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Sample records for parte iii transporte

  1. Defense Transportation Regulation, Part III: Mobility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-11

    cargo, passenger and personal property transportation services (including rail, highway, air, sea, pipeline, inland waterway, coastal, intercostal ...vehicle. Center of Balance Formula W1 -- Front axle weight. W2 -- Rear axle weight. D1 -- Distance from RDL to front axle or center of articulated ...tandem axle D2 -- Distance from RDL to rear axle or center of articulated tandem axle. (Wl X D1) + (W2 X D2) Gross Weight = CB b. The vehicle CB is

  2. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report III Appendix III to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. III...

  3. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report III Appendix III to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App....

  4. Transportation Facilitation Education Program: A Handbook for Transportation and Distribution. Part III. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Coll. of Business Administration.

    The handbook accents the nature of transportation and related domestic and international business activities. Its objective is to provide basic information for the newcomer to the field. Chapters 2 and 3 describe assistance available from public and private agencies, as well as regulatory requirements for foreign traders and a resume of the…

  5. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  6. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  7. Electronic communication. Part III.

    PubMed

    Bergren, M D

    1995-02-01

    This is the concluding article of a three-part series on electronic communication for school nurses. The October 1994 column described electronic communication and the hardware and software required. The December 1994 column examined e-mail, bulletin boards, databases, and file transfers. This column will list many health and nursing resources available on-line. Some of the resources are available only through the Internet. Others are accessible by more than one route: dial-in, telnet, gopher, or world wide web. A few of the services, such as MEDLINE, are only accessed with purchased accounts (Glowniak & Bushway, 1994). The electronic resources of interest to school nurses are so numerous it would be impossible to cite all of them in a column of this length. Selected resources for the school health provider will be listed in alphabetical order.

  8. Stochastic foundations of undulatory transport phenomena: generalized Poisson-Kac processes—part III extensions and applications to kinetic theory and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Brasiello, Antonio; Crescitelli, Silvestro

    2017-08-01

    This third part extends the theory of Generalized Poisson-Kac (GPK) processes to nonlinear stochastic models and to a continuum of states. Nonlinearity is treated in two ways: (i) as a dependence of the parameters (intensity of the stochastic velocity, transition rates) of the stochastic perturbation on the state variable, similarly to the case of nonlinear Langevin equations, and (ii) as the dependence of the stochastic microdynamic equations of motion on the statistical description of the process itself (nonlinear Fokker-Planck-Kac models). Several numerical and physical examples illustrate the theory. Gathering nonlinearity and a continuum of states, GPK theory provides a stochastic derivation of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation, furnishing a positive answer to the Kac’s program in kinetic theory. The transition from stochastic microdynamics to transport theory within the framework of the GPK paradigm is also addressed.

  9. Impact analysis of Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbis, P.P.

    1993-12-01

    An analysis of the impact of the Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III into a nonyielding target at 46 m.p.h. and 30 m.p.h., and into a yielding target at 46 m.p.h. is presented. The analysis considers the structural response of the tiedown system which secures the Minuteman III re-entry system to the floor of the payload transporter. A finite element model of the re-entry system, its tiedown system, which includes tie-rods and shear pins, and the pallet plate which is attached to the transporter floating plate, was constructed. Because accelerations of the payload transporter are not known, acceleration data from one-quarter scale testing of the Safe Secure Trailer was used to investigate the response of the tiedown system. These accelerations were applied to the pallet plate. The ABAQUS computer code was used to predict the forces in the members of the tiedown system.

  10. The PC Connection Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, David L.; Zilora, Karen S.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a series of four applications of data acquisition, system control, and data analysis using personal computers. Covers topics of pilot plant information and control, automation of drug safety evaluation, analysis and characterization of petroleum resources, and high-speed analog-digital conversion connections. Part three of a series on…

  11. Benchmarking the Sandia Pulsed Reactor III cavity neutron spectrum for electronic parts calibration and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.G.; Griffin, P.J.; Fan, W.C.

    1993-08-01

    The SPR III bare cavity spectrum and integral parameters have been determined with 24 measured spectrum sensor responses and an independent, detailed, MCNP transport calculation. This environment qualifies as a benchmark field for electronic parts testing.

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false III Appendix III to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix III to Part 261 ...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false III Appendix III to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix III to Part 261 ...

  14. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part III. Comparison to Monte Carlo simulation in voxelized anatomical computational models

    SciTech Connect

    Zourari, K.; Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Sakelliou, L.; Georgiou, E.; Karaiskos, P.; Papagiannis, P.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To compare TG43-based and Acuros deterministic radiation transport-based calculations of the BrachyVision treatment planning system (TPS) with corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results in heterogeneous patient geometries, in order to validate Acuros and quantify the accuracy improvement it marks relative to TG43. Methods: Dosimetric comparisons in the form of isodose lines, percentage dose difference maps, and dose volume histogram results were performed for two voxelized mathematical models resembling an esophageal and a breast brachytherapy patient, as well as an actual breast brachytherapy patient model. The mathematical models were converted to digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) image series for input to the TPS. The MCNP5 v.1.40 general-purpose simulation code input files for each model were prepared using information derived from the corresponding DICOM RT exports from the TPS. Results: Comparisons of MC and TG43 results in all models showed significant differences, as reported previously in the literature and expected from the inability of the TG43 based algorithm to account for heterogeneities and model specific scatter conditions. A close agreement was observed between MC and Acuros results in all models except for a limited number of points that lay in the penumbra of perfectly shaped structures in the esophageal model, or at distances very close to the catheters in all models. Conclusions: Acuros marks a significant dosimetry improvement relative to TG43. The assessment of the clinical significance of this accuracy improvement requires further work. Mathematical patient equivalent models and models prepared from actual patient CT series are useful complementary tools in the methodology outlined in this series of works for the benchmarking of any advanced dose calculation algorithm beyond TG43.

  15. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  16. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  17. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  18. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  19. 7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDING NO. 10, PRODUCER GAS & EXHAUSTER BLDG., PLANT A.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant A, Parts I, II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Producer Gas Plant, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  20. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  1. Validity Coefficients of Clinical Competence on NBME Part III Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Judith G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The relationship of National Board of Medical Examiners Part III examination performance for first-year residents with performance on medical school preadmission measures, performance on prior NBME examinations, and clinical performance during medical school was examined. (Author/MLW)

  2. Pregnancy and Beyond Part III: Cosmic Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Borkenhagen, Rainer H.

    1988-01-01

    Over the last 35 years transport technology has created new environmental frontiers in which family physicians are, and will continue to be, involved both in research and in administering patient care. Some frontiers address basic physiological problems that cross over into others. In a series of four articles, the author describes six of these frontiers, with specific emphasis on pregnancy, from hyperbarism (undersea physiology) to microgravity (space physiology), and discusses the problems and linkages where evident. This third article deals with the known effects of cosmic radiation on the well-being of pregnant women in high-altitude flight, and in space. PMID:21253187

  3. 43. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDINGS H-1 TO H-10 INCL., GRINDING, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLANT 'B'.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of the District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  4. 38. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photograph of a line drawing. 'PART III, SECTION 1, EQUIPMENT LAYOUT, BUILDINGS G-1 TO G-10 INCL., PURIFICATION, MANUFACTURING AREA, PLAN 'B'.' From U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Industrial Facilities Inventory, Holston Ordnance Works, Kingsport, Tennessee. Plant B, Parts II, III. (Nashville, TN: Office of District Engineer, 1944). - Holston Army Ammunition Plant, RDX-and-Composition-B Manufacturing Line 9, Kingsport, Sullivan County, TN

  5. Searching Lexis and Westlaw: Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Carl

    1986-01-01

    This last installment in a three-part series covers several important areas in the searching of legal information: online (group) training and customer service, documentation (search manuals and other aids), account representatives, microcomputer software, and pricing. Advantages and drawbacks of both the LEXIS and WESTLAW databases are noted.…

  6. Searching Lexis and Westlaw: Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Carl

    1986-01-01

    This last installment in a three-part series covers several important areas in the searching of legal information: online (group) training and customer service, documentation (search manuals and other aids), account representatives, microcomputer software, and pricing. Advantages and drawbacks of both the LEXIS and WESTLAW databases are noted.…

  7. Bariatric transport challenges: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Haber, Christopher B

    2008-05-01

    In Part 1 in the April issue, we reviewed some basics of bariatric lifting and moving. This article examines some practical scenarios of showing how these skills can be put to use. Think about how you would handle each of these patients if you experienced a clinical encounter with them during duty hours.

  8. Drug addiction. Part III. Pharmacotherapy of addiction.

    PubMed

    Vetulani, J

    2001-01-01

    The last decade brought a considerable progress in pharmacotherapy of addiction. Basing on recently gained knowledge of mechanisms of development of addiction and the physiology of the brain reward system, several therapeutic strategies have evolved. The strategies aimed at targeting the basic mechanisms of addiction rely on the premises that addiction is caused by adaptive changes in the central nervous system and that craving, which is the main cause of relapse, depends on dopaminergic mechanisms and requires high general excitability. The pharmacological approach involves drugs that reduce neuronal adaptability by inhibiting the calcium entry to neurons both through voltage-gated channels (e.g. nimodipine) and NMDA receptors (e.g. memantine), and drugs that stimulate the inhibitory GABAergic system (gamma-vinyl-GABA, baclofen), Particular attention is paid to the compounds that may attenuate dopaminergic hyperactivity, without considerable suppression of tonic activity of dopaminergic neurons (e.g. BP 897, a partial dopamine D3 receptor antagonist). Specific strategies are aimed at interference with the action of particular drugs of addiction. An important group includes the agonistic therapies (known also as substitution or maintenance therapies) in which a long-acting agonist is used in order to reduce the action of the drugs of high addictive potential (e.g. methadone against heroin addiction or vanoxerine (GBR 12909) against psychostimulants). Other specific strategies aimed at reduction of the transport of molecules of addictive substances into the brain: the approaches involve preparation of antibodies that form complexes unable to cross blood-brain barrier or enzymes accelerating the metabolism of the compounds in the blood (e.g. variants of butyrylcholinesterase). A considerable progress has been made in combating the abuse of legal addictive substances, alcohol (naltrexone, acamprosate) and tobacco (bupropion). The prospects for developing effective

  9. Studies in Natural Illumination in Schoolrooms. Part III

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1929-11-01

    PI"C HEALTH BULLIN No. 188 STUDIESJIN ATURA ILUMINATION IN SCHOOLROOMSA f1-~7~PART III 20 U. 0 49990809 433 UngimED STATES ý-REASURY DE~PART1WENT... ilumination ratio of desk No. 14 for each month and hour of observation ---------------------------------------------- 55 29. Mean illumination ratio of desk

  10. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy, Part III: Lung Cancer, Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1985-01-01

    An update in cancer chemotherapy that deals with the various therapies of lung cancer is described. At present, the stage of the disease and cell type are the major factors that determine the treatment. Important differences in the biological behavior and response to treatment exist between small cell and non-small cell cancers. The small cell type is sensitive to many chemotherapeutic agents. Differences in response to chemotherapy and survival have been less among the non-small cell types. The treatment of non-small cell carcinomas including squamous cell, large cell, and adenocarcinoma are reviewed in Part I of this paper. Small cell lung cancer will be described in Part II, which will be published in a future issue of the journal. PMID:2414458

  11. PARTS: (Plasma Accelerated Reusable Transport System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aherne, Michael; Davis, Phil; England, Matt; Gustavsson, Jake; Pankow, Steve; Sampaio, Chere; Savella, Phil

    2002-01-01

    The Plasma Accelerated Reusable Transport System (PARTS) is an unmanned cargo shuttle intended to ferry large payloads to and from Martian orbit using a highly efficient VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR). The design of PARTS focuses on balancing cost and minimizing transit time for a chosen payload consisting of vehicles, satellites, and other components provided by interested parties.

  12. Assessment of hoist failure rate for Payload Transporter III

    SciTech Connect

    Demmie, P.N.

    1994-02-01

    Assessment of the hoist failure rate for the Payload Transporter Type III (PT-III) hoist was completed as one of the ground transportation tasks for the Minuteman II (MMIII) Weapon System Safety Assessment. The failures of concern are failures that lead to dropping a reentry system (RS) during hoist operations in a silo or the assembly, storage, and inspection building for a MMIII wing. After providing a brief description of the PT-III hoist system, the author summarizes his search for historical data from industry and the military services for failures of electric hoist systems. Since such information was not found, the strategy for assessing a failure rate was to consider failure mechanisms which lead to load-drop accidents, estimate their rates, and sum the rates for the PT-III hoist failure rate. The author discusses failure mechanisms and describes his assessment of a chain failure rate that is based on data from destructive testing of a chain of the type used for the PT-III hoist and projected usage rates for hoist operations involving the RS. The main result provides upper bounds for chain failure rates that are based on these data. No test data were found to estimate failure rates due to mechanisms other than chain failure. The author did not attempt to quantify the effects of human factors on the PT-III hoist failure rate.

  13. Room-temperature ballistic transport in III-nitride heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Matioli, Elison; Palacios, Tomás

    2015-02-11

    Room-temperature (RT) ballistic transport of electrons is experimentally observed and theoretically investigated in III-nitrides. This has been largely investigated at low temperatures in low band gap III-V materials due to their high electron mobilities. However, their application to RT ballistic devices is limited by their low optical phonon energies, close to KT at 300 K. In addition, the short electron mean-free-path at RT requires nanoscale devices for which surface effects are a limitation in these materials. We explore the unique properties of wide band-gap III-nitride semiconductors to demonstrate RT ballistic devices. A theoretical model is proposed to corroborate experimentally their optical phonon energy of 92 meV, which is ∼4× larger than in other III-V semiconductors. This allows RT ballistic devices operating at larger voltages and currents. An additional model is described to determine experimentally a characteristic dimension for ballistic transport of 188 nm. Another remarkable property is their short carrier depletion at device sidewalls, down to 13 nm, which allows top-down nanofabrication of very narrow ballistic devices. These results open a wealth of new systems and basic transport studies possible at RT.

  14. Organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)-mediated transport of coproporphyrins I and III.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Dallas; Boiselle, Carri

    2016-01-01

    1. Organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) 1B1 and 1B3 are polyspecific transporters that mediate the transport of organic acids into hepatocytes. Inactivating mutations of both OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 alleles lead to Rotor syndrome, a disease characterized by coproporphyrinuria, an elevated urinary excretion of coproporphyrins I and III. It was hypothesized that transport of coproporphyrins I and III was mediated by OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. 2. This hypothesis was tested using cells transfected with OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. OATP1B-mediated transport of coproporphyrin was time-dependent and concentration-dependent. OATP1B1-mediated transport of coproporphyrins I and III (Km = 0.13 and 0.22 µM, respectively), as did OATP1B3 (Km = 3.25 and 4.61 µM, respectively). The OATP1B-mediated transport of each coproporphyrin was inhibited by rifampicin. 3. The specificity of coproporphyrin transport was also investigated where OATP2B1 demonstrated meaningful transport of coproporphyrin III (Km = 0.31 µM), while OCT1, OCT2, OAT1, OAT3 and NTCP were negative for coproporphyrin transport. 4. The identification of coproporphyrins as OATP substrates in vitro more clearly defines the role of OATPs in the hepatic disposition and renal excretion of coproporphyrins I and III and provides compelling evidence for future in vivo exploration of coproporphyrins as biomarkers of OATP activity.

  15. 78 FR 18325 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States Transportation... Department of Defense published a notice titled Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV. DoD has completed... Transportation Regulation, Part IV Web site at http://www.transcom.mil/dtr/part-iv/phaseiii.cfm (DPM SECTION...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-Altitude Counties III Appendix III to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROVISIONS FOR ENGINE PROGRAMS Pt. 1068, App. III Appendix III to Part...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 265, App. III Appendix III to Part 265—EPA Interim Primary...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices III Appendix III to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices III Appendix III to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices III Appendix III to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices III Appendix III to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices III Appendix III to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Pt. 280, App. III Appendix III to Part 280—Statement for Shipping...

  3. 77 FR 60743 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040... Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Schedule F... Number: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040). Abstract: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)...

  4. Chemical vapour transport of III-V semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mervyn Howard

    Over the temperature range 770 to 1310 K, however, two bromides compete for prominence, dependent upon temperature. In both instances, it is shown that vapour transport becomes rate limited at low temperature. Further to the chemical vapour transport of indium phosphide, the dissociative sublimation of the compound has also been investigated. Raman spectroscopy has been used to identify high temperature molecular species involved in vapour transport of III-V semiconductor materials. Supplementary work has been performed on the thermochemistry of indium monobromide. The heat of formation of indium bromide crystals has been determined using a solution calormetric technique. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the heat capacity and heat of fusion, of the salt. An entrainment study of the evaporation of liquid indium monobromide was undertaken to yield a value for its heat of vaporisation. Using a statistical thermodynamic approach, the heat capacity of the vapour was calculated. Collating the information, a value for the heat of formation of indium monobromide gas at 1000 K has been calculated for use in other thermodynamic calculations.

  5. Ballistic transport and luminescence in III-V semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wei

    This thesis describes research to develop novel scanning probe methods employing ballistic electron emission to characterize nanoscale carrier transport and luminescence of quantum-confined III-V semiconductor nanostructures. First, spectroscopic and microscopic ballistic electron emission luminescence (BEEL) of an InAs quantum dot heterostructure based on three-terminal hot electron injection using a scanning tunneling microscope and a planar tunnel-junction transistor is described in detail. Second, BEEL device simulation based on one-dimensional Poisson equation and carrier drift-diffusion model is examined. Third, a scheme to integrate a photon detector directly into a BEEL heterostructure to improve the photon collection efficiency is presented. Fourth, experimental results toward development of a dual scanning probe microscopy to study nanoscale metal-semiconductor interfaces without the requirement of an externally-contacted continuous metal thin film are described. Finally, some prospects of ballistic carrier spintronic devices are discussed.

  6. 75 FR 16445 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States Transportation... for the Defense Personal Property Program (DP3) in the Defense Transportation Regulation (DTR) Part IV...

  7. Monte Carlo Studies of Nonlinear Electron Transport in III-V semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    ELECTRON TRANSPORT IN III-V SEMICONDUCTORS DTIC Ki Wook Kim EL, .4 .SEP2 3198 H UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAICIN Approved for Public Release... semiconductors , GaAs/AlGaAs materia * system, Nonequilibrium situations, Monte Carlo simulation method, Analysis of transport properties, Semiclassical...Boltzmar k. £8TRACT Contfinue on verse Inecesar. and ideneity by bloci, n,Mbr, transport picture. Electron transport in III-V semiconductors , especially the

  8. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1037 - Emission Control Identifiers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... includes advanced hybrid technology components -ADVO—Vehicle includes other advanced technology components (i.e., non-hybrid system) -INV—Vehicle includes innovative technology components ... POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW HEAVY-DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 1037, App. III Appendix III...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1037 - Emission Control Identifiers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... includes advanced hybrid technology components -ADVO—Vehicle includes other advanced technology components (i.e., non-hybrid system) -INV—Vehicle includes innovative technology components ... POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW HEAVY-DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 1037, App. III Appendix III...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1037 - Emission Control Identifiers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... includes advanced hybrid technology components -ADVO—Vehicle includes other advanced technology components (i.e., non-hybrid system) -INV—Vehicle includes innovative technology components ... POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW HEAVY-DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 1037, App. III Appendix III...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches Standards...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches Standards...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 92 - Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized.... III Appendix III to Part 92—Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Table III-1—Equivalent Smoke Standards for Non-Normalized Measurements Path length If the path length is: cm inches...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., App. III Appendix III to Part 1042—Not-to-Exceed Zones (a) The following definitions apply for this Appendix III: (1) Percent power means the percentage of the maximum power achieved at Maximum Test Speed (or at Maximum Test Torque for constant-speed engines). (2) Percent speed means the percentage of...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., App. III Appendix III to Part 1042—Not-to-Exceed Zones (a) The following definitions apply for this Appendix III: (1) Percent power means the percentage of the maximum power achieved at Maximum Test Speed (or at Maximum Test Torque for constant-speed engines). (2) Percent speed means the percentage of...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., App. III Appendix III to Part 1042—Not-to-Exceed Zones (a) The following definitions apply for this Appendix III: (1) Percent power means the percentage of the maximum power achieved at Maximum Test Speed (or at Maximum Test Torque for constant-speed engines). (2) Percent speed means the percentage of...

  19. Selective transport of Fe(III) using ionic imprinted polymer (IIP) membrane particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djunaidi, Muhammad Cholid; Jumina, Siswanta, Dwi; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-12-01

    The membrane particles was prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polymer IIP with weight ratios of 1: 2 and 1: 1 using different adsorbent templates and casting thickness. The permeability of membrane towards Fe(III) and also mecanism of transport were studied. The selectivity of the membrane for Fe(III) was studied by performing adsorption experiments also with Cr(III) separately. In this study, the preparation of Ionic Imprinted Polymer (IIP) membrane particles for selective transport of Fe (III) had been done using polyeugenol as functional polymer. Polyeugenol was then imprinted with Fe (III) and then crosslinked with PEGDE under alkaline condition to produce polyeugenol-Fe-PEGDE polymer aggregates. The agrregates was then crushed and sieved using mesh size of 80 and the powder was then used to prepare the membrane particles by mixing it with PVA (Mr 125,000) solution in 1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent. The membrane was obtained after casting at a speed of 25 m/s and soaking in NaOH solution overnight. The membrane sheet was then cut and Fe(III) was removed by acid to produce IIP membrane particles. Analysis of the membrane and its constituent was done by XRD, SEM and size selectivity test. Experimental results showed the transport of Fe(III) was faster with the decrease of membrane thickness, while the higher concentration of template ion correlates with higher Fe(III) being transported. However, the transport of Fe(III) was slower for higher concentration of PVA in the membrane. IImparticles works through retarded permeation mechanism, where Fe(III) was bind to the active side of IIP. The active side of IIP membrane was dominated by the -OH groups. The selectivity of all IIP membranes was confirmed as they were all unable to transport Cr (III), while NIP (Non-imprinted Polymer) membrane was able transport Cr (III).

  20. 76 FR 66281 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV AGENCY: United States Transportation...). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Jim Teague, United States Transportation Command, TCJ5/4-PI, 508...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false High-Altitude Counties III Appendix... Appendix III to Part 1068—High-Altitude Counties In some cases the standard-setting part includes requirements or other specifications that apply for high-altitude counties. The following counties have...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called...

  3. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  4. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  5. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  6. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  7. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting of...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 265, App. III Appendix III to Part 265—EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium 0.05...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App....

  11. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App....

  12. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Inquiry/Application Log Sheet eR20MY94.003...

  13. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Inquiry/Application Log Sheet eR20MY94.003...

  14. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Inquiry/Application Log Sheet eR20MY94.003...

  15. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Inquiry/Application Log Sheet eR20MY94.003...

  16. 12 CFR Appendix III to Part 27 - Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fair Housing Lending Inquiry/Application Log Sheet III Appendix III to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Inquiry/Application Log Sheet eR20MY94.003...

  17. The prospects for European aerospace transporters. III - Applications of aerospace transporters. IV - Historical and political considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. Q.; Ashford, D. M.

    1989-03-01

    A small, near-term-developed aerospace transporter would be useful for launching small satellites, servicing satellites in orbit, and supplying space stations, as well as furnishing a technology-development base for subsequent, larger vehicles. These larger vehicles have a potential cost/flight that is estimated to be of the order of 1000 times lower than that of the NASA Space Shuttle, at traffic levels typical of their use in tourism. An additional part of this work notes that the evolution of space transportation to date has been driven by considerations of defense policy and international prestige, with little priority given to the launch cost reductions that would be of paramount importance to passenger-carrying commercial ventures.

  18. 76 FR 36095 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... and response to comments received in connection with the Defense Personal Property Program (DP3) Phase.../part-iv/phaseiii.cfm . All identified changes have been incorporated into the final dS2 and NTS... (DPS) Phase III programming projected for FY15 (dS2) and FY16 (NTS). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  19. Toward a Model of Vocational Persistence Among Seminarians: Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Assumptions underlying model rely on Cartwright and Harary's (1960) definition of Heider's cognitive balance theory and Festinger's (1957) cognitive dissonance theory. Diagrams illustrate degree of balance between personal and reference group (curch authorities, classmates, family) attitudes. Parts I and II in earlier issues. (CJ)

  20. A Design that Inspires All. Education by Design: Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theimer, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Too many schools are still being built today as warehouses with windows; they get the job done on some minimal level, but beyond that, they simply do not excite the children who spend a great deal of their lives within their walls. Creating an environmentally friendly building is important, but that's only part of the equation. The author and his…

  1. Critical Thinking: The Art of Socratic Questioning, Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Richard; Elder, Linda

    2008-01-01

    In the last two articles, the authors introduced the concept of Socratic questioning and its relationship to critical thinking. They illuminated how understanding the concepts embedded in critical thinking naturally generates questions. For example, a thinker who understands the elements of thought asks questions which probe the parts of thinking.…

  2. Sequential Mathematics Course III. Part 1. Pilot Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This document outlines part one of the third year course of the newly implemented New York State Mathematics Curriculum. The three-year Sequential Mathematics sequence designed by New York State is a move in the direction of fusing the formerly separate topics found in algebra, geometry, and intermediate algebra/trigonometry, and introducing…

  3. Toward a Model of Vocational Persistence Among Seminarians: Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Assumptions underlying model rely on Cartwright and Harary's (1960) definition of Heider's cognitive balance theory and Festinger's (1957) cognitive dissonance theory. Diagrams illustrate degree of balance between personal and reference group (curch authorities, classmates, family) attitudes. Parts I and II in earlier issues. (CJ)

  4. Reaction-based reactive transport modeling of Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Kemner, K.M.; Kelly, S.D.; Burgos, Bill; Roden, Eric

    2006-06-01

    This research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to Argonne National Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Dr. Eric Roden, formerly at The University of Alabama, is now at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  5. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  6. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  7. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  8. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  9. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  10. Scary gas: intravascular, intracranial, and intraspinal ectopic gas (part III).

    PubMed

    Sandstrom, Claire K; Osman, Sherif F; Linnau, Ken F

    2017-08-01

    While ectopic gas can be a sign of dangerous disease requiring immediate medical or surgical intervention, it can also be an incidental and benign finding. Intravenous gas and spinal vacuum gas are common and almost always benign. Intravascular gas is most often related to instrumentation and, if intraarticular, can cause end-organ ischemia; however, treatment is usually supportive. Pneumocephalus arises from a communication with paranasal sinuses or mastoids more often than from meningeal infection and can usually be managed nonoperatively. In part 3 of this series, the different causes of ectopic gas in the vessels, skull, and spine are reviewed, as are the imaging features that can help to narrow the differential diagnosis.

  11. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume III - Transport Aircraft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The specific task of the Panel on Transport Aircraft was to…

  12. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume III - Transport Aircraft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The specific task of the Panel on Transport Aircraft was to…

  13. Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: ExposureAssessment

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

    2006-06-01

    Human exposure assessment is a key step in estimating the environmental and public health burdens that result chemical emissions in the life cycle of an industrial product or service. This column presents the third in a series of overviews of the state of the art in integrated environmental assessment - earlier columns described emissions estimation (Frey and Small, 2003) and fate and transport modeling (Ramaswami, et al., 2004). When combined, these first two assessment elements provide estimates of ambient concentrations in the environment. Here we discuss how both models and measurements are used to translate ambient concentrations into metrics of human and ecological exposure, the necessary precursors to impact assessment. Exposure assessment is the process of measuring and/or modeling the magnitude, frequency and duration of contact between a potentially harmful agent and a target population, including the size and characteristics of that population (IPCS, 2001; Zartarian, et al., 2005). Ideally the exposure assessment process should characterize the sources, routes, pathways, and uncertainties in the assessment. Route of exposure refers to the way that an agent enters the receptor during an exposure event. Humans contact pollutants through three routes--inhalation, ingestion, and dermal uptake. Inhalation occurs in both outdoor environments and indoor environments where most people spend the majority of their time. Ingestion includes both water and food, as well as soil and dust uptake due to hand-to-mouth activity. Dermal uptake occurs through contacts with consumer products; indoor and outdoor surfaces; the water supply during washing or bathing; ambient surface waters during swimming or boating; soil during activities such as work, gardening, and play; and, to a lesser extent, from the air that surrounds us. An exposure pathway is the course that a pollutant takes from an ambient environmental medium (air, soil, water, biota, etc), to an exposure medium

  14. Revision of the Genus Paratylenchus Micoletzky, 1922 and Descriptions of New Species. Part III of Three parts-Gracilacus

    PubMed Central

    Raski, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Part III covers species with female stylet length >41 μm which are considered by this author to comprise the genus Gracilacus Raski, 1962. Seven new species of Gracilacus are described and further observations given on 14 other species. Paratylenchus strenzkei (Volz, 1951) Oostenbrink, 1960 is transferred to species inquirendae. A key to the species of Gracilacus is included. PMID:19308207

  15. The ballistic transport instability in Saturn's rings - III. Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latter, Henrik N.; Ogilvie, Gordon I.; Chupeau, Marie

    2014-07-01

    Saturn's inner B-ring and its C-ring support wavetrains of contrasting amplitudes but with similar length-scales, 100-1000 km. In addition, the inner B-ring is punctuated by two intriguing `flat' regions between radii 93 000 and 98 000 km in which the waves die out, whereas the C-ring waves coexist with a forest of plateaus, narrow ringlets, and gaps. In both regions, the waves are probably generated by a large-scale linear instability whose origin lies in the meteoritic bombardment of the rings: the ballistic transport instability. In this paper, the third in a series, we numerically simulate the long-term non-linear evolution of this instability in a convenient local model. Our C-ring simulations confirm that the unstable system forms low-amplitude wavetrains possessing a preferred band of wavelengths. B-ring simulations, on the other hand, exhibit localized non-linear wave `packets' separated by linearly stable flat zones. Wave packets travel slowly while spreading in time, a result that suggests the observed flat regions in Saturn's B-ring are shrinking. Finally, we present exploratory runs of the inner B-ring edge which reproduce earlier numerical results: ballistic transport can maintain the sharpness of a spreading edge while building a `ramp' structure at its base. Moreover, the ballistic transport instability can afflict the ramp region, but only in low-viscosity runs.

  16. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. Part III; Nonthermal Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Holman, Gordon; O'Flannagain, Aidan; Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the third part of a global flare energetics project, in which Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) data of 191 M and X-class flare events from the first 3.5 years of the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission are analyzed. We fit a thermal and a nonthermal component to RHESSI spectra, yielding the temperature of the differential emission measure (DEM) tail, the nonthermal power-law slope and flux, and the thermal nonthermal cross-over energy eco. From these parameters, we calculate the total nonthermal energy E(sub nt) in electrons with two different methods: (1) using the observed cross-over energy e(sub co) as low-energy cutoff, and (2) using the low-energy cut off e(sub wt) predicted by the warm thick-target bremsstrahlung model of Kontar et al. Based on a mean temperature of T(sub e) = 8.6 MK in active regions, we find low-energy cutoff energies of e(sub wt) = 6.2 +/-1.6 keV for the warm-target model, which is significantly lower than the cross-over energies e(sub co) = 21 +/- 6 keV. Comparing with the statistics of magnetically dissipated energies E(sub mag) and thermal energies E(sub th) from the two previous studies, we find the following mean (logarithmic) energy ratios with the warm-target model: E(sub nt) = 0.41E(sub mag), E(sub th) = 0.08 E(sub mag), and E(sub th) = 0.15 E(sub nt). The total dissipated magnetic energy exceeds the thermal energy in 95% and the nonthermal energy in 71% of the flare events, which confirms that magnetic reconnection processes are sufficient to explain flare energies. The nonthermal energy exceeds the thermal energy in 85% of the events, which largely confirms the warm thick-target model.

  17. Aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmospheric environment. Part III: personal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgen, E.; Levsen, K.; Angerer, J.; Schneider, P.; Heinrich, J.; Wichmann, H.-E.

    As part of a larger study, personal sampling of the aromatic hydrocarbons benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the isomeric xylenes (BTEX) was carried out by 55 nonsmoking volunteers for a period of 14 days. Thirty-nine persons lived in a rural area near Hannover (Germany) with hardly any traffic at all, while 16 persons lived in a high-traffic city street in Hannover. The personal exposure level of the persons in the rural area (some commuting to Hannover) was: 2.9, 24.8, 2.4 and 7.7 μg m -3 for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the sum of xylenes, respectively, while the corresponding data for the high traffic city streets were 4.0, 22.2, 2.8 and 9.7 μg m -3 (geometric means). Four microenvironments have been monitored which contribute to the total exposure to BTEX, i.e. the home, the outdoor air, the workplace and the car cabin. The most important microenvironment for non-working persons is the private home. The concentration of most BTEX in the private home is almost equal to the personal exposure level, demonstrating that the indoor pollution in the home makes by far the highest contribution to the total exposure. For working people (mostly office workers), the workplace is the second most important microenvironment contributing to the total BTEX exposure. Taking all working persons into consideration (independent of the location of their private home) the personal exposure level is higher by a factor of 1.2-1.4 than that of the workplace (for toluene this factor is 2.2). As already found by others, very high BTEX concentrations may be found in car cabins, in particular, if the engine is gasoline-driven. In the cabin of 44 cars in the rural/urban area average benzene concentrations (geometric mean) of 12/14 μg m -3 and a maximum value of ˜550 μg m -3 were found. On average, the participating volunteers drove their car for 45 min day -1 (i.e. 3% of the day). Nevertheless, the car cabin constitutes about 10% of the total benzene exposure. Refueling of the

  18. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. Part III; Nonthermal Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Holman, Gordon; O'Flannagain, Aidan; Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the third part of a global flare energetics project, in which Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) data of 191 M and X-class flare events from the first 3.5 years of the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission are analyzed. We fit a thermal and a nonthermal component to RHESSI spectra, yielding the temperature of the differential emission measure (DEM) tail, the nonthermal power-law slope and flux, and the thermal nonthermal cross-over energy eco. From these parameters, we calculate the total nonthermal energy E(sub nt) in electrons with two different methods: (1) using the observed cross-over energy e(sub co) as low-energy cutoff, and (2) using the low-energy cut off e(sub wt) predicted by the warm thick-target bremsstrahlung model of Kontar et al. Based on a mean temperature of T(sub e) = 8.6 MK in active regions, we find low-energy cutoff energies of e(sub wt) = 6.2 +/-1.6 keV for the warm-target model, which is significantly lower than the cross-over energies e(sub co) = 21 +/- 6 keV. Comparing with the statistics of magnetically dissipated energies E(sub mag) and thermal energies E(sub th) from the two previous studies, we find the following mean (logarithmic) energy ratios with the warm-target model: E(sub nt) = 0.41E(sub mag), E(sub th) = 0.08 E(sub mag), and E(sub th) = 0.15 E(sub nt). The total dissipated magnetic energy exceeds the thermal energy in 95% and the nonthermal energy in 71% of the flare events, which confirms that magnetic reconnection processes are sufficient to explain flare energies. The nonthermal energy exceeds the thermal energy in 85% of the events, which largely confirms the warm thick-target model.

  19. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  20. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  1. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  3. 10 CFR Appendix III to Part 960 - Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of the System and Technical Guidelines During the Siting Process III Appendix III to Part 960 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Pt. 960, App. III Appendix III to...

  4. PROBABILITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR LIQUID WASTE TANKS - PART III

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Edwards, T.

    2010-12-09

    The liquid waste chemistry control program is designed to reduce the pitting corrosion occurrence on tank walls. The chemistry control program has been implemented, in part, by applying engineering judgment safety factors to experimental data. However, the simple application of a general safety factor can result in use of excessive corrosion inhibiting agents. The required use of excess corrosion inhibitors can be costly for tank maintenance, waste processing, and in future tank closure. It is proposed that a probability-based approach can be used to quantify the risk associated with the chemistry control program. This approach can lead to the application of tank-specific chemistry control programs reducing overall costs associated with overly conservative use of inhibitor. Furthermore, when using nitrite as an inhibitor, the current chemistry control program is based on a linear model of increased aggressive species requiring increased protective species. This linear model was primarily supported by experimental data obtained from dilute solutions with nitrate concentrations less than 0.6 M, but is used to produce the current chemistry control program up to 1.0 M nitrate. Therefore, in the nitrate space between 0.6 and 1.0 M, the current control limit is based on assumptions that the linear model developed from data in the <0.6 M region is applicable in the 0.6-1.0 M region. Due to this assumption, further investigation of the nitrate region of 0.6 M to 1.0 M has potential for significant inhibitor reduction, while maintaining the same level of corrosion risk associated with the current chemistry control program. Ongoing studies have been conducted in FY07, FY08, FY09 and FY10 to evaluate the corrosion controls at the SRS tank farm and to assess the minimum nitrite concentrations to inhibit pitting in ASTM A537 carbon steel below 1.0 molar nitrate. The experimentation from FY08 suggested a non-linear model known as the mixture/amount model could be used to predict

  5. Technological Support of Critical Parts for Railway Transport Working Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabets, A. V.; Gabets, D. A.; Markov, A. M.; Radchenko, M. V.; Leonov, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    The materials of complex research of operational properties of a new brand cast iron CHMN-35M. Optimal chemical composition was determined. The obtained results allow to conclude about possibility of its use for the manufacture of critical parts of rolling stock of railway transport, in particular of a side bearing cap

  6. Phase 0 and phase III transport in various organs: combined concept of phases in xenobiotic transport and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Döring, Barbara; Petzinger, Ernst

    2014-08-01

    The historical phasing concept of drug metabolism and elimination was introduced to comprise the two phases of metabolism: phase I metabolism for oxidations, reductions and hydrolyses, and phase II metabolism for synthesis. With this concept, biological membrane barriers obstructing the accessibility of metabolism sites in the cells for drugs were not considered. The concept of two phases was extended to a concept of four phases when drug transporters were detected that guided drugs and drug metabolites in and out of the cells. In particular, water soluble or charged drugs are virtually not able to overcome the phospholipid membrane barrier. Drug transporters belong to two main clusters of transporter families: the solute carrier (SLC) families and the ATP binding cassette (ABC) carriers. The ABC transporters comprise seven families with about 20 carriers involved in drug transport. All of them operate as pumps at the expense of ATP splitting. Embedded in the former phase concept, the term "phase III" was introduced by Ishikawa in 1992 for drug export by ABC efflux pumps. SLC comprise 52 families, from which many carriers are drug uptake transporters. Later on, this uptake process was referred to as the "phase 0 transport" of drugs. Transporters for xenobiotics in man and animal are most expressed in liver, but they are also present in extra-hepatic tissues such as in the kidney, the adrenal gland and lung. This review deals with the function of drug carriers in various organs and their impact on drug metabolism and elimination.

  7. Costs and Their Assessment to Users of a Medical Library, Part III: Allocating Fixed Joint Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bres, E.; And Others

    Part III of the study describes a model for completing the cost assessment (justification) process by accounting for the fixed joint costs; a "fair" and equitable mechanism is developed in the context of game-theoretic approach. An n-person game is constructed in which the "players" are the institutions served by the library,…

  8. 48 CFR 14.201-4 - Part III-Documents, exhibits, and other attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Part III-Documents, exhibits, and other attachments. 14.201-4 Section 14.201-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... attachments. The contracting officer shall list the title, date, and number of pages for each attached...

  9. 48 CFR 1436.270-4 - Part III-Documents, exhibits and other attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Part III-Documents, exhibits and other attachments. 1436.270-4 Section 1436.270-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... (See FAR 22.404), SF-24—Bid Bond (See FAR 28.101), and other attachments by listing the title, date and...

  10. 48 CFR 15.204-4 - Part III-List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Part III-List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments. 15.204-4 Section 15.204-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL.... Section J, List of attachments. The contracting officer shall list the title, date, and number of pages...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... III to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION... Cheyenne Kimball Sioux STATE OF NEVADA Carson City Douglas Elko Esmeralda Eureka Humboldt Lander Lincoln Lyon Mineral Nye Pershing Storey Washoe White Pine STATE OF NEW MEXICO Bernalillo Catron Colfax...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... III to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION... Nebraska Banner Cheyenne Kimball Sioux State of Nevada Carson City Douglas Elko Esmeralda Eureka Humboldt Lander Lincoln Lyon Mineral Nye Pershing Storey Washoe White Pine State of New Mexico Bernalillo...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... III to Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION... NEBRASKA Banner Cheyenne Kimball Sioux STATE OF NEVADA Carson City Douglas Elko Esmeralda Eureka Humboldt Lander Lincoln Lyon Mineral Nye Pershing Storey Washoe White Pine STATE OF NEW MEXICO Bernalillo...

  14. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling. Part A: Codes; Part B: Applications with examples

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Beutler, D.E.

    1997-09-01

    This report contains the notes from the second session of the 1997 IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference Short Course on Applying Computer Simulation Tools to Radiation Effects Problems. Part A discusses the physical phenomena modeled in radiation transport codes and various types of algorithmic implementations. Part B gives examples of how these codes can be used to design experiments whose results can be easily analyzed and describes how to calculate quantities of interest for electronic devices.

  15. Cr(VI) retention and transport through Fe(III)-coated natural zeolite.

    PubMed

    Du, Gaoxiang; Li, Zhaohui; Liao, Libing; Hanson, Renee; Leick, Samantha; Hoeppner, Nicole; Jiang, Wei-Teh

    2012-06-30

    Cr(VI) is a group A chemical based on the weight of evidence of carcinogenicity. Its transport and retention in soils and groundwater have been studied extensively. Zeolite is a major component in deposits originated from volcanic ash and tuff after alteration. In this study, zeolite aggregates with the particle size of 1.4-2.4mm were preloaded with Fe(III). The influence of present Fe(III) on Cr(VI) retention by and transport through zeolite was studied under batch and column experiments. The added Fe(III) resulted in an enhanced Cr(VI) retention by the zeolite with a capacity of 82mg/kg. The Cr(VI) adsorption on Fe(III)-zeolite followed a pseudo-second order kinetically and the Freundlich adsorption isotherm thermodynamically. Fitting the column experimental data to HYDRUS-1D resulted in a retardation factor of 3 in comparison to 5 calculated from batch tests at an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 3mg/L. The results from this study showed that enhanced adsorption and retention of Cr(VI) may happen in soils derived from volcanic ash and tuff that contains significant amounts of zeolite with extensive Fe(III) coating. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Global thermohaline circulation. Part 2: Sensitivity with interactive atmospheric transports

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Stone, P.H.; Marotzke, J.

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid coupled ocean-atmospheric model is used to investigate the stability of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to an increase in the surface freshwater forcing in the presence of interactive meridional transports in the atmosphere. The ocean component is the idealized global general circulation model used in Part 1. The atmospheric model assumes fixed latitudinal structure of the heat and moisture transports, and the amplitudes are calculated separately for each hemisphere from the large-scale sea surface temperature (SST) and SST gradient, using parameterizations based on baroclinic stability theory. The ocean-atmosphere heat and freshwater exchanges are calculated as residuals of the steady-state atmospheric budgets. Owing to the ocean component`s weak heat transport, the model has too strong a meridional SST gradient when driven with observed atmospheric meridional transports. When the latter are made interactive, the conveyor belt circulation collapses. A flux adjustment is introduced in which the efficiency of the atmospheric transports is lowered to match the too low efficiency of the ocean component. The feedbacks between the THC and both the atmospheric heat and moisture transports are positive, whether atmospheric transports are interactive in the Northern Hemisphere, the Southern Hemisphere, or both. However, the feedbacks operate differently in the northern and southern Hemispheres, because the Pacific THC dominates in the Southern Hemisphere, and deep water formation in the two hemispheres is negatively correlated. The feedbacks in the two hemisphere do not necessarily reinforce each other because they have opposite effects on low-latitude temperatures. The model is qualitatively similar in stability to one with conventional additive flux adjustment, but quantitatively more stable.

  17. Prediction of Sucessful Nursing Performance. Part III and Part IV. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwirian, Patricia M.; And Others

    As part of the three-phase national study to provide information to form a basis for predictions about successful nursing performance, a review was conducted of the performance of nursing school graduates at their first jobs. In March, 1976, questionnaires were mailed to a cohort of 1975 graduates who were selected by school officials as having…

  18. Factors Related to the Pronunciation of Vowel Clusters. Part III (of 3 Parts).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dale D.

