ITER CABLE-IN-CONDUIT SUPERCONDUCTORS. PART V: COMBINED MOMENTUM AND HEAT TRANSFER IN RIB ROUGHENED PIPES

    SciTech Connect

    Zanino, R.; Giors, S.

    2008-03-16

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques have been proposed and applied in a series of papers to analyze cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Previous work on the pressure drop in the central channel of ITER CICC is extended here to the problem of combined heat and momentum transfer. The CFD model, solved by the FLUENT commercial code, is first validated against 2D and 3D data from compact heat exchangers, showing good agreement. The Colburn analogy between the friction factor f and the Nusselt number Nu is not verified in the considered 2D geometries, as shown by both experiment and simulation. The validated CFD model is finally applied to the 3D analysis of central channel-like geometries relevant for ITER CICC. It is shown that the heat transfer coefficient on the central channel side stays relatively close to the smooth-pipe (Dittus-Boelter) value.

  9. Optimal heating condition of mouthguard sheet in vacuum-pressure formation: part 2 Olefin-based thermoplastic elastomer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Koide, Kaoru

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to clarify the suitable heating conditions during vacuum-pressure formation of olefin copolymer sheets and to examine the sheet temperature at molding and the thickness of the molded mouthguard. Mouthguards were fabricated using 4.0-mm-thick olefin copolymer sheets utilizing a vacuum-pressure forming device, and then, 10 s of vacuum forming and 2 min of compression molding were applied. Three heating conditions were investigated. They were, defined by the degree of sagging observed at the center of the softened sheet (10, 15, or 20 mm lower than the clamp (H-10, H-15, or H-20, respectively)). The working model was trimmed to the height of 20 mm at the maxillary central incisor and 15 mm at the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar. The temperature on both the directly heated and the non-heated surfaces of the mouthguard sheet was measured by the radiation thermometer for each condition. The thickness of mouthguard sheets after fabrication was determined for the incisal portion (incisal edge and labial surface) and molar portion (cusp and buccal surface), and dimensional measurements were obtained using a measuring device. Differences in the thickness due to the heating condition of the sheets were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's multiple comparison tests. The temperature difference between the heated and non-heated surfaces was highest under H-10. Sheet temperature under H-15 and H-20 was almost the same. The thickness differences were noted at incisal edge, cusp, and buccal surface, and H-15 was the greatest. This study demonstrated that heating of the sheet resulting in sag of 15 mm or more was necessary for sufficient softening of the sheet and that the mouthguard thickness decreased with increased sag. In conclusion, sag of 15 mm can be recommended as a good indicator of appropriate molding timing for this material.

  10. Development of corrosion resistant aluminum heat exchanger, Part 1: Development of new aluminum alloy sheets for sacrificial anode

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, M.; Baba, Y.; Tanabe, Z.; Miura, T.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iijima, K.

    1986-01-01

    The sacrificial anodic effect of Al-Zn alloy reduced markedly in aluminium heat exchanger as car air conditioner manufactured by vacuum brazing conventionally used, as zinc elements preferentially evaporate in vacuum-heating. It was found that Al-Sn alloy had superior electrochemical characteristics than Al-Zn alloy (AA7072) as the sacrificial anodic material used in vacuum brazing. According to many experimental results, the new brazing sheet-fin with Al-Mn-Sn alloy core metal has been developed. This fin has favorable formability and prominent sacrificial anodic effect. Therefore, this fin is excellent material for car air conditioner manufactured by vacuum brazing.

  11. The Mark III VLBI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Levine, J. I.; Nesman, E. F.; Webber, J. C.; Hinteregger, H. F.

    1988-01-01

    Geodetic measurements have errors in centimeter range. Collection of three reports describes both equipment and results of some measurements taken with Mark III very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) system. Has demonstrated high accuracy over short baselines, where phase-delay measurements used. Advanced hardware, called Mark III A, developed to improve system performance and efficiency. Original Mark III hardware and III A subsystem upgrades developed as part of NASA Crustal Dynamics Project at Haystack Observatory.

  12. Tetracycline residues in meat and bone meals. Part 2: the effect of heat treatments on bound tetracycline residues.

    PubMed

    Kühne, M; Körner, U; Wenzel, S

    2001-07-01

    The stability of bound tetracycline residues during heat treatments at 133 degrees C and 100 degrees C for up to 45 min was investigated. An intermediate product from a rendering plant was mixed with bone splinters that contained bound tetracycline (TC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) residues. The mixture was heated in an autoclave at 133 degrees C for 20, 30 and 45 min and at 100 degrees C for 20 and 30 min and subsequently dried at 103 degrees C for 4 h. Two different extraction procedures with hydrochloric acid were used, one with and one without the previous sedimentation of bone particles. Tetracycline concentrations were determined by HPLC analysis before and after the heat treatment. A complete destruction of tetracyclines during heat treatment at 133 degrees C could not be demonstrated, but there was a significant decrease of TC by about 50%. CTC was less resistant to the same temperature, which brought about a reduction of 90-100%. Treatment at 100 degrees C did not bring about any reduction, except for CTC after extraction without sedimentation. The possible toxicological relevance of the findings is discussed. Further research has to be done on possible degradation products of the tetracycline derivatives.