    Children's pronunciations of vowel clusters in synthetic words were analyzed in relation to common English words containing the same vowel clusters. Subjects were 436 elementary students of both high and low reading levels from a suburban, an urban, and a rural community. Discussion of the problem and procedures of the study are found in Part 1,…

  19. Potassium transport of Salmonella is important for type III secretion and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yehao; Ho, Katharina Kim; Su, Jing; Gong, Hao; Chang, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular cations are essential for the physiology of all living organisms including bacteria. Cations such as potassium ion (K+), sodium ion (Na+) and proton (H+) are involved in nearly all aspects of bacterial growth and survival. K+ is the most abundant cation and its homeostasis in Escherichia coli and Salmonella is regulated by three major K+ transporters: high affinity transporter Kdp and low affinity transporters Kup and Trk. Previous studies have demonstrated the roles of cations and cation transport in the physiology of Escherichia coli; their roles in the virulence and physiology of pathogenic bacteria are not well characterized. We have previously reported that the Salmonella K+ transporter Trk is important for the secretion of effector proteins of the type III secretion system (TTSS) of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Here we further explore the role of Salmonella cation transport in virulence in vitro and pathogenesis in animal models. Impairment of K+ transport through deletion of K+ transporters or exposure to the chemical modulators of cation transport, gramicidin and valinomycin, results in a severe defect in the TTSS of SPI-1, and this defect in the TTSS was not due to a failure to regulate intrabacterial pH or ATP. Our results also show that K+ transporters are critical to the pathogenesis of Salmonella in mice and chicks and are involved in multiple growth and virulence characteristics in vitro, including protein secretion, motility and invasion of epithelial cells. These results suggest that cation transport of the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella, especially K+ transport, contributes to its virulence in addition to previously characterized roles in maintaining homeostasis of bacteria. PMID:23728623

  20. Potassium transport of Salmonella is important for type III secretion and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yehao; Ho, Katharina Kim; Su, Jing; Gong, Hao; Chang, Alexander C; Lu, Sangwei

    2013-08-01

    Intracellular cations are essential for the physiology of all living organisms including bacteria. Cations such as potassium ion (K(+)), sodium ion (Na(+)) and proton (H(+)) are involved in nearly all aspects of bacterial growth and survival. K(+) is the most abundant cation and its homeostasis in Escherichia coli and Salmonella is regulated by three major K(+) transporters: high affinity transporter Kdp and low affinity transporters Kup and Trk. Previous studies have demonstrated the roles of cations and cation transport in the physiology of Escherichia coli; their roles in the virulence and physiology of pathogenic bacteria are not well characterized. We have previously reported that the Salmonella K(+) transporter Trk is important for the secretion of effector proteins of the type III secretion system (TTSS) of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Here we further explore the role of Salmonella cation transport in virulence in vitro and pathogenesis in animal models. Impairment of K(+) transport through deletion of K(+) transporters or exposure to the chemical modulators of cation transport, gramicidin and valinomycin, results in a severe defect in the TTSS of SPI-1, and this defect in the TTSS was not due to a failure to regulate intrabacterial pH or ATP. Our results also show that K(+) transporters are critical to the pathogenesis of Salmonella in mice and chicks and are involved in multiple growth and virulence characteristics in vitro, including protein secretion, motility and invasion of epithelial cells. These results suggest that cation transport of the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella, especially K(+) transport, contributes to its virulence in addition to previously characterized roles in maintaining homeostasis of bacteria.

  1. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokheon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Hwang, Joohyun; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD.

  2. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 III Appendix III to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining the...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 III Appendix III to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 III Appendix III to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 III Appendix III to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 III Appendix III to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining...

  12. Reaction-Based Reactive Transport Modeling of Fe(III) and U(V) Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, William D.; Roden, Eric E.; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh

    2005-06-01

    Our new research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to The Pennsylvania State University, University of Central Florida, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Our previous NABIR project (DE-FG02-01ER63180/63181/63182, funded within the Biotransformation Element) focused on (1) microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) individually, and concomitantly in natural sediments, (2) Fe(III) oxide surface chemistry, specifically with respect to reactions with Fe(II) and U(VI), (3) the influence of humic substances on Fe(III) and U(VI) bioreduction, and on U(VI) complexation, and (4) the development of reaction-based reactive transport biogeochemical models to numerically simulate our experimental results. The new project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  13. Centrifugal Modelling of Soil Structures. Part III. The Stability of River Banks and Flood Embankments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    CENTRIFUGAL MODELLING OF SOIL STRUCTURES. PART I1. THE STARILI--ETC(U) OCT T8 C J PADFIELD. A N SCHOFIELD DA-ERO-76GO-00U C L A S IF I E n N L...ASIIIIIIIII E]lllllEEEEEEE mEEEEEEmhhEEEE EEEEEEEEmhhEEI HhIL~ 222 LEVELA!>1 ; CENTRIFUGAL MODELLING OF SOIL STRUCTURES PART III THE STABILITY OF RIVER...8217WM 1. R NUMBER GOVI ACCESSION NO). 3. R ~CI PIENT . CATALOG NUMNL H .. PERIODCO RED Centrifugal Modelling of soil StructuresPrt = Final Technical The

  14. Transport Properties of the Tomato Fruit Tonoplast : III. Temperature Dependence of Calcium Transport.

    PubMed

    Joyce, D C; Cramer, G R; Reid, M S; Bennett, A B

    1988-12-01

    Calcium transport into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill, cv Castlemart) fruit tonoplast vesicles was studied. Calcium uptake was stimulated approximately 10-fold by MgATP. Two ATP-dependent Ca(2+) transport activities could be resolved on the basis of sensitivity to nitrate and affinity for Ca(2+). A low affinity Ca(2+) uptake system (K(m) > 200 micromolar) was inhibited by nitrate and ionophores and is thought to represent a tonoplast localized H(+)/Ca(2+) antiport. A high affinity Ca(2+) uptake system (K(m) = 6 micromolar) was not inhibited by nitrate, had reduced sensitivity to ionophores, and appeared to be associated with a population of low density endoplasmic reticulum vesicles that contaminated the tonoplast-enriched membrane fraction. Arrhenius plots of the temperature dependence of Ca(2+) transport in tomato membrane vesicles showed a sharp increase in activation energy at temperatures below 10 to 12 degrees C that was not observed in red beet membrane vesicles. This low temperature effect on tonoplast Ca(2+)/H(+) antiport activity could only by partially ascribed to an effect of low temperature on H(+)-ATPase activity, ATP-dependent H(+) transport, passive H(+) fluxes, or passive Ca(2+) fluxes. These results suggest that low temperature directly affects Ca(2+)/H(+) exchange across the tomato fruit tonoplast, resulting in an apparent change in activation energy for the transport reaction. This could result from a direct effect of temperature on the Ca(2+)/H(+) exchange protein or by an indirect effect of temperature on lipid interactions with the Ca(2+)/H(+) exchange protein.

  15. ESCRT-III-Associated Protein ALIX Mediates High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Trafficking to Maintain Phosphate Homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cardona-López, Ximena; Cuyas, Laura; Marín, Elena; Rajulu, Charukesi; Irigoyen, María Luisa; Gil, Erica; Puga, María Isabel; Bligny, Richard; Nussaume, Laurent; Geldner, Niko; Paz-Ares, Javier; Rubio, Vicente

    2015-09-01

    Prior to the release of their cargoes into the vacuolar lumen, sorting endosomes mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) through the action of ENDOSOMAL COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT) protein complexes. MVB-mediated sorting of high-affinity phosphate transporters (PHT1) to the vacuole limits their plasma membrane levels under phosphate-sufficient conditions, a process that allows plants to maintain phosphate homeostasis. Here, we describe ALIX, a cytosolic protein that associates with MVB by interacting with ESCRT-III subunit SNF7 and mediates PHT1;1 trafficking to the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the partial loss-of-function mutant alix-1 displays reduced vacuolar degradation of PHT1;1. ALIX derivatives containing the alix-1 mutation showed reduced interaction with SNF7, providing a simple molecular explanation for impaired cargo trafficking in alix-1 mutants. In fact, the alix-1 mutation also hampered vacuolar sorting of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1. We also show that alix-1 displays altered vacuole morphogenesis, implying a new role for ALIX proteins in vacuolar biogenesis, likely acting as part of ESCRT-III complexes. In line with a presumed broad target spectrum, the alix-1 mutation is pleiotropic, leading to reduced plant growth and late flowering, with stronger alix mutations being lethal, indicating that ALIX participates in diverse processes in plants essential for their life.

  16. ESCRT-III-Associated Protein ALIX Mediates High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Trafficking to Maintain Phosphate Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-López, Ximena; Cuyas, Laura; Marín, Elena; Irigoyen, María Luisa; Gil, Erica; Puga, María Isabel; Bligny, Richard; Nussaume, Laurent; Geldner, Niko; Paz-Ares, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the release of their cargoes into the vacuolar lumen, sorting endosomes mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) through the action of ENDOSOMAL COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT) protein complexes. MVB-mediated sorting of high-affinity phosphate transporters (PHT1) to the vacuole limits their plasma membrane levels under phosphate-sufficient conditions, a process that allows plants to maintain phosphate homeostasis. Here, we describe ALIX, a cytosolic protein that associates with MVB by interacting with ESCRT-III subunit SNF7 and mediates PHT1;1 trafficking to the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the partial loss-of-function mutant alix-1 displays reduced vacuolar degradation of PHT1;1. ALIX derivatives containing the alix-1 mutation showed reduced interaction with SNF7, providing a simple molecular explanation for impaired cargo trafficking in alix-1 mutants. In fact, the alix-1 mutation also hampered vacuolar sorting of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1. We also show that alix-1 displays altered vacuole morphogenesis, implying a new role for ALIX proteins in vacuolar biogenesis, likely acting as part of ESCRT-III complexes. In line with a presumed broad target spectrum, the alix-1 mutation is pleiotropic, leading to reduced plant growth and late flowering, with stronger alix mutations being lethal, indicating that ALIX participates in diverse processes in plants essential for their life. PMID:26342016

  17. 75 FR 30385 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... with funding and programming future Phase III capabilities. DATES: Comments must be received on or... programming future Phase III capabilities. Dated: May 26, 2010. Mitchell S. Bryman, Alternate OSD Federal...

  18. Modeling of the electrical carrier transport in III-V on silicon tandem solar cell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, T. K.; Cheong, Dan; Yang, Jingfeng; Kleiman, R. N.

    2011-08-01

    The electrical carrier transport of a tandem cell structure was evaluated by investigating the band alignment of and carrier transport through a tunnel junction. The modeling structure of a tandem cell consists of a III-V (or II-VI) top cell layer, a Si bottom cell layer and tunnel junction layers in-between which connect the top and the bottom cells. The values of energy bandgap and electron affinity of each layer were varied to investigate their effect on the energy barrier height at the interface between Si and compound semiconductors of interest. The contour plots of barrier heights for majority and minority carriers at the hetero-interface are used as a starting point to define the successful regions for electrical carrier transport through the tunnel junctions.

  19. 76 FR 77982 - Applications for Eligibility Designation; Programs Under Parts A and F of Title III of the Higher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... (FSEOG), the Federal Work Study (FWS), the Student Support Services (SSS), or the Undergraduate... needy student enrollment and to average educational and general (E&G) expenditures for a specified base... Needy Students: For Part A SIP; TCCU; ANNH; Part A NASNTI; Part A AANAPISI; Title III, Part F HSI STEM...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Transportation Facilities A Appendix A to Part 37 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Pt. 37, App. A Appendix A to Part 37... also be found via a hyperlink on the Internet at the following address:...

  1. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe Part III: victims of the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    In Part I, neuroscience collaborators with the Nazis were discussed, and in Part II, neuroscience resistors were discussed. In Part III, we discuss the tragedy regarding european neuroscientists who became victims of the Nazi onslaught on “non-Aryan” doctors. Some of these unfortunate neuroscientists survived Nazi concentration camps, but most were murdered. We discuss the circumstances and environment which stripped these neuroscientists of their profession, then of their personal rights and freedom, and then of their lives. We include a background analysis of anti-Semitism and Nazism in their various countries, then discuss in depth seven exemplary neuroscientist Holocaust victims; including Germans Ludwig Pick, Arthur Simons, and Raphael Weichbrodt, Austrians Alexander Spitzer and Viktor Frankl, and Poles Lucja Frey and Wladyslaw Sterling. by recognizing and remembering these victims of neuroscience, we pay homage and do not allow humanity to forget, lest this dark period in history ever repeat itself.

  2. Dynamics of Synoptic Eddy and Low-Frequency Flow Interaction. Part III: Baroclinic Model Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L.-L.; Jin, F.-F.; Watanabe, M.

    2006-07-01

    In this three-part study, a linear closure has been developed for the synoptic eddy and low-frequency flow (SELF) interaction and demonstrated that internal dynamics plays an important role in generating the leading low-frequency modes in the extratropical circulation anomalies during cold seasons.In Part III, a new linearized primitive equation system is first derived for time-mean flow anomalies. The dynamical operator of the system includes a traditional part depending on the observed climatological mean state and an additional part from the SELF feedback closure utilizing the observed climatological properties of synoptic eddy activity. The latter part relates nonlocally all the anomalous eddy-forcing terms in equations of momentum, temperature, and surface pressure to the time-mean flow anomalies. Using the observational data, the closure was validated with reasonable success, and it was found that terms of the SELF feedback in the momentum and pressure equations tend to reinforce the low-frequency modes, whereas those in the thermodynamic equation tends to damp the temperature anomalies to make the leading modes equivalent barotropic. Through singular vector analysis of the linear dynamical operator, it is highlighted that the leading modes of the system resemble the observed patterns of the Arctic Oscillation, Antarctic Oscillation, and Pacific North American pattern, in which the SELF feedback plays an essential role, consistent with the finding of the barotropic model study in Part II.


  3. Binary group III-nitride based heterostructures: band offsets and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roul, Basanta; Kumar, Mahesh; Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Krupanidhi, S. B.

    2015-10-01

    In the last few years, there has been remarkable progress in the development of group III-nitride based materials because of their potential application in fabricating various optoelectronic devices such as light emitting diodes, laser diodes, tandem solar cells and field effect transistors. In order to realize these devices, growth of device quality heterostructures are required. One of the most interesting properties of a semiconductor heterostructure interface is its Schottky barrier height, which is a measure of the mismatch of the energy levels for the majority carriers across the heterojunction interface. Recently, the growth of non-polar III-nitrides has been an important subject due to its potential improvement on the efficiency of III-nitride-based opto-electronic devices. It is well known that the c-axis oriented optoelectronic devices are strongly affected by the intrinsic spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields, which results in the low electron-hole recombination efficiency. One of the useful approaches for eliminating the piezoelectric polarization effects is to fabricate nitride-based devices along non-polar and semi-polar directions. Heterostructures grown on these orientations are receiving a lot of focus due to enhanced behaviour. In the present review article discussion has been carried out on the growth of III-nitride binary alloys and properties of GaN/Si, InN/Si, polar InN/GaN, and nonpolar InN/GaN heterostructures followed by studies on band offsets of III-nitride semiconductor heterostructures using the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique. Current transport mechanisms of these heterostructures are also discussed.

  4. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec. 123 III Appendix III to Part 310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND... Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec....

  5. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec. 123 III Appendix III to Part 310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND... Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec....

  6. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec. 123 III Appendix III to Part 310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND... Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec....

  7. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 310 - Form: Application for Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec. 123 III Appendix III to Part 310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND... Reimbursement to Local Governments for Emergency Response to Hazardous Substance Release Under CERCLA Sec....

  8. Electronic structure and transport properties of III-V core/shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, Florinda; Leijnse, Martin

    We have modeled electron structure and low-temperature transport in III-V core/shell nanowires to establish a relationship between electron-hole hybridization and signatures in thermoelectrical measurements. Nanowires with a GaSb core and an InAs shell (and inverted) are interesting for studies of hybridization effects due to the bulk broken band gap alignment at the material interface. By varying the core radius and shell thickness of such wires we can modify the size of the band gap and create wires with band structures that exhibit hole-electron hybridization states. The band structures are obtained using 8-band k . p theory together with the envelope function approximation. The calculated energy dispersions are used as input to the Boltzmann equation to study thermoelectric transport quantities such as the Seebeck coefficient, in the diffusive limit.

  9. Department of Transportation Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... [Department of Transportation Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] Part XII Department of Transportation Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (DOT) DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary 14 CFR Chs. I-III 23 CFR Chs. I-III 33 CFR Chs. I and IV 46 CFR Chs. I-III 48 CFR Ch. 12 49 CFR Subtitle A, Chs. I-VI and Chs....

  10. Optical photon transport in powdered-phosphor scintillators. Part II. Calculation of single-scattering transport parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Poludniowski, Gavin G.; Evans, Philip M.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods based on the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) have previously been used to model light transport in powdered-phosphor scintillator screens. Physically motivated guesses or, alternatively, the complexities of Mie theory have been used by some authors to provide the necessary inputs of transport parameters. The purpose of Part II of this work is to: (i) validate predictions of modulation transform function (MTF) using the BTE and calculated values of transport parameters, against experimental data published for two Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb screens; (ii) investigate the impact of size-distribution and emission spectrum on Mie predictions of transport parameters; (iii) suggest simpler and novel geometrical optics-based models for these parameters and compare to the predictions of Mie theory. A computer code package called phsphr is made available that allows the MTF predictions for the screens modeled to be reproduced and novel screens to be simulated. Methods: The transport parameters of interest are the scattering efficiency (Q{sub sct}), absorption efficiency (Q{sub abs}), and the scatter anisotropy (g). Calculations of these parameters are made using the analytic method of Mie theory, for spherical grains of radii 0.1-5.0 {mu}m. The sensitivity of the transport parameters to emission wavelength is investigated using an emission spectrum representative of that of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb. The impact of a grain-size distribution in the screen on the parameters is investigated using a Gaussian size-distribution ({sigma}= 1%, 5%, or 10% of mean radius). Two simple and novel alternative models to Mie theory are suggested: a geometrical optics and diffraction model (GODM) and an extension of this (GODM+). Comparisons to measured MTF are made for two commercial screens: Lanex Fast Back and Lanex Fast Front (Eastman Kodak Company, Inc.). Results: The Mie theory predictions of transport parameters were shown to be highly sensitive to both grain size

  11. Optical photon transport in powdered-phosphor scintillators. Part II. Calculation of single-scattering transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Poludniowski, Gavin G; Evans, Philip M

    2013-04-01

    Monte Carlo methods based on the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) have previously been used to model light transport in powdered-phosphor scintillator screens. Physically motivated guesses or, alternatively, the complexities of Mie theory have been used by some authors to provide the necessary inputs of transport parameters. The purpose of Part II of this work is to: (i) validate predictions of modulation transform function (MTF) using the BTE and calculated values of transport parameters, against experimental data published for two Gd2O2S:Tb screens; (ii) investigate the impact of size-distribution and emission spectrum on Mie predictions of transport parameters; (iii) suggest simpler and novel geometrical optics-based models for these parameters and compare to the predictions of Mie theory. A computer code package called phsphr is made available that allows the MTF predictions for the screens modeled to be reproduced and novel screens to be simulated. The transport parameters of interest are the scattering efficiency (Q sct), absorption efficiency (Q abs), and the scatter anisotropy (g). Calculations of these parameters are made using the analytic method of Mie theory, for spherical grains of radii 0.1-5.0 μm. The sensitivity of the transport parameters to emission wavelength is investigated using an emission spectrum representative of that of Gd2O2S:Tb. The impact of a grain-size distribution in the screen on the parameters is investigated using a Gaussian size-distribution (σ = 1%, 5%, or 10% of mean radius). Two simple and novel alternative models to Mie theory are suggested: a geometrical optics and diffraction model (GODM) and an extension of this (GODM+). Comparisons to measured MTF are made for two commercial screens: Lanex Fast Back and Lanex Fast Front (Eastman Kodak Company, Inc.). The Mie theory predictions of transport parameters were shown to be highly sensitive to both grain size and emission wavelength. For a phosphor screen structure with a

  12. Investigational drug tracking: phases I-III and NDA submissions--Part II.

    PubMed

    Grant, K L

    1994-10-01

    The author catalogs over 800 investigational drugs/biologicals currently in Phase I, II or III clinical trials or drugs/biologicals submitted to the FDA as new drug applications. Part I of this article appeared in the September issue of Hospital Pharmacy. The list assists in predicting when new drugs will be marketed. The entries include generic/chemical name, investigational drug number, synonyms, trade names, manufacturers, clinical trial status, predicted approval year, indications or drug class, whether the drug has been developed through biotechnology, and references. Entries were gleaned from medical journals, stock market analysis publications, and the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association's Medicines in Development Series. The list is alphabetized by the generic/chemical name or investigational drug number and cross-indexed by the trade name and synonyms. The list reflects those drugs which were not FDA approved as of April 15, 1994. Part I concludes with the remaining alphabetical listing by generic/chemical name or investigational drug number.

  13. Recent progress in III-V based ferromagnetic semiconductors: Band structure, Fermi level, and tunneling transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohya, Shinobu Nam Hai, Pham

    2014-03-15

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics is an emerging field, in which we try to utilize spin degrees of freedom as well as charge transport in materials and devices. While metal-based spin-devices, such as magnetic-field sensors and magnetoresistive random access memory using giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, are already put to practical use, semiconductor-based spintronics has greater potential for expansion because of good compatibility with existing semiconductor technology. Many semiconductor-based spintronics devices with useful functionalities have been proposed and explored so far. To realize those devices and functionalities, we definitely need appropriate materials which have both the properties of semiconductors and ferromagnets. Ferromagnetic semiconductors (FMSs), which are alloy semiconductors containing magnetic atoms such as Mn and Fe, are one of the most promising classes of materials for this purpose and thus have been intensively studied for the past two decades. Here, we review the recent progress in the studies of the most prototypical III-V based FMS, p-type (GaMn)As and its heterostructures with focus on tunneling transport, Fermi level, and bandstructure. Furthermore, we cover the properties of a new n-type FMS, (In,Fe)As, which shows electron-induced ferromagnetism. These FMS materials having zinc-blende crystal structure show excellent compatibility with well-developed III-V heterostructures and devices.

  14. 75 FR 70217 - Defense Transportation Regulation, Part IV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Property Program (DP3), Phase III Final-Draft Business Rules. The notice was published in the Federal... review of remaining comments received is on-going. Any subsequent changes will be published in a Federal...

  15. Effect of viscoelastic relaxation on moisture transport in foods. Part I: solution of general transport equation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan P; Maier, Dirk E; Cushman, John H; Haghighi, Kamyar; Corvalan, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Within the framework of continuum mechanics, Singh et al. developed an integro-differential equation, which applies to both Darcian (Fickian) and non-Darcian (non-Fickian) modes of fluid transport in swelling biological systems. A dimensionless form of the equation was obtained and transformed from moving Eulerian to the stationary Lagrangian coordinates. Here a solution scheme for the transport equation is developed to predict moisture transport and viscoelastic stresses in spheroidal biopolymeric materials. The equation was solved numerically and results used for predicting drying and sorption curves, moisture profiles, and viscoelastic stresses in soybeans. The Lagrangian solution was obtained by assembling together several schemes: the finite element method was used to discretize the equation in space; non-linearity was addressed using the Newton-Raphson method; the Volterra term was handled via a time integration scheme of Patlashenko et al. and the Galerkin rule was used to solve the time-differential term. The solution obtained in Lagrangian coordinates was transformed back to the Eulerian coordinates. In part II of this sequence we present the numerical results.

  16. REINFORCEMENT IN CLASSROOM LEARNING. PART II, STUDIES OF REINFORCEMENT IN SIMULATED CLASSROOM SITUATIONS. PART III, IDENTIFICATION OF REINFORCERS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRAVERS, ROBERT M.W.; AND OTHERS

    REINFORCEMENT CONCEPTS DERIVED LARGELY FROM RESEARCH OF SUBHUMAN SUBJECTS WERE TESTED FOR APPLICABILITY TO HUMAN-LEARNING SITUATIONS SIMILAR TO THOSE THAT OCCUR IN SCHOOLS. A SERIES OF EXPLORATORY STUDIES CONDUCTED IS DESCRIBED IN PART II OF THIS REPORT. IN PART III, TWO EXPERIMENTS CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE REINFORCING VALUE OF DIFFERENT STIMULI…

  17. Final Report: Vapor Transport Deposition for Thin Film III-V Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Boettcher, Shannon; Greenaway, Ann; Boucher, Jason; Aloni, Shaul

    2016-02-10

    Silicon, the dominant photovoltaic (PV) technology, is reaching its fundamental performance limits as a single absorber/junction technology. Higher efficiency devices are needed to reduce cost further because the balance of systems account for about two-thirds of the overall cost of the solar electricity. III-V semiconductors such as GaAs are used to make the highest-efficiency photovoltaic devices, but the costs of manufacture are much too high for non-concentrated terrestrial applications. The cost of III-V’s is driven by two factors: (1) metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), the dominant growth technology, employs expensive, toxic and pyrophoric gas-phase precursors, and (2) the growth substrates conventionally required for high-performance devices are monocrystalline III-V wafers. The primary goal of this project was to show that close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT), using water vapor as a transport agent, is a scalable deposition technology for growing low-cost epitaxial III-V photovoltaic devices. The secondary goal was to integrate those devices on Si substrates for high-efficiency tandem applications using interface nanopatterning to address the lattice mismatch. In the first task, we developed a CSVT process that used only safe solid-source powder precursors to grow epitaxial GaAs with controlled n and p doping and mobilities/lifetimes similar to that obtainable via MOCVD. Using photoelectrochemical characterization, we showed that the best material had near unity internal quantum efficiency for carrier collection and minority carrier diffusions lengths in of ~ 8 μm, suitable for PV devices with >25% efficiency. In the second task we developed the first pn junction photovoltaics using CSVT and showed unpassivated structures with open circuit photovoltages > 915 mV and internal quantum efficiencies >0.9. We also characterized morphological and electrical defects and identified routes to reduce those defects. In task three we grew epitaxial

  18. Solubility and transport of Cr(III) in a historically contaminated soil - Evidence of a rapidly reacting dimeric Cr(III) organic matter complex.

    PubMed

    Löv, Åsa; Sjöstedt, Carin; Larsbo, Mats; Persson, Ingmar; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Cornelis, Geert; Kleja, Dan B

    2017-09-20

    Chromium is a common soil contaminant and, although it has been studied widely, questions about its speciation and dissolutions kinetics remain unanswered. We combined information from an irrigation experiment performed with intact soil columns with data from batch experiments to evaluate solubility and mobilization mechanisms of Cr(III) in a historically contaminated soil (>65 years). Particulate and colloidal Cr(III) forms dominated transport in this soil, but their concentrations were independent of irrigation intensity (2-20 mm h(-1)). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements indicated that Cr(III) associated with colloids and particles, and with the solid phase, mainly existed as dimeric hydrolyzed Cr(III) bound to natural organic matter. Dissolution kinetics of this species were fast (≤1 day) at low pH (<3) and slightly slower (≤5 days) at neutral pH. Furthermore, it proved possible to describe the solubility of the dimeric Cr(III) organic matter complex with a geochemical equilibrium model using only generic binding parameters, opening the way for use of geochemical models in risk assessments of Cr(III)-contaminated sites. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  20. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa magnesium transporter MgtE inhibits transcription of the type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gregory G; Yahr, Timothy L; Lovewell, Rustin R; O'Toole, George A

    2010-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes life-long pneumonia in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). These long-term infections are maintained by bacterial biofilm formation in the CF lung. We have recently developed a model of P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on cultured CF airway epithelial cells. Using this model, we discovered that mutation of a putative magnesium transporter gene, called mgtE, led to increased cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa toward epithelial cells. This altered toxicity appeared to be dependent upon expression of the type III secretion system (T3SS). In this study, we found that mutation of mgtE results in increased T3SS gene transcription. Through epistasis analyses, we discovered that MgtE influences the ExsE-ExsC-ExsD-ExsA gene regulatory system of T3SS by either directly or indirectly inhibiting ExsA activity. While variations in calcium levels modulate T3SS gene expression in P. aeruginosa, we found that addition of exogenous magnesium did not inhibit T3SS activity. Furthermore, mgtE variants that were defective for magnesium transport could still complement the cytotoxicity effect. Thus, the magnesium transport function of MgtE does not fully explain the regulatory effects of MgtE on cytotoxicity. Overall, our results indicate that MgtE modulates expression of T3SS genes.

  1. General theory of Taylor dispersion phenomena. Part 3. Surface transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, L.H.; Brenner, H.

    1982-01-01

    An asymptotic theory of Brownian tracer particle transport phenomena within a bulk fluid, as augmented by surface transport, is presented in the context of generalized Taylor dispersion theory. The analysis expands upon prior work, which was limited to transport wholly within a continuous phase, so as to now include surface adsorption, diffusion, and convection of the tracer along a continuous surface bounding the continuous fluid phase.

  2. Transgenic petunia with the iron(III)-phytosiderophore transporter gene acquires tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline environments.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoshiko; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Iwashita, Takashi; Namba, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all plants. However, terrestrial plants often suffer from iron deficiency in alkaline soil due to its extremely low solubility. Alkaline soil accounts for about 30% of all cultivated ground in the world. Plants have evolved two distinct strategies, I and II, for iron uptake from the soil. Dicots and non-graminaceous monocots use Strategy I, which is primarily based on the reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) and the uptake of iron(II) by the iron-regulated transporter, IRT1. In contrast, graminaceous plants use Strategy II to efficiently acquire insoluble iron(III). Strategy II comprises the synthesis and secretion of iron-chelating phytosiderophores, such as mugineic acids and the Yellow Stripe 1 transporter proteins of the iron(III)-phytosiderophore complex. Barley, which exhibits the highest tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline soil among graminaceous plants, utilizes mugineic acids and the specific iron(III)-mugineic acids transporter, HvYS1. In this study, we established the transgenic plant Petunia hybrida, which originally had only Strategy I, by introducing the HvYS1 transporter gene derived from barley. When the transgenic plants were grown hydroponically in media containing the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex, free 2'-deoxymugineic acid and its iron(III) complex were detected in the root extract of the transgenic plant by electrospray ionization-Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The growth of the transgenic petunia was significantly better than that of the control host in alkaline conditions. Consequently, the transgenic plant acquired a significantly enhanced tolerance to alkaline hydroponic media in the presence of the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex. Furthermore, the flower color of the transgenic plant deepened. The results showed that iron-phytosiderophore complexes and their transporters can potentially be utilized to overcome the worldwide iron uptake problems to diverse

  3. Negative membrane curvature catalyzes nucleation of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il-Hyung; Kai, Hiroyuki; Carlson, Lars-Anders; Groves, Jay T; Hurley, James H

    2015-12-29

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery functions in HIV-1 budding, cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, and other pathways, in the course of which it interacts with concave membrane necks and bud rims. To test the role of membrane shape in regulating ESCRT assembly, we nanofabricated templates for invaginated supported lipid bilayers. The assembly of the core ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B/Snf7 is preferentially nucleated in the resulting 100-nm-deep membrane concavities. ESCRT-II and CHMP6 accelerate CHMP4B assembly by increasing the concentration of nucleation seeds. Superresolution imaging was used to visualize CHMP4B/Snf7 concentration in a negatively curved annulus at the rim of the invagination. Although Snf7 assemblies nucleate slowly on flat membranes, outward growth onto the flat membrane is efficiently nucleated at invaginations. The nucleation behavior provides a biophysical explanation for the timing of ESCRT-III recruitment and membrane scission in HIV-1 budding.

  4. Ubiquitin-Yop hybrids as probes for post-translational transport by the Yersinia type III secretion pathway.

    PubMed

    Quenee, Lauriane E; Schneewind, Olaf

    2007-07-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica uses type III secretion to transport Yop proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. Previous work generated hypotheses for both co- and post-translational transport mechanisms in the Yersinia type III pathway. Here, we used ubiquitin (Ub) and UBP1, the Ub-specific protease, to examine whether Yops can be secreted when synthesized prior to recognition by the type III machinery. Fusion of Ub to the N-terminus of Yops blocked substrate recognition and secretion of hybrids generated with YopE, YopQ or YopR. UBP1 removed Ub from the N-terminus of these hybrids and allowed YopE, YopQ or YopR cleavage products to enter the secretion pathway. Following the release of Ub, Yersinia type III machines also transported the YopE cleavage product into the cytosol of tissue culture cells. Minimal secretion signals were also examined with the Ub/UBP1 system and some, but not all, of these signals promoted type III secretion even after polypeptides had been freed from Ub. These results suggest that recognition and secretion of Yop substrates by the type III machinery can occur by a post-translational mechanism.

  5. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos III Laser: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S.; Manka, C.

    2011-11-10

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt PHAROS III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were tested using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The first campaign investigated impulse generation with the beam oriented almost normal to the target surface, with energies ranging from 23 to 376 J, and pulses of 5 to 30 ns FWHM. Air breakdown/ plasma dynamics were diagnosed with GOI cameras and color photography. Laser generated impulse was quantified with both vertical pendulums and piezoelectric pressure transducers using the standard performance metric, C{sub M}--the momentum coupling coefficient. Part 1 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 1 results including laser plasma diagnostics, pressure gage and vertical pendulum data.

  6. Vibration transmission through rolling element bearings. Part III: Geared rotor system studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, T. C.; Singh, R.

    1991-11-01

    This paper extends the proposed bearing matrix formulation of Parts I and II to analyze the overall dynamics of a geared rotor system which includes a spur gear pair, shafts, rolling element bearing, a prime mover and a load (attached to the geared rotor system through flexible torsional couplings), a rigid or flexible casing, and compliant or massive mounts. Linear time-invariant, discrete dynamic models of a generic geared rotor system with proportional viscous damping are developed, by using lumped parameter and dynamic finite element techniques, which are then used to predict the vibration transmissibility through bearings and mounts, casing vibration motion, and dynamic response of the internal rotating system. Each rotating shaft is modeled as an Euler beam in the lumped parameter model and as a Timoshenko beam in the dynamic finite element model, but the gyroscopic moment is not included. Eigensolution and forced harmonic response studies due to rotating mass unbalance or kinematic transmission error excitation for the following example cases are obtained by using the formulation, and the results are compared with those of simple models currently available in the literature and/or experiment: case I, a single-stage rotor system with flexibly mounted rigid casing consisting of two bearings as a special case of the geared rotor system; case II, a spur gear pair drive supported by four bearings installed in a flexibly mounted rigid casing; and case III, an experimental set-up consisting of a high-precision gear and pinion, and four identical rolling element bearings contained in a flexible casing mounted rigidly on a massive foundation. Analytical predictions show that the theory is indeed capable of predicting bearing and mount moment transmissibilities in addition to the force transmissibilities. Also, flexural vibrations of the casing plate are predicted well as the theory is in good agreement with measurements made on case III; such predictions are not

  7. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 141 - Airline Transport Pilot Certification Course

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airline Transport Pilot Certification... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. E Appendix E to Part 141—Airline Transport Pilot Certification Course 1. Applicability. This appendix prescribes the...

  8. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 141 - Airline Transport Pilot Certification Course

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airline Transport Pilot Certification... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. E Appendix E to Part 141—Airline Transport Pilot Certification Course 1. Applicability. This appendix prescribes the...

  9. 36 CFR Appendix F to Part 1191 - Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modifications Adopted by the... Appendix F to Part 1191—Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation The Department of Transportation has adopted by reference Appendices B and D to this part with modifications as the regulatory...

  10. 36 CFR Appendix F to Part 1191 - Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modifications Adopted by the... Appendix F to Part 1191—Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation The Department of Transportation has adopted by reference Appendices B and D to this part with modifications as the regulatory...

  11. A Study of Low-Wage Workers and Their Response to High Intensity Training. Volume III, Part 1 and Part 2: Appendices B 1-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Earl E.

    This document is the last of a three-volume study designed to examine low-wage, low-skilled workers, within the context of their work environment, and to develop ways of measuring the effects of skill advancement training upon the program participants. Volume III, Parts I and II, contains modified employee pre- and post-test interview schedules…

  12. Part Transportation Improvement in Warehouse of an Automotive Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choojan, Tiwapom; Chutima, Parames

    2016-05-01

    This research is focus on the problems cause the assembly line stop in a Japanese automotive manufacturer in Thailand. The problem arose from not being able to supply parts to the assembly line in time and supplying wrong parts to the assembly line. Methods to resolve these problems involved the followings: 1) design new tag labels, 2) improve operations method and 3) redesign the parts storage layout and supply routes. The result showed that the time for transferring parts from the warehouse to the preparing area and the overlapped routes were reduced. Moreover, the supply accuracy from the preparation area to the assembly line was improved.

  13. Global thermohaline circulation. Part 1: Sensitivity to atmospheric moisture transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Stone, P.H.; Marotzke, J.

    1999-01-01

    A global ocean general circulation model of idealized geometry, combined with an atmospheric model based on observed transports of heat, momentum, and moisture, is used to explore the sensitivity of the global conveyor belt circulation to the surface freshwater fluxes, in particular the effects of meridional atmospheric moisture transports. The numerical results indicate that the equilibrium strength of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation increases as the global freshwater transports increase. However, the global deep water formation--that is, the sum of the NADW and the Southern Ocean Deep Water formation rates--is relatively insensitive to changes of the freshwater flux. Perturbations to the meridional moisture transports of each hemisphere identify equatorially asymmetric effects of the freshwater fluxes. The results are consistent with box model results that the equilibrium NADW formation is primarily controlled by the magnitude of the Southern Hemisphere freshwater flux. However, the results show that the Northern Hemisphere freshwater flux has a strong impact on the transient behavior of the North Atlantic overturning. Increasing this flux leads to a collapse of the conveyor belt circulation, but the collapse is delayed if the Southern Hemisphere flux also increases. The perturbation experiments also illustrate that the rapidity of collapse is affected by random fluctuations in the wind stress field.

  14. Biomembranes. Part M. Transport in bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts: General approaches and transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, S.; Fleischer, B.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains three sections, each consisting of several papers. Some of the paper titles are: Voltammetric Measurement of Quinones; Use of lac Gene Fusions to Study Transport Proteins; Methods for Mutagenesis of the Bacterioopsin Gene; Transport in Mycoplasmas; Alanine Carrier from Thermophilic Bacteria; and Measurement of Citrate Transport in Tumor Mitochondria.

  15. βIII Spectrin Regulates the Structural Integrity and the Secretory Protein Transport of the Golgi Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo-Sicilia, Laia; Granell, Susana; Jovic, Marko; Sicart, Adrià; Mato, Eugenia; Johannes, Ludger; Balla, Tamas; Egea, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    A spectrin-based cytoskeleton is associated with endomembranes, including the Golgi complex and cytoplasmic vesicles, but its role remains poorly understood. Using new generated antibodies to specific peptide sequences of the human βIII spectrin, we here show its distribution in the Golgi complex, where it is enriched in the trans-Golgi and trans-Golgi network. The use of a drug-inducible enzymatic assay that depletes the Golgi-associated pool of PI4P as well as the expression of PH domains of Golgi proteins that specifically recognize this phosphoinositide both displaced βIII spectrin from the Golgi. However, the interference with actin dynamics using actin toxins did not affect the localization of βIII spectrin to Golgi membranes. Depletion of βIII spectrin using siRNA technology and the microinjection of anti-βIII spectrin antibodies into the cytoplasm lead to the fragmentation of the Golgi. At ultrastructural level, Golgi fragments showed swollen distal Golgi cisternae and vesicular structures. Using a variety of protein transport assays, we show that the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi and post-Golgi protein transports were impaired in βIII spectrin-depleted cells. However, the internalization of the Shiga toxin subunit B to the endoplasmic reticulum was unaffected. We state that βIII spectrin constitutes a major skeletal component of distal Golgi compartments, where it is necessary to maintain its structural integrity and secretory activity, and unlike actin, PI4P appears to be highly relevant for the association of βIII spectrin the Golgi complex. PMID:23233669

  16. Acuity and case management: a healthy dose of outcomes, part III.

    PubMed

    Huber, Diane L; Craig, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    This is the third of a 3-part series presenting 2 effective applications--acuity and dosage--that describe how the business case for case management (CM) can be made. In Part I, dosage and acuity concepts were explained as client need-severity, CM intervention-intensity, and CM activity-dose prescribed by amount, frequency, duration, and breadth of activities. Concepts were presented that related the practice of CM to the use of evidence-based practice (EBP), knowledge, and methods and the development of instruments that measure and score pivotal CM actions. Part I also featured a specific exemplar, the CM Acuity Tool, and described how to use acuity to identify and score the complexity of a CM case. Part II further explained dosage and 2 acuity instruments, the Acuity Tool and AccuDiff. Part III presents linkage to EBP and practical applications. The information contained in the 3-part series applies to all CM practice settings and contains ideas and recommendations useful to CM generalists, specialists, supervisors, and business and outcomes managers. The Acuity Tools Project was developed from frontline CM practice in one large, national telephonic CM company. Dosage: A literature search failed to find research into dosage of a behavioral intervention. The Huber-Hall model was developed and tested in a longitudinal study of CM models in substance abuse treatment and reported in the literature. Acuity: A structured literature search and needs assessment launched the development of the suite of acuity tools. A gap analysis identified that an instrument to assign and measure case acuity specific to CM activities was needed. Clinical experts, quality specialists, and business analysts (n = 7) monitored the development and testing of the tools, acuity concepts, scores, differentials, and their operating principles and evaluated the validity of the acuity tools' content related to CM activities. During the pilot phase of development, interrater reliability testing of

  17. Committee of the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics Geometry Conference, Part III: Geometric Transformation Groups and Other Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durst, Lincoln K., Ed.

    This is Part III of the first volume of the proceedings of the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM) Geometry Conference, held at Santa Barbara in June, 1967. The purpose of the conference was to consider the status of geometry in colleges at the undergraduate level. The conference, attended by undergraduate mathematics…

  18. [Investigation of biologically active compounds at the Department of Organic Chemistry of University of Debrecen 1992-2009. Part III].

    PubMed

    Antus, Sándor

    2010-01-01

    The author briefly reviews the beginning of the carbohydrate chemistry in Hungary with special regard to the results achieved at the Department of Organic Chemistry of University of Debrecen and summarizes the most important synthetic and pharmaceutical results obtained in this field between 1992-2009, part III.

  19. The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on nurse stress and burnout: a qualitative and quantitative study, part III.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Katz, Joanne; Wiley, Susan; Capuano, Terry; Baker, Debra M; Deitrick, Lynn; Shapiro, Shauna

    2005-01-01

    Part III of the study on mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) describes qualitative data and discusses the implications of the findings. Study analysis revealed that nurses found MBSR helpful. Greater relaxation and self-care and improvement in work and family relationships were among reported benefits. Challenges included restlessness, physical pain, and dealing with difficult emotions.

  20. A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part III: Radiative Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2001-08-01

    In Part III of a series of papers describing the extended time high-cloud observations from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) supporting the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment, the visible and infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds over Salt Lake City, Utah, are examined. Using {approx}860 h of combined ruby (0.694 {micro}m) lidar and midinfrared (9.5-11.5 {micro}m) radiometer data collected between 1992 and 1999 from visually identified cirrus clouds, the visible optical depths {tau} and infrared layer emittance epsilon of the varieties of midlatitude cirrus are characterized. The mean and median values for the cirrus sample are 0.75 {+-} 0.91 and 0.61 for {tau}, and 0.30 {+-} 0.22 and 0.25 for epsilon. Other scattering parameters studied are the visible extinction and infrared absorption coefficients, and their ratio, and the lidar backscatter-to-extinction ratio, which has a mean value of 0.041 sr{sup -1}. Differences among cirrus clouds generated by general synoptic (e.g., jet stream), thunderstorm anvil, and orographic mechanisms are found, reflecting basic cloud microphysical effects. The authors draw parameterizations in terms of midcloud temperature T{sub m} and physical cloud thickness {Delta}z for epsilon and {tau}: both macrophysical variables are needed to adequately address the impact of the adiabatic process on ice cloud content, which modulates radiative transfer as a function of temperature. For the total cirrus dataset, the authors find epsilon = 1 -exp [-8.5 x 10{sup -5} (T{sub m} + 80 C) {Delta}z]. These parameterizations, based on a uniquely comprehensive dataset, hold the potential for improving weather and climate model predictions, and satellite cloud property retrieval methods.

  1. Dissociation of manganese(III) oxide as part of a thermochemical water splitting cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Todd Michael

    A three-step thermochemical cycle to produce renewable hydrogen was proposed, which utilizes manganese(III) oxide and thermal energy to produce hydrogen. Most work on the cycle has focused on the hydrogen generating and product recovery steps with little work on the dissociation. It is essential to understand the dissociation because the feasibility of the cycle is based on this reaction having a high conversion. Because of the importance of the reduction step, this reaction has been selected as the topic of this dissertation. Additionally, because the dispersion of Mn2O3 particles into an Aerosol Flow Reactor (AFR) is important, feeding concepts were developed as well. Two powder feeding systems were developed: a Spinning Wheel Feeder (SWF) and a Fluidized Bed Feeder (FBF). Results of statistical particle size distribution studies indicated that the FBF was the better choice to disperse Mn2O3 powder. Additionally, results in an AFR demonstrated that the FBF was able to produce higher dissociation conversions. A study in a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) indicated multiple mechanisms were controlling Mn2O3 dissociation. The first half reaction of the dissociation was calculated to be controlled by an Avrami-Erofeev mechanism and had an activation energy of 106.4+/-1.9 kJ/mol. The second half reaction had a duel mechanism utilizing an Avrami-Erofeev and Order of Reaction (OOR) mechanism. The mechanisms had activation energies of 251.2+/-6.5 and 110.7+/-24.6 kJ/mol respectively. Mn2O3 dissociation investigations were done in an AFR. They revealed oxygen is a significant factor and to effectively control the dissociation with temperature and gas flow rate, the oxygen concentration must be below 0.25%. Experimental runs that had oxygen concentrations less than 0.25% were used to calculate reaction rate constants. The Avrami-Erofeev mechanisms were combined into a single mechanism. Rate constants for the Avrami-Erofeev and OOR mechanisms were 1.8E7+/-1.3E7 and 5.6E3

  2. Transgenic Petunia with the Iron(III)-Phytosiderophore Transporter Gene Acquires Tolerance to Iron Deficiency in Alkaline Environments

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Yoshiko; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Iwashita, Takashi; Namba, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all plants. However, terrestrial plants often suffer from iron deficiency in alkaline soil due to its extremely low solubility. Alkaline soil accounts for about 30% of all cultivated ground in the world. Plants have evolved two distinct strategies, I and II, for iron uptake from the soil. Dicots and non-graminaceous monocots use Strategy I, which is primarily based on the reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) and the uptake of iron(II) by the iron-regulated transporter, IRT1. In contrast, graminaceous plants use Strategy II to efficiently acquire insoluble iron(III). Strategy II comprises the synthesis and secretion of iron-chelating phytosiderophores, such as mugineic acids and the Yellow Stripe 1 transporter proteins of the iron(III)-phytosiderophore complex. Barley, which exhibits the highest tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline soil among graminaceous plants, utilizes mugineic acids and the specific iron(III)-mugineic acids transporter, HvYS1. In this study, we established the transgenic plant Petunia hybrida, which originally had only Strategy I, by introducing the HvYS1 transporter gene derived from barley. When the transgenic plants were grown hydroponically in media containing the iron(III)-2′-deoxymugineic acid complex, free 2′-deoxymugineic acid and its iron(III) complex were detected in the root extract of the transgenic plant by electrospray ionization-Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The growth of the transgenic petunia was significantly better than that of the control host in alkaline conditions. Consequently, the transgenic plant acquired a significantly enhanced tolerance to alkaline hydroponic media in the presence of the iron(III)-2′-deoxymugineic acid complex. Furthermore, the flower color of the transgenic plant deepened. The results showed that iron-phytosiderophore complexes and their transporters can potentially be utilized to overcome the worldwide iron uptake problems to

  3. Modeling the influence of exopolymeric substances (EPS) extracted from Pseudomonas bacteria on chromium (III) sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantar, C.; Demiray, H.; Koleli, N.; Mercan, N.

    2009-04-01

    In situ remediation of soils contaminated with Cr(VI) is usually accomplished through microbial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by soil microorganisms including Pseudomonas bacteria. Cr(VI) is a toxic substance that may stimulate the production of exopolymeric substances (EPS) by soil bacteria. Natural organic ligands such as EPS may have a pronounced impact on Cr(III) solubility, sorption, transport and bioavailability in subsurface systems. In this study, laboratory sorption and column experiments were performed to investigate the influence of exopolymeric substances (EPS) extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16, Pseudomonas putida P18 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 on chromium (III) sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils. The results from laboratory experiments indicate that microbial EPS enhanced Cr(III) solubility, which, in turn, led to an increase in Cr(III) transport through columns packed with subsurface soils under slightly acidic to alkaline pH conditions. A reactive transport code that includes a semi-empirical surface complexation model (SCM) to describe chemical processes e.g., sorption was used to simulate bench-scale column data for Cr(III) transport in the presence of EPS. Our transport simulations suggest that for an accurate simulation of Cr(III) transport in the presence of microbial EPS, the following processes and/or interactions need to be explicitly considered: 1) Cr(III)-EPS interactions; 2) binary soil/Cr and soil/EPS surface complexes; and 3) ternary soil/Cr/EPS complexes.

  4. FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER: PART II. COLLOIDAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project consisted of both field and laboratory components. Field studies evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganicgeochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Research at three different metal-contaminated sit...

  5. FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER: PART II. COLLOIDAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project consisted of both field and laboratory components. Field studies evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganicgeochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Research at three different metal-contaminated sit...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 141 - Airline Transport Pilot Certification Course

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airline Transport Pilot Certification Course E Appendix E to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. E Appendix E to...

  7. Convection in the Physical Vapor Transport Process. Part 2; Thermosolutal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the effect of an inert gas on the diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process. We investigate the case when the temperature gradient is stabilizing and the concentration gradient is destabilizing for a wide parametric range. When an inert gas is present, the thermal and solutal convection oppose each other. The solutal field is destabilizing while the thermal field and the advective-diffusive flux stabilize the flow field. When the pressure of the inert component is increased, the stabilizing effect of the advective-diffusive flux is decreased. The intensity of convection as well as the oscillatory transient time increases. Below, the critical Rayleigh number, the nonlinear dynamics of the flow field show an oscillatory approach to steady state. For parametric values in the neighborhood of the critical Rayleigh number, the flow field undergoes a chaotic transient which settles to a periodic state. The asymptotic state of the flow field shows that growth and amalgamation of cells yields an overturning motion which results in an asymmetric cellular structure. The low gravity environment yields the stabilizing advective-diffusive flow which results in uniform temperature and concentration gradients near the crystal interface.

  8. A Study of Future Communications Concepts and Technologies for the National Airspace System-Part III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, Denise S.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wichgersm Joel M.; Haynes, Brian; Roy, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating current and anticipated wireless communications concepts and technologies that the National Airspace System (NAS) may need in the next 50 years. NASA has awarded three NASA Research Announcements (NAR) studies with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. This paper will present progress made in the studies and describe the communications challenges and opportunities that have been identified as part of the study. NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project integrates solutions for a safe, efficient and high-capacity airspace system through joint research efforts and partnerships with other government agencies. The CTD Project is one of two within NASA's Airspace Systems Program and is managed by the NASA Ames Research Center. Research within the CTD Project is in support the 2011 NASA Strategic Plan Sub-Goal 4.1: Develop innovative solutions and advanced technologies, through a balanced research portfolio, to improve current and future air transportation. The focus of CTD is on developing capabilities in traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations and airport surface operations. Important to its research is the development of human/automation information requirements and decisionmaking guidelines for human-human and human-machine airportal decision-making. Airborne separation, oceanic intrail climb/descent and interval management applications depend on location and intent information of surrounding aircraft. ADS-B has been proposed to provide the information exchange, but other candidates such as satellite-based receivers, broadband or airborne internet, and cellular communications are possible candidate's.

  9. Arrangement of electron transport chain components in bovine mitochondrial supercomplex I1III2IV1

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, Thorsten; Mills, Deryck J; Popot, Jean-Luc; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The respiratory chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane contains three large multi-enzyme complexes that together establish the proton gradient for ATP synthesis, and assemble into a supercomplex. A 19-Å 3D map of the 1.7-MDa amphipol-solubilized supercomplex I1III2IV1 from bovine heart obtained by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy reveals an amphipol belt replacing the membrane lipid bilayer. A precise fit of the X-ray structures of complex I, the complex III dimer, and monomeric complex IV indicates distances of 13 nm between the ubiquinol-binding sites of complexes I and III, and of 10–11 nm between the cytochrome c binding sites of complexes III and IV. The arrangement of respiratory chain complexes suggests two possible pathways for efficient electron transfer through the supercomplex, of which the shorter branch through the complex III monomer proximal to complex I may be preferred. PMID:21909073

  10. Arrangement of electron transport chain components in bovine mitochondrial supercomplex I1III2IV1.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Thorsten; Mills, Deryck J; Popot, Jean-Luc; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2011-09-09

    The respiratory chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane contains three large multi-enzyme complexes that together establish the proton gradient for ATP synthesis, and assemble into a supercomplex. A 19-Å 3D map of the 1.7-MDa amphipol-solubilized supercomplex I(1)III(2)IV(1) from bovine heart obtained by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy reveals an amphipol belt replacing the membrane lipid bilayer. A precise fit of the X-ray structures of complex I, the complex III dimer, and monomeric complex IV indicates distances of 13 nm between the ubiquinol-binding sites of complexes I and III, and of 10-11 nm between the cytochrome c binding sites of complexes III and IV. The arrangement of respiratory chain complexes suggests two possible pathways for efficient electron transfer through the supercomplex, of which the shorter branch through the complex III monomer proximal to complex I may be preferred.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rounds to 15 mi./gal1 1 The model type fuel economy values rounded to the nearest mile per gallon, are... Vehicle config. sales Ajax 1 M-4 3500 2.73 16.1001 16 15,000 Ajax 2 A-3 3500 2.56 15.9020 16 35,000 Boredom III 4 M-4 4000 3.08 14.2343 14 10,000 Ajax 3 M-4 4000 3.36 15.0000 15 15,000 Boredom III 8...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rounds to 15 mi./gal1 1 The model type fuel economy values rounded to the nearest mile per gallon, are... Vehicle config. sales Ajax 1 M-4 3500 2.73 16.1001 16 15,000 Ajax 2 A-3 3500 2.56 15.9020 16 35,000 Boredom III 4 M-4 4000 3.08 14.2343 14 10,000 Ajax 3 M-4 4000 3.36 15.0000 15 15,000 Boredom III 8...

  13. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part III. Determining which practices are most effective and installing materials

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    The training program is designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic manual. Subjects covered in Part III are: determining which practices are most efficient and economical; installing energy-saving materials; and improving efficiency of equipment.

  14. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 21 - Application of Part 21 to Certain Federal Financial Assistance of the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... authority and the Urban Mass Transportation Administration to assure public transportation, convenient to..., contractors, licensees, or any organization furnishing public transportation service as a part of, or in... against with regard to the routing, scheduling, or quality of service of transportation service...

  15. Technical Reports (Part I). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information Systems of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center (WN-REC) funded by a Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant. These reports describe methods of interpreting the printouts from the Student Information System;…

  16. Water Ingestion into Axial Flow Compressors. Part III. Experimental Results and Discussion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    specifications, or other data, is not to be re- garded by implication or otherwise as in any manner licensing the holder or any other person or corporation , or...arises a large change In gas phase and liquid phase (a) mass flow and (b) temperatura and also a change in gas phase composition. In regime (iii) one

  17. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Appendix III: (1) Percent power means the percentage of the maximum power achieved at Maximum Test Speed (or at Maximum Test Torque for constant-speed engines). (2) Percent speed means the percentage of Maximum Test Speed. (b) Figure 1 of this Appendix illustrates the default NTE zone for commercial marine...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Appendix III: (1) Percent power means the percentage of the maximum power achieved at Maximum Test Speed (or at Maximum Test Torque for constant-speed engines). (2) Percent speed means the percentage of Maximum Test Speed. (b) Figure 1 of this Appendix illustrates the default NTE zone for commercial marine...

  19. [Study of chemical constituents in active parts of Mentha spicata III].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-Tong; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Zheng, Jian; Wu, Bin; Yang, Xiao-Ke; Wu, Li-Jun

    2006-04-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Mentha spicata. The chemical constituents were isolated by silica gel column chromatography, and identified by physical and chemical characters and spectroscopic analysis. Compounds I - V were obtained and their structures were elucidated as protocatechuic aldehyde (I), protocatechuic acid (II), chrysoeriol (III), 5, 6-dihydroxy-7, 8, 3', 4'-tetramethoxyflavone (IV), nodifloretin (V). Compound I and II were first isolated from the genus Mentha. Compound Ill, IV and V were isolated from M. spicata for the first time.

  20. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part III. Innovativeness, applications, economy, development scenarios, politics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    Electronics is under development in this country in an organized and institutional way since the beginning of 30-ties of the previous century. It grew up from electrical engineering of weak currents and its first name used popularly was communications. It was time when television was born and the radio was maturing. Electronics is a branch of research and technology which deals with generation and processing of electrical and electromagnetic signals. A subject of telecommunications is signal transmission for a distance. Electronics and telecommunications (ET) includes or is combined with other branches like: microelectronics, radioelectronics, optoelectronics, photonics, acoustoelectronics, magnetronics, bioelectronics, energoelectronics, material engineering, semiconductor physics, automation and robotics, mechatronics and microsystems, informatics, teleinformatics, software engineering and other. Devices and functional systems of ET such as computers, data warehouses, cell phones, TV sets, Internet, GPS are build of electronic components and circuits. ET is a branch which belongs to hi-tech area, where the products gather a large load of knowledge of value overcoming frequently the price of work and material. ET has recently turned to an active participant of the processes of generation, storing, processing, transportation, distribution and usage of knowledge in the society. ET started to create artificial intelligence, co-creates intellectual property, searches for knowledge in big data sets, aids medicine, extends virtual/augmented reality, builds Internet of persons and things, strengthens security, protects natural environment, facilitates our life, aids our decisions, activates individuals, equalizes chances, provides convenient personal communications and access to data, starts building a penetrating ubiquitous infrastructure, ceases to be only a branch of technology, grows into the social space, touches culture, sociology, psychology and art. Such an

  1. Theoretical Studies of High Field Transport in III-V Semiconductors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    AD-A123 947 THEORETICAL STUDIES OF HIGH FIELD TRANSPORT IN Ill-V- 1/2 SENXCONDUCTORS(U) ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA COORDINATED SCIENCE LAB H SHICHIJO...CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitleo S. TYPE Of REPORT & PERIOD COVERED THEORETICAL STUDIES OF HIGH FIELD TRANSPORT Technical Report IN IllI-V...Continue on reverse aide It necessary and identitfy by block number) High field transport , 3-5 semicopductors, Monte Carlo simulation 20. ABSTRACT

  2. Volume-surface hardening of railroad transport parts by a high-speed water stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedin, V. M.

    1996-09-01

    Large production volumes of rolling stock and track structure require the introduction of effective strengthening methods at a minimum expenditure. This stimulates a search for ways of increasing the service life of parts of railroad transport. Volume-surface hardening is an efficient method of thermal strengthening. The method consists in through or deep furnace or induction heating of parts before hardening and subsequent intense cooling. The hardenability of the steel used is consistent with the thickness of the strengthened layer, which creates a hardness gradient over the thickness of the parts, i.e., a high surface hardness and a ductile core. In turn, this creates a favorable distribution of internal stresses and provides a high cyclic endurance of the parts in operation. The possibility of using volume-surface hardening to strength railroad transport parts is considered with allowance for the special features of their production and operation.

  3. Low-Cost Growth of III-V Layers on Si Using Close-Spaced Vapor Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, Jason W.; Greenaway, Ann L.; Ritenour, Andrew J.; Davis, Allison L.; Bachman, Benjamin F.; Aloni, Shaul; Boettcher, Shannon W.

    2015-06-14

    Close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT) uses solid precursors to deposit material at high rates and with high precursor utilization. The use of solid precursors could significantly reduce the costs associated with III-V photovoltaics, particularly if growth on Si substrates can be demonstrated. We present preliminary results of the growth of GaAs1-xPx with x ≈ 0.3 and 0.6, showing that CSVT can be used to produce III-V-V’ alloys with band gaps suitable for tandem devices. Additionally, we have grown GaAs on Si by first thermally depositing films of Ge and subsequently depositing GaAs by CSVT. Patterning the Ge into islands prevents cracking due to thermal mismatch and is useful for potential tandem structures.

  4. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part III. Game Design as a Collaborative Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this three part series, four professors who teach graduate level courses on the design of instructional video games discuss their perspectives on preparing instructional designers to optimize game-based learning. Part I set the context for the series and one of four panelists discussed what he believes instructional designers should know about…

  5. Behind the scene with the fathead team: Part III. Molecular, biochemical, and in vitro analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a research team focused on aquatic toxicity testing using fathead minnows as a model species, this presentation is the third in the three-part series, giving an overview of the types of field and laboratory studies as well as sample processing our team conducts at the ...

  6. Pre-Career Curriculum Guide for Deaf-Blind. Parts I-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, LaVernya K.; And Others

    The two-volume document provides a pre-career curriculum guide for professionals and teachers working with deaf-blind students. Part 1 contains professionals and teachers working with deaf-blind students. Part I contains introductory information. Pointed out is the void in providing adequate programs for deaf-blind students over the age of 10.…

  7. Basic Metrics--Part I, II and III. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyes, Joan

    Individualized classroom activities for use in learning centers to teach junior and senior high school students about the metric system are provided. The activities are organized into three sequential parts, each of which takes from four to six hours to complete. There is a teacher's guide and a student booklet for each part. The teachers' guides…

  8. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part III. Game Design as a Collaborative Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this three part series, four professors who teach graduate level courses on the design of instructional video games discuss their perspectives on preparing instructional designers to optimize game-based learning. Part I set the context for the series and one of four panelists discussed what he believes instructional designers should know about…

  9. Basic Metrics--Part I, II and III. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyes, Joan

    Individualized classroom activities for use in learning centers to teach junior and senior high school students about the metric system are provided. The activities are organized into three sequential parts, each of which takes from four to six hours to complete. There is a teacher's guide and a student booklet for each part. The teachers' guides…

  10. Pre-Career Curriculum Guide for Deaf-Blind. Parts I-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, LaVernya K.; And Others

    The two-volume document provides a pre-career curriculum guide for professionals and teachers working with deaf-blind students. Part 1 contains professionals and teachers working with deaf-blind students. Part I contains introductory information. Pointed out is the void in providing adequate programs for deaf-blind students over the age of 10.…

  11. User Feedback Procedures; Part III of Scientific Report No. ISR-18, Information Storage and Retrieval...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Dept. of Computer Science.

    Part Three of this five part report on Salton's Magical Automatic Retriever of Texts (SMART) project contains four papers. The first: "Variations on the Query Splitting Technique with Relevance Feedback" by T. P. Baker discusses some experiments in relevance feedback performed with variations on the technique of query splitting. The…

  12. Behind the scene with the fathead team: Part III. Molecular, biochemical, and in vitro analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a research team focused on aquatic toxicity testing using fathead minnows as a model species, this presentation is the third in the three-part series, giving an overview of the types of field and laboratory studies as well as sample processing our team conducts at the ...

  13. CONTEMPORARY ARABIC READERS--III. FORMAL ARABIC, PART 2. NOTES AND GLOSSARIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCARUS, ERNEST N.; AND OTHERS

    THIS COMPANION BOOK TO "FORMAL ARABIC, PART 1" CONTAINS THE GRAMMATICAL NOTES AND AN INDIVIDUAL VOCABULARY LISTING FOR EACH OF THE 26 SELECTIONS INCLUDED IN "PART 1." ALL WORDS ARE GLOSSED EXCEPT FOR THE FIRST 500 WORDS OF LANDAU'S "A WORD COUNT OF MODERN ARABIC PROSE," AMERICAN COUNCIL OF LEARNED SOCIETIES, NEW YORK,…

  14. English as a Second Language Resource Manual, Volume III, Part Two. Supplement 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC.

    This is the second part of a two-part volume of supplementary materials intended for use in the Department of State's Intensive English as a Second Language, Cultural Orientation, and Pre-Employment Training Program for United States-bound Southeast Asian refugees. It contains classroom activities developed for the English as a second language…

  15. Land-Grant College Education, 1910 to 1920. Part III: Agriculture. Bulletin, 1925, No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, C. John, Ed.

    1925-01-01

    This bulletin represents the third of a 5-part survey of land-grant college education. Other parts are: (1) History and Educational Objectives of Land-Grant College Education; (2) The Liberal Arts and Sciences and Miscellaneous Subjects in Land-Grant Colleges; (4) Engineering and Mechanic Arts in Land-Grant Colleges; and (5) Home Economics in…

  16. Active Control of Low-Speed Fan Tonal Noise Using Actuators Mounted in Stator Vanes: Part III Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Remington, Paul J.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    A test program to demonstrate simplification of Active Noise Control (ANC) systems relative to standard techniques was performed on the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan from May through September 2001. The target mode was the m = 2 circumferential mode generated by the rotor-stator interaction at 2BPF. Seven radials (combined inlet and exhaust) were present at this condition. Several different error-sensing strategies were implemented. Integration of the error-sensors with passive treatment was investigated. These were: (i) an in-duct linear axial array, (ii) an induct steering array, (iii) a pylon-mounted array, and (iv) a near-field boom array. The effect of incorporating passive treatment was investigated as well as reducing the actuator count. These simplified systems were compared to a fully ANC specified system. Modal data acquired using the Rotating Rake are presented for a range of corrected fan rpm. Simplified control has been demonstrated to be possible but requires a well-known and dominant mode signature. The documented results here in are part III of a three-part series of reports with the same base title. Part I and II document the control system and error-sensing design and implementation.

  17. Role of microbial exopolymeric substances (EPS) on chromium sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils: II. Binding of Cr(III) in EPS/soil system.

    PubMed

    Kantar, Cetin; Demiray, Hilal; Dogan, Nazime Mercan

    2011-03-01

    Laboratory batch sorption and column experiments were performed to investigate the effects of microbial EPSs isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 on Cr(III) mobility in heterogeneous subsurface soils. Our batch and column results indicate that microbial EPS may have a pronounced effect on Cr(III) sorption and transport behavior depending on system conditions (e.g., pH, type of EPS). While EPS had no effect on Cr(III) sorption at pH<5, it led to a significant decrease in Cr(III) sorption under slightly acidic to alkaline pH range. Column experiments performed at pH 7.9 suggest that, in the presence of EPS, chromium(III) was significantly mobilized relative to non-EPS containing system due to the formation less sorbing and highly soluble Cr-EPS complexes and competition of EPS against Cr for surface sites. A two-site non-electrostatic surface chemical model incorporating a discrete ligand approach for the description of Cr-EPS interactions accurately predicted Cr(III) sorption and transport behavior in the presence of EPS under variable chemical conditions. Our simulations show that an accurate description of Cr(III) transport in the presence of EPS requires incorporation of proton and Cr(III) binding by EPS, EPS binding by soil minerals, Cr(III) binding by soil minerals, and ternary Cr(III)-EPS surface complexes into the transport equations. Although this approach may not accurately describe the actual mechanisms at the molecular level, it can improve our ability to accurately describe the effects of EPS on Cr(III) mobility in subsurface environment relative to the use of distribution coefficients (K(d)).

  18. Development and physiological regulation of intestinal lipid absorption. III. Intestinal transporters and cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Hui, David Y; Labonté, Eric D; Howles, Philip N

    2008-04-01

    Intestinal cholesterol absorption is modulated by transport proteins in enterocytes. Cholesterol uptake from intestinal lumen requires several proteins on apical brush-border membranes, including Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), scavenger receptor B-I, and CD36, whereas two ATP-binding cassette half transporters, ABCG5 and ABCG8, on apical membranes work together for cholesterol efflux back to the intestinal lumen to limit cholesterol absorption. NPC1L1 is essential for cholesterol absorption, but its function as a cell surface transporter or an intracellular cholesterol transport protein needs clarification. Another ATP transporter, ABCA1, is present in the basolateral membrane to mediate HDL secretion from enterocytes.

  19. An Introduction to Flow and Transport in Fractal Models of Porous Media: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianchao; San José Martínez, Fernando; Martín, Miguel Angel; Hu, Xiangyun

    2015-03-01

    This is the second part of the special issue on fractal geometry and its applications to the modeling of flow and transport in porous media, in which 10 original research articles and one review article are included. Combining to the first part of 11 original research articles, these two issues summarized current research on fractal models applied to porous media that will help to further advance this multidisciplinary development. This whole special issue is published also to celebrate the 70th birthday of Professor Boming Yu for his distinguished researches on fractal geometry and its application to transport physics of porous media.

  20. History of Lung Diseases of Coal Miners in Great BritainPART III, 1920-1952*

    PubMed Central

    Meiklejohn, Andrew

    1952-01-01

    All sciences are connected; they lend each other material aid as parts of one great whole, each doing its own work not for itself alone but for the other parts, as the eye guides the whole body and the foot sustains it and leads it from place to place. As with an eye torn out or a foot cut off, so it is with the different departments of knowledge; none can attain its proper result separately, since all are parts of one and the same complete wisdom. ROGER BACON (1214-1294). PMID:14944741

  1. Reduction of Iron-Oxide-Carbon Composites: Part III. Shrinkage of Composite Pellets during Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  2. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part III. Shrinkage of composite pellets during reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2008-12-15

    This article involves the evaluation of the volume change of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets and its implications on reduction kinetics under conditions prevalent in a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) that were simulated in the laboratory. The pellets, in general, were found to shrink considerably during the reduction due to the loss of carbon and oxygen from the system, sintering of the iron-oxide, and formation of a molten slag phase at localized regions inside the pellets due to the presence of binder and coal/wood-charcoal ash at the reduction temperatures. One of the shortcomings of the RHF ironmaking process has been the inability to use multiple layers of composite pellets because of the impediment in heat transport to the lower layers of a multilayer bed. However, pellet shrinkage was found to have a strong effect on the reduction kinetics by virtue of enhancing the external heat transport to the lower layers. The volume change of the different kinds of composite pellets was studied as a function of reduction temperature and time. The estimation of the change in the amount of external heat transport with varying pellet sizes for a particular layer of a multilayer bed was obtained by conducting heat-transfer tests using inert low-carbon steel spheres. It was found that if the pellets of the top layer of the bed shrink by 30 pct, the external heat transfer to the second layer increases by nearly 6 times.

  3. Current Status of Biomedical Book Reviewing: Part III. Duplication Patterns in Biomedical Book Reviewing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-chih

    1974-01-01

    This is the third part of a comprehensive, quantitative study of biomedical book reviewing. The data base of the total project was built from statistics of 3,347 reviews of 2,067 biomedical books appearing in all 1970 issues of fifty-four reviewing journals. This part of the study explores the duplication patterns in book reviewing among these media. It is found that 35.17% (727 books) of the 2,067 titles were reviewed more than once in 1970, these titles accounting for 2,007 of the total of 3,347 reviews. For the most part, reviews of the most frequently reviewed titles appeared in such journals as British Medical Journal, Annals of Internal Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, and New England Journal of Medicine. These five journals covered 93.53% of the 727 books reviewed more than once in 1970. PMID:4471577

  4. Cardiac electrophysiological experiments in numero, Part III: Simulation of arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    Malik, M; Camm, A J

    1991-12-01

    This paper is the third and final part of a series of articles reviewing mathematical and computer models of the electrophysiological processes. This section reviews the arrhythmia simulation and discusses models of arrhythmogenic processes, fibrillation and defibrillation, and of heart-pacemaker interaction. The models of arrhythmogenesis are classified into three main sections: models of reentry and vortex reentry, models of myocardial electrotonic interactions, and models of macroreentrant supraventricular tachycardias. This final part of the review discusses the future potential of mathematical and computer models of different cardiac processes.

  5. 36 CFR Appendix F to Part 1191 - Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation F Appendix F to Part 1191 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... negotiate steps may have to travel compared to the general public. Modification to 406 of Appendix D 406...

  6. 36 CFR Appendix F to Part 1191 - Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation F Appendix F to Part 1191 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... negotiate steps may have to travel compared to the general public. Modification to 406 of Appendix D 406...

  7. Mathematics Through Science, Part III: An Experimental Approach to Functions. Teacher's Commentary. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Elroy J., Jr.; And Others

    The purpose of this project is to teach learning and understanding of mathematics at the ninth grade level through the use of science experiments. This part of the program contains significant amounts of material normally found in a beginning algebra class. The material should be found useful for classes in general mathematics as a preparation for…

  8. Providing for Energy Efficiency in Homes and Small Buildings, Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Vocational Instructional Materials, Athens, GA.

    Presented is part three of a training program designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy efficient buildings. Alternatives are provided in this program to allow for specific instruction in…

  9. Photophysical Study of a Series of Cyanines Part III. The Direct Photooxidation Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepaja, Shukri; Strub, Henry; Lougnot, Daniel-Joseph

    1983-01-01

    The main degradative pathway of tricarbocyanine dyes in aerated solutions is demonstrated to be a photooxidation; using sensitization techniques and specific quenchers, this reaction is established to proceed via singlet oxygen for a part, and the site at which this species attacks the polymethinic skeleton is unambiguously determined. The major photoproduct is identified as being 1,3,3-trimethyl-2-indolinone.

  10. Wetlands & Wildlife: Alaska Wildlife Curriculum Teacher Information Manual, Parts I-II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigman, Marilyn; And Others

    This document consists of a teacher manual and a set of information cards. The teacher manual is designed to educate Alaskan students about the important functions of Alaska's wetlands and about the fish and wildlife that live there. Part I of the manual explores Alaska's wetland habitats, the plants and animals that live there, and the…

  11. Helping Students with Recursion: Teaching Strategies. Part III: Teaching Students about Embedded Recursion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riordon, Tim

    1984-01-01

    Describes activities designed to teach students about embedded recursion. Topics cover providing intuitions about embedded recursions, predicting embedded recursions, seeing patterns and processes, presenting graphic designs containing embedded copies of themselves, and exploring graphics, numerical, and word examples. Parts I and II are in…

  12. Beyond the Evident Content Goals Part III. An Undercurrent-Enhanced Approach to Trigonometric Identities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugdale, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    The third in a series of 3 articles, a study of 30 students was conducted to test the effect of restructuring a unit on trigonometric identities around microcomputer activities based on the themes of educational undercurrents identified in Part II. Experimental-group students scored significantly higher relating trigonometric functions to their…

  13. Beyond the Evident Content Goals Part III. An Undercurrent-Enhanced Approach to Trigonometric Identities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugdale, Sharon

    1990-01-01

    The third in a series of 3 articles, a study of 30 students was conducted to test the effect of restructuring a unit on trigonometric identities around microcomputer activities based on the themes of educational undercurrents identified in Part II. Experimental-group students scored significantly higher relating trigonometric functions to their…

  14. 48 CFR 14.201-4 - Part III-Documents, exhibits, and other attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., exhibits, and other attachments. 14.201-4 Section 14.201-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Part III—Documents, exhibits, and other attachments. Section J, List of documents, exhibits, and other attachments. The contracting officer shall list the title, date, and number of pages for each...

  15. 48 CFR 15.204-4 - Part III-List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Exhibits, and Other Attachments. 15.204-4 Section 15.204-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Receipt of Proposals and Information 15.204-4 Part III—List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments. Section J, List of attachments. The contracting officer shall list the title, date, and number of...

  16. Tone Systems of Tibeto-Burman Languages of Nepal. Part III, Texts, I. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, F. K., Ed.

    The present volume, the third of a four-part report on the Tibeto-Burman languages of Nepal, includes text materials on Burung, by Warren Glover; on Tamang, by Doreen Taylor, and on Thakali, by Annemarie Hari and Anita Maibaum. For each language, a list of included texts is given, with the native language divided into sequentially-numbered…

  17. Microcomputer Instruction in Special Education and the Fine and Practical Arts. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannwitt, Barbara

    1984-01-01

    The last of a three-part series on computer-assisted instruction (CAI), this report describes microcomputer applications in special education, music, visual arts, speech arts and drama, home economics, and industrial/vocational arts. Under each subject heading, current and developing computer applications are discussed and specific courseware…

  18. Broadcasting Stations of the World; Part III. Frequency Modulation Broadcasting Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Washington, DC.

    This third part of "Broadcasting Stations of the World", which lists all reported radio broadcasting and television stations, with the exception of those in the United States which broadcast on domestic channels, covers frequency modulation broadcasting stations. It contains two sections: one indexed alphabetically by country and city, and the…

  19. LEXICOGRAPHY. HISTORY OF ENGLISH, PART ONE. LANGUAGE CURRICULUM III, STUDENT VERSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    AN OUTLINE OF THE NEED FOR AND USES OF LEXICOGRAPHY AND A HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, PART 1, WERE COMBINED IN THIS CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR NINTH-GRADE STUDENTS. THE FIRST SECTION, THE OUTLINE ON LEXICOGRAPHY, GAVE A BRIEF HISTORY OF DICTIONARY COMPILATION AND DESCRIBED THE NEED FOR DICTIONARIES AND THEIR USES. WAYS WERE SUGGESTED FOR STUDENTS…

  20. About the International System of Units (SI) Part III. SI Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubrecht, Gordon J., II; French, Anthony P.; Iona, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Before discussing more details of SI, we will summarize the essentials in a few tables that can serve as ready references. If a unit isn't listed in Tables I-IV, it is not part of SI or specifically allowed for use with SI. The units and symbols that are sufficient for most everyday applications are given in bold.

  1. Distinct Mechanisms of Recognizing Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport III (ESCRT-III) Protein IST1 by Different Microtubule Interacting and Trafficking (MIT) Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Emily Z.; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery is responsible for membrane remodeling in a number of biological processes including multivesicular body biogenesis, cytokinesis, and enveloped virus budding. In mammalian cells, efficient abscission during cytokinesis requires proper function of the ESCRT-III protein IST1, which binds to the microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin via its C-terminal MIT-interacting motif (MIM). Here, we studied the molecular interactions between IST1 and the three MIT domain-containing proteins to understand the structural basis that governs pairwise MIT-MIM interaction. Crystal structures of the three molecular complexes revealed that IST1 binds to the MIT domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin using two different mechanisms (MIM1 mode versus MIM3 mode). Structural comparison revealed that structural features in both MIT and MIM contribute to determine the specific binding mechanism. Within the IST1 MIM sequence, two phenylalanine residues were shown to be important in discriminating MIM1 versus MIM3 binding. These observations enabled us to deduce a preliminary binding code, which we applied to provide CHMP2A, a protein that normally only binds the MIT domain in the MIM1 mode, the additional ability to bind the MIT domain of Spartin in the MIM3 mode. PMID:25657007

  2. Distinct mechanisms of recognizing endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III) protein IST1 by different microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains.

    PubMed

    Guo, Emily Z; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-03-27

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery is responsible for membrane remodeling in a number of biological processes including multivesicular body biogenesis, cytokinesis, and enveloped virus budding. In mammalian cells, efficient abscission during cytokinesis requires proper function of the ESCRT-III protein IST1, which binds to the microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin via its C-terminal MIT-interacting motif (MIM). Here, we studied the molecular interactions between IST1 and the three MIT domain-containing proteins to understand the structural basis that governs pairwise MIT-MIM interaction. Crystal structures of the three molecular complexes revealed that IST1 binds to the MIT domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin using two different mechanisms (MIM1 mode versus MIM3 mode). Structural comparison revealed that structural features in both MIT and MIM contribute to determine the specific binding mechanism. Within the IST1 MIM sequence, two phenylalanine residues were shown to be important in discriminating MIM1 versus MIM3 binding. These observations enabled us to deduce a preliminary binding code, which we applied to provide CHMP2A, a protein that normally only binds the MIT domain in the MIM1 mode, the additional ability to bind the MIT domain of Spartin in the MIM3 mode. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Distinct Mechanisms of Recognizing Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport III (ESCRT-III) Protein IST1 by Different Microtubule Interacting and Trafficking (MIT) Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Emily Z.; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-02-05

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery is responsible for membrane remodeling in a number of biological processes including multivesicular body biogenesis, cytokinesis, and enveloped virus budding. In mammalian cells, efficient abscission during cytokinesis requires proper function of the ESCRT-III protein IST1, which binds to the microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin via its C-terminal MIT-interacting motif (MIM). In this paper, we studied the molecular interactions between IST1 and the three MIT domain-containing proteins to understand the structural basis that governs pairwise MIT-MIM interaction. Crystal structures of the three molecular complexes revealed that IST1 binds to the MIT domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin using two different mechanisms (MIM1 mode versus MIM3 mode). Structural comparison revealed that structural features in both MIT and MIM contribute to determine the specific binding mechanism. Within the IST1 MIM sequence, two phenylalanine residues were shown to be important in discriminating MIM1 versus MIM3 binding. Finally, these observations enabled us to deduce a preliminary binding code, which we applied to provide CHMP2A, a protein that normally only binds the MIT domain in the MIM1 mode, the additional ability to bind the MIT domain of Spartin in the MIM3 mode.

  4. Distinct Mechanisms of Recognizing Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport III (ESCRT-III) Protein IST1 by Different Microtubule Interacting and Trafficking (MIT) Domains

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Emily Z.; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-02-05

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery is responsible for membrane remodeling in a number of biological processes including multivesicular body biogenesis, cytokinesis, and enveloped virus budding. In mammalian cells, efficient abscission during cytokinesis requires proper function of the ESCRT-III protein IST1, which binds to the microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin via its C-terminal MIT-interacting motif (MIM). In this paper, we studied the molecular interactions between IST1 and the three MIT domain-containing proteins to understand the structural basis that governs pairwise MIT-MIM interaction. Crystal structures of the three molecular complexes revealed thatmore » IST1 binds to the MIT domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin using two different mechanisms (MIM1 mode versus MIM3 mode). Structural comparison revealed that structural features in both MIT and MIM contribute to determine the specific binding mechanism. Within the IST1 MIM sequence, two phenylalanine residues were shown to be important in discriminating MIM1 versus MIM3 binding. Finally, these observations enabled us to deduce a preliminary binding code, which we applied to provide CHMP2A, a protein that normally only binds the MIT domain in the MIM1 mode, the additional ability to bind the MIT domain of Spartin in the MIM3 mode.« less

  5. A pH dependent transport and back transport of americium(III) through the cellulose triacetate composite polymer membrane of cyanex-301 and TBP: role of H-bonding interactions.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar; Ghanty, Tapan Kumar; Manchanda, Vijay Kumar

    2008-11-07

    Transport of Am(III) was studied through the composite polymer membrane of Cyanex-301 [bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid] and tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP). Depending on the pH of the strip solution containing alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid (AHIBA), the transport behaviour of Am(III) was changed significantly. After approximately 70% of the Am(III) transported to the strip side, interestingly, back transport of Am(III) was observed at a pH of 3.5. The back transport phenomenon was not so significant at pH 1 and 5.7. The back transport of Am(III) was attributed to the transport of AHIBA from strip to the feed side due to its interaction with TBP in the membrane and the attainment of Donnan equilibrium because of the presence of Na(+) in the feed as the driving ion. The experimental observations were rationalized using the hydrogen bonding interaction energies obtained through ab initio molecular orbital and DFT calculations.

  6. Implementation of Language Interoperability Interfaces for NTCC transport models as part of FMCFM project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadlamani, Srinath; Pankin, A. Y.; Kruger, S.; Pletzer, A.; Carlsson, J.; Cary, J.

    2007-11-01

    A new generalized interface to the transport modules and libraries from the National Transport Code Collaboration (NTCC) module library [1] is presented. The interface is created as a part of the Framework for Modernization and Componentization of Fusion Modules (FMCFM) project. The interface utilizes the technologies of encapsulation and polymorphism available in Fortran-95 that replace the COMMON BLOCK approach typical for Fortran legacy codes and allows us to create a generalized interface to the reduced transport modules. The new interface facilitates access to the transport models from integrated modeling codes and allows interlanguage interfaces using a new library of C++/Fortran-95 wrappers. This library also includes a collection of subroutines for data access from C/C++ to the Fortran 90 derived data structures. The new interface to transport modules has been applied to the the GLF23 and MMM95 transport models. The functionality is demonstrated in Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations (FACETS) project. [1] A. H. Kritz et al. Comp. Phys. Communications 164 (2004) 108.

  7. Current-driven plasma acceleration versus current-driven energy dissipation. III - Anomalous transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Kelly, Arnold J.; Jahn, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    In the present paper the linear stability description and weak turbulence theory are used to develop a second order description of wave-particle transport and anomalous dissipation. The goal is to arrive at anomalous transport coefficients that can be readily included in fluid flow codes. In particular, expressions are derived for the heating rates of ions and electrons by the unstable waves and for the electron-wave momentum exchange rate that controls the anomalous resistivity effect. Comparative calculations were undertaken assuming four different saturation models: ion trapping, electron trapping, ion resonance broadening, and thermodynamic bound. A foremost finding is the importance of the role of electron Hall parameter in scaling the level of anomalous dissipation for the parameter range of the MPD thruster plasma. Polynomial expressions of the relevant transport coefficients cast solely in terms of macroscopic parameters are also obtained for inclusion in plasma fluid codes for the self-consistent numerical simulation of real thruster flows including microturbulent effects.

  8. The Health of Healthcare, Part III: Dissolving (curing) the cancer in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Deane

    2013-01-01

    In a previous part of this "The Health of Healthcare" series, the etiology of sickness in our healthcare system was established as cancer. This article offers a method to "cure" healthcare, taken from strategic management thinking called VOSIE. In this article, the use of VOSIE is described as well as who needs to apply this cure: the public. A unifying mantra is suggested: Think and decide.

  9. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-06-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the "elevator technique". All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the "Journal of Ultrasonography".

  10. Starting a hospital-based home health agency: Part III--Marketing.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, P

    1993-10-01

    Successfully marketing home healthcare involves not only community awareness, but the system's support as well--nurses, physicians, administration, social services. Working together with common goals and commitments is essential to the program's success. Addressing questions and concerns ensures a successful business start-up and ongoing implementation. A service benefit profile, target markets, and a feasibility analysis are provided in this final section of a three-part series on establishing a home health agency.

  11. Oxygen transport in unreduced, reduced and Rh(III)-doped CeO2 nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Sayle, Thi X T; Parker, Stephen C; Sayle, Dean C

    2007-01-01

    Ceria, CeO2, based materials are a major (active) component of exhaust catalysts and promising candidates for solid oxide fuel cells. In this capacity, oxygen transport through the material is pivotal. Here, we explore whether oxygen transport is influenced (desirably increased) compared with transport within the bulk parent material by traversing to the nanoscale. In particular, atomistic models for ceria nanocrystals, including perfect: CeO2; reduced: CeO1.95 and doped: Rh0.1Ce0.9O1.95, have been generated. The nanocrystals were about 8 nm in diameter and each comprised about 16,000 atoms. Oxygen transport can also be influenced, sometimes profoundly, by microstructural features such as dislocations and grain-boundaries. However, these are difficult to generate within an atomistic model using, for example, symmetry operations. Accordingly, we crystallised the nanocrystals from an amorphous precursor, which facilitated the evolution of a variety of microstructures including: twin-boundaries and more general grain-boundaries and grain-junctions, dislocations and epitaxy, isolated and associated point defects. The shapes of the nanocrystals are in accord with HRTEM data and comprise octahedral morphologies with {111} surfaces, truncated by (dipolar) {100} surfaces together with a complex array of steps, edges and corners. Oxygen transport data was then calculated using these models and compared with data calculated previously for CeO1.97/ YSZ thin films and the (bulk) parent material, CeO197. Oxygen transport was calculated to increase in the order: CeO2 nanocrystal < (reduced) CeO1.95 nanocrystal approximately Rh0.1Ce0.9O1.95 nanocrystal < CeO1.97/YSZ thin film < (reduced) CeO1.97 (bulk) parent material; the mechanism was determined to be primarily vacancy driven. Our findings indicate that reducing one- (thin film) or especially three- (nanocrystal) dimensions to the nanoscale may prove deleterious to oxygen transport. Conversely, we observed dynamic evolution and

  12. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part III--kinetics and energy assessment.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, D H

    2005-06-01

    Historically, clinical applications of measurements of force and energy followed electromyography and kinematics in temporal sequence. This sequence is mirrored by the order of topics included in this trilogy on the Evolution of Clinical Gait Analysis, with part I [Sutherland DH. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part I: kinesiological EMG. Gait Posture 2001;14:61-70.] devoted to Kinesiological EMG and part II [Sutherland DH. The evolution of clinical gait analysis part II - kinematics. Gait Posture 2002;16(2):159-179.] to Kinematics. This final review in the series will focus on kinetics as it relates to gait applications. Kinematic measurements give the movements of the body segments, which can be compared with normal controls to identify pathological gait patterns, but they do not deal with the forces controlling the movements. As a major goal of scientifically minded clinicians is to understand the biomechanical forces producing movements, the objective measurement of ground reaction forces is essential. The force plate (platform) is now an indispensable tool in a state-of-the-art motion analysis laboratory. Nonetheless, it is not a stand-alone instrument as both kinematic and EMG measurements are needed for maximum clinical implementation and interpretation of force plate measurements. The subject of energy assessment is also given mention, as there is a compelling interest in whether walking has been made easier with intervention. The goals of this manuscript are to provide a historical background, recognize some of the important contributors, and describe the current multiple uses of the force plate in gait analysis. The widespread use of force plates for postural analyses is an important and more recent application of this technology, but this review will be restricted to measurements of gait rather than balance activities. Finally, this manuscript presents my personal perspective and discusses the developments and contributors that have shaped my

  13. Conformational Changes in the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for the Transport III Subunit Ist1 Lead to Distinct Modes of ATPase Vps4 Regulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jason; Davies, Brian A; Payne, Johanna A; Benson, Linda M; Katzmann, David J

    2015-12-11

    Intralumenal vesicle formation of the multivesicular body is a critical step in the delivery of endocytic cargoes to the lysosome for degradation. Endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III) subunits polymerize on endosomal membranes to facilitate membrane budding away from the cytoplasm to generate these intralumenal vesicles. The ATPase Vps4 remodels and disassembles ESCRT-III, but the manner in which Vps4 activity is coordinated with ESCRT-III function remains unclear. Ist1 is structurally homologous to ESCRT-III subunits and has been reported to inhibit Vps4 function despite the presence of a microtubule-interacting and trafficking domain-interacting motif (MIM) capable of stimulating Vps4 in the context of other ESCRT-III subunits. Here we report that Ist1 inhibition of Vps4 ATPase activity involves two elements in Ist1: the MIM itself and a surface containing a conserved ELYC sequence. In contrast, the MIM interaction, in concert with a more open conformation of the Ist1 core, resulted in stimulation of Vps4. Addition of the ESCRT-III subunit binding partner of Ist1, Did2, also converted Ist1 from an inhibitor to a stimulator of Vps4 ATPase activity. Finally, distinct regulation of Vps4 by Ist1 corresponded with altered ESCRT-III disassembly in vitro. Together, these data support a model in which Ist1-Did2 interactions during ESCRT-III polymerization coordinate Vps4 activity with the timing of ESCRT-III disassembly.