  13. Importance of Thermokinetic Diagrams of Transformation of Supercooled Austenite for Development of Heat Treatment Modes for Critical Steel Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadi, G. P.; Kondrat'ev, S. Yu.; Malyshevskii, V. A.; Sil'nikov, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    The role of plotting of diagrams of isothermal and thermokinetic transformations of supercooled austenite in the development of heat treatment processes of steels is discussed. Specific examples of the necessity of plotting of thermokinetic diagrams of transformations in steels for solving critical production problems are considered.

  14. Heat and Moisture Transfer in Clothing Systems. Part 2. Theoretical Consideration of the Effect of some Variables on Thermal Conductivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    fibres are lying in series to the direc,.ion of heat flow. RSUME L’effet the’orique de plusieurs variables sur la conductivite ’ thermique totale d’un...presence d’eau ou de’glace augmente de beaucoup la conductivite thermique et quvo atteint la conductivite thermique minimale, dans les teneurs en

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Loop Heat Pipes with Multiple Capillary Pumps and Multiple Condensers. Part 1; Stead State Stimulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, Triem T.; OConnell, Tamara; Ku, Jentung

    2004-01-01

    Loop Heat Pipes (LHPs) have proven themselves as reliable and robust heat transport devices for spacecraft thermal control systems. So far, the LHPs in earth-orbit satellites perform very well as expected. Conventional LHPs usually consist of a single capillary pump for heat acquisition and a single condenser for heat rejection. Multiple pump/multiple condenser LHPs have shown to function very well in ground testing. Nevertheless, the test results of a dual pump/condenser LHP also revealed that the dual LHP behaved in a complicated manner due to the interaction between the pumps and condensers. Thus it is redundant to say that more research is needed before they are ready for 0-g deployment. One research area that perhaps compels immediate attention is the analytical modeling of LHPs, particularly the transient phenomena. Modeling a single pump/single condenser LHP is difficult enough. Only a handful of computer codes are available for both steady state and transient simulations of conventional LHPs. No previous effort was made to develop an analytical model (or even a complete theory) to predict the operational behavior of the multiple pump/multiple condenser LHP systems. The current research project offered a basic theory of the multiple pump/multiple condenser LHP operation. From it, a computer code was developed to predict the LHP saturation temperature in accordance with the system operating and environmental conditions.

  16. Further Characterization of a Type III Secretion System (T3SS) and of a New Effector Protein from a Clinical Isolate of Aeromonas Hydrophila - Part I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A type III secretion system (T3SS)-associated cytotoxin, AexT, with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa bifuncational toxins ExoT/S, was recently identified from a fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida. In this study, we reported the molecular cha...

  17. 14 CFR 61.21 - Duration of a Category II and a Category III pilot authorization (for other than part 121 and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... after the month in which it was issued or renewed. (b) Upon passing a practical test for a Category II... month the practical test was accomplished in that type aircraft. (d) If the holder of a Category II or Category III pilot authorization passes the practical test for a renewal in the month before...

  18. An Excerpt From Evaluation of Title III Programs in the Detroit Public Schools (A Report of the Third Years' Activities). Part One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Michael; Wilkes, Ronald

    The specific focus of this document is on the evolutionary development of the Neighborhood Educational Center Project supported under Title III, 1965 Elementary Secondary Act, which was marked by continual evaluation and appropriate modification. Application of the concepts of individualized instruction was one of the basic means by which the…

  19. Further Characterization of a Type III Secretion System (T3SS) and of a New Effector Protein from a Clinical Isolate of Aeromonas Hydrophila - Part I

    EPA Science Inventory

    A type III secretion system (T3SS)-associated cytotoxin, AexT, with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa bifuncational toxins ExoT/S, was recently identified from a fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida. In this study, we reported the molecular cha...

  20. Study of the Need for Educational Manpower for Handicapped Children and Youth: Part D - Volume I, Phase III. State Analysis Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Raymond D.; And Others

    The document is the first of three volumes (see also EC 032 851 and EC 032 852) of State Analysis Reports resulting from Phase III of the Study of the Need for Educational Manpower for Handicapped Children and Youth, which involved a validation study and state surveys related to the Manpower Requirements Projection Model (MRPM). Included in the…