  14. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system: Volume III, Appendices C through J. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.; De Avila, J.C.; Keith, V.F.

    1996-08-01

    The Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) provides a portabler laboratory for the analysis of soils, ground water, and surface water. This report presents data from a soils sample TCLP VOA and SVOA report, aqueous sample RCRA metals report, soils sample total and isotopic uranium report, SVOA sample analytical performance report, and and RCRA metal sample analytical performance report.

  15. Building Worlds and Learning Astronomy on Facebook Part III: Testing, Launch, and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harold, J.; Hines, D.; Vidugiris, E.; Goldman, K. H.

    2015-11-01

    James Harold (SSI), Dean Hines (STScI/SSI) and a team at the National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute are developing Starchitect, an end-to-end stellar and planetary evolution game for the Facebook platform. Supported by NSF and NASA, and based in part on a prototype presented at ASP several years ago, Starchitect uses the “sporadic play” model of games such as Farmville, where players might only take actions a few times a day, but may continue playing for months. This paper is an update to a presentation at last year's ASP conference.

  16. Biomechanical considerations in high myopia: Part III--Therapy for high myopia.

    PubMed

    Bell, G R

    1993-05-01

    Clinical procedures for the treatment of high myopia are updated in this third part of a report on high myopia. After a discussion of testing techniques and refractive approaches for high myopia, an examination of therapeutic drug experiences shows their relative merits. The author believes that more investigation of beta blocker and epinephrine topical solutions is needed pertaining to the treatment of high myopia. Theoretically, such agents could improve deficient arterial perfusion of the highly myopic eye, and could be helpful in retarding scleral creep. Lifestyle recommendations include patient advice on accommodative reduction and proper exercise techniques. Low impact aerobics may have merit for highly myopic patients since the improved cardiovascular efficiency they can provide may improve the deficient arterial perfusion of their retinas. A summary of the three-part report on high myopia concludes the article. The physiological patterns of high myopia dovetail into the biomechanical considerations showing that a scleral pathogenesis hypothesis of myopic development is a viable working theory. The author's clinical procedures reflect the influence of that theory. If research were redirected from deprivation studies to investigating biomechanical considerations and pharmacological approaches to high myopia, the author contends that dramatically improved treatment regimens could result.

  17. Managing the multicultural laboratory, Part III: Putting the cross-cultural tools to work.

    PubMed

    Ketchum, S M

    1993-01-01

    This third article provides two case studies that enable laboratory managers to see how the cross-cultural model postulated by Dr. Geert Hofstede can be practically applied to two important issues--staff training and conflict resolution between employees. In addition, the opinions of several managers from a variety of industries are presented to add realism and perspective. This encourages laboratory managers to step outside the laboratory environment and learn from other managers who have years of experience supervising culturally diverse groups of employees. Part I of this series explained what is meant by "culture" and featured the research-based model set forth by Dutch social psychologist and management consultant, Dr. Geert Hofstede. His four dimensions of culture (Power Distance, Masculinity/Femininity, Individualism/Collectivism, and Uncertainty Avoidance) provide a useful framework for understanding the different values, attitudes, and behaviors exhibited by those of different cultural backgrounds. Part II presented advice in the form of 13 anecdotes from experienced cross-cultural managers. Issues of performance management, interpersonal skills, and language and safety were explored in light of the four dimensions. In this third article, abbreviated reference tables adapted from Hofstede's research are presented that make these cross-cultural data more useful for management decision making. Laboratory managers will receive practical, "real world" advice that will help them to positively resolve conflicts and to take full advantage of staff training opportunities.

  18. Transport of clays in the eastern part of santa barbara channel, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpack, R.L.; Drake, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    A record discharge of about 54 ?? 106 metric tons of predominantly fine-grained detrital sediment was introduced during 1969 into the eastern part of Santa Barbara Channel from the Santa Clara and Ventura Rivers. The clay-size fraction from bottom samples collected during a time-series of about 18 months revealed movement across the shelf and into the adjacent basin in a repetitive sequential pattern. Light transmission profiles show resuspension and transport of sediments at depths of up to 225 m. This transport and distribution history is attributed to seasonal variations in the vertical and lateral position of a poleward-flowing current. ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  19. The health of Canada's children. Part III: Public policy and the social determinants of children's health.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Dennis

    2010-03-01

    The health of Canada's children does not compare well with other wealthy industrialized nations. Significant inequalities in health exist among Canadian children, and many of these inequalities are due to variations in Canadian children's life circumstances - the social determinants of health. The present article describes the social determinants of children's health and explains how the quality of these social determinants is shaped, in large part, by public policy decisions. The specific public policies that shape the quality of Canadian children's health are examined, and Canadian approaches in comparison with other wealthy developed nations are described. Policy directions that would improve the quality of the social determinants of children's health are presented and barriers to their implementation are considered.

  20. Dental caries: A complete changeover, PART III: Changeover in the treatment decisions and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Carounanidy, Usha; Sathyanarayanan, R

    2010-01-01

    Comprehensive management of dental caries should involve the management of disease as well as the lesion. Current decision making process in cariology is influenced by numerous factors such as the size/ depth/ activity of the carious lesion and age/ the caries risk status of the patient. Treatment decisions should involve planning the non-operative/ preventive treatment for non-cavitated or early cavitated lesions and also formulating operative treatment for cavitated lesions. Apart from these two responsibilities, a clinician should also be knowledgeable enough to decide when not to interfere in the caries dynamics and how frequently to recall the patient for follow-ups. The non-operative treatment prescriptions vary in dose, intensity and mode of delivery according to the caries risk status. Minimal invasion and maximal conservation of tooth structure has become the essence of current operative treatments. This part of the series elaborates on the paradigm shift in the management of dental caries. PMID:21217948

  1. The threat of avian influenza A (H5N1). Part III: Antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cinatl, Jindrich; Michaelis, Martin; Doerr, Hans W

    2007-12-01

    Among emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, influenza constitutes one of the major threats to mankind. In this review series epidemiologic, virologic and pathologic concerns raised by infections of humans with avian influenza virus A/H5N1 as well as treatment options are discussed. The third part discusses therapeutic options. Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors are the most promising agents despite uncertainty about efficacy. Dosage increase, prolonged treatment or combination therapies may increase treatment efficacy and/or inhibit resistance formation. Immune system dysregulation contributes to H5N1 disease. Although current evidence does not support the use of anti-inflammatory drugs beneficial effects cannot be excluded at later disease stages.

  2. Responsible conduct of radiology research. Part III. Exemptions from regulatory requirements for human research.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jeffrey A

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this series of articles is to explain the ethical and legal basis for responsible conduct of radiology research and the rules that an investigator needs to follow. In this article (part three of the series), the situations in which human research in radiology is exempt from regulatory requirements are explained. There are several situations in which an activity falls under the regulatory definition of research but is exempt from the research regulations. Investigators who conduct exempt research should know the regulatory criteria for the exemptions. In the case of research that is potentially exempt from the Department of Health and Human Services regulations, the institutional review board or an authority other than the investigator should make the determination of whether a proposed research activity is exempt from the regulations. For research exempt from Food and Drug Administration regulations, investigators should follow institutional guidance and seek input from the institutional review board or Food and Drug Administration for questionable cases.

  3. Bioelectrical impedance techniques in medicine. Part III: Impedance imaging. First section: general concepts and hardware.

    PubMed

    Rigaud, B; Morucci, J P

    1996-01-01

    Measurement accuracy is a key point in impedance imaging and is mainly limited by factors that take place in the acquisition system. This part is a review of hardware solutions developed in acquisition systems for electrical impedance tomography (EIT). The general principles of EIT along with the changes that have taken place in the last decade, in terms of measurement strategy, and a certain number of definitions are introduced. The major hardware error sources that occur in the front end of EIT systems are presented. A review of the various alternatives published in the literature that are used to drive current, including current and voltage approaches, and the main solutions recommended in the literature to overcome the key point drawbacks of voltage measurement systems, including voltage buffers, instrumentation amplifiers, and demodulators, are provided. Some calibration procedures and approaches for the evaluation of the performance of EIT systems are also presented.

  4. [A systematic analysis of the Ottoman Red Crescent periodical (Part III)].

    PubMed

    Okutan, Yahya

    2002-01-01

    Founded in 1877, the Ottoman Red Crescent Society rendered a lot of important services in military and civil areas in the Ottoman Empire. The Ottoman Red Crescent Society not only gave health services for the soldiers, but it also attempted to obey the international acts signed for the war captives and to rescue them together with the countries involved under the supervision of the international Red Cross. In the civilian area, the Ottoman Red Crescent Society also played an active role to meet the casualties' needs, such as food, clothes, and accommodation following natural disasters like earthquake, flood, fire etc. The Ottoman Red Crescent Society published a monthly newsletter called Osmanli Hilâl-i Ahmer Mecmuasi to announce its services more effectively to the public since 15 September 1921 (12 Muharrem 1340). The publication of the newsletter continued as Türkiye Hilâl-i Ahmer Mecmuas' after the 15th issue. Starting with the 85th issue on September 15th, 1928 (30 Rebiülevvel 1347) it was printed with Latin alphabet instead of Arabic letters. A brief translation in French and in English exist in the end of each issue. In the second part of this research, news about the Red Crescent Society's organization; financial supports for the Society and, in return, material and financial aids by the Society; local organizations providing aid to the Society; money collected during Bairams; plays and balls arranged by the Society; and the activities of the womens' branch of the Red Crescent Society, are introduced. The third and last part of the study deals with the comments of visitors about the Red Crescent Society; and news and activities of the European Red Cross Societies.

  5. [Clinical and bacteriological effects of cefetamet pivoxil against community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Part III].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, R; Suzuki, Y; Nishinari, C; Ishii, Y; Matsumoto, Y; Kaku, M; Shimada, J

    1999-06-01

    We investigated clinical and bacteriological effects of cefetamet pivoxil (CEMT-PI) on community-acquired respiratory tract infection and obtained the following results: This method of investigation was almost the same to those adopted in 1994 and 1996. 1. 512 cases of respiratory tract infection were treated with CEMT-PI under the same protocol at a total of 53 institutions in Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, Chiba and Yamanashi prefectures from January, 1, 1998 over March, 31, 1998. Outpatients accounted for 99.7% of all subjects. Diagnoses given to these patients included pharyngolaryngitis (51.4%), tonsillitis (37.7%), and acute bronchitis (10.1%). 2. For the bacteriological study, a manual detailing the method of collecting specimens, storage and transport was distributed to the above-mentioned institutions. The isolation and identification of suspected causative bacteria, determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), and investigation of beta-lactamase production were conducted all together at Section of Studies, Tokyo Clinical Research Center. Suspected causative bacteria were detected in 144 (37.2%) out of 387 cases that were the analytical subjects of the clinical efficacy. The major bacteria identified were 32 strains of Streptococcus pyogenes and 19 strains of Haemophilus influenzae. The clinical efficacy (the ratio of improvement) of CEMT by suspected causative bacterium was 84.4% against CEMT-indicated organisms and 81.2% against CEMT-non-indicated organisms. 3. We investigated clinical efficacy rates (the ratio of "markedly improved" + "improved") by disease. The improvement rate was 78.4% in pharyngolaryngitis, 87.0% in tonsillitis, and 79.5% in acute bronchitis. The clinical efficacy rate was an average of 81.9% in all CEMT-PI indicated diseases.

  6. Heteroleptic cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes with charge transporting groups: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2012-09-13

    Efficient and stable high energy organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are a vital component of new generation general illumination solutions. However, large charge imbalances in the emissive layer of OLEDs lead to charge accumulation and subsequent side reactions which lowers the device efficiency and dramatically shortens operational lifetime. Radical changes in the way emitter materials are designed are needed to address this problem. Conventional approaches have only focused on color tuning; however, multi-functional emitter materials are needed to assist the transport of charge in the emissive layer. We propose to design and synthesize new organometallic iridium phosphorescent materials with bipolar charge transport properties to be used in high energy OLEDs and white light configurations

  7. Guidelines for clinical engineering programs--Part III: the risk of electrical shock in hospitals; Part IV: isolated power in anesthetizing locations? History of an appeal.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, M

    1981-01-01

    This four-part series presents guidelines for: electrically isolated inputs and outputs; measuring the performance of hospital biomedical engineering programs; evaluation the risk of electric shock in hospitals; and for isolated power in anesthetizing locations. Parts I and II, covering the first two topics above, were published in the Oct.-Dec. 1980 issue of this Journal. Part III constitutes an attempt to place the risk of electric shock in hospitals in a quantitative perspective. Arguments are presented that indicate that electrical safety precautions usually take up a larger share of the hospital's biomedical equipment safety budget than is justified by the actual hazard levels. Part IV reviews the need for isolated power in anesthetizing locations. Three independently proposed revisions to the 1973 edition of NFPA Standard 56A would have significantly simplified the safety requirements for hospital anesthetizing locations (a) by reducing the area in flammable locations classified as hazardous to the internationally accepted "zone of risk," and (b) by permitting the use of conventional electrical power rather than isolated power in locations where the risk of electrical accidents can be shown to be no greater than it is in other areas of the hospital. Despite extensive technical testimony supported with substantial supporting documentation, the revisions were vetoed by the Technical Committee after they were voted into the document by a floor vote of the general membership attending the NFPA Annual Meeting in Anaheim in 1978. The chronology of the major events surrounding the subsequent appeal of this veto is traced back to 1974, and an analysis is presented of what are considered to be shortcomings in the NFPA appeals process revealed by this particular case history.

  8. Differential carrier lifetime and transport effects in electrically injected III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, A.; Nami, M.; Monavarian, M.; Aragon, A.; DaVico, K.; Ayoub, F.; Mishkat-Ul-Masabih, S.; Rishinaramangalam, A.; Feezell, D.

    2017-07-01

    This work describes a small-signal microwave method for determining the differential carrier lifetime and transport effects in electrically injected InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). By considering the carrier diffusion, capture, thermionic escape, and recombination, the rate equations are used to derive an equivalent small-signal electrical circuit for the LEDs, from which expressions for the input impedance and modulation response are obtained. The expressions are simultaneously fit to the experimental data for the input impedance and modulation response for nonpolar InGaN/GaN micro-LEDs on free-standing GaN substrates. The fittings are used to extract the transport related circuit parameters and differential carrier lifetimes. The dependence of the parameters on the device diameter and current density is reported. We also derive approximations for the modulation response under low and high injection levels and show that the transport of carriers affects the modulation response of the device, especially at low injection levels. The methods presented are relevant to the design of high-speed LEDs for visible-light communication.

  9. Electron diffraction based analysis of phase fractions and texture in nanocrystalline thin films, part III: application examples.

    PubMed

    Lábár, J L; Adamik, M; Barna, B P; Czigány, Zs; Fogarassy, Zs; Horváth, Z E; Geszti, O; Misják, F; Morgiel, J; Radnóczi, G; Sáfrán, G; Székely, L; Szüts, T

    2012-04-01

    In this series of articles, a method is presented that performs (semi)quantitative phase analysis for nanocrystalline transmission electron microscope samples from selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns. Volume fractions and degree of fiber texture are determined for the nanocrystalline components. The effect of the amorphous component is minimized by empirical background interpolation. First, the two-dimensional SAED pattern is converted into a one-dimensional distribution similar to X-ray diffraction. Volume fractions of the nanocrystalline components are determined by fitting the spectral components, calculated for the previously identified phases with a priori known structures. These Markers are calculated not only for kinematic conditions, but the Blackwell correction is also applied to take into account dynamic effects for medium thicknesses. Peak shapes and experimental parameters (camera length, etc.) are refined during the fitting iterations. Parameter space is explored with the help of the Downhill-SIMPLEX. The method is implemented in a computer program that runs under the Windows operating system. Part I presented the principles, while part II elaborated current implementation. The present part III demonstrates the usage and efficiency of the computer program by numerous examples. The suggested experimental protocol should be of benefit in experiments aimed at phase analysis using electron diffraction methods.

  10. Capsicum--production, technology, chemistry, and quality. Part III. Chemistry of the color, aroma, and pungency stimuli.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, V S

    1986-01-01

    The spice capsicum, the fruits of the genus Capsicum (Family Solanaceae), is a very popular food additive in many parts of the world, valued for the important sensory attributes of color, pungency, and aroma. A large number of varieties are widely cultivated and traded. The characteristic carotenoids of the bright red paprika and cayenne-type chillies, the high character impact aroma stimuli, the methoxy pyrazine of green bell capsicum, the esters of ripe tabasco and the highly potent pungency stimuli, and the capsaicinoids of African and other Asian varieties of chillies, have been of great interest to chemists and biochemists. Research workers in other disciplines such as genetics and breeding, agriculture, and technology have been interested in this spice to develop new varieties with combinations of different optimal levels of the stimuli for the sensory attributes and to maximize production of storable products for specific end uses. Physiologists have been intensely studying the action of the highly potent pungency stimuli and social psychologists the curious aspect of growing acceptance and preference for the initially unacceptable pungency sensation. In the sequential review of all these aspects of the fruit spice Capsicum, the earlier two parts covered history, botany, cultivation and primary processing, and processed products, standards, world production, and trade. In Part III, the chemistry, the compositional variations, synthesis and biosynthesis of the functional components, the carotenoids, the volatiles, and the capsaicinoids are comprehensively reviewed.

  11. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  12. The Systemic Theory of Living Systems and Relevance to CAM: the Theory (Part III)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Western medical science lacks a solid philosophical and theoretical approach to disease cognition and therapeutics. My first two articles provided a framework for a humane medicine based on Modern Biophysics. Its precepts encompass modern therapeutics and CAM. Modern Biophysics and its concepts are presently missing in medicine, whether orthodox or CAM, albeit they probably provide the long sought explanation that bridges the abyss between East and West. Key points that differentiate Systemic from other systems' approaches are ‘Intelligence’, ‘Energy’ and the objective ‘to survive’. The General System Theory (GST) took a forward step by proposing a departure from the mechanistic biological concept—of analyzing parts and processes in isolation—and brought us towards an organismic model. GST examines the system's components and results of their interaction. However, GST still does not go far enough. GST assumes ‘Self-Organization’ as a spontaneous phenomenon, ignoring a causative entity or central controller to all systems: Intelligence. It also neglects ‘Survive’ as the directional motivation common to any living system, and scarcely assigns ‘Energy’ its true inherent value. These three parameters, Intelligence, Energy and Survive, are vital variables to be considered, in our human quest, if we are to achieve a unified theory of life. PMID:16136205

  13. Uterine sarcoma part III-Targeted therapy: The Taiwan Association of Gynecology (TAG) systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ming-Shyen; Chen, Jen-Ruei; Wang, Peng-Hui; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chen, Yi-Jen; Ng, Heung-Tat

    2016-10-01

    Uterine sarcoma is a very aggressive and highly lethal disease. Even after a comprehensive staging surgery or en block cytoreduction surgery followed by multimodality therapy (often chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy), many patients relapse or present with distant metastases, and finally die of diseases. The worst outcome of uterine sarcomas is partly because of their rarity, unknown etiology, and highly divergent genetic aberration. Uterine sarcomas are often classified into four distinct subtypes, including uterine leiomyosarcoma, low-grade uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma, high-grade uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma, and undifferentiated uterine sarcoma. Currently, evidence from tumor biology found that these tumors showed alternation and/or mutation of genomes and the intracellular signal pathway. In addition, some preclinical studies showed promising results for targeting receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, various kinds of growth factor pathways, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway, transforming growth factor β/bone morphogenetic protein signal pathway, aurora kinase A, MDM2 proto-oncogene, histone deacetylases, sex hormone receptors, certain types of oncoproteins, and/or loss of tumor suppressor genes. The current review is attempted to summarize the recurrent advance of targeted therapy for uterine sarcomas. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Stratigraphic sections of the Phosphoria formation in Idaho, 1947-48, Part III

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Malley, F.W.; Davidson, D.F.; Hoppin, R.A.; Sheldon, R.P.

    1951-01-01

    .The U.S. Geological Survey has measured and sampled the Phosphoria formation at many localities in Idaho and other western states. These data will not be fully synthesized and analyzed for several years but segments of the data, accompanied by little or no interpretation, are published as preliminary reports as they are assembled. This report, which contains abstracts of many of the sections in southeastern Idaho (fig. 1), is one of this series and is the third report of data gathered in Idaho during 1947 and 1948. The field and laboratory procedures adopted in these investigations are described rather fully in a companion report (McKelvey and others, 1953). Many people have taken part in this investigation, which was organized and supervised by V. E. McKelvey. D. A. Bostwick, R. M. Campbell, R. A. Gulbrandsen, R. A. Harris, R. L. Parker, R. A. Smart, J. E. Smedley, R. H. Thurston, and R. G. Waring participated in the description of strata and collection of samples referred to in this report. D. B. Dimick, Jack George, W. S. Hunziker, J. E. Jones, H. A. Larsen, and T. K. Rigby assisted in the preparation of trenches and collection, crushing, and splitting of samples in the field. The laboratory preparation of samples for chemical analysis was done in Denver, Colo., under the direction of W. P. Huleatt.

  15. The anniversary year: Part III. The ACD role in dental journalism.

    PubMed

    Rovelstad, G H

    1990-01-01

    Thus, the challenge to proprietary dental journalism was made and corrective action presented. The Journal of Dental Research was identified as a model and given encouragement and support. The Journal of the American College of Dentists became a regular part of the dental literature. The College established formal relations with the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the College indirectly gave birth through the W.J. Gies Endowment Fund for the Journal of Dental Research to the William J. Gies Foundation for the Advancement of Dentistry, Inc. These actions crossed all disciplines of the dental profession and in the 1930's identified the College as an organization to be reckoned with for professional matters. J. Ben Robinson stated it very well in his Presidential Address on the afternoon of November 3rd, 1935: "The College, from its modest beginning fifteen years ago, has rapidly and substantially grown to occupy an important place in the profession. As its duty has become clearer, and its responsibilities better understood, additional problems have been accepted and assigned to committees for investigation, study and report. The ensuing results have contributed materially to the advancement of the profession by clarifying thought, establishing sound trends of endeavor, and strengthening the positions of dentistry in many important relations... The American College of Dentists exist for the prime purpose of fostering professionalism as an ideal, and of promoting education, literature, and organization along lines that will ensure high standards in all relations....(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Evaluation of peripheral neuropathy. Part III: vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2005-01-01

    In this, the third of a 3-part series on peripheral neuropathy, the syndromes of vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathy are discussed. Vasculitis is a frequent cause of neuropathy in the setting of a connective tissue disease. The infectious neuropathies most likely to be encountered in the United States are those due to varicella-zoster virus, human immunodeficiency virus, Lyme disease, hepatitis C virus, and, most recently, West Nile virus. Inherited neuropathies are divided into 2 main types: predominant motor or predominant sensory. The former are generally classed as the Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases and the latter as the hereditary sensory neuropathies. Each category has a number of different subtypes. If the results of routine screening tests are negative, the clinician must consider special testing for unusual disorders, including evaluations for underlying autoimmune or malignant disorders, genetic tests for inherited neuropathies, and other unusual or selectively ordered tests. These tests are very expensive and should be ordered only after the common causes of neuropathy are excluded. Unless the neuropathy can be substantially alleviated or cured, symptomatic treatment (most often for pain) plays a significant role for these patients.

  17. High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part B. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco), and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasibility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part B of Volume 3 contains the following contents: (1) project impact assessment which covers geological impacts, hydrology, ecological impacts, air quality and meteorology, land use, archaeology, aesthetics, acoustics, socioeconomic impacts, and peat resources; (2) impact mitigation which covers hydrology, ecology, air quality, archaeology, acoustics, and socioeconomics; (3) conclusions; and (4) appendices. 2 figures, 18 tables.

  18. Circuit modeling of the electrical impedance: part III. Disuse following bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, C A

    2013-05-01

    Multifrequency measurements of the electrical impedance of muscle have been extended to the study of disuse following bone fracture, and analyzed using the five-element circuit model used earlier in the study of the effects of disease. Eighteen subjects recovering from simple fractures on upper or lower limbs were examined (ten males, eight females, aged 18-66). Muscles on uninjured contralateral limbs were used as comparison standards, and results are presented in terms of the ratios p(injured)/p(uninjured), where p stands for the circuit parameter r1, r2, r3, 1/c1 or 1/c2. These are strikingly similar to the diseased-to-healthy ratios for patients with neuromuscular disease, reported in part I of this series. In particular, r1 is virtually unaffected and the ratios for r2, r3, 1/c1 and 1/c2 can be as large as in serious disease. Furthermore, the same pattern of relationships between the parameters is found, suggesting that there is a common underlying mechanism for the impedance changes. Atrophy and fibrosis are examined as candidates for that mechanism, but it is argued that their effects are too small to explain the observed changes. Fundamental considerations aside, the sensitivity, reproducibility and technical simplicity of the technique recommend its use for in-flight assessments of muscles during orbital or interplanetary missions.

  19. Figures and institutions of the neurological sciences in Paris from 1800 to 1950. Part III: neurology.

    PubMed

    Broussolle, E; Poirier, J; Clarac, F; Barbara, J-G

    2012-04-01

    We present a short historical review of the major figures, their administrative functions and their works that contributed to make Paris a renowned centre of physiology and neurology during the xixth and the first half of the xxth century. We purposely chose to focus on the period 1800-1950, as 1800 corresponds to the actual beginning of neurosciences, and 1950 marks their exponential rise. Our presentation is divided into four chapters, matching the main disciplines which have progressed and contributed the most to the knowledge we have of the brain sciences: anatomy, physiology, neurology, and psychiatry-psychology. The present article is the third of four parts of this review, and deals with neurology. A special credit should be given to Jean-Martin Charcot who founded the Salpêtrière School of neurology and became one of the world's most important neurologists of the xixth century. We provide below the biographical sketches of Armand Trousseau, Guillaume Benjamin Amand Duchenne, Jean-Martin Charcot, Alfred Vulpian, Désiré-Magloire Bourneville, Paul Richer, Henri Parinaud, Albert Pitres, Jules Joseph Dejerine, Mrs. Augusta Dejerine-Klumpke, Édouard Brissaud, Pierre Marie, Georges Édouard Brutus Gilles de la Tourette, Joseph Babinski, André Thomas, Georges Marinesco, Achille Alexandre Souques, Georges Guillain and Charles Foix. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. History of clubfoot treatment; part III (twentieth century): back to the future.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2017-09-06

    Clubfoot is one of the most common congenital orthopaedic anomalies and was described by Hippocrates in the year 400 BC. From manipulation in antiquity to splint and plaster in the Renaissance the treatment had improved before tenotomy. Many surgical treatments were tested during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and will be explained in this manuscript; however, the pathology still continues to challenge the paediatric orthopedic surgeon as it has a notorious tendency to relapse, irrespective of whether the foot is treated with conservative or operative means. Part of the reason that the foot relapses is the surgeon's failure to recognize the underlying pathoanatomy. Clubfoot is often automatically assumed to be an equinovarus deformity, however, other permutations and combinations, such as calcaneovalgus, equinovalgus and calcaneovarus, are possible. Out of these combinations, calcaneovalgus occurs most frequently, followed by equinovarus deformity. In more than 90% of the cases, calcaneovalgus responds to conservative treatment, which involves passive manipulation and usually does not require casting or operative intervention as has been demonstrated by Ponseti.

  1. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit E: Successful Selling. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit E focuses on personal (face-to-face)…

  2. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit D: Marketing Management. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit D focuses on market management. It…

  3. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit A: Managing the Business. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in Part III is operating a business. Unit A focuses on the management process. It…

  4. PACE. A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship. Part III: Being an Entrepreneur. Unit H: Business Protection. Research and Development Series No. 194 C-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This three-part curriculum for entrepreneurship education is primarily for postsecondary level, including four-year colleges and adult education, but it can be adapted for special groups or vocational teacher education. The emphasis of the eight instructional units in part III is operating a business. Unit H focuses on business protection. It…

  5. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 36 - Noise Levels for Transport Category and Jet Airplanes Under § 36.103

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Noise Levels for Transport Category and Jet..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Pt. 36, App. B Appendix B to Part 36—Noise Levels for Transport Category and Jet Airplanes Under § 36.103 Sec...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 36 - Noise Levels for Transport Category and Jet Airplanes Under § 36.103

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Noise Levels for Transport Category and Jet..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Pt. 36, App. B Appendix B to Part 36—Noise Levels for Transport Category and Jet Airplanes Under § 36.103 Sec...

  7. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 36 - Noise Levels for Transport Category and Jet Airplanes Under § 36.103

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Noise Levels for Transport Category and Jet..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Pt. 36, App. B Appendix B to Part 36—Noise Levels for Transport Category and Jet Airplanes Under § 36.103 Sec...

  8. AICRG, Part III: The influence of antibiotic use on the survival of a new implant design.

    PubMed

    Morris, Harold F; Ochi, Shigeru; Plezia, Richard; Gilbert, Harry; Dent, C Daniel; Pikulski, James; Lambert, Paul M

    2004-01-01

    The American College of Surgeons guidelines suggest that complex oral surgery may benefit from prophylactic antibiotic coverage. The use of preoperative antibiotics, postoperative antibiotics, or both during implant placement is a widely accepted practice in the United States, whereas dentists in other countries rarely use antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to determine if antibiotic coverage at the time of implant placement improves the survival of the Ankylos implant. As part of a comprehensive, multicentered, multidisciplinary, prospective, independent, international clinical study, designed and coordinated in the United States by the Ankylos Implant Clinical Research Group (AICRG), the use of preoperative (several regimens) and postoperative antibiotics (yes/no) were carefully documented to assess their influence on improving survival. A total of 1500 Ankylos implants were placed and followed for a period of 3 to 5 years. The decision to use antibiotics and the regimen to be employed was made by the treating surgeon. Failure was defined as removal of the implant for any reason. All data were entered into a computerized database for analysis. The use of preoperative antibiotics produced no significant improvement (P = .21, Fisher's exact test) in survival compared with those placed without antibiotic coverage. There was no significant difference between the regimens defined as AHA-1990, AHA-1997, and Peterson's recommendations. The results of this study suggest that there was little or no advantage to providing antibiotic coverage when placing this implant. These findings also suggest that the use of antibiotics for implant placement may not be as beneficial as once believed. If validated by other studies, the elimination of this practice for routine implant placement would represent a small but significant step forward in the reduction of unnecessary antibiotic use.

  9. [Validation of the questionnaire for adolescents concerning ailments of lumbosacral region. Part III: validity].

    PubMed

    Baczkiewicz, Maja; Demczuk-Włodarczyk, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    The third part of the series of articles includes the results of validity and coherence check conducted over the LBP questionnaire designed for pupils aged 13-18. 22 adolescents aged 13-17 were randomly chosen from the group of 124 pupils, who filled in the questionnaire using stratification to 3 groups: without LBP, LBP in a life time, but not in the week preceding the testing and LBP in the preceding week. The validity of questions was tested by comparison to the data obtained from parents and in clinical testing conducted by a physiotherapist, which took place within two weeks from the first questionnaire session. The questions were found valid if the answers or indexes counted from the answers were consistent with data from clinical testing and from parents. For birth date, height and weight data from parents were used. Data from clinical testing served to verify: height, weight, presence and location of pain (local symptoms of overloading were palpated), faulty posture and directional preference according to McKenzie. With reference to some questions the coherence check was performed, by comparing the answers to questions logically linked. As a result of validity and coherence check rejected were the questions about: intensive growth period (small number of answers together with many incoherent ones), about beginning of pain episode (lack of coherence), about directional preference (differences with clinical testing) and about faulty posture (not consistent with findings in clinical testing). On the other hand the question about presence of LBP proved to be highly specific, good results were also found as to the questions about birth date, height and weight. The rest of the questions tested were found acceptable.

  10. Inventory-transportation integrated optimization for maintenance spare parts of high-speed trains.

    PubMed

    Lin, Boliang; Wang, Jiaxi; Wang, Huasheng; Wang, Zhongkai; Li, Jian; Lin, Ruixi; Xiao, Jie; Wu, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a 0-1 programming model aimed at obtaining the optimal inventory policy and transportation mode for maintenance spare parts of high-speed trains. To obtain the model parameters for occasionally-replaced spare parts, a demand estimation method based on the maintenance strategies of China's high-speed railway system is proposed. In addition, we analyse the shortage time using PERT, and then calculate the unit time shortage cost from the viewpoint of train operation revenue. Finally, a real-world case study from Shanghai Depot is conducted to demonstrate our method. Computational results offer an effective and efficient decision support for inventory managers.

  11. Inventory-transportation integrated optimization for maintenance spare parts of high-speed trains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaxi; Wang, Huasheng; Wang, Zhongkai; Li, Jian; Lin, Ruixi; Xiao, Jie; Wu, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a 0–1 programming model aimed at obtaining the optimal inventory policy and transportation mode for maintenance spare parts of high-speed trains. To obtain the model parameters for occasionally-replaced spare parts, a demand estimation method based on the maintenance strategies of China’s high-speed railway system is proposed. In addition, we analyse the shortage time using PERT, and then calculate the unit time shortage cost from the viewpoint of train operation revenue. Finally, a real-world case study from Shanghai Depot is conducted to demonstrate our method. Computational results offer an effective and efficient decision support for inventory managers. PMID:28472097

  12. Anaerobic Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens: Analysis of the electron transport chain

    SciTech Connect

    Daad Saffarini

    2004-01-20

    The goals of the project were to isolate mutants that are deficient in metal reduction, identify components of the electron transport chain that are involved in this process, and purify some of these proteins for biochemical analyses. In the 3-year period since the start of the project, we have accomplished many of these goals. We have isolated several new S. oneidensis mutants that are deficient in metal reduction, and have initiated the development of vectors for the overexpression of cytochromes and other proteins in S. oneidensis. We have also overexpressed CymA, one of the c cytochromes that are involved in metal reduction.

  13. Effects of Surface Conditions on Carrier Transport in III-V Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    large enough that charging effects would complicate the XPS measurements. Consequently, a doping density in the 1016 cm-3 range is very suitable for XPS...constant, T is the absolute temperature, Nc is the effective conduction-band density of states and ND is the donor density . For ND W1017 cm-3 , EcEF...CHART NAIIONAt BLRLJALI Of MANDARD, lq% A AFWAL-TR-81-1200 AD A109 7 (0 3 EFFECTS OF SURFACE CONDITIONS ON CARRIER TRANSPORT IN Ill-V COMPOUNDS R.W

  14. HLA alleles and haplotypes among the Lakota Sioux: report of the ASHI minority workshops, part III.

    PubMed

    Leffell, Mary S; Fallin, M Daniele; Hildebrand, William H; Cavett, Joshua W; Iglehart, Brian A; Zachary, Andrea A

    2004-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II alleles were defined for 302 Lakota Sioux American Indians as part of the American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics coordinated studies on minority populations. The study group was comprised of adult volunteers from the Cheyenne River and Ogala Sioux tribes residing, respectively, on the Cheyenne River and Pine Ridge Reservations in South Dakota. Of the participants, 263 (87%) claimed full American Indian ancestry through both maternal and paternal grandparents. The study group included 25 nuclear families that were informative for genotyping. HLA phenotypes from 202 adults with no other known first-degree relative included in the study were used for calculation of allele and haplotype frequencies by maximum likelihood estimation. HLA-A, -B, and -Cw alleles were found to be in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. Deviation from equilibrium was observed for DRB1 alleles (p=0.01), but could be attributed to the sample size and the occurrence of some genotypes with low expected frequencies. Polymorphism among the Sioux was limited with four to seven alleles comprising >80% of those observed at each locus. Several alleles were found at high frequency (0.05-0.30) among the Sioux that are also prevalent in other Native Americans and Alaska Natives, including: A*2402, *3101, and *0206; B*3501,*3901, *5101, and *2705; Cw*0702, *0404, and *03041; DRB1*0407, *0404, *1402, and *16021; and DQB1*0301, *0302, and *0402. DRB1*0811, which has been only previously described in Navajo and Tlingit Indians, was found to occur at a frequency of 0.119 among the Sioux. Two new alleles were defined among the Sioux: Cw*0204 and DRB1*040703, which were found in two and four individuals, respectively. In the haplotype analyses, significant linkage disequilibrium (p<0.00001) was seen in all pairwise comparisons of loci and numerous two and three locus haplotypes were found to have strong, positive linkage disequilibrium values. The two most

  15. Stochastic foundations of undulatory transport phenomena: generalized Poisson-Kac processes—part I basic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Brasiello, Antonio; Crescitelli, Silvestro

    2017-08-01

    This article introduces the notion of generalized Poisson-Kac (GPK) processes which generalize the class of ‘telegrapher’s noise dynamics’ introduced by Kac (1974 Rocky Mount. J. Math. 4 497) in 1974, using Poissonian stochastic perturbations. In GPK processes the stochastic perturbation acts as a switching amongst a set of stochastic velocity vectors controlled by a Markov-chain dynamics. GPK processes possess trajectory regularity (almost everywhere) and asymptotic Kac limit, namely the convergence towards Brownian motion (and to stochastic dynamics driven by Wiener perturbations), which characterizes also the long-term/long-distance properties of these processes. In this article we introduce the structural properties of GPK processes, leaving all the physical implications to part II and part III (Giona et al 2016a J. Phys. A: Math. Theor., 2016b J. Phys. A: Math. Theor.).

  16. Optical properties and electrical transport of thin films of terbium(III) bis(phthalocyanine) on cobalt

    PubMed Central

    Robaschik, Peter; Siles, Pablo F; Bülz, Daniel; Richter, Peter; Monecke, Manuel; Fronk, Michael; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Grimm, Daniel; Schmidt, Oliver G; Ruben, Mario; Zahn, Dietrich R T

    2014-01-01

    Summary The optical and electrical properties of terbium(III) bis(phthalocyanine) (TbPc2) films on cobalt substrates were studied using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) and current sensing atomic force microscopy (cs-AFM). Thin films of TbPc2 with a thickness between 18 nm and 87 nm were prepared by organic molecular beam deposition onto a cobalt layer grown by electron beam evaporation. The molecular orientation of the molecules on the metallic film was estimated from the analysis of the spectroscopic ellipsometry data. A detailed analysis of the AFM topography shows that the TbPc2 films consist of islands which increase in size with the thickness of the organic film. Furthermore, the cs-AFM technique allows local variations of the organic film topography to be correlated with electrical transport properties. Local current mapping as well as local I–V spectroscopy shows that despite the granular structure of the films, the electrical transport is uniform through the organic films on the microscale. The AFM-based electrical measurements allow the local charge carrier mobility of the TbPc2 thin films to be quantified with nanoscale resolution. PMID:25551034

  17. Yersinia enterocolitica type III secretion: evidence for the ability to transport proteins that are folded prior to secretion.

    PubMed

    Wilharm, Gottfried; Lehmann, Verena; Neumayer, Wibke; Trcek, Janja; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2004-07-12

    Pathogenic Yersinia species (Y. enterocolitica, Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis) share a type three secretion system (TTSS) which allows translocation of effector proteins (called Yops) into host cells. It is believed that proteins are delivered through a hollow needle with an inner diameter of 2-3 nm. Thus transport seems to require substrates which are essentially unfolded. Recent work from different groups suggests that the Yersinia TTSS cannot accommodate substrates which are folded prior to secretion. It was suggested that folding is prevented either by co-translational secretion or by the assistance of specific Yop chaperones (called Sycs). In this study we have fused YopE secretion signals of various length to the mouse dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) in order to analyse the DHFR folding state prior to secretion. We could demonstrate that secretion-deficient as well as secretion-competent YopE-DHFR fusions complexed to SycE can be efficiently purified from Yersinia cytosol by affinity chromatography using methotrexate-agarose. This implies the folding of the DHFR fusion moiety despite SycE binding and contradicts the previously presented model of folding inhibition by chaperone binding. Secretion-deficient YopE-DHFR fusions caused severe jamming of the TTSS. This observation contradicts the co-translational secretion model. We present evidence that the Yersinia TTSS is familiar with the processing of transport substrates which are folded prior to secretion. We therefore predict that an unfoldase is involved in type III secretion.

  18. A sequential partly iterative approach for multicomponent reactive transport with CORE2D

    SciTech Connect

    Samper, J.; Xu, T.; Yang, C.

    2008-11-01

    CORE{sup 2D} V4 is a finite element code for modeling partly or fully saturated water flow, heat transport and multicomponent reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. It can handle coupled microbial processes and geochemical reactions such as acid-base, aqueous complexation, redox, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/exsolution, ion exchange, sorption via linear and nonlinear isotherms, sorption via surface complexation. Hydraulic parameters may change due to mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. Coupled transport and chemical equations are solved by using sequential iterative approaches. A sequential partly-iterative approach (SPIA) is presented which improves the accuracy of the traditional sequential noniterative approach (SNIA) and is more efficient than the general sequential iterative approach (SIA). While SNIA leads to a substantial saving of computing time, it introduces numerical errors which are especially large for cation exchange reactions. SPIA improves the efficiency of SIA because the iteration between transport and chemical equations is only performed in nodes with a large mass transfer between solid and liquid phases. The efficiency and accuracy of SPIA are compared to those of SIA and SNIA using synthetic examples and a case study of reactive transport through the Llobregat Delta aquitard in Spain. SPIA is found to be as accurate as SIA while requiring significantly less CPU time. In addition, SPIA is much more accurate than SNIA with only a minor increase in computing time. A further enhancement of the efficiency of SPIA is achieved by improving the efficiency of the Newton-Raphson method used for solving chemical equations. Such an improvement is obtained by working with increments of log-concentrations and ignoring the terms of the Jacobian matrix containing derivatives of activity coefficients. A proof is given for the symmetry and non-singularity of the Jacobian matrix

  19. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Subpart A reference Applies tosubpart III Comment § 63.1 YES Except that § 63.1(c)(2) is not applicable to the extent area sources are not subject to subpart III. § 63.2 YES Definitions are modified and supplemented by § 63.1292. § 63.3 YES § 63.4 YES § 63.5 YES § 63.6 (a)-(d) YES § 63.6(e) (1)-(2) YES § 63.6(e...

  20. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Subpart A reference Applies tosubpart III Comment § 63.1 YES Except that § 63.1(c)(2) is not applicable to the extent area sources are not subject to subpart III. § 63.2 YES Definitions are modified and supplemented by § 63.1292. § 63.3 YES § 63.4 YES § 63.5 YES § 63.6 (a)-(d) YES § 63.6(e) (1)-(2) YES § 63.6(e...

  1. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tosubpart III Comment § 63.1 YES Except that § 63.1(c)(2) is not applicable to the extent area sources are not subject to subpart III. § 63.2 YES Definitions are modified and supplemented by § 63.1292. § 63.3 YES § 63.4 YES § 63.5 YES § 63.6 (a)-(d) YES § 63.6(e) (1)-(2) YES § 63.6(e)(3) NO Owners and...

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tosubpart III Comment § 63.1 YES Except that § 63.1(c)(2) is not applicable to the extent area sources are not subject to subpart III. § 63.2 YES Definitions are modified and supplemented by § 63.1292. § 63.3 YES § 63.4 YES § 63.5 YES § 63.6 (a)-(d) YES § 63.6(e) (1)-(2) YES § 63.6(e)(3) NO Owners and...

  3. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reference Applies tosubpart III Comment § 63.1 YES Except that § 63.1(c)(2) is not applicable to the extent area sources are not subject to subpart III. § 63.2 YES Definitions are modified and supplemented by § 63.1292. § 63.3 YES § 63.4 YES § 63.5 YES § 63.6 (a)-(d) YES § 63.6(e) (1)-(2) YES § 63.6(e)(3) NO...

  4. Plasma transport in stochastic magnetic fields. III. Kinetics of test-particle diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.; Kleva, R.G.

    1982-07-01

    A discussion is given of test particle transport in the presence of specified stochastic magnetic fields, with particular emphasis on the collisional limit. Certain paradoxes and inconsistencies in the literature regarding the form of the scaling laws are resolved by carefully distinguishing a number of physically distinct correlation lengths, and thus by identifying several collisional subregimes. The common procedure of averaging the conventional fluid equations over the statistics of a random field is shown to fail in some important cases because of breakdown of the Chapman-Enskog ordering in the presence of a stochastic field component with short autocorrelation length. A modified perturbation theory is introduced which leads to a Kubo-like formula valid in all collisionality regimes. The direct-interaction approximation is shown to fail in the interesting limit in which the orbit exponentiation length L/sub K/ appears explicitly. A higher order renormalized kinetic theory in which L/sub K/ appears naturally is discussed and used to rederive more systematically the results of the heuristic scaling arguments.

  5. Study of the Need for Educational Manpower for Handicapped Children and Youth: Part D - Volume III, Phase III. State Analysis Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Raymond D.; And Others

    The document is the third of three volumes (see also EC 032 850 and EC 032 851) OF State Analysis Reports resulting from Phase III of the Study of the Need for Educational Manpower for Handicapped Children and Youth, which involved a validation study and state surveys related to the Manpower Requirements Projection Model (MRPM). Included in the…

  6. 41 CFR 302-10.203 - What are my allowances when a mobile home is transported partly by commercial carrier and partly...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are my allowances when a mobile home is transported partly by commercial carrier and partly by POV? 302-10.203 Section 302-10.203 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System...

  7. RF thermal and new cold part design studies on TTF-III input coupler for Project-X

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Shilun; Adolphsen, Chris E.; Li, Zenghai; Solyak, Nikolay A.; Gonin, Ivan V.

    2015-05-15

    An RF power coupler is one of the key components in a superconducting (SC) linac. It provides RF power to the SC cavity and interconnects different temperature layers (1.8 K, 4.2 K, 70 K and 300 K). The TTF-III coupler is one of the most promising candidates for the High Energy (HE) linac of Project X, but it cannot meet the average power requirements because of the relatively high temperature rise on the warm inner conductor, so some design modifications will be required. In this paper, we describe our simulation studies on the copper coating thickness on the warm inner conductor with RRR values of 10 and 100. Our purpose is to rebalance the dynamic and static loads, and finally lower the temperature rise along the warm inner conductor. Additionally, to get stronger coupling, better power handling and less multipacting probability, one new cold part design was proposed using a 60 mm coaxial line; the corresponding multipacting simulation studies have also been investigated.

  8. A Comparative Study on Safe Pile Capacity as Shown in Table 1 of IS 2911 (Part III): 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakrashi, Somdev

    2017-06-01

    Code of practice for design and construction of under reamed pile foundations: IS 2911 (Part-III)—1980 presents one table in respect of safe load for bored cast in situ under reamed piles in sandy and clayey soils including black cotton soils, stem dia. of pile ranging from 20 to 50 cm and its effective length being 3.50 m. A comparative study, was taken up by working out safe pile capacity for one 400 dia., 3.5 m long bored cast in situ under reamed pile based on subsoil properties obtained from soil investigation work as well as subsoil properties of different magnitudes of clayey, sandy soils and comparing the same with the safe pile capacity shown in Table 1 of that IS Code. The study reveals that safe pile capacity computed from subsoil properties, barring a very few cases, considerably differs from that shown in the aforesaid code and looks forward for more research work and study to find out a conclusive explanation of this probable anomaly.

  9. Optically detected carrier transport in III/V semiconductor QW structures: experiments, model calculations and applications in fast 1.55 µm laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmer, H.; Marcinkevičius, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews optically detected carrier dynamics in III/V semiconductor quantum well (QW) heterostructures perpendicular to the interfaces. Photoluminescence emissions originating from different semiconductor layers are recorded in a time-resolved way to monitor the carrier dynamics between these layers. The experimental methods presented provide a very high spatial and temporal resolution, partly even in the nanometer and sub-picosecond ranges, respectively. Model calculations based on a self-consistent solution of the continuity equation, the Poisson equation and rate-equation(s) are used to evaluate the experimental data. It will be demonstrated that experiments using several specially tailored semiconductor heterostructures enable the following individual dynamic effects to be studied and separated: transport in extended unquantized layers, capture into the QWs, relaxation in the QWs, tunneling between the QWs and thermal re-emission from the QWs. It will be shown that several basic physical effects have to be studied and understood before modern high-speed semiconductor laser devices can be designed and implemented. By adding levels of increasing complexity, this review starts from simple basic structures to finally approach real laser structures in a sequence of consecutive steps. AlGaInAs and GaInAsP heterostructures are compared with respect to interwell transfer efficiencies and problems in technological implementation. This review proceeds from basic research on carrier dynamics to applications in high-speed laser devices. Throughout the review an overview of the experimental and theoretical literature is given.

  10. Relating Reactive Transport to Hierarchical Sedimentary Architecture. Part 1. Horizontal Spatial Correlation of Hydraulic and Reactive Transport Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzi, R. W., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    A number of studies of the spatial correlation of log permeability (Y) in different sedimentary aquifers are reviewed showing that the spatial correlation structure can be defined by how the proportion of lag transitions crossing different facies (i.e. the cross-transition probability structure) increases with increasing lag distance. The common underlying cross-transition structure can contain substructures with different correlation ranges corresponding to different scales of sedimentary facies within the hierarchy of the sedimentary architecture. For each substructure, the standard deviation in facies length relative to the mean can mostly define the shape, and the proportions and mean length of facies define the range. An illustrative example from the Borden research site shows the horizontal spatial bivariate correlation of Y and of reactive attributes (R) affecting subsurface transport are both defined by the same underlying cross-transition probability structures. Thus, the horizontal Y and R autosemivariograms and the R-Y cross-semivariogram have the same underlying composite correlation structure and substructures (shape and range in the rise to a sill). Such cross-transition probability based correlation structures are used in the companion Part 2 presentation (Soltanian et al.) to develop models which relate the time-dependent effective retardation and the particle displacement variance to hierarchical sedimentary architecture.

  11. Elasto-dynamic analysis of a gear pump-Part III: Experimental validation procedure and model extension to helical gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns external gear pumps for automotive applications, which operate at high speed and low pressure. In previous works of the authors (Part I and II, [1,2]), a non-linear lumped-parameter kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps was presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machine. The two main sources of noise and vibration are considered: pressure pulsation and gear meshing. The model has been used in order to foresee the influence of working conditions and design modifications on vibration generation. The model's experimental validation is a difficult task. Thus, Part III proposes a novel methodology for the validation carried out by the comparison of simulations and experimental results concerning forces and moments: it deals with the external and inertial components acting on the gears, estimated by the model, and the reactions and inertial components on the pump casing and the test plate, obtained by measurements. The validation is carried out comparing the level of the time synchronous average in the time domain and the waterfall maps in the frequency domain, with particular attention to identify system resonances. The validation results are satisfactory globally, but discrepancies are still present. Moreover, the assessed model has been properly modified for the application to a new virtual pump prototype with helical gears in order to foresee gear accelerations and dynamic forces. Part IV is focused on improvements in the modelling and analysis of the phenomena bound to the pressure evolution around the gears in order to achieve results closer to the measured values. As a matter of fact, the simulation results have shown that a variable meshing stiffness has a notable contribution on the dynamic behaviour of the pump but this is not as important as the pressure phenomena. As a consequence, the original model was modified with the

  12. Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part III--Practitioners and Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulin, David; Martinez, David; Aenchbacher, Amy; Aiello, Rocco; Doyle, Mike; Hilgenbrinck, Linda; Busse, Sean; Cappuccio, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In Part III of the feature, physical educators and adapted physical educators offer current best practices as models of implementation for readers. Contributions included are: (1) Answer to the Dear Colleague Letter from the Anchorage School District's Adapted Sport Program (David Poulin); (2) Georgia's Adapted Physical Educators Response to the…

  13. Proceedings of the EMU Conference on Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions (Dearborn, Michigan, April 5-7, 1984). Part III: Taking the Humanities to Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voght, Geoffrey M., Ed.

    Part III of the proceedings contains 12 presentations. They are: "The Role of Business Language in the Traditional Curriculum" (Michel Rocchi); "Foreign Languages for Business and the Professions Belong in the Liberal Arts" (Robert A. Kreiter); "How Much and How Far? Commercial French and the Student, Instructor, Administrator, and the Business…

  14. Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part III--Practitioners and Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulin, David; Martinez, David; Aenchbacher, Amy; Aiello, Rocco; Doyle, Mike; Hilgenbrinck, Linda; Busse, Sean; Cappuccio, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In Part III of the feature, physical educators and adapted physical educators offer current best practices as models of implementation for readers. Contributions included are: (1) Answer to the Dear Colleague Letter from the Anchorage School District's Adapted Sport Program (David Poulin); (2) Georgia's Adapted Physical Educators Response to the…

  15. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (83rd, Phoenix, Arizona, August 9-12, 2000). Miscellaneous, Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Miscellaneous, part III section of the proceedings contains the following 11 papers: "The Relationship between Health and Fitness Magazine Reading and Eating-Disordered Weight-Loss Methods among High School Girls" (Steven R. Thomsen, Michelle M. Weber, and Lora Beth Brown); "A Practical Exercise for Teaching Ethical Decision…

  16. Arabidopsis chloroplast lipid transport protein TGD2 disrupts membranes and is part of a large complex.

    PubMed

    Roston, Rebecca; Gao, Jinpeng; Xu, Changcheng; Benning, Christoph

    2011-06-01

    In most plants the assembly of the photosynthetic thylakoid membrane requires lipid precursors synthesized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Thus, the transport of lipids from the ER to the chloroplast is essential for biogenesis of the thylakoids. TGD2 is one of four proteins in Arabidopsis required for lipid import into the chloroplast, and was found to bind phosphatidic acid in vitro. However, the significance of phosphatidic acid binding for the function of TGD2 in vivo and TGD2 interaction with membranes remained unclear. Developing three functional assays probing how TGD2 affects lipid bilayers in vitro, we show that it perturbs membranes to the point of fusion, causes liposome leakage and redistributes lipids in the bilayer. By identifying and characterizing five new mutant alleles, we demonstrate that these functions are impaired in specific mutants with lipid phenotypes in vivo. At the structural level, we show that TGD2 is part of a protein complex larger than 500 kDa, the formation of which is disrupted in two mutant alleles, indicative of the biological relevance of this TGD2-containing complex. Based on the data presented, we propose that TGD2, as part of a larger complex, forms a lipid transport conduit between the inner and outer chloroplast envelope membranes, with its N terminus anchored in the inner membrane and its C terminus binding phosphatidic acid in the outer membrane.

  17. A novel mechanism of regulating the ATPase VPS4 by its cofactor LIP5 and the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III protein CHMP5.

    PubMed

    Vild, Cody J; Li, Yan; Guo, Emily Z; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-03-13

    Disassembly of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery from biological membranes is a critical final step in cellular processes that require the ESCRT function. This reaction is catalyzed by VPS4, an AAA-ATPase whose activity is tightly regulated by a host of proteins, including LIP5 and the ESCRT-III proteins. Here, we present structural and functional analyses of molecular interactions between human VPS4, LIP5, and the ESCRT-III proteins. The N-terminal domain of LIP5 (LIP5NTD) is required for LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4, and the ESCRT-III protein CHMP5 strongly inhibits the stimulation. Both of these observations are distinct from what was previously described for homologous yeast proteins. The crystal structure of LIP5NTD in complex with the MIT (microtubule-interacting and transport)-interacting motifs of CHMP5 and a second ESCRT-III protein, CHMP1B, was determined at 1 Å resolution. It reveals an ESCRT-III binding induced moderate conformational change in LIP5NTD, which results from insertion of a conserved CHMP5 tyrosine residue (Tyr(182)) at the core of LIP5NTD structure. Mutation of Tyr(182) partially relieves the inhibition displayed by CHMP5. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of VPS4 regulation in metazoans, where CHMP5 functions as a negative allosteric switch to control LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4.

  18. A Novel Mechanism of Regulating the ATPase VPS4 by Its Cofactor LIP5 and the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT)-III Protein CHMP5

    DOE PAGES

    Vild, Cody J.; Li, Yan; Guo, Emily Z.; ...

    2015-01-30

    Disassembly of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery from biological membranes is a critical final step in cellular processes that require the ESCRT function. This reaction is catalyzed by VPS4, an AAA-ATPase whose activity is tightly regulated by a host of proteins, including LIP5 and the ESCRT-III proteins. In this paper, we present structural and functional analyses of molecular interactions between human VPS4, LIP5, and the ESCRT-III proteins. The N-terminal domain of LIP5 (LIP5NTD) is required for LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4, and the ESCRT-III protein CHMP5 strongly inhibits the stimulation. Both of these observations are distinct frommore » what was previously described for homologous yeast proteins. The crystal structure of LIP5NTD in complex with the MIT (microtubule-interacting and transport)-interacting motifs of CHMP5 and a second ESCRT-III protein, CHMP1B, was determined at 1 Å resolution. It reveals an ESCRT-III binding induced moderate conformational change in LIP5NTD, which results from insertion of a conserved CHMP5 tyrosine residue (Tyr182) at the core of LIP5NTD structure. Finally, mutation of Tyr182 partially relieves the inhibition displayed by CHMP5. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of VPS4 regulation in metazoans, where CHMP5 functions as a negative allosteric switch to control LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4.« less

  19. A Novel Mechanism of Regulating the ATPase VPS4 by Its Cofactor LIP5 and the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT)-III Protein CHMP5

    SciTech Connect

    Vild, Cody J.; Li, Yan; Guo, Emily Z.; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-01-30

    Disassembly of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery from biological membranes is a critical final step in cellular processes that require the ESCRT function. This reaction is catalyzed by VPS4, an AAA-ATPase whose activity is tightly regulated by a host of proteins, including LIP5 and the ESCRT-III proteins. In this paper, we present structural and functional analyses of molecular interactions between human VPS4, LIP5, and the ESCRT-III proteins. The N-terminal domain of LIP5 (LIP5NTD) is required for LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4, and the ESCRT-III protein CHMP5 strongly inhibits the stimulation. Both of these observations are distinct from what was previously described for homologous yeast proteins. The crystal structure of LIP5NTD in complex with the MIT (microtubule-interacting and transport)-interacting motifs of CHMP5 and a second ESCRT-III protein, CHMP1B, was determined at 1 Å resolution. It reveals an ESCRT-III binding induced moderate conformational change in LIP5NTD, which results from insertion of a conserved CHMP5 tyrosine residue (Tyr182) at the core of LIP5NTD structure. Finally, mutation of Tyr182 partially relieves the inhibition displayed by CHMP5. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of VPS4 regulation in metazoans, where CHMP5 functions as a negative allosteric switch to control LIP5-mediated stimulation of VPS4.

  20. Denatured ethanol release into gasoline residuals, Part 2: Fate and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Juliana G.; Barker, James F.

    2013-05-01

    When denatured ethanol (E95) is spilled in a site with previous gasoline contamination, it modifies the source distribution (Part 1). But it can also impact the transport and fate of hydrocarbons in the groundwater. Ethanol could cause an increase in dissolved concentrations and more persistent plumes due to cosolvency and decreased hydrocarbon biodegradation rates. To investigate these possibilities, two controlled releases were performed: first of E10 (gasoline with 10% ethanol) and one year later of E95 on top of the gasoline. Groundwater concentrations were monitored above and below the water table in multilevel wells. Soil cores and vapor samples were also collected over a period of approximately 400 days. Surprisingly, ethanol transport was very limited; at wells located 2.3 m downgradient from the mid-point of the release trench, the maximum concentration measured was around 2400 mg/L. After 392 days, only 3% of the ethanol released migrated past 2.3 m, and no ethanol remained in the source. The processes that caused ethanol loss were likely volatilization, aerobic biodegradation in the unsaturated zone, and anaerobic biodegradation. Evidence that biodegradation was significant in the source zone includes increased CO2 concentrations in the vapor and the presence of biodegradation products (acetate concentrations up to 2300 mg/L). The position of the dissolved hydrocarbon plumes was slightly shifted, but the concentrations and mass flux remained within the same range as before the spill, indicating that cosolvency was not significant. Hydrocarbons in the groundwater were significantly biodegraded, with more than 63% of the mass being removed in 7.5 m, even when ethanol was present in the groundwater. The impacts of ethanol on the hydrocarbon transport and fate were minimal, largely due to the separation of ethanol and hydrocarbons in the source (Part 1).

  1. Denatured ethanol release into gasoline residuals, Part 2: fate and transport.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Juliana G; Barker, James F

    2013-05-01

    When denatured ethanol (E95) is spilled in a site with previous gasoline contamination, it modifies the source distribution (Part 1). But it can also impact the transport and fate of hydrocarbons in the groundwater. Ethanol could cause an increase in dissolved concentrations and more persistent plumes due to cosolvency and decreased hydrocarbon biodegradation rates. To investigate these possibilities, two controlled releases were performed: first of E10 (gasoline with 10% ethanol) and one year later of E95 on top of the gasoline. Groundwater concentrations were monitored above and below the water table in multilevel wells. Soil cores and vapor samples were also collected over a period of approximately 400 days. Surprisingly, ethanol transport was very limited; at wells located 2.3m downgradient from the mid-point of the release trench, the maximum concentration measured was around 2400 mg/L. After 392 days, only 3% of the ethanol released migrated past 2.3 m, and no ethanol remained in the source. The processes that caused ethanol loss were likely volatilization, aerobic biodegradation in the unsaturated zone, and anaerobic biodegradation. Evidence that biodegradation was significant in the source zone includes increased CO2 concentrations in the vapor and the presence of biodegradation products (acetate concentrations up to 2300 mg/L). The position of the dissolved hydrocarbon plumes was slightly shifted, but the concentrations and mass flux remained within the same range as before the spill, indicating that cosolvency was not significant. Hydrocarbons in the groundwater were significantly biodegraded, with more than 63% of the mass being removed in 7.5m, even when ethanol was present in the groundwater. The impacts of ethanol on the hydrocarbon transport and fate were minimal, largely due to the separation of ethanol and hydrocarbons in the source (Part 1).

  2. 49 CFR Appendix to Part 800 - Request to the Secretary of the Department of Transportation To Investigate Certain Aircraft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... surrounding certain fixed-wing and rotorcraft aircraft accidents and to submit a report to the Board from... application, amateur-built aircraft, restricted category aircraft, and all fixed-wing aircraft which have a... Transportation To Investigate Certain Aircraft Accidents Appendix to Part 800 Transportation Other...

  3. Groundwater and solute transport modeling at Hyporheic zone of upper part Citarum River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandar, Irwan; Farazi, Hendy; Fadhilah, Rahmat; Purnandi, Cipto; Notosiswoyo, Sudarto

    2017-06-01

    Groundwater and surface water interaction is an interesting topic to be studied related to the water resources and environmental studies. The study of interaction between groundwater and river water at the Upper Part Citarum River aims to know the contribution of groundwater to the river or reversely and also solute transport of dissolved ions between them. Analysis of drill logs, vertical electrical sounding at the selected sections, measurement of dissolved ions, and groundwater modeling were applied to determine the flow and solute transport phenomena at the hyporheic zone. It showed the hyporheic zone dominated by silt and clay with hydraulic conductivity range from 10-4∼10-8 m/s. The groundwater flowing into the river with very low gradient and it shows that the Citarum River is a gaining stream. The groundwater modeling shows direct seepage of groundwater into the Citarum River is only 186 l/s, very small compared to the total discharge of the river. Total dissolved ions of the groundwater ranged from 200 to 480 ppm while the river water range from 200 to 2,000 ppm. Based on solute transport modeling it indicates dissolved ions dispersion of the Citarum River into groundwater may occur in some areas such as Bojongsoang-Dayeuh Kolot and Nanjung. This situation would increase the dissolved ions in groundwater in the region due to the contribution of the Citarum River. The results of the research can be a reference for further studies related to the mechanism of transport of the pollutants in the groundwater around the Citarum River.

  4. Information technology in chemistry research and education: Part I. Ab initio studies on the hydrolysis of aromatic diazonium ions. Part II. Theoretical study and molecular modeling of non-covalent interactions. Part III. Applying information technology in chemistry education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhengyu

    Part I of this dissertation studies the bonding in chemical reactions, while Part II studies the bonding related to inter- and intra-molecular interactions. Part III studies the application of IT technology in chemistry education. Part I of this dissertation (chapter 1 and chapter 2) focuses on the theoretical studies on the mechanism of the hydrolysis reactions of benzenediazonium ion and guaninediazonium ion. The major conclusion is that in hydrolysis reactions the "unimolecular mechanism" actually has to involve the reacting solvent molecule. Therefore, the unimolecular pathway can only serve as a conceptual model but will not happen in the reality. Chapter I concludes that the hydrolysis reaction of benzenediazonium ion takes the direct SN2Ar mechanism via a transition state but without going through a pre-coordination complex. Chapter 2 concludes that the formation of xanthine from the dediazoniation reaction of guaninediazonium ion in water takes the SN2Ar pathway without a transition state. And oxanine might come from an intermediate formed by the bimolecular deprotonation of the H atom on N3 of guaninediazonium ion synchronized with the pyrimidine ring opening reaction. Part II of this dissertation includes chapters 3, 4, and 5. Chapter 3 studies the quadrupole moment of benzene and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. We concluded that the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction is important in the arene-arene interactions. Our study shows the most stable structure of benzene dimer is the point-to-face T-shaped structure. Chapter 4 studies the intermolecular interactions that result in the disorder of the crystal of 4-Chloroacetophenone-(4-methoxyphenylethylidene). We analyzed all the nearest neighbor interactions within that crystal and found that the crystal structure is determined by its thermo-dynamical properties. Our calculation perfectly reproduced the percentage of parallel-alignment of the crystal. Part III of this dissertation is focused on the

  5. Anaerobic humus and Fe(III) reduction and electron transport pathway by a novel humus-reducing bacterium, Thauera humireducens SgZ-1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chen; Yu, Zhen; Lu, Qin; Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shun-Gui

    2015-04-01

    In this study, an anaerobic batch experiment was conducted to investigate the humus- and Fe(III)-reducing ability of a novel humus-reducing bacterium, Thauera humireducens SgZ-1. Inhibition tests were also performed to explore the electron transport pathways with various electron acceptors. The results indicate that in anaerobic conditions, strain SgZ-1 possesses the ability to reduce a humus analog, humic acids, soluble Fe(III), and Fe(III) oxides. Acetate, propionate, lactate, and pyruvate were suitable electron donors for humus and Fe(III) reduction by strain SgZ-1, while fermentable sugars (glucose and sucrose) were not. UV-visible spectra obtained from intact cells of strain SgZ-1 showed absorption peaks at 420, 522, and 553 nm, characteristic of c-type cytochromes (cyt c). Dithionite-reduced cyt c was reoxidized by Fe-EDTA and HFO (hydrous ferric oxide), which suggests that cyt c within intact cells of strain SgZ-1 has the ability to donate electrons to extracellular Fe(III) species. Inhibition tests revealed that dehydrogenases, quinones, and cytochromes b/c (cyt b/c) were involved in reduction of AQS (9, 10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid, humus analog) and oxygen. In contrast, only NADH dehydrogenase was linked to electron transport to HFO, while dehydrogenases and cyt b/c were found to participate in the reduction of Fe-EDTA. Thus, various different electron transport pathways are employed by strain SgZ-1 for different electron acceptors. The results from this study help in understanding the electron transport processes and environmental responses of the genus Thauera.

  6. Numerical modeling of humic colloid borne americium (III) migration in column experiments using the transport/speciation code K1D and the KICAM model.

    PubMed

    Schüssler, W; Artinger, R; Kim, J I; Bryan, N D; Griffin, D

    2001-02-01

    The humic colloid borne Am(III) transport was investigated in column experiments for Gorleben groundwater/sand systems. It was found that the interaction of Am with humic colloids is kinetically controlled, which strongly influences the migration behavior of Am(III). These kinetic effects have to be taken into account for transport/speciation modeling. The kinetically controlled availability model (KICAM) was developed to describe actinide sorption and transport in laboratory batch and column experiments. Application of the KICAM requires a chemical transport/speciation code, which simultaneously models both kinetically controlled processes and equilibrium reactions. Therefore, the code K1D was developed as a flexible research code that allows the inclusion of kinetic data in addition to transport features and chemical equilibrium. This paper presents the verification of K1D and its application to model column experiments investigating unimpeded humic colloid borne Am migration. Parmeters for reactive transport simulations were determined for a Gorleben groundwater system of high humic colloid concentration (GoHy 2227). A single set of parameters was used to model a series of column experiments. Model results correspond well to experimental data for the unretarded humic borne Am breakthrough.

  7. Numerical modeling of humic colloid borne Americium (III) migration in column experiments using the transport/speciation code K1D and the KICAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüßler, W.; Artinger, R.; Kim, J. I.; Bryan, N. D.; Griffin, D.

    2001-02-01

    The humic colloid borne Am(III) transport was investigated in column experiments for Gorleben groundwater/sand systems. It was found that the interaction of Am with humic colloids is kinetically controlled, which strongly influences the migration behavior of Am(III). These kinetic effects have to be taken into account for transport/speciation modeling. The kinetically controlled availability model (KICAM) was developed to describe actinide sorption and transport in laboratory batch and column experiments. Application of the KICAM requires a chemical transport/speciation code, which simultaneously models both kinetically controlled processes and equilibrium reactions. Therefore, the code K1D was developed as a flexible research code that allows the inclusion of kinetic data in addition to transport features and chemical equilibrium. This paper presents the verification of K1D and its application to model column experiments investigating unimpeded humic colloid borne Am migration. Parameters for reactive transport simulations were determined for a Gorleben groundwater system of high humic colloid concentration (GoHy 2227). A single set of parameters was used to model a series of column experiments. Model results correspond well to experimental data for the unretarded humic borne Am breakthrough.

  8. Modeling diffusion-governed solidification of ternary alloys - Part 2: Macroscopic transport phenomena and macrosegregation.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Li, J; Ludwig, A; Kharicha, A

    2014-09-01

    Part 1 of this two-part investigation presented a multiphase solidification model incorporating the finite diffusion kinetics and ternary phase diagram with the macroscopic transport phenomena (Wu et al., 2013). In Part 2, the importance of proper treatment of the finite diffusion kinetics in the calculation of macrosegregation is addressed. Calculations for a two-dimensional (2D) square casting (50 × 50 mm(2)) of Fe-0.45 wt.%C-1.06 wt.%Mn considering thermo-solutal convection and crystal sedimentation are performed. The modeling result indicates that the infinite liquid mixing kinetics as assumed by classical models (e.g., the Gulliver-Scheil or lever rule), which cannot properly consider the solute enrichment of the interdendritic or inter-granular melt at the early stage of solidification, might lead to an erroneous estimation of the macrosegregation. To confirm this statement, further theoretical and experimental evaluations are desired. The pattern and intensity of the flow and crystal sedimentation are dependent on the crystal morphologies (columnar or equiaxed); hence, the potential error of the calculated macrosegregation caused by the assumed growth kinetics depends on the crystal morphology. Finally, an illustrative simulation of an engineering 2.45-ton steel ingot is performed, and the results are compared with experimental results. This example demonstrates the model applicability for engineering castings regarding both the calculation efficiency and functionality.

  9. Energy transports by ocean and atmosphere based on an entropy extremum principle. Part I: Zonal averaged transports

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, B.J.; Smith, E.A. )

    1993-05-01

    Required global energy transports determined from Nimbus-7 satellite net radiation measurements have been separated into atmospheric and oceanic components by applying a maximum entropy production principle to the atmospheric system. Strong poleward fluxes by the oceans in the Northern Hemisphere exhibit a maximum of 2.4 10[sup 15] W at 18[degrees]N, whereas maximum atmospheric transports are found at 37[degrees]N with a magnitude of 4.5 10[sup 15] W. These results are in good agreement with other published results. In the Southern Hemisphere, atmospheric transports are found to be considerably stronger than oceanic transports, and this finding corroborates findings based on other published direct estimates. Maximum atmospheric energy transports are found at 37[degrees]S with a magnitude of 4.7 x 10[sup 15]W; two local oceanic transport maxima are shown at 18[degrees]S and 45[degrees]S with magnitudes of 1.3 x 10[sup 15] W and 1.1 x 10[sup 15] W, respectively. There is also evidence of net cross-equatorial transport in which the Southern Hemisphere oceans give rise to a net transfer of heat northward across the equator that exceeds a net transfer from Northern to Southern Hemisphere by the atmosphere. Since Southern Hemisphere results in this study should have the same degree of accuracy as in the Northern Hemisphere, these findings suggest that Southern Ocean transports are weaker than previously reported. A main implication of the study is that a maximum entropy production principle can serve as a governing rule on macroscale global climate, and in conjunction with conventional satellite measurements of the net radiation balance, provides a means to decompose atmosphere and ocean transports from the total transport field. Furthermore, the modeling methodology provides a possible means to partition the transports in a two-dimensional framework; this approach is tested on the separate ocean basins with qualified success. 59 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Structure property relationships in polymer blends and composites. Part I. Polymer/POSS composites. Part II. Poly(ethylene terephthalate) ionomer/polyamide 6 blends. Part III. Elastomer/boron nitride composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Subramanian

    Multiphase polymer systems are an increasingly important technical area of polymer science. By definition, a multiphase system is one that has two or more distinct phases. From the standpoint of commercial applications and developments, polymer blending represents one of the easiest ways to achieve properties not available in individual materials. This work discusses the structure property relationships in polymer certain blends and composites. Polymer/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSSRTM) blends and copolymers have gained significant attention in the last decade due the unique properties of the inorganic-organic hybrid structure of POSS. The majority of the research in polymer/POSS has been in the form of copolymers and thermosets. The criteria for the reinforcement of polymers using POSS as a filler material is not been discussed in literature. Part I of the thesis will highlight the effect of blending POSS with different polymers and discuss the rules for reinforcement of polymers when using POSS as a filler material. Part II of the thesis will discuss the structure property relationships in poly(ethylene terephthalate) ionomer/polyamide 6 blends. Part III will discuss the control of coefficient of thermal expansion of elastomers using boron nitride as a filler material.

  11. Thermodynamic and transport combustion properties of hydrocarbons with air. Part 4: Compositions corresponding to Rankine temperature schedules in part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S.

    1982-01-01

    The equilibrium compositions corresponding to the thermodynamic and transport combustion properties for a wide range of conditions for the reaction of hydrocarbons with air are presented. The compositions presented correspond to Rankine temperature schedules.

  12. 46 CFR Appendix I to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Application Instructions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Administration-Application Instructions I Appendix I to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. I Appendix I to Part... Applicant submits the following information: I. As to the identity of and other General Information of...

  13. 14 CFR Appendix J to Part 141 - Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate J Appendix J to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. J Appendix J to Part 141—Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than...

  14. 14 CFR Appendix J to Part 141 - Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate J Appendix J to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. J Appendix J to Part 141—Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an...

  15. 14 CFR Appendix J to Part 141 - Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate J Appendix J to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. J Appendix J to Part 141—Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix J to Part 141 - Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an Airline Transport Pilot Certificate J Appendix J to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. J Appendix J to Part 141—Aircraft Type Rating Course, For Other Than an...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 21 - Application of Part 21 to Certain Federal Financial Assistance of the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 21, App. C Appendix C to Part 21... retained for, or incidental to, construction, planning, research, highway safety, engineering, property... that discrimination based on race, color, or national origin is prohibited on the airport. (3)...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 21 - Application of Part 21 to Certain Federal Financial Assistance of the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 21, App. C Appendix C to Part 21... retained for, or incidental to, construction, planning, research, highway safety, engineering, property... that discrimination based on race, color, or national origin is prohibited on the airport. (3)...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart S of Part 572

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Figures to Subpart S of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart T of Part 572

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Figures to Subpart T of Part 572 Appendix Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart S of Part 572

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Figures to Subpart S of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart S of Part 572

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Figures to Subpart S of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart S of Part 572

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Figures to Subpart S of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart O of Part 572

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figures to Subpart O of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version Test conditions...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart S of Part 572

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figures to Subpart S of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy Test conditions and...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart T of Part 572

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Figures to Subpart T of Part 572 Appendix Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) Appendix—Figures...

  7. In-plant demonstration of optimization of energy utilization in beck dyeing of carpet. Proposed Part III, Phase III extension of DOE contract

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    A proposal to demonstrate on a commercial scale an optimized procedure for beck dyeing of carpet to improve energy utilization is discussed. The proposal is for Phase III. A number of energy conserving procedural and equipment modification including lower dyeing temperature, lower liquor ratio, lower air exhaust flows, and recycle of hot spent dyebaths will be demonstrated in the plant dyeings. Pilot-scale experiments suggest that these modifications will reduce direct energy consumption in carpet dyeing by 400 Btu per pound of carpet processed. Adoption of the modified process by only 50% of the carpet industry would yield an annual reduction in energy consumption of 1 x 10/sup 12/ Btu's (1.7 x 10/sup 5/ BOE). The pilot-scale experiments also indicate that a cost savings of approximately 2 cents per pound of carpet dyed can be achieved with the suggested modifications. The demonstrated technology will have application in other types of nylon and polyester fiber dyeing. The Salem Carpet Mills carpet dyeing facility at Chickamauga, Georgia, will be the site of the demonstration.

  8. Compensation of skeletal Class III malocclusion by isolated extraction of mandibular teeth: Part 2: Skeletal, dentoalveolar and soft tissue parameters in comparison with nonextraction Class III therapies.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Bernd; Gaida, Sarah; Dathe, Henning

    2016-03-01

    To retrospectively compare two compensatory approaches taken in skeletal Class III patients during the main treatment stage, including a study group of multiband treatment plus isolated extraction of mandibular teeth and a control group of multiband treatment without extraction of teeth. The extraction group included 22 (12 female, 10 male) patients receiving compensatory multiband treatment for a mean of 3.47 ± 1.14 years and 16.22 ± 1.92 years old at debonding. The nonextraction group included 24 (14 female, 10 male) patients undergoing multiband treatment for 2.76 ± 1.28 years and 15.38 ± 1.46 years old at debonding. Lateral cephalograms obtained at baseline and upon completion of active treatment were traced for skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue parameters. Welch and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze intergroup differences (initial values, final values, initial-to-final changes) and within-group differences (p < 0.05). Upon completion of active treatment, the only significant intergroup differences were noted for U1NA and L1ML. Significant within-group changes over the courses of treatment were seen for SNB, MLNL, U1NA, U1NL, L1NB, L1ML, H-angle, ULipEL, and LLipEL (extraction group) or for SNB, ANB, individual ANB, Wits appraisal, U1NA, U1NL, H-angle, Naslab-a, ULipEL, and LLipEL (nonextraction group). Parameters that changed by significantly different amounts in both groups included Wits appraisal, L1NB, L1ML, and LLipEL. The added value of isolated extraction therapy basically lies in increasing the potential for retruding the lower incisor inclinations, so that compensatory treatment becomes an option even in selected patients presenting with adverse occlusal situations that would otherwise require orthognathic surgery. Given the successful outcomes in both groups, which had been established by Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores, it was possible to define the skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue characteristics of successful treatment more

  9. Multiscale Model for Electrokinetic Transport in Networks of Pores, Part I: Model Derivation.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Shima; Mani, Ali

    2017-06-27

    We present an efficient and robust numerical model for the simulation of electrokinetic phenomena in porous media and microstructure networks considering a wide range of applications including energy conversion, deionization, and microfluidic-based lab-on-a-chip systems. Coupling between fluid flow and ion transport in these networks is governed by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes equations. These equations describe a wide range of phenomena that can interact in a complex fashion when coupled in networks involving multiple pores with variable properties. Capturing these phenomena by direct simulation of the governing equations in multidimensions is prohibitively expensive. We present here a reduced-order model that treats a network of many pores via solutions to 1D equations. Assuming that each pore in the network is long and thin, we derive a 1D model describing the transport in the pore's longitudinal direction. We take into account the cross-sectional nonuniformity of potential and ion concentration fields in the form of area-averaged coefficients in different flux terms representing fluid flow, electric current, and ion fluxes. These coefficients are obtained from the solutions to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and are tabulated against dimensionless surface charge and dimensionless thickness of the electric double layer (EDL). Although similar models have been attempted in the past, distinct advantages of the present framework include a fully conservative discretization with zero numerical leakage, fully bounded area-averaged coefficients without any singularity in the limit of infinitely thick EDLs, a flux discretization that exactly preserves equilibrium conditions, and extension to a general network of pores with multiple intersections. In part II of this two-article series, we present a numerical implementation of this model and demonstrate its applications in predicting a wide range of electrokinetic phenomena in microstructures.

  10. The Precrystalline Cytoplasmic Granules of Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma Contain Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 and CD147

    PubMed Central

    Ladanyi, Marc; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Drobnjak, Marija; Baren, Ann; Lui, Man Yee; Golde, David W.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is an unusual tumor of young adults with the characteristic presence on ultrastructural analysis of rhomboid or rectangular cytoplasmic crystals. These membrane-bound crystals are known to form within specific PAS-diastase-resistant electron-dense cytoplasmic granules. The composition of these crystals and the dense granules from which they are derived has remained elusive. After the detection of strong discrete granular cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in ASPS for monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) in the course of a broad immunohistochemical characterization of an MCT1 antibody, we studied the expression of MCT1 and its interacting partner, CD147, in a panel of 10 ASPS cases using appropriate antibodies. MCT1 is one of a family of widely expressed proton-linked transporters for monocarboxylates such as lactate and pyruvate. In all normal and neoplastic tissues studied to date, MCT1 immunoreactivity is limited to the cell surface. We find that the periodic acid-Schiff-diastase-resistant cytoplasmic granules of ASPS are strongly immunoreactive for MCT1 and CD147. Specifically, intense cytoplasmic granular positivity for MCT1 and CD147 was found in 7 of 10 and 8 of 10 ASPSs, respectively. Ultrastructural immunohistochemistry with immunogold labeling confirmed that the MCT1 immunoreactivity localized to the cytoplasmic electron-dense granules in ASPS. Western blot analysis of several ASPS cases confirmed that the protein reactive with the MCT1 antibody and that reactive with the CD147 antibody both migrated at the size expected for MCT1 and CD147, respectively. Thus, ASPS cells seem to accumulate MCT1-CD147 complexes in the specific cytoplasmic granules known to undergo crystallization. The possible basis for the overproduction or impaired surface localization of these proteins in ASPS remains unclear. PMID:11943706

  11. Study of the Need for Educational Manpower for Handicapped Children and Youth: Part A - Phase III. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Raymond D.; And Others

    Phase III of the Study of the Need for Educational Manpower for Handicapped Children and Youth, in demonstrating the feasibility of the Manpower Requirements Projection Model (MRPM), gathered data in the states necessary for implementation of the model. The MRPM was developed to enable state or local administrators of special education to estimate…

  12. Role of Microbial Exopolymeric Substances (EPS) on Chromium Sorption and Transport in Heterogeneous Subsurface Soils: I. Cr(III) Complexation with EPS in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    C Kantar; H Demiray; N Dogan; C Dodge

    2011-12-31

    Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

  13. Role of microbial exopolymeric substances (EPS) on chromium sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils: I. Cr(III) complexation with EPS in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kantar, C.; Dodge, C.; Demiray, H.; Dogan, N.M.

    2011-01-26

    Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

  14. Role of microbial exopolymeric substances (EPS) on chromium sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils: I. Cr(III) complexation with EPS in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kantar, Cetin; Demiray, Hilal; Dogan, Nazime Mercan; Dodge, Cleveland J

    2011-03-01

    Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK(a) values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL(2) monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL(2) and HL(3) monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

  15. Thermodynamic and transport combustion properties of hydrocarbons with air. Part 2: Compositions corresponding to Kelvin temperature schedules in part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S.

    1982-01-01

    The equilibrium compositions that correspond to the thermodynamic and transport combustion properties for a wide range of conditions for the reaction of hydrocarbons with air are presented. Initially 55 gaseous species and 3 coin condensed species were considered in the calculations. Only 17 of these 55 gaseous species had equilibrium mole fractions greater than 0.000005 for any of the conditions studied and therefore these were the only ones retained in the final tables.

  16. [Operative treatment of traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spinal column: Part III: Follow up data].

    PubMed

    Reinhold, M; Knop, C; Beisse, R; Audigé, L; Kandziora, F; Pizanis, A; Pranzl, R; Gercek, E; Schultheiss, M; Weckbach, A; Bühren, V; Blauth, M

    2009-03-01

    In this third and final part, the Spine Study Group (AG WS) of the German Trauma Association (DGU) presents the follow-up (NU) data of its second, prospective, internet-based multicenter study (MCS II) for the treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal injuries including 865 patients from 8 trauma centers. Part I described in detail the epidemiologic data of the patient collective and the subgroups, whereas part II analyzed the different methods of treatment and radiologic findings. The study period covered the years 2002 to 2006 including a 30-month follow-up period from 01.01.2004 until 31.05.2006. Follow-up data of 638 (74%) patients were collected with a new internet-based database system and analyzed. Results in part III will be presented on the basis of the same characteristic treatment subgroups (OP, KONS, PLASTIE) and surgical treatment subgroups (Dorsal, Ventral, Kombi) in consideration of the level of injury (thoracic spine, thoracolumbar junction, lumbar spine). After the initial treatment and discharge from hospital, the average duration of subsequent inpatient rehabilitation was 4 weeks, which lasted significantly longer in patients with persistent neurologic deficits (mean 10.9 weeks) or polytraumatized patients (mean 8.6 weeks). Following rehabilitation on an inpatient basis, subsequent outpatient rehabilitation lasted on average 4 months. Physical therapy was administered significantly longer to patients with neurologic deficits (mean 8.7 months) or type C injuries (mean 8.6 months). The level of injury had no influence of the duration of the inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. A total of 382 (72.2%) patients who were either operated from posterior approach only or in a combined postero-anterior approach had an implant removal after an average 12 months. During the follow-up period 56 (8.8%) patients with complications were registered and of these 18 (2.8%) had to have surgical revision. The most common complications reported were infection, loss

  17. SCRAM: A scoring and ranking system for persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic substances for the North American Great Lakes. Part III: Acute and subchronic or chronic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Snyder, E M; Snyder, S A; Giesy, J P; Blonde, S A; Hurlburt, G K; Summer, C L; Mitchell, R R; Bush, D M

    2000-01-01

    In Part I of this series (Snyder: et al., 1999a), the Chemical Scoring and Ranking Assessment Model (SCRAM) was introduced. This system produces scores for chemicals based on their bioaccumulation potential, environmental persistence, and toxicity. In Part II, scoring of the potential for a chemical to persist in the environment and bioaccumulate was described (Snyder et al., 1999b). In Part III, scoring of chemical toxicity is discussed, including definitions and descriptions of effects that are scored, specific scoring instructions, the basis for the criteria and scores, and specific conditions or concerns regarding the types of data used for scoring. A score for each chemical screened is determined from available test data from acute or subchronic and chronic toxicity tests conducted on aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Subchronic and chronic human health effects, including carcinogenicity, are also considered. Part IV includes an evaluation of the performance of the scoring and ranking system (Snyder: et al., 1999c).

  18. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 - Part 1: Land transport and shipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, M.; Hendricks, J.; Sausen, R.

    2015-01-01

    Using the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications), we simulate the impact of land transport and shipping emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Future emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare the resulting 2030 land-transport- and shipping-induced aerosol concentrations to the ones obtained for the year 2000 in a previous study with the same model configuration. The simulations suggest that black carbon and aerosol nitrate are the most relevant pollutants from land transport in 2000 and 2030 and their impacts are characterized by very strong regional variations during this time period. Europe and North America experience a decrease in the land-transport-induced particle pollution, although in these regions this sector remains a major source of surface-level pollution in 2030 under all RCPs. In Southeast Asia, however, a significant increase is simulated, but in this region the surface-level pollution is still controlled by other sources than land transport. Shipping-induced air pollution is mostly due to aerosol sulfate and nitrate, which show opposite trends towards 2030. Sulfate is strongly reduced as a consequence of sulfur reduction policies in ship fuels in force since 2010, while nitrate tends to increase due to the excess of ammonia following the reduction in ammonium sulfate. The aerosol-induced climate impact of both sectors is dominated by aerosol-cloud effects and is projected to decrease between 2000 and 2030, nevertheless still contributing a significant radiative forcing to Earth's radiation budget.

  19. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 - Part 1: Land transport and shipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, M.; Hendricks, J.; Sausen, R.

    2014-09-01

    Using the EMAC global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE, we simulate the impact of land transport and shipping emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Future emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare the resulting 2030 land-transport- and shipping-induced aerosol concentrations to the ones obtained for the year 2000 in a previous study with the same model configuration. The simulations suggest that black carbon and aerosol nitrate are the most relevant pollutants from land transport in 2000 and 2030, but their impacts are characterized by very strong regional variations during this time period. Europe and North America experience a decrease in the land-transport-induced particle pollution, although in these regions this sector remains the dominant source of surface-level pollution in 2030 under all RCPs. In Southeast Asia, on the other hand, a significant increase is simulated, but in this region the surface-level pollution is still controlled by other sources than land transport. Shipping-induced air pollution is mostly due to aerosol sulfate and nitrate, which show opposite trends towards 2030. Sulfate is strongly reduced as a consequence of sulfur reduction policies in ship-fuels in force since 2010, while nitrate tends to increase due to the excess of ammonia following the reduction in ammonium-sulfate. The aerosol-induced climate impact of both sectors is dominated by aerosol-cloud effects and is projected to decrease between 2000 and 2030, nevertheless still contributing a significant radiative forcing to the Earth's radiation budget.

  20. 23 CFR Appendix A to Part 450 - Linking the Transportation Planning and NEPA Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... individual training programs to support learning curves and skill development that contribute to a... transportation planning process but does not second-guess the content of transportation plans and programs... Transportation Improvement Programs (STIPs/TIPs), or planning-level corridor/subarea/feasibility studies. When...

  1. 23 CFR Appendix A to Part 450 - Linking the Transportation Planning and NEPA Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... individual training programs to support learning curves and skill development that contribute to a... transportation planning process but does not second-guess the content of transportation plans and programs... Transportation Improvement Programs (STIPs/TIPs), or planning-level corridor/subarea/feasibility studies. When...

  2. 23 CFR Appendix A to Part 450 - Linking the Transportation Planning and NEPA Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... individual training programs to support learning curves and skill development that contribute to a... transportation planning process but does not second-guess the content of transportation plans and programs... Transportation Improvement Programs (STIPs/TIPs), or planning-level corridor/subarea/feasibility studies. When...

  3. 23 CFR Appendix A to Part 450 - Linking the Transportation Planning and NEPA Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... individual training programs to support learning curves and skill development that contribute to a... transportation planning process but does not second-guess the content of transportation plans and programs... Transportation Improvement Programs (STIPs/TIPs), or planning-level corridor/subarea/feasibility studies. When...

  4. The National Council for Geographic Education Competency-Based Geography Test. Secondary Level. Form I. Parts I, II, and III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurfman, Dana G.; And Others

    A 3-part test measures the geography knowledge, skills, and understanding of secondary level students. Part 1, map skills and location, contains 20 questions involving the use of three maps: an imaginary sketch map, a contour map, and a political map of the world. Part 2 consists of 20 questions covering physical geography. Students analyze…

  5. Preparation and photoluminescence of a novel β-diketone ligand containing electro-transporting group and its europium(III) ternary complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Neng-Jun; Leung, Louis M.; So, Shu-Kong; Gong, Meng-Lian

    2006-11-01

    A novel β-diketone with an electro-transporting oxadiazole group, 1-(4'-(5-(4-methylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)biphenyl-4-yl)-4,4,4-trifluorobutane-1,3-dione (MPBDTFA), was prepared with high yield. With this synthesized ligand as the first ligand and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) as the secondary ligand, a new europium(III) ternary complex, Eu(MPBDTFA) 3Phen, was synthesized. The new β-diketone and its europium(III) ternary complex were characteristized by elemental analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, IR and UV-visible spectroscopies. Photoluminescence measurements indicated that the energy absorbed by the organic ligands was efficiently transfered to the central Eu 3+ ions, and the complex showed intensely and characteristically red emissions due to the 5D0 → 7Fj transitions of the central Eu 3+ ions. With an electro-transporting group in molecule and highly thermal stability, the synthesized Eu(III) ternary complex is expected as a red-emitting candidate material for fabrication of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs).

  6. Preparation and photoluminescence of a novel beta-diketone ligand containing electro-transporting group and its europium(III) ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Neng-Jun; Leung, Louis M; So, Shu-Kong; Gong, Meng-Lian

    2006-11-01

    A novel beta-diketone with an electro-transporting oxadiazole group, 1-(4'-(5-(4-methylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)biphenyl-4-yl)-4,4,4-trifluorobutane-1,3-dione (MPBDTFA), was prepared with high yield. With this synthesized ligand as the first ligand and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) as the secondary ligand, a new europium(III) ternary complex, Eu(MPBDTFA)(3)Phen, was synthesized. The new beta-diketone and its europium(III) ternary complex were characteristized by elemental analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, IR and UV-visible spectroscopies. Photoluminescence measurements indicated that the energy absorbed by the organic ligands was efficiently transfered to the central Eu(3+) ions, and the complex showed intensely and characteristically red emissions due to the (5)D(0)-->(7)F(j) transitions of the central Eu(3+) ions. With an electro-transporting group in molecule and highly thermal stability, the synthesized Eu(III) ternary complex is expected as a red-emitting candidate material for fabrication of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs).

  7. Electrification of the transportation sector: Is there a need for restructuring the automotive parts suppliers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaslan, A. Ebru

    The future of the transportation sector has significant implications for the mitigation of climate change through reduced GHG emissions as well as achieving energy efficiency and energy independence. Battery-powered, plug-in, and hybrid electric vehicles are widely seen as the greatest source of a solution. This thesis analyzes the historical development and growth of the automotive industry as well as the restructuring toward the next generation technologies in comparison with the U.S. and China to shed light on the question of how a developing country can structure its strategies to be able to upgrade and be competitive over time. Conventional business models can become obsolete. Companies will find it difficult to maintain their market position unless they gain new perspectives on the outlook of the industry as a whole, and take into account the successful business models of tomorrow. The potential for further growth of the Turkish automotive supplier base particularly in the next generation of automotive technologies is therefore highly dependent on policies and strategies at the national level as much as its dependence on the global strategies of the automotive industry's major players. In this sense, the key questions that motivate this study are whether there are foreseeable technological changes and product-segmentation strategies that could significantly enhance the competitiveness of local Turkish suppliers of automotive components. The thesis builds on the theory of innovative enterprise and evolutionary agglomeration to examine the competitive potential of the Konya Auto Part Suppliers' Cluster in Turkey.

  8. Part I. Bacteriorhodopsin-related materials work for molecular electronics. Part II. Volumetric optical memory based on the branched photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin. Part III. The role of calcium in the bacteriorhodopsin binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Jeffrey Alan

    Part I. A protocol for the routine isolation and purification of purple membrane sheets containing the integral membrane protein, bacteriorhodopsin, was developed based upon modifications of protocols already in the literature. This simplified protocol is geared toward the facile isolation of protein for use in molecular electronic devices. Methods for the incorporation of bacteriorhodopsin into various polymeric supports were also developed, primarily in the form of dried films and hydrated cubes. This work also represents the first reported production of dried films of the deionized protein, or blue membrane. Part II. An architecture for a volumetric optical memory based on the branched-photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin is presented. The branching reaction circumvents problems associated with destructive reading and writing processes and allows access to a stable, long-lived state, separated both temporally and energetically from the main photocycle, thereby making long-term data storage possible. The state, denoted as Q, can only be accessed by exposing the protein to two different wavelengths of light in the proper sequence, with the appropriate temporal separation (roughly 2 ms between the light pulses). The Q-state (assigned as a binary one) is transparent to both writing and reading processes, making them rigorously non-destructive. Bacteriorhodopsin in its resting state is assigned as a binary zero. A differential absorption reading process is used to determine the state of each volumetric binary element. Preliminary results are reported. Part III. The nature of the chromophore binding site of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin is analyzed by using all-valence electron MNDO and MNDO-PSDCI molecular orbital theory to interpret previously reported linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopic measurements. It is concluded that the unique two-photon properties of the chromophore are due in part to the electrostatic field associated with a Casp{2+} ion near the

  9. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  10. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 112 - Memorandum of Understanding Among the Secretary of the Interior, Secretary of Transportation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Memorandum of Understanding Among the Secretary of the Interior, Secretary of Transportation, and Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency B Appendix B to Part 112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 112 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Secretary of Transportation and the Administrator of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Memorandum of Understanding Between the Secretary of Transportation and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency A Appendix A to Part 112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS...

  12. 46 CFR Appendix I to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Application Instructions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. I Appendix I to Part... laws of the United States. h. Area of operation. i. Full details concerning the service in which the... redelivery and place of reconstruction. g. Date documented under the laws of the United States. h. Area...

  13. 41 CFR 302-4.2 - Am I eligible for subsistence and transportation allowances for PCS travel under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Am I eligible for subsistence and transportation allowances for PCS travel under this part? 302-4.2 Section 302-4.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES PERMANENT CHANGE OF...

  14. 41 CFR 302-4.2 - Am I eligible for subsistence and transportation allowances for PCS travel under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Am I eligible for subsistence and transportation allowances for PCS travel under this part? 302-4.2 Section 302-4.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES PERMANENT CHANGE OF...

  15. Long Range Kelvin Wave Propagation of Transport Variations in the Pacific Ocean Equatorial Currents: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, D.; Fukumori, I.; Menemenlis, D.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    In Part I, Knox and Halpern (Journal of Marine Research, 40 Supplement, 329-339, 1982) vertically integrated zonal current observations recorded in March-May 1980 at seven depths from the thermocline to 15 m at the equator and 75 km north and south of the equator near 152°W and also simultaneously at three similar sites at 110°W. Their in-situ current measurements provided the first persuasive evidence of Kelvin wave motion propagating within the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC). A 7-day decrease in transport at peak amplitude of the Kelvin wave pulse at 152°W and 110°W has remained a curiosity with regards to its repeatability at other times within the year and in other years. The advent of realistic currents generated with an ocean general circulation model constrained by observations (excluding current measurements) provided an opportunity to re-explore Kelvin wave motion in the Pacific EUC. We use the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) - Ice interactions in Earth System (IcES) solutions or ocean state estimates, which represent complete, consistent, and optimal statistical estimates of the global ocean state. ECCO-IcES solutions exist for 2004 and four other years. Twelve 10-m thick layers cover the top 120 m with nine additional layers in the uppermost 400 m. The horizontal grid spacing is 19 km and 3-day averaged quantities are archived. Three longitudes (170°W, 140°W, 110°W) were initially chosen to examine Kelvin wave characteristics; additional longitudes will be described. The large burst in ECCO-IcES EUC transport (defined as eastward flow between the surface and 400 m and from 1.5°S to 1.5°N) in April-May 2004 replicated the well-known annual surfacing of the EUC. The large bursts of EUC transport at 140°W in late January, late April, middle July, and early September and a more modest burst in early November compared exceedingly well with similar bursts at 170°W and 110°W. The average magnitude at 140°W was 50 Sv. Each

  16. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

  17. Study of transient flow and particle transport in continuous steel caster molds: Part I. Fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Quan; Thomas, Brian G.; Vanka, S. P.

    2004-08-01

    Unsteady three-dimensional flow in the mold region of the liquid pool during continuous casting of steel slabs has been computed using realistic geometries starting from the submerged inlet nozzle. Three large-eddy simulations (LES) have been validated with measurements and used to compare results between full-pool and symmetric half-pool domains and between a full-scale water model and actual behavior in a thin-slab steel caster. First, time-dependent turbulent flow in the submerged nozzle is computed. The time-dependent velocities exiting the nozzle ports are then used as inlet conditions for the flow in the liquid pool. Complex time-varying flow structures are observed in the simulation results, in spite of the nominally steady casting conditions. Flow in the mold region is seen to switch between a “double-roll” recirculation zone and a complex flow pattern with multiple vortices. The computed time-averaged flow pattern agrees well with measurements obtained by hot-wire anemometry and dye injection in full-scale water models. Full-pool simulations show asymmetries between the left and right sides of the flow, especially in the lower recirculation zone. These asymmetries, caused by interactions between two halves of the liquid pool, are not present in the half-pool simulation. This work also quantifies differences between flow in the water model and the corresponding steel caster. The top-surface liquid profile and fluctuations are predicted in both systems and agree favorably with measurements. The flow field in the water model is predicted to differ from that in the steel caster in having higher upward velocities in the lower-mold region and a more uniform top-surface liquid profile. A spectral analysis of the computed velocities shows characteristics similar to previous measurements. The flow results presented here are later used (in Part II of this article) to investigate the transport of inclusion particles.

  18. The Development of a Model State Data Analysis Plan (SDAP). (Phase I.) Part III: The SDAP Data Compendium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scientific Educational Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This document is the third part of a 3-part report on the development of a generic State Educational Agency Data Analysis Plan (SDAP). It consists of a compendium of data available by program within the studied State education agencies. The compendium provides a direct comparison of the information elements that are available by program in the two…

  19. Double-blind, single-dose, cross-over study of the effects of pramipexole, pergolide, and placebo on rest tremor and UPDRS part III in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Navan, Prithiva; Findley, Leslie J; Jeffs, Jim A R; Pearce, Ronald K B; Bain, Peter G

    2003-02-01

    Tremor is one of the cardinal signs of Parkinson's disease (PD) but its response to antiparkinsonian medication is variable. It has been postulated that pramipexole may have a stronger antiparkinsonian tremor effect than pergolide, another direct acting dopamine agonist medication, possibly because the former has preferential affinity for the dopamine D3 receptor. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the effects of a single oral dose of either pramipexole (Pr) or pergolide (Pe) or placebo (Pl) on parkinsonian tremor and the motor (part III) subsection of the UPDRS. Ten patients (6 men, 4 women), mean age 65.3 years, mean duration from diagnosis of 2.6 years, with tremor dominant PD were recruited. On three separate occasions a single dose of pramipexole (salt) 500 microg, pergolide 500 microg or placebo were administered in random order to each patient, who were pretreated with domperidone and had their antiparkinsonian medication withheld from midnight before study. After each medication patients were assessed at baseline and then every 30 min for 4 hr using a 0 to 10 tremor rating scale and the UPDRS (part III) in a double-blind protocol. Adverse effects were systematically recorded. The results demonstrate that 500 microg of either pramipexole or pergolide reduced PD rest tremor scores to a similar degree, which at peak effect was significantly greater than placebo (respectively Pe v Pl: P < 0.006, Pr v Pl: P < 0.033). The two active drugs also had weaker beneficial effects on the UPDRS part III. Pergolide, however, was significantly more likely than pramipexole to cause nausea (P = 0.005) or vomiting (P = 0.014).

  20. Solar power satellite. System definition study. Part 1, volume 3: Construction, transportation and cost analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Concepts developed for both LEO and GEO construction of photovoltaic and thermal engine satellites are analyzed. Topics discussed include: satellite construction; crew scheduling; crew jobs and organizations; operator productivity rating; constructability rating; transportation systems for cargo launch, refueling operations, personnel transport, and orbit transfer; collision analysis, cost analysis, and radiation evironment and effects.

  1. QUANTIFYING SEASONAL SHIFTS IN NITROGEN SOURCES TO OREGON ESTUARIES: PART II: TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in estuaries is complicated by the multiple sources, temporal variability in inputs, and variations in transport. We used a hydrodynamic model to simulate the transport and uptake of three sources of DIN (oceanic, riv...

  2. QUANTIFYING SEASONAL SHIFTS IN NITROGEN SOURCES TO OREGON ESTUARIES: PART II: TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in estuaries is complicated by the multiple sources, temporal variability in inputs, and variations in transport. We used a hydrodynamic model to simulate the transport and uptake of three sources of DIN (oceanic, riv...

  3. 23 CFR Appendix A to Part 450 - Linking the Transportation Planning and NEPA Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Transportation Improvement Programs (STIPs/TIPs), or planning-level corridor/subarea/feasibility studies. When... published. This Appendix presents environmental review as a continuum of sequential study, refinement, and... planning study does not subject transportation plans and programs to NEPA. Implementation of this Appendix...

  4. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...__ 1,025 Exhibit A-2—XYZ Co., Summary of Securities and Stock (Adjusted Basis and Fair Market Value) in... Report Exhibit A—XYZ Co., Summary of cash, securities, and stock on deposit and net accrued deposits to... A-1 and B) $1,025 Securities and stock—adjusted basis (exhibit A-2 and B) 2,560 Fund total for tax...

  5. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... 1, 19__ Balances brought forward $1,500,000 $2,000,000 Jan. 1, 19__ Bond debt payment—SS Smith. $250.... Payment of Principal on Existing Indebtedness SS Smith—Official No. 236425: Balance brought forward $500...

  6. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization, Part II: Analysis of Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the mid-latitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale-dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of 38 mid-latitude continental convection. We show that the single updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as 3 updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  7. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  8. Charged Multivesicular Body Protein 2B (CHMP2B) of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport-III (ESCRT-III) Polymerizes into Helical Structures Deforming the Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Bodon, Gilles; Chassefeyre, Romain; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Martinelli, Nicolas; Effantin, Grégory; Hulsik, David Lutje; Belly, Agnès; Goldberg, Yves; Chatellard-Causse, Christine; Blot, Béatrice; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Sadoul, Rémy

    2011-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT-0-III) allow membrane budding and fission away from the cytosol. This machinery is used during multivesicular endosome biogenesis, cytokinesis, and budding of some enveloped viruses. Membrane fission is catalyzed by ESCRT-III complexes made of polymers of charged multivesicular body proteins (CHMPs) and by the AAA-type ATPase VPS4. How and which of the ESCRT-III subunits sustain membrane fission from the cytoplasmic surface remain uncertain. In vitro, CHMP2 and CHMP3 recombinant proteins polymerize into tubular helical structures, which were hypothesized to drive vesicle fission. However, this model awaits the demonstration that such structures exist and can deform membranes in cellulo. Here, we show that depletion of VPS4 induces specific accumulation of endogenous CHMP2B at the plasma membrane. Unlike other CHMPs, overexpressed full-length CHMP2B polymerizes into long, rigid tubes that protrude out of the cell. CHMP4s relocalize at the base of the tubes, the formation of which depends on VPS4. Cryo-EM of the CHMP2B membrane tubes demonstrates that CHMP2B polymerizes into a tightly packed helical lattice, in close association with the inner leaflet of the membrane tube. This association is tight enough to deform the lipid bilayer in cases where the tubular CHMP2B helix varies in diameter or is closed by domes. Thus, our observation that CHMP2B polymerization scaffolds membranes in vivo represents a first step toward demonstrating its structural role during outward membrane deformation. PMID:21926173

  9. Charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B) of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport-III (ESCRT-III) polymerizes into helical structures deforming the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Bodon, Gilles; Chassefeyre, Romain; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Martinelli, Nicolas; Effantin, Grégory; Hulsik, David Lutje; Belly, Agnès; Goldberg, Yves; Chatellard-Causse, Christine; Blot, Béatrice; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Sadoul, Rémy

    2011-11-18

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT-0-III) allow membrane budding and fission away from the cytosol. This machinery is used during multivesicular endosome biogenesis, cytokinesis, and budding of some enveloped viruses. Membrane fission is catalyzed by ESCRT-III complexes made of polymers of charged multivesicular body proteins (CHMPs) and by the AAA-type ATPase VPS4. How and which of the ESCRT-III subunits sustain membrane fission from the cytoplasmic surface remain uncertain. In vitro, CHMP2 and CHMP3 recombinant proteins polymerize into tubular helical structures, which were hypothesized to drive vesicle fission. However, this model awaits the demonstration that such structures exist and can deform membranes in cellulo. Here, we show that depletion of VPS4 induces specific accumulation of endogenous CHMP2B at the plasma membrane. Unlike other CHMPs, overexpressed full-length CHMP2B polymerizes into long, rigid tubes that protrude out of the cell. CHMP4s relocalize at the base of the tubes, the formation of which depends on VPS4. Cryo-EM of the CHMP2B membrane tubes demonstrates that CHMP2B polymerizes into a tightly packed helical lattice, in close association with the inner leaflet of the membrane tube. This association is tight enough to deform the lipid bilayer in cases where the tubular CHMP2B helix varies in diameter or is closed by domes. Thus, our observation that CHMP2B polymerization scaffolds membranes in vivo represents a first step toward demonstrating its structural role during outward membrane deformation.

  10. Solar power satellite. System definition study. Part 1, volume 4: SPS transportation system requirements. [spacecraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The best estimates of space transportation requirements for cargo launch vehicles, personnel launch carriers, high thrust orbit transfer, and electric orbit transfer systems are discussed, along with the rationale for each.

  11. COLLOIDAL-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUND WATER: PART I. SAMPLING CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigations at Pinal Creek, Arizona, evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganic geochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Sampling variables included pump type and flow rate, collection under air or nitrogen,...

  12. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. K.

    1983-12-31

    The auxiliary heat transport systems of the Carrisa Plains Solar Power Plant (CPSPP) comprise facilities which are used to support plant operation and provide plant safety and maintenance. The facilities are the sodium purification system, argon cover gas system, sodium receiving and filling system, sodium-water reaction product receiving system, and safety and maintenance equipment. The functions of the facilities of the auxiliary system are described. Design requirements are established based on plant operating parameters. Descriptions are given on the system which will be adequate to perform the function and satisfy the requirements. Valve and equipment lists are included in the appendix.

  13. Representation of tropical deep convection in atmospheric models - Part 2: Tracer transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Marécal, V.; Russo, M. R.; Allen, G.; Arteta, J.; Chemel, C.; Chipperfield, M. P.; D'Amato, F.; Dessens, O.; Feng, W.; Hamilton, J. F.; Harris, N. R. P.; Hosking, J. S.; Lewis, A. C.; Morgenstern, O.; Peter, T.; Pyle, J. A.; Reddmann, T.; Richards, N. A. D.; Telford, P. J.; Tian, W.; Viciani, S.; Volz-Thomas, A.; Wild, O.; Yang, X.; Zeng, G.

    2011-08-01

    The tropical transport processes of 14 different models or model versions were compared, within the framework of the SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere) project. The tested models range from the regional to the global scale, and include numerical weather prediction (NWP), chemical transport, and chemistry-climate models. Idealised tracers were used in order to prevent the model's chemistry schemes from influencing the results substantially, so that the effects of modelled transport could be isolated. We find large differences in the vertical transport of very short-lived tracers (with a lifetime of 6 h) within the tropical troposphere. Peak convective outflow altitudes range from around 300 hPa to almost 100 hPa among the different models, and the upper tropospheric tracer mixing ratios differ by up to an order of magnitude. The timing of convective events is found to be different between the models, even among those which source their forcing data from the same NWP model (ECMWF). The differences are less pronounced for longer lived tracers, however they could have implications for modelling the halogen burden of the lowermost stratosphere through transport of species such as bromoform, or short-lived hydrocarbons into the lowermost stratosphere. The modelled tracer profiles are strongly influenced by the convective transport parameterisations, and different boundary layer mixing parameterisations also have a large impact on the modelled tracer profiles. Preferential locations for rapid transport from the surface into the upper troposphere are similar in all models, and are mostly concentrated over the western Pacific, the Maritime Continent and the Indian Ocean. In contrast, models do not indicate that upward transport is highest over western Africa.

  14. Evaluation of Transportation Vibration Associated with Relocation of Work in Process As Part of KCRIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, Troy

    2013-04-01

    During relocation of the Kansas City Plant (KCP) from the site at Bannister Road to the site at Botts Road, work in process (WIP) within a production department must be transported. This report recommends packaging to mitigate vibration levels experienced by products during between-facility transportation. Measurements and analysis demonstrate that this mitigation results in vibration levels less than those experienced by the product during routine production processes within potentially damaging frequency ranges.

  15. Localization landscape theory of disorder in semiconductors. III. Application to carrier transport and recombination in light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chi-Kang; Piccardo, Marco; Lu, Li-Shuo; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Martinelli, Lucio; Peretti, Jacques; Speck, James S.; Weisbuch, Claude; Filoche, Marcel; Wu, Yuh-Renn

    2017-04-01

    This paper introduces a novel method to account for quantum disorder effects into the classical drift-diffusion model of semiconductor transport through the localization landscape theory. Quantum confinement and quantum tunneling in the disordered system change dramatically the energy barriers acting on the perpendicular transport of heterostructures. In addition, they lead to percolative transport through paths of minimal energy in the two-dimensional (2D) landscape of disordered energies of multiple 2D quantum wells. This model solves the carrier dynamics with quantum effects self-consistently and provides a computationally much faster solver when compared with the Schrödinger equation resolution. The theory also provides a good approximation to the density of states for the disordered system over the full range of energies required to account for transport at room temperature. The current-voltage characteristics modeled by three-dimensional simulation of a full nitride-based light emitting diode (LED) structure with compositional material fluctuations closely match the experimental behavior of high-quality blue LEDs. The model allows also a fine analysis of the quantum effects involved in carrier transport through such complex heterostructures. Finally, details of carrier population and recombination in the different quantum wells are given.

  16. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... determine the load ratings shown on the vessel's wire rope certificates for all wire rope and wire rope... shall apply to the use of wire rope as a part of the ship's cargo handling gear: (1) Eye splices in wire...) Wire rope and wire rope slings exhibiting any of the defects or conditions specified in......

  17. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... determine the load ratings shown on the vessel's wire rope certificates for all wire rope and wire rope... shall apply to the use of wire rope as a part of the ship's cargo handling gear: (1) Eye splices in wire...) Wire rope and wire rope slings exhibiting any of the defects or conditions specified in......

  18. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... determine the load ratings shown on the vessel's wire rope certificates for all wire rope and wire rope... shall apply to the use of wire rope as a part of the ship's cargo handling gear: (1) Eye splices in wire...) Wire rope and wire rope slings exhibiting any of the defects or conditions specified in......

  19. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... determine the load ratings shown on the vessel's wire rope certificates for all wire rope and wire rope... shall apply to the use of wire rope as a part of the ship's cargo handling gear: (1) Eye splices in wire...) Wire rope and wire rope slings exhibiting any of the defects or conditions specified in......

  20. 29 CFR 1918.51 - General requirements (See also § 1918.11 and appendix III of this part).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shall apply to the use of wire rope as a part of the ship's cargo handling gear: (1) Eye splices in wire... provide the same level of safety may be used; (2) Except for eye splices in the ends of wires, each...

  1. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume III, Part 1, High-level Manpower for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Guy

    This document, the first part of the third volume of a study concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, appraises the high-level manpower needs of the region. The report is divided into two sections: the first includes the major comments on the position of high-level manpower in…

  2. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume III, Part 2, Language Policy and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard

    This document, the second part of the third volume of a study concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, discusses the problems aroused by language in the region. Chapters I-IV cover assumptions of the study, common problems of the region, current solutions, and future outlook.…

  3. Schinus terebinthifolius countercurrent chromatography (Part III): Method transfer from small countercurrent chromatography column to preparative centrifugal partition chromatography ones as a part of method development.

    PubMed

    das Neves Costa, Fernanda; Hubert, Jane; Borie, Nicolas; Kotland, Alexis; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2017-03-03

    Countercurrent chromatography (CCC) and centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) are support free liquid-liquid chromatography techniques sharing the same basic principles and features. Method transfer has previously been demonstrated for both techniques but never from one to another. This study aimed to show such a feasibility using fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius berries dichloromethane extract as a case study. Heptane - ethyl acetate - methanol -water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was used as solvent system with masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids as target compounds. The optimized separation methodology previously described in Part I and II, was scaled up from an analytical hydrodynamic CCC column (17.4mL) to preparative hydrostatic CPC instruments (250mL and 303mL) as a part of method development. Flow-rate and sample loading were further optimized on CPC. Mobile phase linear velocity is suggested as a transfer invariant parameter if the CPC column contains sufficient number of partition cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Interface simulation of strained and non-abrupt III-V quantum wells. Part 1: band profile calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, C.

    1996-01-01

    This work presents a program, based on the Van de Walle-Martin model solid theory, able to compute the most important physical quantities of any In 1- xGa xAs yP 1- y quaternary epitaxially strained growth on any In 1- zGa zAs wP 1- w hypothetical substrate. The adopted interface-band alignment procedure is extensively described. The effect of strain on several examples of ideal heterostructures characterized by abrupt interfaces is discussed in detail. Furthermore, the problem of a composition gradient spread over some monolayers at the interfaces of III-V quantum wells and superlattices, due to the technological problems in group V switches in the present epitaxial techniques is treated extensively. The interface layers are thus non-intentionally strained on the substrate lattice parameter causing a local change in the bands profile along the growth direction. The differences between an ideal rectangular potential and the real profile are shown. The output files of this program consist in the band profiles for electrons, heavy and light holes, which will be used by the program PLSIMUL (described in a subsequent article) to compute the corresponding quantized levels to be compared with experimental 4 K photoluminescence data.

  5. Predictability in orbital reconstruction. A human cadaver study, part III: Implant-oriented navigation for optimized reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Leander; Essig, Harald; Schreurs, Ruud; Jansen, Jesper; Maal, Thomas J J; Gooris, Peter J J; Becking, Alfred G

    2015-12-01

    Navigation-assisted orbital reconstruction remains a challenge, because the surgeon focuses on a two-dimensional multiplanar view in relation to the preoperative planning. This study explored the addition of navigation markers in the implant design for three-dimensional (3D) orientation of the actual implant position relative to the preoperative planning for more fail-safe and consistent results. Pre-injury computed tomography (CT) was performed for 10 orbits in human cadavers, and complex orbital fractures (Class III/IV) were created. The orbits were reconstructed using preformed orbital mesh through a transconjunctival approach under image-guided navigation and navigation by referencing orientating markers in the implant design. Ideal implant positions were planned using preoperative CT scans. Implant placement accuracy was evaluated by comparing the planned and realized implant positions. Significantly better translation (3.53 mm vs. 1.44 mm, p = 0.001) and rotation (pitch: -1.7° vs. -2.2°, P = 0.52; yaw: 10.9° vs. 5.9°, P = 0.02; roll: -2.2° vs. -0.5°, P = 0.16) of the placed implant relative to the planned position were obtained by implant-oriented navigation. Navigation-assisted surgery can be improved by using navigational markers on the orbital implant for orientation, resulting in fail-safe reconstruction of complex orbital defects and consistent implant positioning.

  6. Bombardment induced ion transport. Part I: Numerical investigation of bombardment induced ion transport through glasses and membranes on the basis of the Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, M; Weitzel, K-M

    2011-12-07

    The bombardment of condensed matter by low energy ion beams induces ion transport through the material. A general theory for bombardment induced ion transport (BIIT) based on numerical solutions of the well known Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations is presented. The theory is applicable to polymer membranes as well as ion-conducting glasses with the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. The fundamental properties of the theory, i.e. the capability to describe the potential, the field and the concentration/charge density profile within the two classes of materials mentioned above are demonstrated. In particular, the theory is capable of describing experimental observables which will be further elaborated in part II of this miniseries.

  7. The U. S. transportation sector in the year 2030: results of a two-part Delphi survey.

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.; Stephens, T.S.

    2011-10-11

    A two-part Delphi Survey was given to transportation experts attending the Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy in August, 2011. The survey asked respondents about trends in the US transportation sector in 2030. Topics included: alternative vehicles, high speed rail construction, rail freight transportation, average vehicle miles traveled, truck versus passenger car shares, vehicle fuel economy, and biofuels in different modes. The survey consisted of two rounds -- both asked the same set of seven questions. In the first round, respondents were given a short introductory paragraph about the topic and asked to use their own judgment in their responses. In the second round, the respondents were asked the same questions, but were also given results from the first round as guidance. The survey was sponsored by Argonne National Lab (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), and implemented by University of California at Davis, Institute of Transportation Studies. The survey was part of the larger Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project run by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Of the 206 invitation letters sent, 94 answered all questions in the first round (105 answered at least one question), and 23 of those answered all questions in the second round. 10 of the 23 second round responses were at a discussion section at Asilomar, while the remaining were online. Means and standard deviations of responses from Round One and Two are given in Table 1 below. One main purpose of Delphi surveys is to reduce the variance in opinions through successive rounds of questioning. As shown in Table 1, the standard deviations of 25 of the 30 individual sub-questions decreased between Round One and Round Two, but the decrease was slight in most cases.

  8. Transport of Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) across the Scotia Sea. Part II: Krill growth and survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fach, Bettina A.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Murphy, Eugene J.

    2006-06-01

    A time-dependent, size-structured, physiologically based krill growth model was used in conjunction with a circulation model to test the hypothesis that Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) populations at South Georgia are sustained by import of individuals from upstream regions. Surface phytoplankton concentrations along the simulated drifter trajectories were extracted from historical Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) measurements and sea ice biota concentrations were calculated from sea ice concentration and extent extracted along drifter trajectories from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager measurements. As additional food sources, a time series of heterotrophic food was constructed from historical data, and time series of detritus concentrations were calculated using phytoplankton concentrations extracted from CZCS measurements together with measured particulate organic carbon to chlorophyll a ratios. These food resources along specified drifter trajectories were then input to the krill growth model to determine the size and viability of krill during transport from the source region to South Georgia. The krill growth model simulations showed that no single food source can support continuous growth of krill during the 58-306 days needed for transport to South Georgia. However, under the current assumptions results indicate that combinations of food sources during the transport time enhanced krill survival, with heterotrophic food and detritus being particularly important during periods of low phytoplankton concentrations. The growth model simulations also showed that larval and juvenile krill originating along the western Antarctic Peninsula can grow to 1+ (14-36 mm) and 2+ (26-45 mm) age and size classes observed at South Georgia during the time needed for transport to this region. Krill originating in the Weddell Sea need 20 months for transport, which allows retention in a potentially high food environment, provided by sea ice, for almost 1 year. Krill then

  9. Adaptation of intestinal nutrient transport in health and disease. Part I.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A B; Wild, G

    1997-03-01

    Why is it important to understand the mechanisms controlling intestinal adaptation? There are two major answers to this question. Firstly, in establishing the cellular and molecular events associated with intestinal adaptation, we will formulate a general framework that may be applied to the understanding of adaptation of other cell membranes. For example, alterations in the synthesis of glucose carriers and their subsequent insertion into membranes may alter sugar entry across the intestinal brush border membrane (BBM) using the sodium-dependent D-glucose transporter, SGLT1, or the BBM sodium-independent facultative fructose transporter, GLUT5, and may alter facilitated sugar exit across the basolateral membrane (BLM) using GLUT2. The precise role of transcriptional and translational processes in the up- or down-regulation of sugar transport requires further definition. Alterations in enterocyte microsomal lipid metabolic enzyme expression occurring during the course of intestinal adaptation will direct the synthesis of lipids destined for trafficking to the BBM and BLM domains of the enterocyte. This will subsequently alter the passive permeability properties of these membranes and ultimately influence lipid absorption. Therefore, establishing the physiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms of adaptation in the intestine will define principles that may be applied to other epithelia. Secondly, enterocyte membrane adaptation is subject to dietary modification, and these may be exploited as a means to enhance a beneficial or to reduce a detrimental aspect of the intestinal adaptive process in disease states. Alterations in membrane function occur in association with changes in dietary lipids, and these are observed in a variety of cells and tissues including lymphocytes, testes, liver, adipocytes, nerve tissue, nuclear envelope and mitochondria. Therefore, the elucidation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation and the manner whereby dietary manipulation

  10. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill--Part III: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test).

    PubMed

    Thomas, P A

    2000-06-01

    Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated 226Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m2) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, 226Ra, and 210Pb than rainfall, while more 210Po was deposited with rainfall.

  11. Lutein transport by Caco-2 TC-7 cells occurs partly by a facilitated process involving the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI).

    PubMed

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Abou, Lydia; Mikail, Céline; Ghiringhelli, Odette; André, Marc; Portugal, Henri; Jourdheuil-Rahmani, Dominique; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Lairon, Denis; Borel, Patrick

    2005-04-15

    The carotenoid lutein is thought to play a role in the human eye and to protect against age-related macular degeneration. Lutein transport in the human intestine has not been characterized. We examined lutein transport processes using Caco-2 TC-7 monolayers as a model for human intestinal epithelium. Purified lutein was mixed with phospholipids, lysophospholipids, cholesterol, mono-olein, oleic acid and taurocholate to obtain lutein-rich mixed micelles that mimicked those found under physiological conditions. The micelles were added to the apical side of Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers for 30 min or 3 h at 37 degrees C. Absorbed lutein, i.e. the sum of lutein recovered in the scraped cells and in the basolateral chamber, was quantified by HPLC. Transport rate was measured (i) as a function of time (from 15 to 60 min), (ii) as a function of micellar lutein concentration (from 1.5 to 15 microM), (iii) at 4 degrees C, (iv) in the basolateral to apical direction, (v) after trypsin pretreatment, (vi) in the presence of beta-carotene and/or lycopene, (vii) in the presence of increasing concentrations of antibody against SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B type 1) and (viii) in the presence of increasing concentrations of a chemical inhibitor of the selective transfer of lipids mediated by SR-BI, i.e. BLT1 (blocks lipid transport 1). The rate of transport of lutein as a function of time and as a function of concentration was saturable. It was significantly lower at 4 degrees C than at 37 degrees C (approx. 50%), in the basal to apical direction than in the opposite direction (approx. 85%), and after trypsin pretreatment (up to 45%). Co-incubation with beta-carotene, but not lycopene, decreased the lutein absorption rate (approx. 20%) significantly. Anti-SR-BI antibody and BLT1 significantly impaired the absorption rate (approx. 30% and 57% respectively). Overall, these results indicate that lutein absorption is, at least partly, protein-mediated and that some lutein is taken up

  12. Lutein transport by Caco-2 TC-7 cells occurs partly by a facilitated process involving the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The carotenoid lutein is thought to play a role in the human eye and to protect against age-related macular degeneration. Lutein transport in the human intestine has not been characterized. We examined lutein transport processes using Caco-2 TC-7 monolayers as a model for human intestinal epithelium. Purified lutein was mixed with phospholipids, lysophospholipids, cholesterol, mono-olein, oleic acid and taurocholate to obtain lutein-rich mixed micelles that mimicked those found under physiological conditions. The micelles were added to the apical side of Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers for 30 min or 3 h at 37 °C. Absorbed lutein, i.e. the sum of lutein recovered in the scraped cells and in the basolateral chamber, was quantified by HPLC. Transport rate was measured (i) as a function of time (from 15 to 60 min), (ii) as a function of micellar lutein concentration (from 1.5 to 15 μM), (iii) at 4 °C, (iv) in the basolateral to apical direction, (v) after trypsin pretreatment, (vi) in the presence of β-carotene and/or lycopene, (vii) in the presence of increasing concentrations of antibody against SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B type 1) and (viii) in the presence of increasing concentrations of a chemical inhibitor of the selective transfer of lipids mediated by SR-BI, i.e. BLT1 (blocks lipid transport 1). The rate of transport of lutein as a function of time and as a function of concentration was saturable. It was significantly lower at 4 °C than at 37 °C (approx. 50%), in the basal to apical direction than in the opposite direction (approx. 85%), and after trypsin pretreatment (up to 45%). Co-incubation with β-carotene, but not lycopene, decreased the lutein absorption rate (approx. 20%) significantly. Anti-SR-BI antibody and BLT1 significantly impaired the absorption rate (approx. 30% and 57% respectively). Overall, these results indicate that lutein absorption is, at least partly, protein-mediated and that some lutein is taken up through SR

  13. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 73 - Levels of Physical Protection To Be Applied in International Transport of Nuclear Material 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... International Transport of Nuclear Material 1 E Appendix E to Part 73 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... Physical Protection To Be Applied in International Transport of Nuclear Material 1 1 See appendix C to part 110 of this chapter from the physical description of the categories of nuclear material as set forth...

  14. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 73 - Levels of Physical Protection To Be Applied in International Transport of Nuclear Material 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... International Transport of Nuclear Material 1 E Appendix E to Part 73 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... Physical Protection To Be Applied in International Transport of Nuclear Material 1 1 See appendix C to part 110 of this chapter from the physical description of the categories of nuclear material as set forth...

  15. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 73 - Levels of Physical Protection To Be Applied in International Transport of Nuclear Material 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... International Transport of Nuclear Material 1 E Appendix E to Part 73 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... Physical Protection To Be Applied in International Transport of Nuclear Material 1 1 See appendix C to part 110 of this chapter from the physical description of the categories of nuclear material as set forth...

  16. Organizational Infrastructure in the Collegiate Athletic Training Setting, Part III: Benefits of and Barriers in the Medical and Academic Models.

    PubMed

    Eason, Christianne M; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

    2017-01-01

     Academic and medical models are emerging as alternatives to the athletics model, which is the more predominant model in the collegiate athletic training setting. Little is known about athletic trainers' (ATs') perceptions of these models.  To investigate the perceived benefits of and barriers in the medical and academic models.  Qualitative study.  National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III.  A total of 16 full-time ATs (10 men, 6 women; age = 32 ± 6 years, experience = 10 ± 6 years) working in the medical (n = 8) or academic (n = 8) models.  We conducted semistructured telephone interviews and evaluated the qualitative data using a general inductive approach. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were completed to satisfy data credibility.  In the medical model, role congruency and work-life balance emerged as benefits, whereas role conflict, specifically intersender conflict with coaches, was a barrier. In the academic model, role congruency emerged as a benefit, and barriers were role strain and work-life conflict. Subscales of role strain included role conflict and role ambiguity for new employees. Role conflict stemmed from intersender conflict with coaches and athletics administrative personnel and interrole conflict with fulfilling multiple overlapping roles (academic, clinical, administrative).  The infrastructure in which ATs provide medical care needs to be evaluated. We found that the medical model can support better alignment for both patient care and the wellbeing of ATs. Whereas the academic model has perceived benefits, role incongruence exists, mostly because of the role complexity associated with balancing teaching, patient-care, and administrative duties.

  17. Insight on the fate of CNS-targeted nanoparticles. Part II: Intercellular neuronal cell-to-cell transport.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Giovanni; Vilella, Antonietta; Chhabra, Resham; Schmeisser, Michael J; Boeckers, Tobias M; Ruozi, Barbara; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Forni, Flavio; Zoli, Michele; Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2014-03-10

    The application of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) has a promising future for targeting and delivering drugs into the central nervous system (CNS). However, the fate of NPs once entered in the brain after crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and taken up into neuronal cells is a neglected area of study. Thus, here, we investigate the possible mechanisms of a cell-to-cell transport of poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) NPs modified with a glycopeptide (g7-NPs), already demonstrated to be able to cross the BBB after in vivo administration in rodents. We also tested antibody (Ab) -modified g7-NPs both in vitro and in vivo to investigate the possibility of specific targeting. Our results show that g7-NPs can be transported intra- and inter-cellularly within vesicles after vesicular internalization. Moreover, cell-to-cell transport is mediated by tunneling-nanotube (TNT)-like structures in cell lines and most interestingly in glial as well as neuronal cells in vitro. The transport is dependent on F-actin and can be increased by induction of TNT-like structures overexpressing M-Sec, a central factor and inducer of TNT formation. Moreover, cell-to-cell transport occurs independently from NP surface modification with antibodies. These in vitro findings were in part confirmed by in vivo evidence after i.p. administration of NPs in mice.

  18. Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, Brent M.; Timothy, Ginn R.; Sani, Rajesh K.

    2013-08-14

    citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS– by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS– preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ –1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

  19. Transport of Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) across the Scotia Sea. Part I: Circulation and particle tracking simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fach, Bettina A.; Klinck, John M.

    2006-06-01

    The Harvard Ocean Prediction System (HOPS) is configured to simulate the circulation of the Scotia Sea and environs. This is part of a study designed to test the hypothesis that Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) populations at South Georgia in the eastern Scotia Sea are sustained by import of individuals from upstream regions, such as the western Antarctic Peninsula. Comparison of the simulated circulation fields obtained from HOPS with observations showed good agreement. The surface circulation, particularly through the Drake Passage and across the Scotia Sea, matches observations, with its northeastward flow characterized by three high-speed fronts. Also, the Weddell Sea and the Brazil Current, and their associated transports match observations. In addition, mesoscale variability, an important component of the flow in this region, is found in the simulated circulation and the model is overall well suited to model krill transport. Drifter simulations conducted with HOPS showed that krill spawned in areas coinciding with known krill spawning sites along the west Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf can be entrained into the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SACCF). They are transported across the Scotia Sea to South Georgia in 10 months or less. Drifters originating on the continental shelf of the Weddell Sea can reach South Georgia as well; however, transport from this region averages about 20 months. Additional simulations show that such transport is sensitive to changes in wind stress and the location of the SACCF. The results of this study show that krill populations along the Antarctic Peninsula and the Weddell Sea are possible source populations that can provide krill to the South Georgia population. However, successful transport of krill to South Georgia is shown to depend on a multitude of factors, such as the location of the spawning area and timing of spawning, and variations in the location of the SACCF. Therefore, this study provides

  20. Solar power satellite. System definition study. Part 1, volume 5: SPS transportation. Representative system descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Both LEO transportation (earth to low earth orbit) and GEO transportation (low earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit) segments were addressed. LEO options include both a 2 stage winged space freighter vehicle and a 2 stage ballistic recoverable vehicle. Both incorporate LO(2)/RP-1/LH(2) engines on the booster and standard SSME's on the upper stage. The orbit transfer vehicle options included chemical for geosynchronous satellite assembly and self powered electric propulsion for low earth orbit satellite assembly. An exhaust products analysis was conducted for the earth to LEO vehicle since atmospheric pollution could be a concern.

  1. The amino acids upstream of NH(2)-terminal dileucine motif play a role in regulating the intracellular sorting of the Class III transporters GLUT8 and GLUT12.

    PubMed

    Aerni-Flessner, Lauren B; Otu, Mitch C; Moley, Kelle H

    2011-01-01

    The transport of glucose across cell membranes is mediated by a family of facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs). The class III glucose transporters GLUT8 and GLUT12 both contain a similar [DE]XXXL[LI] dileucine sorting signal in their amino terminus. This type of dileucine motif facilitates protein trafficking to various organelles or to the plasma membrane via interactions with adaptor protein (AP) complexes. The [DE]XXXL[LI] motif in GLUT8 is thought to direct it to late endosomal/lysosomal compartments via its interactions with AP1 and AP2. Unlike GLUT8, the [DE]XXXL[LI] motif does not direct GLUT12 to a lysosomal compartment. Rather, GLUT12 resides in the Golgi network and at the plasma membrane. In a previous study, we found that exchanging the XXX (TQP) residues in GLUT8 with the corresponding residues in GLUT12 (GPN) resulted in a dramatic missorting of GLUT8 to the cell surface. We postulated that the XXX amino acids upstream of the dileucine motif in GLUT8 influence the degree of interaction between the [DE]XXXL[LI] motif and adaptor proteins. To further explore its trafficking mechanisms, we created mutant constructs to identify the role that each of the individual XXX amino acids has for regulating the intracellular sorting of GLUT8. Here we find that the XXX amino acids, specifically the position of a proline -2 from the dileucine residues, influence the affinity of APs for GLUT8 and GLUT12.

  2. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA booster subcritical assembly, Part III : low enriched uranium conversion analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-05-12

    This study investigates the performance of the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly, located in Belarus, during operation with high (90%), medium (36%), and low (21%) enriched uranium fuels in the assembly's fast zone. The YALINA Booster is a zero-power, subcritical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was constructed for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven subcritical systems, and to serve as a fast neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinides. The first part of this study analyzes the assembly's performance with several fuel types. The MCNPX and MONK Monte Carlo codes were used to determine effective and source neutron multiplication factors, effective delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron lifetime, neutron flux profiles and spectra, and neutron reaction rates produced from the use of three neutron sources: californium, deuterium-deuterium, and deuterium-tritium. In the latter two cases, the external neutron source operates in pulsed mode. The results discussed in the first part of this report show that the use of low enriched fuel in the fast zone of the assembly diminishes neutron multiplication. Therefore, the discussion in the second part of the report focuses on finding alternative fuel loading configurations that enhance neutron multiplication while using low enriched uranium fuel. It was found that arranging the interface absorber between the fast and the thermal zones in a circular rather than a square array is an effective method of operating the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly without downgrading neutron multiplication relative to the original value obtained with the use of the high enriched uranium fuels in the fast zone.

  3. Early Pottery Making in Northern Coastal Peru. Part III: Mössbauer Study of Sicán Pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, I.; Häusler, W.; Hutzelmann, T.; Riederer, J.; Wagner, U.

    2003-09-01

    Sicán blackware from a 1000-year old elite tomb at Huaca Loro was characterised by neutron activation analysis, optical thin-section microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. A number of blackware fragments from the later site of Puerto Pobre (ca. AD 1460-1550) were included in the analysis for comparison and found to be of different origin. The black surface of the specimens from Huaca Loro is mostly due to carbon deposition during firing in a reducing environment. Part of the pottery was merely dried at temperatures below 400°C, perhaps because it was made in haste for funeral use.

  4. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Kinga Lemieszek, Marta; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-02

    (Arrhenatherum elatius). Some plant-pathogenic strains of P. agglomerans are tumourigenic, inducing gall formation on table beet, an ornamental plant gypsophila (Gypsophila paniculata), wisteria, Douglas-fir and cranberry. Recently, a Pantoea species closely related to P. agglomerans has been identified as a cause of bacterial blight disease in the edible mushroom Pleurotus eryngii cultivated in China. The genetically governed determinants of plant pathogenicity in Pantoea agglomerans include such mechanisms as the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) system, phytohormones, the quorum-sensing (QS) feedback system and type III secretion system (T3SS) injecting the effector proteins into the cytosol of a plant cell.

  5. Optimizing Air Transportation Service to Metroplex Airports. Part 1; Analysis of Historical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, George; Hoffman, Karla; Sherry, Lance; Ferguson, John; Kara, Abdul Qadar

    2010-01-01

    The air transportation system is a significant driver of the U.S. economy, providing safe, affordable, and rapid transportation. During the past three decades airspace and airport capacity has not grown in step with demand for air transportation (+4% annual growth), resulting in unreliable service and systemic delays. Estimates of the impact of delays and unreliable air transportation service on the economy range from $32B to $41B per year. This report describes the results of an analysis of airline strategic decision-making with regards to: (1) geographic access, (2) economic access, and (3) airline finances. This analysis evaluated markets-served, scheduled flights, aircraft size, airfares, and profit from 2005-2009. During this period, airlines experienced changes in costs of operation (due to fluctuations in hedged fuel prices), changes in travel demand (due to changes in the economy), and changes in infrastructure capacity (due to the capacity limits at EWR, JFK, and LGA). This analysis captures the impact of the implementation of capacity limits at airports, as well as the effect of increased costs of operation (i.e. hedged fuel prices). The increases in costs of operation serve as a proxy for increased costs per flight that might occur if auctions or congestion pricing are imposed.

  6. A REGIONAL ATMOSPHERIC FATE AND TRANSPORT MODEL FOR ATRAZINE, PART I: DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system is adapted to simulate the regional transport and fate of atrazine, one of the most widely used herbicides in the United States. Model chemistry and deposition are modified, and a gas-to-particle partitioning algorithm...

  7. A REGIONAL ATMOSPHERIC FATE AND TRANSPORT MODEL FOR ATRAZINE, PART I: DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system is adapted to simulate the regional transport and fate of atrazine, one of the most widely used herbicides in the United States. Model chemistry and deposition are modified, and a gas-to-particle partitioning algorithm...

  8. Solar power satellite system definition study. Part 2, volume 5: Space operations (construction and transportation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, K.; Davis, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    Construction and transportation systems and operations are described for the following combinations: (1) silicon photovoltaic CR=1 satellite constructed primarily in low earth orbit (LEO); (2) silicon photovoltaic CR=1 satellite constructed in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO); (3) Rankine thermal engine satellite constructed primarily in LEO; and (4) Rankine thermal engine satellite constructed in GEO.

  9. The effects of national health care reform on local businesses--Part III: secondary research questions--discoveries and implications.

    PubMed

    Rotarius, Timothy; Liberman, Aaron; Perez, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    This is the third part of a 3-part examination of what may potentially be expected from the 2010 national health care reform legislation. Political researchers and pundits have speculated endlessly on the many changes mandated by the 2010 national health care reform legislation, styled the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. A review and assessment of this legislation at several levels (federal, state, state agency, local region, and individual business leaders) were undertaken. The results of this expanded analysis suggest strongly that nationally members of the business community and their employees will benefit from the legislation early on (years 1 through 3) and then likely will be impacted adversely as the payment mechanisms driving the legislation are tightened by new federal regulations (years 4 onward). As a result of this research, it is surmised that businesses will be immediately impacted by the legislation, with small business owners being the prime beneficiaries of the new legislation, owing to the availability of coverage to approximately 32 million individuals who previously had no access to coverage. In that regard, the soon-to-be newly insured population also will be a prime beneficiary of the legislation as the limitations on chronic illnesses and other preexisting conditions will be reduced or eliminated by the legislation.

  10. Global ocean tides. Part III. The semidiurnal principal solar tide (S2), atlas of tidal charts and maps. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiderski, E.W.

    1981-03-15

    In Part I of this report (AD-A060 913), a unique hydrodynamical interpolation technique was introduced, extensively tested, and evaluated in order to compute partial global ocean tides in great detail and with a high degree of accuracy. This novel method has been applied to construct the semidiurnal principal solar (S2) ocean tide with a relative accuracy of better than 5 cm anywhere in the open oceans. The resulting tidal amplitudes and phases are tabulated on a 1 deg x 1 deg grid system in an atlas of 42 deg x 71 deg overlapping charts covering the whole oceanic globe. A corresponding atlas of global corange and cotidal maps is included to provide the reader with a quick general overview of the major tidal phenomena. The specifying hydrodynamical parameters of the model are listed along with quoted sources of empirical tide data, and significant tidal features are explained and discussed. The S2 ocean tide is found to resemble closely the corresponding lunar M2 tide presented in Part II of this report (AD-A084 694).

  11. A Trimodality Comparison of Volumetric Bone Imaging Technologies. Part III: SD, SEE, LSC Association With Fragility Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Andy K. O.; Beattie, Karen A.; Min, Kevin K. H.; Merali, Zamir; Webber, Colin E.; Gordon, Christopher L.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Cheung, Angela M. W.; Adachi, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Part II of this 3-part series demonstrated 1-yr precision, standard error of the estimate, and 1-yr least significant change for volumetric bone outcomes determined using peripheral (p) quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and peripheral magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) modalities in vivo. However, no clinically relevant outcomes have been linked to these measures of change. This study examined 97 women with mean age of 75 ± 9 yr and body mass index of 26.84 ± 4.77 kg/m2, demonstrating a lack of association between fragility fractures and standard deviation, least significant change and standard error of the estimate-based unit differences in volumetric bone outcomes derived from both pMRI and pQCT. Only cortical volumetric bone mineral density and cortical thickness derived from high-resolution pQCT images were associated with an increased odds for fractures. The same measures obtained by pQCT erred toward significance. Despite the smaller 1-yr and short-term precision error for measures at the tibia vs the radius, the associations with fractures observed at the radius were larger than at the tibia for high-resolution pQCT. Unit differences in cortical thickness and cortical volumetric bone mineral density able to yield a 50% increase in odds for fractures were quantified here and suggested as a reference for future power computations. PMID:25129407

  12. The nature of the sunspot phenomenon. III - Energy consumption and energy transport. IV - The intrinsic instability of the magnetic configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1975-01-01

    The basic relation is described between conversion of thermal energy into convective fluid motion and convective transport of thermal energy, and the equilibrium configuration of a sunspot's magnetic field is shown to be unstable to the hydromagnetic exchange instability. It is determined that heat transport necessarily accompanies convective driving of fluid motion and that the formation of cool sunspots requires convection extending coherently over several scale heights, a distance of at least 500 km. Several theoretical possibilities for sunspot stabilization are reviewed, and it is suggested that a suitable redistribution of cooling in the umbra may be the stabilization mechanism. It is believed that if cooling extends to a great depth in an elongated portion of a sunspot, the magnetic pressure on the boundary will be reduced, tending to reduce the elongation.

  13. The nature of the sunspot phenomenon. III - Energy consumption and energy transport. IV - The intrinsic instability of the magnetic configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1975-01-01

    The basic relation is described between conversion of thermal energy into convective fluid motion and convective transport of thermal energy, and the equilibrium configuration of a sunspot's magnetic field is shown to be unstable to the hydromagnetic exchange instability. It is determined that heat transport necessarily accompanies convective driving of fluid motion and that the formation of cool sunspots requires convection extending coherently over several scale heights, a distance of at least 500 km. Several theoretical possibilities for sunspot stabilization are reviewed, and it is suggested that a suitable redistribution of cooling in the umbra may be the stabilization mechanism. It is believed that if cooling extends to a great depth in an elongated portion of a sunspot, the magnetic pressure on the boundary will be reduced, tending to reduce the elongation.

  14. Microstructural engineering applied to the controlled cooling of steel wire rod: Part III. Mathematical model-formulation and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P. C.; Hawbolt, E. B.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1991-11-01

    In this final part of the study, a mathematical model incorporating heat flow, microstructural phenomena, and structure-composition-mechanical property relationships has been developed to compute the yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of steel rod control cooled on a Stelmor line. The predictive capability of the model, in terms of temperature response, microstructural evolution, and strength of the rods, has been tested by comparison to measurements from an extensive set of laboratory and plant trials. Thus, the model has been shown to simulate the complex heat flow and microstructural phenomena in the steel rod very well, although improvements need to be sought in the characterization of the austenite-ferrite transformation kinetics and of pearlite interlamellar spacing. The latter variable has a significant influence on the strength of eutectoid steels. Nonetheless, the model consistently is capable of predicting the strengths of plain-carbon steel rods ranging from 1020 to 1080 to within ± 10 pet.

  15. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part III: Cyanotic Heart Diseases and Complex Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-01-01

    From the stand point of radiographic analysis most of the complex cyanotic congenital heart diseases (CHD), can be divided into those associated with decreased or increased pulmonary vascularity. Combination of a specific cardiac configuration and status of lung vasculature in a clinical context allows plain film diagnosis to be predicted in some CHD. Correlation of the position of the cardiac apex in relation to the visceral situs is an important information that can be obtained from the plain film. This information helps in gathering information about the atrio-ventricular, ventricular arterial concordance or discordance. Categorization of the cyanotic heart disease based on vascularity is presented below. Thorough understanding of cardiac anatomy by different imaging methods is essential in understanding and interpreting complex cardiac disease. Basic anatomical details and background for interpretation are provided in the previous parts of this presentation. PMID:27630924

  16. Devices for the diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders. Part III: Thermography, ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and electromyographic biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Mohl, N D; Ohrbach, R K; Crow, H C; Gross, A J

    1990-04-01

    This last article in the three-part series on devices for the diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) compared the claimed diagnostic usefulness of thermography with the present scientific evidence. In a similar manner, the therapeutic efficacy of ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and electromyographic biofeedback was also reviewed. This evaluation concluded that the application of thermography to the diagnosis of TMD is limited by variations within and among subjects and by intrinsic problems with controls of the test environment. It also concluded that evidence that therapeutic ultrasound alone is useful for the treatment of TMD is lacking, that positive clinical results of electrical stimulation may not be due to specific therapeutic effects, and that it is doubtful that the use of electrical stimulation devices can produce a position of the mandible that has any diagnostic or therapeutic significance. There is evidence, however, that relaxation training, assisted by EMG biofeedback, can reduce daytime muscle activity.

  17. Systematics of the parasitic wasp genus Oxyscelio Kieffer (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae s.l.), part III: African fauna

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Roger A.; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F.; Austin, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract African species of Oxyscelio (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae s.l.) are revised. A total of 14 species are recognized, 13 of which are described as new: Oxyscelio absentiae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio galeri Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio gyri Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio idoli Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio intensionis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio io Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio kylix Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio lunae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio nemesis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio pulveris Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio quassus Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio teli Burks, sp. n. and Oxyscelio xenii Burks, sp. n. The genus Freniger Szabó, syn. n. is recognized as part of an endemic African species group of Oxyscelio with incomplete hind wing venation, and Oxyscelio bicolor (Szabó), comb. n. is therefore recognized as the only previously described species of Oxyscelio from Africa. The Oxyscelio crateris and Oxyscelio cuculli species groups, previously known from southeast Asia, are represented in Africa by seven and one species respectively. PMID:27081336

  18. Anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine: Part III: the “unstable” cervical spine †

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Marion

    1990-01-01

    In this, the last of the three part series on the anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine, the clinical entity-instability-is addressed. A summative definition of instability, addressing both the clinical and radiographic issues, is presented based on current available literature. The etiology of instability is discussed as it pertains to three possible mechanisms: acute trauma, latent evidence of trauma and repetitive microtrauma. The anatomical, clinical and radiographic aspects in each of these meachanisms is discussed. A case report is presented to illustrate the salient features of this potentially disastrous condition. The conclusion emphasizes the importance of defineable limits in each of the presented definitions, calling for future research into the clinical and radiographic correlations of abnormal cervical motion. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  19. Functional role of inorganic trace elements in angiogenesis part III: (Ti, Li, Ce, As, Hg, Va, Nb and Pb).

    PubMed

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Orangi, Jafar; Asatourian, Armen; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-02-01

    Many essential elements exist in nature with significant influence on human health. Angiogenesis is vital in developmental, repair, and regenerative processes, and its aberrant regulation contributes to pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to explore the role of these elements in such a vital process. This is third in a series of reviews that serve as an overview of the role of inorganic elements in regulation of angiogenesis and vascular function. Here we will review the roles of titanium, lithium, cerium, arsenic, mercury, vanadium, niobium, and lead in these processes. The roles of other inorganic elements in angiogenesis were discussed in part I (N, Fe, Se, P, Au, and Ca) and part II (Cr, Si, Zn, Cu, and S) of these series. The methods of exposure, structure, mechanisms, and potential activities of these elements are briefly discussed. An electronic search was performed on the role of these elements in angiogenesis from January 2005 to April 2014. These elements can promote and/or inhibit angiogenesis through different mechanisms. The anti-angiogenic effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles comes from the inhibition of angiogenic processes, and not from its toxicity. Lithium affects vasculogenesis but not angiogenesis. Nanoceria treatment inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. Vanadium treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced cytotoxic effects through interactions with DNA. The negative impact of mercury on endothelial cell migration and tube formation activities was dose and time dependent. Lead induced IL-8 production, which is known to promote tumor angiogenesis. Thus, understanding the impact of these elements on angiogenesis will help in development of new modalities to modulate angiogenesis under various conditions.

  20. Functional Role of Inorganic Trace Elements in in Angiogenesis Part III: (Ti, Li, Ce, As, Hg, Va, Nb and Pb)

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, M. A.; Orangi, J.; Asatourian, A.; Sorenson, C.M.; Sheibani, N.

    2016-01-01

    Many essential elements exist in nature with significant influence on human health. Angiogenesis is vital to developmental, repair, and regenerative processes, and its aberrant regulation contributes to pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to explore the role of these elements in such a vital process. This is third in a series of reviews that serve as an overview of the role of inorganic elements in regulation of angiogenesis and vascular function. Here we will review the roles of titanium, lithium, cerium, arsenic, mercury, vanadium, niobium, and lead in these processes. The roles of other inorganic elements in angiogenesis were discussed in part I and part II of these series. The methods of exposure, structure, mechanisms, and potential activities of these elements are briefly discussed. An electronic search was performed on the role of these elements in angiogenesis from January 2005-April 2014. These elements can promote and/or inhibit angiogenesis through different mechanisms. The anti-angiogenic effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles comes from the inhibition of angiogenic processes, and not from its toxicity. Lithium affects vasculogenesis but not angiogenesis. Nanoceria treatment inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. Vanadium treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced cytotoxic effects through interactions with DNA. The negative impact of Mercury on cell migration and tube formation activities was dose and time dependent. Lead induced IL-8 production, which is known to promote tumor angiogenesis. Thus, understanding the impact of these elements on angiogenesis will help in development of new modalities to modulate angiogenesis under various conditions. PMID:26638864

  1. A gene (tmpA) for an efflux protein of the transporter family III from Brevibacterium linens OC2, an antibacterial substance-producing strain.

    PubMed

    Boucabeille, C; Simonet, J M; Henckes, G

    1999-06-01

    A gene (tmpA) encoding a putative transmembrane protein has been cloned from B. linens OC2, an antibacterial substance-producing strain. The deduced TmpA protein sequence shares similarities to members of the transporter family III exploiting the transmembrane proton gradient to provide export of toxic compounds such as antiseptics or antibiotics. Northern blot analysis indicated that tmpA gene is expressed. Length of RNA messenger and overlapping of ORFs upstream tmpA gene suggested that it might belong to an operon. The tmpA gene is unusual among B. linens species since it was not detected among eight B. linens collection strains and 40 B. linens industrial strains.

  2. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Transport. Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Hydrogen storage and in-space hydrogen transport research focused on developing and verifying design concepts for efficient, safe, lightweight liquid hydrogen cryogenic storage systems. Research into hydrogen production had a specific goal of further advancing proton conducting membrane technology in the laboratory at a larger scale. System and process trade studies evaluated the proton conducting membrane technology, specifically, scale-up issues.

  3. Observations of pockmark flow structure in Belfast Bay, Maine, Part 3: implications for sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandel, Christina L.; Lippmann, Thomas C.; Foster, Diane L.; Brothers, Laura L.

    2017-02-01

    Current observations and sediment characteristics acquired within and along the rim of two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine, were used to characterize periods of sediment transport and to investigate conditions favorable to the settling of suspended sediment. Hourly averaged Shields parameters determined from horizontal current velocity profiles within the center of each pockmark never exceed the critical value (approximated with the theoretical model of Dade et al. 1992). However, Shields parameters estimated at the pockmark rims periodically exceed the critical value, consistent with conditions that support the onset of sediment transport and suspension. Below the rim in the near-center of each pockmark, depth-averaged vertical velocities were less than zero (downward) 60% and 55% of the time in the northern and southern pockmarks, and were often comparable to depth-averaged horizontal velocities. Along the rim, depth-averaged vertical velocities over the lower 8 m of the water column were primarily downward but much less than depth-averaged horizontal velocities indicating that suspended sediment may be moved to distant locations. Maximum grain sizes capable of remaining in suspension under terminal settling flow conditions (ranging 10-170 μm) were typically much greater than the observed median grain diameter (about 7 μm) at the bed. During upwelling flow within the pockmarks, and in the absence of flocculation, suspended sediment would not settle. The greater frequency of predicted periods of sediment transport along the rim of the southern pockmark is consistent with pockmark morphology in Belfast Bay, which transitions from more spherical to more elongated toward the south, suggesting near-bed sediment transport may contribute to post-formation pockmark evolution during typical conditions in Belfast Bay.

  4. Observations of pockmark flow structure in Belfast Bay, Maine, Part 3: implications for sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fandel, Christina L.; Lippmann, Thomas C.; Foster, Diane L.; Brothers, Laura L.

    2017-01-01

    Current observations and sediment characteristics acquired within and along the rim of two pockmarks in Belfast Bay, Maine, were used to characterize periods of sediment transport and to investigate conditions favorable to the settling of suspended sediment. Hourly averaged Shields parameters determined from horizontal current velocity profiles within the center of each pockmark never exceed the critical value (approximated with the theoretical model of Dade et al. 1992). However, Shields parameters estimated at the pockmark rims periodically exceed the critical value, consistent with conditions that support the onset of sediment transport and suspension. Below the rim in the near-center of each pockmark, depth-averaged vertical velocities were less than zero (downward) 60% and 55% of the time in the northern and southern pockmarks, and were often comparable to depth-averaged horizontal velocities. Along the rim, depth-averaged vertical velocities over the lower 8 m of the water column were primarily downward but much less than depth-averaged horizontal velocities indicating that suspended sediment may be moved to distant locations. Maximum grain sizes capable of remaining in suspension under terminal settling flow conditions (ranging 10–170 μm) were typically much greater than the observed median grain diameter (about 7 μm) at the bed. During upwelling flow within the pockmarks, and in the absence of flocculation, suspended sediment would not settle. The greater frequency of predicted periods of sediment transport along the rim of the southern pockmark is consistent with pockmark morphology in Belfast Bay, which transitions from more spherical to more elongated toward the south, suggesting near-bed sediment transport may contribute to post-formation pockmark evolution during typical conditions in Belfast Bay.

  5. Concept of the transport system in the western part of the Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Parfenov, A.F.

    1994-09-01

    According to the concept of the energy policy of Russia under new economic conditions, the production of oil and gas condensate after a decline to 300-345 million tons/yr in 1997 will reach 370-400 million tons in 2010, and the export of oil and petroleum products, apart from countries of the CIS, will be 90-120 million tons/yr and of natural gas 130-140 billion m{sup 3}. The main sources of oil and gas production will be Volga region and Tyumen, Yamal, and Pechora-Nenets provinces. The most prospective oil and gas fields are located in an extensive territory north of the Arctic Circle and on the continental shelf of the Barnets and Kara Seas. The geographic location of the world`s richest fields of energy resources creates favorable conditions for their export to Northern Europe, northern states of the USA and Canada, and after developing direct sailing along the Northern Sea Route. According to preliminary data, the volume of export of oil and petroleum products in the next 10-15 years form this region can amount to 20-25 millions tons and delivery of supplies 1.5-2.0 million tons. Sea transport plays a substantial role in export shipments. In 1989, 98.0 Million tons of oil was unloaded through Black Sea and Baltic ports. The transport system should be reliable, ecologically safe, and cost-effective, should adapt well for providing the fields being developed on the continent and shelf with transport services, and should deliver oil and products to any importing country. With consideration of the complex; and importance of the problem, in the present concept the transport system in the stretch of domestic traffic is examined in there variants: variant 1 - {open_quotes}Island terminal,{close_quotes} variant 2 - {open_quotes}Oil trunk pipeline,{close_quotes} 3 - {open_quotes}Shore terminal.{close_quotes}

  6. Bombardment induced ion transport - part IV: ionic conductivity of ultra-thin polyelectrolyte multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Wesp, Veronika; Hermann, Matthias; Schäfer, Martin; Hühn, Jonas; Parak, Wolfgang J; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2016-02-14

    The dependence of the ionic conductance of ultra-thin polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films on the temperature and the number of bilayers has been investigated by the recently developed low energy bombardment induced ion transport (BIIT) method. To this end multilayers of alternating poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate) (PSS) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) layers were deposited on a metal electrode and subsequently bombarded by a low energy potassium ion beam. Ions are transported through the film according to the laws of electro-diffusion towards a grounded backside electrode. They are neutralized at the interface between the polymer film and the metal electrode. The detected neutralization current scales linearly with the acceleration potential of the ion beam indicating Ohmic behavior for the (PAH/PSS)x multilayer, where x denotes the number of bilayers. The conductance exhibits a non-monotonic dependence on the number of bilayers, x. For 2 ≤ x ≤ 8 the conductance increases non-linearly with the number of bilayers. For x ≥ 8 the conductance decreases with increasing number of bilayers. The variation of the conductance is rationalized by a model accounting for the structure dependence of the conductivity. The thinnest sample for which the conductance has been measured is the single bilayer reflecting properties dominated by the interface. The activation energy for the ion transport is 0.49 eV.

  7. New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science: Part III: Operational applications and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Cedric; Margot, Pierre

    2009-11-20

    The research reported in this series of article aimed at (1) automating the search of questioned ink specimens in ink reference collections and (2) at evaluating the strength of ink evidence in a transparent and balanced manner. These aims require that ink samples are analysed in an accurate and reproducible way and that they are compared in an objective and automated way. This latter requirement is due to the large number of comparisons that are necessary in both scenarios. A research programme was designed to (a) develop a standard methodology for analysing ink samples in a reproducible way, (b) comparing automatically and objectively ink samples and (c) evaluate the proposed methodology in forensic contexts. This report focuses on the last of the three stages of the research programme. The calibration and acquisition process and the mathematical comparison algorithms were described in previous papers [C. Neumann, P. Margot, New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science-Part I: Development of a quality assurance process for forensic ink analysis by HPTLC, Forensic Sci. Int. 185 (2009) 29-37; C. Neumann, P. Margot, New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science-Part II: Development and testing of mathematical algorithms for the automatic comparison of ink samples analysed by HPTLC, Forensic Sci. Int. 185 (2009) 38-50]. In this paper, the benefits and challenges of the proposed concepts are tested in two forensic contexts: (1) ink identification and (2) ink evidential value assessment. The results show that different algorithms are better suited for different tasks. This research shows that it is possible to build digital ink libraries using the most commonly used ink analytical technique, i.e. high-performance thin layer chromatography, despite its reputation of lacking reproducibility. More importantly, it is possible to assign evidential value to ink evidence in a transparent way using a probabilistic model. It is therefore

  8. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Bottner, Harold; Konig, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolett, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Partricia; Sharp, Jeff; Lo, Jason; Keinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo I.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research and development of high temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential of converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as an important area for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is Part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main focuses in Part I are on two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

  9. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics—An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D.; Böttner, Harald; König, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolet, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Patricia; Sharp, Jeff W.; Lo, Jason; Kleinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo

    2013-04-01

    Recent research and development of high-temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential for converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air-conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, still needs to be improved from the current value of 1.0 to 1.5 to above 2.0 to be competitive with other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods, and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as a key component for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the Implementing Agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main foci in part I are the measurement of two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

  10. Injection, transport, absorption and phosphorescence properties of a series of blue-emitting Ir(III) emitters in OLEDs: a DFT and time-dependent DFT study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Na; Wu, Zhi-Jian; Si, Zhen-Jun; Zhang, Hong-Jie; Zhou, Liang; Liu, Xiao-Juan

    2009-08-17

    Quantum-chemistry methods were explored to investigate the electronic structures, injection and transport properties, absorption and phosphorescence mechanism of a series of blue-emitting Ir(III) complexes {[(F(2)-ppy)(2)Ir(pta -X/pyN4)], where F(2)-ppy = (2,4-difluoro)phenylpyridine; pta = pyridine-1,2,4-triazole; X = phenyl(1); p-tolyl (2); 2,6-difluororophenyl (3); -CF(3) (4), and pyN4 = pyridine-1,2,4-tetrazolate (5)}, which are used as emitters in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The mobility of hole and electron were studied computationally based on the Marcus theory. Calculations of Ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) were used to evaluate the injection abilities of holes and electrons into these complexes. The reasons for the lower EL efficiency and phosphorescence quantum yields in 3-5 than in 1and 2 have been investigated. These new structure-property relationships can guide an improved design and optimization of OLED devices based on blue-emitting phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes.

  11. Comparative binding of antitumor indazolium [trans-tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] to serum transport proteins assayed by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Timerbaev, Andrei R; Rudnev, Alexander V; Semenova, Olga; Hartinger, Christian G; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2005-06-15

    The indazolium [trans-tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] coordination compound shows notable antiproliferative activity in different tumor models and has recently ended phase I clinical trials as a lead anticancer metallodrug candidate. Its approval could be greatly facilitated if more precise information was available on the rate and degree of the drug's transformation occurring upon interaction with serum transport proteins and on the stability of the adducts formed. With this objective, a new method has been developed for the determination of the protein-binding rate and association constants under simulated physiological conditions by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). These binding parameters were assessed by monitoring the time- and concentration-dependent changes in peak area responses of reaction components, constructing the corresponding binding curves, and conducting a mathematical analysis. Comparison of the apparent rate constants determined by CZE revealed that indazolium [trans-tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] binds to transferrin much faster than to albumin: k=39.5 x 10(-4) and 3.3 x 10(-4)s(-1), respectively. The corresponding association constants are indicative of moderate metal-protein coordination, with a somewhat higher affinity of the Ru complex toward albumin (9910 and 6460 M(-1), respectively). The results of our study confirm in a quantitative manner that, in real bloodstream circumstances, plasma albumin may serve as a reservoir and a natural carrier of the administered ruthenium drug and hence mediate its accumulation in tumors.

  12. US Transuranium Registry report on the SU Am content of a whole body. Part III: Gamma-ray measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, H.E.; Spitz, H.B.; Rieksts, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    The SU Am measurements on the donor's body, followed by an analysis of each bone of the skeleton, have provided the best available calibration factors for measuring the SU Am content in the skeletons of the living. These calibration factors have already been useful in measuring the skeletal burden of several workers in the nuclear industry. This study has shown that differential linear scanning provides good results on the content of various parts of the skeleton. Previously used methods of head or leg counting for estimating total skeletal content of SU Am were also found to provide good results. These studies confirm previous recommendations that in-vivo measurement of the skull probably provides the best estimate of SU Am in the skeleton; however, other positions such as the knee are also found to be bilaterally symmetrical for identical bones on the right and left sides of the body. A comparison of measurements on the donor's body with those of other people with skeletal burdens of SU Am shows that differences in skeletal distribution do exist and are probably due to the age of the person, the duration of the skeletal SU Am burden, and perhaps the physical activity of the person. Additional measurements and studies are planned on the remaining half of the skeleton and they should further improve the accuracy of in-vivo measurements of SU Am in the human skeleton.

  13. Preformulation considerations for controlled release dosage forms. Part III. Candidate form selection using numerical weighting and scoring.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowski, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Two numerical methods, Decision Analysis (DA) and Potential Problem Analysis (PPA) are presented as alternative selection methods to the logical method presented in Part I. In DA properties are weighted and outcomes are scored. The weighted scores for each candidate are totaled and final selection is based on the totals. Higher scores indicate better candidates. In PPA potential problems are assigned a seriousness factor and test outcomes are used to define the probability of occurrence. The seriousness-probability products are totaled and forms with minimal scores are preferred. DA and PPA have never been compared to the logical-elimination method. Additional data were available for two forms of McN-5707 to provide complete preformulation data for five candidate forms. Weight and seriousness factors (independent variables) were obtained from a survey of experienced formulators. Scores and probabilities (dependent variables) were provided independently by Preformulation. The rankings of the five candidate forms, best to worst, were similar for all three methods. These results validate the applicability of DA and PPA for candidate form selection. DA and PPA are particularly applicable in cases where there are many candidate forms and where each form has some degree of unfavorable properties.

  14. Injury and the orchestral environment: part III. the role of psychosocial factors in the experience of musicians undertaking rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Dale Ll; Barrett, Margaret S; Ackermann, Bronwen J

    2014-09-01

    Workplace rehabilitation in the orchestral setting poses a number of challenges that arise in part due to a poor fit between generic injury insurance and medical care and the elite performance requirements of professional musicians. Currently, the orchestral profession lacks information and strategies to best deal with the unique challenges of this complex rehabilitation environment. In order to inform future directions for research and suggest possible changes of practice, the researchers conducted a qualitative case-study aimed at understanding the injury and rehabilitation experiences of professional musicians. In-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with three chronically injured professional cellists from a single Australian orchestra. After initial data analysis, further interviews were undertaken with a set of five orchestral management staff as a means of data triangulation. All data were analysed using a themes-based analysis-of-narrative approach. The findings indicate that injury concealment played a considerable role in the development of chronic injuries for these musicians, and management staff felt that this concealment may be the norm amongst orchestral musicians. The musicians in this study suffered emotional and psychological trauma as the result of their injuries, and two participants felt socially marginalised. During rehabilitation, the musicians in this study encountered difficulties with medical staff not understanding the elite performance requirements of orchestral work. The article proposes recommendations that may assist in dealing with the complex challenges of injury rehabilitation in the orchestral environment.

  15. Presentation of the EURODELTA III intercomparison exercise - evaluation of the chemistry transport models' performance on criteria pollutants and joint analysis with meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessagnet, Bertrand; Pirovano, Guido; Mircea, Mihaela; Cuvelier, Cornelius; Aulinger, Armin; Calori, Giuseppe; Ciarelli, Giancarlo; Manders, Astrid; Stern, Rainer; Tsyro, Svetlana; García Vivanco, Marta; Thunis, Philippe; Pay, Maria-Teresa; Colette, Augustin; Couvidat, Florian; Meleux, Frédérik; Rouïl, Laurence; Ung, Anthony; Aksoyoglu, Sebnem; María Baldasano, José; Bieser, Johannes; Briganti, Gino; Cappelletti, Andrea; D'Isidoro, Massimo; Finardi, Sandro; Kranenburg, Richard; Silibello, Camillo; Carnevale, Claudio; Aas, Wenche; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Fagerli, Hilde; Gonzalez, Lucia; Menut, Laurent; Prévôt, André S. H.; Roberts, Pete; White, Les

    2016-10-01

    The EURODELTA III exercise has facilitated a comprehensive intercomparison and evaluation of chemistry transport model performances. Participating models performed calculations for four 1-month periods in different seasons in the years 2006 to 2009, allowing the influence of different meteorological conditions on model performances to be evaluated. The exercise was performed with strict requirements for the input data, with few exceptions. As a consequence, most of differences in the outputs will be attributed to the differences in model formulations of chemical and physical processes. The models were evaluated mainly for background rural stations in Europe. The performance was assessed in terms of bias, root mean square error and correlation with respect to the concentrations of air pollutants (NO2, O3, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5), as well as key meteorological variables. Though most of meteorological parameters were prescribed, some variables like the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and the vertical diffusion coefficient were derived in the model preprocessors and can partly explain the spread in model results. In general, the daytime PBL height is underestimated by all models. The largest variability of predicted PBL is observed over the ocean and seas. For ozone, this study shows the importance of proper boundary conditions for accurate model calculations and then on the regime of the gas and particle chemistry. The models show similar and quite good performance for nitrogen dioxide, whereas they struggle to accurately reproduce measured sulfur dioxide concentrations (for which the agreement with observations is the poorest). In general, the models provide a close-to-observations map of particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) concentrations over Europe rather with correlations in the range 0.4-0.7 and a systematic underestimation reaching -10 µg m-3 for PM10. The highest concentrations are much more underestimated, particularly in wintertime. Further evaluation of

  16. Numerical Modeling of Hailstorms and Hailstone Growth. Part III: Simulation of an Alberta Hailstorm--Natural and Seeded Cases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Richard D.

    1987-07-01

    This paper reports on simulations of a multicellular hailstorm case observed during the 1983 Alberta Hail Project. The field operations on that day concentrated on two successive feeder cells which were subjected to controlled seeding experiments. The fist of these cells received the placebo treatment and the second was seeded with dry ice. The principal tool of this study is a modified version of the two-dimensional, time dependent hail category model described in Part I of this series of papers. It is with this model that hail growth processes are investigated, including the simulated effects of cloud seeding techniques as practiced in Alberta.The model simulation of the natural case produces a very good replication of the observed storm, particularly the placebo feeder cell. This is evidenced, in particular, by the high degree of fidelity of the observed and modeled radar reflectivity in terms of magnitudes, structure, and evolution. The character of the hailfall at the surface and the scale of the storm are captured nicely by the model, although cloud-top heights are generally too high, particularly for the mature storm system.Seeding experiments similar to those conducted in the field have also been simulated. These involve seeding the feeder cell early in its active development phase with dry ice (CO2) or silver iodide (AgI) introduced near cloud top. The model simulations of these seeded cases capture some of the observed seeding signatures detected by radar and aircraft. In these model experiments, CO2 seeding produced a stronger response than AgI seeding relative to inhibiting hail formation. For both seeded cases, production of precipitating ice was initially enhanced by the seeding, but retarded slightly in the later stages, the net result being modest increases in surface rainfall, with hail reduced slightly. In general, the model simulations support several subhypotheses of the operational strategy of the Alberta Research Council regarding the earlier

  17. Nosocomial transmission and infection control aspects of parasitic and ectoparasitic diseases. Part III. Ectoparasites/summary and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Lettau, L A

    1991-03-01

    As a rule, both the standard of hygiene and sanitation prevalent in hospitals in the United States and the rarity of parasitic diseases compared to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections, reduce the hazard of nosocomial acquisition of parasites to relatively trivial levels. However, abetted by the resultant low index of suspicion on the part of clinical staff, certain parasitic microorganisms may at times cause significant morbidity and even mortality in both normal and immunocompromised patients, as summarized in this review. Also, the nosocomial acquisition of parasites may be somewhat underappreciated because the incubation period for clinical illness may be days to weeks and thus a hospital-acquired infection may not be recognized as such, particularly if the parasite is endemic locally. Parasitic diseases have been a much more significant problem in certain special facilities, such as custodial institutions for the mentally ill or retarded, where crowding, poor environmental sanitation, and low levels of personal hygiene have in the past allowed the rapid dissemination and endemic occurrence of a large variety of parasitic infections. It is likely that nosocomial transmission of parasites may be an even greater problem in some hospitals in the tropics, where strict hygienic standards are costly or otherwise more difficult to maintain, and where often an increased proportion of the patient population harbors one or more parasites. However, the exact magnitude of the problem in tropical hospitals is also more difficult to determine because nosocomial acquisition of a parasitic infection may not be distinguished easily versus exogenous infection or reactivation of latent infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. The three-dimensional easy morphological (3-DEMO) classification of scoliosis – Part III, correlation with clinical classification and parameters

    PubMed Central

    Negrini, Stefano; Negrini, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Background In the first part of this study we proposed a new classification approach for spinal deformities (3-DEMO classification). To be valid, a classification needs to describe adequately the phenomenon considered (construct validity): a way to verify this issue is comparison with already existing classifications (concurrent and criterion validity). Aim To compare the 3-DEMO classification and the numerical results of its classificatory parameters with the existing clinical classifications and the Cobb degrees on the frontal and sagittal planes respectively. Methods 118 subjects (96 females) with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (age 15.9 ± 3.1, 37.4 ± 12.5° Cobb) have been classified according to 3-DEMO, SRS-Ponseti, King and Lenke classifications as well as according to sagittal configuration. For all patients we computed the values of the 3-DEMO parameters and the classical Cobb degrees measurements in the frontal and sagittal planes. Statistical analysis comprised Chi Square and Regression analysis, including a multivariate stepwise regression. Results Three of the four 3-DEMO parameters (Direction, Sagittal and Frontal Shift) correlated with SRS-Ponseti, King and sagittal configuration classifications, but not with Lenke's one. Feeble correlations have been found among numerical parameters, while the stepwise regression allowed us to develop almost satisfactory models to obtain 3-DEMO parameters from classical Cobb degrees measurements. Discussion These results support the hypothesis of a possible clinical significance of the 3-DEMO classification, even if follow-up studies are needed to better understand these possible correlations and ultimately the classification usefulness. The most interesting 3D parameters appear to be Direction and mainly Phase, the latter being not at all correlated with currently existing classifications. Nevertheless, Shift cannot be easily appreciated on classical frontal and sagittal radiographs, even if it could presumably

  19. The three-dimensional easy morphological (3-DEMO) classification of scoliosis - Part III, correlation with clinical classification and parameters.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Stefano; Negrini, Alberto

    2007-03-19

    In the first part of this study we proposed a new classification approach for spinal deformities (3-DEMO classification). To be valid, a classification needs to describe adequately the phenomenon considered (construct validity): a way to verify this issue is comparison with already existing classifications (concurrent and criterion validity). To compare the 3-DEMO classification and the numerical results of its classificatory parameters with the existing clinical classifications and the Cobb degrees on the frontal and sagittal planes respectively. 118 subjects (96 females) with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (age 15.9 +/- 3.1, 37.4 +/- 12.5 degrees Cobb) have been classified according to 3-DEMO, SRS-Ponseti, King and Lenke classifications as well as according to sagittal configuration. For all patients we computed the values of the 3-DEMO parameters and the classical Cobb degrees measurements in the frontal and sagittal planes. Statistical analysis comprised Chi Square and Regression analysis, including a multivariate stepwise regression. Three of the four 3-DEMO parameters (Direction, Sagittal and Frontal Shift) correlated with SRS-Ponseti, King and sagittal configuration classifications, but not with Lenke's one. Feeble correlations have been found among numerical parameters, while the stepwise regression allowed us to develop almost satisfactory models to obtain 3-DEMO parameters from classical Cobb degrees measurements. These results support the hypothesis of a possible clinical significance of the 3-DEMO classification, even if follow-up studies are needed to better understand these possible correlations and ultimately the classification usefulness. The most interesting 3D parameters appear to be Direction and mainly Phase, the latter being not at all correlated with currently existing classifications. Nevertheless, Shift cannot be easily appreciated on classical frontal and sagittal radiographs, even if it could presumably be calculated.

  20. "Why Not Stoichiometry" versus "Stoichiometry—Why Not?" Part III: Extension of GATES/GEB on Complex Dynamic Redox Systems.

    PubMed

    Michałowska-Kaczmarczyk, Anna M; Michałowski, Tadeusz; Toporek, Marcin; Asuero, Agustin G

    2015-01-01

    In the third part of a series of articles issued under a common title, some examples of complex dynamic redox systems are presented and considered from analytical and physico-chemical viewpoints; the analysis is a leitmotiv for detailed, physico-chemical considerations. All attainable physico-chemical knowledge is involved in algorithms applied for resolution of the systems, realized with use of iterative computer programs. The first redox system (System I) is related to titration of FeSO4 + H2C2O4 with KMnO4 solution in acidic (H2SO4) medium, where simultaneous determination of both analytes from a single curve of potentiometric titration is possible. The possibility of the formation of precipitates (FeC2O4 and/or MnC2O4) in this system is taken into considerations. The second system (System II) relates to the complete analytical procedure involved in the iodometric determination of Cu; four consecutive steps of this analysis are considered. As a reasonable tool for explanation of processes occurring during simulated redox titration, speciation diagrams are suggested. This explanation is based on graphical presentation of results obtained from the calculations. The calculations made for this purpose are performed in accordance with principles of the generalized approach to electrolytic systems (GATES) with generalized electron balance (GEB) or GATES/GEB and realized with use of iterative computer programs offered by MATLAB. The reactions proceeding in this system can be formulated, together with their efficiencies, at any stage of the titration. Stoichiometry is considered as the derivative concept when put in context with GATES/GEB. The article illustrates the enormous possibilities and advantages offered by GATES/GEB.

  1. Development of parallel monte carlo electron and photon transport (PMCEPT) code III: Applications to medical radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Oyeon; Han, Youngyih; Jeong, Hae Sun

    2012-05-01

    Minimizing the differences between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient is an essential requirement for successful radiotheraphy. Accurate calculation of dose distributions in the treatment planning process is important and can be done only by using a Monte Carlo calculation of particle transport. In this paper, we perform a further validation of our previously developed parallel Monte Carlo electron and photon transport (PMCEPT) code [Kum and Lee, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 47, 716 (2005) and Kim and Kum, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 49, 1640 (2006)] for applications to clinical radiation problems. A linear accelerator, Siemens' Primus 6 MV, was modeled and commissioned. A thorough validation includes both small fields, closely related to the intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT), and large fields. Two-dimensional comparisons with film measurements were also performed. The PMCEPT results, in general, agreed well with the measured data within a maximum error of about 2%. However, considering the experimental errors, the PMCEPT results can provide the gold standard of dose distributions for radiotherapy. The computing time was also much faster, compared to that needed for experiments, although it is still a bottleneck for direct applications to the daily routine treatment planning procedure.

  2. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics: An International Round-Robin Study, Part II: Thermal Diffusivity, Specific Heat, and Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D.; Böttner, Harald; König, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolet, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Patricia; Sharp, Jeff; Lo, Jason; Kleinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo

    2013-06-01

    For bulk thermoelectrics, improvement of the figure of merit ZT to above 2 from the current values of 1.0 to 1.5 would enhance their competitiveness with alternative technologies. In recent years, the most significant improvements in ZT have mainly been due to successful reduction of thermal conductivity. However, thermal conductivity is difficult to measure directly at high temperatures. Combined measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat, and mass density are a widely used alternative to direct measurement of thermal conductivity. In this work, thermal conductivity is shown to be the factor in the calculation of ZT with the greatest measurement uncertainty. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group, under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT), has conducted two international round-robins since 2009. This paper, part II of our report on the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk bismuth telluride, focuses on thermal diffusivity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity measurements.

  3. A novel Geobacteraceae-specific outer membrane protein J (OmpJ) is essential for electron transport to Fe (III) and Mn (IV) oxides in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Afkar, Eman; Reguera, Gemma; Schiffer, Marianne; Lovley, Derek R

    2005-01-01

    Background Metal reduction is thought to take place at or near the bacterial outer membrane and, thus, outer membrane proteins in the model dissimilatory metal-reducing organism Geobacter sulfurreducens are of interest to understand the mechanisms of Fe(III) reduction in the Geobacter species that are the predominant Fe(III) reducers in many environments. Previous studies have implicated periplasmic and outer membrane cytochromes in electron transfer to metals. Here we show that the most abundant outer membrane protein of G. sulfurreducens, OmpJ, is not a cytochrome yet it is required for metal respiration. Results When outer membrane proteins of G. sulfurreducens were separated via SDS-PAGE, one protein, designated OmpJ (outer membrane protein J), was particularly abundant. The encoding gene, which was identified from mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments, is present in other Geobacteraceae, but not in organisms outside this family. The predicted localization and structure of the OmpJ protein suggested that it was a porin. Deletion of the ompJ gene in G. sulfurreducens produced a strain that grew as well as the wild-type strain with fumarate as the electron acceptor but could not grow with metals, such as soluble or insoluble Fe (III) and insoluble Mn (IV) oxide, as the electron acceptor. The heme c content in the mutant strain was ca. 50% of the wild-type and there was a widespread loss of multiple cytochromes from soluble and membrane fractions. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of mutant cells revealed an unusually enlarged periplasm, which is likely to trigger extracytoplasmic stress response mechanisms leading to the degradation of periplasmic and/or outer membrane proteins, such as cytochromes, required for metal reduction. Thus, the loss of the capacity for extracellular electron transport in the mutant could be due to the missing c-type cytochromes, or some more direct, but as yet unknown, role of OmpJ in metal reduction. Conclusion Omp

  4. Incommunicado detention and torture in Spain, Part III: 'Five days is enough': the concept of torturing environments.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sales, Pau; Navarro-Lashayas, Miguel Angel; Plaza, Angeles; Morentin, Benito; Barrios Salinas, Oihana

    2016-01-01

    Torture is changing in western societies, evolving from pain-producing torture to more subtle mixed psychological methods that are harder to detect. Despite this, there is not an adequate understanding of the complexities of contemporary psychological techniques used in coercive interrogation and torture. The interrogation and torture techniques used on 45 detainees held in short-term incommunicado detention in Spain during the period 1980-2012 were analyzed. The list of torture categories set out in the Istanbul Protocol (IP) were assessed quantitatively. Software-aided qualitative analysis of the testimonies was conducted, using both inferential and deductive approaches to deduce a classification of torture techniques from the point of view of the survivor. The most frequent methods according to the IP categories used against detainees were isolation and manipulation of environment (100%), humiliation (93%), psychological techniques to break down the individual (91%), threats (89%) and forced positions and physical exercises until extenuation (80%). Additionally, with a frequency of between 51 and 70%, mild but constant blows, being forced to witness the torture of others, hooding (mainly dry asphyxia) and unacceptable undue conditions of detention were also frequent. Sexual torture was also widespread with sexual violence (42%), forced nudity (38%) and rape (7%). Qualitative analysis showed that most detainees were submitted to coercive interrogation using a wide array of deceptive techniques. This is often a central part of the torturing process, frequently used in conjunction with many other methods. It was found that giving false or misleading information or making false accusations was most frequently used, followed by maximization of responsibility or facts and giving false information regarding relatives or friends. Different patterns of harsh interrogation, ill-treatment and torture are described that appear to have been tailored to the profile of Basque

  5. An Introduction to Flow and Transport in Fractal Models of Porous Media: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianchao; San José Martínez, Fernando; Martín, Miguel Angel; Perfect, Edmund

    2014-09-01

    This special issue gathers together a number of recent papers on fractal geometry and its applications to the modeling of flow and transport in porous media. The aim is to provide a systematic approach for analyzing the statics and dynamics of fluids in fractal porous media by means of theory, modeling and experimentation. The topics covered include lacunarity analyses of multifractal and natural grayscale patterns, random packing's of self-similar pore/particle size distributions, Darcian and non-Darcian hydraulic flows, diffusion within fractals, models for the permeability and thermal conductivity of fractal porous media and hydrophobicity and surface erosion properties of fractal structures.

  6. Flow and particle dispersion in a pulmonary alveolus--part II: effect of gravity on particle transport.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Sudhaker; Prasad, Ajay K

    2010-05-01

    The acinar region of the human lung comprises about 300x10(6) alveoli, which are responsible for gas exchange between the lung and the blood. As discussed in Part I (Chhabra and Prasad, "Flow and Particle Dispersion in a Pulmonary Alveolus-Part I: Velocity Measurements and Convective Particle Transport," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132, p. 051009), the deposition of aerosols in the acinar region can either be detrimental to gas exchange (as in the case of harmful particulate matter) or beneficial (as in the case of inhalable pharmaceuticals). We measured the flow field inside an in-vitro model of a single alveolus mounted on a bronchiole and calculated the transport and deposition of massless particles in Part I. This paper focuses on the transport and deposition of finite-sized particles ranging from 0.25 microm to 4 microm under the combined influence of flow-induced advection (computed from velocity maps obtained by particle image velocimetry) and gravitational settling. Particles were introduced during the first inhalation cycle and their trajectories and deposition statistics were calculated for subsequent cycles for three different particle sizes (0.25 microm, 1 microm, and 4 microm) and three alveolar orientations. The key outcome of the study is that particles or=4 microm is dominated by gravitational settling and shows little effect of fluid advection. Additionally, small and midsize particles deposit at about two-thirds height in the alveolus irrespective of the gravitational orientation whereas the deposition of large particles is governed primarily by the orientation of the gravity vector.

  7. SCAI/AATS/ACC/STS operator and institutional requirements for transcatheter valve repair and replacement, Part III: Pulmonic valve.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Ziyad M; Ruiz, Carlos E; Zahn, Evan; Ringel, Richard; Aldea, Gabriel S; Bacha, Emile A; Bavaria, Joseph; Bolman, R Morton; Cameron, Duke E; Dean, Larry S; Feldman, Ted; Fullerton, David; Horlick, Eric; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Moon, Marc R; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Trento, Alfredo; Tommaso, Carl L

    2015-07-01

    surgeons was formed to include a majority of members with no relevant RWI and to be led by an interventional cardiology cochair and a surgical cochair with no relevant RWI. Authors with relevant RWI were not permitted to draft or vote on text or recommendations pertaining to their RWI. RWI were reviewed on all conference calls and updated as changes occurred. Author and peer reviewer RWI pertinent to this document are disclosed in the Appendices. In addition, to ensure complete transparency, authors' comprehensive disclosure information (including RWI not pertinent to this document) is available in Appendix AII. The work of the writing committee was supported exclusively by the partnering societies without commercial support. SCAI, AATS, ACC, and STS believe that adherence to these recommendations will maximize the chances that these therapies will become a successful part of the armamentarium for treating valvular heart disease in the United States. In addition, these recommendations will hopefully facilitate optimum quality during the delivery of this therapy, which will be important to the development and successful implementation of future, less invasive approaches to structural heart disease. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The American College of Cardiology Foundation and The American Association for Thoracic Surgery.

  8. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part III. Investigation of European standard methods.

    PubMed

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Larry A; Kashon, Michael L; Harper, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Lee et al. (Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2014a;58:60-73) introduced an approach to measure pump pulsation (PP) using a real-world sampling train, while the European Standards (EN) (EN 1232-1997 and EN 12919-1999) suggest measuring PP using a resistor in place of the sampler. The goal of this study is to characterize PP according to both EN methods and to determine the relationship of PP between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods. Additional test parameters were investigated to determine whether the test conditions suggested by the EN methods were appropriate for measuring pulsations. Experiments were conducted using a factorial combination of personal sampling pumps (six medium- and two high-volumetric flow rate pumps), back pressures (six medium- and seven high-flow rate pumps), resistors (two types), tubing lengths between a pump and resistor (60 and 90 cm), and different flow rates (2 and 2.5 l min(-1) for the medium- and 4.4, 10, and 11.2 l min(-1) for the high-flow rate pumps). The selection of sampling pumps and the ranges of back pressure were based on measurements obtained in the previous study (Lee et al., 2014a). Among six medium-flow rate pumps, only the Gilian5000 and the Apex IS conformed to the 10% criterion specified in EN 1232-1997. Although the AirChek XR5000 exceeded the 10% limit, the average PP (10.9%) was close to the criterion. One high-flow rate pump, the Legacy (PP=8.1%), conformed to the 10% criterion in EN 12919-1999, while the Elite12 did not (PP=18.3%). Conducting supplemental tests with additional test parameters beyond those used in the two subject EN standards did not strengthen the characterization of PPs. For the selected test conditions, a linear regression model [PPEN=0.014+0.375×PPNIOSH (adjusted R2=0.871)] was developed to determine the PP relationship between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods

  9. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... also be found via a hyperlink on the Internet at the following address: http://www.access-board.gov/ada... Department has modified the language of the ADAAG as it applies to entities subject to 49 CFR part 37. These entities must comply with the modified language in this Appendix rather than the language of Appendices...

  10. Fluid flow and particle transport in mechanically ventilated airways. Part I. Fluid flow structures.

    PubMed

    Van Rhein, Timothy; Alzahrany, Mohammed; Banerjee, Arindam; Salzman, Gary

    2016-07-01

    A large eddy simulation-based computational study of fluid flow and particle transport in upper tracheobronchial airways is carried out to investigate the effect of ventilation parameters on pulmonary fluid flow. Respiratory waveforms commonly used by commercial mechanical ventilators are used to study the effect of ventilation parameters and ventilation circuit on pulmonary fluid dynamics. A companion paper (Alzahrany et al. in Med Biol Eng Comput, 2014) reports our findings on the effect of the ventilation parameters and circuit on particle transport and aerosolized drug delivery. The endotracheal tube (ETT) was found to be an important geometric feature and resulted in a fluid jet that caused an increase in turbulence and created a recirculation zone with high wall shear stress in the main bronchi. Stronger turbulence was found in lower airways than would be found under normal breathing conditions due to the presence of the jet caused by the ETT. The pressure-controlled sinusoidal waveform induced the lowest wall shear stress on the airways wall.

  11. Particle transport in low-energy ventilation systems. Part 2: Transients and experiments.

    PubMed

    Bolster, D T; Linden, P F

    2009-04-01

    Providing adequate indoor air quality while reducing energy consumption is a must for efficient ventilation system design. In this work, we study the transport of particulate contaminants in a displacement-ventilated space, using the idealized 'emptying filling box' model (P.F. Linden, G.F. Lane-serff and D.A. Smeed (1990) Emptying filling boxes: the fluid mechanics of natural ventilation, J. fluid Mech., 212, 309-335.). In this paper, we focused on transient contaminant transport by modeling three transient contamination scenarios, namely the so called 'step-up', 'step-down', and point source cases. Using analytical integral models and numerical models we studied the transient behavior of each of these three cases. We found that, on average, traditional and low-energy systems can be similar in overall pollutant removal efficiency, although quite different vertical gradients can exist. This plays an important role in estimating occupant exposure to contaminant. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted to validate the developed models. The results presented here illustrate that the source location plays a very important role in the distribution of contaminant concentration for spaces ventilated by low energy displacement-ventilation systems. With these results and the knowledge of typical contaminant sources for a given type of space practitioners can design or select more effective systems for the purpose at hand.

  12. Part 2: Pharmacogenetic Variability in Drug Transport and Phase I Anticancer Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Deenen, Maarten J.; Cats, Annemieke; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2011-01-01

    Equivalent drug doses in anticancer chemotherapy may lead to wide interpatient variability in drug response reflected by differences in treatment response or in severity of adverse drug reactions. Differences in the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) behavior of a drug contribute to variation in treatment outcome among patients. An important factor responsible for this variability is genetic polymorphism in genes that are involved in PK/PD processes, including drug transporters, phase I and II metabolizing enzymes, and drug targets, and other genes that interfere with drug response. In order to achieve personalized pharmacotherapy, drug dosing and treatment selection based on genotype might help to increase treatment efficacy while reducing unnecessary toxicity. We present a series of four reviews about pharmacogenetic variability in anticancer drug treatment. This is the second review in the series and is focused on genetic variability in genes encoding drug transporters (ABCB1 and ABCG2) and phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes (CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, DPYD, CDA and BLMH) and their associations with anticancer drug treatment outcome. Based on the literature reviewed, opportunities for patient-tailored anticancer therapy are presented. PMID:21632461

  13. Sedimentological conditions and sediment transport pathways in the nearshore zone of the Russian part of South-Eastern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorokhova, Evgenia

    2016-04-01

    The sediment transport pathways and sedimentological conditions are identified on the South-Eastern Baltic Sea coastal zone (Russian part) up to the depth of 30 m on the base of grain size analysis of recent marine sediments. The interrelations between grain size statistical parameters of 971 sediment samples are used. The two independent approaches that discussed in the literature are applied: 1) the sediment trend analysis, based on spatial variations of sediment grain size parameters from sample to sample (McLaren, 1981) and 2) the population anomalies method, which allows to determine the sedimentation conditions (erosion, transit or accumulation) from the deviations of sediments grain size parameters in each sampling place from the average values in investigation area (Baraniecki and Racinowski, 1996). Taking into account that the sediment grain size composition achieve its constant in calm period of reduced storm influence and that the all samples were taking during summer season, the obtained sedimentation pattern present the long-time annual average of sediment transport pathways in the investigated area. The results show that the sediment accumulation under the wave influence prevails up to the depth of 5 m. The continuous accumulation zone breaks in erosion where the shore line changes its direction. Seaward of the accumulation zone the sediment transit area extends and interrupts by zones of erosion and accumulation up to the depth of 20 m. Sediment transport here occurs in hydrodynamic circulation cells within bays along the Sambian peninsula north coast. The erosion zones serves as sediment source on the underwater shore slope. The north-eastern direction of sediment transport exist along the straightened coast of Curonian spit according to prevail west winds. Deeper there are zones of transit and "slowly" sediment accumulation up to the depth of 30 m. The seaward and isobaths parallel sediment transport pathways are obtained in these zones. The work

  14. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part III. Effectively effecting and sustaining change.

    PubMed

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    Reaping the optimal rewards from any quality improvement project mandates sustainability after the initial implementation. In Part III of this three-part ATS Seminars series, we discuss strategies to create a culture for change, improve cooperation and interaction between multidisciplinary teams of clinicians, and position the intensive care unit (ICU) optimally within the hospital environment. Coaches are used throughout other industries to help professionals assess and continually improve upon their practice; use of this strategy is as of yet infrequent in health care, but would be easily transferable and potentially beneficial to ICU managers and clinicians alike. Similarly, activities focused on improving teamwork are commonplace outside of health care. Simulation training and classroom education about key components of successful team functioning are known to result in improvements. In addition to creating an ICU environment in which individuals and teams of clinicians perform well, ICU managers must position the ICU to function well within the hospital system. It is important to move away from the notion of a standalone ("siloed") ICU to one that is well integrated into the rest of the institution. Creating a "pull-system" (in which participants are active in searching out needed resources and admitting patients) can help ICU managers both provide better care for the critically ill and strengthen relationships with non-ICU staff. Although not necessary, there is potential upside to creating a unified critical care service to assist with achieving these ends.

  15. The JADE and WOCE I10/IR6 Throughflow sections in the southeast Indian Ocean. Part 2: velocity and transports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprintall, Janet; Wijffels, Susan; Chereskin, Teresa; Bray, Nancy

    Velocity and transports are estimated for five recent hydrographic sections and one full-depth velocity section that cross the Indonesian Throughflow in the southeast Indian Ocean between Australia and Indonesia. The sections are: JADE August 1989 and JADE February 1992, both between northwestern Australia and Bali; WOCE repeat sections IR6 April 1995, IR6 September 1995 and I10 November 1995, all between Western Australia to near Sunda Strait, Java. The three WOCE surveys include direct velocity measurements from shipboard and lowered (I10 only) acoustic Doppler current profilers. None of the WOCE hydrographic surveys measured the Indonesian Exclusive Economic Zone between ˜9°S and the Java coast. Concurrent XBT and XCTD observations taken as part of the regular co-located IX1-XBT transect were used to complete the sections. Both the velocity fields and the transport estimates vary widely in magnitude and direction, and reflect the seasonal and the shorter-term variability from the eddy field at the time of each survey. The eddies are found during each of the WOCE surveys in the South Equatorial Current between 14°S-12°S, and have a significant impact on the velocity structure: the mass transport tends to recirculate within the features. The direct current estimates support the finding that the strongest flow across all sections is found within the eddy structures, as well as in the South Java Current that flows along the Java coastline. The semi-annually reversing South Java Current plays an important role in distributing freshwater into and out of the southeast Indian Ocean. The errors and uncertainties of the transport calculations are assessed in terms of salinity variability in the region using different available salinity fields. For the shallow-layer transport, a new mean historical salinity estimate does a good job of reproducing the transports determined from synoptically available fields. However, for deeper reference layers, the presence of the

  16. Evaluation of active cooling systems for a Mach 6 hypersonic transport airframe, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helenbrook, R. G.; Mcconarty, W. A.; Anthony, F. M.

    1971-01-01

    Transpiration and convective cooling concepts are examined for the fuselage and tail surface of a Mach 6 hypersonic transport aircraft. Hydrogen, helium, and water are considered as coolants. Heat shields and radiation barriers are examined to reduce heat flow to the cooled structures. The weight and insulation requirements for the cryogenic fuel tanks are examined so that realistic totals can be estimated for the complete fuselage and tail. Structural temperatures are varied to allow comparison of aluminum alloy, titanium alloy, and superalloy contruction materials. The results of the study are combined with results obtained on the wing structure, obtained in a previous study, to estimate weights for the complete airframe. The concepts are compared among themselves, and with the uncooled concept on the basis of structural weight, cooling system weight, and coolant weight.

  17. Plasma membrane electron transport in pancreatic β-cells is mediated in part by NQO1

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Joshua P.; Eisen, Timothy; Cline, Gary W.; Smith, Peter J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma membrane electron transport (PMET), a cytosolic/plasma membrane analog of mitochondrial electron transport, is a ubiquitous system of cytosolic and plasma membrane oxidoreductases that oxidizes cytosolic NADH and NADPH and passes electrons to extracellular targets. While PMET has been shown to play an important role in a variety of cell types, no studies exist to evaluate its function in insulin-secreting cells. Here we demonstrate the presence of robust PMET activity in primary islets and clonal β-cells, as assessed by the reduction of the plasma membrane-impermeable dyes WST-1 and ferricyanide. Because the degree of metabolic function of β-cells (reflected by the level of insulin output) increases in a glucose-dependent manner between 4 and 10 mM glucose, PMET was evaluated under these conditions. PMET activity was present at 4 mM glucose and was further stimulated at 10 mM glucose. PMET activity at 10 mM glucose was inhibited by the application of the flavoprotein inhibitor diphenylene iodonium and various antioxidants. Overexpression of cytosolic NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) increased PMET activity in the presence of 10 mM glucose while inhibition of NQO1 by its inhibitor dicoumarol abolished this activity. Mitochondrial inhibitors rotenone, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide elevated PMET activity. Regardless of glucose levels, PMET activity was greatly enhanced by the application of aminooxyacetate, an inhibitor of the malate-aspartate shuttle. We propose a model for the role of PMET as a regulator of glycolytic flux and an important component of the metabolic machinery in β-cells. PMID:21505151

  18. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The attachments contained within this appendix provide additional details about the model development and estimation process which do not easily lend themselves to incorporation in the main body of the model documentation report. The information provided in these attachments is not integral to the understanding of the model`s operation, but provides the reader with opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of some of the model`s underlying assumptions. There will be a slight degree of replication of materials found elsewhere in the documentation, made unavoidable by the dictates of internal consistency. Each attachment is associated with a specific component of the transportation model; the presentation follows the same sequence of modules employed in Volume 1. The following attachments are contained in Appendix F: Fuel Economy Model (FEM)--provides a discussion of the FEM vehicle demand and performance by size class models; Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Model--describes data input sources and extrapolation methodologies; Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) Stock Model--discusses the fuel economy gap estimation methodology; Light Duty Vehicle Fleet Model--presents the data development for business, utility, and government fleet vehicles; Light Commercial Truck Model--describes the stratification methodology and data sources employed in estimating the stock and performance of LCT`s; Air Travel Demand Model--presents the derivation of the demographic index, used to modify estimates of personal travel demand; and Airborne Emissions Model--describes the derivation of emissions factors used to associate transportation measures to levels of airborne emissions of several pollutants.

  19. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 - Part 2: Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, M.; Hendricks, J.; Sausen, R.

    2015-12-01

    We use the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications) to simulate the impact of aviation emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare our findings with the results of a previous study with the same model configuration focusing on year 2000 emissions. We also characterize the aviation results in the context of the other transport sectors presented in a companion paper. In spite of a relevant increase in aviation traffic volume and resulting emissions of aerosol (black carbon) and aerosol precursor species (nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide), the aviation effect on particle mass concentration in 2030 remains quite negligible (on the order of a few ng m-3), about one order of magnitude less than the increase in concentration due to other emission sources. Due to the relatively small size of the aviation-induced aerosol, however, the increase in particle number concentration is significant in all scenarios (about 1000 cm-3), mostly affecting the northern mid-latitudes at typical flight altitudes (7-12 km). This largely contributes to the overall change in particle number concentration between 2000 and 2030, which results also in significant climate effects due to aerosol-cloud interactions. Aviation is the only transport sector for which a larger impact on the Earth's radiation budget is simulated in the future: The aviation-induced RF in 2030 is more than doubled with respect to the year 2000 value of -15 mW m-2, with a maximum value of -63 mW m-2 simulated for RCP2.6.

  20. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 - Part 2: Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, Mattia; Hendricks, Johannes; Sausen, Robert

    2016-04-01

    We use the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications) to simulate the impact of aviation emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare our findings with the results of a previous study with the same model configuration focusing on year 2000 emissions. We also characterize the aviation results in the context of the other transport sectors presented in a companion paper. In spite of a relevant increase in aviation traffic volume and resulting emissions of aerosol (black carbon) and aerosol precursor species (nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide), the aviation effect on particle mass concentration in 2030 remains quite negligible (on the order of a few ng m-3), about 1 order of magnitude less than the increase in concentration due to other emission sources. Due to the relatively small size of the aviation-induced aerosol, however, the increase in particle number concentration is significant in all scenarios (about 1000 cm-3), mostly affecting the northern mid-latitudes at typical flight altitudes (7-12 km). This largely contributes to the overall change in particle number concentration between 2000 and 2030, which also results in significant climate effects due to aerosol-cloud interactions. Aviation is the only transport sector for which a larger impact on the Earth's radiation budget is simulated in the future: the aviation-induced radiative forcing in 2030 is more than doubled with respect to the year 2000 value of -15 mW m-2 in all scenarios, with a maximum value of -63 mW m-2 simulated for RCP2.6.

  1. Walkability is only part of the story: walking for transportation in Stuttgart, Germany.

    PubMed

    Reyer, Maren; Fina, Stefan; Siedentop, Stefan; Schlicht, Wolfgang

    2014-05-30

    In modern Western societies people often lead inactive and sedentary lifestyles, even though there is no doubt that physical activity and health are related. From an urban planning point of view it would be highly desirable to develop built environments in a way that supports people in leading more active and healthy lifestyles. Within this context there are several methods, predominantly used in the US, to measure the suitability of built environments for walking and cycling. Empirical studies show that people living in highly walkable areas are more physically active (for example, walk more or cycle more). The question is, however, whether these results are also valid for European cities given their different urban planning characteristics and infrastructure standards. To answer this question we used the Walkability-Index and the Walk Score to empirically investigate the associations between walkability and active transportation in the city of Stuttgart, Germany. In a sample of household survey data (n = 1.871) we found a noticeable relationship between walkability and active transportation-the more walkable an area was, the more active residents were. Although the statistical effect is small, the health impact might be of relevance. Being physically active is multi-determined and not only affected by the walkability of an area. We highlight these points with an excursion into research that the health and exercise sciences contribute to the topic. We propose to strengthen interdisciplinary research between the disciplines and to specifically collect data that captures the influence of the environment on physical activity in the future.

  2. Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of tether transportation is given. Four steps were used over a period of time. First, theoretical engineering feasibility and technology requirements were determined. Then the survivors of that effort went into step two in the analysis of promising candidates. Those survivors went into the third phase which is engineering design and cost benefits. Survivors entered into the demonstration mission definition phase. Transportation studies have covered two kinds of deployments. First, steady state deployment was studied. Like the TSS, it's nearly vertical. It takes a long time to deploy and involves relatively high tether tension. Secondly, dynamic deployment was studied. Deployment started in an almost horizontal direction under a very shallow angle which allows a high deployment rate under very low tension. Momentum transfer here occurs by libration. Specific payloads were used to study tethered transportation benefits. Four transportation concepts were studied with regard to cost benefits. A tethered orbiter deboost from the space station, an OTV boost up from the Space Station, a science platform on a tether with a possible micro-g lab moving in between platform and station, and a tethered boost of payloads fromthe orbiter are the four concepts. These benefits are examined in detail.

  3. Full title page pp iii Transport of conservative and reactive tracers through a naturally structured upland podzol field lysimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutter, M. I.; Deeks, L. K.; Billett, M. F.

    2005-01-01

    Compared to agricultural soils, descriptions of solute transport in upland soils at scales smaller than catchments are scarce. This study evaluates data from three consecutive field tracer experiments in which Cl, Na and Ca (stepped rates of 4.5, 9 and 4.5 mm h -1) were irrigated onto a ferric podzol monolith (3×2 m 2 and 0.6 m depth) isolated from the surrounding soil except at the base. For each individual experiment a one hour pulse of tracer was applied and subsequently washed through with water for approximately 1 pore volume and monitored using suction cup samplers located in the O and B horizons. Breakthrough curves showed considerable heterogeneity in the response of both horizons and inferred that downward leaching would result in considerable temporal spreading of solute mass across wide time scales. Patterns of Cl and Na breakthrough were similar and were characterised by low peak concentrations (maximum C/C 0 of 0.05 Cl and 0.03 Na). Minimal Ca breakthrough was observed in the O horizon, although a higher breakthrough was observed in the B horizon. These factors suggest that isolated highly active pathways were controlling the O horizon response, although these were not captured by the sampler network. This was supported by more rapid mean times to peak in the B horizon. Lateral drainage, intercepted at the base of the O horizon on the downslope face, accounted for approximately 45% of solute volume and 25, 21 and 14% of Cl, Na and Ca tracer mass, respectively. This rapid drainage pathway comprised surface flow and flow along the organic mineral interface, likely fed from preferential flow pathways in the O horizon. The breakthroughs observed in the mineral soil, although heterogeneous, indicated a response for this horizon of sustained leaching to shallow ground waters.

  4. Transport of water and ions in partially water-saturated porous media. Part 2. Filtration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.

    2017-05-01

    A new set of constitutive equations describing the transport of the ions and water through charged porous media and considering the effect of ion filtration is applied to the problem of reverse osmosis and diffusion of a salt. Starting with the constitutive equations derived in Paper 1, I first determine specific formula for the osmotic coefficient and effective diffusion coefficient of a binary symmetric 1:1 salt (such as KCl or NaCl) as a function of a dimensionless number Θ corresponding to the ratio between the cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the salinity. The modeling is first carried with the Donnan model used to describe the concentrations of the charge carriers in the pore water phase. Then a new model is developed in the thin double layer approximation to determine these concentrations. These models provide explicit relationships between the concentration of the ionic species in the pore space and those in a neutral reservoir in local equilibrium with the pore space and the CEC. The case of reverse osmosis and diffusion coefficient are analyzed in details for the case of saturated and partially saturated porous materials. Comparisons are done with experimental data from the literature obtained on bentonite. The model predicts correctly the influence of salinity (including membrane behavior at high salinities), porosity, cation type (K+ versus Na+), and water saturation on the osmotic coefficient. It also correctly predicts the dependence of the diffusion coefficient of the salt with the salinity.

  5. Thermodynamic and transport combustion properties of hydrocarbons with air. Part 1: Properties in SI units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S.

    1982-01-01

    Thermodynamic and transport combustion properties were calculated for a wide range of conditions for the reaction of hydrocarbons with air. Three hydrogen-carbon atom ratios (H/C = 1.7, 2.0, 2.1) were selected to represent the range of aircraft fuels. For each of these H/C ratios, combustion properties were calculated for the following conditions: Equivalence ratio: 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.25 Water - dry air mass ratio: 0, 0.03 Pressure, kPa: 1.01325, 10.1325, 101.325, 1013.25, 5066.25 (or in atm: 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 50) Temperature, K: every 10 degrees from 200 to 900 K; every 50 degrees from 900 to 3000 K Temperature, R: every 20 degrees from 360 to 1600 R; very 100 degrees from 1600 to 5400 R. The properties presented are composition, density, molecular weight, enthalphy, entropy, specific heat at constant pressure, volume derivatives, isentropic exponent, velocity of sound, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and Prandtl number. Property tables are based on composites that were calculated by assuming both: (1) chemical equilibrium (for both homogeneous and heterogeneous phases) and (2) constant compositions for all temperatures. Properties in SI units are presented in this report for the Kelvin temperature schedules.

  6. Colloidal-facilitated transport of inorganic contaminants in ground water: part 1, sampling considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puls, Robert W.; Eychaner, James H.; Powell, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    Investigations at Pinal Creek, Arizona, evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganic geochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Sampling variables included pump type and flow rate, collection under air or nitrogen, and filter pore diameter. During well purging and sample collection, suspended particle size and number as well as dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, pH, and redox potential were monitored. Laboratory analyses of both unfiltered samples and the filtrates were performed by inductively coupled argon plasma, atomic absorption with graphite furnace, and ion chromatography. Scanning electron microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray was also used for analysis of filter particulates. Suspended particle counts consistently required approximately twice as long as the other field-monitored indicators to stabilize. High-flow-rate pumps entrained normally nonmobile particles. Difference in elemental concentrations using different filter-pore sizes were generally not large with only two wells having differences greater than 10 percent in most wells. Similar differences (>10%) were observed for some wells when samples were collected under nitrogen rather than in air. Fe2+/Fe3+ ratios for air-collected samples were smaller than for samples collected under a nitrogen atmosphere, reflecting sampling-induced oxidation.

  7. Tension fracture of laminates for transport fuselage. Part 1: Material screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Avery, W. B.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Harris, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Transport fuselage structures are designed to contain pressure following a large penetrating damage event. Applications of composites to fuselage structures require a database and supporting analysis on tension damage tolerance. Tests with 430 fracture specimens were used to accomplish the following: (1) identify critical material and laminate variables affecting notch sensitivity; (2) evaluate composite failure criteria; and (3) recommend a screening test method. Variables studied included fiber type, matrix toughness, lamination manufacturing process, and intraply hybridization. The laminates found to have the lowest notch sensitivity were manufactured using automated tow placement. This suggests a possible relationship between the stress distribution and repeatable levels of material inhomogeneity that are larger than found in traditional tape laminates. Laminates with the highest notch sensitivity consisted of toughened matrix materials that were resistant to a splitting phenomena that reduces stress concentrations in major load bearing plies. Parameters for conventional fracture criteria were found to increase with crack length for the smallest notch sizes studied. Most material and laminate combinations followed less than a square root singularity for the largest crack sizes studied. Specimen geometry, notch type, and notch size were evaluated in developing a screening test procedure. Traitional methods of correcting for specimen finite width were found to be lacking. Results indicate that a range of notch sizes must be tested to determine notch sensitivity. Data for a single small notch size (0.25 in. diameter) was found to give no indication of the sensitivity of a particular material and laminate layup to larger notch sizes.

  8. ASIST 2003: Part III: Posters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three posters address topics including access to information; metadata; personal information management; scholarly information communication; online resources; content analysis; interfaces; Web queries; information evaluation; informatics; information needs; search effectiveness; digital libraries; diversity; automated indexing; e-commerce;…

  9. ASIST 2003: Part III: Posters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three posters address topics including access to information; metadata; personal information management; scholarly information communication; online resources; content analysis; interfaces; Web queries; information evaluation; informatics; information needs; search effectiveness; digital libraries; diversity; automated indexing; e-commerce;…

  10. The Mushroom Place. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlichter, Carol

    1978-01-01

    The final installment of a series of articles on the "Mushroom Place" learning center program, which involves creative thinking activities for young, gifted students, describes "Doing It the Hard Way," a performance task which involves the actual construction of objects from a selected set of materials in the absence of the usual project tools.…

  11. A Child's Brain: Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Robert

    1982-01-01

    This article, the last in a series about the human brain, focuses on the skin and its importance for the brain. Physiological functions of the skin, concerning touch and body protection, are explained, as well as its social role in nonverbal communication. Suggestions for student discussions are given. (PP)

  12. The Mushroom Place. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlichter, Carol

    1978-01-01

    The final installment of a series of articles on the "Mushroom Place" learning center program, which involves creative thinking activities for young, gifted students, describes "Doing It the Hard Way," a performance task which involves the actual construction of objects from a selected set of materials in the absence of the usual project tools.…

  13. A theoretical study on the injection, transport, absorption and phosphorescence properties of heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes with different ancillary ligands.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiaohong; Wan, Ning; Han, Deming; Zhang, Gang

    2014-03-01

    We have reported a theoretical analysis of a series of heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes (mpmi)2Ir(fppi) [mpmi = 1-(4-tolyl)-3-methyl-imidazole, fppi = 4-fluoro-2-(pyrrol-2-yl)-pyridine] (1a), (mpmi)2Ir(dfpi) [dfpi = 4-fluoro-2-(3-fluoro-pyrrol-2-yl)-pyridine] (1b), (mpmi)2Ir(tfpi) [tfpi = 2-(pyrrol-2-yl)-4-trifluoromethyl-pyridine] (1c), (mpmi)2Ir(priq) [priq = 1-(pyrrol-2-yl)isoquinoline] (2a), (mpmi)2Ir(isql) [isql = 1-(indol-2-yl)-isoquinoline] (2b), and (mpmi)2Ir(biql) [biql = 1-(benzoimidazol-2-yl)-isoquinoline] (2c) by using the density functional theory (DFT) method to investigate their electronic structures, photophysical properties, and the phosphorescent efficiency mechanism. The results reveal that the nature of the ancillary ligands can affect the electron density distributions and energies of frontier molecular orbitals, resulting in changes of charge transfer performances and emission color. It is found that the studied complex 1c with the -CF3 substituent at the pyridine moiety results in the lower HOMO-LUMO energy gap and LUMO energy level, which will lead to a rich electron injection ability compared with that of 1a. For each complex studied (except 2b), the hole-transporting performance is better than the electron-transporting performance. In addition, for complexes 2a and 2b, the differences between reorganization energies for hole transport (λ(ih)) and reorganization energies for electron transport (λ(ie)) are relatively smaller, indicating that the hole and electron transfer balance could be achieved more easily in the emitting layer. It is believed that the largest metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) character, the higher μ(S1) and E(T1) values, as well as the smallest ΔE(S1-T1) value could result in higher phosphorescent quantum efficiency for 1b than those of other complexes.

  14. Walkability is Only Part of the Story: Walking for Transportation in Stuttgart, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Reyer, Maren; Fina, Stefan; Siedentop, Stefan; Schlicht, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    In modern Western societies people often lead inactive and sedentary lifestyles, even though there is no doubt that physical activity and health are related. From an urban planning point of view it would be highly desirable to develop built environments in a way that supports people in leading more active and healthy lifestyles. Within this context there are several methods, predominantly used in the US, to measure the suitability of built environments for walking and cycling. Empirical studies show that people living in highly walkable areas are more physically active (for example, walk more or cycle more). The question is, however, whether these results are also valid for European cities given their different urban planning characteristics and infrastructure standards. To answer this question we used the Walkability-Index and the Walk Score to empirically investigate the associations between walkability and active transportation in the city of Stuttgart, Germany. In a sample of household survey data (n = 1.871) we found a noticeable relationship between walkability and active transportation—the more walkable an area was, the more active residents were. Although the statistical effect is small, the health impact might be of relevance. Being physically active is multi-determined and not only affected by the walkability of an area. We highlight these points with an excursion into research that the health and exercise sciences contribute to the topic. We propose to strengthen interdisciplinary research between the disciplines and to specifically collect data that captures the influence of the environment on physical activity in the future. PMID:24886755

  15. Transportability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-25

    psi). (g) Maximum axle load (pneumatic tires) - 2,268 kg (5,000 lb). (h) Maximum wheel load (pneumatic tires) - 1,134 kg (2,500 lb). (i...survivability following the shock or vibration environment induced. Vehicles not typically transported with payload such as wreckers, truck tractors ...combination weight rating (GCWR) means the value specified by the manufacturer as the loaded weight of the combination vehicle. (d) Gross axle weight

  16. Transportation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    International (cont.) European Commission – Directorate General for Energy and Transport, Brussels, Belgium Headquarters Netherlands Customs ...100,000 by 2014. As a result of these challenges and due to the increase in intermodal freight traffic, a customer /client relationship has...increase by 50% domestically and 110% internationally by 2016 (CRS, 2007). United Parcel Service (UPS), FedEx, and DHL currently control the package

  17. Thermocline circulation and ventilation of the East/Japan Sea, part I: Water-mass characteristics and transports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yuzhu; Chang, Kyung-Il; Yun, Jae-Yul; Kim, Kyung-Ryul

    2010-07-01

    three other major convection sites of the world's oceans, the Gulf of Lions, Labrador Sea and Greenland Sea, showing some common and distinctive features, especially the extremely low salinity of the EJS. Water-mass properties on neutral density surfaces are analyzed with the water-mass Turner angle (WTu) and circulation and transport are deducted from geostrophic calculations. From the 15-year mean hydrography, a basin-wide net annual mean transport of about 2.10±0.29 Sv (1 Sv=10 6 m 3 s -1) is estimated with summer and winter transports of 2.56±0.36 and 1.63±0.23 Sv, respectively. This transport is slightly less than the annual mean transport of the Tsushima Current at the KTS, 2.4 Sv from cable and 2.3 Sv from other direct current meter and geostrophic methods but matches the ±14% error bar of ±0.29 Sv adjusted by ±150 dbar from the reference level of 800 dbar. This error bar is close to the error of ±0.34 Sv determined from water-mass conservation residual in a separated study. Three mechanisms are discovered to explain the seasonal difference in the Tsushima Current transports: the stronger winter Ekman pumping, outcropping and southward crossing flow. During winter, the Tsushima Current branches are imposed under strong wind stress curl in the Ulleung Basin and Yamato Basin, showing a doubling Ekman downwelling transport, partly weakening the Tsushima Current flow in the eastern boundary. Meanwhile the thermocline isopycnal surfaces outcrop in winter, reducing volume transport due to reduced space and thickness. The southward currents in the southern Ulleung Basin and Yamato Basin are perpendicular to the Tsushima Current branches west of Japan, which weakens the eastern boundary current in winter.

  18. Reflecting Equity and Diversity. Part I: Guidelines and Procedure for Evaluating Bias in Instructional Materials. Part II: Bias Awareness Training Worksheets. Part III: Bias Awareness and Procedure Training Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bebermeyer, Jim; Edmond, Mary, Ed.

    Reflecting a need to prepare students for working in diverse organizations, this document was developed to increase school officials' awareness of bias in instructional materials and help them select bias-free materials. A number of the examples illustrate situations dealing with diversity in the workplace. The guide is divided into three parts:…

  19. Inhibition of Nuclear Transport of NF-ĸB p65 by the Salmonella Type III Secretion System Effector SpvD

    PubMed Central

    Rolhion, Nathalie; Furniss, R. Christopher D.; Grabe, Grzegorz; Ryan, Aindrias; Liu, Mei; Matthews, Sophie A.; Holden, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica replicates in macrophages through the action of effector proteins translocated across the vacuolar membrane by a type III secretion system (T3SS). Here we show that the SPI-2 T3SS effector SpvD suppresses proinflammatory immune responses. SpvD prevented activation of an NF-ĸB-dependent promoter and caused nuclear accumulation of importin-α, which is required for nuclear import of p65. SpvD interacted specifically with the exportin Xpo2, which mediates nuclear-cytoplasmic recycling of importins. We propose that interaction between SpvD and Xpo2 disrupts the normal recycling of importin-α from the nucleus, leading to a defect in nuclear translocation of p65 and inhibition of activation of NF-ĸB regulated promoters. SpvD down-regulated pro-inflammatory responses and contributed to systemic growth of bacteria in mice. This work shows that a bacterial pathogen can manipulate host cell immune responses by interfering with the nuclear transport machinery. PMID:27232334

  20. Balloon Borne Soundings of Water Vapor, Ozone and Temperature in the Upper Tropospheric and Lower Stratosphere as Part of the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voemel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of our work was to provide in situ water vapor and ozone profiles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere as reference measurements for the validation of SAGE III water vapor and ozone retrievals. We used the NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer and ECC ozone sondes on small research balloons to provide continuous profiles between the surface and the mid stratosphere. The NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer is currently the only lightweight balloon borne instrument capable of measuring water vapor between the lower troposphere and middle stratosphere. The validation measurements were based in the arctic region of Scandinavia for northern hemisphere observations and in New Zealand for southern hemisphere observations and timed to coincide with overpasses of the SAGE III instrument. In addition to SAGE III validation we also tried to coordinate launches with other instruments and studied dehydration and transport processes in the Arctic stratospheric vortex.